WorldWideScience

Sample records for submission toxicity studies

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions 2.0 (TSCATS 2.0) tracks the submissions of health and safety data submitted to the EPA either as required or...

  2. Studying toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  3. Journal of Cultural Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bibliographic referencing within and at the end of each paper should follow the MLA style. An abstract of between 150 and 200 words, and a cover page, which indicates the full name and brief bio-data of the author, should accompany each submission. The cover page should be typed separately from the manuscript, which ...

  4. [Toxicity study of realgar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aihua; Li, Chunying; Wang, Jinhua; Xue, Baoyun; Li, Hua; Yang, Bing; Wang, Jingyu; Xie, Qing; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the toxicity of realgar and provide the scientific basis for safety use of realgar in clinic. Acute toxicity was tested by single oral administration. Chronic toxicity of realgar was tested at different dose levels (5, 10, 20, 80, 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) which correspond to 1/2, 1, 2, 8, 16 times of human dose levels. The rats were treated with the test substances through oral administration once daily for successively 90 days. Urinary qualitative test, blood routine examination, serum chemistry measurement, and histomorphologic observation were conducted at day 30, 60 and 90. Toxic changes related to the treatment of realgar and no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was evaluated. With the content of 90% total arsenic and 1.696 mg x g(-1) soluble asenic, LD50 of Realgar with oral administration was 20.5 g x kg(-1) (corresponding to 34.8 mg x kg(-1) soluble arsenic), equivalent to 12 812 times of clinical daily dose for an adult. Realgar can cause kidney toxicity or/and liver toxicity after administration for over 30, 60 or 90 days respectively. The kidney was more sensitive to realgar than liver. Based on repeated dose toxicity study, NOAELs were 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 30 day's administration, 20 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 60 day's administration, 10 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 90 day's administration respectively. Thus, for safety use of realgar, it is recommended that the daily doses of realgar (with soluble arsenic realgar can cause kidney and liver pathological change, so the doses and administration duration should be limited. The suggestion is as follows: realgar which contains soluble arsenic < or = 1.7 mg x g(-1) should be used less than 2 weeks at daily dose 160 mg, less than 4 weeks at the dose of 20 mg and less than 6 weeks at the dose of 10 mg.

  5. 'Submission'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    On 7 January 2015, the day of the deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo, the Parisian satirical magazine, French author Michel Houellebecq published Soumission (Submission), his already contested novel. Charlie Hebdo had a satirical feature on the cover that day ridiculing Houellebecq’s novel, which...

  6. Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions must be original research, and must be between 5000 and 8000 words excluding references and endnotes. STYLE GUIDE ... The journal uses U.K. punctuation and spelling, following The Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Foreign words .... In Jones, C., Turner, J. & Street, B.V. Students Writing in the University.

  7. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts are refereed anonymously; therefore, the author's name, e-mail address, and brief contributor information (not exceeding fifty words) should appear on the title page only. All pages must be numbered. The Journal prefers submissions sent as an e-mail attachment editoruniswaijhs@yahoo.com in Microsoft Word.

  8. Chronic Toxicity Study of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reports on effect of petroleum samples on blood and rats pathology are scanty. The current study therefore deals with the laematologica changes on rats induce by the chronic exposure to crude oil (bonny light). Kerosene and gasoline. MATERIALS AND METHODS. 71 male albino rats of 0.2kg body weight obtained.

  9. 78 FR 70954 - Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data...) transport format for the submission of regulatory study data. The current study data transport format supported by FDA is the SAS Transport (XPORT) version 5 file format. Although XPORT has been a reliable...

  10. Identifying the cause of toxicity in an algal whole effluent toxicity study - an unanticipated toxicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddy, Rami B; Tapp, Kelly; Rehner, Anita B; Pillard, David A; Schrage, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Toxicity was observed in whole effluent toxicity (WET) studies with the freshwater alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, in three consecutive monthly studies, (NOEC=50-75%). Toxicity was not observed to Ceriodaphnia dubia or the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas in concurrent studies. Selected toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests were conducted in a tiered approach to eliminate possible toxicants and progressively identify the causative agent. Filtration following alkaline adjustment (pH 10 or 11) was effective in eliminating significant growth effects and also reduced phosphate concentration. The TIE studies confirmed that the observed effluent toxicity was caused by excess ortho-phosphate in the effluent not by overstimulation or related to unfavorable N:P ratios; but due to direct toxicity. The 96-h 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of ortho-phosphate to P. subcapitata was 3.4 mg L⁻¹ while the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration was 4.8 mg L⁻¹. This study illustrates the value of multi-species testing and also provides an example of an effective TIE using algae identifying an unanticipated toxicant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Journal of Development and Communication Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Journal of Development & Communication Studies is a quarterly journal that accepts academic research articles, talks, essays, conference papers, brief case studies, and book reviews that conform to the following specifications: 1) Full length academic research articles: Maximum 30 pages including ...

  12. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) 8(e) Notices and FYI Submissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires U.S. chemical manufacturers, importers, processors and distributors to notify EPA within 30 calendar...

  13. ACUTE TOXICITY STUDIES AND ANTIDOTAL THERAPY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the myriad of ethno medical uses and agro-feed potential of Jatropha curcas (JC) seeds and the potential for production of biodiesel, toxic properties have been adduced to the plant, especially the seeds. Thus, the current study was done with the aim of investigating the toxicity of the ethanol seed extract of JC in ...

  14. Review of toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2017-09-28

    We reviewed studies on pulmonary, reproductive, and developmental toxicity caused by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In paricular, we analyzed how CNT exposure affects the several processes of pulmonary toxicity, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, and pulmonary tumors. In pulmonary toxicity, there are various processes, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, respiratory tumor in the lungs, and biopersistence of CNTs and genotoxicity as tumor-related factors, to develop the respiratory tumor. We evaluated the evidence for the carcinogenicity of CNTs in each process. In the fields of reproductive and developmental toxicity, studies of CNTs have been conducted mainly with mice. We summarized the findings of reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of CNTs. In animal studies, exposure to CNTs induced sustained inflammation, fibrosis, lung cancer following long-term inhalation, and gene damage in the lung. CNTs also showed high biopersistence in animal studies. Fetal malformations after intravenous and intraperitoneal injections and intratracheal instillation, fetal loss after intravenous injection, behavioral changes in offsprings after intraperitoneal injection, and a delay in the delivery of the first litter after intratracheal instillation were reported in mice-administered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) appeared to be embryolethal and teratogenic in mice when given by intravenous injection; moreover, the tubes induced death and growth retardation in chicken embryos. CNTs are considered to have carcinogenicity and can cause lung tumors. However, the carcinogenicity of CNTs may attenuate if the fiber length is shorter. The available data provide initial information on the potential reproductive and developmental toxicity of CNTs.

  15. E-submission chronic toxicology study supplemental files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formats and instructions in these documents are designed to be used as an example or guide for registrants to format electronic files for submission of animal toxicology data to OPP for review in support of registration and reevaluation of pesticides.

  16. 76 FR 64368 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Homelessness Prevention... site visits that are part of HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study. The proposed information collection... collection for the Homelessness Prevention study that was already approved under emergency review (OMB...

  17. Toxicity studies of fullerenes and derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosnjaj, Jelena; Szwarc, Henri; Moussa, Fathi

    2007-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, fullerenes, a model of carbon-based nanoparticles, have attracted considerable interest in many fields of research including material science and biomedical applications. The potential and the growing use of fullerenes and their mass production have raised several questions about their safety and environmental impact. Available data clearly shows that pristine C60 has no acute or sub-acute toxicity in a large variety of living organisms, from bacteria and fungal to human leukocytes, and also in drosophila, mice, rats and guinea pigs. In contrast to chemically--either covalently or noncovalently--modified fullerenes, some C60 derivatives can be highly toxic. Furthermore, under light exposure, C60 is an efficient singlet oxygen sensitizer. Therefore, if pristine C60 is absolutely nontoxic under dark conditions, this is not the case under UV-Visible irradiation and in the presence of O2 where ffullerene solutions can be highly toxic through 1O2 formation. This chapter offers a general review of the studies on the toxicity of [60]fullerene or C60, the most abundant fullerene, and its derivatives.

  18. 75 FR 54886 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; the Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; the Framingham... studying the determinants of cardiovascular disease. Examinations will be conducted on the original...; (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Minimize...

  19. 78 FR 42084 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support; Availability of the Center for Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support... Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the CDER Data Standards...

  20. 78 FR 5816 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support End Date AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center for Biologics... CONTACT: Virginia Hussong, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903...

  1. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    OpenAIRE

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions: Methanolic...

  3. Toxicity study of diethyl phthalate on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2014-02-12

    Feb 12, 2014 ... Therefore, a study was designed to determine the acute toxicity effects of DEP on a fresh water fish,. Clarias gariepinus ... Key words: Diethyl phthalate, Clarias gariepinus, acute toxicity, sublethal toxicity, heamatology, biochemical, histopathology ..... discharge of DEP-laden effluents and wastes take place.

  4. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  5. Toxicity Assessment for EPA's Hydraulic Fracturing Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains data used to develop multiple manuscripts on the toxicity of chemicals associated with the hydraulic fracturing industry. These manuscripts...

  6. Drinking water toxicity study of the environmental contaminant--Bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongmei, Liu; Zhiwei, Wang; Qi, Zhu; Fuyi, Cui; Yujuan, Shan; Xiaodong, Liu

    2015-12-01

    Bromate is a byproduct of water disinfection that is produced when waters contain bromide treated with ozone. To investigate the level of the toxicity of bromate and find the most sensitive indicators in a short time, a series of toxicological assessments were conducted including the acute toxicity, cumulative toxicity, genetic toxicity and subacute toxicity of bromate (using Potassium Bromate to represent bromate). The LD50 of orally administered Potassium Bromate was 215 mg/kg in Wistar rats and 464 mg/kg in ICR mice. The cumulative toxicity of Potassium Bromate was not obvious. The Ames test, mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test did not indicate mutagenicity. The results of the subacute study did not exhibit significant differences in most of the parameters, except the white blood cell count, which was significantly decreased in male rats. In addition, Potassium Bromate influenced the albumin, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in male rats to various extents. A thorough analysis of the above tests clearly demonstrates that bromate has toxicity, not obvious cumulative toxicity and the white blood cell count can be used as an indicator to reflect the toxicity of bromate and investigate bromate's toxic mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of reproductive toxicity of Combretum leprosum Mart and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most plants culturally used in Brazil for medicine do not have pre-clinical studies of reproductive toxicity, therefore risks of using such products on the reproductive system are unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate possible reproductive toxicity of ethanolic extract of Combretum leprosum Mart and Eicher (EECL) in ...

  8. Subchronic oral toxicity studies with α-cyclodextrin in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bär, A.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD), a cyclic polymer of six α-1,4-linked glucopyranosyl units with potential applications as a food ingredient, more specifically a water-soluble dietary fiber, was examined in a 4-week range finding study and a 13-week oral toxicity study in rats. In the 4-week

  9. [Study on the regulation of autophagy against anticancer drugs' toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiao-e; Zhu, Yi; He, Qiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a crucial biological process in eukaryotes, which is involved in cell growth, survival and energy metabolism. It has been confirmed that autophagy mediates toxicity of anticancer drugs, especially in heart, liver and neuron. It is important to understand the function and mechanism of autophagy in anticancer drugs-induced toxicity. Given that autophagy is a double-edged sword in the maintenance of the function of heart, liver and neuron, the autophagy-mediated toxicity are very complicated in the body. We provide a review on the concept of autophagy and current status about autophagy-mediated toxicity of anticancer drugs. The knowledge is crucial in the basic study of anticancer drugs-induced toxicity, and provides some strategies for the development of alleviating the toxicity of anticancer drugs.

  10. 77 FR 9945 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Providing Submissions in Electronic Format-Standardized Study Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... current thinking on the submission of study data in a standard electronic format. The draft guidance... current thinking on submitting standardized study data in electronic format. It does not create or confer... Electronic Format--Standardized Study Data; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  11. Acute toxicity, 28-day repeated-dose toxicity and toxicokinetic study of timosaponin BII in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ni; Liu, Baofeng; Zhang, Jie; Long, Yongpeng; Dong, Guoming; Jin, Hongtao; Ma, Baiping

    2017-11-01

    Timosaponin BII (TBII), a major steroidal saponin isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bge., displays a variety of promising pharmacological activities, such as neuroprotection, enhancement of learning and memory, vascular protection and inhibition of platelet aggregation; therefore, it has been developed as a pharmaceutical for prevention or treatment of dementia. Given the safety concerns surrounding timosaponins and the absence of studies on the safety of TBII, the potential toxicity of TBII was evaluated in toxicity and toxicokinetic studies in rats. In the acute oral toxicity study, loose stools were observed in rats receiving 4000 mg/kg, and the symptoms recovered within 1 day. In the 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity and toxicokinetic study, rats receiving 540 mg/kg showed loose stools and a slight deceleration of body weight growth in both sexes, and the females also showed a slight decrease in food consumption. Moreover, urinalysis indicated reversible treatment-related toxicity in rats receiving 540 mg/kg. The toxicokinetic study demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in systematic exposure to TBII after 28 successive days of oral treatment with TBII. The accumulation coefficients of TBII were 4.35, 1.70 and 1.81, respectively, in rats that received 60, 180 and 540 mg/kg. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is proposed to be 180 mg/kg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phytochemical, Proximate and Toxicity Studies of Aqueous Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical, Proximate and Toxicity Studies of Aqueous Extract of Crinum ornatum (Toad's Onion) ... The results indicate that, the bulbs can be considered as a spice that could serve as potential sources of flavouring agent with medicinal benefits. Keywords: Crinum ornatum, Phytochemical, Proximate, Toxicity ...

  13. 77 FR 19267 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Study of Promising Features...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... pair of teachers in the same school and grade level, one of whom will have experienced the type of... states for the study, selecting the specific features related to clinical practice (i.e., the ``program... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; Study of Promising Features of...

  14. Inhalation toxicity studies with 1,3-butadiene. 2. 3 month toxicity study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, C.N.; Pullinger, D.H.; Gaunt, I.F.

    1979-09-01

    The available toxicological data for 1,3-butadiene are limited and contradictory. Three month toxicity and two year carcinogenicity studies have therefore been initiated to identify any potential hazard to occupationally exposed personnel. The results of the 3 month study are reported in this paper. Five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1,3-butadiene gas at atmospheric concentrations of 0, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 ppM v/v respectively, 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks. No untoward effects attributable to exposure were observed, except a moderately increased salivation, particularly in female animals during the last 5 to 8 weeks of exposure, at higher concentrations of butadiene.

  15. 75 FR 76706 - Acceptance of Public Submissions on a Study Mandated by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ..., Division of Risk, Strategy, and Financial Innovation, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE... to capture one set of information versus another? 40. Would there be a benefit to making the computer... COMMISSION SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Acceptance of Public Submissions on a Study Mandated by the...

  16. 76 FR 44508 - Acceptance of Public Submissions for a Study on International Swap Regulation Mandated by Section...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ..., currency swaps, interest rate swaps (IRS),\\22\\ and commodity swaps; \\21\\ For CDS, include: corporate single... contracts, such as CDS, equity swaps, currency swaps, IRS, and commodity swaps; b. For classes and... Submissions for a Study on International Swap Regulation Mandated by Section 719(c) of the Dodd-Frank Wall...

  17. COASTAL STUDY Submission for Lafourche Parish, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  18. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  19. Investigation of self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviors of nursing students studying in different curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraydın, Şahizer; Karagözoğlu, Şerife

    2017-07-01

    Today, nursing education which educates the future members of the nursing profession aims to gain them high self-esteem, selfconfidence and self-compassion, independence, assertiveness and ability to establish good human relations. This aim can only be achieved through a contemporary curriculum supporting students in the educational process and enabling those in charge to make arrangements by taking the characters and needs of each individual into account. The study aims to investigate self-compassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours of undergraduate nursing students studying in different curriculums. This descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study was carried out with the 1st- and 4th-year students of the three schools, each of which has a different curriculum: conventional, integrated and Problem Based Learning (PBL). The study data were collected with the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), Self-Confidence Scale (CS) and Submissive Acts Scale (SAS): The data were analyzed through frequency distribution, means, analysis of variance and the significance test for the difference between the two means. The mean scores the participating students obtained from the Self-Compassion, Self-confidence and Submissive Acts Scales were 3.31±0.56, 131.98±20.85 and 36.48±11.43 respectively. The integrated program students' mean self-compassion and self-confidence scores were statistically significantly higher and their mean submissive behaviour scores were lower than were those of the students studying in the other two programs (pnursing students tended to display moderate levels of selfcompassion, self-confidence and submissive behaviours, and that the selfcompassion and self-confidence scores of the 4th-year students in the integrated program were higher than were those of the students in the other two programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxicity studies using mammalian cells and impedance spectroscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a study of cell-based Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS sensors employed for testing toxicants in real-time. Mammalian cells are exposed to toxicants and information about cell viability are obtained from impedance measurements. The toxicants used are nicotine, phenol, ammonia and aldicarb. Two different adherent mammalian cells lines and cell culturewares were used to optimize the toxicity study. The cell lines used in this study were: bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPEC. The BAECs generated higher impedance values and formed cell monolayers at a faster rate compared to RFPECs. The two cell culturewares used in this study were simple open cell-culture wells and enclosed cell culturewares with microfluidic perfusion barriers. Experimental results indicated that the open wells are not suited for toxicity experiments. The turbulent flow created by pipetting media and toxicants in open cell culture wells disrupts the formation of the cell monolayer. When enclosed culture chambers were used, the flow of the cell culture medium and toxicant solutions were laminar on the cell monolayer. Both finite element simulations and experimental results showed that enclosed perfusion chamber have better performance due to the laminar flow of the solutions. The enclosed perfusion chamber also significantly shortens the response time of the cells when exposed to toxicants compared to the open cell culture wells. The experimental results demonstrated that ECIS biosensors seeded with BAECs inside enclosed cell culture chambers successfully assesses the effect of toxicants on mammalian cells in real-time.

  1. Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used by subsistence farmers around the Lake Victoria Basin. M Kamatenesi-Mugisha, JP Buyungo, P Ogwal, A Kasibante, AL Deng, JO Ogendo, MJ Mihale ...

  2. A Review: Epigenetic Mechanism in Ochratoxin A Toxicity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liye; Zhang, Boyang; Dai, Yaqi; Li, Hongyu; Xu, Wentao

    2017-03-23

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a natural contaminant that has displayed nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in mammals. It contaminates a great variety of foodstuffs and threatens people's lives. The molecular mechanism of OTA-induced toxicity has been studied since 1965. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms are also studied in OTA-induced toxicity. Additionally, the mode of OTA epigenetic research has been advanced in research hotspots. However, there is still no epigenetic study of OTA-induced toxicity. In this review, we discuss the relationship between these epigenetic mechanisms and OTA-induced toxicity. We found that studies on the epigenetic mechanisms of OTA-induced toxicity all chose the whole kidney or liver as the model, which cannot reveal the real change in DNA methylation or miRNAs or histone in the target sites of OTA. Our recommendations are as follows: (1) the specific target site of OTA should be detected by advanced technologies; and (2) competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNA) should be explored with OTA.

  3. Acute toxicity study of methanolic extract of Asparagus pubescens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acute toxicity study of methanolic extract of Asparagus pubescens root was studied on rats. The indices of the study were the liver enzymes (transaminases), cholesterol, creatinine and urea serum levels as well as the ionic analysis. Both alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) showed a ...

  4. The use of pig hepatocytes for biotransformation and toxicity studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were, (1) to investigate the possibility to isolate viable hepatocytes from liver samples of pigs, (2) to study their use for biotransformation and toxicity studies, and (3) to demonstrate the value of this model, in particular in the field of residue

  5. Study on the Personal Submission of Agricultural Product Samples for Quality and Safety Inspection

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, Dan; WANG, Yan; ZHANG, Yongzhi; CUI, Yehan; LIU, Pengcheng; ZHOU, Yunlong; LI, Yueru

    2015-01-01

    This paper carries out a questionnaire survey on 30 quality inspection institutions at the level of the Ministry of Agriculture, and based on systematic analysis, analyzes the causes of difficulties in personal submission of samples for inspection from six aspects in order to meet the real needs of personal submission of agricultural product samples for inspection under the new situation. In accordance with the actual situation of China's current regulatory system and quality control system, ...

  6. Oral toxicity study of certain plant extracts containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şeremet, Oana Cristina; Bărbuceanu, Florica; Ionică, Floriana Elvira; Margină, Denisa Marilena; GuŢu, Claudia Maria; Olaru, Octavian Tudorel; Ilie, Mihaela; Gonciar, Veaceslav; Negreş, Simona; ChiriŢă, Cornel

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are a class of toxic compounds which are found in plants. Poisoning caused by these toxins is associated with acute and chronic liver damage. Tussilago farfara (coltsfoot), Petasites hybridus (common butterbur), Senecio vernalis (eastern groundsel) and Symphytum officinale (comfrey) are traditional phytotherapic species, which beside the therapeutic bioactive compounds contain PAs. The aim of the paper was to assess the safety of some dry extracts obtained from these species. For the determination of acute toxicity, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Guideline No. 423 was used. For the determination of repeated dose oral toxicity, Senecionis vernalis herba and Symphyti radix extracts (250 mg÷kg) were administrated, by gavage, for 28 days, and their effects on animal weight, liver and biliary functions, hepatic tissue and oxidative stress were investigated. After the acute toxicity testing, the dry extracts were placed in the GHS Category V (LD50>5000 mg÷kg, p.o.). For the subacute toxicity testing, no death or any signs of toxicity were observed. Also, no significant differences in biochemical parameters were observed between control and treated groups. The observed histopathological lesions were non-specific and were not consistent with the data reported in the literature for PAs exposure. In conclusion, the administration for 28 days, of the tested extracts, in a dose which correspond to a PAs concentration over the limits imposed in some countries, produced no hepatic and biliary toxic effects. Further studies, extended over a longer period of time, are needed in order to determine the safety of plant extracts containing PAs.

  7. Phytochemical screening and acute toxicity studies of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carissa edulis is used traditionally in Nigeria for the treatment of epilepsy, headache, syphilis, rheumatism and sickle cell anaemia. In this study, phytochemical screening was conducted to determine putative active components of Carissa edulis, as well as acute toxicity studies of the ethanolic extract and flavoniod fractions ...

  8. Zimbabwe Science News: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  9. Chronic arsenic toxicity: Studies in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debendranath Guha Mazumder

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arsenic toxicity (arsenicosis as a result of drinking arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a major environmental health hazard throughout the world, including India. A lot of research on health effects, including genotoxic effect of chronic arsenic toxicity in humans, have been carried out in West Bengal during the last 2 decades. A review of literature including information available from West Bengal has been made to characterize the problem. Scientific journals, monographs, and proceedings of conferences with regard to human health effects, including genotoxicity, of chronic arsenic toxicity have been reviewed. Pigmentation and keratosis are the specific skin diseases characteristic of chronic arsenic toxicity. However, in West Bengal, it was found to produce various systemic manifestations, such as chronic lung disease, characterized by chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive and/or restrictive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis; liver diseases, such as non cirrhotic portal fibrosis; polyneuropathy; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; nonpitting edema of feet/hands; conjunctival congestion; weakness; and anemia. High concentrations of arsenic, greater than or equal to 200 μg/L, during pregnancy were found to be associated with a sixfold increased risk for stillbirth. Cancers of skin, lung, and urinary bladder are the important cancers associated with this toxicity. Of the various genotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, chromosomal aberration and increased frequency of micronuclei in different cell types have been found to be significant. Various probable mechanisms have been incriminated to cause DNA damage because of chronic arsenic toxicity. The results of the study in West Bengal suggest that deficiency in DNA repair capacity, perturbation of methylation of promoter region of p53 and p16 genes, and genomic methylation alteration may be involved in arsenic-induced disease manifestation in humans. P53 polymorphism has been

  10. toxicity study in mice of resins of three commiphora species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    ABSTRACT: Acute toxicity studies of crude extracts of resins of Commiphora myrrha, C. guidottii and. C. erlangeriana, and pure compounds isolated from C. erlangeriana were conducted on Swiss albino mice. The extract from C. erlangeriana had a mean LD50 of 410 mg/kg body weight. However the extracts from.

  11. Oral Toxicity Studies of Hydroalcohol Leaf Extract of Ageratum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Bordeaux, France. Abstract. Purpose: Ageratum conyzoides is an annual herbaceous plant commonly used in African traditional medicine as a purgative, antipyretic, anti-ulcer and wound dressing agent. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of A. conyzoides leaves in Wistar rats.

  12. Toxicity Studies of the Crude Aqueous Root Extract of Albizzia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity Studies of the Crude Aqueous Root Extract of Albizzia chevalieri Harms in Albino Rats. Y Saidu, FC Nwachukwu, LS Bilbis, UZ Faruk, AY Abbas. Abstract. Aqueous root extract of Albizzia chevalieri has been reported to possess hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic effects. The current work investigated the LD50 of ...

  13. Toxicity study in mice of resins of three Commiphora species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity studies of crude extracts of resins of Commiphora myrrha, C. guidottii and C. erlangeriana, and pure compounds isolated from C. erlangeriana were conducted on Swiss albino mice. The extract from C. erlangeriana had a mean LD50 of 410 mg/kg body weight. However the extracts from C. myrrha and C.

  14. Toxicity study of diethyl phthalate on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diethyl Phthalate (DEP) is used as a plasticizer, a detergent base, in aerosol sprays, as a perfume binder and after shave lotion. It is known to be a contaminant of fresh water and marine ecosystem. Therefore, a study was designed to determine the acute toxicity effects of DEP on a fresh water fish, Clarias gariepinus ...

  15. Pharmacological and toxicity studies of the crude extracts and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory potency of the hydro-ethanol extract and fractions from Hedranthera barteri leaf. Column chromatography of the crude extracts, practical acute toxicity testing and fixed dose procedures were carried out. Effects of the extracts on nociception were assessed by ...

  16. Acute toxicity studies of potassium permanganate in Swiss albino mice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity study of potassium permanganate was carried out in Swiss albino mice. Potassium permanganate was administered at dose rate of 0.0, 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 and 3500mg/kg body weight to groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, ten per group for LD50 determination. The dead animals were posted for ...

  17. Some scientific landmarks of the MIT radium toxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maletskos, C.J. [Constantine Maletskos, Gloucester, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Until the recent forced termination of the studies on radium toxicity, more than six decades of investigation and research have been devoted to them. These studies involve {approximately}2400 subjects who were exposed to long-term internally deposited radium [high linear energy transfer (LET)], whose health status was evaluated in great detail and whose radiation dosimetry was based on measurements of their actual radium body burdens. The quality and usefulness of these studies are, therefore, in sharp contrast to other human radiation-exposure studies that involve instantaneous or somewhat protracted external low-LET exposures and inferred radiation dose, as in the atomic-bomb survivor studies. As a consequence of national news in 1932 concerning the gruesome death of a prominent Pittsburgh businessman and sportsman, Robley D. Evans became involved with radium toxicity, and its study became an important project when he joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology physics department and set up the interdisciplinary Radioactivity Center.

  18. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... certain biological products and is committed to advancing the public health through innovative activities... 56363, October 3, 2007). The phase 2 pilot was aimed at evaluating animal toxicity data submitted in... transport file (XPT version 5) datasets with data provided in PDF. CBER currently receives nonclinical study...

  19. In Vivo Toxicity Studies of Europium Hydroxide Nanorods in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence properties and pro-angiogenic to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [EuIII(OH)3] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mgKg−1day−1) and time dependent manner (8–60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice sacrificed on day 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods. PMID:19616569

  20. Protocol Development and Preliminary Toxicity Study of CBRN Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    developmental problems in offspring. One study found titanium dioxide ( TiO2 ) nanoparticles were present in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. This...lungs, but can also cross into the blood stream and disseminate deeper inside the body to threaten the brain, liver, kidney , and other tissues/organs...is quite different than for micro-sized TiO2 particles, which are considered inert and relatively non-toxic to experimental animals and humans

  1. 75 FR 17411 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ...), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a... of medical ] history update forms will provide essential data for outcomes assessment for this..., should be directed to the: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Regulatory Affairs, OIRA_submission...

  2. Ninety day toxicity study of chloroacetic acids in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, H K; Kanz, M F; Campbell, G A; Ansari, G A

    1991-08-01

    Chloroacetic acids are produced in drinking water as a result of disinfection processes. Chloroacetic acids are also metabolites of widely used and toxic halogenated hydrocarbons. Thus, chronic human exposure to these chemicals is likely to occur. The objective of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in a 90-day subchronic study in rats via oral exposure by drinking water. Chloroacetic acid solutions were prepared at concentrations which provided an approximate intake of 1/4 the LD50 dose per day: MCA, 1.9 mM; DCA, 80.5 mM; TCA, 45.8 mM. Control rats received distilled water only. After 90 days, major organs were removed, fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained. Light microscopic examination of the major organs revealed variable degrees of alterations in the lung and liver of all three treated groups. In the liver, morphological changes were predominantly localized to the portal triads, which were mildly to moderately enlarged with random bile duct proliferation, extension of portal veins, fibrosis, edema, and occasional foci of inflammation. In the lungs, minimal alterations were observed as foci of perivascular inflammation on small pulmonary veins. Morphological changes in the testes and brain were seen only in the DCA treated group. Testes were atrophic with few spermatocytes and no mature spermatozoa. Focal vacuolation and gliosis were present in the forebrain and brainstem. The results of these studies indicate that, relative to their respective LD50 values, DCA given at 80.5 mM is more toxic than TCA given at 45.8 mM and MCA at 1.9 mM is least toxic.

  3. Relative parameter sensitivity in prenatal toxicity studies with substances classified as developmental toxicants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rorije, E.; van Hienen, F.J.W.; Dang, Z.C.; Hakkert, B.H.; Vermeire, T.; Piersma, A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071276947

    2012-01-01

    Developmental toxicity testing according to the globally standardized OECD 414 protocol is an important basis for decisions on classification and labeling of developmental toxicants in the European Union (EU). This test requires relatively large animal numbers, given that parental and offspring

  4. Chronic toxicity study of Hyptis suaveolens (L. Poit in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunjong Chaorai

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water extract of Hyptis suaveolens (H. suaveolens was evaluated for 6-month chronic toxicity in Wistar rats. Control group received distilled water orally 10 ml/kg/day. The extract was orally given to five treatment groups at the doses of 5, 50, 250, 500 and 500 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The last group was served as the recovery group. Changes in the body weights, actual and relative organ weights were not significantly demonstrated in all groups throughout the study. The results of hematological, biochemical parameters and histopathological lesions showed that the extract did not produce any significant doserelated changes. Therefore, it may be concluded that the extract of H. suaveolens at the given doses did not produce any significant toxic effect in rats during 6-month period of the treatment.

  5. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity: case study with syndrome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cott, Theodore E; Yehle, Karen S; DeCrane, Susan K; Thorlton, Janet R

    2013-01-01

    Amiodarone is often prescribed for the control of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. While generally effective, the potential for a variety of side effects is substantial. Pulmonary toxicity, leading to acute or chronic respiratory failure, manifests with cough, dyspnea, infiltrates on chest radiograph, and a potential for progression to death. Although routinely cited as an adverse effect of amiodarone, it is relatively rare in terms of statistical incidence. In an effort to shed light on this syndrome, we present a stereotypical case study in amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, as a prelude to a review of theorized pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, therapeutics, monitoring recommendations, and areas for future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin: Analytical studies and toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Tiele Caprioli, E-mail: tiele@enq.ufrgs.br [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Engenheiro Luiz Englert s/n, CEP: 90040-040 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pizzolato, Tânia Mara [Chemical Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Arenzon, Alexandre [Ecology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Segalin, Jeferson [Biotechnology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lansarin, Marla Azário [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Engenheiro Luiz Englert s/n, CEP: 90040-040 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin, which is a drug that has been used to reduce blood cholesterol levels, was studied in this work employing ZnO as catalyst. The experiments were carried out in a temperature-controlled batch reactor that was irradiated with UV light. Preliminary the effects of the photocatalyst loading, the initial pH and the initial rosuvastatin concentration were evaluated. The experimental results showed that rosuvastatin degradation is primarily a photocatalytic process, with pseudo-first order kinetics. The byproducts that were generated during the oxidative process were identified using nano-ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-UPLC–MS/MS) and acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna were done to evaluate the toxicity of the untreated rosuvastatin solution and the reactor effluent. - Highlights: • The photocatalytic degradation of rosuvastatin was studied under UV irradiation. • Commercial catalyst ZnO was used. • Initial rosuvastatin concentration, photocatalyst loading and pH were evaluated. • The byproducts generated during the oxidative process were detected and identified. • Acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna were carried out.

  7. Subacute (90 days) oral toxicity studies of Kombucha tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Singh, M; Rao, P V; Bhattacharya, R; Kumar, P; Sugendran, K; Kumar, O; Pant, S C; Singh, R

    2000-12-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy. KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment. The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria. KT is consumed in several countries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments, viz., intestinal disorders, arthritis, ageing and stimulation of immunological system. Though KT is used in several parts of the world its beneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated. Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT, subacute oral toxicity study was carried out. Five groups of rats were maintained: (a) control group given tap water orally, (b) KT given 2 ml/kg orally, (c) plain tea (PT) given 2 ml/kg orally, (d) KT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v) and (e) PT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v). The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days. Weekly records of weight, feed intake, water intake and general behaviour were monitored. There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progressive body weight change. The organ to body weight ratio and histological evaluation did not show any toxic signs. The haematological and biochemical variables were within the clinical limits. The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 days showed no toxic effects.

  8. Preliminary acute toxicity study on imidacloprid in Swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Bagri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To ascertain the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and to investigate the acute oral toxic effects of imidacloprid towards Swiss albino male mice.Materials and Methods: The MTD of imidacloprid was determined in pilot dose range finding study following the standard method. Animals were observed for toxic signs and symptoms after oral administration of MTD of imidacloprid in single dose. The body weights of animals were recorded on alternate day. Animals were sacrificed on 14th day and changes in hematological parameters (Hb, TEC, TLC and DLC and morphometric measurements (length, breadth, thickness and weight of various body organs (heart, liver, spleen, kidney, testis and epididymis were examined. The student's t-test was applied to statistically analyze the results.Results: The MTD of imidacloprid was determined to be 110 mg/kg body weight. The sign and symptoms of acute toxicity were ataxia, rigidity and fasciculation of muscles, protrusion of eye ball and tremors of head. Imidacloprid treatment resulted in decreased body weight gain as compared to the control group. The changes in hematological parameters were not significant between imidacloprid treated and control groups. Also the values of relative organ weights and morphometric measurements of various body organs did not differ significantly between the control and imidacloprid treated animals.Conclusions: MTD of imidacloprid in Swiss albino male mice through oral route was determined for the first time. Study revealed a non-toxic effect of imidacloprid on body weight, relative organs weight, hematological parameters and morphometric measurements of various body organs in mice.

  9. Online Research Output Submission System as a mechanism to influence publication citations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetha Nundulall

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher Education Institutions (HEIs need to ensure that the education provided meets the student’s and employer’s requirements, for today and the future. However, in addition to the challenges of teaching and learning, internationalisation, globalisation and world university rankings are rearing their heads thus increasing the demands made on many HEIs.Objective: One of the ways in which HEIs can make their mark is through world university rankings. This may be achieved by exposing more information on new and innovative research knowledge to the broader community in the global market via research publications that attract citations on open access platforms, hence influencing the university’s ranking. For this purpose and intent, a ‘simple’ and ‘easy-to-use’ online web tool was developed at a HEI. The aim was to have research publications submitted via the Online Research Output Submission System (OROSS tool, screened and deposited in the institution’s open access database.Method: Training was provided to the relevant participants and a survey was conducted to ascertain the participants’ perceptions about the utilisation of the OROSS tool and the training provided.Conclusion: This article reflects on the pilot phase of a longitudinal study. Results of an evaluation conducted by the researcher of the OROSS application from a user perspective (process are highlighted. In general, users rated OROSS favourably in terms of it being a useful, simple and easy-to-use web-based tool. The findings of this study may assist University of Johannesburg’s executive management in deciding the fate of the OROSS tool for future use.

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY FOR SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY OF VASELINE OIL AND GLYCELAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Voronkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary therapeutic approaches offer a wide range of laxative agents, which are often used without a control, exceeding the regime recommended. Therefore, the comparative study for subchronic toxicity of both drugs from this group (Vaseline oil and Glycelax appears interesting.The aim of the study was the comparison of a toxic influence of 14-days application of the drugs under study.Methods. The drugs were studied in two doses: higher therapeutic, and toxic, which 10 times exceeds therapeutic dose. We used “Polispektr-8/B” electrocardiograph, BC 2800vet (Mindray hematologic veterinary analyzer, BS-380 (Mindray biochemical analyzer, CL-50 urine analyzer. After the animals autopsy we determined organs’ coefficient (heart, lungs, spleen, liver, stomach, kidneys, adrenals.Results. While studying the ECG of female rats, amplitude of R wave increased after they got Glycelax in both doses. Female rats who got Vaseline oil this index decreased at minimum dose and increased at maximum dose. After Glycelax application, male rats had an increased activity of alanine aminotransferase. After Vaseline oil application at maximum dose, female rats had alkaline phosphatase activity lowered. Female rats, which got a maximum dose of Vaseline oil had a total protein lowered. Glycelax at maximum dose increased the content of bilirubin and its fractions in male and female rats, while Vaseline oil application at maximum dose increased the content of bilirubin in female rats. Male rats which got Glycelax had hemoglobin and hematocrit level increased.Conclusion. At long-term application of Vaseline oil, animals of both genders had heart disorders with possible development of arrhythmia, hepatotoxic effect, lipid exchange dysfunction. After excessive use of Glycelax the above mentioned is added with possible hemoglobin and rheological blood properties level decrease.

  11. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  12. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50. The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW−1 day−1 dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW−1 in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW−1 day−1 in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes.

  13. STUDIES OF CHOSEN TOXIC ELEMENTS CONCENTRATION IN MULTIFLOWER BEE HONEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Popiela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 72 544x376 Normal 0 21 false false false  The aim of the study was to determine the bioaccumulation level of chosen toxic elements (Zn, Cu, Pb, As and Cd in multiflower honey collected from Brzeg area. Biological material (honey was mineralized using the microwave technique at an elevated pressure in the microprocessor station of pressure in the type Mars 5. Quantitative analysis of elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn was performed by plasma spectrometry method using a Varian ICP-AES apparatus. The presence of toxic elements was determined in examined biological materials. The elements fallowed the fallowing decreasing order with respect to their content of honey: Zn>Cu>Pb>As>Cd. The average concentrations of studied elements observed in multi-flower honey were as follows: 6.24 mg.kg-1 of zinc, 2.75 mg.kg-1 of copper, 0.53, 0.071, 0.042 mg.kg-1of lead, arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Lead was the most problematic in bee honey because its average content exceeded the maximum acceptable concentration. Additionally, this metal concentration was 60% higher in studied samples than allowable standard of lead content.doi:10.5219/134 

  14. Tunable functionality and toxicity studies of titanium dioxide nanotube layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feschet-Chassot, E.; Raspal, V.; Sibaud, Y. [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, C-BIOSENSS, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand (France); Awitor, O.K., E-mail: koawitor@iut.u-clermont1.f [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, C-BIOSENSS, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand (France); Bonnemoy, F. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, UMR CNRS 6023, LMGE, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand (France); Bonnet, J.L.; Bohatier, J. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, UMR CNRS 6023, LMGE, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand (France); Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Laboratoire de Biologie cellulaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we have developed a simple process to fabricate scalable titanium dioxide nanotube layers which show a tunable functionality. The titanium dioxide nanotube layers were prepared by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil in 0.4 wt.% hydrofluoric acid solution. The nanotube layers structure and morphology were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The surface topography and wettability were studied according to the anodization time. The sample synthesized displayed a higher contact angle while the current density reached a local minimum. Beyond this point, the contact angles decreased with anodization time. Photo-degradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers under UV irradiation. We obtained better photocatalytic activity for the sample fabricated at higher current density. Finally we used the Ciliated Protozoan T. pyriformis, an alternative cell model used for in vitro toxicity studies, to predict the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers in a biological system. We did not observe any characteristic effect in the presence of the titanium dioxide nanotube layers on two physiological parameters related to this organism, non-specific esterases activity and population growth rate.

  15. Toxicity study of ethanolic extract of Chrysanthemum morifolium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Gu, Liqiang; Chen, Zhongjian; Wang, Ruwei; Ye, Jianfeng; Jiang, Huidi

    2010-08-01

    Chrysanthemum morifolium extract (CME) has many pharmacological effects, and the effective components of CME are luteolin and apigenin which have been reported with cytotoxicity in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of CME in Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. In the acute toxicity study, a single oral dose of 15 g/kg body weight (bw) CME was administered to rats, then the rats were observed for 14 d. No treatment-related death was observed, and the maximal tolerance dose estimated was greater than 15 g/kg bw in rats. In the long-term toxicity study, the rats were administered daily by gavage at dose levels of 320, 640, and 1280 mg/kg bw/d for consecutive 26 wk followed by 4 wk recovery period. The results showed that no toxicological changes in body weight, food, and water consumption, hematologic examination, blood biochemical examination, organ weight, and microscopic histopathologic examination were found in any treatment group. Therefore, CME is considered to be safe in general in rats at the limited dose level.

  16. Toxicity of coenzyme Q(10): a report of 90-day repeated dose toxicity study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhipeng, Wang; Mingkai, Li; Shuyu, Cui; Min, Jia; Jingru, Meng; Xue, Ma; Yumei, Wu; Xiaoxing, Luo

    2007-12-01

    Potential toxicity of CoQ(10) was studied in rats by oral gavage for 90 days at 500, 1500, and 3000 mg/kg.day. A 15-day recovery period after the administration period was investigated. Body weight and food consumption were measured throughout the study. Meanwhile, clinical observations were recorded. Hematological and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated at both the end of the dosing period and the end of the recovery period. Gross-pathologic and histopathologic examination was performed on select tissues from all animals. No adverse changes in mortality and clinical signs occurred. The body weights of males in the 1500 mg/kg dosage group were slightly reducted; likewise, the food consumption in 3000 mg/kg female rats decreased, but this is not a dose-dependent behavior. Significant change of liver function (TRIGL) and CHOL did not show a dose-dependent effect. Weight of ovary and ovary-to-body weight ratio decreased in the 1500 mg/kg dosage groups. Meanwhile, the uterus -to-body weight ratio increased the in 3000 mg/kg dosage groups. However, there were no significant histopathological changes observed in ovary and uterus: so they were not considered to be adverse. It suggested that CoQ(10) is relatively safe on the test dosage administration. Nevertheless, appetite the body weight, blood lipid and liver function should be observed during long-term clinical administration of this drug with high dosage. Overall, CoQ(10) was well tolerated by male and female rats at dose levels up to 3000 mg/kg.day.

  17. STUDY OF THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CYPERMETHRIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mehmood Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the toxic effects of a commercially available pesticide, cypermethrin (CM, on animals. This pesticide was administered in the form of aerosol spray through a nebulizer. The study was performed in four different groups and a constant dose of the pesticide was administered once, twice, thrice and four times a day to the respective group for a period of 30 days. The animals were then dissected to study the pesticide effects on different organs. The organs were preserved in 10% formalin. The tissues were processed by basic histopathological method and the slides were prepared for observation. The results were recorded on a performa and were quantified by a unique scoring system. It is concluded that the injurious effects to the mentioned organs were dose and frequency dependent.

  18. Acute toxicity study of stone-breaker (Phyllanthus tenellus Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássia Campos de Lima e Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phyllanthus tenellus Roxb. is a herbaceous plant native to Brazil and appears frequently in humid environments. This plant is used to treat urolithiasis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and hepatitis B. The acute toxicity and LD50 of an aqueous extract of P. tenellus were determined in laboratory mice and their behavior was analyzed. The intraperitoneal LD50 was calculated by the Karber & Behrens (1964 method, for which a 96% alcoholic extract was concentrated in a rotary evaporator. Male albino mice (Mus musculus were divided into three batches of six animals and observed for 24 hours after administration of the extract, diluted in 0.9% saline, at doses of 500, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 mg / kg. Short-term studies have demonstrated this plant to be non-toxic; however, we found that this species induced agitation in animals, with stereotyped movements, spasms and increased respiratory frequency, as well as signs of depression, such as sleepiness, prostration, dyspnea and a reduction in respiratory frequency.

  19. Acute toxicity studies of Croton membranaceus root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, George A; Sittie, A; Bugyei, K; Gyan, Ben A; Adjei, Samuel; Addo, Phyllis; Wiredu, Edwin K; Nyarko, Alex K; Otu-Nyarko, Lydia S; Adjei, David Nana

    2011-04-12

    Croton membranaceus root and leaf extracts are used in the Bahamas to aromatize tobacco, in Nigeria to improve digestion, and in Ghana, for benign prostate hyperplasia. Despite claims of success there is paucity of information on its toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine if Croton membranaceus has acute toxicity properties. Roots were air-dried in a solar dryer for one week before milling. The powder was extracted with 96% ethanol, freeze-dried and re-extracted with distilled water and freeze-dried. 15 male Sprague-Dawley rats (180-200 g) were divided equally into 2 treatment groups [low dose (LD) and high dose (HD)], plus a control group (C). LD and HD received 1500 and 3000 mg/kg b.wt. Croton membranaceus aqueous extract, respectively, one time and observed for 14 days. Haematological [Full Blood Count and haemoglobin (Hb)], biochemical [bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALA), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin, globulin, alkaline phosphatise (ALP), γ-glutamyltranspetidase (GGT), urea, creatinine, creatinine kinase - Muscle and Brain (CK-MB), creatinine kinase - Total (CK-R)] examinations were performed. Control group's CK-MB (5444±534 U/L) and LD group CK-MB (4014±1016 U/L) were significantly different (p<0.05). Control and the HD group CK-MB (3955±1135 U/L) were significantly different (p<0.05). Both LD and HD CK-R levels (697±197U/L and 732±203 U/L, respectively), were lower than the control (1139±220 U/L) at 48 h and 14 days (p<0.05, p<0.05, respectively). γ-GT levels of the HD group was 4.8±0.4 U/L compared to the Control group value of 0.9±0.2 U/L (p<0.05). Taking all factors into consideration, Croton membranaceus ingestion does not produce general acute toxicity. However, its creatinine kinase lowering ability could be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying multiple submissions in Internet research: preserving data integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anne M; Daniel, Candice M; Williams, Mark L; Baird, Grayson L

    2008-11-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 "unique", 132 first submissions by "repeat responders" and 495 additional submissions by the "repeat responders" (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: "infrequent" (2-5 submissions), "persistent" (6-10 submissions), "very persistent" (11-30 submissions), and "hackers" (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying "infrequent" repeat responders. "Hackers" often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated "hackers". Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as "hackers".

  1. Assessment of the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent NDA submissions: study design and data analysis issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S M; Lesko, L J; Williams, R L

    1999-10-01

    This report investigates the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent new drug applications (NDAs). Eighty-nine studies contained in 14 NDAs submitted between December 1995 and November 1996 to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed. The results indicated that the median number of clinical drug-drug interaction studies per NDA was 6, almost double that of a 1994-1995 survey. In vitro metabolism data were present in 70% of the submissions. More than 50% of the submissions contained interaction studies using a battery of drugs (cimetidine, digoxin, or warfarin) without optimal use of the in vitro metabolism or in vivo mass balance data. Various study designs using a median number of 12 subjects were employed in the evaluation of drug-drug interactions. Some of the important study design factors such as dose size, dosing regimen, dosing duration, and timing of coadministration were considered, although not consistently, by the sponsors in their study design. Seventy-five percent of the studies used normal, healthy male subjects, and 25% used patients for whom the new molecular entities were intended. In 33% of the studies, female subjects were also recruited. Although the majority (80%) of the submissions still used p-values to determine the significance of drug interactions, 30% used a more relevant equivalence approach with 90% confidence intervals for key pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic parameter ratios to assess the extent of drug interactions. Overall, 82% of the studies concluded no interaction. Although population pharmacokinetic analysis can be a useful tool in studying drug-drug interactions, only 21% of the submissions used this approach. In summary, this assessment reveals that the quantity and quality of drug-drug interaction studies in NDAs have improved over the years. These improvements, as well as others that can be implemented, should result in more informative labeling and better patient care. FDA

  2. Study on acute toxicity of amoxicillin wastewater to Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifang; Shen, Hongyan

    2017-12-01

    The main research in this paper is to obtain the effect of pharmaceutical wastewater on the acute toxicity of Zebrafish. The experimental method of exposure is used in this research. Experiments were carried out with different groups of pharmaceutical wastewater. Zebrafish was cultivated in a five liter fish tank. In the experiment, according to mortality, initially a 96h preliminary test was carried out at exposure concentrations to determine if the amoxicillin wastewater was toxic and to define the concentration range (24h LC100, 96h LC0) to be employed in the definitive tests. Based on the half lethal concentration of Zebrafish, the acute toxicity of amoxicillin wastewater to Zebrafish was calculated and the toxicity grade of wastewater was determined. In the experiment, the Zebrafish was exposed with amoxicillin wastewater during 96h. The 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h LC50 of amoxicillin wastewater on the Zebrafish were 63.10%, 53.70%, 41.69% and 40.74%, respectively. At 96h, the test time is the longest, and the value of LC50 is the smallest. In the observation period of 96 hours, the LC50 of amoxicillin wastewater were in the range of 40% ~ 60% and the value of Tua is 1 ~ 2. It indicates amoxicillin wastewater is low toxic wastewater when the experimental time is shorter than 48h, amoxicillin wastewater is moderate toxicity wastewater when the experimental time is higher than 48h. According to the experimental data, with the exposure time and the volume percentage of amoxicillin wastewater increases, the mortality rate of Zebrafish is gradually increased and the toxicity of amoxicillin wastewater increases. It indicates that the toxicity of amoxicillin wastewater is the biggest and the effect of wastewater on Zebrafish is greatest. In some ways, the toxicity of amoxicillin wastewater can be affected by the test time.

  3. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  4. 13-week inhalation toxicity study of menthol cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaworski, C L; Dozier, M M; Gerhart, J M; Rajendran, N; Brennecke, L H; Aranyi, C; Heck, J D

    1997-07-01

    Menthol is a common pharmaceutical, food and tobacco flavouring ingredient used for its minty characteristics and cooling effects. A 13-wk comparative nose-only smoke inhalation toxicity study was conducted using an American-style, cellulose acetate-filtered, non-menthol reference cigarette and a similarly blended test cigarette containing 5000 ppm synthetic l-menthol tobacco. Male and female Fischer 344 rats were exposed for 1 hr/day, 5 days/wk for 13 wk at target mainstream smoke particulate concentrations of 200, 600 or 1200 mg/m3, while control rats were exposed to filtered air. Internal dose biomarkers (blood carboxyhaemoglobin, serum nicotine and serum continine) indicated equivalent exposures were obtained for the two cigarettes. Effects typically noted in rats exposed to high levels of mainstream tobacco smoke were similar for both cigarette types and included reduced body weights (males slightly more affected than females), increased heart-to-body weight ratios and lung weights, and histopathological changes in the respiratory tract. Rats exposed to reference cigarette smoke displayed a dose-related increase in nasal discharge that was not observed in menthol smoke-exposed rats. All smoke-related effects diminished significantly during a 6-wk non-exposure recovery period. The results of this 13-wk smoke inhalation study indicated that the addition of 5000 ppm menthol to tobacco had no substantial effect on the character or extent of the biological responses normally associated with inhalation of mainstream cigarette smoke in rats.

  5. A focused ethnographic study of Alberta cattle veterinarians' decision making about diagnostic laboratory submissions and perceptions of surveillance programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sawford

    Full Text Available The animal and public health communities need to address the challenge posed by zoonotic emerging infectious diseases. To minimize the impacts of future events, animal disease surveillance will need to enable prompt event detection and response. Diagnostic laboratory-based surveillance systems targeting domestic animals depend in large part on private veterinarians to submit samples from cases to a laboratory. In contexts where pre-diagnostic laboratory surveillance systems have been implemented, this group of veterinarians is often asked to input data. This scenario holds true in Alberta where private cattle veterinarians have been asked to participate in the Alberta Veterinary Surveillance Network-Veterinary Practice Surveillance, a platform to which pre-diagnostic disease and non-disease case data are submitted. Consequently, understanding the factors that influence these veterinarians to submit cases to a laboratory and the complex of factors that affect their participation in surveillance programs is foundational to interpreting disease patterns reported by laboratories and engaging veterinarians in surveillance. A focused ethnographic study was conducted with ten cattle veterinarians in Alberta. Individual in-depth interviews with participants were recorded and transcribed to enable thematic analysis. Laboratory submissions were biased toward outbreaks of unknown cause, cases with unusual mortality rates, and issues with potential herd-level implications. Decreasing cattle value and government support for laboratory testing have contributed to fewer submissions over time. Participants were willing participants in surveillance, though government support and collaboration were necessary. Changes in the beef industry and veterinary profession, as well as cattle producers themselves, present both challenges and opportunities in surveillance.

  6. In vitro toxicity studies of polymer-coated gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayavarapu, Raja G; Petersen, Wilma; Manohar, Srirang; Van Leeuwen, Ton G [Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Otto, Cees [Medical Cell Biophysics, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Chin, Patrick; Van Leeuwen, Fijs W B [Division of Diagnostic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Janssen, Hans, E-mail: S.Manohar@utwente.nl [Division of Cell Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-09

    We evaluated cellular responses to polymer-treated gold nanorods, which were synthesized using the standard wet-chemistry method that utilizes hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The nanorod dispersions were coated with either polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two sizes of nanorods were tested, with optical responses peaking at 628 and 773 nm. The cells were from mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBR3), Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse myoblast (C2C12) and Human Leukemia (HL60) cell lines. Their mitochondrial function following exposure to the nanorods were assessed using the MTS assay. We found PEGylated particles to have superior biocompatibility compared with PSS-coated nanorods, which showed substantial cytotoxicity. Electron microscopy showed no cellular uptake of PEGylated particles compared with their PSS counterparts. PEGylated gold nanorods also exhibited better dispersion stability in the presence of cell growth medium; PSS-coated rods tended to flocculate or cluster. In the case of the PSS particles, toxicity correlated with surface area across the two sizes of nanorods studied.

  7. Short-term toxicity studies of loline alkaloids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, S C; Munday, J S; Munday, R; Kerby, J W F

    2016-08-01

    Epichloë endophytes have been used successfully in pastoral systems to reduce the impact of insect pests through the expression of secondary metabolites. The use of endophytes could be extended to other plant species, such as cereal crops, where the production of bioactive secondary metabolites would reduce the reliance on pesticides for insect control. The success of this approach is dependent on the selection of an appropriate secondary metabolite target which must not only be effective against insect pests but also be safe for grazing and monogastric animals. The loline alkaloids have been identified as possible target metabolites as they are associated with potent effects on insects and low toxicity to grazing animals. The purpose of the current study was to generate toxicological data on the loline alkaloids in a monogastric system using mice. Male and female mice were fed 415 mg/kg/day total lolines for a 3-week period. The loline treatment caused no statistically significant effect on gross pathology, histology, haematology, blood chemistry, heart rate, blood pressure or motor coordination. Reduced weight gain and food consumption were noted in the loline groups during the initial stages of the experiment. This experiment raises no food safety concerns for the loline alkaloids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies on the toxicity of industrial waste to Macrobrachium dayanum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S.R.; Mathur, R.P.

    1974-01-01

    The toxic substances in industrial wastes, if discharged untreated into the stream can rapidly harm the aquatic life. It is, therefore, necessary to know the permissible concentration of various wastes. This paper presents data obtained from a series of static bioassay experiments conducted to establish the median tolerance limits (TL/sub m/). The distillery waste and the mixed pulp and paper waste were taken and the range of their toxicity was evaluated. Macrobrachium dayanum, a crustacean, was chosen as the test animal because of experimental convenience and suitability. The results on toxicity indicate that distillery waste is more toxic than the mixed pulp and paper factory waste. The toxicity of distillery waste is due to sulphides and H/sub 2/S. The mixed pulp and paper waste contain colloidal particles of cellulose and lignin which are lethal. The statistical analysis shows that both of the wastes are lethal to the animals separately in their natural form. The difference in survival rates is highly significant.

  9. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  10. Nigerian Journal of Technology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article acts as the template for preparing articles for submission to Nigerian Journal of Technology. The abstract should be a clear statement defining the problems of study, methodology adopted, results and conclusions. Please do not refer readers to other literature articles in the abstract. The abstract should be brief ...

  11. Shakespeare in Southern Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Shakespeare in Southern Africa sets out to publish articles, commentary and reviews on all aspects of Shakespearean studies and performance, with a particular emphasis on the response to Shakespeare in southern Africa. Scholarly notes of a factual nature are also welcome. Submissions are reviewed ...

  12. Sacha Inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L. powder: acute toxicity, 90 days oral toxicity study and micronucleus assay in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania Rodeiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sacha Inchi has been consumed for years by indigenous peoples. Meanwhile, its toxicological potential has not been sufficiently studied. Aims: To assess the acute, sub-chronic toxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of Sacha Inchi powder obtained from Plukenetia volubilis L. Methods: A dose of 2000 mg/kg was orally administered to rats and mice and toxicity symptoms for 14 days were observed. In repeated dose study, the product was orally administered to Sprague Dawley rats of both sexes. Animals received 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day of the product for 90 days. At the end, animals were sacrificed and samples were done for hematological and biochemical analysis, organ weighs and histopathological examination. Genotoxicity potential of Sacha Inchi powder was evaluated through micronucleus test in mice. Negative controls received the vehicle (carboxymethyl cellulose, 0.5% used. Results: No morbidity or mortality at 2000 mg/kg of the product were found. Sacha Inchi powder oral administration during 90 days to rats did not lead to death, body weight gain, food consumption, or adverse events. No significant changes on hematological or biochemical parameters, organ weights or histopathological findings were observed. Induction of micronucleus formation attributable to the product was not found in mice. Conclusions: No toxicity effects after oral acute exposure of Sacha Inchi power to rats and mice were observed. Neither toxicity attributable to oral doses of the product up to 500 mg/kg during 90 days to rats were found. Results suggested Sacha Inchi powder does not have genotoxicity potential under our experimental conditions.

  13. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two

  14. Acute toxicity studies of aqueous stem bark extract of Ximenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Based on the result of the acute toxicity test, white Swiss albino mice of average weight 25.3 g divided into 3 groups of one animal per group were intraperitoneally/orally administered 1600, 2900 and. 5000 mg/kg body weight, aqueous bark extract in water. Death was monitored over a period of 24 h.

  15. Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    Key words: Oral acute toxicity, biopesticide, plant extracts, Lake Victoria Basin. ... Asia in the upland forest areas and open waste areas. It is used .... freeze like water. The essential oils were kept in a fridge so as to minimize their volatile behavior which is catalyzed by relatively high temperature including room temperature.

  16. A Literature Review - Problem Definition Studies on Selected Toxic Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-16

    Toxicity... . ....... .. 39 1. Experimental Investigations in Animals ..... ............. .. 39 A. Effect of the Nature of Food ...protein-rich diet ....... .. 40 B. Effect of Other Food Additives ....... .............. .. 40 i. Vitamin C...which is also called plasticized white phosphorus. Epoxy white phosphorus is made from white phosphorus and Bisphenol A-epichlorohydrin, an epoxy resin

  17. Speciation Studies of Some Toxic Metal Complexes of Glycylglycine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    the body, specially the bones and teeth, the kidneys, and the nervous, cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems.4–6. Lead also interferes with the normal metabolism of calcium in cells and causes it to build up within ... ing of their distribution, mobility, bioavailability, toxicity and for setting environmental quality ...

  18. Acute and Subacute Toxic Study of Aqueous Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Results: For the acute toxicit test, no death and signs of poisoning were observed in the treated groups. In the subacute .... Subcute toxicity test. The animals were divided into six groups of six animals each. The treatments were given by intraperitoneal injection. Group 1 served ... produce significant changes in behavior,.

  19. Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    used plants were identified and selected for biosafety assessments namely: Ocimum gratissimum,. Tithonia diversifolia, Eucalyptus ... Key words: Oral acute toxicity, biopesticide, plant extracts, Lake Victoria Basin. INTRODUCTION. There is a ..... breathing (hyperventilation), excess loss of saliva. (salivation) and death of ...

  20. Sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies at marine sites suspected of ordnance contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R S; Nipper, M; Biedenbach, J M; Hooten, R L; Miller, K; Saepoff, S

    2001-10-01

    A sediment quality assessment survey and subsequent toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) study was conducted at several sites in Puget Sound, Washington. The sites were previously suspected of contamination with ordnance compounds. The initial survey employed sea urchin porewater toxicity tests to locate the most toxic stations. Sediments from the most toxic stations were selected for comprehensive chemical analyses. Based on the combined information from the toxicity and chemical data, three adjacent stations in Ostrich Bay were selected for the TIE study. The results of the phase I TIE suggested that organics and metals were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity in the sea urchin fertilization test. In addition to these contaminants, ammonia was also contributing to the toxicity for the sea urchin embryological development test. The phase II TIE study isolated the majority of the toxicity in the fraction containing nonpolar organics with high log K(ow), but chemical analyses failed to identify a compound present at a concentration high enough to be responsible for the observed toxicity. The data suggest that some organic or organometallic contaminant(s) that were not included in the comprehensive suite of chemical analyses caused the observed toxicological responses.

  1. Dermal toxicity studies of technical polychlorinated biphenyls and fractions thereof in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.G.; Beems, R.B.

    A significant difference in toxicity between 3 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) preparations was found in a prior study: Clophen A 60 and Phenoclor DP6 showing the highest, Aroclor 1260 the lowest, toxicity (Vos and Koeman, 1970). A subsequent study revealed the presence of tetra- and

  2. Toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein mixtures : in vitro studies using nasal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, F.R.; Stenhuis, W.S.; Groten, J.P.; Feron, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro studies with human and rat nasal epithelial cells were carried out to investigate the combined toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein and the role of aldehyde dehydrogenases in this process. These studies showed that the toxic effect of mixtures of aldehydes was additive. In addition,

  3. Guilt, fear, submission, and empathy in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lynn E; Berry, Jack W; Weiss, Joseph; Gilbert, Paul

    2002-09-01

    This study compares self-focused motivations (fear of negative evaluation, social comparison, and fear of envy) and other-focused motivations (empathy and interpersonal guilt) in submissive behavior and depression. The Beck Depression Inventory, Submissive Behavior Scale, Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale, Social Comparison Scale, Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire, and Interpersonal Reactivity Inventory were administered to 50 patients hospitalized for depression and 52 students. Depressed patients were significantly higher in survivor guilt, omnipotent responsibility guilt, submissive behavior, fear of negative evaluation, fear of envy, and empathic distress, and lower in social comparison. This research was limited in that it was a correlational study. This study suggests that altruistic concern about others may be an important factor in depression and submissive behavior. Evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. A comparative study of insecticide toxicity among seven cladoceran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-11-01

    The sensitivities of seven cladoceran species (Ceriodaphnia reticulata, Chydorus sphaericus, Daphnia galeata, Diaphanosoma brachyurum, Moina macrocopa, Scapholeberis kingi, and Simocephalus vetulus) to carbamate insecticides (carbaryl and methomyl) were investigated by acute toxicity tests. The sensitivities to carbaryl and methomyl were highly correlated among the tested organisms, but the co-tolerance level varied markedly among species. C. reticulata showed the highest sensitivity, whereas M. macrocopa and S. kingi showed the lowest sensitivities to the two insecticides. These results indicate that the degree of chemical impacts on natural communities can vary depending on cladoceran species composition. The highly positive correlation between the EC(50) values for both insecticides indicates that the two chemicals have a shared mode of action on cladoceran species. Unlike previous reports, acute toxicity was not correlated with body size. The results are discussed in relation to community-level experiments, the functions of freshwater ecosystems, and ecological risk assessment.

  5. A Mechanistic Study on the Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Bader; Khalifa, Mohamed; Bakheet, Saleh A.; Yasser, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone- (AM-) induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is still a matter of research and is poorly understood. In attempting to resolve this issue, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats with AM doses of 80 mg/kg/day/i.p. for one, two, three, and four weeks. The rats were weighed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained to determine total leukocyte count (TLC). For each group, lung weighing, histopathology, and homogenization were performed. Fresh homogenates were used for determination of ATP content, lipid peroxides, GSH, catalase, SOD, GPx, GR activities, NO, and hydroxyproline levels. The results showed a significant decrease in body weight and GSH depletion together with an increase in both lung weight and lung/body weight coefficient in the first week. Considerable increases in lung hydroxyproline level with some histopathological alterations were apparent. Treatment for two weeks produced a significant increase in BAL fluid, TLC, GR activity, and NO level in lung homogenate. The loss of cellular ATP and inhibition of most antioxidative protective enzymatic system appeared along with alteration in SOD activity following daily treatment for three weeks, while, in rats treated with AM for four weeks, more severe toxicity was apparent. Histopathological diagnosis was mostly granulomatous inflammation and interstitial pneumonitis in rats treated for three and four weeks, respectively. As shown, it is obvious that slow oedema formation is the only initiating factor of AIPT; all other mechanisms may occur as a consequence. PMID:26933474

  6. Acute and sub-acute toxicity study of Clerodendrum inerme, Jasminum mesnyi Hance and Callistemon citrinus

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat Bhushan; Satish Sardana; Gulshan Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study acute and sub-acute toxicity study of Clerodendrum inerme (C. inerme), Jasminum mesnyi (J. mesnyi) Hance and Callistemon citrinus (C. citrinus). Methods: The acute toxicity test was conducted in Swiss albino mice. The extracts of C. inerme, J. mesnyi Hance and C. citrinus was administered in single dose of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 g/kg and observed for behavioral changes and mortality, if any. In sub-acute toxicity study, Wistar rats of either sex were administer...

  7. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakiah Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group at 0 (control, 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect.

  8. Toxicity of Transition Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: Recent Insights from in vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Aronstam

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has evolved to play a prominent role in our economy. Increased use of nanomaterials poses potential human health risk. It is therefore critical to understand the nature and origin of the toxicity imposed by nanomaterials (nanotoxicity. In this article we review the toxicity of the transition metal oxides in the 4th period that are widely used in industry and biotechnology. Nanoparticle toxicity is compellingly related to oxidative stress and alteration of calcium homeostasis, gene expression, pro-inflammatory responses, and cellular signaling events. The precise physicochemical properties that dictate the toxicity of nanoparticles have yet to be defined, but may include element-specific surface catalytic activity (e.g., metallic, semiconducting properties, nanoparticle uptake, or nanoparticle dissolution. These in vitro studies substantially advance our understanding in mechanisms of toxicity, which may lead to safer design of nanomaterials.

  9. Towards Global QSAR Model Building for Acute Toxicity: Munro Database Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Chavan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of 436 Munro database chemicals were studied with respect to their corresponding experimental LD50 values to investigate the possibility of establishing a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. Dragon molecular descriptors were used for the QSAR model development and genetic algorithms were used to select descriptors better correlated with toxicity data. Toxic values were discretized in a qualitative class on the basis of the Globally Harmonized Scheme: the 436 chemicals were divided into 3 classes based on their experimental LD50 values: highly toxic, intermediate toxic and low to non-toxic. The k-nearest neighbor (k-NN classification method was calibrated on 25 molecular descriptors and gave a non-error rate (NER equal to 0.66 and 0.57 for internal and external prediction sets, respectively. Even if the classification performances are not optimal, the subsequent analysis of the selected descriptors and their relationship with toxicity levels constitute a step towards the development of a global QSAR model for acute toxicity.

  10. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  12. Is A/A/O process effective in toxicity removal? Case study with coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liu; Wang, Dong; Cao, Di; Na, Chunhong; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A/A/O) process is the commonly used biological wastewater treatment process, especially for the coking wastewater. However, limit is known about its ability in bio-toxicity removal from wastewater. In this study, we evaluated the performance of A/A/O process in bio-toxicity removal from the coking wastewater, using two test species (i.e. crustacean (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio rerio)) in respect of acute toxicity, oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that the acute toxicity of raw influent was reduced gradually along with A/A/O process and the effluent presented no acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (D. magna) and zebra fish. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in D. magna and zebra fish was promoted by the effluent from each tank of A/A/O process, showing that coking wastewater induced oxidative damage. Herein, the oxidative damage to D. magna was mitigated in the oxic tank, while the toxicity to zebra fish was reduced in the anoxic tank. The comet assays showed that genotoxicity to zebra fish was removed stepwise by A/A/O process, although the final effluent still presented genotoxicity to zebra fish. Our results indicated that the A/A/O process was efficient in acute toxicity removal, but not so effective in the removal of other toxicity (e.g. oxidative damage and genotoxicity). Considering the potential risks of wastewater discharge, further advanced toxicity mitigation technology should be applied in the conventional biological treatment process, and the toxicity index should be introduced in the regulation system of wastewater discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perspectives in Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Guidelines to authors can be found on the journal's own site here: http://www.perspectives-in-education.com/pages.aspx?PID=10. Alternatively, see below: Information for Authors. Submission of articles. PiE invites submissions in the following categories: Research articles. Contributors are encouraged to ...

  14. Mizan Law Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES The following submissions are acceptable for publication upon approval by the Editorial Board. Publication of an article further involves anonymous peer review by two External Assessors. Articles: Research articles that identify, examine, explore and analyze legal and related ...

  15. Whole effluent toxicity of agricultural irrigation drainwater entering Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, NV : Acute toxicity studies with fish and aquatic invertebrates

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the acute toxicity studies conducted with samples collected from Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge. The objective of these studies was to...

  16. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  17. Chlorella Vulgaris Alleviates Lead-induced Testicular Toxicity Better than Zingiber Officinale: An Ultrastructural Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Hesham N.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella Vulgaris Alleviates Lead-induced Testicular Toxicity Better than Zingiber Officinale: An Ultrastructural Study   XXIV International Symposium on Morphological Sciences, Prof. Dr. Cemil Bilsel Congress Hall, Faculty of Science, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. Oral Presentation; 09/2015

  18. Case Study: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior as Interventions to Increase Sponsored Project Proposal Submissions from Liberal Arts Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic climate, many colleges and universities face similar challenges: the need to increase external sponsorship for research activities and the need to benefit from additional indirect cost recovery. Preparing funding proposals for submission to sponsors is a faculty behavior that can be modified by applying behavioral theory to…

  19. Evaluation of analgesic, antipyretic activity and toxicity study of Bryonia laciniosa in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, T; Perumal, P; Kumar, R Sambath; Vamsi, M L M; Gomathi, P; Mazumder, U K; Gupta, M

    2004-01-01

    Analgesic, antipyretic activity and toxicity study of the leaves of Bryonia laciniosa Linn. (Family: Cucurbitaceae) was evaluated in the standard animal models. The methanol extract of Bryonia laciniosa (MEBL) was evaluated by hot plate and acetic acid-induced writhing methods to assess analgesic activity. The antipyretic activity of the extract was also evaluated by normal body temperature and yeast-induced hyperpyrexia. The extract showed significant analgesic and antipyretic activity. The MEBL was further evaluated for toxicity at the doses of 125 and 250 mg/kg administered orally for 14 days in rats. At the end of experiments, the blood, liver function and kidney metabolism were observed. The hematological profile and different biochemical parameters such as SGOT, SGPT and ALP were estimated. The present study revealed that MEBL exhibited significant analgesic and antipyretic activity in the tested experimental animal models. The toxicity study indicates that the extract is not toxic at the tested doses.

  20. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light alkylate naphtha distillate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, C; Lapadula, E; Breglia, R; Bui, Q; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; White, R; Mandella, R; Hoffman, G

    1998-10-23

    A 13-wk inhalation study was conducted with Sprague-Dawley CD rats (12/sex/group) were exposed by inhalation for 13 weeks to a light alkylate naphtha distillate (LAND-2, C4-C10; average molecular weight 89.2) at actual average concentrations of 0 (room air), 668, 2220, or 6646 ppm, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk; 12 additional rats/sex in the control and high dose groups were held after final exposure for a 4-wk recovery period. The highest exposure concentration was 75% of the lower explosive limit. Standard parameters of subchronic toxicity were measured throughout the study; at necropsy, organs were weighed and tissues processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurotoxicity evaluations consisted of motor activity (MA) and a functional operational battery (FOB) measured pretest, during 5, 9, and 14 wk of the study, and after the 4-wk recovery period. Whole-body perfusion and microscopic examination of selected organs and nervous tissue from the control and high dose rats were conducted at the end of exposure. No test-related mortality or effects on physical signs, body weight, or food consumption were observed. Statistically significant increases in absolute and relative kidney weights in high-exposure males correlated with microscopically observed hyaline droplet formation and renal nephropathy, effects in male rats that are not toxicologically significant for humans. Increased liver weights in both sexes at the highest dose had no microscopic correlate and appeared reversible after the 4-wk recovery period. Exposure to LAND-2 at any dose did not produce neurotoxicity measured by MA, FOB, or neuropathology. The no-observed-effects level (NOEL) for LAND-2 was 2220 ppm for subchronic toxicity and > or =26646 ppm for neurotoxicity.

  1. Impact of study outcome on submission and acceptance metrics for peer reviewed medical journals: six year retrospective review of all completed GlaxoSmithKline human drug research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evoniuk, Gary; Mansi, Bernadette; DeCastro, Barbara; Sykes, Jennie

    2017-04-21

    Objectives To determine whether the outcome of drug studies influenced submission and/or acceptance rates for publication in peer reviewed medical journals.Design A six year retrospective review of publication status by study outcome for all human drug research studies conducted by a single industry sponsor (GlaxoSmithKline) that completed from 1 January 2009 to 30 June 2014 and were therefore due for manuscript submission (per the sponsor's policy) to peer reviewed journals within 18 months of study completion-that is, 31 December 2015. In addition, manuscripts from studies completing after 30 June 2014 were included irrespective of outcome if they were submitted before 31 December 2015.Setting Studies conducted by a single industry sponsor (GlaxoSmithKline)Studies reviewed 1064 human drug research studies.Main outcome measures All studies were assigned a publication status at 26 February 2016 including (as applicable): study completion date, date of first primary manuscript submission, number of submissions, journal decision(s), and publication date. All studies were also classified with assessors blinded to publication status as "positive" (perceived favorable outcome for the drug under study), "negative" (perceived unfavorable outcome for the drug under study), mixed, or non-comparative based on the presence and outcome of the primary outcome measure(s) for each study. "Negative" studies included safety studies in which the primary outcome was achieved but was adverse for the drug under study. For the total cohort and each of the four study outcomes, measures included descriptive statistics for study phase, time from study completion to submission and publication, and number and outcome (accepted/rejected) of publication submissions.Results Of the 1064 studies (phase I-IV, interventional and non-interventional) included, 321 had study outcomes classified as positive, 155 as negative, 52 as mixed, and 536 as non-comparative. At the time of publication cut

  2. Toxicity evaluation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl and other compounds involved in studies of fossil fuels biodesulphurisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L; Paixão, S M

    2011-10-01

    The acute toxicity of some compounds used in fossil fuels biodesulphurisation studies, on the respiration activity, was evaluated by Gordonia alkanivorans and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Moreover, the effect of 2-hydroxybiphenyl on cell growth of both strains was also determined, using batch (chronic bioassays) and continuous cultures. The IC₅₀ values obtained showed the toxicity of all the compounds tested to both strains, specially the high toxicity of 2-HBP. These results were confirmed by the chronic toxicity data. The toxicity data sets highlight for a higher sensitivity to the toxicant by the strain presenting a lower growth rate, due to a lower cells number in contact with the toxicant. Thus, microorganisms exhibiting faster generation times could be more resistant to 2-HBP accumulation during a BDS process. The physiological response of both strains to 2-HBP pulse in a steady-state continuous culture shows their potential to be used in a future fossil fuel BDS process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ozonides: intermediates in ozone-induced toxicity : a study on their mechanism of toxic action and detoxification by antioxidants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Ozone is a major constituent of photochemical smog. The toxicity of ozone is well documented and has been related to its strong oxidative potential. The principal target organ for ozone toxicity is the respiratory system. Unsaturated fatty acids, which are present in both the lipids of the

  4. Brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity studies on Swietenia mahagoni (Linn.) Jacq. seed methanolic extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, Geethaa; Ramanathan, Surash; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Mordi, Mohd. Nizam; Ismail, Sabariah; Mansor, Sharif Mahsufi

    2010-01-01

    Background: The seeds of Swietenia mahagoni have been applied in folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, malaria, amoebiasis, cough, chest pain, and intestinal parasitism. Here we are the first to report on the toxicity of the Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic (SMCM) seed extract. Methods: SMCM seed extract has been studied for its brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity, in mice. Results: The brine shrimp lethality bioassay shows a moderate cytotoxicity at high concentration. The LC50 for the extract is 0.68 mg/ml at 24 hours of exposure. The LD50 of the SMCM seed extract for acute oral toxicity in mice is greater than 5000 mg/kg. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic seed extract may contain bioactive compounds of potential therapeutic significance which are relatively safe from toxic effects, and can compromise the medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:21808570

  5. Sub-Chronic Toxicity study of Aqueous extract of Clerodendrum Phlomidis Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta Reena; Duggal Sanjiv; Kapoor Bhupinder

    2012-01-01

    Clerodendrum phlomidis Linn. has been traditionally used for treatment of gynecological disturbances and for agricultural uses. It has been used in many Ayurvedic polyherbal formulations as an immunomodulatory agent. Irrespective of its widespread use, no data on subchronic toxicity has been described. The present study was designed to access sub-chronic toxicity of aqueous extract of Clerodendrum phlomidis leaves. Aqueous extract of Clerodendrum phlomidis leaves was given orally at doses of ...

  6. Harbour sediment toxicity: An italian case study; Valutazione della tossicita` di sedimenti portuali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, M. [ICRAM, Istituto Centrale per la -ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica Applicata al Mare, Rome (Italy); Bigongiari, N.; Mellera, F.; Giuliani, S. [CIBM, Centro Interuniversitario di Biologia Marina, Livorno (Italy); De Poorter, L. R. M. [AquaSense Consultants, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-01-01

    Harbour sediments usually contain a complex mixture of compounds originating from industrial and shipping activities. An important tool for the recognition of potential toxic effects of sediments is the use of bioassays. In order to estimate harbour sediment toxicity a specific study was carried out measuring reduction of microbial luminescence (Vibrio fischeri), oyster larvae development impairment (Crassostrea gigas) and amphipod mortality (Corophium volutator). Bioassay results are correlated with data on chemical contaminants (heavy metals, PAHs and PCBs).

  7. Safety studies of homoeopathic drugs in acute, sub-acute and chronic toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homoeopathic drugs are frequently recommended in day to day life as therapeutic agents by homoeopathic practitioners. However, safety of homoeopathic drugs remains a challenge because of the high variability of chemical components involved. Aim: The objective of the present study was to investigate the acute, subacute, and chronic oral toxicity of different homoeopathic drugs (Ferrum phosphoricum 3X, Ferrum phosphoricum 6X, Calcarea phosphoricum 6X, and Magnesium phosphoricum 6X in experimental models. Materials and Methods: In acute oral toxicity study, homoeopathic drugs were administered orally at 2000mg/kg body weight, and animals were observed for toxic symptoms till 10 days as per the OECD guidelines. For subacute and chronic toxicity study, homoeopathic drugs were administered for 28 and 180 days, respectively, as per the OECD guidelines. At the end of 28 and 180 days, the animals were sacrificed and toxicity parameters were assessed. Histopathological evaluation of different organs was also performed to assess any toxicity. Results: In acute toxicity study, no mortality was found at a dose of 2000 mg/kg which indicates that oral LD50of homoeopathic drugs were more than 2000 mg/kg. The administration of drugs at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight for 28 and 180 days did not produce any significant change in haematological and biochemical parameters of male and female rats as compared to normal control group. No pathological changes were observed in histology of various organs of treated rats as compared to normal control animals. Conclusion: These homoeopathic drugs are safe & produce no toxicity when administered for longer duration.

  8. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship study of some natural and synthetic coumarins using retention parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabtti El Hadi M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four lipophilicity descriptors (RM0, b, C0, PC1 for twelve coumarine derivatives were determined by reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography in order to analyze which descriptor best describes the lipophilicity of coumarines investigated. Moreover, possible chemical toxicity of coumarins, expressed as the probability of a compound to cause organ-specific health effects, was calculated using ACD/Tox Suite program. The quantitative relationships between toxicity and molecular descriptors, including experimentally determined lipophilicity descriptors obtained in current study, were investigated using partial least square regression. The best models were obtained for kidney and liver health effects. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship models revealed the importance of electric polarization descriptors, size descriptors and lipophilicity descriptors. Obtained models were used for the selection of the structural features of the compounds that are significantly affecting their absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity. [Acknowledgements. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Serbia, Grant 172017.

  9. U.S./Mexico Border environmental study toxics release inventory data, 1988--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.F.; LoPresti, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    This is a report on industrial toxic chemical releases and transfers based on information reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a database maintained by the USEPA. This document discusses patterns of toxic chemical releases to the atmosphere, to water, to the land, and to underground injection; and transfers of toxic chemicals to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), and for disposal, treatment and other off-site transfers during the TRI reporting years 1988--1992. Geographic coverage is limited to the US side of the ``Border Area``, the geographic area situated within 100 km of the US/Mexico international boundary. A primary purpose of this study is to provide background information that can be used in the future development of potential ``indicator variables`` for tracking environmental and public health status in the Border Area in conjunction with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

  10. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Gillian C., E-mail: gillbarnett@doctors.org.uk [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pharoah, Paul D.P. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Talbot, Christopher J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Elliott, Rebecca M. [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tanteles, George A. [Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Symonds, R. Paul [Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dunning, Alison M. [Cancer Research-UK Centre for Genetic Epidemiology and Department of Oncology, Strangeways Research Laboratories, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge Department of Oncology, Oncology Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  12. Changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in pesticide toxicity to earthworms: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    The occurring climate changes will have direct consequences to all ecosystems, including the soil ecosystems. The effects of climate change include, among other, the changes in temperature and greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather conditions. Temperature is an important factor in ecotoxicological investigations since it can act as a stressor and influence the physiological status of organisms, as well as affect the fate and transport of pollutants present in the environment. However, most of so far conducted (eco)toxicological investigations neglected the possible effects of temperature and focused solely on the effects of toxicants on organisms. Considering that temperature can contribute to the toxicity of pollutants, it is of immense importance to investigate whether the change in the exposure temperature will impact the strength of the toxic effects of pollutants present in soil ecosystems. Therefore, in the present study the toxicity of several commonly used pesticides to earthworms was assessed under different exposure temperatures (15, 20 and 25°C). The results showed that changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in susceptibility of earthworms to particular pesticides. Namely, exposures to the same pesticide concentration at different temperatures lead to different toxicity responses. Increase in exposure temperature in most cases caused increase in toxicity, whereas decrease in temperature mostly caused decrease in toxicity. This preliminary study points to need for an in-depth investigation of mechanisms by which temperature affects the toxicity of pesticides and also provides important data for future research on the effects of temperature change on the soil ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials under four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and UV irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  14. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnard, Christopher; Gopal, Anand; Linkin, Darren R; Maslow, Joel

    2013-01-01

    our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%). Among 18/219 patients (8%) that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1-5 months). In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07). In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52). cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population.

  15. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Vinnard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. Methods: we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. Results: 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%. Among 18/219 patients (8% that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1–5 months. In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07. In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52. Conclusions: cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population.

  16. Cytotoxicity and oral acute toxicity studies of Lantana camara leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-05-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicity of Lantana camara methanol extract. In order to evaluate the toxicity of Lantana camara, the acute toxicity of the methanolic extract on adult mice and cytotoxicity test on Vero cell line were investigated. A fixed large dose of 2 g/kg body weight of L. camara leaf extract was administrated by a single oral gavage according to the OECD procedure. In 2 weeks, L. camara leaf extract showed no obvious acute toxicity. While female mice lost body weight after being treated with single dose of leaf extract in acute toxicity test, male ones lost organ mass, particularly for heart and kidney. The biochemical liver function tests showed significantly elevated TBIL and ALT in the L. camara leaf extract treated female mice group compared with the control group. Cytotoxicity effect of leaf extract of L. camara was estimated through a MTT assay. Cytotoxicity tests on Vero cell line disclosed that leaf extract at concentrations up to 500 µg/mL inhibited the growth of cells 2.5 times less than did Triton 100 × 1%. More interestingly, the cytotoxicity initiated to decline at elevated concentrations of this extract. The results of both tests confirm that L. camara shows a pro toxic effect.

  17. Cytotoxicity and Oral Acute Toxicity Studies of Lantana camara Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicity of Lantana camara methanol extract. Methods: In order to evaluate the toxicity of Lantana camara, the acute toxicity of the methanolic extract on adult mice and cytotoxicity test on Vero cell line were investigated. A fixed large dose of 2 g/kg body weight of L. camara leaf extract was administrated by a single oral gavage according to the OECD procedure. Results: In 2 weeks, L. camara leaf extract showed no obvious acute toxicity. While female mice lost body weight after being treated with single dose of leaf extract in acute toxicity test, male ones lost organ mass, particularly for heart and kidney. The biochemical liver function tests showed significantly elevated TBIL and ALT in the L. camara leaf extract treated female mice group compared with the control group. Cytotoxicity effect of leaf extract of L. camara was estimated through a MTT assay. Cytotoxicity tests on Vero cell line disclosed that leaf extract at concentrations up to 500 µg/mL inhibited the growth of cells 2.5 times less than did Triton 100× 1%. More interestingly, the cytotoxicity initiated to decline at elevated concentrations of this extract. Conclusions: The results of both tests confirm that L. camara shows a pro toxic effect.

  18. Safety assessment of ocimum basilicum hydroalcoholic extract in wistar rats: acute and subchronic toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Mehri, Soghra; Kamli-Nejad, Mohammad; Aslani, Majid; Tanbakoosazan, Farahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum L. is widely used in folk medicine of many countries including . Both O. basilicum and its oil extract have received considerable attention for their potential medicinal properties, but there are a few reports about possible toxicity of this plant. Therefore, in the present study, acute and subchronic toxicity of O. basilicum hydroalcohlic extract have been evaluated in Wistar rats. For the acute toxicity assessment, five groups of 10 animals (5 male, 5 female) received four different single dose of extract orally, the animals were, then, kept under observation for 14 days. For subchronic toxicity, the animals were divided into four groups (5 male, 5 female) and were gavaged daily by 50, 200 and 500 mg/kg of extract. Mortality, clinical signs, body weight changes, food and water consumption, and hematological and biochemical parameters were monitored during the study period. On the 45th day, animals were sacrificed and gross findings, weight of liver and left kidney and liver histological markers were assessed. The results of acute study indicated that LD50 of O. basilicum is higher than 5 mg/kg. In subchronic study, no adverse effects were observed on serum parameters in male and female rats. The hematological results showed a reduction in the hematocrit, platelets and RBC in both sexes. No abnormalities were observed in other parameters. Based on the results of this study, present data suggest that hematologic system could serve as a target organ in oral toxicity of this plant.

  19. MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION FORM Upon submission of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The submission of a paper by a set of authors represents the results of their original research not previously published; that it is not under consideration for publication elsewhere; and that if accepted for the journal, it will not be published elsewhere. ii). The list of authors includes those and all those who have contributed in.

  20. Estimation of acute oral toxicity using the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) from the 28 day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgheroni, Anna; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Acute systemic toxicity is one of the areas of particular concern due to the 2009 deadline set by the 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC), which introduces a testing and marketing ban of cosmetic products with ingredients tested on animals. The scientific community is putting considerable effort into developing and validating non-animal alternatives in this area. However, it is unlikely that validated and regulatory accepted alternative methods and/or strategies will be available in March 2009. Following the initiatives undertaken in the pharmaceutical industry to waive the acute oral toxicity testing before going to clinical studies by using information from other in vivo studies, we proposed an approach to identify non-toxic compounds (LD50>2000mg/kg) using information from 28 days repeated dose toxicity studies. Taking into account the high prevalence of non-toxic substances (87%) in the New Chemicals Database, it was possible to set a NOAEL threshold of 200mg/kg that allowed the correct identification of 63% of non-toxic compounds, while cosmetic ingredients.

  1. Phytochemical screening and acute toxicity study of ethanolic extract of Alpinia galanga in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subash K.R, Muthulakshmi Bhaarathi G, Jagan Rao N, Binoy Vargheese Cheriyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpinia galanga is an important ingredient in various herbal formulations has reached extensive acceptability as therapeutic agents for several diseases. The investigation of authentic analytical methods, which can reliably profile the phytochemical composition and studies on toxicity profile, including hematological and biochemical parameters is an important initial step for the establishment of standardization to screen further in search of consistent biological activity. Aim: To screen ethanolic extract of Alpinia galanga for its phytochemical constituents and acute toxicity profile. Methods: Acute toxicity studies done in rodent by OECD guideline 423 and phytochemical analysis by standard laboratory grade reagents. Results The present study revealed the presence of complex phytochemical constituents including phenols and flavanoids. The acute toxicity results has classified the test material to fall under the hazard category 2000mg/kgstudy concludes the safety of ethnobotanical use of Alpinia galanga from acute toxicity results and the presence of various phytochemical constituents in Alpinia galanga may be responsible for its various pharmacological actions documented in traditional medicine.

  2. Use of factorial designs in combination toxicity studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.; Schoen, E.D.; Feron, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of factorial designs, in which n chemicals are studied at x(n) dose levels (x treatment groups), has been put forward as one of the valuable statistical approaches for hazard assessment of chemical mixtures. Very recently a '25 study' was presented to describe interactions between the

  3. One Health and the Environment: Toxic Cyanobacteria A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  4. Irritantcy potential and sub acute dermal toxicity study of Pistacia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was undertaken to assess safety of Pistacia lentiscus fruits fatty oil (PLFO) as a topical traditional remedy. A primary skin and eye irritation tests were conducted with New Zealand white rabbits to determine the potential for PLFO to produce irritation from a single application. In addition, a sub acute dermal ...

  5. Toxicity studies of iron-containing ayurvedic drug Kasisa Bhasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satadru Palbag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kasisa is an important iron-containing mineral drug of ayurvedic Rasa Shastra and employs for various therapeutic uses in anemia, hair growth modulator, eye disorders, skin disorders, etc. Objective: In this study, shodhana was done by triturating in lemon juice and calcination was done by traditional heating arrangement with Kanji (sour gruel method. Both the purified and calcined product of the Kasisa was subjected to histopathological and toxicological study to evaluate the safety of this iron-based ayurvedic medicine. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two adult Charles Foster albino rats of either sex, 16 for each drug (Shodhita Kasisa, Kasisa Bhasma, were taken for the whole study. Toxicological study of the brain, liver, kidney, and spleen was performed. Results: Kasisa Bhasma at higher dose of 100 mg/kg showed some adverse effects in isolated organs of experimental animals, but the extent of damage is minimal compared to Shodhita Kasisa which showed adverse effects at 25-50 mg/kg. Conclusions: Kasisa Bhasma is nontoxic and safer as compared to Shodhita Kasisa. It can be administered at a controlled dose to affect therapeutic efficacy.

  6. Acute toxicity studies and characterisation of local dietary salts in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kanwa and Shem are food additives and also local dietary salts which are commonly used in Nigeria for various purposes both in rural and urban communities. Kanwa and Shem were subjected to acute toxicological studies using the modified Lorke method while the elemental, qualitative analysis and pH were determined ...

  7. Subchronic Toxicity Study on 1,4-Dithiane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    respectively. The left-ear clipped control male in cage 14 had malocclusion (a bite defect) and was excluded from all statistical analyses. An ANOVA on the...to test an oronasal species, e.g., a rabbit . 5.) Studying other compounds (e.g., 1,4-thioxane or other mustard metabolites or 1,3-dithiane) for

  8. Per- and polyfluoro toxicity (LC(50) inhalation) study in rat and mouse using QSAR modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-03-15

    Fully or partially fluorinated compounds, known as per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are widely distributed in the environment and released because of their use in different household and industrial products. Few of these long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are classified as emerging pollutants, and their environmental and toxicological effects are unveiled in the literature. This has diverted the production of long chain compounds, considered as more toxic, to short chains, but concerns regarding the toxicity of both types of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are alarming. There are few experimental data available on the environmental behavior and toxicity of these compounds, and moreover, toxicity profiles are found to be different for the types of animals and species used. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is applied to a combination of short and long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals, for the first time, to model and predict the toxicity on two species of rodents, rat (Rattus) and mouse (Mus), by modeling inhalation (LC(50)) data. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models using the ordinary-least-squares (OLS) method, based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA), were used for QSAR studies. Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori, and these sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the model was verified on a larger set of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals retrieved from different databases and journals. The descriptors involved, the similarities, and the differences observed between models pertaining to the toxicity related to the two species are discussed. Chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) were used to select most toxic compounds from those within the AD of both models, which will be subjected to experimental tests

  9. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain); Mariani, Valentina [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Cohen, Dror [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Madi, Lea [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Garanger, Elisabeth [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Rossi, François [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam [Dead Sea Laboratories, AHAVA (Israel); Korenstein, Rafi [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler School of Medicine (Israel); Lecommandoux, Sébastien [ENSCPB, Université de Bordeaux (France); Ponti, Jessica [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro, E-mail: heredia@gaiker.es [GAIKER Technology Centre (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)-block–poly(l-glutamic acid) (PTMC-b–PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-block–poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PEG-b–PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood–serum–protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC-b–PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG-b–PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  10. Subchronic and developmental toxicity studies in rats with Ac-Di-Sol croscarmellose sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Christine; Weiner, Myra L; Kotkoskie, Lois A; Borzelleca, Joseph; Butt, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the subchronic and developmental toxicity of Ac-Di-Sol (croscarmellose sodium). In the subchronic study, groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (20/sex/group) received 0 (control), 10000, or 50000 ppm Ac-Di-Sol in the diet for 90 consecutive days (equivalent to 757 and 893 mg/kg/day for males and females fed 10000 ppm, respectively, and to 3922 and 4721 mg/kg/day for males and females fed 50000 ppm, respectively). No mortality, clinical signs of toxicity, or adverse toxicological effects on hematology or serum chemistry parameters, feed consumption, or ophthalmologic examinations were noted in any treatment group. Body weight gain was depressed in high-dose males during the final 3 weeks. The only treatment-related histological lesion noted was moderate renal mineralization at the corticomedullary junction in one high-dose female. This lesion was not considered a specific effect of Ac-Di-Sol, but rather a secondary effect resulting from a potential increase in urinary pH and renal excretion of sodium due to the high intake of sodium associated with Ac-Di-Sol. In the developmental toxicity study, groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (25/group) received 0 (control), 10000, or 50000 ppm Ac-Di-Sol in the diet on gestational days 6 to 15. No evidence of maternal, fetal, or embryo toxicity was noted. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for Ac-Di-Sol in both studies exceeds 50000 ppm in the diet, which represents doses of 3922 and 4712 mg/kg/day, for males and females, respectively. The results of these studies demonstrate the low subchronic oral toxicity and developmental toxicity of Ac-Di-Sol, and support the safe use of Ac-Di-Sol in oral applications such as pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, and sweetener tablets.

  11. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Mariani, Valentina; Cohen, Dror; Madi, Lea; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella; Garanger, Elisabeth; Rossi, François; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam; Korenstein, Rafi; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Ponti, Jessica; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)- block-poly( l-glutamic acid) (PTMC- b-PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly( γ-benzyl- l-glutamate) (PEG- b-PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood-serum-protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC- b-PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG- b-PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  12. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes in the context of toxicity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, D.; Dybowska, A.; Misra, S.K.; Stanley, C.J.; Ruenraroengsak, P.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Tetley, T.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Plant, J.A.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionise our futures, but has also prompted concerns about the possibility that nanomaterials may harm humans or the biosphere. The unique properties of nanoparticles, that give them novel size dependent functionalities, may also have the potential to cause harm. Discrepancies in existing human health and environmental studies have shown the importance of good quality, well-characterized reference nanomaterials for toxicological studies. Here we make a case for the importance of the detailed characterization of nanoparticles, using several methods, particularly to allow the recognition of impurities and the presence of chemically identical but structurally distinct phases. Methods to characterise fully, commercially available multi-wall carbon nanotubes at different scales, are presented. ?? 2009 Berhanu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. A thirteen week ad libitum administration toxicity study of tartrazine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tartrazine is a colorant widely used in food products, drugs and cosmetics. The current study evaluates the effect of sub-chronic ingestion of tartrazine in drinking water at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.45, 1 and 2.5% for 13 weeks in mice. Our results show that female body weight gain and food consumption decreased in all treated ...

  14. Acute oral toxicity and biodistribution study of zinc-aluminium-levodopa nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Saifullah, Bullo; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Azmi, Norazrina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-03-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) is an inorganic-organic nano-layered material that harbours drug between its two-layered sheets, forming a sandwich-like structure. It is attracting a great deal of attention as an alternative drug delivery (nanodelivery) system in the field of pharmacology due to their relative low toxic potential. The production of these nanodelivery systems, aimed at improving human health through decrease toxicity, targeted delivery of the active compound to areas of interest with sustained release ability. In this study, we administered zinc-aluminium-LDH-levodopa nanocomposite (ZAL) and zinc-aluminium nanocomposite (ZA) to Sprague Dawley rats to evaluate for acute oral toxicity following OECD guidelines. The oral administration of ZAL and ZA at a limit dose of 2,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout 14 days of the observation. The percentage of body weight gain of the animals showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Animal from the two treated groups gained weight continuously over the study period, which was shown to be significantly higher than the weight at the beginning of the study ( P lesion or histopathological changes observed in vital organs of the rats. The results suggested that ZAL and ZA at 2,000 mg/kg body weight in rats do not induce acute toxicity in the animals. Elemental analysis of tissues of treated animals demonstrated the wider distribution of the nanocomposite including the brain. In summary, findings of acute toxicity tests in this study suggest that zinc-aluminium nanocomposite intercalated with and the un-intercalated were safe when administered orally in animal models for short periods of time. It also highlighted the potential distribution ability of Tween-80 coated nanocomposite after oral administration.

  15. 78 FR 24220 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... historical, physical, psychosocial, and physiologic characteristics. In addition, the observational study... information on the common causes of frailty, disability and death for postmenopausal women, namely, coronary...

  16. 77 FR 60113 - Acceptance of Public Submissions Regarding the Study of Stable Value Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... (``SVCs'') fall within the definition of a swap. The study is required by Section 719(d) of the Dodd-Frank....regulations.gov ). Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Paper Comments Send paper comments in... Commissions jointly must conduct a study to determine whether SVCs fall within the definition of a swap.\\2...

  17. QSAR study of the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to river bacteria and photobacterium phosphoreum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, X.; Lu, G.; Lang, P. [Northeast Normal Univ., Changchun (China)

    1997-01-01

    Since nitrobenzenes constitute a class of industrial chemicals that are present in Songhua River and probably in many other industrialized countries as well, it is useful to gain insight into their potential hazard to aquatic organisms. For this reason, it was decided to determine data on the toxicity for bacteria in the Songhua River. Furthermore, the toxicity to Ph. phosphoreum was determined in the Microtox assay, in order to further evaluate the usefulness of this assay for hazard assessment. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have been developed for aromatic nitro compound toxicity to aquatic species, but no data on the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to environmental bacteria were used. In this study, the toxicity of various substituted nitrobenzenes to bacteria in Songhua River and to Ph. phosphoreum has been investigated, establishing quantitative structure-activity relationships with n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P), the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) and the sum of substituent constant ({Sigma}{sigma}-). 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Mushroom poisoning: a study on circumstances of exposure and patterns of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk-Jaeger, Katharina M; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Bodmer, Michael; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Picking wild mushrooms is a popular pastime in Switzerland. Correct identification of the species is difficult for laypersons. Ingestion of toxic mushrooms may result in serious toxicity, including death. The aim of the study is to analyze and describe the circumstances of exposure to mushrooms, and to define the clinical relevance of mushroom poisoning for humans in Central Europe. We performed a retrospective case study and analyzed all inquiries concerning human exposures to mushrooms (n = 5638, 1.2% of all inquiries) which were reported to the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre between January 1995 and December 2009. The most frequent reason for contacting the poison center in cases of adult exposure was toxicity resulting from edible species. Pediatric exposure predominantly occurred from mushrooms found around the home. Severe symptoms have not only been observed after ingestion of non-amatoxin-containing toxic mushrooms, i.e. Boletus sp. and Cortinarius sp., but also after meals of edible species. The mortality of confirmed amatoxin poisonings was high (5/32) compared to other reports. Inquiries regarding mushroom poisoning were a relatively infrequent reason for contacting the poison center. Nevertheless, accidental ingestion of toxic mushrooms can be responsible for severe or fatal poisonings. Although pediatric exposure to mushrooms found around the home has not led to serious toxicity in this study, prevention of exposure is warranted. Inspection of wild mushrooms by a certified mushroom expert or a mycologist seems to be a safe procedure which should be recommended. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mercury sensing and toxicity studies of novel latex fabricated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borase, Hemant P; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Salunkhe, Rahul B; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2014-11-01

    Safe and eco-friendly alternatives to currently used hazardous chemico-physical methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis are need of time. Rapid, low cost, selective detection of toxic metals in environmental sample is important to take safety action. Toxicity assessment of engineered AgNPs is essential to avoid its side effects on human and non-target organisms. In the present study, biologically active latex from Euphorbia heterophylla (Poinsettia) was utilized for synthesis of AgNPs. AgNPs was of spherical shape and narrow size range (20-50 nm). Occurrence of elemental silver and crystalline nature of AgNPs was analyzed. Role of latex metabolites in reduction and stabilization of AgNPs was analyzed by FT-IR, protein coagulation test and phytochemical analysis. Latex-synthesized AgNPs showed potential in selective and sensitive detection of toxic mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with limit of detection around 100 ppb. Addition of Hg(2+) showed marked deviation in color and surface plasmon resonance spectra of AgNPs. Toxicity studies on aquatic non-target species Daphnia magna showed that latex-synthesized AgNPs (20.66 ± 1.52% immobilization) were comparatively very less toxic than chemically synthesized AgNPs (51.66 ± 1.52% immobilization). Similarly, comparative toxicity study on human red blood cells showed lower hemolysis (4.46 ± 0.01%) by latex-synthesized AgNPs as compared to chemically synthesized AgNPs causing 6.14 ± 0.01% hemolysis.

  20. Proteomics study of silver nanoparticles toxicity on Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzajani, Fateme; Askari, Hossein; Hamzelou, Sara; Schober, Yvonne; Römpp, Andreas; Ghassempour, Alireza; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles, (AgNPs), will inevitably result in their release into the environment and thereby cause the exposure to plants. It was claimed that using AgNPs is a safe and efficient method to preserve and treat agents of disease in agriculture. This study tries to understand the protein populations and sub-populations and follow up environmental AgNPs stresses. To accomplish these, the action of homemade spherical AgNPs colloidal suspension against Oryza sativa L. was investigated by a proteomic approach (2-DE and NanoLC/FT-ICR MS identification). Twenty-eight responsive (decrement/increment in abundance) proteins were identified. Proteomic results revealed that an exposure of O. sativa L., root with different concentrations of AgNPs resulted in an accumulation of protein precursors, indicative of the dissipation of a proton motive force. The identified proteins are involved in oxidative stress tolerance, Ca(2+) regulation and signaling, transcription and protein degradation, cell wall and DNA/RNA/protein direct damage, cell division and apoptosis. The expression pattern of these proteins and their possible involvement in the nontoxicity mechanisms were discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uptake and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in terrestrial springtails--studying bioconcentration kinetics and linking toxicity to chemical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Smith, Kilian Eric Christopher; Holmstrup, Martin; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    Passive dosing applies a polymer loaded with test compound(s) to establish and maintain constant exposure in laboratory experiments. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) was used to control exposure of the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida to six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bioconcentration and toxicity experiments. Folsomia candida could move freely on the PAH-loaded silicone, resulting in exposure via air and direct contact. The bioconcentration kinetics indicated efficient uptake of naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene through air and (near) equilibrium partitioning of these PAHs to lipids and possibly the waxy layer of the springtail cuticle. Toxicities of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene were related to chemical activity, which quantifies the energetic level and drives spontaneous processes including diffusive biouptake. Chemical activity-response relationships yielded effective lethal chemical activities (La50s) well within the expected range for baseline toxicity (0.01-0.1). Effective lethal body burdens for naphthalene and pyrene exceeded the expected range of 2 to 8 mmol kg(-1) fresh weight, which again indicated the waxy layer to be a sorbing phase. Finally, chemical activities were converted into equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids yielding effective lethal concentrations for naphthalene and phenanthrene in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Passive dosing was a practical approach for tightly controlling PAH exposure, which in turn provided new experimental possibilities and findings. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  2. A study on the differential response of malting barley genotypes to boron toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Mehmet; Kaptan, Mustafa Ali; Sümer, Feride Öncan

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out to study the differential response of eight malting barley genotypes to boron toxicity in Aydın, Turkey. Genotypes were grown with and without the application of 40 kg B ha-1. Total dry matter yield, grain yield and boron concentration of roots, stems, leaves and ears were determined. Boron application resulted in toxicity symptoms at the flag leaves and reduced total dry matter and grain yield as 12.2% and 30.5%. Line 7 gave both the lowest yiel...

  3. beta-Cyclodextrin: 52-week toxicity studies in the rat and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellringer, M E; Smith, T G; Read, R; Gopinath, C; Olivier, P

    1995-05-01

    A 52-wk toxicity study by dietary administration was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats and in pure-bred beagle dogs with beta-cyclodextrin, a starch derivative that acts as a molecular inclusion agent. Doses of 0 (control), 12,500, 25,000 and 50,000 ppm were selected for the rat study, and 0 (control), 6200, 12,500 and 50,000 ppm were selected for the dog study. The liver and kidney were identified at the histopathological examination as target organs for toxicity in the rat at doses of 50,000 and 25,000 ppm, with the hepatic changes associated with increased plasma liver enzyme and reduced plasma triglyceride concentrations. In the dog study, there was no pathological evidence of systemic toxicity, although there were minor changes in urinalysis and biochemical parameters and a slightly higher incidence of liquid faeces. These changes were considered to be of no toxicological importance. The results in these studies, therefore, indicate that the non-toxic effect level was 12,500 ppm in the rat (equivalent to 654 or 864 mg/kg/day for males or females, respectively) and 50,000 ppm in the dog (equivalent to 1831 or 1967 mg/kg/day for males or females, respectively).

  4. 77 FR 67823 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: NEXT Generation Health Study; Correction Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    .... adolescents and influences on their health. The study has collected information on adolescent health behaviors... Burden for Affected Public: Young Adults Estimated Estimated Estimated number of Average total annual... response requested Young Adults in NEXT Cohort 2,100 1 1.0 2,100 Peers Recruited by NEXT Plus Young Adults...

  5. Biokemistri: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts may be rejected on the basis of poor English or lack of conformity to accepted standards of style. ORGANIZATION AND FORMAT Regular Papers Regular full-length papers should include the elements described in this section. Title: Each manuscript should present the results of an independent, cohesive study; ...

  6. Short-term toxicity studies with triphenyltin compounds in rats and guinea-pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, H.G.; Kroes, R.; Vink, H.H.; Esch, G.J. van

    1966-01-01

    Short-term toxicity studies have been carried out in rats and guinea-pigs fed diets containing triphenyltin acetate (TPTA), triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH) or triethyltin hydroxide (TETH) for 90 days at levels ranging from 0 to 50 ppm. The lowest dietary levels found to retard growth in rats and

  7. Ninety-day oral toxicity study of lycopene from Blakeslea trispora in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, D.; Kuper, C.F.; Fraile, N.; Estrella, A.; Rodríguez Otero, C.

    2003-01-01

    Lycopene, as a suspension in sunflower oil (20% w/w), was tested for subchronic toxicity by administration at dietary concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0% to groups of 20 male and 20 female Wistar rats for a period of 90 days. The lycopene examined in this study was derived from a fungal

  8. Developmental toxicity study of vegetable oil-derived stanol fatty acid esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slesinski, R.S.; Turnbull, D.; Frankos, V.H.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    In a standard developmental toxicity study, a mixture of vegetable oil- derived stanol fatty acid esters was administered in the diet to groups of 28 mated female HsdCpb:WU Wistar rats at concentrations that provided 0, 1, 2.5, and 5% total stanols (equivalent to 0, 1.75, 4.38, and 8.76% plant

  9. Prenatal developmental toxicity study with 7-hydroxymatairesinol potassium acetate (HMRlignan) in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Roberts, A.; Korte, H.; Unkila, M.; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Plant lignan 7-hydromatairesinol, a novel precursor of the mammalian lignan enterolactone was evaluated in a prenatal developmental toxicity study conducted in the Wistar rat. Mated female rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.25, 1, and 4% (w/w) of 7-hydroxymatairesinol in the form of potassium

  10. One-generation reproductive toxicity study of DHA-rich oil in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, R.; Kiy, T.; Waalkens-Berendsen, I.; Wong, A.W.; Roberts, A.

    2007-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are natural constituents of the human diet. DHA-algal oil is produced through the use of the marine protist, Ulkenia sp. The reproductive toxicity of DHA-algal oil was assessed in a one-generation study. Rats were provided diets

  11. Acute toxicity study and effect of ethanolic leaf extract of Guiera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity study and effect of ethanolic leaf extract of Guiera senegalensis J. F. Gmel (combretaceae) on trypanosome Brucei brucei induced pathology in albino rats. ... were observed at histopathology in some extract treated groups compared to the infected untreated group, suggesting a dose dependent extract activity.

  12. Oral two-generation reproduction toxicity study with NM-200 synthetic amorphous silica in Wistar rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.; Oosterwijk, T.; Schneider, S.; Landsiedel, R.; Groot, D. de; Ee, R. van; Wouters, M.; Sandt, H. van de

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) like NM-200 is used in a wide variety of technological applications and consumer products. Although SAS has been widely investigated the available reproductive toxicity studies are old and do not cover all requirements of current OECD Guidelines. As part of a

  13. Study on the Potential Toxicity of a Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction Nanoemulsion in Sprague Dawley Tats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxicological studies constitute an essential part of the effort in developing an herbal medicine into a drug product. A newly developed thymoquinone-rich fraction nanoemulsion (TQRFNE has been prepared using a high pressure homogenizer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential acute toxicity of this nanoemulsion in Sprague Dawley rats. The acute toxicity studies were conducted as per the OECD guidelines 425, allowing for the use of test dose limit of 20 mL TQRFNE (containing 44.5 mg TQ/kg. TQRFNE and distilled water (DW as a control were administered orally to both sexes of rats on Day 0 and observed for 14 days. All the animals appeared normal, and healthy throughout the study. There was no observed mortality or any signs of toxicity during the experimental period. The effects of the TQRFNE and DW groups on general behavior, body weight, food and water consumption, relative organ weight, hematology, histopathology, and clinical biochemistry were measured. All the parameters measured were unaffected as compared to the control (DW group. The administration of 20 mL TQRFNE /kg was not toxic after an acute exposure.

  14. Use of the zebrafish larvae as a model to study cigarette smoke condensate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lee D; Soo, Evelyn C; Achenbach, John C; Morash, Michael G; Soanes, Kelly H

    2014-01-01

    The smoking of tobacco continues to be the leading cause of premature death worldwide and is linked to the development of a number of serious illnesses including heart disease, respiratory diseases, stroke and cancer. Currently, cell line based toxicity assays are typically used to gain information on the general toxicity of cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, they provide little information regarding the complex disease-related changes that have been linked to smoking. The ethical concerns and high cost associated with mammalian studies have limited their widespread use for in vivo toxicological studies of tobacco. The zebrafish has emerged as a low-cost, high-throughput, in vivo model in the study of toxicology. In this study, smoke condensates from 2 reference cigarettes and 6 Canadian brands of cigarettes with different design features were assessed for acute, developmental, cardiac, and behavioural toxicity (neurotoxicity) in zebrafish larvae. By making use of this multifaceted approach we have developed an in vivo model with which to compare the toxicity profiles of smoke condensates from cigarettes with different design features. This model system may provide insights into the development of smoking related disease and could provide a cost-effective, high-throughput platform for the future evaluation of tobacco products.

  15. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity studies of methanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity studies of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans in mice. Zainul Amiruddin Zakaria, Mohammad Hafiz Abdul Rahim, Norhafizah Mohtarrudin, Arifah Abdul Kadir, Manraj Singh Cheema, Zuraini Ahmad, Ching Siew Mooi, Siti Farah Md. Tohid ...

  16. Sub-acute toxicity study on the aqueous extract of Albizia zygia stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub-acute toxicity study on the aqueous extract of Albizia zygia stem bark. ... Morphological (body weight and organ weight indices), haematological {white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin, haematocrit, and platelet counts}, biochemical {alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase ...

  17. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. Inhalation toxicity studies with 1,3-butadiene 3 two year toxicity/carcinogenicity study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.E.; Glaister, J.R.; Gaunt, I.F.; Pullinger, D.H.

    1987-05-01

    Groups of 110 male and 110 female CD (Sprague-Dawley) rats were exposed to atmospheres containing 0 (control), 1000 or 8000 ppm v/v butadiene for 6 hr/day and 5 days/week. Ten of each sex from each group were killed at 52 weeks. The study was terminated when it was predicted that survival would drop to 20% to 25%. High dose rats had wet, ruffled fur and showed slight incoordination during the first exposure each week. During the second year, mortality in both treated female groups was increased because of humanitarian sacrifice of animals with large subcutaneous masses, while increased mortality in the high dose males was accompanied by an increase of the severity of nephropathy. Body weight was slightly lower than controls in both sexes at the high dose, but statistically significant only over the first 12 weeks. There were no effects in hematological analyses or tests of neuromuscular function that definitely could be associated with treatment. Liver weights at both doses were increased in both sexes with no associated pathological change. Kidney weight was increased in males at the high dose, together with an increase in the severity of nephrosis. There were increases in the incidences of pancreatic exocrine adenoma; uterine sarcoma; Zymbal gland carcinoma; mammary tumors; thyroid follicular cell tumors; and testis Leydig-cell tumors. These data suggest the butadiene is a weak oncogen to the rat under the conditions of exposure used in this study.

  19. Aqueous chlorination of fenamic acids: Kinetic study, transformation products identification and toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liyun; Li, Jian; Xu, Li

    2017-05-01

    Fenamic acids, one important type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are ubiquitous in environmental matrices. Thus it is of high significance to know the fate of them during chlorination disinfection considering their potential toxicity to the environment and humans. In the present study, the chlorination kinetics of three fenamic acids, i.e. mefenamic acid (MEF), tolfenamic acid (TOL) and clofenamic acid (CLO), were examined at different pHs, which followed second-order reaction under studied conditions. The studied fenamic acids degraded fast, with the largest apparent second-order rate coefficient (kapp) values of 446.7 M-1 s-1 (pH 7), 393.3 M-1 s-1 (pH 8) and 360.0 M-1 s-1 (pH 6) for MEF, TOL and CLO, respectively. The transformation products (TPs) were identified by solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer and ion-pair liquid-liquid extraction and injection port derivatization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Despite different numbers of TPs were detected for each studied fenamic acid through these two analytical methods, the types of TPs were almost the same; chlorine substitution, oxidation and the joint oxidation with chlorine substitution are transformation reactions involved in chlorination. Moreover, the total toxicity of the TPs was assayed based on luminescent bacteria. Under different pHs, the different types of TPs might form, resulting in the varied total toxicity. The toxicity of all three fenamic acids chlorinated at pH of 8 was greater than those at pHs of 6 and 7. This study provided the information about the kinetics, transformation and toxicity of three fenamic acids during water chlorination, which is important to the drinking water safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitive endpoints in extended one-generation reproductive toxicity study versus two generation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie

    Increasing pressure is exerted by some stakeholders to replace the current “golden standard”, two-generation study (OECD TG 416), by an extended one-generation reproductive toxicity study (EOGRTS), because this would considerably reduce the number of animals and other costs involved in these leng......Increasing pressure is exerted by some stakeholders to replace the current “golden standard”, two-generation study (OECD TG 416), by an extended one-generation reproductive toxicity study (EOGRTS), because this would considerably reduce the number of animals and other costs involved...... during critical period of development in contrast to the parental generation. Retrospective analysis of available two-generation studies, however, indicate that the assessment included in the study of other endpoints in the male offspring such as histopathology of reproductive organs and semen quality...

  1. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from Harrisonia perforata Merr. in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seewaboon Sireeratawong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The water extract from Harrisonia perforata Merr. was studied for acute and subchronic toxicities. The extract at a single dose of 5,000 mg/kg was administered orally to female and male rats (5 males, 5 females. After 14 days, signs and behavioral changes, mortality, gross and histopathological changes of internal organs were examined. The body weight of the male treated rats was significantly decreased when compared to the control group. The extract did not produce signs of toxicity. For the subchronic toxicity test, the extract at doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight were orally administeredto rats daily for 90 days (10 males, 10 females. Observation of signs, behavior and health status showed no abnormality in the test groups as compared with the controls. However, the body weight of all male treated rats was significantly decreased when compared to the control group. At the end of the study, necropsy and histopathology examination were performed in all animals in the control group, the test groups and the satellite group in which the extract was discontinued for another 28 days. Body and organ weights, hematological and blood clinical chemistry were also examined. The results suggest that the water extract of Harrisonia perforata Merr. does not cause acute and subchronic toxicities in rats.

  2. Toxicity and biocompatibility profile of 3D bone scaffold developed by Universitas Indonesia: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahyussalim A., J.; Kurniawati, T.; Aprilya, D.; Anggraini, R.; Ramahdita, Ghiska; Whulanza, Yudan

    2017-02-01

    Scaffold as a biomaterial must fulfill some requirements to be safely implanted to the human body. Toxicity and biocompatibility test are needed to evaluate scaffold material in mediating cell proliferation and differentiation, secreting extracelullar matrix and carrying biomolecular signals for cell communication. An in vitro study with mesenchymal stem cells consisted of direct contact test and indirect contact test using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) tetrazolium reduction assay was conducted on 4 scaffolds made of poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and hydroxyapatite-poly (vinyl alcohol) composite. There were cells-substrate adhesion impairment, morphological changes, cell death and reduction in cell proliferation seen at 2nd and 6th day in most tested scaffold. Cell count result at day-6 showed proliferation inhibition of more than 50% cell death (inhibition value >50) in all tested scaffold. In MTT assay, two scaffolds were proven non-toxic. In conclusion, various scaffold materials showed different toxicity effect. The toxicity and biocompatibility profile in this study is a preliminary data for further research aiming to use those local-made scaffolds to fill human bone defect in various needs.

  3. Toxicity studies of the water extract from the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Itharat, Arunporn; Khonsung, Parirat; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Jaijoy, Kanjana

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicities of the water extract from calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa were studied in male and female rats. After 14 days of a single oral administration of test substance 5,000 mg/kg body weight, measurement of the body and organ weights, necropsy and health monitoring were performed. No signs and differences of the weights or behaviour compared to the control rats were observed. The results indicated that the single oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract in the amount of 5,000 mg/kg body weight does not produce acute toxicity. The chronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding both male and female rats daily with the extract at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days. The examinations of signs, animal behaviour and health monitoring showed no defects in the test groups compared to the control groups. Both test and control groups (day 270th) and satellite group (day 298th) were analysed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining haematology, blood clinical chemistry, and microanatomy. Results showed no differences from the control groups. Overall, our study demonstrated that an oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days does not cause chronic toxicity in rat.

  4. Enzymatic extract from Ecklonia cava: Acute and subchronic oral toxicity and genotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Yun-Soon; You, Ji-Ran; Cho, Eun-Young; Yoon, Jung-Hee; Kwon, Euna; Yun, In-Jue; Oh, Je-Hun; Jang, Ja-June; Park, Jin-Sung; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Byeong-Cheol

    2018-02-01

    Ecklonia cava (EC) is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and anticancer properties. Despite its wide use and beneficial properties, comprehensive toxicological information regarding EC extract is currently limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate acute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, and genotoxicity of enzymatic EC extract according to test guidelines published by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The acute oral LD50 values of this EC extract administered to rats and dogs were estimated to be more than 3000 mg/kg BW. In an oral 13-week toxicity study, changes in body weights of rats exposed to the EC extract up to 3000 mg/kg BW were found to be normal. In addition, repeated doses of EC extract failed to influence any systematic parameters of treatment-related toxic symptoms such as food/water consumption, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight, or histopathology. These results indicated that the no-observed-adverse-effect level for the EC extract was 3000 mg/kg/day for male and female rats. Data obtained from Ames test, chromosome aberration assay, and micronucleus assay indicated that EC extract was not mutagenic or clastogenic. Taken together, these results support the safety of enzymatic EC extract as a potential therapeutic for human consumption against various diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies of [{sup 18}F] fluorocholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Danielle C.; Santos, Priscilla F., E-mail: dcc@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gereais (INCT-MM/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Medicina Molecular; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B. da, E-mail: radiofarmacoscdtn@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos; Souza, Cristina M.; Campos, Liliane C.; Ferreira, Enio; Araujo, Marina R.; Cassali, Geovanni D., E-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (LPC/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada

    2013-07-01

    [{sup 18}F]Fluorocholine ({sup 18}FCH) is a valuable tool for non-invasive diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET). This radiotracer has been proven to be highly effective in detecting recurrences and staging prostate cancer, diagnoses brain, breast, and esophageal tumors and also hepatocellular carcinoma. The higher uptake of fluorocholine by malignant tumors results from increased choline kinase activity due to accelerated cell multiplication and membrane formation. According to the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), radiopharmaceuticals have to be registered before commercialization. The aim of this work was to evaluate single dose toxicity and biodistribution of {sup 18}FCH in mice, since preclinical safety studies are required for register. Experimental procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA-IPEN/SP). Single dose toxicity and biodistribution studies were conducted in Swiss mice. No signs of toxicity were observed during clinical trial. No changes in the parameters which were examined, such as: body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology parameters or lesions microscopic were noted. Biodistribution results indicated high physiological tracer uptake in kidney, liver and heart 30 min after injection. Lower activities were recorded in other organs/tissues: pancreas, intestine, spleen, bone, bladder, muscle, brain and blood. Initial preclinical investigations showed no toxic effects of {sup 18}FCH at investigated doses and a biodistribution profile very similar to other reports in literature. This information is essential to support future human trials. (author)

  6. Surface modification minimizes the toxicity of silver nanoparticles: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Balaram; Tripathy, Satyajit; Adhikary, Jaydeep; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Mandal, Debasis; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Das, Sabyasachi; Dey, Aditi; Dey, Sankar Kumar; Das, Debasis; Roy, Somenath

    2017-08-01

    Currently toxicological research in Silver nanoparticle is a leading issue in medical science. The surface chemistry and physical dimensions of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) play an important role in toxicity. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo toxicity of Ag-NPs as well as the alteration of toxicity profile due to surface functionalization (PEG and BSA) and the intracellular signaling pathways involved in nanoparticles mediated oxidative stress and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo system. Ag-NPs released excess Ag+ ions leads to activation of NADPH oxidase and helps in generating the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Silver nanoparticles elicit the production of excess amount of ROS results activation of TNF-α. Ag-NPs activates caspase-3 and 9 which are the signature of mitochondrial pathway. Ag-NPs are responsible to decrease the antioxidant enzymes and imbalance the oxidative status into the cells but functionalization with BSA and PEG helps to protect the adverse effect of Ag-NPs on the cells. This study suggested that Ag-NPs are toxic to normal cells which directly lead with human health. Surface functionalization may open the gateway for further use of Ag-NPs in different area such as antimicrobial and anticancer therapy, industrial use or in biomedical sciences.

  7. The study of the stability, toxicity and antimicrobial effect of allicin solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaneian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Allicin is extracted from Garlic, and can attach to the tiol groups of proteins by tiosulfanate group. This attachment leads to damage of various proteins and enzymes of microbes, and can affect wide spectrum of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The aim of this study was to investigate the stability, toxicity and antimicrobial effect of allicin solution. Methods: First, serial concentrations of allicin solution were prepared, and exposed to suspension of standard isolates of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, andPsodomonasaerogina and fungi (Aspergillusnige rand Candida albicans.The minimum inhibitory concentration(MIC50 and MIC90 of this compound against each isolate was determined. To evaluate the toxicity of allicin solution, the suspension of skin cells of Balb/C mice was prepared, and incubated with serial concentrations of allicin for 6, 12 and 24 h. Then, cell viability was calculated by MTT assay, based on control. To evaluate stability of allicin solution,some pieces of sterilized marble were prepared, and their surfaces were treated with the solution of allicin. After 6, 12 and 24 h,marbles were sampled, inoculated on the nutrient agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37 °C. Finally, the number of colonies grown on each plate was counted. Results: The micro-dilution test showed that allicin solution had antimicrobial effecton the all bacterial and fungal isolates which studied. This study also showed that the toxicity of allicin solution slightly dependent on the time and concentration, but increase the time until 24 h had nota significant impact on the reducing of stability. Conclusions: The allicin solution has antimicrobial activity and its toxicity is negligible. Also, this material has high stability in the environmental conditions. Keywords: Antimicrobial activity, Nanoparticles, Allicin, Toxicity, Stability

  8. Acute toxicity study of tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil-solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Shuyu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies demonstrated that tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil solid lipid nanoparticles (Til-HCO-SLN are a promising formulation for enhanced pharmacological activity and therapeutic efficacy in veterinary use. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the acute toxicity of Til-HCO-SLN. Methods Two nanoparticle doses were used for the study in ICR mice. The low dose (766 mg/kg.bw with tilmicosin 7.5 times of the clinic dosage and below the median lethal dose (LD50 was subcutaneously administered twice on the first and 7th day. The single high dose (5 g/kg.bw was the practical upper limit in an acute toxicity study and was administered subcutaneously on the first day. Blank HCO-SLN, native tilmicosin, and saline solution were included as controls. After medication, animals were monitored over 14 days, and then necropsied. Signs of toxicity were evaluated via mortality, symptoms of treatment effect, gross and microscopic pathology, and hematologic and biochemical parameters. Results After administration of native tilmicosin, all mice died within 2 h in the high dose group, in the low dose group 3 died after the first and 2 died after the second injections. The surviving mice in the tilmicosin low dose group showed hypoactivity, accelerated breath, gloomy spirit and lethargy. In contrast, all mice in Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN groups survived at both low and high doses. The high nanoparticle dose induced transient clinical symptoms of treatment effect such as transient reversible action retardation, anorexy and gloomy spirit, increased spleen and liver coefficients and decreased heart coefficients, microscopic pathological changes of liver, spleen and heart, and minor changes in hematologic and biochemical parameters, but no adverse effects were observed in the nanoparticle low dose group. Conclusions The results revealed that the LD50 of Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN exceeded 5 g/kg.bw and thus the

  9. African Studies Monographs: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privacy Statement. The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party. ISSN: 1119-7196. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  10. Emerging Patterns for Engineered Nanomaterials in the Environment: A Review of Fate and Toxicity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, K.; Keller, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The technical complexity of measuring ENM fate and transport processes in all environments necessitates identifying trends in these same processes. As part of our research, we collected emerging information on the environmental fate and toxicity of many ENMs and investigated transportation and transformation processes in air, water, and soil. Generally, studies suggest that (i) ENMs will have limited transport in the atmosphere, because they settle rapidly; (ii) ENMs are more stable in freshwater and stormwater than in seawater or groundwater primarily due to variations in ionic strength and the presence of natural organic matter; and (iii) in soil, the fate of ENMs strongly depends on the size of the ENM aggregates and groundwater chemistry, as well as pore and soil particle size. Emerging patterns regarding ENM fate, transport, and exposure combined with emerging information on toxicity indicate the risk is low for most ENMs although current exposure estimates compared with current data on toxicity indicate that at current production and release levels, exposure to Ag, nZVI, and ZnO may cause a toxic response to freshwater and marine species.

  11. Subchronic Toxicity Study of Standardized Methanolic Extract of Mitragyna Speciosa Korth in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ulul Ilmie Ahmad Nazri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitragyna speciosa Korth, or better known as ketum, has long been used by traditional folk around Southeast Asia to prevent fatigue from working under hot tropical weather and as a replacement of opium, which can then cause addiction. To date, no findings have been reported of the toxic effect of ketum subchronically (28 days. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of subchronic effect of standardised methanolic extract of ketum (SMEMS in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were orally administered with 100, 200, and 500 mg/kg of SMEMS for 28 days. Body weights were recorded daily. They were terminated at day 28 to obtain data for haematology, biochemistry, and histopathology of the brain, liver, kidney, lung, heart, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. The SMEMS affected body weight compared to control group. Biochemistry findings showed that liver and kidney were affected with the abnormal values in AST, creatinine, globulin, glucose, total protein, and urea. However, SMEMS produced toxic effect more to liver, kidney, and lung than other organs as observed histopathologically. The results suggested subchronic exposure of ketum is toxic to the physiology of the animals.

  12. Acute Toxicity Study of “Gadagi” Tea on Rats | Gadanya | Bayero ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute toxicity study was carried out on three most common types of “Gadagi” tea preparations, “sak'',”sada” and “magani”.. LD50 values of each type of the tea were determined. Results of phase I and phase II of the study showed no mortality was recorded in any of the experimental groups of rats in 24hours and up to four ...

  13. Genotoxicity test and subchronic toxicity study with Superba™ krill oil in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Bruce; Burri, Lena; Berge, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    The safety of krill oil was assessed in a subchronic toxicity study and in a genotoxicity test. In a 13-week study, rats were fed krill oil or control diets. There were no differences noted in body weight, food consumption or in the functional observation battery parameters in either gender. Differences in both haematology and clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill oil-treated groups. However these findings were of no toxicological significance. Significant decreases in absolute an...

  14. One Year Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 Succinate in Dogs. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-18

    and Mead, D.C. Clin. Chem. 20, 586, 1974. Haptoelobin Antigen- antibody method Ciba-Corning 550 Express Clinical Chemistry System Atlantic... Antibodies Test Kit B-4 ’ £• ET •^ !• Tk ir\\. a f HEMATOLOGY Ervthrocyte Count Electronic counting procedure SysmexKlOOO Hematology Analyzer...100X C-19 ONE YEAR ORAL TOXICITY STUDY OF WR23 8605 SUCCINATE IN DOGS 1 Shf INCIDENCE OF OBSERVATIONS SEX: MALE STUDY: 219 PERIOD D0SE:(mg

  15. Study of 99mTc Pertechnetate Radiopharmaceuticals in Relation to Thyroid Hormone for Toxic and non-Toxic Diffuse Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Viantri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the thyroid gland in the form of enlargement of the thyroid gland are called a goiter. Goiter is divided into two types, namely toxic and non-toxic diffuse goiter. Diagnosis could be done with thyroid scan (in vivo and test for thyroid hormone value (in vitro. Thyroid scan is applied by giving injection of 99mTc Pertechnetate as much as 2 - 5 mCi intravenally in the arm and then thyroid gland and salivary glands imaging were conducted in the fifth minute, tenth minute and fifteenth minute using gamma camera. Thyroid hormones test in blood is done with radioimmunoassay method. The same pattern showed the accumulation polad of the radioactive number from quotation of salivary glands. The accumulation percentage activity of 99mTc Pertechnetate in thyroid gland for the case of toxic diffuse goiter is larger than the case of non-toxic diffuse goiter. The results of this study indicate that the predictors for the case of toxic diffuse goiter could be characterized by high thyroid uptake which the the value of T3 hormone 3.3 ng/dl, the value of T4 hormone 165 nmol/l, and the value of TSH hormone 0.2 μIU/ml. While the case of non-toxic diffuse goiter could be characterized by low thyroid uptake which the value of T3 hormone 1.2 ng/dl, the value of T4 hormone 90 nmol/l, and the value of TSH hormone 1.8 μIU/ml

  16. 40 CFR 716.20 - Studies not subject to the reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. These studies are limited to section 8(e) submissions, studies... listed ureaformaldehyde resins (CAS Nos. 9011-05-6 and 68611-64-3), studies on agronomic plant growth or damage which demonstrate only that the resins stimulate plant growth or cause plant damage when applied...

  17. Parental poison prevention practices and their relationship with perceived toxicity: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Groom, L; Prasad, V; Kendrick, D

    2008-12-01

    To describe poison prevention practices for a range of substances and explore the relationship between prevention practices and perceptions of toxicity. Cross-sectional study using a validated postal questionnaire. Parents with children aged 12-35 months on 23 health visitors' caseloads. Areas of various levels of deprivation in Nottingham, UK. Possession and storage of substances, putting substances away immediately after use, and perceptions of toxicity. Dishwasher tablets (68%), toilet cleaner (71%), bleach (74%), oven cleaner (78%), oral contraceptives (80%), and essential oils (81%) were least likely to be stored safely. Children's painkillers (69%), cough medicine (72%), and essential oils (77%) were least likely to be put away immediately after use. More than 50% of parents perceived antibiotics and oral contraceptives as harmful in small quantities and cough medicines as harmful only in large quantities. Six substances perceived by parents to be more harmful were more likely to be put away immediately after use. Parents perceiving dishwasher tablets (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.66), essential oils (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.35 to 5.81), turpentine (OR 14.54, 95% CI 2.75 to 76.95), and rat/ant killer (OR 15.33, 95% CI 2.01 to 116.82) as more harmful were more likely to store these substances safely. Parents' perceptions of toxicity of substances were sometimes inaccurate. Perceived toxicity was associated with putting substances away immediately after use for six substances and with safe storage for four substances. The effect of addressing perceptions of toxicity on poison prevention practices requires evaluation.

  18. A subchronic toxicity study of ethanol root extract of baked Aconitum flavum in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanbin Zhang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The genus Aconitum has strong toxicity, but the acute toxicity of baked Aconitum flavum Hand.-Mazz., Ranunculaceae, was reduced significantly on the premise of keeping anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. However, the risk associated with long-term use is unknown. In a sub-chronic toxicity study, rats were orally administered A. flavum at doses of 0.76–3.03 g/kg for 90 days and further recovered for 14 days. Our results showed that oral treatment with A. flavum for 90 days caused significant changes in some hematological indicators at doses of 3.03 and 1.52 g/kg, such as red blood cell, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These results indicated that the A. flavum affects the structure and function of red blood cell. Furthermore, significant changes were observed in the white blood cell at dose of 3.03 g/kg in male rats, which confirmed tissue damage or toxicity. The liver function tests exhibited non-significant alterations in aspertate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and avenin-like storage proteinsgene. But other parameters, such as total protein and albumin were obviously decreased at all doses. A. flavum also caused a significant decrease in glucose, cholesterol and triacylglyceride at all doses. For kidney function, there were significant elevations in urea and creatinine at doses of 3.03 and 1.52 g/kg. The levels of certain electrolytes (Na+, K+ and Cl- were significantly different after 90 days of treatment with A. flavum (3.03 and 1.52 g/kg. Organs were observed by light microscopy after hematoxylin-eosin staining. Hemosiderin depositions in the spleen were observed in the A. flavum group. These data demonstrated that the subtoxicity of A. flavum was reduced considerably by baked, but the subchronic toxicity effects on the liver, kidney and spleen should not be ignored.

  19. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Zhou, Xianghong; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. © 2013.

  20. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  1. Perinatal toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of styrene-acrylonitrile trimer, a ground water contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A; Malarkey, David E; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Gerken, Diane K; Chhabra, Rajendra S

    2013-12-06

    Styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site's ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN Trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Fluorescent spectral studies of the toxic effect of chlororganic pesticides on the biochemical parameters of synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Bekshokov, K. S.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Abdullaeva, N. M.; Israpov, E. Kh.; Gashimov, I. Sh.

    2017-04-01

    The results of the study of the fluorescence spectra of suspensions of synaptosomes, which have been exposed to a chlororganic pesticide, thiamethoxam, at a concentration of 50 MPC during different time periods, at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 290 ± 5/310-600, 340 ± 5/360-700, and 420 ± 5/450-800 nm are given for the first time. It has been demonstrated that the development of intoxication results in weakening of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, NAD(P)·H, derivatives of vitamin B6, and vitamin A and in an increase in the fluorescence of pyridoxic acid, lipofuscin, and flavin and porphyrin complexes. The results of the spectral studies indicate that the toxic effect of the chlororganic pesticide for the functioning of living systems is based on free radical toxicity.

  3. Oral dietary developmental toxicity study with polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMerlis, C C; Schoneker, D R; Borzelleca, J F

    2014-10-01

    Polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) was evaluated in a developmental toxicity study with Crl:CD(SD) rats. Female rats were provided continual access to the formulated diets on days 6 through 20 of presumed gestation (DGs 6 through 20) at concentrations of 0%, 0.75%, 1.5% and 3%. All surviving rats were sacrificed and Caesarean-sectioned on DG 21. The following parameters were evaluated: viability, clinical observations, body weights, feed consumption, necropsy observations, Caesarean-sectioning and litter observations, including gravid uterine weights, fetal body weights and sex, and fetal gross external, soft tissue and skeletal alterations. There were no treatment-related adverse effects reported in the developmental toxicity study. The maternal and developmental no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of PVAP was the highest concentration administered, i.e., 3.0% (equivalent to 2324mgPVAP/kg/day). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  5. Genotoxicity test and subchronic toxicity study with Superba™ krill oil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bruce; Burri, Lena; Berge, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    The safety of krill oil was assessed in a subchronic toxicity study and in a genotoxicity test. In a 13-week study, rats were fed krill oil or control diets. There were no differences noted in body weight, food consumption or in the functional observation battery parameters in either gender. Differences in both haematology and clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill oil-treated groups. However these findings were of no toxicological significance. Significant decreases in absolute and covariant heart weight in some krill oil-treated animals were noted although no corresponding histological changes were observed. In addition, periportal microvesicular hepatocyte vacuolation was noted histologically in males fed 5% krill oil. This finding was not associated with other indications of hepatic dysfunction. Given that the effects of the 13-week toxicity study were non-toxic in nature, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the conditions of this study was considered to be 5% krill oil. The genotoxicity experiments documented no mutagenicity of krill oil in bacteria.

  6. Genotoxicity test and subchronic toxicity study with Superba™ krill oil in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Robertson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of krill oil was assessed in a subchronic toxicity study and in a genotoxicity test. In a 13-week study, rats were fed krill oil or control diets. There were no differences noted in body weight, food consumption or in the functional observation battery parameters in either gender. Differences in both haematology and clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill oil-treated groups. However these findings were of no toxicological significance. Significant decreases in absolute and covariant heart weight in some krill oil-treated animals were noted although no corresponding histological changes were observed. In addition, periportal microvesicular hepatocyte vacuolation was noted histologically in males fed 5% krill oil. This finding was not associated with other indications of hepatic dysfunction. Given that the effects of the 13-week toxicity study were non-toxic in nature, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL for the conditions of this study was considered to be 5% krill oil. The genotoxicity experiments documented no mutagenicity of krill oil in bacteria.

  7. Acute toxicity profiling of the ethyl acetate fraction ofSwietenia macrophyllaseeds andin-vitroneuroprotection studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad, Mustak; Tiang, Ning; Kumari, Yatinesh; Goh, Bey Hing; Jaiswal, Yogini; Rosli, Rozita; Williams, Leonard; Shaikh, Mohd Farooq

    2017-02-01

    Swietenia macrophylla (SM) is a medicinally important plant found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The ethyl acetate fraction of the seeds of S. macrophylla (SMEAF) is reported to exhibit potent anticancer, antitumor, anti-inflammatory and antifeedant activities. Till date, there have been no studies reported on the acute oral toxicity profile of the ethyl acetate fraction of the seeds of SM. The objective of the present study was to determine the acute toxicity of SMEAF and evaluate the in - vitro neuroprotective activity of SMEAF using primary neuronal cell cultures. In acute oral toxicity study, the SMEAF did not produce any lethal signs of morbidity and mortality. Histo-pathological findings, support the safety of SMEAF, as there were no significant changes observed in any of the parameters studied. Based on the results obtained in MTT assay, we infer that SMEAF has a significant neuroprotective effect, as it increased the cell viability and exhibited protection to the neuronal cells against TBHP induced oxidative stress. Thus, SMEAF can be suggested for use in the development of herbal drug formulations with neuroprotective potential.

  8. Chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium: The evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asic, Adna; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Besic, Larisa; Mehinovic, Lejla; Hasic, Azra; Kozaric, Mirza; Hukic, Mirsada; Marjanovic, Damir

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the current state of knowledge on chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium (DU) and their effect on living systems and cell lines. This was done by presenting a summary of previous investigations conducted on different mammalian body systems and cell cultures in terms of potential changes caused by either chemical toxicity or radioactivity of DU. In addition, the authors aimed to point out the limitations of those studies and possible future directions. The majority of both in vitro and in vivo studies performed using animal models regarding possible effects caused by acute or chronic DU exposure has been reviewed. Furthermore, exposure time and dose, DU particle solubility, and uranium isotopes as factors affecting the extent of DU effects have been discussed. Special attention has been dedicated to chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and DNA breaks, as well as micronuclei formation and epigenetic changes, as DU has recently been considered a possible causative factor of all these processes. Therefore, this approach might represent a novel area of study of DU-related irradiation effects on health. Since different studies offer contradictory results, the main aim of this review is to summarize and briefly discuss previously obtained results in order to identify the current opinion on DU toxicity and radioactivity effects in relation to exposure type and duration, as well as DU properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral 28-day and developmental toxicity studies of (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Kieran; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Pawlosky, Robert; Carter, Emma; Knight, Nicholas S.; Murray, Andrew J.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; King, M. Todd; Wong, Andrea W.; Roberts, Ashley; Robertson, Jeremy; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    (R)-3-Hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (ketone monoester) has been developed as an oral source of ketones, which may be utilized for energy. In a 28-day toxicity study, Crl:WI (Wistar) rats received diets containing, as 30% of the calories, ketone monoester (12 and 15 g/kg body weight/day for male and female rats, respectively). Control groups received either carbohydrate- or fat-based diets. Rats in the test group consumed less feed and gained less weight than control animals; similar findings have been documented in studies of ketogenic diets. Between-group differences were noted in selected hematology, coagulation, and serum chemistry parameters; however, values were within normal physiological ranges and/or were not accompanied by other changes indicative of toxicity. Upon gross and microscopic evaluation, there were no findings associated with the ketone monoester. In a developmental toxicity study, pregnant Crl:WI (Han) rats were administered 2 g/kg body weight/day ketone monoester or water (control) via gavage on days 6 through 20 of gestation. No Caesarean-sectioning or litter parameters were affected by the test article. The overall incidence of fetal alterations was higher in the test group; however, there were no specific alterations attributable to the test substance. The results of these studies support the safety of ketone monoester. PMID:22504461

  10. The impact of tobacco additives on cigarette smoke toxicity: a critical appraisal of tobacco industry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma; Gomes-Carneiro, Maria Regina; Oliveira, Ana Cecilia Amado Xavier de

    2017-09-21

    Cigarette production involves a number of substances and materials other than just tobacco, paper and a filter. Tobacco additives include flavorings, enhancers, humectants, sugars, and ammonium compounds. Although companies maintain that tobacco additives do not enhance smoke toxicity and do not make cigarettes more attractive or addictive, these claims are questioned by independent researchers. This study reviewed the studies on the effects of tobacco additives on smoke chemistry and toxicity. Tobacco additives lead to higher levels of formaldehyde and minor changes in other smoke analytes. Toxicological studies (bacterial mutagenicity and mammalian cytoxicity tests, rat 90 days inhalation studies and bone-marrow cell micronucleus assays) found that tobacco additives did not enhance smoke toxicity. Rodent assays, however, poorly predicted carcinogenicity of tobacco smoke, and were clearly underpowered to disclose small albeit toxicologically relevant differences between test (with tobacco additives) and control (without tobacco additives) cigarettes. This literature review led to the conclusion that the impact of tobacco additives on tobacco smoke harmfulness remains unclear.

  11. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  12. A phylogeographical study of the toxic benthic dinoflagellate genus Ostreopsis Schmidt

    OpenAIRE

    Penna, Antonella; Fraga, Santiago; Battocchi, Cecilia; Casabianca, Silvia; Giacobbe, Maria Grazia; Riobó, Pilar; Vernesi, Cristiano

    2010-01-01

    Aim Ostreopsis is a benthic and epiphytic dinoflagellate producing potent toxins widespread in tropical and warm temperate coastal areas world-wide. We tested the hypothesis that as it is benthic, it would show distinct biogeographical patterns in comparison with planktonic species. Here, we analyse sequence variability in ribosomal DNA markers to provide the first phylogeographical study of this toxic benthic dinoflagellate. Location Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean. ...

  13. Menthol should not be given a free pass based on studies of biomarkers of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Pamela I; Gardiner, Phillip

    2011-07-01

    Exposure and toxicity studies comparing menthol and nonmenthol cigarettes have resulted in mixed results. On the basis of those results, cigarette manufacturers have concluded that there is no increased harm from the addition of menthol to cigarettes. We propose that such a narrow definition of harm is not appropriate in dealing with the issue of menthol, and its broader negative public health impact. ©2011 AACR

  14. Tanzania Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corresponding author certifies in the letter that all coauthors have read the manuscript and agree to its submission. Every coauthor should .... If you will be using a digital camera to capture images for print production, you must use the highest resolution setting option with the least amount of compression. Digital camera ...

  15. ORiON: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This format is also supported by the ORiON LATEX style sheet (which may be downloaded from http://www.orssa.org.za -> ORiON -> Submissions -> Style Sheets). ... If MS Word is used to prepare a manuscript, it should be utilised appropriately. .... An example of an unpublished technical report [6] is also shown below.

  16. Nigerian Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCOPE The Editorial Board of the Nigerian Veterinary Journal (NVJ) welcomes contributions in the form of original research papers, review articles, clinical case reports, and short communications on all aspects of Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Animal Production. Submissions are accepted on the understanding that ...

  17. Open Veterinary Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All submitted manuscripts are checked for plagiarism using PlagScan Plagiarism Detection Software: The image shows our cooperation with the online plagiarism detection service PlagScan. Submission ... For case reports, text should be organized as follows: Introduction, Case Details, Discussion, and References. Review ...

  18. Ergonomics SA: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscript submissions. Authors should submit their full papers (using the abovementioned template) as an attachment via email to the journal email address j.mcdougall@ru.ac.za. All submitted papers should be sent in .doc or .rtf formats. No other formats will be accepted. Editor. Editor-in-Chief: Ergonomics SA

  19. Manuscript Submission Form

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mr.XAVIER

    To: Indian Academy of Sciences. From: Author or Corresponding author with institutional/corresponding address including e-mail. (on behalf of, and binding upon, all the authors). Journal: Title of manuscript: Date of submission of manuscript: In respect of the work mentioned above, I/we undertake to ensure that: i).

  20. Lagos Historical Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submissions can be made by sending a word processing computer file in MS Word format by e-mail to sarlek@yahoo.com, or by mailing three paper copies to the Editorial Office. Authors should keep a computer file version of their manuscript, as Lagos Historical Review will require a disk version upon acceptance for ...

  1. Africa Sanguine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submissions for consideration may include original scientific articles (which will be peer reviewed), short reports, letters to the Editor, reviews, congress proceedings, and reprints of published articles (with permission). Original scientific work must meet the following requirements: Be a report of original ...

  2. The Study on Acute and Subacute Toxicity and Anti-Cancer Effects of cultivated wild ginseng Herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Rok, Kwon

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate acute and subacute toxicity and sarcoma-180 anti-cancer effects of herbal acupuncture with cultivated wild ginseng (distilled in mice and rats. Methods : Balb/c mice were injected intravenous with cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture for LD50 and acute toxicity test. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenous with cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture for subacute toxicity test. The cultivated wild ginseng herbal-acupuncture was injected at the tail vein of mice. Results : 1. In acute LD50 toxicity test, there was no mortality thus unable to attain the value. 2. Examining the toxic response in the acute toxicity test, there was no sign of toxication. 3. In acute toxic test, running biochemical serum test couldn't yield any differences between the control and experiment groups. 4. In subacute toxicity test, there was no sign of toxication in the experimental groups and didn't show any changes in weight compared to the normal group. 5. In subacute toxicity test, biochemical serum test showed significant increase of Total albumin, Albumin, and Glucose in the experimental group I compared with the control group. Significant decrease of GOT, ALP, GPT, and Triglyceride were shown. In experiment group II, only Glucose showed significant increase compared with the control group. 6. Measuring survival rate for anti-cancer effects of Sarcoma-180 cancer cell line, all the experimental groups showed significant increase in survival rate. 7. Measuring NK cell activity rate, no significant difference was shown throughout the groups. 8. Measuring Interleukin-2 productivity rate, all the experimental groups didn't show significant difference. 9. For manifestation of cytokine mRNA, significant decrease of interleukin-10 was witnessed in the experimental group compared to the control group. Conclusion : According to the results, we can conclude cultivated wild ginseng herbal acupuncture

  3. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: A case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Dayong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Anyang Institute of Technology, Anyang 455000 (China); Lin, Zhifen, E-mail: lzhifen@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhou, Xianghong [Department of Public Management, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Daqiang [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Joint effects of nitriles and aldehydes at non-equitoxic ratios were determined. • A novel descriptor, ligand–receptor interaction energy (E{sub binding}), was employed. • Quantitative relationships for mixtures were developed based on a novel descriptor. • The underlying toxic mechanism was revealed based on quantitative relationships. • Two

  4. Sub-chronic toxicity study of a novel herbal-based formulation (Semelil on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzamfar B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a novel herbal-based compound containing extract of Melilotus officinalis, was formulated for treatment of chronic wounds, especially diabetic foot ulcer. The purpose of this study was to investigate safety and toxicity effects of intramuscular administration of Semelil in dogs. "nPreliminary one-month study with Semelil was performed on 8 male and female dogs divided into 2 groups, test and control, four animals each. Semelil was administered intramuscularlyat a dose of 0.07 ml/kg body wt. once a day to the animals of the test group, while the control group received sterile saline. During experiments, general state of the animals including the dynamics of body weight changes, appetite, motor activity and behavior, hair condition, ECG parameters, rectal temperature of animals and data of hematological and biochemical tests were monitored for signs of toxicity and side-effects. Finally, morphology and histology analyses were performed using standard methods."nNo adverse health or toxicity effects were observed through the course of the study. No damaging consequences of Semelil injections on the functional state of main organs of the experimental animals were found. This observation gave a good evidence of a favorable safety profile compatible with potential therapeutic use of Semelil.

  5. Toxicity Studies on Novel N-Substituted Bicyclo-Heptan-2-Amines at NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Farbaniec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several novel norcamphor derivatives were designed and synthesized as uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists at the phencyclidine (PCP binding site. Such compounds have potential as ligands for understanding and possibly the treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders and other glutamate-dependent disorders. We examined the toxic effects of the compounds as compared with memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist that is FDA approved for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, by testing these compounds on two cell lines: MDCK (to mimic blood brain barrier and N2a (a neuronal cell line. The compounds showed toxicity profiles similar to those of memantine i.e., dose dependence above 100 μM and IC50 values above 150 μM for each cell line. It is known that the serum level of memantine under therapeutic conditions in patients is about 1 µM, indicting these compounds could have acceptable therapeutic indexes. 2-Phenyl-N-(2-(piperidin-1-yl ethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-amine (5a was found to possess acceptable toxicity profiles in both cell lines. Interestingly, this was the compound identified as a good lead in our previous studies based on binding and anticonvulsant (MES activity studies. It has thus emerged as an excellent lead compound for further studies.

  6. Aqueous chlorination of levofloxacin: kinetic and mechanistic study, transformation product identification and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Najjar, Nasma Hamdi; Deborde, Marie; Journel, Romain; Vel Leitner, Nathalie Karpel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain further insight into the fate of levofloxacin during the chlorination process. First, a kinetic study was thus performed at pH 7.2, 20 °C and in the presence of an excess of total chlorine. A slower apparent removal of levofloxacin (k ~ 26 M(-1) s(-1)) was noted when sodium thiosulfate was used to stop the chlorination reaction compared to the degradation observed without using a reducing agent (k ~ 4400 M(-1) s(-1)). The formation of a chlorammonium intermediate which could be converted back into the parent compound through a reaction with thiosulfate was thus expected. This intermediate would result from an initial chlorine attack on the tertiary amine function of levofloxacin. Secondly, four chlorination transformation products were detected by LC/UV/MS analysis. The chemical structures of two of them are proposed. It was suggested that these compounds could come from a secondary reaction of the chlorammonium intermediate on levofloxacin. A reactional pathway is then proposed. Finally, a bioassay using Vibrio fisheri was carried out to study the toxicity pattern during levofloxacin chlorination. An increase in toxicity was observed during chlorination suggesting that the first transformations products formed were more toxic than the parent compound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary toxicity and phytochemical studies of the stem bark aqueous extract of Musanga cecropioides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeneye, A A; Ajagbonna, O P; Adeleke, T I; Bello, S O

    2006-05-24

    These studies were designed to determine the preliminary oral toxicity profile of the crude aqueous stem bark extract of Musanga cecropioides (MCW) in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and its active chemical constituents by way of phytochemistry. The acute oral toxicity study was conducted using limit dose test of Up and Down Procedure according to the OECD/OCDE Test Guidelines on Acute Oral Toxicity (AOT425statPgm, version: 1.0) at a limit dose of 3,000 mg/kg body weight/oral route. Repeat dose oral toxicity studies were conducted by daily oral dosing of 750 mg/kg body weight of MCW dissolved in 1 ml of 0.9% saline and 1 ml of 0.9% saline to rats in the test and control groups, respectively, for 28 days. On day 29, blood samples for bioassays were collected by cardiac puncture under diethyl ether anesthesia. The phytochemical analysis was conducted using standard procedures. The LD(50) estimate of the extract was calculated to be greater than 3,000 mg/kg body weight/oral route. The extract caused a significant (P<0.05) decrease in weight gain, differential eosinophil count and increase in serum creatinine but did not affect the organ weights, other serum electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), HCO(3)(-)), liver enzymes and other hematological indices in test rats. Its phytochemical analysis showed it contains saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids, tannins, phlobatannins, glycosides, reducing sugars and anthraquinones. These results show that the aqueous extract of Musanga cecropioides is relatively safe toxicologically when administered orally. Thus, its use in folkloric medicine as an oral antihypertensive is relatively safe when used over the tested period.

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model System for Studying Drug Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard de Boer

    Full Text Available Today HIV-1 infection is recognized as a chronic disease with obligatory lifelong treatment to keep viral titers below detectable levels. The continuous intake of antiretroviral drugs however, leads to severe and even life-threatening side effects, supposedly by the deleterious impact of nucleoside-analogue type compounds on the functioning of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. For detailed investigation of the yet partially understood underlying mechanisms, the availability of a versatile model system is crucial. We therefore set out to develop the use of Caenorhabditis elegans to study drug induced mitochondrial toxicity. Using a combination of molecular-biological and functional assays, combined with a quantitative analysis of mitochondrial network morphology, we conclude that anti-retroviral drugs with similar working mechanisms can be classified into distinct groups based on their effects on mitochondrial morphology and biochemistry. Additionally we show that mitochondrial toxicity of antiretroviral drugs cannot be exclusively attributed to interference with the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

  9. Toxicity and medical countermeasure studies on the organophosphorus nerve agents VM and VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Helen; Dalton, Christopher H; Price, Matthew E; Graham, Stuart J; Green, A Christopher; Jenner, John; Groombridge, Helen J; Timperley, Christopher M

    2015-04-08

    To support the effort to eliminate the Syrian Arab Republic chemical weapons stockpile safely, there was a requirement to provide scientific advice based on experimentally derived information on both toxicity and medical countermeasures (MedCM) in the event of exposure to VM, VX or VM-VX mixtures. Complementary in vitro and in vivo studies were undertaken to inform that advice. The penetration rate of neat VM was not significantly different from that of neat VX, through either guinea pig or pig skin in vitro. The presence of VX did not affect the penetration rate of VM in mixtures of various proportions. A lethal dose of VM was approximately twice that of VX in guinea pigs poisoned via the percutaneous route. There was no interaction in mixed agent solutions which altered the in vivo toxicity of the agents. Percutaneous poisoning by VM responded to treatment with standard MedCM, although complete protection was not achieved.

  10. Toxicity Study of Nanosilver (Nanocid® on Osteoblast Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayyeh Moaddab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology presents countless opportunities to develop new and improved consumer products for the benefit of society. Despite the wide application of nanomaterials, there is a serious lack of information concerning their impact on human health. The purpose of this study was to assess the biological assay of nanosilver (Nanocid® on osteoblast (G292 cell line. The effect of nanosilver on these cells was evaluated by light microscopy, and by cell proliferation and standard cytotoxicity assays. The results demonstrate a concentration-dependent toxicity for the cell tested, and IC50 was determined 3.42 µg/mL, suggest that the product is more toxic to cancerous cell comparing to other heavy metal ions.

  11. Toxicity of nanoparticles embedded in paints compared to pristine nanoparticles, in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Golanski, Luana; Martens, Johan; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2015-01-22

    The unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials has led to an increased use in the paint and coating industry. In this study, the in vitro toxicity of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag and SiO₂), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO₂, Ag and SiO₂) and control paints without ENPs were compared. In a first experiment, cytotoxicity was assessed using a biculture consisting of human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells and human monocytic cells (THP-1) to determine subtoxic concentrations. In a second experiment, a new coculture model of the lung-blood barrier consisting of 16HBE14o- cells, THP-1 and human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) was used to study pulmonary and extrapulmonary toxicity. The results show that the pristine TiO₂ and Ag ENPs have some cytotoxic effects at relative high dose, while pristine SiO₂ ENPs and all aged paints with ENPs and control paints do not. In the complex triculture model of the lung-blood barrier, no considerable changes were observed after exposure to subtoxic concentration of the different pristine ENPs and paint particles. In conclusion, we demonstrated that although pristine ENPs show some toxic effects, no significant toxicological effects were observed when they were embedded in a complex paint matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies on toxicity, anti-stress and hepato-protective properties of Kombucha tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauline, T; Dipti, P; Anju, B; Kavimani, S; Sharma, S K; Kain, A K; Sarada, S K; Sairam, M; Ilavazhagan, G; Devendra, K; Selvamurthy, W

    2001-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate toxicity, anti-stress activity and hepato-protective properties of Kombucha tea. Kombucha tea was fed orally for 15 days using three different doses i.e. normal dose, five and ten times the dose. Rats were then sacrificed and various biochemical, and histological parameters were estimated. Anti-stress activity was evaluated either by 1) by exposing animals to cold and hypoxia and estimating the levels of malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione in plasma/blood or 2) by subjecting the animals to restraint stress and recording faecal output. Hepato-toxicity was induced by challenging the animals to an acute dose of paracetamol (1 gm/kg) orally and determining the plasma levels of SGPT, SGOT and MDA. The effect of oral administration of different doses of K-tea to albino rats was examined and the results indicate that K-tea has no significant toxicity as revealed by various biochemical and histopathological parameters. K-tea has been found to prevent lipid peroxidation and fall in reduced glutathione level when rats were exposed to cold and hypoxia in simulated chamber. Further, K-tea has also been found to decrease the Wrap-restraint faecal pellet output in rats. K-tea has also been found to decrease paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity significantly. The study shows that K-tea has anti-stress and hepato-protective activities.

  13. Subchronic toxicity study of the total flavonoids from Rosa laevigata Michx fruit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Sun, Huijun; Li, Hua; Yao, Jihong; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2012-03-01

    The total flavonoids (TFs) from Rosa laevigata Michx fruit showed hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities. However, the safety of this natural product has not been investigated. In the present paper, a 90-day subchronic toxicity study was conducted, and the tested TFs was orally administered to rats at the doses of 500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day. The toxicity of the TFs was evaluated on base of ophthalmic examination, body weight, feed/water consumption, urinalysis, hematology, clinical biochemistry and pathology. No toxic signs of the TFs at the doses of 500 and 1000mg/kg/day were observed. However, decreased PLT was found in the 2000mg/kg/day groups and increased intercellular space of myocardial cells was observed in the male 2000mg/kg/day group compared with control. A significant increase in the relative cardiac weight was observed in the male 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day groups. And the significant decrease in the absolute and relative weight of adrenals in the female 1000 and 2000mg/kg groups was happened. The TFs could cause mild side effects at the dose of 1000mg/kg/day in males and females. Thus, the dose of 500mg/kg/day for male and female were selected as the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). The present study provides useful data for subsequent researches and new drug exploration of the TFs from R. laevigata Michx fruit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phytochemical screening and toxicity studies on the methanol extract of the seeds of moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajibade, Temitayo Olabisi; Arowolo, Ruben; Olayemi, Funsho Olakitike

    2013-05-07

    The seeds of Moringa oleifera were collected, air-dried, pulverized, and subjected to cold extraction with methanol. The methanol extract was screened phytochemically for its chemical components and used for acute and sub-acute toxicity studies in rats. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, tannins, terpenes, alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, and cardiac glycosides but the absence of anthraquinones. Although signs of acute toxicity were observed at a dose of 4,000 mg kg-1 in the acute toxicity test, and mortality was recorded at 5,000 mg kg-1, no adverse effect was observed at concentrations lower than 3,000 mg kg-1. The median lethal dose of the extract in rat was 3,873 mg kg-1. Sub-acute administration of the seed extract caused significant (p<0.05) increase in the levels of alanine and aspartate transferases (ALT and AST), and significant (p<0.05) decrease in weight of experimental rats, at 1,600 mg kg-1. The study concludes that the extract of seeds of M. oleifera is safe both for medicinal and nutritional uses.

  15. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Java Tea Leaf Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariyani, Raghunath; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Azam, Amalina Ahmad; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2015-01-01

    The term Java tea refers to the decoction of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) Benth (Lamiaceae) leaves, which are widely consumed by the people in Europe and South East Asian countries. The OS leaves are known for their use in traditional medicinal systems as a prophylactic and curative agent for urinary stone, diabetes, and hypertension and also as a diuretic agent. The present study was aimed at evaluating its possible toxicity. Herein, the major phytochemical constituents of microwave dried OS leaf, which is the common drying process for tea sachets in the market, were also identified. The acute oral toxicity test of aqueous, 50% aqueous ethanolic, and ethanolic extracts of OS was performed at a dose of 5000 mg/Kg body weight of Sprague-Dawley rats. During the 14-day study, the animals were observed for any mortality, behavioral, motor-neuronal abnormalities, body weight, and feed-water consumption pattern. The hematological and serum biochemical parameters to assess the kidney and liver functions were carried out, along with the histological analysis of these organs. It was found that all microwave dried OS leaf extracts did not cause any toxic effects or mortality at the administered dose. No abnormality was noticed in all selected parameters in rats of both sexes as compared with their respective control groups. Thus, the possible oral lethal dose for microwave dried Java tea leaves is more than 5000 mg/Kg body weight.

  16. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Java Tea Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Pariyani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term Java tea refers to the decoction of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS Benth (Lamiaceae leaves, which are widely consumed by the people in Europe and South East Asian countries. The OS leaves are known for their use in traditional medicinal systems as a prophylactic and curative agent for urinary stone, diabetes, and hypertension and also as a diuretic agent. The present study was aimed at evaluating its possible toxicity. Herein, the major phytochemical constituents of microwave dried OS leaf, which is the common drying process for tea sachets in the market, were also identified. The acute oral toxicity test of aqueous, 50% aqueous ethanolic, and ethanolic extracts of OS was performed at a dose of 5000 mg/Kg body weight of Sprague-Dawley rats. During the 14-day study, the animals were observed for any mortality, behavioral, motor-neuronal abnormalities, body weight, and feed-water consumption pattern. The hematological and serum biochemical parameters to assess the kidney and liver functions were carried out, along with the histological analysis of these organs. It was found that all microwave dried OS leaf extracts did not cause any toxic effects or mortality at the administered dose. No abnormality was noticed in all selected parameters in rats of both sexes as compared with their respective control groups. Thus, the possible oral lethal dose for microwave dried Java tea leaves is more than 5000 mg/Kg body weight.

  17. Analysis of historical control litter parameters of reproduction toxicity studies in Sprague-Dawley derived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M; Kast, A

    1989-04-01

    Control litter data from reproduction toxicity studies in SD derived rats bred in our closed colony were investigated for historical changes, differences due to study design or generations, seasonal variations and effects of vehicle-treatment. The litter size did not change visibly during the entire 16-year period, but the number of live fetuses differed significantly between study designs or generations. The fetal weight gradually increased during these years. The malformation rate decreased, while the rate of 14 th ribs remained stable. There were no seasonal variations and no effects of vehicle-treatment.

  18. Repeated dose 28-days oral toxicity study of Carica papaya L. leaf extract in Sprague Dawley rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Rashid, Badrul Amini; Semail, Raja Hazlini Raja; Abdullah, Noordini; Jantan, Ibrahim; Muhammad, Hussin; Ismail, Zakiah

    2012-01-01

    .... Despite its benefits, very few studies on their potential toxicity have been described. The aim of the present study was to characterize the chemical composition of the leaf extract from 'Sekaki' C...

  19. Prediction of Acute Mammalian Toxicity Using QSAR Methods: A Case Study of Sulfur Mustard and Its Breakdown Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wheeler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Predicting toxicity quantitatively, using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR, has matured over recent years to the point that the predictions can be used to help identify missing comparison values in a substance’s database. In this manuscript we investigate using the lethal dose that kills fifty percent of a test population (the LD50 for determining relative toxicity of a number of substances. In general, the smaller the LD50 value, the more toxic the chemical, and the larger the LD50 value, the lower the toxicity. When systemic toxicity and other specific toxicity data are unavailable for the chemical(s of interest, during emergency responses, LD50 values may be employed to determine the relative toxicity of a series of chemicals. In the present study, a group of chemical warfare agents and their breakdown products have been evaluated using four available rat oral QSAR LD50 models. The QSAR analysis shows that the breakdown products of Sulfur Mustard (HD are predicted to be less toxic than the parent compound as well as other known breakdown products that have known toxicities. The QSAR estimated break down products LD50 values ranged from 299 mg/kg to 5,764 mg/kg. This evaluation allows for the ranking and toxicity estimation of compounds for which little toxicity information existed; thus leading to better risk decision making in the field.

  20. Depth Profiling (ICP-MS Study of Toxic Metal Buildup in Concrete Matrices: Potential Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bassioni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential of concrete material to accumulate toxic trace elements using ablative laser technology (ICP-MS. Concrete existing in offshore structures submerged in seawater acts as a sink for hazardous metals, which could be gradually released into the ocean creating pollution and anoxic conditions for marine life. Ablative laser technology is a valuable tool for depth profiling concrete to evaluate the distribution of toxic metals and locate internal areas where such metals accumulate. Upon rapid degradation of concrete these “hotspots” could be suddenly released, thus posing a distinct threat to aquatic life. Our work simulated offshore drilling conditions by immersing concrete blocks in seawater and investigating accumulated toxic trace metals (As, Be, Cd, Hg, Os, Pb in cored samples by laser ablation. The experimental results showed distinct inhomogeneity in metal distribution. The data suggest that conditions within the concrete structure are favorable for random metal accumulation at certain points. The exact mechanism for this behavior is not clear at this stage and has considerable scope for extended research including modeling and remedial studies.

  1. Synthesis, structure and toxicity evaluation of ethanolamine nitro/chloronitrobenzoates: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Manuela; Halip, Liliana; Bourosh, Paulina; Chicu, Sergiu Adrian; Chumakov, Yurii

    2017-12-06

    Nitroaromatic and chloronitroaromatic compounds have been a subject of great interest in industry and recently in medical-pharmaceutic field. 2-Chloro-4-nitro/2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoic acids and 4-nitrobenzoic acid are promising new agents for the treatment of main infectious killing diseases in the world: immunodeficiency diseases and tuberculosis. New ethanolamine nitro/chloronitrobenzoates were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-vis, FT-IR and elementary analysis techniques. The toxicity of the compounds prepared and correspondent components was evaluated using Hydractinia echinata as test system. A significant lower toxicity was observed for nitro-derivative compared with chloronitro-derivatives and individual components. Crystallographic studies, together with the chemical reactivity and stability profiles resulted from density functional theory and ab initio molecular orbital calculations, explain the particular behavior of ethanolamine 4-nitrobenzoate in biological test. The experimental and theoretical data reveal the potential of these compounds to contribute to the design of new active pharmaceutical ingredients with lower toxicity.

  2. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

  3. Impact of Skin Toxicities Associated with Targeted Cancer Therapies on Body Image: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Cécile; Razavi, Darius; Bungener, Catherine; Mateus, Christine; Lanoy, Emilie; Verschoore, Michèle; Dauchy, Sarah; Robert, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Body-image issues associated with dermatological side effects induced by anticancer-targeted therapies have not been specifically explored until now despite growing literature about their impact on quality of life. Prospective and longitudinal investigations were needed. The aim of our study was to describe body-image changes occurring with cutaneous toxicities and their psychosocial impact on patients. Thirty-three patients were evaluated four times during the first 3 months of targeted therapy in terms of body satisfaction, physical attitudes and depression with validated and ad hoc questionnaires. The NCI-CTCAE V4.0 was used to grade adverse dermatological events. Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted with SPSS 14.0 software. Ninety-four per cent of the patients developed skin toxicities. Body satisfaction remained stable and slightly better than average over this period. About one-third of the patients reported body-image issues at baseline. Body satisfaction and depression levels at baseline appeared to be significantly associated with body-image issues after 3 months of therapy. In the framework of regular dermatological monitoring, skin toxicities did not appear to be associated with body-image issues. Body satisfaction and depressive symptoms at the beginning of targeted therapy emerged as critical factors that practitioners should consider in order to prevent deterioration of body image that could impact on quality of life and compromise compliance.

  4. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of April 14-21, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 4.3, Poplar Creek Mile 5.1, and Poplar Creek Mile 6.0 on April 13, 15, and 18. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to daphnids in undiluted samples; however, toxicity to fathead minnows (significantly reduced survival) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Daphnid reproduction was significantly less than controls in 50 percent dilutions of samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0, while no toxicity to fathead minnows was shown in diluted (50 percent) samples.

  5. Clinicopathological Studies on Vitamin D(3) Toxicity and Therapeutic Evaluation of Aloe vera in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavhan, Sambhaji G; Brar, R S; Banga, H S; Sandhu, H S; Sodhi, S; Gadhave, P D; Kothule, V R; Kammon, A M

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the clinical signs, hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes in vitamin D(3) toxicity at a dose rate 2 mg/kg b.wt. of vitamin D(3) and to assess the protective effect of Aloe vera in vitamin D(3) toxicity. The clinical signs observed were anorexia, progressive weight loss, difficulty in movement and respiration, diarrhea, epistaxis, subnormal body temperature and nervous signs before death. Mortality was observed in treated rats between day 10 and day 19 of treatment. The gross postmortem changes observed were severe emaciation, white chalky deposits on epicardial surface of heart, pin point white deposits on cortical surface of kidneys with pale yellow discoloration and diffused white deposits on serosal surface of stomach and intestine with bloody ingesta in lumen. The hematological changes included non-significant increase in hemoglobin and total leukocyte count and significant increase in relative neutrophil count. The biochemical changes observed were significant increase in plasma concentration of calcium, phosphorus and blood urea nitrogen, whereas a significant decrease in the concentration of albumin and total plasma protein was observed. The histopathological lesions included calcification of various organs, viz., tongue, stomach, intestines, kidney, heart, aorta, larynx, trachea, lungs, spleen, choroid plexus arteries of brain and vas deferens. The Aloe vera juice (2.5% in drinking water) has no protective effect on vitamin D(3) toxicity (2 mg/kg b.wt.).

  6. Embryo-Fetal Developmental Toxicity Studies with Pregabalin in Mice and Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Dennis C

    2016-04-01

    Pregabalin was evaluated for potential developmental toxicity in mice and rabbits. Pregabalin was administered once daily by oral gavage to female albino mice (500, 1250, or 2500 mg/kg) and New Zealand White rabbits (250, 500, or 1250 mg/kg) during organogenesis (gestation day 6 through 15 [mice] or 6 through 20 [rabbits]). Fetuses were evaluated for viability, growth, and morphological development. Pregabalin administration to mice did not induce maternal or developmental toxicity at doses up to 2500 mg/kg, which was associated with a maternal plasma exposure (AUC0-24 ) of 3790 μg•hr/ml, ≥30 times the expected human exposure at the maximum recommended daily dose (MRD; 600 mg/day). In rabbits, treatment-related clinical signs occurred at all doses (AUC0-24 of 1397, 2023, and 4803 μg•hr/ml at 250, 500, and 1250 mg/kg, respectively). Maternal toxicity was evident at all doses and included ataxia, hypoactivity, and cool to touch. In addition, abortion and females euthanized moribund with total resorption occurred at 1250 mg/kg. There were no treatment-related malformations at any dose. At 1250 mg/kg, compared with study and historical controls, the percentage of fetuses with retarded ossification was significantly increased and the mean number of ossification sites was decreased, which correlated with decreased fetal and placental weights, consistent with in utero growth retardation. Therefore, the no-effect dose for developmental toxicity in rabbits was 500 mg/kg, which produced systemic exposure approximately 16-times human exposure at the MRD. These findings indicate that pregabalin, at the highest dose tested, was not teratogenic in mice or rabbits. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interaction between Ammonium Toxicity and Green Tide Development Over Seagrass Meadows: A Laboratory Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Moreno-Marín

    Full Text Available Eutrophication affects seagrasses negatively by increasing light attenuation through stimulation of biomass of fast-growing, bloom-forming algae and because high concentrations of ammonium in the water can be toxic to higher plants. We hypothesized nevertheless, that moderate amounts of nitrophilic macroalgae that coexists with seagrasses under eutrophic conditions, can alleviate the harmful effects of eutrophication on seagrasses by reducing ammonium concentrations in the seawater to non-toxic levels because such algae have a very large capacity to take up inorganic nutrients. We studied therefore how combinations of different ammonium concentrations (0, 25 and 50 μM and different standing stocks of macroalgae (i.e. 0, 1 and 6 layers of Ulva sp. affected survival, growth and net production of the seagrass Zostera noltei. In the absence of Ulva sp., increasing ammonium concentrations had a negative influence on the performance of Z. noltei. The presence of Ulva sp. without ammonium supply had a similar, but slightly smaller, negative effect on seagrass fitness due to light attenuation. When ammonium enrichment was combined with presence of Ulva sp., Ulva sp. ameliorated some of negative effects caused by high ammonium availability although Ulva sp. lowered the availability of light. Benthic microalgae, which increased in biomass during the experiment, seemed to play a similar role as Ulva sp.--they contributed to remove ammonium from the water, and thus, aided to keep the ammonium concentrations experienced by Z. noltei at relatively non-toxic levels. Our findings show that moderate amounts of drift macroalgae, eventually combined with increasing stocks of benthic microalgae, may aid seagrasses to alleviate toxic effects of ammonium under eutrophic conditions, which highlights the importance of high functional diversity for ecosystem resistance to anthropogenic disturbance.

  8. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of the Median Septum of Juglans regia in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Ravanbakhsh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Median septum of Juglans regia L. (Juglandaceae with anti - diabetic effects has been used in Iranian traditional medicine. The present study estimates both oral acute and subchronic toxicities. Methods: In the oral acute toxicity study, female Wistar rats were treated with doses of 10, 100, 1000, 1600 , 2900 and 5000 mg/ kg of the Juglans regia septum of methanol extract (JRSME, and were monitored for 14 days. In subchronic study, JRSME was administered by gavage at dose of 1000 mg/kg daily in Wistar rats for 28 days. Antioxidant status and biochemical examinations were fulfilled, and the vital organs were subjected to pathological analyses. Results: The extract did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the medium lethal dose must be higher than 5000 mg/kg. In subchronic study, No significant morpholo gical and histopathological changes were observed in the studied tissues. There was a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde (MDA level in treated group compared to control after 4 weeks of JRSME intake. The treatment of rats resulted in a signific ant reduction of serum urea level (p<0.05, kidney’s xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH activity (p<0.001 and elevation of aldehyde oxidase (AO activity (p<0.05 in kidney. In the treated group, the mean diameter of glomerulus and proximal urine tube epitheliu m stature was slightly greater than control group. A significant increase in serum MDA level is subject for further studies. Conclusion: This study showed that the extract has no acute or subacute adverse effects with dose of 1000 mg/kg. The administratio n of JRSME may improve kidney structure and function and help in treatment of some chronic diseases.

  9. Journal of Psychology in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Please note that this journal is no longer published by NISC. Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these ...

  10. Hindrance of conservation biology by delays in the submission of manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Ryan P; Supp, Sarah R; Cobbold, Stephanie M

    2010-04-01

    Timely dissemination of scientific findings depends not only on rapid publication of submitted manuscripts, a topic which has received much discussion, but also on rapid submission of research after the research is completed. We measured submission delay (time from the last date of data collection to the submission of a manuscript) for every paper from 14 journals in 2007 and compared these submission delays among four fields of biology (conservation, taxonomy, behavior, and evolution). Manuscripts published in leading journals in the field of conservation biology have the longest delays in publication of accepted manuscripts and the longest intervals between completion of research and submission of the manuscript. Delay in manuscript submission accounts for more than half of the total time from last date of data collection to publication. Across fields, the number of authors was significantly negatively correlated with submission delay, but conservation journals had the second highest number of authors and the greatest submission delay, so submission of conservation manuscripts was not hindered by a shortage of collaboration relative to other fields. Rejection rates were greater in conservation journals than in behavior and evolution, but rejection times were faster; thus, there were no obvious net differences among fields in the time papers spent waiting to be rejected. Publication delay has been reduced significantly in the last 7 years, but was still greater in conservation journals than in any of the other three fields we studied. Thus, the urgent field of conservation biology is hindered in both preparation and publication of manuscripts.

  11. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics in Hanalei Bay, Kaua'i, Hawaii, part III, studies of sediment toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Robert S.; Nipper, Marion; Field, Michael; Biedenbach, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Toxicity tests are commonly conducted as a measure of the bioavailability of toxic chemicals to biota in an environment. Chemical analyses alone are insufficient to determine whether contaminants pose a threat to biota. Porewater toxicity tests are extremely sensitive to a broad range of contaminants in marine environments and provide ecologically relevant data on sensitive life stages. The inclusion of porewater toxicity testing as an additional indicator of sediment quality provides a more comprehensive picture of contaminant effects in these sensitive habitats. In this study purple-spined sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development porewater toxicity tests were used to evaluate the sediments collected from the coastal environment around Hanalei Bay, Kaua’i, Hawaii. These tests have been used previously to assess the bioavailability of contaminants associated with sediments in the vicinity of coral reefs.

  12. [Toxic megacolon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, M; Ganslmayer, M; Strauß, R; Neurath, M F

    2015-10-01

    Toxic megacolon constitutes a feared, life-threatening complication of severe intestinal inflammation and is a challenge for interdisciplinary medical care. Specific aspects of conservative treatment based on current scientific evidence derived from guidelines, qualified reviews, and scientific studies are presented, which provide a rational approach and maximize therapeutic success. This work is based on a selective literature review and the authors' experience of many years in gastroenterology and intensive care. Toxic megacolon requires a rapid interdisciplinary assessment. Depending on the underlying etiology, an individual treatment concept needs to be developed. If an infectious or inflammatory cause is probable, a conservative approach can reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. A step-wise approach with controlled reevaluations of the response to therapy after 72 h and 7 days avoids uncontrolled delay of surgical options further ensuring patient safety. Despite a decreasing incidence of toxic megacolon, it remains an interdisciplinary therapeutic challenge.

  13. 76 FR 64357 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ...)/Study of Latinos (SOL) will identify risk factors for cardiovascular and lung disease in Hispanic populations and determine the role of acculturation in the prevalence and development of these diseases... Chicago, Miami, San Diego, and the Bronx. The study will examine measures of obesity, physical activity...

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Sport on Submissive Behavior and Communication Skills of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakay, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the differences in submissive behaviors and communication skills of high school students in terms of sports activities and relationship between communication skills and properties of submissive behavior of high school students who are actively involved in sports activities. In this respect at the study, 728…

  15. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity studies of erythritol in Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Alex K; de Cock, Peter; Crincoli, Christine M; Means, Charlotte; Wismer, Tina; Pappas, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Polyols, also known as sugar alcohols, are widely used in the formulation of tooth-friendly and reduced-calorie foods. Considering the significant health benefits of polyols in products formulated for human use, there is increased interest in evaluating potential uses in companion animal applications. Erythritol and xylitol are two polyols which are currently widely used in products ranging from reduced-sugar foods to personal care and cosmetics. Published studies have shown that both of these compounds are well-tolerated in rodents. Their toxicity profiles differ when comparing canine safety data. Doses of xylitol as low as 0.15 g/kg-BW in dogs can result in life-threatening hypoglycemia and acute liver failure, whereas erythritol is well-tolerated in dogs with reported No Adverse Effect Levels upwards of 5 g/kg-BW/day in repeat-dose studies. While pivotal studies substantiating the safe use of erythritol in humans have been published, there are limited published studies to support the safe use of erythritol in dogs. Here we present the results of an acute oral and a sub-chronic oral toxicity study in Beagle dogs. Given the potential health benefits of oral products formulated with erythritol and the data presented herein substantiating the safe use in dogs, erythritol can be safely used in products for canines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity studies of six types of carbon nanoparticles in a chicken-embryo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Sawosz, Ewa; Halik, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide. Experimental solutions at a concentration of 500 µg/mL were administrated into the egg albumin. Gross pathology and the rate of survival were examined after 5, 10, 15, and 20 days of incubation. After 20 days of incubation, blood samples were collected......In the present study, the toxicity of six different types of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) was investigated using a chicken-embryo model. Fertilized chicken eggs were divided into the following treatment groups: placebo, diamond NPs, graphite NPs, pristine graphene, small graphene oxide, large...

  17. [Nursing diagnoses for the patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Taize Muritiba; Silva, Iranete Almeida Sousa

    2012-01-01

    This is a retrospective case study of a patient affected by toxic epidermal necrolysis in the intensive care unit of a public hospital, with the goal to apprehend, starting from the clinical judgments of the nurses, theirs nursing diagnoses. Thirteen nursing diagnoses were evidenced and, also, it was evidenced the necessity of the theoretical improvement of those professionals about the Systematization of Nursing Care, and on the sense of value that this practice may add to nursing in the pursuit of individualized assistance to the patients under their care.

  18. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayasteltar, Liju; Nair, Gopakumar Gopinathan; Maliakel, Balu; Kuttan, Ramadasan; I.M., Krishnakumar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol), as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days) and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and...

  19. Quantitative structure-activity relationships in fish toxicity studies. Part 1: relationship for 50 industrial pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenemann, H.

    1981-01-01

    LC50-experiments have been conducted using guppies subjected to 72 industrial pollutants. The correlation of the LC50 with several expressions of the hydrophobicity of these chemicals has been studied. Calculated log Poct-values appeared to satisfy more than HPLC retention indices, solubility data or molecular connectivity indices. One QSAR, with log Poct as the only variable, gave good estimations of the toxicity of most of the tested compounds with log Poct less than 6. No LC50 could be determined for solutions of compounds with log Poct greater than 6.

  20. Toxicity Study of Antidiabetics Functional Drink of Piper crocatum and Cinnamomum burmannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEGA SAFITHRI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Piper crocatum and Cinnamomum burmannii formulations is known to be a new diabetes functional drink. Thus, its toxicological profile needs to be studied. At present, the formulation was evaluated for the repeated dose toxicity study. The Sprague dawley albino rats were treated with P. crocatum and C. burmannii formulations (0, 630, 1260, and 1890 mg/kg and administered orally for a period of 28 days in albino rats. The effects on body weight, food and water consumption, organ weight, hematology, clinical biochemistry as well as histology were studied. There were no significant differences in the body weight, organ weights and feeding habits between control and treated animals. Hematological analysis showed no marked differences in any of the parameters examined in either the control or treated groups. There were no significant changes that occurred in the blood chemistry analysis including glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, SGPT, and SGOT in experimental animals. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed. The formulation of P. crocatum and C. burmannii was found safe in repeated dose toxicity studies.

  1. Safety assessment of lutein and zeaxanthin (Lutemax 2020): subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikrishnan, R; Rusia, Shraddha; Ilamurugan, G; Salunkhe, Ulhas; Deshpande, Jayant; Shankaranarayanan, J; Shankaranarayana, M L; Soni, Madhu G

    2011-11-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin, naturally occurring carotenoids, have shown to reduce the risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Lutemax 2020 is a lutein and zeaxanthin (including meso-isomer) enriched product obtained from Marigold flowers (Tagetes erecta L). The objective of the present study was to investigate adverse effects, if any, of Lutemax 2020 in acute and subchronic toxicity, and mutagenicity studies. In acute toxicity study in rats no lethality was noted at 2000 mg Lutemax 2020/kg body weight (bw). In the subchronic study, Wistar rats (10/sex/group) were administered (gavage) lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate at dose levels of 0, 4, 40 and 400mg/kg bw/day for 90-days. Compared with the control group, administration of lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate did not result in any toxicologically significant treatment-related changes in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, body weight gains, feed consumption, and organ weights. No toxicologically relevant findings were noted in urinalysis, hematology or clinical biochemistry parameters at the end of the treatment or recovery period. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related gross or histopathology findings. The results of mutagenicity testing in Salmonella typhimurium did not reveal any genotoxicity. The no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate was determined as 400mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antihyperglycemic and subchronic toxicity study of Moringa stenopetala leaves in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesemma Sileshi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antihyperglycemic activity and subchronic toxicity of an extract of Moringa stenopetala (M. stenopetala leaves in mice. Methods: Antihyperglycemic activities of various solvent subfractions and chromatographic fractions were investigated in alloxan induced diabetic mice. All fractions were administered intragastrically using oral gavage at a dose of 500 mg/kg. For the subchronic toxicity investigation of the 70% ethanol extract of M. stenopetala leaves, a daily dose of 300 or 600 mg/kg body weight was administered to mice over 96 d. Some hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured as indices of organ specific toxicity. Preliminary phytochemical screening and antioxidant activity investigation was done using thin layer chromatography method. Results: Among the solvent subfractions of the 70% ethanol extract tested only butanol subfraction exhibited significant reduction of blood glucose level (P<0.05 at 2 h (53.44% and 4.5 h (46.34% in diabetic mice and it was further fractionated chromatographically. This resulted in isolation of three chromatographic fractions (fraction 1, 2, and 3 which exhibited maximal blood glucose reduction (P<0.01 at 6 h (77.2%, at 4.5 h (69.1% and at 4.5 h (71.96% after administration. Furthermore, these fractions exhibited comparable antioxidant activity, and preliminary phytochemical screening indicated the presence of phenolic compounds which may be phenolic glycoside in all fractions. The subchronic toxicity study of the 70% ethanol extract of M. stenopetala leaves revealed that there were no significant differences in body weight, between controls and treated mice. Hematological analysis showed no differences in most parameters examined. Furthermore, it did not significantly affect plasma creatinine, urea, cholesterol, triglycerides and CA125 levels. It also did not significantly affect the plasma T3, T4 and THS level. It, however, caused a significant dose

  3. Acute and short-term toxicity studies on p-aminodiphenylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R L; Khanna, S K; Shanker, R; Singh, G B

    1986-06-01

    p- Aminodiphenylamine (p-ADPA), an aromatic amine of wide industrial applications, also finds human exposure through hair dye preparations or via ingestion of a common food colouring metanil yellow. Acute and short-term toxicity studies in albino rats have been done following the biochemical markers, hematology and tissue histopathology. The acute LD50 value of p-ADPA is 0.847 g/kg body weight which qualifies for the 'moderately toxic' category. In short-term studies, animals were fed p-ADPA, mixed in routine laboratory diet at the concentrations of 0.0 (control), 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75% (w/w), daily for 90 days. Feed intake and body weight gain in the highest dosed group were reduced. Hematological examinations exhibited moderate anemic conditions with decreased red blood cells, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and lowered packed cell volume suggesting normocytic normochromic anemia at 0.25% onward levels of p-ADPA intake. There was significant increase in the activities of acid/alkaline phosphatases and GOT/GPT in serum with simultaneous depletion from liver at the levels of 0.5 and 0.75% p-ADPA intake, suggesting biochemical lesions of the liver. Testicular LDH and hyaluronidase were lowered at 0.5 and 0.75% levels indicating partial arrest of spermatogenesis. These findings were supported histopathologically. The study warrants careful consideration on its exposure, industrially or through common food color or hair dye preparations.

  4. Thirteen-week repeated dose toxicity study of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Tomoko; Watanabe, Takao; Okamura, Miwa; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Kashida, Yoko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2003-12-01

    Wormwood, Artemisia absinthium, is a very bitter plant, and its extract has been used as food additives such as seasonings for food and drinks. A 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of wormwood extract was performed in both sexes of Wistar Hannover (GALAS) rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups consisting of 10 males and 10 females each, and were given water containing 0, 0.125, 0.5, or 2% wormwood extract. All rats had survived at the end of the study, and no changes indicating obvious toxicities that are attributable to the treatment of wormwood extract were observed in the body weights, hematological and serum biochemical examinations, organ weights, and histopathological examinations. Based on the results of the present study, the NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of wormwood extract of Wistar Hannover rats was estimated to be 2% (equivalent to 1.27 g/kg/day in males and 2.06 g/kg/day in females) or more.

  5. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liju Vijayasteltar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol, as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg b.wt. for 90 days toxicity studies on Wistar rats and mutagenicity studies employing Salmonella typhimurium strains. Administration of Clovinol did not result in any toxicologically significant changes in clinical/behavioural observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, organ weights, feed consumption, urinalysis, hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters when compared to the untreated control group of animals, indicating the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL as 1000 mg/kg b.wt./day; the highest dose tested. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related histopathology changes. Clovinol did not show genotoxicity when tested on TA-98, TA-100 and TA-102 with or without metabolic activation; rather exhibited significant antimutagenic potential against the known mutagens, sodium azide, NPD and tobacco as well as against 2-acetamidoflourene, which needed metabolic activation for mutagenicity.

  6. Novel approaches to the use of cytochrome P450 activities in wildlife toxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VandenBerg, M. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology; Bosveld, A.T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many wildlife toxicity studies, e.g. with avian species, use cytochrome P450 activities as markers for biological activities of environmental contaminants. It has been established that induction of CYP1A1 correlates with Ah-receptor mediated toxicity of dioxin-like compounds in many species. In addition, CYP1A1 plays a significant role in bioactivation of polycyclic aromatics. So far very few studies focused on the natural function of P450 isoenzymes in wildlife species. Besides classical hepatic CYP1A(1) associated activities, like EROD and AHH, several new techniques are available to study the activities of various CYP isoenzymes. Caffeine N-demethylation, testosterone and 17ss-estradiol hydroxylation patterns can provide new insights in the physiological function of P450 isoenzymes and the induction of the basal activities by chemicals. So far little interest was given to processes which occur after the DNA-receptor binding, e.g. changes in steroid hormone metabolism and pathways in environmental toxicology. This in spite of the fact that very subtle changes in steroid hormone levels may have significant physiological implications. This presentation will focus on some P450 activities, besides CYP1A(1), which might be important for development and reproduction. Some experimental approaches, limitations and techniques will be discussed which could lead to elucidation of the possible endocrine function of P450s.

  7. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasteltar, Liju; Nair, Gopakumar Gopinathan; Maliakel, Balu; Kuttan, Ramadasan; I M, Krishnakumar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol), as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days) and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg b.wt. for 90 days) toxicity studies on Wistar rats and mutagenicity studies employing Salmonella typhimurium strains. Administration of Clovinol did not result in any toxicologically significant changes in clinical/behavioural observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, organ weights, feed consumption, urinalysis, hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters when compared to the untreated control group of animals, indicating the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) as 1000 mg/kg b.wt./day; the highest dose tested. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related histopathology changes. Clovinol did not show genotoxicity when tested on TA-98, TA-100 and TA-102 with or without metabolic activation; rather exhibited significant antimutagenic potential against the known mutagens, sodium azide, NPD and tobacco as well as against 2-acetamidoflourene, which needed metabolic activation for mutagenicity.

  8. Safety assessment of dietary bamboo charcoal powder: a 90-day subchronic oral toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenchao, Jia; Yuting, Zhong; Jiuming, Yan; Yedan, Lu; Yang, Song; Jinyao, Chen; Lishi, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Vegetable carbon has been used as food additive in EU (E153) and China for many years; however, no experimental data have been available on its dietary safety. This study was designed to evaluate the subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of bamboo charcoal powder (BCP). In the study of subchronic oral toxicity, BCP was administered orally at doses of 2.81, 5.62, and 11.24 g/kg BW for 90 days to SD rats. Additional satellite groups from the control group and high dose group were observed for a 28-day recovery period. At the end of the treatment and recovery periods, animals were sacrificed, and their organs were weighed and blood samples were collected. The toxicological endpoints observed included clinical signs, food consumption, body and organ weights, hematological and biochemical parameters, macroscopic and microscopic examinations. The results showed no significant differences between the BCP treated groups and control group. The genotoxicity of BCP was assessed with the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and a combination of comet assay and mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus protocol. The results did not reveal any genotoxicity of BCP. Based on our study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for BCP is 11.24 g/kg BW/day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Texas Gulf Coast Field Station; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Center for Coastal Studies

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  10. Integrating toxicity reduction strategies for materials and components into product design: a case study on utility meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Carl W; Lim, Seong-Rin; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Shapiro, Andrew A; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Brock, Andrew; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-04-01

    Using RIO Tronics utility meter products as an industrial case study, the numeric Fraunhofer Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment tool is used to determine high impact materials with the aim of reducing the content of inherently toxic substances in these products. However, because product redesign with alternative materials affects entire components, overall component toxicity potential must also be explored. To achieve this, material TPI scores are aggregated into component TPI scores by 2 methods: 1) the Sum-Weighted Component TPI method, which considers the mass of materials in the component to assign an overall score, and 2) the Max Component TPI method, which scores the component with the highest impact material. With consideration of uncertainties from materials' toxicity information and mass estimates, key results from both scoring methods prioritized components that contain acrylonitrile-based polymers, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and stainless steel. Furthermore, an alternative materials assessment is carried out to identify less-toxic substitutes to meet cost and technical constraints. Substitute materials such as Al alloys for stainless steel and high-density polyethylene for PVC show promise for a combination of toxicity reduction and cost-effectiveness. The new screening methodology described can help product designers systematically benchmark toxicity potential in parallel to cost and functionality. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  11. A 12-week subchronic intramuscular toxicity study of risperidone-loaded microspheres in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ye, L; Wang, W; Du, G; Yu, X; Zhu, X; Dong, Q; Cen, X; Guan, X; Fu, F; Tian, J

    2015-02-01

    Long-acting injectable formulations of antipsychotics have been an important treatment option to increase the compliance of the patient with schizophrenia by monitoring drug administration and identifying medication noncompliance and to improve the long-term management of schizophrenia. Risperidone, a serotoninergic 5-HT2 and dopaminergic D2 receptor antagonist, was developed to be a long-acting sustained-release formulation for the treatment of schizophrenia. In this study, 12-week subchronic toxicity study of risperidone-loaded microspheres (RMs) in rats by intramuscular injection with an 8-week recovery phase was carried out to investigate the potential subchronic toxicity of a novel long-acting sustained-release formulation. The results indicated that the dosage of 10-90 mg/kg of RM for 2 weeks did not cause treatment-related mortality. The main drug-related findings were contributed to the dopamine D2 receptor and α1-adrenoceptor antagonism of risperidone such as elevation of serum and pituitary prolactin levels and ptosis and changes in reproductive system (uterus, ovary, vagina, mammary gland, testis, seminal vesicle, epididymis, and prostate). In addition, foreign body granuloma in muscle at injection sites caused by poly-lactide-co-glycolide was observed. At the end of the recovery phase, these changes mostly returned to normal. The results indicated that RM had a good safety profile in rats. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Preclinical Studies Evaluating Subacute Toxicity and Therapeutic Efficacy of LQB-118 in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Júnior, Edézio Ferreira; Martins, Thiago Martino; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene Marcuzzo; Marques, Paulo Roberto; Portari, Elyzabeth Avvad; Coelho, Marsen Garcia Pinto; Netto, Chaquip Daher; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; Sabino, Katia Costa de Carvalho; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio

    2016-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and is the second major cause of death by parasites, after malaria. The arsenal of drugs against leishmaniasis is small, and each has a disadvantage in terms of toxicity, efficacy, price, or treatment regimen. Our group has focused on studying new drug candidates as alternatives to current treatments. The pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 was designed and synthesized based on molecular hybridization, and it exhibited antiprotozoal and anti-leukemic cell line activities. Our previous work demonstrated that LQB-118 was an effective treatment for experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study, we observed that treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight/day LQB-118 orally inhibited the development of hepatosplenomegaly with a 99% reduction in parasite load. An in vivo toxicological analysis showed no change in the clinical, biochemical, or hematological parameters. Histologically, all of the analyzed organs were normal, with the exception of the liver, where focal points of necrosis with leukocytic infiltration were observed at treatment doses 5 times higher than the therapeutic dose; however, these changes were not accompanied by an increase in transaminases. Our findings indicate that LQB-118 is effective at treating different clinical forms of leishmaniasis and presents no relevant signs of toxicity at therapeutic doses; thus, this framework is demonstrated suitable for developing promising drug candidates for the oral treatment of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Acute and subacute (28-day) toxicity studies of ionic liquid, didecyldimethyl ammonium acesulfamate, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Nowicki, Michał; Adamska, Teresa; Ewertowska, Małgorzata; Kujawska, Małgorzata; Petzke, Ewelina; Konwerska, Aneta; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Pernak, Juliusz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute and subacute oral toxicity of an ionic liquid, didecyldimethylammonium acesulfamate [DDA][Ace], in rats. The compound tested was classified to the fourth toxicity class with a fixed LD(50) cut-off value of 500 mg/kg. Organ pathology induced by [DDA][Ace] in acute experiments included exfoliation of the surface layer of the digestive tract and alveolar septa in lung parenchyma. In a subacute experiment, rats were administered 10, 50, and 100 mg/kg/day [DDA][Ace] for 28 days. Reduced body weight gain and reduced food consumption was observed in mid- and high-dose rats. Statistically significant hematology changes were found mostly in high-dose groups of both sexes: increases in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, and mean platelet volume. Statistically significant changes in clinical chemistry parameters included increases in the GGT, SDH, and LDH activity and bilirubin concentration, and decreases in triglycerides, glucose, and inorganic phosphorus concentration. No treatment-related microscopic changes were observed. Under the conditions of this study, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of [DDA][Ace] was considered to be 10 mg/kg/day.

  14. In Vitro Evaluations and In Vivo Toxicity and Efficacy Studies of MFM501 against MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Azmi Johari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have discovered a synthetically derived pyrrolidone alkaloid, MFM501, exhibiting good inhibitory activity against 53 MRSA and MSSA isolates with low cytotoxicity against three normal cell-lines with IC50 values at >625 µg/ml. Time-kill assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis, in vivo oral acute toxicity test, and mice peritonitis model were carried out in this study. In the time-kill study, MFM501 showed a less than 3 log10 decrease in bacterial colony concentration value (CFU/ml which represented a bacteriostatic action while displaying a time-dependent inhibitory mechanism. Following that, SEM analysis suggested that MFM501 may exert its inhibitory activity via cytoplasmic membrane disruption. Moreover, MFM501 showed no toxicity effect on treated mice at an estimated median acute lethal dose (LD50 value of more than 300 mg/kg and less than 2000 mg/kg. For the efficacy test, a mean effective dose (ED50 of 87.16 mg/kg was obtained via a single dose oral administration. Our data demonstrated that MFM501 has the potential to be developed further as a new, safe, and effective oral-delivered antibacterial agent against MRSA isolates.

  15. In Vitro Evaluations and In Vivo Toxicity and Efficacy Studies of MFM501 against MRSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtar, Mastura; Syed Mohamad, Sharifah Aminah; Mohammat, Mohd Fazli; Sahdan, Rohana; Mohamed, Azman; Mohamad Ridhwan, Mohamad Jemain

    2017-01-01

    Previously we have discovered a synthetically derived pyrrolidone alkaloid, MFM501, exhibiting good inhibitory activity against 53 MRSA and MSSA isolates with low cytotoxicity against three normal cell-lines with IC50 values at >625 µg/ml. Time-kill assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, in vivo oral acute toxicity test, and mice peritonitis model were carried out in this study. In the time-kill study, MFM501 showed a less than 3 log10 decrease in bacterial colony concentration value (CFU/ml) which represented a bacteriostatic action while displaying a time-dependent inhibitory mechanism. Following that, SEM analysis suggested that MFM501 may exert its inhibitory activity via cytoplasmic membrane disruption. Moreover, MFM501 showed no toxicity effect on treated mice at an estimated median acute lethal dose (LD50) value of more than 300 mg/kg and less than 2000 mg/kg. For the efficacy test, a mean effective dose (ED50) of 87.16 mg/kg was obtained via a single dose oral administration. Our data demonstrated that MFM501 has the potential to be developed further as a new, safe, and effective oral-delivered antibacterial agent against MRSA isolates. PMID:28536702

  16. A 28-day gavage toxicity study in Fischer 344 rats with 3-methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Santokh; Kavanagh, Meghan; Cherry, Wendy; Barker, Michael; Weld, Madeline; Cooke, Gerard M

    2015-02-01

    3-Methylfuran is produced in foods during food processing and preservation techniques that involve heat treatment such as cooking, jarring, canning, and pasteurization. Currently, there are no studies available on the toxicity of 3-methylfuran. We conducted a 28-day gavage toxicity study (7 days per week) using doses of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 25.0 mg/kg bw/day in order to determine the dose range needed to establish a no observed adverse effect level and to better characterize nonneoplastic effects including those affecting hematology, clinical biochemistry, gross morphology, and histopathology. Histological changes of the liver were noted in all treated animals and gross changes were noted beginning at 3.0 mg/kg bw/kg. Alterations in the activity of serum enzymes indicative of effects on the liver were observed, including increases in levels of alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase at the highest dose. There was a significant increase in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which was not accompanied by histological changes in the thyroid. For the most part, statistically significant changes were seen only at the highest dose for hematology and at the 2 highest doses for clinical chemistry parameters. In contrast, mild histological lesions in the liver were observed even at the lowest dose of 0.1 mg/kg bw/day. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  17. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Stenzel, S.

    2009-04-01

    Several air dispersion models are available for prediction and simulation of the hazard areas associated with accidental releases of toxic gases. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for effective presentation of results. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios"), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. Uncertainties in the meteorological input together with incorrect estimates of the source play a critical role for the model results. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Vienna fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and Synex Ries & Greßlehner GmbH. RETOMOD was funded by the KIRAS safety research program at the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (www.kiras.at). The main tasks of this project were 1. Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input for modeling of the hazard areas (human exposure) during the accidental toxic releases. 2. Comparison of several model packages (based on reference scenarios) in order to estimate the utility for the fire brigades. This presentation gives a short introduction to the project and presents the results of task 1 (meteorological input). The results of task 2 are presented by Stenzel and Baumann-Stanzer in this session. For the aim of this project, the observation-based analysis and forecasting system INCA, developed in the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) was used. INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) data were calculated with 1 km horizontal resolution and

  18. [Studies on distribution, excretion and subacute toxicity of squalane in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, H; Koga, N; Oguri, K; Yoshimura, H; Inoue, H; Sato, K; Ohkubo, M

    1989-05-01

    In the previous papers, we demonstrated, by using rats, that squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) could stimulate the fecal excretion of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, which was regarded as the most important etiologic agent of yusho among PCB and PCDF congeners found in the causal rice oil. We also reported that, in rats, squalane was not essentially absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and did not show any appreciable side effects during the 3-month treatment. In the present paper, we have investigated the distribution, excretion and subacute toxicity of squalane in beagle dogs. The fecal excretion of squalane accounted for about 83% of dose during the initial 2 days after administration at a single oral dose of 1,200 mg/kg to male dogs. On day 3, absorbed squalane was mostly distributed to the hair and the skin, and the concentrations in these tissues were decreased on day 6. These results suggested that most of squalane administered orally was not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, but a part was absorbed and excreted through the hair. In addition, squalane distributed into the liver was found to be eliminated rather slowly. A long-term (13-week) treatments with squalane orally at doses of 400 mg/kg/day or 1,200 mg/kg/day in male and female dogs, resulted also in accumulation of squalane in the liver at a level of about 3% (400 mg/kg) or about 6% (1,200 mg/kg) of the daily dose. This accumulation of squalane in the liver was highest among all the tissues. Nevertheless, no appreciable toxic signs were observed in the serum biochemical tests and the hepatic functional test for squalane groups. Therefore, squalane accumulating in the liver, did not seem to disturb the hepatic physiological functions. It was suggested also in a long-term treatment that the skin and the hair played the most important role in the elimination of squalane. In conclusion, the present studies on subacute toxicity tests suggested that squalane did not give any

  19. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Ajaykumar B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Results Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years. Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67% treatment courses, of which 2 (13% were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%. Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58% evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23% were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42% courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Conclusions Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy.

  20. Acute and 28-day subchronic toxicity studies of mangiferin, a glucosylxanthone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalena Prado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pharmacological properties of mangiferin have been reported, but few studies have investigated mangiferin toxicity. Aims: To study the acute and 28-day toxicity effects of mangiferin in rodents. Methods: Single doses of mangiferin were administered by oral or i.p. route or were applied dermally to Sprague-Dawley rats and Balb/C mice. Clinical symptoms of animals were observed during 14 days after treatment. Animals also received single oral doses daily for 28 consecutive days. Blood biochemistry, hematology and pathology findings were reported. Results: In the acute study, no toxic effects were observed after dermal exposure to mangiferin 2000 mg/kg but transient dyspnea, flank position and piloerection were observed after oral administration to this xanthone. I.p. administration induced similar toxicity signs, but at the highest dose (2000 mg/kg all mice, one female rat and one male rat died. Rats orally treated with mangiferin (250-1000 mg/kg for 28 days did not show any abnormal clinical signs or hematology alterations, when compared to control group animals. Histopathological alterations like vacuolar degeneration, necrosis and increment of apoptosis of the acinar cells were observed in the exocrine pancreas of rats at 1000 mg/kg. This suggesting that exocrine pancreas was the target organ for mangiferin’s toxicity. Conclusions: These studies indicated that acute and subchronic toxicities of mangiferin for oral exposure are low.

  1. Ethnobotanical Study on the Usage of Toxic Plants in Traditional Medicine in the City Center of Tlemcen, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Nassima Elyebdri; Asma Boumediou; Soumia Addoun

    2017-01-01

    Traditional medicine has been part of the Algerian culture for decades. In particular, the city of Tlemcen still retains practices based on phytotherapy to the present day, as this kind of medicine fulfills the needs of its followers among the local population. The toxic plants contain diverse natural substances which supplied a lot of medicine in the pharmaceutical industry. In order to explore new medicinal sources among toxic plants, an ethnobotanical study was carried out on the use of th...

  2. Immunohistochemical and molecular study on the protective effect of curcumin against hepatic toxicity induced by paracetamol in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Nassan, Mohamed Abdo; Ismail, Tamer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background An overdose of paracetamol is a frequent reason for liver and renal toxicity and possible death and curcumin has hepatoprotective properties against liver damage. The exact mechanism of such protection is not clear. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the molecular levels of the protective effect of curcumin on paracetamol overdose induced hepatic toxicity in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were allocated into 4 groups. Control group, administered corn oil; curcumin group...

  3. Influence of Exposure and Toxicokinetics on Measures of Aquatic Toxicity for Organic Contaminants: A Case Study Review

    OpenAIRE

    Landrum, Peter F.; Chapman, Peter M.; Neff, Jerry; Page, David S

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical and case study review of dynamic exposures of aquatic organisms to organic contaminants examines variables important for interpreting exposure and therefore toxicity. The timing and magnitude of the absorbed dose change when the dynamics of exposure change. Thus, the dose metric for interpreting toxic responses observed during such exposure conditions is generally limited to the specific experiment and cannot be extrapolated to either other experiments with different exposure...

  4. 76 FR 27271 - TSCA Inventory Update Reporting Modifications; Submission Period Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) section 8(a) Inventory Update Reporting (IUR) regulations by... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 710 RIN 2070-AJ43 TSCA Inventory Update Reporting Modifications; Submission Period... chemical substances included on the TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory (TSCA Inventory) to report current...

  5. A 90-day subchronic toxicity study of neem oil, a Azadirachta indica oil, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Cao, M; Shi, D-X; Yin, Z-Q; Jia, R-Y; Wang, K-Y; Geng, Y; Wang, Y; Yao, X-P; Yang, Z-R; Zhao, J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of exposure and target organs of neem oil for establishing safety criteria for human exposure, the subchronic toxicity study with neem oil in mice was evaluated. The mice (10 per sex for each dose) was orally administered with neem oil with the doses of 0 (to serve as a control), 177, 533 and 1600 mg/kg/day for 90 days. After the treatment period, observation of reversibility or persistence of any toxic effects, mice were continuously fed without treatment for the following 30 days. During the two test periods, the serum biochemistry, organ weight and histopathology were examined. The results showed that the serum biochemistry and organ coefficient in experimental groups had no statistical difference compared with those of the control group. At the 90th day, the histopathological examinations showed that the 1600 mg/kg/day dose of neem oil had varying degrees of damage on each organ except heart, uterus and ovarian. After 30-day recovery, the degree of lesions to the tissues was lessened or even restored. The NOAEL of neem oil was 177 mg/kg/day for mice and the target organs of neem oil were determined to be testicle, liver and kidneys.

  6. Comparative study of the nutritional composition and toxic elements of farmed and wild Chanodichthys mongolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haifeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Geng, Longwu; Tang, Shizhan; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Information of the difference in quality between farmed and wild fish is central to better ensuring fish products produced in aquaculture meet regulatory and consumer requirements. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid profiles, and toxic elements contents of farmed and wild Chanodichthys mongolicus were established and compared. Significantly higher crude protein content while lower moisture content in farmed fish compared to wild fish were observed ( Pamino acids (TAA), total essential amino acids (TEAA), total non-essential amino acids (TNEAA) and total delicious amino acids (TDAA) in farmed fish were all significantly higher than those in the wild equivalent ( Pacid profiles in both farmed and wild C. mongolicus were dominated by monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), with farmed fish contained much more MUFA content compared to wild counterpart ( Pfish exhibited significantly higher levels of total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) than farmed fish ( Pacid (C18:2n6) were the predominant PUFA in wild and farmed C. mongolicus, respectively. Moreover, farmed fish displayed an overall lower toxic element levels (As, Cd, Pb and Hg) in comparison with wild fish, and both were far lower than the established limit standard. In conclusion, our results suggest that the nutritional quality of farmed C. mongolicus was inferior to their wild counterpart with respect to fatty acids nutrition, and therefore further studies should focus on the improving C. mongolicus diet in order to enhance the overall nutritional composition.

  7. [Study on sub-chronic toxicity of powered milk containing transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yuan; Liu, Haibo; Geng, Guiying; Wang, Huiling; Yang, Hua; Feng, Xiaolian; Gao, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Feng, Yongquan; Xu, Haibin

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the potential toxic or adverse effect of transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin powered milk on rats. Weanling Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups according the weight: three transgenic milk powder (T) groups, three non-transgenic milk powder (N) groups and the control (C) group. The diets of T groups contain 15%, 30% and 60% transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin milk powder. The diets of N groups contain 15%, 30% and 60% non-transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin milk powder for 90 days. The diet of C group contains only basic feed. Haematological and biochemical parameters was measured during the study (at 45th and 90th of the experiment). At the end of the 90th day, organ tissues analysis was performed. There were no transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin related adverse effects on the body weight, food intake, food consumption, hematology,serum biochemistry, as well as histopathology. There were no signs of toxic and adverse effects for transgenic human alpha-lactalbumin powdered milk on rats.

  8. Pathological study of acute pulmonary toxicity induced by intratracheally instilled Asian sand dust (kosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naota, Misaki; Mukaiyama, Toru; Shimada, Akinori; Yoshida, Atushi; Okajima, Mina; Morita, Takehito; Inoue, Kenichiro; Takano, Hirohisa

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate acute lung toxicity caused by Asian sand dust. Simulated Asian sand dust collected from the Tennger desert in China (CJ-2 particles) and Asian sand dust collected from the atmosphere in Japan (Tottori particles) were used. Saline suspensions of 50, 200, 800, and 3,000 µg Asian sand dust were intratracheally instilled to ICR mice. Localized accumulation of the dust particles was observed in the bronchioles and the alveoli of the lung tissues; acute inflammatory changes characterized by infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils were observed around the particles. Degenerated alveolar walls and bronchial epithelial cells, as well as a weakened positive immunolabeling for laminin, were observed to be associated with particle attachment. Positive immunolabelings for interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α inducible nitric oxide synthase, and dimeric copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase were observed mainly in the inflammatory cells in the lesions; these findings were not observed in the controls or in areas lacking lesions. These results suggest that Asian sand dust particles caused damage to the lung tissue through a direct physical effect. In addition, secondary released cytokines and oxidative stress generated in the lesion may be involved in the development of the acute lung toxicity.

  9. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brainstem Metastases: An International Cooperative Study to Define Response and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M., E-mail: daniel.trifiletti@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Lee, Cheng-Chia [Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veteran General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kano, Hideyuki; Cohen, Jonathan [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Janopaul-Naylor, James; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lee, John Y.K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Simonova, Gabriela; Liscak, Roman [Department of Radiation and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Wolf, Amparo; Kvint, Svetlana [Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Lagone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Grills, Inga S.; Johnson, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Liu, Kang-Du; Lin, Chung-Jung [Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veteran General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mathieu, David; Héroux, France [Division of Neurosurgery, Université de Sherbrooke, Centre de recherche du CHUS, Sherbrooke, Québec (Canada); Silva, Danilo; Sharma, Mayur [Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Cifarelli, Christopher P. [Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); and others

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To pool data across multiple institutions internationally and report on the cumulative experience of brainstem stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Data on patients with brainstem metastases treated with SRS were collected through the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation. Clinical, radiographic, and dosimetric characteristics were compared for factors prognostic for local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Of 547 patients with 596 brainstem metastases treated with SRS, treatment of 7.4% of tumors resulted in severe SRS-induced toxicity (grade ≥3, increased odds with increasing tumor volume, margin dose, and whole-brain irradiation). Local control at 12 months after SRS was 81.8% and was improved with increasing margin dose and maximum dose. Overall survival at 12 months after SRS was 32.7% and impacted by age, gender, number of metastases, tumor histology, and performance score. Conclusions: Our study provides additional evidence that SRS has become an option for patients with brainstem metastases, with an excellent benefit-to-risk ratio in the hands of experienced clinicians. Prior whole-brain irradiation increases the risk of severe toxicity in brainstem metastasis patients undergoing SRS.

  10. Acute Oral Toxicity Study of GAL-57 (Bentazon + Dicamba Herbicide in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Brkić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An acute oral toxicity study of the herbicide GAL-57 (Avalon, a mixture of bentazon and dicamba as active ingredients, was conducted to assess its acute oral toxicity to rats, using a new method that has been used in the past several years (2001. Clinical observations were performed for all animals after different time intervals, and gross necropsy was performed at termination of examination. Clinical symptoms (decreased activity, prone position, abnormal limb position, decreased righting reflex, decreased grip and limb tone, decreased body and abdominal tone and dyspnoea from mild to marked degree were noted after administration of 2000 mg/kg. Animals were found dead 30 minutes to one hour after the treatment. GAL-57 did not cause any clinical sings at single 300 mg/kg bw dose. The physical condition and behaviour of animals were normal during the 14-day observation period. The acute oral LD-50 value of the GAL-57 proved to be between 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight in rats and was ranked into Poison group III according to Serbian criteria, category 4 of the Global Harmonized Classification System and Category III of the EPA classification.

  11. Pilot study investigating ambient air toxics emissions near a Canadian kraft pulp and paper facility in Pictou County, Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Guernsey, Judith R; Walker, Tony R; Kim, Jong Sung; Sherren, Kate; Andreou, Pantelis

    2017-07-15

    Air toxics are airborne pollutants known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects, including certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While several EPA-designated air toxics are monitored at a subset of Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) sites, Canada has no specific "air toxics" control priorities. Although pulp and paper (P&P) mills are major industrial emitters of air pollutants, few studies quantified the spectrum of air quality exposures. Moreover, most NAPS monitoring sites are in urban centers; in contrast, rural NAPS sites are sparse with few exposure risk records. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate prioritized air toxic ambient VOC concentrations using NAPS hourly emissions data from a rural Pictou, Nova Scotia Kraft P&P town to document concentration levels, and to determine whether these concentrations correlated with wind direction at the NAPS site (located southwest of the mill). Publicly accessible Environment and Climate Change Canada data (VOC concentrations [Granton NAPS ID: 31201] and local meteorological conditions [Caribou Point]) were examined using temporal (2006-2013) and spatial analytic methods. Results revealed several VOCs (1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride) routinely exceeded EPA air toxics-associated cancer risk thresholds. 1,3-Butadiene and tetrachloroethylene were significantly higher (p < 0.05) when prevailing wind direction blew from the northeast and the mill towards the NAPS site. Conversely, when prevailing winds originated from the southwest towards the mill, higher median VOC air toxics concentrations at the NAPS site, except carbon tetrachloride, were not observed. Despite study limitations, this is one of few investigations documenting elevated concentrations of certain VOCs air toxics to be associated with P&P emissions in a community. Findings support the need for more research on the extent

  12. In vitro studies of the toxic effects of silver nanoparticles on HeLa and U937 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaba SI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Said I Kaba, Elena M Egorova Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Moscow, Russia Abstract: In the last decade, much attention has been paid to studies of the effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs on tumor cells. Apart from elucidation of the mechanism of NPs’ interaction with mammalian cells, these studies are aimed at discovering new effective antitumor drugs. In this work, we report about the toxic effects of Ag NPs observed on two types of tumor cells: HeLa (adhesive cells and U937 (suspension cells. The Ag NPs were obtained by an original method of biochemical synthesis. Particle size was 13.2±4.72 nm, and zeta potential was -61.9±3.2 mV. The toxicity of Ag NPs in the concentration range 0.5–8.0 µg Ag/mL was determined by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and cytofluorometry after 4 and 24 hours' incubation. It was found that Ag NPs had high toxicity toward both cell types. The minimal concentrations where a toxicity effect was registered (toxicity thresholds lied in the range 0.5–2.0 µg Ag/mL. In parallel with the Ag NP solution, cells were incubated with water solutions of the NP stabilizer (aerosol-OT and Ag+ ions (as silver nitrate. It was shown that aerosol-OT had no effect on the viability on HeLa cells, but was moderately toxic toward U937, though less dangerous for these cells than Ag NPs. With Ag+ ions, for HeLa no toxic effect was observed, while for U937 they were as toxic as the Ag NPs. The data obtained indicate that Ag NPs as used in this study may prove to be useful for the creation of medicines for cancer therapy. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, cell viability, apoptosis, tumor cells

  13. Studies on single-dose toxicity of hydrophobically modified hydroxypropyl methylcellulose in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, S; Muto, H; Kokubo, H; Ichikawa, N; Kawanabe, M; Tanaka, O

    1992-02-01

    Single-dose toxicological studies of hydrophobically modified hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HM-HPMC, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose modified with stearylglycidylether) were conducted. A dispersion of HM-HPMC was administered to rats orally or by dermal application at doses up to 900 mg/kg. After the oral administration, the mean body weight of the 900 mg/kg group on the first day after administration was slightly but significantly lower (P less than 0.05) than that of the control group, and one rat had loose stools at 30 min. after the administration. No other abnormalities were noted. In the case of dermal application, no abnormalities were observed. No rats died, and no abnormalities in their organs were found by either route. In conclusion, there was no observed toxicity of HM-HMPC after oral or dermal administration at single dose up to 900 mg/kg under the conditions of these studies.

  14. Safety assessment of Superba™ krill powder: Subchronic toxicity study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Berge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of krill powder was assessed in a subchronic 13-week toxicity study where rats were fed krill powder or control diets. The krill powder inclusion in the test diet was 9.67% (w/w. There were no differences noted in body weight or food consumption in either gender. Differences in clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill powder-treated animals, but these findings were of no toxicological significance. A significant decrease in absolute heart weight, but not relative heart weight, was observed in both sexes given krill powder, although no corresponding histological changes were observed. Hepatocyte vacuolation was noted histologically in males fed krill powder. This finding was not associated with other indications of hepatic dysfunction. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL for the conditions of this study was considered to be 9.67% krill powder.

  15. Safety assessment of Superba™ krill powder: Subchronic toxicity study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Kjetil; Robertson, Bruce; Burri, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The safety of krill powder was assessed in a subchronic 13-week toxicity study where rats were fed krill powder or control diets. The krill powder inclusion in the test diet was 9.67% (w/w). There were no differences noted in body weight or food consumption in either gender. Differences in clinical chemistry values were noted in the krill powder-treated animals, but these findings were of no toxicological significance. A significant decrease in absolute heart weight, but not relative heart weight, was observed in both sexes given krill powder, although no corresponding histological changes were observed. Hepatocyte vacuolation was noted histologically in males fed krill powder. This finding was not associated with other indications of hepatic dysfunction. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the conditions of this study was considered to be 9.67% krill powder.

  16. The Vigabatrin Induced Retinal Toxicity is Associated with Photopic Exposure and Taurine Deficiency: An In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinal toxicity is one of the most commonly discussed and concerning adverse effects of vigabatrin (VGB. The present study explored the relationship between the VGB elicited retinal toxicity, photopic exposure, and taurine deficiency, aiming at screening for risk factors to minimize the adverse effects of VGB. Methods: The effects of VGB on function and morphology of mouse retinas were examined via a series of in vivo tests, including electroretinography (ERG, Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, and optokinetic testing. Moreover, VGB-treated mice were in addition treated with taurine to verify possible protective effects against retinal toxicity. Results: A close relationship between VGB induced retinal toxicity and light exposure was observed. The VGB-treated mice which were reared in darkness preserved better visual function and retinal architectures as verified by the optokinetic tests, OCT and ERG examinations. The retinal taurine level of the VBG-treated mice which were exposed to light were significantly lower than that of the VBG mice reared in darkness. Furthermore, several in vivo evidence provided by our research confirmed that the VGB induced morphological and functional impairments could be partially alleviated by taurine treatment. The present study showed the retinal toxicity of VGB by in vivo measurements. Conclusion: The VGB induced retinal toxicity is closely associated with photopic exposure and taurine deficiency. Patients who are taking VGB might benefit from minimization of light exposure and dietetic taurine supplements.

  17. Complex mixtures of dissolved pesticides show potential aquatic toxicity in a synoptic study of Midwestern U.S. streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Norman, Julia E.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Shoda, Megan E.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Stone, Wesley W.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Hladik, Michelle L.

    2018-01-01

    Aquatic organisms in streams are exposed to pesticide mixtures that vary in composition over time in response to changes in flow conditions, pesticide inputs to the stream, and pesticide fate and degradation within the stream. To characterize mixtures of dissolved-phase pesticides and degradates in Midwestern streams, a synoptic study was conducted at 100 streams during May–August 2013. In weekly water samples, 94 pesticides and 89 degradates were detected, with a median of 25 compounds detected per sample and 54 detected per site. In a screening-level assessment using aquatic-life benchmarks and the Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI), potential effects on fish were unlikely in most streams. For invertebrates, potential chronic toxicity was predicted in 53% of streams, punctuated in 12% of streams by acutely toxic exposures. For aquatic plants, acute but likely reversible effects on biomass were predicted in 75% of streams, with potential longer-term effects on plant communities in 9% of streams. Relatively few pesticides in water—atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, imidacloprid, fipronil, organophosphate insecticides, and carbendazim—were predicted to be major contributors to potential toxicity. Agricultural streams had the highest potential for effects on plants, especially in May–June, corresponding to high spring-flush herbicide concentrations. Urban streams had higher detection frequencies and concentrations of insecticides and most fungicides than in agricultural streams, and higher potential for invertebrate toxicity, which peaked during July–August. Toxicity-screening predictions for invertebrates were supported by quantile regressions showing significant associations for the Benthic Invertebrate-PTI and imidacloprid concentrations with invertebrate community metrics for MSQA streams, and by mesocosm toxicity testing with imidacloprid showing effects on invertebrate communities at environmentally relevant concentrations. This study documents the most

  18. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the substance to affect fertility, pregnancy, maternal and suckling behaviour, and growth and... (pregnant) animals, disturbs lactation and nursing behaviour, and, particularly in feeding studies, may... and dead), sex ratio, postnatal growth (pup weights) and survival (litter size), gross abnormalities...

  19. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies on Sel-Plex, a standardized, registered high-selenium yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, James C; Matulka, Ray A; Power, Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Selenium has been recognized as an essential nutrient for human health; however, its bioavailability is primarily dependent upon the type of selenium, elemental versus organic. In geographic areas low in selenium, there is the potential for animals (including humans) to become selenium deficient and this potential deficiency can be remedied by consumption of exogenous selenium, including selenium-enriched yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that contains high levels of organic selenium (e.g., selenized yeast). The present studies were conducted to investigate potential oral toxicity of a unique selenized yeast preparation (Sel-Plex) when administered to (1) adult female CHS Swiss mice ICo:OFI (IOPS Caw); (2) adult female CHS Sprague-Dawley rats; and (3) adult male and female Sprague-Dawley CD rats. For the 28- and 90-day toxicity studies, (1) adult male and female Sprague-Dawley CRL:CD(R)(SD) IGS BR strain rats and (2) adult male and female 6- to 7-month-old Beagle dogs were used. The LD50 for mice was >or=2000 mg Sel-Plex/kg (>or=4.06 mg Se/kg) and for rats, was greater than >or=2000 mg Sel-Plex/kg (>or=4.06 mg Se/kg). In the two 28-day studies, for rats, the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) was 50 mg Sel-Plex/kg/day (0.1 mg Se/kg/day), and for the dogs, the NOAEL was 22.5 mg Sel-Plex/kg/day (0.045 mg Se/kg/day). For the two 90-day studies, for rats the NOAEL for Sel-Plex was 114 mg/kg/day (0.23 mg Se/kg/day), and for dogs, the NOAEL was 30 mg Sel-Plex/kg/day (0.06 mg Se/kg/day): the latter being the NOAEL in the most sensitive species.

  20. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  1. Model of hormesis and its toxicity mechanism based on quorum sensing: a case study on the toxicity of sulfonamides to Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ziqing; Lin, Zhifen; Zou, Xiaoming; Yao, Zhifeng; Tian, Dayong; Wang, Dali; Yin, Daqiang

    2012-07-17

    During the past two decades, the phenomenon of hormesis has gained increasing recognition in environmental and toxicological communities. However, the mechanistic understanding of hormesis, to date, is extremely limited. Herein is proposed a novel parametric model with a mechanistic basis and two model-based parameters for hormesis that was successfully applied to the hormetic dose-response observed in the chronic toxicity of sulfonamides on Photobacterium phosphoreum. On the basis of the methods of molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), we proposed a mechanistic hypothesis for hormesis that introduces for the first time the concept of quorum sensing in toxicological studies and explains the mechanism at the level of the receptors. The mechanistic hypothesis stated that (1) specific target binding like interaction with LuxR may contribute to transcriptional activation leading to enhanced luciferase activity at low dose exposure of sulfonamides, and (2) as the dose of sulfonamides increases, more sulfonamides competitively bind to dihydropteroate synthase, which inhibit the biosynthesis of folic acid and thus provoke toxicity. This mechanistic hypothesis, which explains both the dose-dependent and time-dependent features of hormesis, could give new insight into the mechanistic study of hormesis.

  2. Toxic Effects of Levofloxacin on Rat Annulus Fibrosus Cells: An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhi-Long; Chen, Qian; Yang, Si-Dong; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Hai-Ying; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones are in wide clinical use as safe and effective antibiotics. Articular cartilage, tendons, and epiphyseal growth plates have been recognized as targets of fluoroquinolone-induced connective tissue toxicity. However, the effects of fluoroquinolones on annulus fibrosus (AF) cells are still unknown. Material/Methods The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of levofloxacin, a typical fluoroquinolone antibiotic drug, on rat AF cells in vitro. Rat annulus fibrosus (RAF) cells were treated with levofloxacin at different concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, and 90 μg/ml) and were assessed to determine the possible cytotoxic effects of levofloxacin. Inverted phase-contrast microscopy was used to accomplish the morphological observation of apoptosis of treated cells. Western blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) was used to explore the expression of active caspase-3 and MMP-3. Flow cytometry was used to measure the apoptotic incidences. Results Our study showed that levofloxacin, with concentrations at 30, 60, and 90 μg/ml, induced dose-dependent RAF cell apoptosis and higher expression of caspase-3 and MMP-3. More apoptotic cells were observed by inverted phase-contrast microscopy. Moreover, levofloxacin increased the activity of caspase-3, and it also reduced cell viability with different concentrations ranging from 10 to 80 μg/ml. Conclusions Our study results suggest that levofloxacin has cytotoxic effects on RAF cells, characterized by enhancing apoptosis and reducing cell viability, and indicate a potential toxic effect of fluoroquinolones on RAF cells. PMID:25380657

  3. May toxicity of amiodarone be prevented by antioxidants? A cell-culture study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Atrial Fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia encountered following cardiac surgery. The most commonly administered drug used in treatment and prophylaxis is amiodarone which has several toxic effects on major organ functions. There are few clinical data concerning prevention of toxic effects and there is no routinely suggested agent. The aim of this study is to document the cytotoxic effects of amiodarone on cell culture media and compare the cytoprotective effects of commonly used antioxidant agents. Methods L929 mouse fibroblast cell line was cultured and 100,000 cells/well-plate were obtained. First group of cells were treated with increasing concentrations of amiodarone (20 to 180 μM) alone. Second and third group of cells were incubated with one-fold equimolar dose of vitamin C and N-acetyl cysteine prior to amiodarone exposure. The viability of cells were measured by MTT assay and the cytoprotective effect of each agent was compared. Results The cytotoxicity of amiodarone was significant with concentrations of 100 μM and more. The viabilities of both vitamin C and N-acetyl cysteine treated cells were higher compared to untreated cells. Conclusions Vitamin C and N-acetyl cysteine are commonly used in the clinical setting for different purposes in context of their known antioxidant actions. Their role in prevention of amiodarone induced cytotoxicity is not fully documented. The study fully demonstrates the cytoprotective role of both agents in amiodarone induced cytotoxicity on cell culture media; more pronounced with vitamin C in some concentrations. The findings may be projectile for further clinical studies. PMID:22741616

  4. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bratland, Ase

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Findings Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. Conclusions When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00455351

  5. Impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on submissions to Jornal de Pediatria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Danilo; Buchweitz, Claudia; Procianoy, Renato S

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of SciELO and MEDLINE indexing on the number of articles submitted to Jornal de Pediatria. Analysis of total article submission, submission of articles from foreign countries and acceptance figures in the following periods: stage I - pre-website (Jan 2000-Mar 2001); stage II - website (Apr 2001-Jul 2002); stage III - SciELO (Aug 2002-Aug 2003); stage IV - MEDLINE (Sep 2003-Dec 2004). There was a significant trend toward linear increase in the number of submissions along the study period (p = 0.009). The number of manuscripts submitted in stages I through IV was 184, 240, 297, and 482, respectively. The number of submissions was similar in stages I and II (p = 0.148), but statistically higher in Stage III (p Pediatria, whereas MEDLINE indexing led to an increase in both Brazilian and foreign submissions.

  6. Quality of Life and Toxicity after SBRT for Organ-Confined Prostate Cancer, a Seven Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT yields excellent disease control for lowandintermediate-risk prostate cancer by delivering high doses of radiation in a small number offractions. Our report presents a 7-year update on treatment toxicity and quality of life (QOLfrom 515 patients treated with prostate SBRT.Methods: From 2006 to 2009, 515 patients with clinically localized, low-, intermediate- andhigh-risk prostate cancer were treated with SBRT using Cyberknife technology. Treatmentconsisted of 35 to 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Seventy-two patients received hormone therapy.Toxicity was assessed at each follow up visit using the Expanded Prostate Cancer IndexComposite (EPIC questionnaire and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG urinaryand rectal toxicity scale.Results: Median follow up was 72 months. The actuarial 7-year freedom from biochemicalfailure was 95.8%, 89.3% and 68.5% for low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, respectively(p < 0.001. No patients experienced acute Grade III or IV acute complications. Fewer than 5%of patients had any acute Grade II urinary or rectal toxicity. Late toxicity was low, with Grade IIrectal and urinary toxicity of 4% and 9.1%, respectively, and Grade III urinary toxicity of 1.7%.Mean EPIC urinary and bowel QOL declined at 1 month post-treatment, returned to baseline by2 years and remained stable thereafter. EPIC sexual QOL declined by 23% at 6-12 months andremained stable afterwards. Of patients potent at baseline evaluation, 67% remained potent atlast follow-up.Conclusions: This study suggests that SBRT, when administered to doses of 35 to 36.25 Gy, isefficacious and safe. With long-term follow up in our large patient cohort, we continue to findlow rates of late toxicity and excellent rates of biochemical control.

  7. Sediment porewater toxicity assessment studies in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Presley, B.J.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L.; Boothe, P.; Kilada, R.; Wade, T.; Montagna, P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary program to assess the potential long-term impacts of offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Gulf of Mexico, sediment chemical analyses and porewater toxicity tests were conducted in the vicinity of five offshore platforms. Based on data from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays, toxicity was observed near four of the five platforms sampled; the majority of the toxic samples were collected within 150 m of a platform. There was excellent agreement among the results of porewater tests with three different species (sea urchin embryological development, polychaete reproduction, and copepod nauplii survival). The sediment concentrations of several metals were well in excess of sediment quality assessment guidelines at a number of stations, and good agreement was observed between predicted and observed toxicity. Porewater metal concentrations compared with EC50, LOEC, and NOEC values generated for water-only exposures indicated that the porewater concentrations for several metals were high enough to account for the observed toxicity. Results of these studies utilizing highly sensitive toxicity tests suggest that the contaminant-induced impacts from offshore platforms are limited to a localized area in the immediate vicinity of the platforms. 

  8. A DFT-based toxicity QSAR study of aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri: Consideration of aqueous freely dissolved concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xianhai; Wang, Juying; Cong, Yi; Mu, Jingli; Jin, Fei

    2016-05-05

    In the present study, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) techniques based on toxicity mechanism and density functional theory (DFT) descriptors were adopted to develop predictive models for the toxicity of alkylated and parent aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri. The acute toxicity data of 17 aromatic hydrocarbons from both literature and our experimental results were used to construct QSAR models by partial least squares (PLS) analysis. With consideration of the toxicity process, the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between water phase and lipid phase and their interaction with the target biomolecule, the optimal QSAR model was obtained by introducing aqueous freely dissolved concentration. The high statistical values of R(2) (0.956) and Q(CUM)(2) (0.942) indicated that the model has good goodness-of-fit, robustness and internal predictive power. The average molecular polarizability (α) and several selected thermodynamic parameters reflecting the intermolecular interactions played important roles in the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between the water phase and biomembrane. Energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) was the most influential descriptor which dominated the toxicity of aromatic hydrocarbons through the electron-transfer reaction with biomolecules. The results demonstrated that the adoption of freely dissolved concentration instead of nominal concentration was a beneficial attempt for toxicity QSAR modeling of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Subacute toxicity study on sup(99m)Tc stannous glucoheptonate injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belbeck, L.; Bowen, B.M.; Jeu, J.; Richardson, M. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1981-07-01

    A subacute toxicity study on sup(99m)Tc stannous glucoheptonate was performed with rats, dogs and rabbits, injected intravenously at ten to 100 times the human dose on a body weight basis. There were no abnormalities in the clinical status of any of the animals. No changes were found in urinalysis, blood chemistry or hematology in the rabbits nor in gross examination, renal histology or bone marrow smears in rats and rabbits. Hepatic histology was also done. A focal area of necrosis in a liver of one rabbit that had been injected with 100 times the human dose was observed using light microscopy. Examination by electron microscopy in another group of rats and rabbits was prompted by the observation of that lesion. This revealed vacuolated and dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum and degranulated and vesiculated rough endoplasmic reticulum in all the test livers. X-ray microanalysis indicates that the ultrastructural changes are linked to the deposition of tin.

  10. Single fiber electromyography. A method for the evaluation of motor axonopathy during toxicity studies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeppi, U; Teste, M; Siegenthaler, U

    1981-11-01

    In man, single fiber electromyography is used as a very sensitive indicator for the assessment of functional changes in motor nerves. The purpose of the present study was to adapt the above testing procedure to allow repeated investigations of dogs used in subchronic toxicity tests. Experiments were performed on anesthetized pure-bred beagle dogs. Action potentials from single muscle fibers in response to electrical stimulation of motor nerves were recorded with Medelec microelectrodes, amplified with a Medelec system and monitored on a Tektronic oscilloscope. Repeated electrical stimulation with pulses of 0.03 msec and 1 p.p.s. produced characteristic action potentials of single muscle fibers consisting of a positive, followed by a negative, deflection having a duration of from 500 to 800 microseconds altogether. Successive potentials occurred with a variable latency (the jitter) ranging from +/- 5 to 15 microseconds. Quantitative evaluation of the jitter will allow the clinical evaluation of motor axonopathies in dogs.

  11. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  12. The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study: objectives and methods of a study investigating causality, course, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Win, Maartje M L; Jager, Gerry; Vervaeke, Hylke K E; Schilt, Thelma; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Den Heeten, Gerard J; Ramsey, Nick F; Korf, Dirk J; Van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and methods of The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study focussing on the causality, course, and clinical relevance of ecstasy neurotoxicity. Previous studies suggest that ecstasy (3,4 methylene-dioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC) is toxic toward brain serotonin axons, but most of these studies have serious methodological limitations. The current study is a combination of different approaches with three substudies: (1) a crosssectional substudy among heavy ecstasy users and controls with variation in drug use, which will provide information about potential neurotoxic consequences of ecstasy in relation to other drugs; (2) a prospective cohort substudy in ecstasy-naive subjects with high risk for future ecstasy use, which will provide information on the causality and short-term course of ecstasy use and potential neurotoxicity, and (3) a retrospective cohort substudy in lifetime ecstasy users and matched controls of an existing epidemiological sample that will provide information on long-term course and outcome of ecstasy use in the general population. Neurotoxicity is studied using (a) different imaging techniques (beta-CIT SPECT, 1H-MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging), and (b) neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments of memory, depression, and personality. The combined results will lead to conclusions that can be used in prevention messages, clinical decision making, and the development of an (inter)national ecstasy policy.

  13. ROS dependent copper toxicity in Hydra-biochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Mohammed; Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Rajendran, Ramasamy Babu; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-01-01

    Copper, an essential microelement, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at concentrations higher than that could be tolerated. Copper-induced oxidative stress has been documented in vitro, yet the in vivo effects of metal-induced oxidative stress have not been extensively studied in the lower invertebrates. The objective of the present study has been to find the effect of ROS-mediated toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of copper at organismal and cellular levels in Hydra magnipapillata. Exposure to copper at sublethal concentrations (0.06 and 0.1mg/L) for 24 or 48h resulted in generation of significant levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We infer that the free radicals here originate predominantly at the lysosomes but partly at the mitochondria also as visualized by H2-DHCFDA staining. Quantitative real-time PCR of RNA extracted from copper-exposed polyps revealed dose-dependent up-regulation of all antioxidant response genes (CAT, SOD, GPx, GST, GR, G6PD). Concurrent increase of Hsp70 and FoxO genes suggests the ability of polyps to respond to stress, which at 48h was not the same as at 24h. Interestingly, the transcript levels of all genes were down-regulated at 48h as compared to 24h incubation period. Comet assay indicated copper as a powerful genotoxicant, and the DNA damage was dose- as well as duration-dependent. Western blotting of proteins (Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3) confirmed ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death in copper-exposed animals. These changes correlated well with changes in morphology, regeneration and aspects of reproduction. Taken together, the results indicate increased production of intracellular ROS in Hydra on copper exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Developmental toxicity of endocrine disruptors in early life stages of zebrafish, a genetic and embryogenesis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Dércia; Matos, Manuela; Coimbra, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are capable of interfering with the endocrine system and are increasingly widespread in the aquatic environments. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae were used to assess how EDCs may interfere with embryogenesis. Therefore, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2: 0.4, 2, 4 and 20 ng/L), genistein (Gen: 2, 20, 200 and 2000 ng/L) and fadrozole (Fad: 2, 10, 50 and 250 μg/L), between 2 and 144 h post-fertilization (hpf). Somite development, heartbeat, malformations, mortality and hatching rates were evaluated. In parallel, the expression patterns of hormone receptors (esr1, esr2a, esr2b and ar) and apoptotic pathways related genes (p53 and c-jun) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that EE2, Gen and Fad caused a higher mortality and also malformations in larvae compared with control. A significant toxic effect was observed in the heartbeat rate, at 144 hpf, in larvae exposed to EE2 and Fad. QPCR revealed alterations in the expression levels of all the evaluated genes, at different time points. esr1 and c-jun genes were upregulated by EE2 and Gen exposure while the expression of esr2a, esr2b and ar genes was downregulated. Fad exposure decreased esr1, p53 and c-jun expression levels. This study shows a toxic effect of EE2, Gen and Fad to vertebrate embryogenesis and a relation between hormones action and apoptosis pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative In vivo, Ex vivo, and In vitro Toxicity Studies of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to reduce the number of animals in engineered nanomaterials (ENM) toxicity testing have resulted in the development of numerous alternative toxicity testing methods, but in vivo and in vitro results are still evolving and variable. This inconsistency could be due to the f...

  16. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity studies of the extracts from herbs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variables included were body weights; feed consumption, organ weights, hematology and blood clinical chemistry, and histopathology were performed. Acute toxicity test revealed that, the limit dose of 2,000 mg/kg did not cause any mortality or symptoms of toxicity in all rats during the observation period. In the ...

  17. Mirtazapine toxicity in cats: retrospective study of 84 cases (2006-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Leah E; McLean, Mary Kay; Bates, Julia A; Quimby, Jessica M

    2016-11-01

    Objectives Mirtazapine is commonly used in veterinary medicine at doses of 1.88 or 3.75 mg as an appetite stimulant. The objectives of this study were to determine the most common adverse effects reported and the dose associated with these signs. Methods Records of cats with mirtazapine exposure (2006-2011) were obtained from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' Animal Poison Control Center. The following parameters were recorded: signalment, weight, outcome, agent ingested, amount ingested, route of exposure, clinical signs observed, intended of use, onset time of signs and duration of signs. Results The 10 most commonly observed adverse effects reported in 84 cats exposed to mirtazapine included vocalization (56.0% of cats; mean dose 2.56 mg/kg), agitation (31.0%; 2.57 mg/kg), vomiting (26.2%; 2.92 mg/kg), abnormal gait/ataxia (16.7%; 2.87 mg/kg), restlessness (14.3%; 3.55 mg/kg), tremors/trembling (14.3%; 2.43 mg/kg), hypersalivation (13.0%; 2.89 mg/kg), tachypnea (11.9%; 3.28 mg/kg), tachycardia (10.7%; 3.04 mg/kg) and lethargy (10.7%; 2.69 mg/kg). Fifty-nine (70.2%) cases were considered accidental ingestions and 25 (29.8%) cases were given mirtazapine as prescribed. The doses associated with signs of toxicity were 15.00 mg (40 cats), 3.75 mg (25 cats), 7.50 mg (four cats), 30.00 mg (one cat), 18.75 mg (one cat), 11.25 mg (one cat), 5.80 mg (one cat) and 1.88 mg (one cat). For cats with available information, the onset of clinical signs ranged from 15 mins to 3 h, and time to resolution of clinical signs ranged from 12-48 h. Conclusions and relevance The greater number of adverse effects at 3.75 mg rather than 1.88 mg suggests that the latter may be a more appropriate starting dose for stimulating appetite while limiting toxicity. The benefit of dispensing exact doses of mirtazapine is implied given the likelihood of accidental administration of a full tablet (15 mg) and the resulting toxicity.

  18. Toxicity study of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) in combination with acetone in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, M.; Østergaard, G.; Lam, Henrik Rye

    2000-01-01

    In two separate studies with exposure duration 9 weeks or 4 weeks, male Wistar rats were dosed with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) by gavage and exposed to drinking water with or without acetone (0.5% wt/v in the 9-week study, 1.0% wt/v in the 4-week study). In the 9-week study the doses of DEHP...... were 0, 125, 250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg b.wt. In the 4-week study the doses of DEHP were increased to 1000, 5000 and 10,000 mg/kg b.wt. In the 9-week study, the relative liver weight was increased in the rats exposed to 500 and 1000 mg/kg b.wt. No interaction of DEHP and acetone was observed in any...... of the measured parameters. In the 4-week study DEHP, at the highest dose level, resulted in severe general toxicity. The group exposed to DEHP in combination with acetone was more affected. Male fertility was decreased. Body weight was decreased, and the relative weight of the liver, kidney, heart, brain...

  19. Dietary safety of a dual-enzyme preparation for animal feed: Acute and subchronic oral toxicity and genotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, G P; Gaffney, M A; Curran, C M; Moran, C A

    2017-08-01

    Animal feed is routinely supplemented with exogenous enzymes to improve nutrient utilization, such as proteases to enhance protein hydrolysis in vivo and xylanases to alleviate feed related anti-nutritional factors. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the potential oral toxicity and genotoxicity of a dual-enzyme preparation, Vegpro® concentrate (VPr-C). Acute oral toxicity studies were conducted in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley Crl CD rats and CHS Swiss ICO:OFI (IOPS Caw) mice. Thirteen week preliminary and final subchronic oral toxicity studies were conducted in male and female rats. Genotoxicity was evaluated through a bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test), an in-vitro mammalian chromosomal aberration test, and a mammalian micronucleus test. The LD50 was >2000 mg/kg of BW in mice and rats. In the 13-week oral toxicity study, the No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL) was 1000 mg/kg BW per day for females and 300 mg/kg BW per day for males. VPr-C showed no mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium, did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes, and did not increase the frequency or proportion of micronucleated immature erythrocytes in mice. There was no evidence of acute or subchronic toxicity or genotoxicity associated with the test article at these test dosages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reprint of: Overview of avian toxicity studies for the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, S J; Alexander, C R; Cacela, D; Cunningham, F L; Dean, K M; Dorr, B S; Ellis, C K; Godard-Codding, C A; Guglielmo, C G; Hanson-Dorr, K C; Harr, K E; Healy, K A; Hooper, M J; Horak, K E; Isanhart, J P; Kennedy, L V; Link, J E; Maggini, I; Moye, J K; Perez, C R; Pritsos, C A; Shriner, S A; Trust, K A; Tuttle, P L

    2017-12-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 establishes liability for injuries to natural resources because of the release or threat of release of oil. Assessment of injury to natural resources resulting from an oil spill and development and implementation of a plan for the restoration, rehabilitation, replacement or acquisition of natural resources to compensate for those injuries is accomplished through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process. The NRDA process began within a week of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which occurred on April 20, 2010. During the spill, more than 8500 dead and impaired birds representing at least 93 avian species were collected. In addition, there were more than 3500 birds observed to be visibly oiled. While information in the literature at the time helped to identify some of the effects of oil on birds, it was not sufficient to fully characterize the nature and extent of the injuries to the thousands of live oiled birds, or to quantify those injuries in terms of effects on bird viability. As a result, the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed various assessment activities to inform NRDA injury determination and quantification analyses associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including avian toxicity studies. The goal of these studies was to evaluate the effects of oral exposure to 1-20ml of artificially weathered Mississippi Canyon 252 oil kg bw-1 day-1 from one to 28 days or one to five applications of oil to 20% of the bird's surface area. It was thought that these exposure levels would not result in immediate or short-term mortality but might result in physiological effects that ultimately could affect avian survival, reproduction and health. These studies included oral dosing studies, an external dosing study, metabolic and flight performance studies and field-based flight studies. Results of these studies indicated changes in hematologic endpoints including formation of Heinz bodies and changes in cell counts. There

  1. Overview of avian toxicity studies for the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, S J; Alexander, C R; Cacela, D; Cunningham, F L; Dean, K M; Dorr, B S; Ellis, C K; Godard-Codding, C A; Guglielmo, C G; Hanson-Dorr, K C; Harr, K E; Healy, K A; Hooper, M J; Horak, K E; Isanhart, J P; Kennedy, L V; Link, J E; Maggini, I; Moye, J K; Perez, C R; Pritsos, C A; Shriner, S A; Trust, K A; Tuttle, P L

    2017-04-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 establishes liability for injuries to natural resources because of the release or threat of release of oil. Assessment of injury to natural resources resulting from an oil spill and development and implementation of a plan for the restoration, rehabilitation, replacement or acquisition of natural resources to compensate for those injuries is accomplished through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process. The NRDA process began within a week of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which occurred on April 20, 2010. During the spill, more than 8500 dead and impaired birds representing at least 93 avian species were collected. In addition, there were more than 3500 birds observed to be visibly oiled. While information in the literature at the time helped to identify some of the effects of oil on birds, it was not sufficient to fully characterize the nature and extent of the injuries to the thousands of live oiled birds, or to quantify those injuries in terms of effects on bird viability. As a result, the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed various assessment activities to inform NRDA injury determination and quantification analyses associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, including avian toxicity studies. The goal of these studies was to evaluate the effects of oral exposure to 1-20ml of artificially weathered Mississippi Canyon 252 oil kg bw-1 day-1 from one to 28 days or one to five applications of oil to 20% of the bird's surface area. It was thought that these exposure levels would not result in immediate or short-term mortality but might result in physiological effects that ultimately could affect avian survival, reproduction and health. These studies included oral dosing studies, an external dosing study, metabolic and flight performance studies and field-based flight studies. Results of these studies indicated changes in hematologic endpoints including formation of Heinz bodies and changes in cell counts. There

  2. Acute Human Lethal Toxicity of Agricultural Pesticides: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarathna, Lalith; Mohamed, Fahim; Gawarammana, Indika; Bowe, Steven J.; Manuweera, Gamini; Buckley, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Agricultural pesticide poisoning is a major public health problem in the developing world, killing at least 250,000–370,000 people each year. Targeted pesticide restrictions in Sri Lanka over the last 20 years have reduced pesticide deaths by 50% without decreasing agricultural output. However, regulatory decisions have thus far not been based on the human toxicity of formulated agricultural pesticides but on the surrogate of rat toxicity using pure unformulated pesticides. We aimed to determine the relative human toxicity of formulated agricultural pesticides to improve the effectiveness of regulatory policy. Methods and Findings We examined the case fatality of different agricultural pesticides in a prospective cohort of patients presenting with pesticide self-poisoning to two clinical trial centers from April 2002 to November 2008. Identification of the pesticide ingested was based on history or positive identification of the container. A single pesticide was ingested by 9,302 patients. A specific pesticide was identified in 7,461 patients; 1,841 ingested an unknown pesticide. In a subset of 808 patients, the history of ingestion was confirmed by laboratory analysis in 95% of patients. There was a large variation in case fatality between pesticides—from 0% to 42%. This marked variation in lethality was observed for compounds within the same chemical and/or WHO toxicity classification of pesticides and for those used for similar agricultural indications. Conclusion The human data provided toxicity rankings for some pesticides that contrasted strongly with the WHO toxicity classification based on rat toxicity. Basing regulation on human toxicity will make pesticide poisoning less hazardous, preventing hundreds of thousands of deaths globally without compromising agricultural needs. Ongoing monitoring of patterns of use and clinical toxicity for new pesticides is needed to identify highly toxic pesticides in a timely manner. Please see later in the

  3. Pathological study of experimental cadmium toxicity in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. I. Al-Taee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The median lethal concentration of cadmium chloride CdCl2 at 24 hour in Cyprinus carpioL was determined. The toxic effect of sublethal concentration of CdCl2 was studied for 4, 7, 15 day. There was estimated significant decrease in hemoglobin concentration, Packed cell volume (PCV and lymphocyte counts, with significant increase (P≤0.05 in the serum alanine aminotransferase and creatine phosphokinase activity correlated with progression of exposure period. The elevation was more significant on the 15th day in all groups in comparison with non treated control group. The fish treated with sublethal concentration of CdCl2 showed behaviors of nervous signs manifested as abnormal swimming and jumping above the water surface. The gross lesions of sublethal concentration toxic effects included congestion of gills. Histopathological lesions revealed hyperplasia of epithelial cells with hyperatrophy of piler cells and inflammatory cells infiltration which lead to adhesion of the secondary lamellae of gills. The same lesions were observed on the 15th day of exposure but were more severe. In liver and kidney which appeared congested with presence of pale areas, histopathological lesions include infiltration of inflammatory cells, specially melanomacrophage and mononuclear cells in hepatic tissue with thickening of the bile duct wall, hemorrhage and necrosis in hepatic tissue. In the kidney, there was a congestion of blood vessels and deposition of hyaline casts in the renal tubules. Accumulation of cadmium in gills, kidney and liver after 4, 7 and 15th day of exposure showed an increase in level of accumulation with progression of exposure period.

  4. Toxicity studies of Cordia salicifolia extract Estudo da toxidade do extrato de Cordia salicifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Kenji Nakamura Cuman

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo foi realizado para determinar a toxicidade aguda do extrato total de Cordia salicifolia (DL50 após administração oral e intraperitoneal em camundongos, assim como os efeitos do extrato sobre alguns parâmetros bioquímicos no plasma de ratos após um tratamento prolongado (90 dias. A DL50 do extrato administrado por v.o. foi maior que 2000 mg/Kg, enquanto a DL50 por via i.p. foi aproximadamente 920 mg/Kg. A administração oral diária do extrato nas doses de 20, 100, 200 e 400 mg/kg por um período de 90 dias não causou modificações no ganho de peso corporal, no peso dos órgãos, nos parâmetros hematológicos e bioquímicos dos animais. Estes resultados indicam que a administração do extrato por um período mais prolongado não provocou efeitos de toxicidade nos animaisThis study was carried out to determine the acute toxicity of the whole Cordia salicifolia extract (LD50 after oral and intraperitoneal administration in mice, and its effect on certain biochemical parameters in the plasma of rats after 90 days of administration. The oral LD50 value of the extract was higher than 2000 mg/kg while the LD50 by intraperitoneal injections was about 920 mg/kg. A daily oral administration of extracts at 20, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg doses for 90 days did not cause significant changes in the body weight gain, organs weight or biochemical assays and hematology in the animals. The results showed that the administration of the extract for a prolonged period did not produce toxic effects in the animals

  5. A relational learning approach to Structure-Activity Relationships in drug design toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Rui; Pereira, Max; Costa, Vítor Santos; Fonseca, Nuno A; Adriano, Carlos; Simões, Carlos J V; Brito, Rui M M

    2011-09-16

    It has been recognized that the development of new therapeutic drugs is a complex and expensive process. A large number of factors affect the activity in vivo of putative candidate molecules and the propensity for causing adverse and toxic effects is recognized as one of the major hurdles behind the current "target-rich, lead-poor" scenario. Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) studies, using relational Machine Learning (ML) algorithms, have already been shown to be very useful in the complex process of rational drug design. Despite the ML successes, human expertise is still of the utmost importance in the drug development process. An iterative process and tight integration between the models developed by ML algorithms and the know-how of medicinal chemistry experts would be a very useful symbiotic approach. In this paper we describe a software tool that achieves that goal--iLogCHEM. The tool allows the use of Relational Learners in the task of identifying molecules or molecular fragments with potential to produce toxic effects, and thus help in stream-lining drug design in silico. It also allows the expert to guide the search for useful molecules without the need to know the details of the algorithms used. The models produced by the algorithms may be visualized using a graphical interface, that is of common use amongst researchers in structural biology and medicinal chemistry. The graphical interface enables the expert to provide feedback to the learning system. The developed tool has also facilities to handle the similarity bias typical of large chemical databases. For that purpose the user can filter out similar compounds when assembling a data set. Additionally, we propose ways of providing background knowledge for Relational Learners using the results of Graph Mining algorithms. Copyright 2011 The Author(s). Published by Journal of Integrative Bioinformatics.

  6. A 13-week subchronic toxicity study of madder color in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kaoru; Shibutani, Makoto; Masutomi, Naoya; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Hironori; Uneyama, Chikako; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Hirose, Masao

    2008-01-01

    A 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity study of madder color (MC), a natural food colorant extracted from the roots of Rubia tinctorum L., was performed using F344 rats. Five groups of animals, each consisting of 10 males and 10 females, were fed diet containing 0, 0.6, 1.2, 2.5 or 5.0% MC for 13 weeks. During the experiment, lower body weight was evident from the 2.5% dose. Hematologically, fluctuation in red blood cell (RBC) parameters suggestive of weak anemia (females), and slight increases of platelet counts (both sexes) and white blood cell (WBC) counts (males) were observed at higher doses. Serum biochemically, slight fluctuations were observed in many parameters, including increased total protein (TP), conjugated bilirubin, Ca, and inorganic phosphate, and decrease of the albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio in both sexes, with dose-dependence for TP and A/G from 0.6% in females. Histopathological changes were mainly observed in the renal proximal tubules, such as microvesicular vacuolar degeneration in the cortex and karyomegaly in the outer medulla involving both sexes, lesions being evident even with 0.6%. In the outer medulla, elevation of cell proliferation activity as assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen was observed in males from 2.5%. Severity of focal necrosis of hepatocytes was increased only in females at 5.0%, while the increased relative liver weight as with the increased conjugated bilirubin was evident in both sexes from 1.2%. The results thus suggest that MC exerts mild toxicity, targeting liver, kidneys, and possibly RBCs and WBCs, some renal changes being evident from 0.6% in diet, that is attributable to be the lowest-observed adverse effect level (305.8-309.2mg/kg body weight/day).

  7. Transformation of acesulfame in chlorination: Kinetics study, identification of byproducts, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Adela Jing; Wu, Pengran; Law, Japhet Cheuk-Fung; Chow, Chi-Hang; Postigo, Cristina; Guo, Ying; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2017-06-15

    Acesulfame (ACE) is one of the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Because it is not metabolized in the human gut, it reaches the aquatic environment unchanged. In the present study, the reactivity of ACE in free chlorine-containing water was investigated for the first time. The degradation of ACE was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics. The first-order rate increased with decreasing pH from 9.4 to 4.8 with estimated half-lives from 693 min to 2 min. Structural elucidation of the detected transformation products (TPs) was performed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Integration of MS/MS fragments, isotopic pattern and exact mass allowed the characterization of up to 5 different TPs in the ultrapure water extracts analyzed, including two proposed new chlorinated compounds reported for the first time. Unexpectedly, several known and regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) were present in the ACE chlorinated solution. In addition, two of the six DBPs are proposed as N-DBPs. Time-course profiles of ACE and the identified by-products in tap water and wastewater samples were followed in order to simulate the actual disinfection process. Tap water did not significantly affect degradation, but wastewater did; it reacted with the ACE to produce several brominated-DBPs. A preliminary assessment of chlorinated mixtures by luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri showed that these by-products were up to 1.8-fold more toxic than the parent compound. The generation of these DBPs, both regulated and not, representing enhanced toxicity, make chlorine disinfection a controversial treatment for ACE. Further efforts are urgently needed to both assess the consequences of current water treatment processes on ACE and to develop new processes that will safely treat ACE. Human health and the health of our aquatic ecosystems are at stake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A study of bio-hybrid silsesquioxane/yeast: Biosorption and neuronal toxicity of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trama-Freitas, Bianca; Freitas, Johnattan C S; Martins, Rui C; Gando-Ferreira, Licínio M; Quinta-Ferreira, Maria Emília; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa Maria; do Carmo, Devaney R

    2017-12-20

    Lead is a heavy metal of high impact for the environment as well as for human health, being cause of several diseases. Considering the importance of obtaining an effective treatment for lead removal, a new hybrid material was developed for sorption of Pb2+ from aqueous solution. The effect of pH, temperature, liquid/solid ratio (g/cm3) and lead concentration on the sorption capacity of yeasts chemically modified with cubic silsesquioxane (YS) was analyzed. Additionally, the toxicity of lead on the neuronal activity was also investigated in order to assess whether the damage caused by the Pb2+ ion is reversible or not. The YS is highly promissory as sorbent of lead in high concentrations (100 and 500ppm), reaching high efficiency in short contact times (15min), and at the natural pH (4) of the Pb2+ solution and room temperature. The best sorption obtained was 82% removal and 248mg/g with 500cm3/g sorbent, pH 4, room temperature and contact time of 15min. Besides, such high efficiencies are obtained with low quantities of biosorbent, when compared with other similar materials. The impact of lead on neuronal function was studied by measuring autofluorescence signals, associated with changes in cellular metabolism, at the hippocampal CA3 area in brain slices. In this toxicity tests, the effect of low concentrations of lead (1 and 3μM) on neuronal activity was evaluated. After removal of the lead, the irreversibility of the observed changes can be verified, which suggests the existence of neuronal damages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > Egyptian Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Finance and Management: Submissions. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Draft Test Guideline: Whole Sediment Acute Toxicity Invertebrates, Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  12. PEGylation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle for drug delivery applications with decreased toxicity: an in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Suma; Mutalik, Srinivas; Rai, Sharada; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish

    2015-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are evolving as a mainstay across various applications in the field of Science and Technology. SPIONs have enticed attention on the grounds of their unique physicochemical properties as well as potential applications in magnetic hyperthermia, immunoassays, as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery among others. Toward this goal, we synthesized SPIONs by chemical co-precipitation and PEGylated it. PEGylated SPIONs (PS) were studied for its detailed in vivo toxicity profile, in view of further surface engineering for its clinical applications. The intravenous LD50(14) of the PS was ascertained as 508.16 ± 41.52 mg/kg b wt. Histopathology of the vital organs of the animals injected with acute toxic doses showed pathological changes in spleen, lung, liver, and kidney. Accumulation of SPION was found in the aforementioned organs as confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Further, 1/10th dose of LD50(14) of PS and the Bare SPION (BS) was used to analyze a detailed toxicity profile, including genotoxicity (micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberration assays), organ-specific toxicity (a detailed serum biochemical analysis), and also determination of oxidative stress. The results of toxicity profile indicated no significant toxicity due to systemic exposure of PS. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis confirmed the accumulation of SPION majorly in lungs, liver spleen, and kidneys. The present study thus indicated an optimal dose of PS which could be used for surface modification for targeted drug delivery applications with least toxicity.

  13. PEGylation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle for drug delivery applications with decreased toxicity: an in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Suma [Manipal University, Department of Radiation Biology & Toxicology, School of Life Sciences (India); Mutalik, Srinivas [Manipal University, Department of Pharmaceutics, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Rai, Sharada [Manipal University, Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College (India); Udupa, Nayanabhirama [Manipal University, Director - Research (Health Sciences) (India); Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com, E-mail: rao.satish@manipal.edu [Manipal University, Department of Radiation Biology & Toxicology, School of Life Sciences (India)

    2015-10-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are evolving as a mainstay across various applications in the field of Science and Technology. SPIONs have enticed attention on the grounds of their unique physicochemical properties as well as potential applications in magnetic hyperthermia, immunoassays, as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery among others. Toward this goal, we synthesized SPIONs by chemical co-precipitation and PEGylated it. PEGylated SPIONs (PS) were studied for its detailed in vivo toxicity profile, in view of further surface engineering for its clinical applications. The intravenous LD{sub 50(14)} of the PS was ascertained as 508.16 ± 41.52 mg/kg b wt. Histopathology of the vital organs of the animals injected with acute toxic doses showed pathological changes in spleen, lung, liver, and kidney. Accumulation of SPION was found in the aforementioned organs as confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Further, 1/10th dose of LD{sub 50(14)} of PS and the Bare SPION (BS) was used to analyze a detailed toxicity profile, including genotoxicity (micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberration assays), organ-specific toxicity (a detailed serum biochemical analysis), and also determination of oxidative stress. The results of toxicity profile indicated no significant toxicity due to systemic exposure of PS. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis confirmed the accumulation of SPION majorly in lungs, liver spleen, and kidneys. The present study thus indicated an optimal dose of PS which could be used for surface modification for targeted drug delivery applications with least toxicity.

  14. Treatment of textile effluent in a developed phytoreactor with immobilized bacterial augmentation and subsequent toxicity studies on Etheostoma olmstedi fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watharkar, Anuprita D. [Department of Biotechnology, Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India); Khandare, Rahul V. [School of Life Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (India); Waghmare, Pankajkumar R.; Jagadale, Ashwini D.; Govindwar, Sanjay P. [Department of Biochemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India); Jadhav, Jyoti P., E-mail: jpj_biochem@unishivaji.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India); Department of Biochemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A phytoreactor was developed and augmented with immobilized bacteria. • This consortium showed enhanced treatment than the individual species. • Oxido-reductases from P. crinitum and B. pumilus could decolorize the effluent. • Characterization of effluent samples endorsed the efficacy of consortial strategy. • Toxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of the consortium treated effluent. - Abstract: A static hydroponic bioreactor using nursery grown plants of Pogonatherum crinitum along with immobilized Bacillus pumilus cells was developed for the treatment of textile wastewater. Independent reactors with plants and immobilized cells were also kept for performance and efficacy evaluation. The effluent samples characterized before and after their treatment showed that the plant–bacterial consortium reactor was more efficient than those of individual plant and bacterium reactors. COD, BOD, ADMI, conductivity, turbidity, TDS and TSS of the textile effluent was found to be reduced by 78, 70, 93, 4, 90, 13 and 70% respectively within 12 d by the consortial set. HPTLC analysis revealed the transformation of the textile effluent to new products. The phytotoxicity study on Phaeseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare seeds showed reduced toxicity of treated effluents. The animal toxicity study performed on Etheostoma olmstedi fishes showed the toxic nature of untreated effluent giving extreme stress to fishes leading to death. Histology of fish gills exposed to treated effluent was found to be less affected. The oxidative stress related enzymes like superoxide dismutase and catalase were found to show decreased activities and less lipid peroxidation in fishes exposed to treated effluent.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and toxicity studies of atranorin extracted from Cladina kalbii Ahti in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelia Garcez Dória de Melo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atranorin (ATR is the main compound from the lichen Cladina kalbii Ahti, which grows in the arid regions of northeastern Brazil. This study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and toxicological properties of ATR. To evaluate anti-inflammatory properties, paw edema was induced by injecting 0.1 mL of carrageenan into the subplantar region of the right hind paw of rats, and leukocyte migration was induced by injection of 500 µL of carrageenan into the peritoneal cavity of mice. In addition, we determined ATR cytotoxicity in L929 cells by MTT assay and acute (5 g/kg-single dose and subchronic (50 mg/kg-30 days toxicity tests in Wistar rats. The results showed that ATR (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity (paw edema and leukocyte migration. In the acute toxicity test, the animals showed hypoactivity and lethargy during the initial period (first 6 hours and increase in total protein, total and indirect bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase after 14 days in ATR-treated male rats. The subchronic toxicity test revealed increases in total protein, globulin, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total and direct bilirubin in ATR-treated female rats. Histological analysis revealed no changes in the architecture and morphology of the organs. These results suggest that ATR has significant anti-inflammatory activity, with no significant acute and subchronic toxicity or cytotoxicity.Atranorina (ATR é o principal composto do líquen Cladina kalbii Ahti, que cresce em terras áridas do nordeste brasileiro. Este estudo foi realizado para avaliar as propriedades antiinflamatórias e toxicológicas da ATR. Para avaliar as propriedades antiinflamatórias, o edema de pata foi induzido, administrando-se 0,1 mL de carragenina na região subplantar da pata traseira direita e a migração leucocitária foi induzida pela injeção de 500 µL de carragenina no peritônio. Além disso, determinou-se a

  16. 5-fluorouracil Toxicity Mechanism Determination in Human Keratinocytes: in vitro Study on HaCaT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hartinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and capecitabine therapy is often accompanied by palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE which is manifestation of 5-FU toxicity in keratinocytes. The main mechanisms of 5-FU action are thymidylate synthase (TS inhibition which can be abrogated by thymidine and strengthened by calciumfolinate (CF and incorporation of fluorouridinetriphosphate into RNA which can be abrogated by uridine. For proper PPE treatment 5-FU mechanism of action in keratinocytes needs to be elucidated. We used the 5-FU toxicity modulators uridine, thymidine and CF to discover the mechanism of 5-FU action in human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. To measure the cellular viability, we used MTT test and RTCA test. CF did not augment 5-FU toxicity and 5-FU toxicity was weakened by uridine. Therefore, the primary mechanism of 5-FU toxicity in keratinocytes is 5-FU incorporation into RNA. The uridine protective effect cannot fully develop in the presence of CF. Thymidine addition to 5-FU and uridine treated cells not only prevents the toxicity-augmenting CF effect but it also prolongs the 5-FU treated cells survival in comparison to uridine only. Therefore, it can be assumed that in the presence of uridine the 5-FU toxicity mechanism is switched from RNA incorporation to TS inhibition. Although particular 5-FU toxicity mechanisms were previously described in various cell types, this is the first time when various combinations of pyrimidine nucleosides and CF were used for 5-FU toxicity mechanism elucidation in human keratinocytes. We suggest that for PPE treatment ointment containing uridine and thymidine should be further clinically tested.

  17. Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity/genotoxicity studies of Irvingia gabonensis extract (IGOB131).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Shil C; Shivarudraiah, Prasad; Venkataramaiah, Suresh Babu; Gavara, Swapna; Soni, Madhu G

    2012-05-01

    African Bush Mango from Irvingia gabonensis is a West African culinary fruit and the mucilage from this fruit seed is used to make traditional soups and sauces. Extract from the kernel (IGOB131) has been claimed for its health benefits. In the present investigations, potential adverse effects, if any, of IGOB131 were investigated in dose-response 90-day study and genotoxicity studies. In the subchronic study, Sprague Dawley rats (20/sex/group) were gavaged with I. gabonensis extract (IGOB131) at dose levels of 0, 100, 1000 and 2500 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 90-days. No treatment-related changes in clinical signs, functional observations, mortality, ophthalmologic observations, body weights, body weight gain or feed consumption were noted. Similarly, hematological, clinical chemistry, urine analysis parameters, and organ weights did not reveal any toxicologically significant treatment-related changes. No treatment-related macroscopic and microscopic abnormalities were noted at the end of treatment period. The mutagenicity as evaluated by Ames assay, in vitro and in vivo chromosomal aberration test and in vivo micronucleus assay did not reveal any genotoxicity of IGOB131. The results of subchronic toxicity study suggest the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for I. gabonensis extract (IGOB131) as ≥ 2500 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Deep convolutional neural network with transfer learning for rectum toxicity prediction in cervical cancer radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Jiawei; Zhong, Zichun; Hrycushko, Brian; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Gu, Xuejun

    2017-11-01

    Better understanding of the dose-toxicity relationship is critical for safe dose escalation to improve local control in late-stage cervical cancer radiotherapy. In this study, we introduced a convolutional neural network (CNN) model to analyze rectum dose distribution and predict rectum toxicity. Forty-two cervical cancer patients treated with combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) were retrospectively collected, including twelve toxicity patients and thirty non-toxicity patients. We adopted a transfer learning strategy to overcome the limited patient data issue. A 16-layers CNN developed by the visual geometry group (VGG-16) of the University of Oxford was pre-trained on a large-scale natural image database, ImageNet, and fine-tuned with patient rectum surface dose maps (RSDMs), which were accumulated EBRT  +  BT doses on the unfolded rectum surface. We used the adaptive synthetic sampling approach and the data augmentation method to address the two challenges, data imbalance and data scarcity. The gradient-weighted class activation maps (Grad-CAM) were also generated to highlight the discriminative regions on the RSDM along with the prediction model. We compare different CNN coefficients fine-tuning strategies, and compare the predictive performance using the traditional dose volume parameters, e.g. D 0.1/1/2cc, and the texture features extracted from the RSDM. Satisfactory prediction performance was achieved with the proposed scheme, and we found that the mean Grad-CAM over the toxicity patient group has geometric consistence of distribution with the statistical analysis result, which indicates possible rectum toxicity location. The evaluation results have demonstrated the feasibility of building a CNN-based rectum dose-toxicity prediction model with transfer learning for cervical cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Deep convolutional neural network with transfer learning for rectum toxicity prediction in cervical cancer radiotherapy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Jiawei; Zhong, Zichun; Hrycushko, Brian; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Gu, Xuejun

    2017-10-12

    Better understanding of the dose-toxicity relationship is critical for safe dose escalation to improve local control in late-stage cervical cancer radiotherapy. In this study, we introduced a convolutional neural network (CNN) model to analyze rectum dose distribution and predict rectum toxicity. Forty-two cervical cancer patients treated with combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) were retrospectively collected, including twelve toxicity patients and thirty non-toxicity patients. We adopted a transfer learning strategy to overcome the limited patient data issue. A 16-layers CNN developed by the visual geometry group (VGG-16) of the University of Oxford was pre-trained on a large-scale natural image database, ImageNet, and fine-tuned with patient rectum surface dose maps (RSDMs), which were accumulated EBRT  +  BT doses on the unfolded rectum surface. We used the adaptive synthetic sampling approach and the data augmentation method to address the two challenges, data imbalance and data scarcity. The gradient-weighted class activation maps (Grad-CAM) were also generated to highlight the discriminative regions on the RSDM along with the prediction model. We compare different CNN coefficients fine-tuning strategies, and compare the predictive performance using the traditional dose volume parameters, e.g. D 0.1/1/2cc, and the texture features extracted from the RSDM. Satisfactory prediction performance was achieved with the proposed scheme, and we found that the mean Grad-CAM over the toxicity patient group has geometric consistence of distribution with the statistical analysis result, which indicates possible rectum toxicity location. The evaluation results have demonstrated the feasibility of building a CNN-based rectum dose-toxicity prediction model with transfer learning for cervical cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Physicochemical analysis and repeated-dose 90-days oral toxicity study of nanocalcium carbonate in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jae Hyuck; Park, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Sook; Song, Kyung Seuk; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Ryu, Hyun Ryol; Lee, Han; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2015-01-01

    In our previous studies of nanocalcium carbonate, in which we performed physicochemical analysis, genotoxicity, acute single-dose and repeated-dose 14-day oral toxicity testings in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, nanocalcium carbonate did not show a difference in toxicity compared to vehicle control. Here, we provide the first report of a repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity test of nanocalcium carbonate in Sprague-Dawley rats, with physicochemical comparison of micro and nanocalcium carbonate. We find that the two particles differ in size, hydrodynamic size, and specific surface area, with no differences in components, crystalline structure and radical production. In terms of ionization ability, nanocalcium carbonate was slightly more ionized within 1% than microcalcium carbonate at pH 5 and pH 7. In the repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity test of nanocalcium carbonate, there was no significant toxicity, and similar blood concentrations of Ca(2+) compared to the vehicle control group. Based on our results, although nanocalcium carbonate has different physicochemical properties, nanocalcium carbonate does not differ from microcalcium carbonate in terms of toxicity. Based on the results, we suggest that the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of nanocalcium carbonate is 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in SD rats according to the maximum dose (OECD guideline 408). However, the NOAEL might be higher than 1000 mg kg(-1) day(-1) because there were no adverse effects revealed by consistent pathological findings or biochemical parameter changes. To justify a safe concentration of nanocalcium carbonate, which is a low toxicity chemical, more data is required on dose levels above 1000 mg kg(-1). Our findings may be useful for creating safety guidelines for the use nanocalcium carbonate.

  1. Studies on the toxicities of aluminium hydroxide and calcium phosphate as immunological adjuvants for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, N; Kato, H; Maeyama, J; Eto, K; Yoshihara, S

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium hydroxide (Al) and calcium phosphate (Ca) have been used for many years as immunological adjuvants for biologicals. We investigated the toxic effects of both adjuvants with different physical properties. Al-gel elicited vascular permeability-increasing and toxic effects to macrophages (M phi), while its haemolytic effect was weak. Ca-gel elicited a significantly stronger haemolytic effect, but no other toxic effect. Incubation of M phi or polymorphonuclear leucocytes with Al-suspension resulted in the largest release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ca-suspension caused haemolysis of about 50% of that caused by Ca-gel.

  2. African Journal of Infectious Diseases: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copying text, photographs, tables or graphics from any source and using it as ones own is considered plagiarism whether or not a reference to the copied portion is given. Submission Preparation Checklist As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the ...

  3. Decomposition of toxicity emission changes on the demand and supply sides: empirical study of the US industrial sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hidemichi; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Kagawa, Shigemi; Managi, Shunsuke

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the changes in the toxicity of chemical emissions from the US industrial sector over the 1998–2009 period. Specifically, we employed a multiregional input–output analysis framework and integrated a supply-side index decomposition analysis (IDA) with a demand-side structural decomposition analysis (SDA) to clarify the main drivers of changes in the toxicity of production- and consumption-based chemical emissions. The results showed that toxic emissions from the US industrial sector decreased by 83% over the studied period because of pollution abatement efforts adopted by US industries. A variety of pollution abatement efforts were used by different industries, and cleaner production in the mining sector and the use of alternative materials in the manufacture of transportation equipment represented the most important efforts.

  4. Study of the degradation performance (TOC, BOD, and toxicity) of bisphenol A by the photo-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moya, M; Kaisto, T; Navarro, M; Del Valle, L J

    2017-03-01

    Degradation of bisphenol A (BPA, 0.5 L, 30 mg L-1) was studied by photo-Fenton treatment, while Fenton reagents were variables. The efficiency of the degradation process was evaluated by the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC), the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and toxicity. For toxicity analysis, bacterial methods were found infeasible, but the in vitro assay of VERO cells culture was successfully applied. Experiments according to a 22 design of experiments (DOE) with star points and three center points for statistical validity allowed selecting those process conditions (Fe(II) and H2O2 load) that maximized the process performance. Photo-Fenton process effectively eliminated BPA and partly degraded its by-products (residual TOC Photo-Fenton increased the biodegradability and reduced the toxicity of the studied sample.

  5. Implementation of toxicokinetics in toxicity studies e Toxicokinetics of 4-methylanisole and its metabolites in juvenile and adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandon, E.F.A.; Kesteren, van P.C.E.; Eijkeren, van J.C.H.; Tienstra, M.; Lopez Sanchez, P.; Tonk, E.C.M.; Piersma, A.H.; Bos, P.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The current risk assessment of compounds is generally based on external exposure and effect relationships. External doses are often not representative for internal exposure concentrations. The aim of this study was to show how the implementation of toxicokinetics in a scheduled toxicity study

  6. Effects of Magnesium on the Phosphate Toxicity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Time for Intervention Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Hamano, Takayuki; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-06

    Magnesium, an essential mineral for human health, plays a pivotal role in the cardiovascular system. Epidemiological studies in the general population have found an association between lower dietary magnesium intake and an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. In addition, magnesium supplementation was shown to improve blood pressure control, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function. The relationship between magnesium and cardiovascular prognosis among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been increasingly investigated as it is becoming evident that magnesium can inhibit vascular calcification, a prominent risk of cardiovascular events, which commonly occurs in CKD patients. Cohort studies in patients receiving dialysis have shown a lower serum magnesium level as a significant risk for cardiovascular mortality. Interestingly, the cardiovascular mortality risk associated with hyperphosphatemia is alleviated among those with high serum magnesium levels, consistent with in vitro evidence that magnesium inhibits high-phosphate induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, a harmful effect of high phosphate on the progression of CKD is also attenuated among those with high serum magnesium levels. The potential usefulness of magnesium as a remedy for phosphate toxicity should be further explored by future intervention studies.

  7. A 10-day toxicity study of toltrazuril 5% suspension in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, M O; Quance, J; Kennedy, T

    2000-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious disorder of the nervous system of horses caused by Sarcocystis neurona. Recently, toltrazuril has begun to be used for treatment of EPM. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of toltrazuril in horses when administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg for 10 days. Five horses were given 50 mg/kg of toltrazuril once daily for 10 days by nasogastric tube. Complete blood cell counts, serum chemistry values, and coagulation panels were evaluated before and after treatment; then a full postmortem examination was completed on day 11. Results of the study show that only mild clinical signs (i.e., anorexia, weight loss, and colic in one of the five horses) were observed after treatment. Minimal changes were noted in the serum chemistry analysis (i.e., increased bilirubin and serum protein, mildly increased hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration, and mildly increased albumin). Renal medullary congestion was noted on gross postmortem examination; however, no microscopic changes due to compound administration were noted in the kidneys or other tissue. Results of this study suggest that administration of toltrazuril at 50 mg/kg (5x to 10x anticipated clinical dosage) for 10 days resulted in only mild clinical abnormalities.

  8. Oleocanthal ameliorates amyloid-β oligomers' toxicity on astrocytes and neuronal cells: In vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S; Mohamed, Loqman A; Al Rihani, Sweilem B; Mousa, Youssef M; Siddique, Abu Bakar; El Sayed, Khalid A; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2017-06-03

    Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) has several health promoting effects. Evidence have shown that EVOO attenuates the pathology of amyloid-β (Aβ) and improves cognitive function in experimental animal models, suggesting it's potential to protect and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Available studies have linked this beneficial effect to oleocanthal, one of the active components in EVOO. The effect of oleocanthal against AD pathology has been linked to its ability to attenuate Aβ and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild-type and AD transgenic mice in vivo. However, the ability of oleocanthal to alter the toxic effect of Aβ on brain parenchymal cells is unknown. In the current study, we investigated oleocanthal effect on modulating Aβ oligomers (Aβo) pathological events in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings demonstrated oleocanthal prevented Aβo-induced synaptic proteins, SNAP-25 and PSD-95, down-regulation in neurons, and attenuated Aβo-induced inflammation, glutamine transporter (GLT1) and glucose transporter (GLUT1) down-regulation in astrocytes. Aβo-induced inflammation was characterized by interleukin-6 (IL-6) increase and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) upregulation that were reduced by oleocanthal. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence to support the protective effect of EVOO-derived phenolic secoiridoid oleocanthal against AD pathology. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional nature of the spasmolytic effect, phytochemical composition and acute toxicity studies on Sauromatum guttatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Shah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the functional nature of the potential spasmolytic effect of the crude extract of Sauromatum guttaum. It was found positive for the presence of alkaloid and tannins. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparation, S. guttaum caused inhibition of spontaneous and high K+ (80 mM-induced contractions, with respective EC50 values (95% confidence intervals of 1.50 mg/mL (0.69-3.02 and 1.17 mg/mL (0.81-1.61, similar to verapamil. Inhibition of high K+ -induced contractions suggests Ca++ antagonistic effect. The Ca++channel blocker activity of S. guttaum was confirmed when pre-treatment of the tissues with extract (0.3-3 mg/mL caused a rightward displacement in the Ca++ concentration-response curves. Moreover, in the acute toxicity test, S. guttaum was found safe up to the dose of 3 g/kg. The findings of the current study suggest that the S. guttaum exhibited spasmolytic activity, possibly mediated through inhibitory effect on Ca++ entry and was found safe and this current study provides first evidence to the potential use of this plant as antispasmodic and can play a possible role as antidiarrheal.

  10. A 7-day intravenous toxicity study and neurotoxicity assessment of pyridorin in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D W; Peterson, R C; Mujer, C V; Gad, S C

    2017-07-01

    Pyridorin®, a naturally occurring metabolite of vitamin B6 that inhibits and scavenges reactive oxygen species, is being developed as a potential therapeutic for acute kidney injury. An investigational new drug application (IND) was opened for Pyridorin in support of its ongoing oral drug clinical development program. Currently, a Pyridorin intravenous (IV) formulation is being developed for use in surgical patients. To support the IND for Pyridorin, a full battery of nonclinical Good Laboratory Practice compliant studies was performed with no neurological or behavioral signs of toxicity seen following oral or IV administration of pyridoxine dihydrochloride (the active ingredient in Pyridorin). However, excessive ingestion of vitamin B6 has been reported to cause neurotoxic syndrome in humans. Therefore, under Food and Drug Administration recommendation, a 7-day IV study in rats was conducted to further evaluate the drug's potential to cause neurotoxicity. Blood plasma samples indicated that exposure to pyridoxamine dihydrochloride and its metabolites, pyridoxal, pyridoxine, and 4-pyridoxic acid was linearly dose proportional and independent of gender. At doses of up to 200 mg/kg/day pyridoxine dihydrochloride, no treatment-related effects were seen in rats, providing further evidence for the absence of pyridoxine dihydrochloride-related changes in the nervous system. A no observed adverse effect level of 200 mg/kg/day was identified for this study.

  11. Study of persistent toxic pollutants in a river basin-ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2017-07-01

    This study presents a complementary approach for the evaluation of water quality in a river basin by employing active and passive sampling. Persistent toxic pollutants representing three classes: organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were studied in grab water samples, in passive samplers/SemiPermeable Membrane Devices (SPMDs) and in fish tissues collected along the Strymonas River, northern Greece at three sampling campaigns during the year 2013. Almost all the target compounds were detected in the study river of Strymonas, northern Greece at the periods of high rainfall intensity and/or low flow-rate. The most frequently detected compounds were 1,2-benzanthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, endrin aldehyde, fluorene, methoxychlor, polychlorinated biphenyl PCB 28, PCB 180 and pyrene. The family of DDT compounds and aldrin were also occasionally detected. Agricultural run-off and waste effluents are the main sources of hydrophobic organic compounds in the river basin. The use of SPMDs allowed the detection of more micropollutants than active sampling (31 vs. 16, respectively). Results showed relatively low risk however the potential risk associated with micropollutants such as 1,2-benzanthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, p,p-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), endosulfan II, methoxychlor, PCB 180 and pyrene should not be neglected. Performing risk assessment based on passive sampling, more information was obtained about temporal and spatial variation. SPMDs could be applied as a pre-evaluation before chemical monitoring in biota.

  12. Intravenous Toxicity Study of Water-soluble Ginseng Pharmacopuncture in SD Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sang Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radix Ginseng has been used for thousands of years to treat a wide variety of diseases. Radix ginseng has also been used as a traditional medicine for boosting Qi energy and tonifying the spleen and lungs. Traditionally, its effect could be obtained orally. Nowadays, a new method, the injection of herbal medicine, is being used. This study was performed to investigate the single-dose intravenous toxicity of water-soluble ginseng pharmacopuncture (WSGP in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods: All experiments were carried out at Biotoxtech, an institute authorized to perform non-clinical studies under the regulation of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. At the age of six weeks, 40 SD rats, 20 male rats and 20 female rats, were allocated into one of 4 groups according to the dosages they would receive. The WSGP was prepared in the Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute under the regulation of Korea-Good Manufacturing Practice (K-GMP. Dosages of WSGP were 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL/animal for the experimental groups, and normal saline was administered to the control group. The rat's general conditions and body weights, the results of their hematological and biochemistry tests, and their necropsy and histopathological findings were investigated to identify the toxicological effect of WSGP injected intravenously. The effect was examined for 14 days after the WSGP injection. This study was performed under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee of Biotoxtech. Results: No deaths were found in this single-dose toxicity test on the intravenous injection of WSGP, and no significant changes in the rat's general conditions and body weights, the results on their hematological and biochemistry test, and their necropsy findings were observed during the test. The local area of the injection site showed minial change. The lethal dose was assumed to be over 1.0 mL/animal in both sexes. Conclusion: These results indicate that WSGP is safe at dosages up to

  13. Radical model of arsenic(III) toxicity: theoretical and EPR spin trapping studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Pedro L; Rockenbauer, Antal; Villamena, Frederick A

    2014-05-19

    Arsenic is one of the most environmentally significant pollutants and a great global health concern. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the mechanism of arsenic toxicity, the exact mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we examine the capacity of trivalent arsenic species arsenous acid (iAs(III)), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) to generate ROS through a theoretical analysis of their structures, redox properties, and their reactivities to various ROS using a density functional theory (DFT) approach at the B3LYP/6-31+G**//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory and by employing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. Results show that the oxidized forms (As(IV)) are structurally more stable compared to the reduced forms (As(II)) that impart elongated As-O bonds leading to the formation of As(III) and hydroxide anion. Enthalpies of one-electron reduction and oxidation indicate that increasing the degree of methylation makes it harder for As(III) to be reduced but easier to be oxidized. The order of increasing favorability for arsenical activation by ROS is O2 redox pathways with concomitant generation of radicals. This is followed by MMA(III) and by iAs(III) being the least favorable. Spin trapping studies showed a higher propensity for methylated arsenicals to generate radicals than iAs(III) upon treatment with H2O2. However, in the presence of Fe(II,III), all showed radical generation where MMA(III) gave predominantly C-centered adducts, while acidified iAs (III) and DMA(III) gave primarily HO-adducts, and their formation was affected in the presence of SOD suggesting a As(III)-OO/OOH radical intermediate. Therefore, our results suggest a basis for the increased redox activity of methylated arsenicals that can be applied to the observed trends in arsenic methylation and toxicity in biological systems.

  14. Acute toxicity study and antipyretic effect of the brown alga t ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sargassaceae) was extracted with n-hexane, cyclohexane, methanol and ethanol-water (1:1) and investigated for acute toxicity and antipyretic activity. Phytochemical analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of steroids, flavonoids and ...

  15. The chick embryo test as used in the study of the toxicity of certain dithiocarbamates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, D.O.E.; Logten, M.J. van

    1968-01-01

    The toxicities of six dithiocarbamates: bis(dimethyl thiocarbamoyl) disulfide (thiram), zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate (ziram), ferric dimethyldithiocarbamate (ferbam), bis(dimethyl thiocarbamoyl) ethylene bis(dithiocarbamate) (triaram), sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate (NaDEDC), and sodium ethylene

  16. In vivo toxicity of nitroaromatics: A comprehensive quantitative structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Aminah; Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-08-01

    The toxicity data of 90 nitroaromatic compounds related to their 50% lethal dose concentration for rats (LD50) were analyzed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Quantum-chemically calculated descriptors together with molecular descriptors generated by DRAGON, PaDEL, and HiT-QSAR software were utilized to build QSAR models. Quality and validity of the models were determined by internal and external validation techniques. The results show that the toxicity of nitroaromatic compounds depends on various factors, such as the number of nitro-groups, the topological state, and the presence of certain structural fragments. The developed models based on the largest (to date) dataset of nitroaromatics in vivo toxicity showed a good predictive ability. The results provide important input that could be applied in a preliminary assessment of nitroaromatic compounds' toxicity to mammals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2227-2233. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  17. Huso huso Acute and subacute toxicity study of ethanolic extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acute toxicity profiles of ... body weight changes, haematology, plasma biochemical parameters, relative organ weight (ROW) were evaluated. ... to ascertain its effect on the male reproductive system as well as its effect on chronic administration.

  18. SYNTHESIS, THERMAL STUDIES AND CONVERSION DEGREE OF DIMETHACRYLATE POLYMERS USING NEW NON-TOXIC COINITIATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Turra Alarcon

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to replace toxic coinitiators (tertiary amines by non-toxic compounds such as glycerol and inositol (polyalcohol in dimethacrylate resins. For this purpose, mid infrared spectroscopy (MIR was used to calculate the monomers' degree of conversion (%DC; as well as simultaneous Thermogravimetric Analysis – Differential Thermal Analysis (TGA-DTA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC were conducted to evaluate thermal stability, degradation steps, and thermal events. The use of different initiator systems did not modify the thermal events or the thermal stability of each of the dimethacrylate resins. Results show a substitution of system 2 (toxicity by system 3 (low toxicity, which had a good conversion velocity and total conversion in some monomers, is plausible.

  19. Arsenic Induced Toxicity in Broiler Chicks and Its Amelioration with Ascorbic Acid: Clinical, Hematological and Pathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Sharaf, Ahrar Khan*, Muhammad Zargham Khan, Iftikhar Hussain, Rao Zahid Abbas, S. T. Gul, Fazal Mahmood and Muhammad Kashif Saleemi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to observe the arsenic (As toxicity lesions in birds and to know either Vit C ameliorates these toxic effects or not. One-day-old broilers chicks (n=72 procured from a local hatchery were randomly divided into four equal groups. First group was kept as control and second group was given As (50 mg/kg BW via crop tubing. Third group received in addition to As, Vit C (250 mg/kg BW whereas fourth group received only Vit C. Killing by neck dislocation of randomly selected six birds from each group was carried out on experimental days 0, 16 and 32 for collection of blood and tissues specimens. Arsenic treated birds showed clinical signs of toxicity throughout the experiment than all other groups. These clinical signs included decreased body weight and feed intake, dullness, open mouth breathing, increased thirst, ruffled feathers, pale comb, skin irritation and watery diarrhea which were not significant in any other group. As treated group showed a significant (P<0.05 decrease in hematological parameters. Severe gross and histopathological changes were observed in intestines, spleen and lungs of birds fed with As than all other groups. Decreased height of villi of middle portion of small intestines was also observed in As treated birds. Villi height in Vit C treated group increased as compared to control group. It was concluded that As induces severe toxic effects in broiler birds; however, these toxic effects can be partially ameliorated by Vit C.

  20. The Toxicology of Ricin and Abrin Toxins - Studies on Immunisation Against Abrin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-13

    based upon that for the isolation of Viscum album lectan, using affinity chromatography on Sepharose 48 (62. In our method, in order to separate toxic...methods. Unpublished CBDE report, 6, Ziska P, Franz H and Kindt A (1978). The lectin fiom Viscum album L, purification by biospecific affinity...lectins abr’n and ricin after parenteral injection into mice. British J. Cancer . 34, 418. 14. Ramsden C S, Drayson M T and Bell E B (1989). The toxicity

  1. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Submission Preparation Checklist. As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another ...

  2. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of Aspergiolide A in early drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanyuan Wang, Xin Qi, Dehai Li, Tianjiao Zhu, Xiaomei Mo, Jing LiKey Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A, from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary.Keywords: aspergiolide A, anticancer

  3. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte E. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); D' Souza, David [London Regional Cancer Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  4. A comparative study of lung toxicity in rats induced by three types of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqing; Ma, Li; X, Zhu-ge; Zhang, Huashan; Lin, Bencheng

    2013-12-01

    The public is increasingly exposed to various engineered nanomaterials because of their mass production and wide application. Even when the biological effects of nanomaterials have been assessed, the underlying mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. The present study was designed to seek a simple, effective, and oxidative stress-based biomarker system used for screening toxicity of nanomaterials. Nano-ferroso-ferric oxide (nano-Fe3O4), nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in corn oil and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rats were exposed to the three nanomaterials by intratracheal instillation once every 2 days for 5 weeks. We investigated their lung oxidative and inflammatory damage by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) detection and comparative proteomics by lung tissue. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of proteins isolated from the lung tissue, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, was performed. In the present study, we chose to detect lactate dehydrogenase, total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde as the biomarker system for screening the oxidative stress of nanomaterials and IL-6 as the inflammatory biomarker in BALF. Proteomics analysis revealed 17 differentially expressed proteins compared with the control group: nine were upregulated and eight were downregulated. Our results indicated that exposure by intratracheal instillation to any of the three typical nanomaterials may cause lung damage through oxidative damage and/or an inflammatory reaction.

  5. Acute toxicity study of Vilocym Premix (herbal growth promoter for Livestockin Wistar Albino Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ahmad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study with the objective of safety evaluation of Vilocym Premix, herbal growth promoter for Livestock (supplied by Ayurvet Ltd., Baddi, India, was done as per standard guidelines of OECD-423 for acute toxicity testing. Vilocym Premix is a scientifically developed combination of herbs that contains herbal ingredients namely Azadirachta indica, Curcuma longa & many more alongwith natural zeolites. The study was done in 3 males and 3 female Wistar Albino rats, which were administered an initial dose of 50 mg/kg body weight followed by dose rates of 300, 500 & 5000 mg/kg body weight of test compound. The animals were observed for signs of convulsions, tremors, circling, depression, excitement and mortality. Body weight was recorded at 0,7th and 14th day and plasma total protein, albumin; AST and ALT were measured after 3rd day of experiment. No abnormal sign of symptoms were observed in any of the animal fed with Vilocym Premix at the dose rate of 50, 300, 500 & 5000 mg/kg. No mortality was observed indicating safety of herbal premix. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 100-102

  6. Effects of reduced food intake for 4 weeks on physiological parameters in toxicity studies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Junya; Izumi, Tomoko; Ogawa, Bunichiro; Ban, Yoshiki; Takagi, Hironori; Sasaki, Minoru; Tsutsumi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to clarify the effects of reduced feeding on physiological parameters in dogs to enable appropriate evaluations of the safety and toxicity of test compounds. We measured alkaline phosphatase isozymes and the circulating blood volume, as well as clinical signs, body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, electrocardiography, organ weight, and histopathology, in male beagle dogs fed a diet consisting of 300 g/day or 150 g/day for 4 weeks. There were no abnormal clinical signs in any of the dogs. In the 150-g/day feeding group, a decreased alkaline phosphatase 3 suggesting effects on the bone and a decreased circulating blood volume associated with body weight loss were observed. Additionally, the following changes were also observed in the 150-g/day group: a decrease in body weight; hematologic changes including decreases in white blood cells, neutrophils, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and reticulocytes; blood chemical changes including decreases in aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and calcium and an increase in the creatinine at week 1 or thereafter; electrocardiographic changes including a decrease in the heart rate, a prolonged QRS duration and the occurrence of a second-degree atrioventricular block at week 3 or thereafter; and pathological changes including decreases in the weights of the liver and thymus, a decrease in hepatocyte rarefaction, and thymic atrophy. These results provide useful information for assessing the safety of compounds in toxicological studies, enabling direct treatment effects and secondary changes caused by decreased food intake to be distinguished.

  7. Review of Ginkgo biloba-induced toxicity, from experimental studies to human case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ren, Zhen; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Guo, Lei

    2017-01-02

    Ginkgo biloba seeds and leaves have been used as a traditional herbal remedy for thousands of years, and its leaf extract has been consumed as a botanical dietary supplement for decades. Ginkgo biloba extract is a complex mixture with numerous components, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones, and is one of the most widely sold botanical dietary supplements worldwide. Concerns about potential health risks for the general population have been raised because of the widespread human exposure to Ginkgo biloba and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities in rodents. The National Toxicology Program conducted 2-year gavage studies on one Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and concluded that there was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of this extract in mice based on an increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatoblastoma. Recently, Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been classified as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects from experimental studies both in vitro and in vivo to human case reports (caused by ginkgo seeds or leaves), and also summarizes the negative results from relatively large clinical trials.

  8. A subchronic 90-day oral toxicity study of Origanum vulgare essential oil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llana-Ruiz-Cabello, M; Maisanaba, S; Puerto, M; Pichardo, S; Jos, A; Moyano, R; Cameán, A M

    2017-03-01

    Oregano essential oil (Origanum vulgare L. virens) (OEO) is being used in the food industry due to its useful properties to develop new active packaging systems. In this concern, the safety assessment of this natural extract is of great interest before being commercialized. The European Food Safety Authority requests different in vivo assays to ensure the safety of food contact materials. One of these studies is a 90 days repeated-dose oral assay in rodents. In the present work, 40 male and 40 female Wistar rats were orally exposed to 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) OEO during 90 days following the OECD guideline 408. Data revealed no mortality and no treatment-related adverse effects of the OEO in food/water consumption, body weight, haematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. These findings suggest that the oral no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of this OEO is 200 mg/kg b.w. in Wistar rats, the highest dose tested. In conclusion, the use of this OEO in food packaging appears to be safe based on the lack of toxicity during the subchronic study at doses 330-fold higher than those expected to be in contact consumers in the worst scenario of exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A 28-day gavage toxicity study in male Fischer 344 rats with 2-methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Santokh S; Kavanagh, Meghan; Cherry, Wendy; Barker, Michael; Weld, Madeline; Cooke, Gerard M

    2014-01-01

    In most thermally treated products, a series of alkylated furan derivatives have been found, in particular 2-substituted alkylfurans such as 2-methylfuran. These methyl analogs are metabolically activated in a similar fashion as the parent furan, yielding highly reactive unsaturated dialdehydes. There is currently limited toxicological data available for 2-methyl furan exposure by any route that makes conducting a risk assessment difficult. In this pilot study, we report the general toxicology findings affecting tissue morphology, histopathology, clinical biochemistry, and hematology in a 28-day gavage study. The liver was the primary target organ that developed dose-dependent toxicity. Relative liver weights were increased by 42% at 25.0 mg/kg/body weight (bw)/day. Histological changes in the liver were observed at 0.4, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 25.0 mg/kg bw/day. These changes were not accompanied by clinical changes in the serum enzyme markers such as alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate transaminase. Clinical biochemistry markers for kidney were altered, but these were not accompanied by histological changes. The prostate was significantly decreased in size at the 25.0 mg/kg bw/day dose of 2-methyfuran. Some hematological parameters were also altered.

  10. Occurrence of Pineal Gland Tumors in Combined Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Studies in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Silke; Buesen, Roland; Gröters, Sibylle; Eichler, Jens-Olaf; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-08-01

    Pineal gland tumors are very rare brain lesions in rats as well as in other species including humans. A total of 8 (out of 1,360 examined) Wistar rats from 3 different combined chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity or mere carcinogenicity studies revealed pineal gland tumors. The tumors were regarded to be spontaneous and unrelated to treatment. The morphology and immunohistochemical evaluation led to the diagnosis malignant pinealoma. The main characteristics that were variably developed within the tumors were the following: cellular atypia, high mitotic index, giant cells, necrosis, Homer Wright rosettes, Flexner-Wintersteiner rosettes and pseudorosettes, positive immunohistochemical reaction for synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase. The pineal gland is not a protocol organ for histopathological examination in carcinogenicity studies. Nevertheless, the pineal gland can occasionally be encountered on the routine brain section or if it is the origin of a tumor protruding into the brain, the finding will be recorded. Therefore, although known to be a rare tumor in rats, pineal neoplasms should be included in the list of possible differential diagnoses for brain tumors, especially when the tumor is located in the region of the pineal body. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  11. [Study on the effect of enzymatic activity and acute toxicity of three PAEs on Eisenia foetida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Ze-Min; Wu, Shi-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The acute toxic effects of DMP, DEP and DBP to earthworms (Eisenia foetida) were examined in this study. The two pollutants are tested by filter paper contact method and natural soil method, results indicated that they were both poisonous to earthworms. Earthworms were exposed to DMP and DEP for 48 h by filter paper contact method, LC50 (DMP) is 129.603 microg x cm(-2) and LC50 (DEP) is 145.336 microg x cm(-2). Earthworms were exposed to DMP and DEP for 14 d by natural soil method, LC50 (DMP) is 1 560. 120 mg x kg(-1) and LC50 (DEP) is 1516. 186 mg x kg(-1). While non-calculatable for the LC50 of DBP due to its low water solubility, penetrating into the skin and cells of earthworm is not easy. The natural soil test method was used to study the effects of DMP, DEP and DBP on enzyme activities of earthworms, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured. SOD activity was induced by DMP and DEP, CAT is the most sensitive and the activity was induced by DEP and DBP at the low concentration and inhibited at the high concentration. AChE activity was inhibited by DEP and DBP at the low concentration and induced at the high concentration, finally exhibited a tendency to recover to the control level at 28 d.

  12. Toxic equine parkinsonism: an immunohistochemical study of 10 horses with nigropallidal encephalomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H T; Rumbeiha, W K; Patterson, J S; Puschner, B; Knight, A P

    2012-03-01

    Chronic ingestion of yellow star thistle (Centaurea solstitialis) or Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) causes nigropallidal encephalomalacia (NPE) in horses with an abrupt onset of neurologic signs characterized by dystonia of lips and tongue, inability to prehend food, depression, and locomotor deficits. The objectives of this study were to reexamine the pathologic alterations of NPE and to conduct an immunohistochemistry study using antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein, to determine whether NPE brains show histopathologic features resembling those in human Parkinson disease. Results confirm that the NPE lesions are located within the substantia nigra pars reticulata, sparing the cell bodies of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and in the rostral portion of the globus pallidus, with partial disruption of dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase-positive) fibers passing through the globus pallidus. No abnormal cytoplasmic inclusions like the Lewy bodies of human Parkinson disease were seen in these NPE brains. These findings indicate that equine NPE may serve as a large animal model of environmentally acquired toxic parkinsonism, with clinical phenotype directly attributable to lesions in globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata rather than to the destruction of dopaminergic neurons.

  13. [An in vitro study on toxic effect of vanadium-titanium-magnetite dust on alveolar macrophage in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Chen, Q; Guan, Y

    1998-11-01

    To study the toxic effect of vanadium-titanium-magnetite (VTM) dust on alveolar macrophage (AM) and its hazardous extent. Survival rates, morphology and function of AM were compared in rabbits exposed to dust of VTM, vanadium oxide, titanium dioxide and silica in various doses and length of time with in vitro cell culture and putamen membrane cover glass transmission electron microscopy, and changes in activities of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid phosphatase (ACP) in cell culture were measured. Exposure to all the four kinds of dust could lead to decrease in survival rate of AM, increase in activities of LDH and ACP in the cell culture, and changes in their morphology and function to the extent dependent on the nature of dust. Toxic effect of exposure to VTM dust was lower than that to vanadium oxide and silica, but higher than that to titanium dioxide, which had slight toxic effect.

  14. No Increased Risk of Ketoconazole Toxicity in Drug-Drug Interaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outeiro, Noémi; Hohmann, Nicolas; Mikus, Gerd

    2016-10-01

    In July 2013 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a safety announcement regarding the use of ketoconazole and its adverse drug reactions. The FDA report advised against the use ketoconazole tablets as a first-line treatment for any fungal infections because of the risk of potentially serious drug-drug interactions and liver and adrenal gland complications. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) also proposed to limit the use of oral ketoconazole in fungal infections because of the same risk of harmful effects and interactions. In addition, the FDA also advised against the use of oral ketoconazole in drug interaction studies, in which it has been extensively used as an index inhibitor of drug metabolism. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the risks of ketoconazole-induced hepatotoxicity described by the FDA and EMA in published drug interaction studies with ketoconazole and compare these data with the toxicity reported for ketoconazole when used as antifungal treatment. In the drug interaction studies (2355 participants; healthy volunteers and patients; median treatment duration, 6 days), only 40 participants were reported to have increased liver transaminase activity (1.7%), and no deaths were reported or associated with ketoconazole. In studies investigating ketoconazole treatment, patients were treated for 276 days (median), and 5.6% of patients had elevated liver enzyme activity. Because of the short treatment period in drug interaction studies the risk of drug-induced hepatic injury is considered very low. As such, we recommend that ketoconazole remain a safe CYP3A index inhibitor for use in drug interaction studies with healthy volunteers. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Evaluation of 90-day oral rat toxicity studies on the food additive, gum ghatti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, Robert R; Davis, Jeffrey; Moser, Glenda; Giri, Dipak K; Hayashi, Shim-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Gum ghatti, a polysaccharide of natural origin, is used in foods as a thickening, gelling, emulsifying and stabilizing agent. In a 90-day toxicity study following Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guideline #408, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (control), 0.5, 1.5 and 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M basal diet. Expected changes included increased full and empty cecal weights in 5% groups. Incidentally 2/10 females from the 5% gum ghatti group had a single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation. In a second 90-day study increased cecal weights were present in Sprague-Dawley females exposed to 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M and NIH-07 basal diets. A single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation occurred in 1/20 control females given AIN-93M basal diet. The colon ulcers were considered a sporadic change possibly attributable to AIN-93M basal diet. In the second study a few statistically significant alterations in clinical chemistry were considered sporadic and unrelated to treatment. Feed consumption among treated and control groups was similar for each sex. Gum ghatti intake at the 5% dietary level ranged from 3044 to 3825mg/kg body weight/day. The 5% dietary administration was a NOAEL in both studies. NOAELs for males and females in the first study were 3044 and 3309mg/kg/day, respectively. NOAELs for females in the second study were 3670 and 3825mg/kg/day for AIN-93M and NIH-07 diets, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arsenic Induced Toxicity in Broiler Chicks and Its Amelioration with Ascorbic Acid: Clinical, Hematological and Pathological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rabia Sharaf, Ahrar Khan*, Muhammad Zargham Khan, Iftikhar Hussain, Rao Zahid Abbas, S. T. Gul, Fazal Mahmood and Muhammad Kashif Saleemi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the arsenic (As) toxicity lesions in birds and to know either Vit C ameliorates these toxic effects or not. One-day-old broilers chicks (n=72) procured from a local hatchery were randomly divided into four equal groups. First group was kept as control and second group was given As (50 mg/kg BW) via crop tubing. Third group received in addition to As, Vit C (250 mg/kg BW) whereas fourth group received only Vit C. Killing by neck dislocation of randomly sel...

  17. Acute and chronic toxicity studies on partially purified hypoglycemic preparation from water extract of bark ofFicus bengalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Shukla, R; Prabhu, K M; Aggrawal, S; Rusia, U; Murthy, P S

    2002-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity studies were conducted to assess toxicity of a partially purified preparation from the water extract of the bark ofFicus bengalensis, which was demonstrated in our earlier studies to have significant hypoglycemic and hypocholesteroiemic effect on alloxan induced, mild and severe diabetes in rabbits. LD(50) of this preparation was found to be ∼1 gm/kg in rats when given orally. For chronic toxicity studies 3 doses of aqueous preparation were given to 3 groups of rats. First group received 5 times ED(50) (50 mg/kg), second group 10 times ED(50) (100 mg/kg) and the third group 15 times ED(50) (150 mg/kg) for 3 months. Fourth group which served as control was given water. After three months, blood was collected for studying biochemical and hematological parameters. Blood glucose, serum cholesterol, liver and kidney function tests, haemoglobin, total and differential leukocyte count were determined. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological examination of liver, heart and kidneys was carried out. Results of the study showed that partially purified preparation fromFicus bengalensis is not toxic by all the above mentioned parameters.

  18. Acute and twenty-eight days repeated oral dose toxicity study of besifloxacin in Wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bikash; Nandi, Utpal; Das, Anjan; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicities of besifloxacin (BAF) in Wistar albino rats. In oral acute and repeated dose study, BAF was administered to both sex of rats, at dose levels of 0, 300, 600, 900 mg/kg/day and 0, 100, 200, 500 mg/kg/day, respectively. In the acute study, total white blood cell (WBC) (male, 43.74%; female, 42.60%) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) (male, 80%; female, 60%) were significantly increase, total protein (TP) (male, 23.24%; 27.80%) was significantly decreased, and significant incidence of pericholangitis (male, 83.33%; female, 75%) was shown in males and females of high-dose groups. In repeated oral dose toxicity study, similar type effects were also observed after serum hematological and serum biochemical analysis, whereas additionally sever hepatic injury and focal ulceration in gastric mucosa also observed in high dose groups of both sexes after histopathological analysis. However these toxic effects of besifloxacin were transient and reversible and no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) were 300 mg/kg/day for acute and 100 mg/kg/day for repeated dose toxicity study, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hormetic versus toxic effects of vegetable tannin in a multitest study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, E; Gallo, M; Iaccarino, M; Meriç, S; Oral, R; Russo, T; Sorrentino, T; Tünay, O; Vuttariello, E; Warnau, M; Pagano, G

    2004-04-01

    Tannin from mimosa trees (Acacia sp.) utilized in traditional leather tanning was tested for toxicity in sea urchin (Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus) embryos and sperm, marine, and freshwater algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Dunaliella tertiolecta), and Daphnia magna. Based on a two-step tanning procedure used in traditional tanneries, two mimosa tannin preparations, i.e., fresh tannin (FT) and used tannin (UT), were tested as suspensions. The early results in S. granularis embryos showed that UT exerted lower acute toxicity than FT, namely, 1 vs 100 mg/L, to obtain 100% mortality, respectively. Subsequent bioassays were conducted on fresh tannin water extracts (TWE) corresponding to nominal tannin concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 30 mg/L. Developmental toxicity, up to embryonic mortality was exerted by TWE at levels > 1 mg/L, S. granularis being more sensitive than P. lividus embryos/larvae. At the concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the frequencies of larval malformations were significantly lower than in controls. This positive stimulatory effect (currently termed as hormesis) was observed in extended numbers of culture replicates (up to 14) and was significant in the embryo cultures characterized by a relatively poor control quality (with or = 70% viable larvae in controls). Cytogenetic analysis of S. granularis embryos reared in FT or UT suspensions (1 mg/L to 1 g/L) showed mitotoxic effects (decrease in active mitoses per embryo) in FT-exposed, but not in UT-exposed embryos. Mitotic aberrations were significantly increased by 10 mg/L UT. Sperm fertilization success in both sea urchin species showed an increasing fertilization rate (FR) up to 0.3 mg/L TWE and a dose-related decrease in FR up to 30 mg/L. Again, the offspring of P. lividus sperm exposed to TWE (0.1 and 0.3 mg/L) showed a decrease in larval malformations compared to controls, whereas a dose-related increase in developmental defects was observed in the offspring of P. lividus sperm

  20. Evaluating the environmental impact of artificial sweeteners: a study of their distributions, photodegradation and toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ziye; Jiang, Yanan; Tsoi, Yeuk-Ki; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2014-04-01

    While having a long tradition as safe food additives, artificial sweeteners are a newly recognized class of environmental contaminants due to their extreme persistence and ubiquitous occurrence in various aquatic ecosystems. Resistant to wastewater treatment processes, they are continuously introduced into the water environments. To date however, their environmental behavior, fate as well as long term ecotoxicological contributions in our water resources still remain largely unknown. As a first step in the comprehensive study of artificial sweeteners, this work elucidates the geographical/seasonal/hydrological interactions of acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose in an open coast system at an estuarine/marine junction. Higher occurrence of acesulfame (seasonal average: 0.22 μg L(-1)) and sucralose (0.05 μg L(-1)) was found in summer while saccharin (0.11  μg L(-1)) and cyclamate (0.10 μg L(-1)) were predominantly detected in winter. Seasonal observations of the four sweeteners suggest strong connections with the variable chemical resistance among different sweeteners. Our photodegradation investigation further projected the potential impact of persistent acesulfame and sucralose compounds under prolonged exposure to intensive solar irradiation. Real-time observation by UPLC-ESI/MS of the degradation profile in both sweeteners illustrated that formation of new photo by-products under prolonged UV irradiation is highly viable. Interestingly, two groups of kinetically behaved photodegradates were identified for acesulfame, one of which was at least six times more persistent than the parent compound. For the first time, acute toxicity for the degradates of both sweeteners were arbitrarily measured, revealing photo-enhancement factors of 575 and 17.1 for acesulfame and sucralose, respectively. Direct comparison of photodegradation results suggests that the phototoxicity of acesulfame degradation products may impact aquatic ecosystems. In an attempt

  1. Study of Single-dose Toxicity of Aconitum Kusnezoffii Reichb. Pharmacopuncture in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JaeKyoun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed to analyze the singledose toxicity of Aconitum kusnezoffii Reichb. pharmacopuncture (AKRP. Methods: All experiments were conducted at the Korea Testing & Research Institute (KTRI, an institute authorized to perform non-clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP. Twenty (20 Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the pilot study. The animals were divided into four groups of five animals per group: group 1 (G1 being the control group with each animal receiving an injection of 0.3 ml of saline and groups 2, 3, and 4 (G2, G3, and G4 being the experimental groups with each animal receiving an injection of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3 ml of AKRP, respectively. This study was conducted with the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the 4 groups, and the LD50 of AKRP administered via IV was higher than 1.77 ml/kg. Some changes in the weights of the male rates were observed between the control group and the experimental groups, but no significant differences were noted in the weights of the female rats. To check for abnormalities in organs and tissues, we stained representative sections of each specified organ with Hematoxylin & Eosin for light microscopic examination. The results showed no significant differences in any of the organs or tissues. Conclusions: The above findings suggest that Aconitum kusnezoffii Reichb. pharmacopuncture is a relatively safe treatment. Further studies on the subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidence.

  2. Absence of a relation between efavirenz plasma concentrations and toxicity-driven efavirenz discontinuations in the EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Luin, Matthijs; Bannister, Wendy P; Mocroft, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    plasma concentrations were measured from patients in the EuroSIDA study starting EFV after 1 January 1999. Patients with a plasma concentration available were divided into those that discontinued EFV because of any toxicity or by the choice of the patient or physician within 2 years (TOXPC group...

  3. Psychosocial and cognitive rehabilitation of patients with solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy : A randomised controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Wekking, Ellie M.; Berg, Ina J.; Deelman, Betto G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is little experience with the ( neuro) psychological treatment of patients with solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy ( CSE). In this randomised controlled trial ( RCT), a treatment programme was evaluated based on previous outcome studies of patients with chronic fatigue,

  4. Psychosocial and cognitive rehabilitation of patients with solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy: a randomised controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Wekking, Ellie M.; Berg, Ina J.; Deelman, Betto G.

    2008-01-01

    There is little experience with the (neuro) psychological treatment of patients with solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy (CSE). In this randomised controlled trial (RCT), a treatment programme was evaluated based on previous outcome studies of patients with chronic fatigue, whiplash and

  5. Intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy in the Fischer 344 rat using 5-aminolevulinic acid and violet laser light: a toxicity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Major, Attila L.; Rose, G. Scott; Svaasand, Lars O.; Lüdicke, Frank; Campana, Aldo; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Our study was designed to investigate 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) as a candidate for intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy (IP-PDT). The toxicity of IP-PDT and the effects of IP-PDT on abdominal and pelvic organs, particularly the small intestine, were investigated after ALA administration

  6. Study of toxic properties of prototypes of photo inactivated vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis by speckle microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianova, Onega V.; Ulyanov, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    Testing of prototypes of vaccines against extremely dangerous diseases, such as tularemia and brucellosis has been performed using speckle-microscopy. Changes of microcirculation caused by effect of toxins at applications of suspension of photoinactivated bacteria have been studied. Toxic properties of prototypes of vaccines against tularemia and brucellosis have been analyzed.

  7. [Study of embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity of 2, 4-dinitroanisole in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junhong; Zhang, Panhong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Hong; Yue, Hong; Lu, Qin; Dang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To detect the embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity of DNAN in rats and provide basic data to occupational protection. 120 adult female SD rats and 60 male rats are mating for 1: 1, and the pregnant rats were randomly divided into five groups by the pregnant time. The negative control group are gavaged with 4% starch, and the three experiment groups are gavaged with DNAN suspension with the dose of 5 mg/kg, 15 mg/kg and 45 mg/kg respectively, while the positive control give aspirin of 280 mg/kg. All rats of the five groups are administrated gavage from gestation day 5 (GD5) to GD19 continuously. The rats are dislocated in GD20, and the toxicity of embryo and toetus are detected. The net weight growth in all three dose group are less than that of negative group, while the dead foetus in high dose group is more than negative group. Moreover, the body weight, body lenghth, tail lenghth and the anal genital distance of foetus rats in high dose group are all less than that of negative group. The foetus external malformations of three dose groups appear no significant compared with negative group.However, the prevalences of skeleton malformation in high dose group and the internal organs malformation in the median and high dose group appear significant higher than that of negative group. There are significantly maternal reproductive toxicity, embryo toxicity and toetus toxicity in positive group. DNAN can induced maternal reproductive toxicity, embryo toxicity and the teratogenicity to rats.

  8. Toxicity studies of six types of carbon nanoparticles in a chicken-embryo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Sawosz, Ewa; Halik, Gabriela; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Grodzik, Marta; Piast, Radosław; Pasanphan, Wanvimol; Chwalibog, André

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the toxicity of six different types of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) was investigated using a chicken-embryo model. Fertilized chicken eggs were divided into the following treatment groups: placebo, diamond NPs, graphite NPs, pristine graphene, small graphene oxide, large graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide. Experimental solutions at a concentration of 500 μg/mL were administrated into the egg albumin. Gross pathology and the rate of survival were examined after 5, 10, 15, and 20 days of incubation. After 20 days of incubation, blood samples were collected and the weight of the body and organs measured. The relative ratio of embryo survival decreased after treatment all treatments except diamond NPs. There was no correlation between the rate of survival and the ζ-potential or the surface charge of the CNPs in solution. Body and organ weight, red blood-cell morphology, blood serum biochemical parameters, and oxidative damage in the liver did not differ among the groups. These results indicate that CNPs can remain in blood circulation without any major side effects, suggesting their potential applicability as vehicles for drug delivery or active compounds per se. However, there is a need for further investigation of their properties, which vary depending on production methods and surface functionalization. PMID:28435265

  9. Ninety-day dietary toxicity study of apple polyphenol extracts in Crl: CD (SD) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kyoko; Nakashima, Shohei; Sami, Manabu; Kanda, Tomomasa

    2013-06-01

    To examine the safety of Dietary Applephenon® (AP) in feed, Crl: CD (SD) rats of each sex were divided into four groups and given diets containing AP at 0%, 1.25%, 2.5%, or 5.0% for 90 days. All rats survived and toxic changes were not observed throughout the study. Body weight and food efficiency in the 5.0% AP group of both sexes were significantly decreased compared with that in controls. These changes were considered to be caused by the physiological effects of AP (including the inhibitory effects on pancreatic lipase activity). Slight hypertrophy in acinar cells in the parotid and submandibular glands appeared in the 2.5% and 5.0% groups. These were suggested not to be toxicological but physiologic adaptive responses to oral stimuli by the lower pH of AP-containing diets. In conclusion, dietary AP in feed, up to a maximum level of 5.0% for 90 days, given to rats did not induce toxicological effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of renal and hepatic toxicity in rats supplemented with creatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracho, Nilo Cesar do Vale; Castro, Letícia Pereira de; Borges, Niara da Cunha; Laira, Patrícia Benício

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the renal and hepatic function, through biochemical analysis after 14 days of creatine supplementation in physically inactive rats. Twenty four male, adult, Wistar rats were used which were kept in individual metabolic cages and were distributed into four groups, and received the following treatments by gavage:1) CONTROL: distilled water; 2)Creatine 0.5g/Kg/day; 3) Creatine 1g/Kg/day; 4) Creatine 2g/Kg/day. Their urinary outputs as well as food and water intake were daily measured. At the end of the experiment, the animals were euthanized and serum samples were stored for biochemical analysis. Creatine supplementation at the doses given produced no significant changes in plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, albumin, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, urea, and creatinine clearance, compared to control group (p> 0.05) Similarly, water and food intake, as well as urinary output, did not show significant changes among the four groups studied. At the doses used, oral creatine supplementation did not result in renal and/or hepatic toxicity.

  11. Pathological study of chronic pulmonary toxicity induced by intratracheally instilled Asian sand dust (kosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naota, Misaki; Shiotsu, Shizuka; Shimada, Akinori; Kohara, Yukari; Morita, Takehito; Inoue, Kenichiro; Takano, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Asian sand dust (ASD) events are associated with an increase in pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The number of ASD events has increased rapidly in the east Asian region since 2000. To study the chronic lung toxicity of ASD, saline suspensions of low doses (200 and 400 µg) and high doses (800 and 3,000 µg) of ASD were intratracheally instilled into ICR mice. Animals were sacrificed at 24 hr, 1 week, or 1, 2, or 3 months after instillation. Histopathological examination revealed that ASD induced acute inflammation at 24 hr after instillation. The acute inflammation was transient and subsided at 1 week and 1 month after instillation. At 2 and 3 months after instillation, focal infiltration of lymphocytes with accumulation of epithelioid macrophages, which is a suggestive finding of transformation to granuloma, and granuloma formation were occasionally observed. Aggregation of macrophages containing particles was observed in the pulmonary lymph nodes at 3 months after instillation in high-dose groups. Prolonged inflammatory foci (granuloma) and presence of ASD particles in pulmonary lymph nodes would have a chance to induce immunological modulation leading to adverse health effects in the exposed animals.

  12. A probe to study the toxic interaction of tartrazine with bovine hemoglobin at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yating; Wei, Haoran; Liu, Rutao

    2014-03-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in food products, but tartrazine in the environment is potentially harmful. The toxic interaction between tartrazine and bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was investigated using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling techniques under simulated physiological conditions. The fluorescence data showed that tartrazine can bind with BHb to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction, in which van der Waals' forces and hydrogen bonds played major roles. Molecular docking results showed that the hydrogen bonds exist between the oxygen atoms at position 31 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys99, and also between the oxygen atoms at position 15 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys104, Lys105. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that tartrazine led to conformational changes in BHb, including loosening of the skeleton structure and decreasing α helix in the secondary structure. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that tartrazine binds into the hemoglobin central cavity, and this was verified using a molecular modeling study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-12-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study.

  14. Three-month subchronic intramuscular toxicity study of rotigotine-loaded microspheres in Cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingwei; Du, Guangying; Ye, Liang; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jianzhao; Wang, Hongbo; Yu, Pengfei; Fu, Fenghua; Liu, Wanhui; Li, Youxin; Cen, Xiaobo; Guan, Xiaolin

    2013-02-01

    Continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS) is an important drug development strategy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotigotine is a non-ergoline D(3)/D(2)/D(1) dopamine receptor agonist for treating PD. As a new treatment option for CDS, rotigotine-loaded microspheres (RoMS), long-acting sustained-release microspheres with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) as drug carrier, are now being evaluated in clinical trial. In the present study, the subchronic toxicity in Cynomolgus monkeys has been characterized via intramuscular administration with RoMS at 0, 10, 40 and 160 mg/kg, weekly for 3 months with a 1-month recovery period. The NOAEL was 10 mg/kg/week. One male at 160 mg/kg died from an extensive pulmonary embolism. The major toxicological effects were associated with dopamine agonist-related pharmacodynamic properties of rotigotine (e.g., hyperactivity and stereotype, decreased serum prolactin level) and foreign body removal reaction induced by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and carboxymethycellulose sodium (e.g., increased mononuclear cells and neutrophils, thymus atrophy and vacuolar degeneration of adrenal cortex, foreign body granuloma with foam cells accumulation at injection sites and foam cells accumulation in spleen and multiple lymph sinuses). At the end of recovery period, above findings recovered to a normal level or to a certain degree except vacuolar degeneration of adrenal gland. RoMS has exhibited high safety on monkeys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-month subchronic intramuscular toxicity study of rotigotine-loaded microspheres in SD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liang; Guan, Xiaolin; Tian, Jingwei; Zhang, Jianzhao; Du, Guangying; Yu, Xin; Yu, Pengfei; Cen, Xiaobo; Liu, Wanhui; Li, Youxin

    2013-06-01

    Continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS) has been an important strategy of drug development for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotigotine is a non-ergoline D3/D2/D1 dopamine agonist for treating PD. As a new treatment option for CDS, rotigotine-loaded microspheres (RoMS), a long-acting sustained-release microspheres for injection with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) as drug carrier, are now being evaluated in clinical trial. In this study, subchronic toxicity of RoMS in SD rats has been characterized via intramuscular administration with RoMS (0-240 mg/kg/week) on a consecutive weekly dosing schedule for 3 months followed by 1-month recovery period. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) was 45 mg/kg/week. One male at 240 mg/kg died from an extensive pulmonary embolism. The major toxicological effects were associated with the dopamine agonist-related pharmacodynamic properties of rotigotine (e.g. hyperactivity and stereotype, enlarged ovary, sporadic gastric mucous membrane lesions, decreased body weight, food consumption and prolactin, and increased mononuclear cell, neutrophil granulocyte, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and foreign body removal reaction induced by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and carboxymethycellulose sodium. At the end of recovery period, all findings had recovered to a normal level or to a certain degree except foreign body reaction at injection sites. RoMS has exhibited high safety on SD rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of soil PCBs in crickets: Comparison of laboratory and field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, J.M.; McKee, M.J.; Ryan, M.E. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab. and Dept. of Zoology)

    1993-11-01

    Laboratory and field studies were used to investigate toxicity and bioaccumulation of PCBs in crickets exposed to contaminated soil. A 14-d laboratory soil bioassay with the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) yielded an LC50 of 1,200 ppm Aroclor 1254. Mean whole-body concentrations of Aroclor 1254 in exposed crickets were 11, 48, 92, 149, and 144 ppm for soil test concentrations of 100, 250, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ppm, respectively. A whole-body concentration of about 150 ppm appears to be a threshold concentration above which acute mortality will be observed. House crickets placed in cages on a PCB-contaminated landfill accumulated 1.6 and 0.9 ppm of PCBs after 3 and 7 d of exposure, respectively. Although this represents a rapid uptake of PCBs, whole-body concentrations remained considerably below levels expected to cause acute mortality. Abundance of another species, the field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus), was investigated using pitfall traps placed at the PCB-contaminated landfill and a reference site. No adverse effect on abundance was observed at the contaminated site, nor was pitfall trap success correlated to soil PCB concentration. These data indicate that PCBs in soil can rapidly move into epigeic fauna but that the likelihood of acquiring sufficient body burdens to cause acute mortality is low.

  17. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  18. Single, 14-Day, and 13-Week Repeated Dose Toxicity Studies of Daily Oral Gelidium elegans Extract Administration to Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelidium elegans extract (GEE is derived from a red alga from the Asia–Pacific region, which has antioxidant, anti-adipogenic, and anti-hyperglycemic effects. However, detailed studies of the toxicology of GEE have not been performed. We evaluated the single oral dose toxicity of GEE in male and female Sprague-Dawley (CD rats. GEE did not cause deaths or have toxic effects at dosages of 5000 mg/kg/day, although compound-colored stools and diarrhea were observed in both sexes, which lasted <2 days. Therefore, the LD50 of GEE is likely to be >5000 mg/kg. We next evaluated the repeated oral dose toxicity of GEE in CD rats over 14 days and 13 weeks. GEE did not induce any significant toxicological changes in either sex at 2000 mg/kg/day. Repeated oral dose toxicity studies showed no adverse effects, in terms of clinical signs, mortality, body mass, food consumption, ophthalmic examination, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, necropsy, organ masses, or histopathology, at dosages of 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg/day. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL for GEE is thus likely to be >2000 mg/kg/day, and no pathology was identified in potential target organs. Therefore, this study indicates that repeated oral dosing with GEE is safe in CD rats.

  19. Thesaurus for histopathological findings in publically available reports of repeated-dose oral toxicity studies in rats for 156 chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Satoshi; Yamashita, Tatsuhiro; Imai, Toshio; Yoshida, Midori; Sakuratani, Yuki; Yamada, Jun; Maekawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    Because histopathological findings are often conclusive indicators of the toxicities of chemicals, standardization of nomenclature and construction of a thesaurus for histopathological findings are important for the comparative evaluation of histopathological data from repeated-dose toxicity studies (RTS). However, terms for histopathological findings have not been standardized and different technical terms are used to indicate almost the same thing in RTS. The present study was conducted to construct an easy-to-use thesaurus for histopathological findings in order to facilitate hazard assessments of untested chemicals by the category approach using knowledge of the toxicity of analogue chemicals. We used reports of 28-day RTS, conducted on rats by gavage, which were posted on the websites of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) and the National Institute of Technology and Evaluation (NITE). The histopathological data were from 156 reports on RTS conducted by 13 institutions in Japan. As a result of this study, major parts of the thesaurus were devoted to the findings in the liver, kidney, stomach, adrenal, thyroid and testis; the first three organs are known to be the main targets of chemicals. We also decided that findings such as swelling and enlargement of hepatocytes should be categorized as synonyms for terms meaning hypertrophy. Our thesaurus will be helpful in assessing or screening new untested chemicals by the category approach using knowledge of the toxicities of analogues of the new chemical. The RTS database with this thesaurus will be made publically available in 2012.

  20. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such

  1. Surface engineering of silica nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: characterization and cell toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Tatiana; Kiill, Charlene P; de Souza, Ana Luiza R; Fangueiro, Joana F; Fernandes, Lisete; Doktorovová, Slavomira; Santos, Dario L; Garcia, Maria L; Gremião, Maria Palmira D; Souto, Eliana B; Silva, Amélia M

    2014-11-01

    The present work aimed at studying the interaction between insulin and SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers (chitosan, sodium alginate or polyethylene glycol) and the evaluation of their biocompatibility with HepG2 and Caco-2 cell lines, which mimic in vivo the target of insulin-loaded nanoparticles upon oral administration. Thus, a systematic physicochemical study of the surface-modified insulin-silica nanoparticles (Ins-SiNP) using mucoadhesive polymers has been described. The surfacing of nanoparticle involved the coating of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) with different mucoadhesive polymers, to achieve high contact between the systems and the gut mucosa to enhance the oral insulin bioavailability. SiNP were prepared by a modified Stöber method at room temperature via hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Interaction between insulin and nanoparticles was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) studies. The high efficiency of nanoparticles' coating resulted in more stable system. FTIR spectra of insulin-loaded nanoparticles showed amide absorption bands which are characteristic of α-helix content. In general, all developed nanoparticles demonstrated high biocompatible, at the tested concentrations (50-500 μg/mL), revealing no or low toxicity in the two human cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2). In conclusion, the developed insulin-loaded SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers demonstrated its added value for oral administration of proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. QSAR studies for the acute toxicity of nitrobenzenes to the Tetrahymena pyriformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dan-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR models play a key role in finding the relationship between molecular structures and the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis. In this work, genetic algorithm, along with partial least square (GA-PLS was employed to select optimal subset of descriptors that have significant contribution to the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A set of five descriptors, namely G2, HOMT, G(Cl…Cl, Mor03v and MAXDP, was used for the prediction of the toxicity of 45 nitrobenzene derivatives and then were used to build the model by multiple linear regression (MLR method. It turned out that the built model, whose stability was confirmed using the leave-one-out validation and external validation test, showed high statistical significance (R2=0.963, Q2LOO=0.944. Moreover, Y-scrambling test indicated there was no chance correlation in this model.

  3. Use of transepithelial electrical resistance in the study of pentachlorophenol toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, G; Ait-Aissa, S; Gillet, C; Rogerieux, F; Lambre, C; Vindimian, E; Porcher, J M

    1999-01-01

    The toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP), a polluting substance believed to exert a narcotic effect, was assayed using the Caco-2 cell line as a model. In order to assess this toxicity as fully as possible, several viability tests, each examining different endpoints, have been used. Neutral red uptake was found to be more sensitive to PCP than MTT and Alamar Blue tests. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was shown to be the most sensitive to PCP at concentrations and exposure times where the Alamar Blue, LDH leakage and Blue Dextran passage did not evidence any effect. Blue Dextran passage and optical microscopy revealed cellular detachment at concentrations where LDH and Alamar Blue showed little or no cytotoxicity. Thus, PCP seems to affect the integrity of the intestinal barrier at levels where no cytotoxicity is seen. Our results support the notion that TEER can be used as a very sensitive method for evaluating membrane-perturbing toxicants.

  4. The sea urchin, a versatile model for eco-toxicity studies and ecological experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Privitera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderm early developmental stages represent a good tool for toxicity testing in different fields, ranging from environment to food contamination, and in full respect of the 3Rs objectives (Reduction, Refinement, Replacement of animal experiments, that will lead to the reduction of vertebrate use for toxicity testing. Further, sea urchins are key species in a wide range of marine habitats, as they are able to structure algal community. Experiments and observations aiming at the  characterization of anthropogenic or climate changes effects on their settlement, population structure, feeding behaviour and reproductive condition, may be useful to describe future scenarios regarding the whole marine community. The present paper represents a short review of the possible applications of eco-toxicity bioassays using Paracentrotus lividus gametes and embryos. Further, examples of ecological researches, involving sea urchins, aiming at the definition of future scenarios will be preserved.

  5. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light catalytic reformed naphtha distillate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, C; Bui, Q; Breglia, R; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Lapadula, E; Podhasky, P; White, R

    2000-08-11

    A 13-wk whole-body inhalation study was conducted with Sprague-Dawley CD rats (16/sex/group) exposed to a light catalytic reformed naphtha distillate (LCRN-D, CAS number 64741-63-5) at target concentrations of 0, 750, 2500, and 7500 ppm for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk. Sixteen rats per sex in the control and high-dose groups were maintained after final exposure for a 4-wk recovery period. The highest exposure concentration was 75% of the lower explosive limit. Standard parameters of subchronic toxicity were measured throughout the study; at necropsy, organs were weighed and tissues processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurotoxicity evaluations consisted of motor activity (MA) and a functional operational battery (FOB) measured pretest, throughout exposure and after the recovery period. Neuropathology was evaluated at termination. No test-related mortality or effects on physical signs, body weight, food consumption, or clinical chemistry were observed. In males exposed to 7500-ppm LCRN-D, a statistically significant decrease in white blood cell counts and lymphocyte counts was observed at the termination of exposure that was not present in animals after the 4-wk recovery period. However, mean corpuscular volume was slightly decreased in high-dose males after the recovery period. Statistically significant increases in kidney weights relative to body weights in 7500-ppm male rats correlated with microscopically observed hyaline droplet formation and renal tubule dilation, indicative of light hydrocarbon nephropathy, a condition in male rats that is not toxicologically significant for humans. Statistically significant decrease in absolute and relative spleen weights in 7500-ppm male rats correlated with decreases in hematologic parameters but had no microscopic correlate and was not observed in animals after 4 wk of recovery. This mild, reversible effect in white blood cell populations may relate to the presence of aromatics in the distillate. The only effect of LCRN-D on

  6. A 4-Week Repeated-Dose Oral Toxicity Study of Bojungikgi-Tang in Crl:CD Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Rom Yoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional herbal medicines have been used for centuries in Asian countries. However, recent studies have led to increasing concerns about the safety and toxicity of herbal prescriptions. Bojungikgi-tang (BJIGT, a herbal decoction, has been used in Korea to improve physical strength. To establish the safety information, BJIGT water extract was evaluated in a 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity test in Crl:CD Sprague Dawley rats. BJIGT was orally administered in daily doses of 0, 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks via oral gavage in male and female rats. We examined the mortality, clinical signs, body weight change, food intake, organ weights, hematology, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis parameters. No significant changes were observed in mortality, clinical sings, body weight, food intake, organ weights, hematology, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis parameters between the control group and the BJIGT-treated groups in the rats of both sexes. The results indicate that BJIGT did not induce toxic effects at a dose level up to 2000 mg/kg in rats. Thus, this concentration is considered the nonobservable effect dose in rats and is appropriate for a 13-week subchronic toxicity study.

  7. [Toxicity of puffer fish fins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shunichi; Ichimaru, Shunichi; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Tamao; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2007-10-01

    Puffer fish is prized as a Japanese traditional food and its fin is also used in the cuisine. However, whether the fin is edible or not is determined for convenience from the toxicity of skin, since little information is available about the toxicity of puffer fish fins. In the present study, we examined the toxicity of fins and skin of three toxic species, Takifugu vermicularis, T. snyderi, and T. porphyreus. The toxicity of T. vermicularis fins (puffer fish with toxic skin also have toxic fins.

  8. 78 FR 43215 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men and Women in..., 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, PO Box 12233, MD A3-05, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, or call non-toll...: The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective Cohort Study of Cancer and Other Disease Among Men and...

  9. Acute, sub-chronic oral toxicity studies and evaluation of antiulcer activity of Sooktyn in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phool Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sooktyn (SKN, mineralo-herbal drug which is being used largely by the patients for its extremely good therapeutic value to treat the gastric ulcers. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity studies and antiulcer activity of SKN. Acute and sub-chronic toxicities were studied in male and female Wistar rats. A single acute SKN of 2 000 mg/kg was administered by oral gavage for acute toxicity. Sub-chronic doses were 400 and 800 mg/kg/day. The major toxicological end points examined included animal body weight and food intake, selected tissue weights, and detailed gross necropsy. In addition, we examined blood elements: hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count and MCH, MCHC and platelets as well as biochemical parameters: urea, sugar, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, and creatinine. Also, anti-ulcer activity was carried out by employing indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models. LD 50 may be greater than 2 000 mg/kg (orally for SKN and there were no signs of toxicity on 28 days sub-chronic oral administration of 400 and 800 mg/kg of SKN in rats on the basis of blood elements and biochemical parameters. The ulcer indices decrease in all ulcer models with 66.62%, 61.24%, 80.18%, and 74.76% in indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models, respectively. The results suggest that SKN has no signs of toxicity at 2 000 mg/kg body weight of rats orally; sub-chronically. The drug is safe and has antiulcer activity.

  10. Acute, sub-chronic oral toxicity studies and evaluation of antiulcer activity of Sooktyn in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Phool; Sachan, Neetu; Kishore, Kamal; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Sooktyn (SKN), mineralo-herbal drug which is being used largely by the patients for its extremely good therapeutic value to treat the gastric ulcers. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity studies and antiulcer activity of SKN. Acute and sub-chronic toxicities were studied in male and female Wistar rats. A single acute SKN of 2 000 mg/kg was administered by oral gavage for acute toxicity. Sub-chronic doses were 400 and 800 mg/kg/day. The major toxicological end points examined included animal body weight and food intake, selected tissue weights, and detailed gross necropsy. In addition, we examined blood elements: hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count and MCH, MCHC and platelets as well as biochemical parameters: urea, sugar, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, and creatinine. Also, anti-ulcer activity was carried out by employing indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models. LD(50) may be greater than 2 000 mg/kg (orally) for SKN and there were no signs of toxicity on 28 days sub-chronic oral administration of 400 and 800 mg/kg of SKN in rats on the basis of blood elements and biochemical parameters. The ulcer indices decrease in all ulcer models with 66.62%, 61.24%, 80.18%, and 74.76% in indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models, respectively. The results suggest that SKN has no signs of toxicity at 2 000 mg/kg body weight of rats orally; sub-chronically. The drug is safe and has antiulcer activity.

  11. Study on the Effect of Heavy metals toxicity according to changing Hardness concentration using D.magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun Sang, H.

    2016-12-01

    n order to determine and prevent the number of ecological effects of heavy metals in the materials, we have to accurately measure the heavy metals present in the water-based protection ecosystems and may determine the effects to humans. Heavy metals occurred in the industrial effluent which is a state in which the monitor, based on the emission standards are made by the Ministry of Environment and managed and waste water contained Copper, Zinc, lead, etc. These heavy metals are able to express the toxic effects only when present in the free-ions in the aqueous condition, which appears differently affected by the degree to hardness change in accordance with the season, precipitation. Generally changing hardness concentration can not precisely evaluate toxic effects of heavy metals in the water system. Anderson announced a study on bioassay for heavy metals from industrial waste water using Daphnia magna(Anderson, 1944, 1948). Breukelman published study the resitivity difference for the mercury Chloride(HgCl2). Braudouin(1974) compared the zooplankton(Daphnia sp.) acute toxicity of the different heavy metals and confirmed the sensitivity. Shcherban(1979) presented for toxicity evaluation results for the heavy metal of the Daphnia magna according to different temperature conditions. In the United States Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) established a standard test method for water fleas, managed and supervised water ecosystems, and announced the adoption of a bioassay standard method. This study was performed to evaluate acute inhibition using the Daphnia magna for the biological effect of heavy metal ions in water-based toxicity in the hardness change. Evaluation methods were conducted in EPA Water Quality process test criteria. TU(Toxic Unit), NOEC (No Observable Effect Concentration), LOEC (Lowest Observable Effect Concentration), EC50 (Median Effective Concentration) was calculated by Toxcalc 5.0 Program. Keywords : D. magna, Hardness, Toxic Unit, Heavy metal

  12. 77 FR 50674 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request August 17, 2012. The Department of..., FNS needs to examine the reasons behind the shopping decision at farmers' markets among recipients of... Information: The objectives of this study are to: (1) Understand the shopping patterns of the SNAP...

  13. 76 FR 2645 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... purposes: (1) To fund feasibility studies, marketing and business plans, and similar development activities... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The Department of Agriculture has submitted the following...

  14. Non-neoplastic lesions found only in the two-year bioassays but not in shorter toxicity studies of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Amakasu, Kouhei; Saegusa, Yukie; Naota, Misaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Ogawa, Kumiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2017-06-01

    International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) has been conducting a prospective evaluation period to validate the criteria for waiving some carcinogenicity studies in rats. Before the waiving strategy is practiced in ICH, it is crucial to elucidate whether non-neoplastic lesions are found only in 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies. To confirm possible importance of 2-year bioassays for evaluating chronic toxicity but not carcinogenicity, we retrospectively surveyed 59 pharmaceuticals approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) from 2007 to 2010 in Japan for non-neoplastic lesions observed in carcinogenicity studies. Non-neoplastic histopathological lesions observed only in 2-year carcinogenicity studies but not in 6-month chronic toxicity studies using rats were compared with clinical adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Thirteen non-neoplastic lesions that may correlate with clinical ADRs were classified into three categories: Category 1, lesions not predictable from other nonclinical data except those from 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies; Category 2, lesions predictable mainly from chronic toxicity studies; Category 3, lesions predictable mainly from pharmacological actions. In the present survey, non-neoplastic lesions only found in 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies were neither significant in terms of frequency and severity nor useful for clinical risk management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A 24-Weeks Toxicity Study of Eryngium foetidum Linn. Leaves in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwitthayanuchit, Kanittha; Kupradinun, Piengchai; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Butryee, Chaniphun

    2016-07-01

    Eryngium foetidum Linn. leaves (EF) are widely used in Thailand and many countries throughout Asia as a culinary seasoning and a traditional medicine. However, adverse effect of high dose consumption in long duration has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate chronic toxicity of EF in mice. Thirty-two ICR male mice were divided into 4 groups of 8 mice each. The mice were fed AIN-76 rodent diet, or AIN-76 rodent diet supplemented with ground freeze-dried EF at 0.8%, 1.6% and 3.2% that is equivalent to approximately 35, 73 and 155 times that of human consumption, respectively, at 97.5 percentile for a period of 24 weeks. At the end of experiment, the mice were euthanized and blood samples were collected for hematological and biochemical evaluations. Necropsy was performed while visceral organs such as lung, liver, kidneys, spleen etc. were collected, weighed and histopathologically examined. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) results of mice in 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet groups were significantly higher than the BUN of control group. No significant difference was noted in other biochemical and hematological properties between the treatment groups and control; all results were within normal range. Histopathology of almost all visceral organs showed no significant changes. However, tubulonephrosis and chronic interstitial nephritis were observed in the groups treated with 1.6% and 3.2% EF diet. Body weight was reduced significantly at week 12 to week 20 when compared to the control group while relative kidney weights were significantly increased. In conclusion, the consumption of EF in diet at high doses illustrated the adverse effect on some biochemical parameters and histopathology in mice. Our findings suggested that EF daily consumption for 24 weeks, at higher doses than the 0.8% EF diet (35 times of human consumption), might cause adverse effect on kidney function in mice.

  16. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from root of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. et Panz. Swingle in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Jaijoy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute and subchronic toxicities of the water extract from the roots of Citrus aurantifolia were studied in both male and female rats. Oral administration of the extract at a single dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight (5 male, 5 female did not produce signs of toxicity, behavioral changes, mortality or differences on gross appearance of internal organs. The subchronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding the test substance at the doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight for 90 days (10 male, 10 female. The examinations of signs, animal behavior and health monitoring showed no signs of abnormalities in the test groups as compared to the controls. The test and control groups (on the 90th day and the satellite group (on the 118th day were analyzed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining hematological parameters, blood clinical chemistry and histopathology features. The oral administration of 1,200 mg/kg/ day of the extract of C. aurantifolia in male and female rats caused a significant increase in the liver enzymes, which remained within the normal range, but did not produce a significant histopathological change in the internal organs. In conclusion, the extract from the roots of C. aurantifolia administered orally did not cause acute or subchronic toxicities to male and female rats.

  17. A pilot study: dose adaptation of capecitabine using mobile phone toxicity monitoring - supporting patients in their homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Andrew; Love, Sharon B; Larsen, Mark; Shanyinde, Milensu; Waters, Rachel; Grainger, Lisa; Shearwood, Vanessa; Brooks, Claire; Gibson, Oliver; Young, Annie M; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Real-time symptom monitoring using a mobile phone is potentially advantageous for patients receiving oral chemotherapy. We therefore conducted a pilot study of patient dose adaptation using mobile phone monitoring of specific symptoms to investigate relative dose intensity of capecitabine, level of toxicity and perceived supportive care. Patients with breast or colorectal cancer receiving capecitabine completed a symptom, temperature and dose diary twice a day using a mobile phone application. This information was encrypted and automatically transmitted in real time to a secure server, with moderate levels of toxicity automatically prompting self-care symptom management messages on the screen of the patient's mobile phone or in severe cases, a call from a specialist nurse to advise on care according to an agreed protocol. Patients (n = 26) completed the mobile phone diary on 92.6 % of occasions. Twelve patients had a maximum toxicity grade of 3 (46.2 %). The average dose intensity for all patients as a percentage of standard dose was 90 %. In eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was reduced, and in eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was increased. Patients and healthcare professionals involved felt reassured by the novel monitoring system, in particular, during out of hours. It is possible to optimise the individual dose of oral chemotherapy safely including dose increase and to manage chemotherapy side effects effectively using real-time mobile phone monitoring of toxicity parameters entered by the patient.

  18. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from dried fruits of Piper nigrum L. in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Jaijoy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate acute and subchronic toxicities of the water extract from the dried fruits of Piper nigrum L. A single oral administration of the extract at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight (5 male, 5 female did not produce signs of toxicity, behavioral changes, mortality, changes on gross appearance or histopathological changes of internal organs. The subchronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding both male and female rats (10 male, 10 female daily with the test substance at the doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight continuously for 90 days. The examinations of signs, animal behavior and health monitoring showed no abnormalities in the test groups as compared to the controls. The test and control groups (on the 90th day and the satellite group (on the 118th day were analyzed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining hematology, blood clinical chemistry and histopathology. The results suggest that the water extract from the dried fruits of P. nigrum does not cause acute or subchronic toxicities in either male or female rats.

  19. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the chronic toxicity of crude ricin from castor bean kernels on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pingping; Wang, Junsong; Dong, Ge; Wei, Dandan; Li, Minghui; Yang, Minghua; Kong, Lingyi

    2014-07-29

    Ricin, a large, water soluble toxic glycoprotein, is distributed majorly in the kernels of castor beans (the seeds of Ricinus communis L.) and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) or other folk remedies throughout the world. The toxicity of crude ricin (CR) from castor bean kernels was investigated for the first time using an NMR-based metabolomic approach complemented with histopathological inspection and clinical chemistry. The chronic administration of CR could cause kidney and lung impairment, spleen and thymus dysfunction and diminished nutrient intake in rats. An orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLSDA) of metabolomic profiles of rat biofluids highlighted a number of metabolic disturbances induced by CR. Long-term CR treatment produced perturbations on energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, amino acid metabolism and kynurenine pathway, and evoked oxidative stress. These findings could explain well the CR induced nephrotoxicity and pulmonary toxicity, and provided several potential biomarkers for diagnostics of these toxicities. Such a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach showed its ability to give a systematic and holistic view of the response of an organism to drugs and is suitable for dynamic studies on the toxicological effects of TCM.

  20. Repeated-Doses Toxicity Study of the Essential Oil of Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) in Swiss Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Rocha Caldas, Germana; Araújo, Alice Valença; Albuquerque, Giwellington Silva; Silva-Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Costa-Silva, João Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) is found in abundance in Northeastern Brazil where it is used in traditional medicine to treat gastric disorders. Since there are no studies reporting the toxicity and safety profile of this species, we investigated repeated-doses toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM). Swiss mice of both sexes were orally treated with EOHM (100 and 500 mg/kg) for 30 days, and biochemical, hematological, and morphological parameters were determined. No toxicity signs or deaths were recorded during the treatment with EOHM. The body weight gain was not affected, but there was an occasional variation in water and food consumption among mice of both sexes treated with both doses. The hematological and biochemical profiles did not show significant differences except for a decrease in the MCV and an increase in albumin, but these variations are within the limits described for the species. The microscopic analysis showed changes in liver, kidneys, lungs, and spleen; however, these changes do not have clinical relevance since they varied among the groups, including the control group. The results indicate that the treatment of repeated-doses with the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii showed low toxicity in mice.

  1. Repeated-Doses Toxicity Study of the Essential Oil of Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae in Swiss Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Freire Rocha Caldas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae is found in abundance in Northeastern Brazil where it is used in traditional medicine to treat gastric disorders. Since there are no studies reporting the toxicity and safety profile of this species, we investigated repeated-doses toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM. Swiss mice of both sexes were orally treated with EOHM (100 and 500 mg/kg for 30 days, and biochemical, hematological, and morphological parameters were determined. No toxicity signs or deaths were recorded during the treatment with EOHM. The body weight gain was not affected, but there was an occasional variation in water and food consumption among mice of both sexes treated with both doses. The hematological and biochemical profiles did not show significant differences except for a decrease in the MCV and an increase in albumin, but these variations are within the limits described for the species. The microscopic analysis showed changes in liver, kidneys, lungs, and spleen; however, these changes do not have clinical relevance since they varied among the groups, including the control group. The results indicate that the treatment of repeated-doses with the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii showed low toxicity in mice.

  2. Comparative study on toxicity of extracellularly biosynthesized and laboratory synthesized CdTe quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komínková, M.; Milosavljevic, V; Vítek, Petr; Polanská, H.; Číhalová, K.; Dostálová, S.; Hynstová, V.; Guran, R.; Kopel, P.; Richtera, L.; Masarik, M.; Brtnický, M.; Kynický, J.; Zítka, O.; Adam, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 241, - (2017), s. 193-200 ISSN 0168-1656 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Quantum dots * Biosynthesis * Escherichia coli (E. coli) * CdTe * Toxicity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.599, year: 2016

  3. Psychological treatment of patients with chronic toxic encephalopathy: lessons from studies of chronic fatigue and whiplash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Wekking, Ellie M.; Berg, Ina J.; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE), which can result from long-term exposure to organic solvents, is characterized by problems of attention and memory, fatigue and affective symptoms. There is little experience with (neuro)psychological treatment in this patient group. We reviewed treatment outcome

  4. Psychological treatment of patients with chronic toxic encephalopathy : Lessons from studies of chronic fatigue and whiplash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Wekking, EM; Berg, IJ; Deelman, BG

    2003-01-01

    Background. Chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE), which can result from long-term exposure to organic solvents, is characterized by problems of attention and memory, fatigue and affective symptoms. There is little experience with (neuro)psychological treatment in this patient group. We reviewed

  5. A one-year oral toxicity study of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL) in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamb, J.; Hentz, K.; Schmitt, D.; Tran, N.; Jonker, D.; Junker, K.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL) was examined in Wistar rats fed diets containing 0, 1.25, 2.5, and 5% SSL for one year, equivalent to mean daily intakes of 558, 1115, and 2214. mg/kg/day in males and 670, 1339, and 2641. mg/kg/day in females, respectively. SSL was well tolerated at

  6. Cell kill pattern and acute toxicity studies of the aqueous fraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... discussed in the context of the fact that P. biglobosa parts have been reported to be used extensively in the treatment of a wide variety of infections. Key words: Methanolic, aqueous fraction, Parkia biglobosa, bactericidal, slightly toxic. INTRODUCTION. Plants have traditionally provided a source of hope for.

  7. CASE STUDY 6.26: UNSUCCESSFUL TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATIONS MANIPULATIONS: SEAWATER BUFFERS AND STERILIZATION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper summarizes several unsuccessful attempts to develop Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) manipulations for aqueous samples during the first 5 years of our research. The first part of the paper explores irradiation as a sterilization technique to discern if sam...

  8. Ozone and nitrogen dioxide : a study on mechanisms of toxic action and cellular defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Ozone and nitrogen dioxide are major toxic components of photochemical smog. They arise from the combustion of fossil fuels (traffic, industrial processes) and from solar radiation-catalyzed reactions in polluted atmospheres.

    The morphological, physiological and biochemical effects

  9. Developmental toxicity study in rats and rabbits administered an emulsion containing medium chain triglycerides as an alternative caloric source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, S; Wilson, D; White, R; Trimbo, S

    1997-12-01

    Triglyceride-containing lipid emulsions have been designed as caloric sources that can be administered intravenously to patients that cannot meet their nutritional needs by conventional parenteral therapies. In their study, we evaluate the developmental toxicity of a 20% lipid emulsion that contains a 3:1 ratio of medium chain triglyceride (MCT) to one long chain containing lipid emulsion (LCT). This emulsion was administered by intravenous infusion to rats and rabbits at dosages of 1 and 4.28 g lipid/kg body weight (g lipid/kg) at dose volumes of 5 and 21.4 mL/kg, respectively, once daily during organogenesis to assess the potential developmental toxicity of the test article. The control group received 0.9% saline at a dose volume of 21.4 mL/kg. Animals were observed for clinical signs of toxicity and adverse effects on body weights and feed consumption. On Day 20 (rats) or Day 29 (rabbits), females were necropsied and examined for maternal and embryo/fetal toxicity. Fetuses were removed, weighed, and examined for external, soft tissue, and skeletal abnormalities. Dosages of 4.28 g lipid/kg resulted in lower feed consumption for rats and rabbits, an expected finding based on the high-caloric nature of the test article. Potentially test article-related gross necropsy findings, including enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, small thymus, and enlarged renal pelvis, for rats given 4.28 g lipid/kg were present at a low incidence. There were no adverse effects on fetal parameters for rats even in the presence of some maternal toxicity. However, embryo and fetal toxicity (i.e., resorptions) and skeletal abnormalities were present for rabbits given 4.28 g lipid/kg. Under the conditions of this study, the no-observable-effect level for developmental toxicity was greater than or equal to 4.28 g lipid/kg for rats and greater than or equal to 1 g lipid/kg but less than 4.28 g lipid/kg for rabbits.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light catalytic cracked naphtha distillate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapin, C; Bui, Q; Breglia, R; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; Lapadula, E; Roth, R; Schreiner, C; White, R; Clark, C; Mandella, R; Hoffman, G

    2001-01-01

    A 15-week, whole-body inhalation study of the vapors of a distillate (LCCN-D) of light catalytic cracked naphtha (CAS no. 64741-55-5, LCCN) was conducted with Sprague-Dawley rats. Target exposure concentrations were 0, 750, 2500, and 7500 ppm for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week. Over the course of the study, animals received at least 65 exposures. For a portion of the control and 7500-ppm groups, a 4-week postexposure period was included in the study. Subchronic toxicity was evaluated using standard parameters. During life, neurotoxicity was evaluated by motor activity assessment and a functional observational battery. Selected tissues from animals in all exposure groups were examined microscopically. Neuropathologic examination of selected neuronal tissues from animals in the control and high-exposure groups was also conducted. No compound-related effects were seen on survival, clinical chemistry, food consumption, or physical signs. No evidence of neurotoxicity was seen at any exposure level. Slight decreases in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations were seen in male rats at the end of exposure to 7500 ppm LCCN-D. However, values were within normal physiological ranges and recovery occurred. Slight decreases in mean body weights and body weight gain were observed in high-exposure females during the first 7 weeks of exposure, but this decrease was not seen during the second half of the study. Male rat nephropathy involving hyaline droplet formation and alpha-2micro-globulin accumulation was seen in mid- and high-exposure males, an effect not relevant to humans. The incidence and severity of goblet cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia and respiratory epithelium hyperplasia in nasoturbinal tissues were greater in high-exposure animals, but recovery occurred. None of the effects observed were considered toxicologically significant. The no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for subchronic and neurotoxicity of LCCN-D was > or = 7500 ppm.

  11. In silico studies of dioxin-like toxicity of 75 individual chloronapthalene congeners (PCNs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzyn, T.; Falandysz, J. [Gdansk Univ. (Poland)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated napthalenes (PCNs) are relatively well known persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic pollutants, which have been affecting the environment since 20s of the last century. Those chemicals have been technically synthesized and used mainly in electrical equipment, wood preservation, as engine oil additives, refractive testing oils and pesticides. Some of chloronaphthalenes elicit toxic effects similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD), and these similarities might be expressed by means of toxic equivalency factors (TEFs). Determination of TEFs is based on the assumption, that all 'dioxin-like' compounds act through the AhR signal transduction pathway. After penetration of the cell, a molecule of TCDD analogue binds to the arylohydrocarbon receptor (AhR) localized in cytoplasm. After docking, the complex AhR-TCDD analogue is translocated to the nucleus, where it binds to dioxin response element (DRE) in DNA. DRE plays role of regulatory element for expression of many genes responsible for different toxic and non-toxic effects. One of the describing effects is induction of P-450 depend izozyme CYP 1A1 (7- ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD). It catalyzes reaction of deethylation of 7-ethoxyresorufin to resorufin. Resorufin are characterized by fluorescence abilities, which can be quantitatively measured by means of the fluorometer. Based on this features, the EROD bioassay used rat hepatoma cells (H4IIE) was implemented by Nebert and Gelboin and used to determination TEF values for new 'dioxin-like' compounds. Another important in vitro assay indirectly measuring AhR binding affinity of potentially 'dioxin-like' compounds is test with luciferase implemented in 19931. This bioassay uses recombinant cells consists of luciferase gene controlled by DRE. Luciferase catalyzes oxidation of luciferin to oxyluciferin. Oxidative form of luciferin produces light, which can be detected and quantitative measured by the

  12. Safety assessment of Withania somnifera extract standardized for Withaferin A: Acute and sub-acute toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shruti B; Rao, Nirav J; Hingorani, Lal L

    2016-03-01

    The use of Withania somnifera is increasing due to a number of its chemical constituents found useful for health. The present study was carried out to investigate the potential adverse effects (if any) of a standardized Withania somnifera extract (WSE) in rats following acute and sub chronic administration. The toxicity study was performed in Wistar rats by oral administration. An acute toxicity study was done at the dose of 2000 mg/kg. In the sub-acute study, Wistar rats (10/sex/group) were administered via gavage 0 (control), 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kg body weight/day of WSE for 28 days. Among two additional satellite groups, one group did not receive any drug while the second group received 2000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. At the end of study, the animals sacrificed and their body weight, hematology, serum chemistry, and histopathology evaluation was done. In acute toxicity studies, oral LD50 of WSE in Wistar rats was greater than 2000 mg/kg body weight. Compared to the control group in sub-acute toxicity study, administration of extract did not show any toxicologically significant treatment related changes in clinical observations, ophthalmic examination, body weight gain, feed consumption, clinical pathology evaluation, and organ weight. Hematological and serum chemistry parameters were within the normal limits. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment related gross or histopathological findings. Based on this study, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level of WSE is 2000 mg/kg body weight, the highest level tested. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 7 CFR 400.705 - Contents required for a new submission or changes to a previously approved submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reinsured under the Act; (5) Focus group results; (6) Market research studies; (7) Qualitative market... any causes of loss excluded; (6) Any statements to be included in the actuarial documents; and (7) The... performance of the submission under various scenarios depicting good and poor actuarial experience; and (6) A...

  14. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance. Type of Information..., including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection...

  15. Antimony toxicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms...

  16. In vivo Studies on the Protective Effect of Propolis on Doxorubicin-Induced Toxicity in Liver of Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Shivani; Kumar, Neelima R; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2014-05-01

    Since anticancer drugs are to be administered for long durations of time and are associated with systemic toxicities, the present studies were conducted to evaluate the protective potential of honey bee propolis against a widely used anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DXR) induced toxicity and oxidative damage in liver tissues of rats. Sixteen male Sprague Dawley rats, weighing between 200-220 g, were used and were divided into four equal groups. Propolis was given orally to rats [250 mg/kg body weight (bw) for 14 consecutive days] and DXR [25 mg/kg bw; intraperitoneally (i.p) was administered on 12(th), 13(th) and 14(th) day of the experiment. All the animals were sacrificed on day 15(th) day by decapitation. Blood and tissue samples were collected for measurement of toxicity and oxidative damage parameters (enzymatic assays and biochemical estimations). Administration of DXR for 3 days at a cumulative dose of 25 mg/kg bw, induced toxicity and oxidative stress in rats as significantly decreased activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR) were observed in rat liver supernatants when compared to control group. Increased activity of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) was obtained in DXR administered rats. Also there are significantly increased levels of lipid peroxides (measured as malondialdehyde formation) and significantly decreased level of glutathione (GSH) in doxorubicin treated rat liver supernatants as compared to healthy controls. On the other hand, administration of animals with propolis prior to DXR treatment led to significant modulation of the oxidative damage related parameters in liver and hepatotoxicity parameters in blood, when compared to doxorubicin treated group. However results were still not comparable to control group or only propolis group indicating partial protection by propolis at

  17. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minghui [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Junsong, E-mail: wang.junsong@gmail.com [Center for Molecular Metabolism, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiao Ling Wei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lu, Zhaoguang; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Kong, Lingyi, E-mail: cpu_lykong@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •A goldfish model was established to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) exposure on multiple organs. •NMR based metabolomics approach were firstly used to provide a global view of the toxicity of LCT. •LCT induced neurotransmitters and osmoregulatory imbalances, oxidative stress, energy and amino acid metabolic disorders. •Glutamate–glutamine–GABA axis as a potential target for LCT toxicity was first found. -- Abstract: In this study, a {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) in goldfish (Carassius auratus). LCT showed tissue-specific damage to gill, heart, liver and kidney tissues of goldfish. NMR profiling combined with statistical methods such as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and two-dimensional statistical total correlation spectroscopy (2D-STOCSY) was developed to discern metabolite changes occurring after one week LCT exposure in brain, heart and kidney tissues of goldfish. LCT exposure influenced levels of many metabolites (e.g., leucine, isoleucine and valine in brain and kidney; lactate in brain, heart and kidney; alanine in brain and kidney; choline in brain, heart and kidney; taurine in brain, heart and kidney; N-acetylaspartate in brain; myo-inositol in brain; phosphocreatine in brain and heart; 2-oxoglutarate in brain; cis-aconitate in brain, and etc.), and broke the balance of neurotransmitters and osmoregulators, evoked oxidative stress, disturbed metabolisms of energy and amino acids. The implication of glutamate–glutamine–gamma-aminobutyric axis in LCT induced toxicity was demonstrated for the first time. Our findings demonstrated the applicability and potential of metabolomics approach for the elucidation of toxicological effects of pesticides and the underlying mechanisms, and the discovery of biomarkers for pesticide pollution in aquatic environment.

  18. Pulmonary toxicity study in rats with PM 10 and PM 2.5: Differential responses related to scale and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Lei, Tian; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Yang, Dan-Feng; Xi, Zhu-Ge; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Wei

    2011-02-01

    ObjectionTo study the pollution of atmospheric particles at winter in Beijing and compare the lung toxicity which induced by particle samples from different sampling sites. MethodWe collected samples from two sampling points during the winter for toxicity testing and chemical analysis. Wistar rats were administered with particles by intratracheal instillation. After exposure, biochemically index, esimmunity indexes, histopathology and DNA damage were detected in rat pulmonary cells. ResultThe elements with enrichment factors (EF) larger than 10 were As, Cd, Cu, Zn, S and Pb in the four experiment groups. The priority control of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 and PM 2.5 of Near-traffic source was much higher than that of Far-traffic source, it demonstrated that near the traffic source of PAHs pollution was heavier than that of Far-traffic source, as it was close to main roads Beiyuan Road, motor vehicle emissions were much higher. The pathology of lung showed that the degree of inflammation was increased with the particle diameter minished, it was the same as the detection of biochemical parameters such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Total antioxidant status(T-AOC) and total protein (TP) in BALF and inflammation cytokine(interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in lung homogenate. The indexes of DNA damage including the content of DNA and Olive empennage of PM 2.5 were significant higher than that of PM 10 at the same surveillance point ( P pollution at winter in Beijing. Meanwhile, atmospheric particulate matters on lung toxicity were related to the particles size and distance related sites which were exposed: smaller size, more toxicity; nearer from traffic, more toxicity.

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials: a critical comparison of published in vitro assays and in vivo inhalation or instillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Sauer, Ursula G; Ma-Hock, Lan; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-11-01

    To date, guidance on how to incorporate in vitro assays into integrated approaches for testing and assessment of nanomaterials is unavailable. In addressing this shortage, this review compares data from in vitro studies to results from in vivo inhalation or intratracheal instillation studies. Globular nanomaterials (ion-shedding silver and zinc oxide, poorly soluble titanium dioxide and cerium dioxide, and partly soluble amorphous silicon dioxide) and nanomaterials with higher aspect ratios (multiwalled carbon nanotubes) were assessed focusing on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reference nanomaterials for these substances. If in vitro assays are performed with dosages that reflect effective in vivo dosages, the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity can be assessed. In early tiers of integrated approaches for testing and assessment, knowledge on mechanisms of toxicity serves to group nanomaterials thereby reducing the need for animal testing.

  20. Studies on the prenatal toxicity of toluene in rabbits following inhalation exposure and proposal of a pregnancy guidance value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimisch, H.J.; Hellwig, J. (BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany). Abt. fuer Toxikologie); Hofmann, A. (Merck (E.), Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie)

    1992-07-01

    Prenatal toxicity of toluene was determined in two separate studies by inhalation exposure of Himalayan rabbits. In the first study 15 artificially inseminated females per group were exposed to 30, 100, or 300 ppm and in the second study 20 artificially inseminated females per group inhaled 100 or 500 ppm. In each case the rabbits were exposed for 6 hours per day from day 6 post-insemination (p.i.) to day 18 p.i. The respective controls inhaled conditioned clean air under the same exposure conditions. No signs of maternal toxicity were observed. All data obtained on gestational parameters were found to be within the variation range reported for this rabbit strain. The fetal external, soft tissue and skeletal findings, were seen in toluene exposed fetuses in a frequency similar to the corresponding and/or historical controls. Differences observed between the groups were not concentration dependent and were considered incidental rather than compound related. Therefore, toluene was not embryotoxic, fetotoxic, or teratogenic for rabbits exposed during the period of organogenesis. The highest concentration tested under these conditions (500 ppm) was found to be a no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both the adult and the fetal Himalayan rabbit. Based on these and previous results of animal studies of prenatal toxicity, a safety or uncertainty factor approach is considered for setting limits of exposure for women at workplaces. A pregnancy guidance value of 20 ppm is proposed. (orig.).

  1. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Behrens, G. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Toxic emissions were measured in the gaseous, solid and aqueous effluent streams in a coal-fired gasification plant. Several internal process streams were also characterized to assess pollution control device effectiveness. The program, consisted of three major phases. Phase I was the toxics emission characterization program described above. phase II included the design, construction and shakedown testing of a high-temperature, high-pressure probe for collecting representative trace composition analysis of hot (1200{degrees}F) syngas. Phase III consisted of the collection of hot syngas samples utilizing the high-temperature probe. Preliminary results are presented which show the emission factors and removal efficiencies for several metals that are on the list of compounds defined by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  2. Nanosilica and Polyacrylate/Nanosilica: A Comparative Study of Acute Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Mei Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the acute toxicity of nanosilica and polyacrylate/nanosilica instillation in Wistar rats (n=60. Exposure to nanosilica and polyacrylate/nanosilica showed a 30% mortality rate. When compared with saline-treated rats, animals in both exposure groups exhibited a significant reduction of PO2 (P<0.05 at both 24 and 72 hr. after exposure. Both exposure groups exhibited a significant reduction of neutrophils in arterial blood compared to saline controls (P<0.05 24 hr. after exposure. The levels of blood ALT and LDH in exposed groups were found to be significantly increased (P<0.05 24 hr. following exposure. The exposed groups exhibited various degrees of pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Our findings indicated respiratory exposure to polyacrylate/nanosilica and nanosilica is likely to cause multiple organ toxicity.

  3. Journal of Business Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS: Submission of Papers The JBR welcomes papers from the general academia and professionals. Authors are encouraged to submit papers for publications in the JBR at any time. The Journal will also at specific times solicit for reviews on topical issues of interest. Procedure ...

  4. South African Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Authorship should be based on: (i) substantial contribution to conceptualisation, design, analysis and interpretation of data; (ii) drafting or critical revision of important scientific ... If authors' names are added or deleted after submission of an article, or the order of the names is changed, all authors must agree to this in writing.

  5. Ghana Journal of Linguistics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. PLEASE follow these guidelines closely when preparing your paper for submission. The editors reserve the right to reject inadequately prepared papers. All areas of linguistics are invited – the journal is not limited to articles on languages of or in Ghana or Africa. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS must be submitted ...

  6. Ghana Journal of Geography: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Submission to the Ghana Journal of Geography. Papers submitted to the journal should follow the guidelines set out below. All correspondence between editor and author is performed by e-mail, and paper copies are not required at all stages. A manuscript must be submitted electronically as an email ...

  7. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If digital images are the only source of images, ensure that the image has minimum resolution of 300 dpi or 1800 x 1600 pixels in TIFF format. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics charges Nigerian Naira 5000 (USD25) on submission of manuscript as processing fees and Nigerian Naira 25,000 (USD125) publication fees on ...

  8. Journal for Juridical Science: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 1. Manuscripts may be submitted to Journal for Juridical Science in Afrikaans or English. The desired length of articles is 7 000 words, while 4 500 words is regarded as the minimum and 11 000 as the maximum. 2. Two typed copies of manuscripts must be submitted. In addition submission on computer ...

  9. Orient Journal of Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charges: Authors are required, at the submission of each article, to pay a sum of N15,000 (Fifteen Thousand Naira only) as processing fee at the Journal Office and obtain a written receipt, or pay into the Orient Journal of Medicine Bank Account (Account No. should be obtained directly from the Editor)and mail a scanned ...

  10. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Original research papers, substantive topic reviews, viewpoints and short communications that make an original contribution to the understanding of hospitality and hospitality management in a global context will be considered for publication in the Journal. Submissions should be e-mailed to the ...

  11. ChemSearch Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It publishes original quality articles which are reporting advances in theory, techniques methodology applications and practice, general survey and critical reviews, etc. SUBMISSION OF ARTICLE ... c/o Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University, P.M.B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. or. via our Email address: ...

  12. Toxic elements as biomarkers for breast cancer: a meta-analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouybari L

    2018-01-01

    groups led to the conclusion that there was a significant difference in Cd and Ni statuses between healthy and BC patients; the standard mean difference was 2.65 (95% CI: 1.57–3.73; P=0.000 and 2.06 (95% CI: 1.20–3.32; P=0.000, respectively. Whereas, there was no significant statistical difference in As status between healthy subjects and BC patients; the standard mean difference between them being 0.52 (95% CI: –0.12–1.16; P=0.114.Conclusion: The present study indicates that there is a direct and positive association between Cd and Ni concentrations and BC risk. It is a warning to health care providers and policy makers to find viable solutions and take requisite measures to reduce BC risk in the society. Keywords: malignancy, breast cancer, arsenic, cadmium, nickel, meta-analysis, toxic element

  13. Interlaboratory study of precision: Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans freshwater sediment toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, G.A.; Norberg-King, T. J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Winger, P.V.; Kubitz, J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Smith, M.E.; Greer, E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Call, D.J.; Day, K.E.; Kennedy, P.; Stinson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Standard 10-d whole-sediment toxicity test methods have recently been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. An interlaboratory evaluation of method precision was performed using a group of seven to 10 laboratories, representing government, academia, and environmental consulting firms. The test methods followed the EPA protocols for 4-d water-only reference toxicant (KCl) testing (static exposure) and for 10-d whole-sediment testing. Test sediments included control sediment, two copper-containing sediments, and a sediment contaminated primarily with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reference toxicant tests resulted in H. azteca and C. tentans median lethal concentration (LC50) values with coefficents of variation (CVs) of 15.8 and 19.6%, respectively. Whole sediments which were moderately contaminated provided the best estimates of precision using CVs. Hyalella azteca and C. tentans tests in moderately contaminated sediments exhibited LC50 CVs of 38.9 and 13.5%, respectively. The CV for C. tentans growth was 31.9%. Only 3% (1 of 28) of samples exceeded acceptable interlaboratory precision limits for the H. azteca survival tests. No samples exceeded the intralaboratory precision limit for H. azteca or C. tentans survival tests. However, intralaboratory variability limits for C. tentans growth were exceeded by 80 and 100% of the laboratories for a moderately toxic and control sample, respectively. Interlaboratory variability limits for C. tentans survival were not exceeded by any laboratory. The results showed these test methods to have relatively low variance and acceptable levels of precision in interlaboratory comparisons.

  14. Lipid therapy with two agents in ropivacaine-induced toxicity: experimental study in swine

    OpenAIRE

    Matheus Rodrigues Bonfim; Marcos De Simone Melo; Elisabeth Dreyer; Luís Fernando Affini Borsoi; Thales Gê de Oliveira; Artur Udelsmann

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Compare hemodynamic changes after ropivacaine-induced toxicity followed by treatment with two lipid emulsions in swine. METHODS: Large White pigs were anesthetized with thiopental, followed by intubation, and kept on mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamic variables at rest were recorded with invasive pressure monitoring and pulmonary artery catheterization. After 30 minutes, 7 mg.kg-1 ropivacaine were injected intravenously and new hemodynamic measurements were performe...

  15. Comparative toxicity study on classical and modified version of Jawarish Jalinoos (a traditional Unani formulation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulam Mohammed Husain

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity study demonstrates that the no observed adverse effect level of SFJJ and JJ is greater than 2024 mg/kg bw/d and 2000 mg/kg bw/d (p.o. in rats, respectively. Both formulations were found to be safe up to the tested dose levels and experimental conditions, and therefore safe for clinical use as specified in the literature.

  16. Mucopenetrating nanoparticles for enhancement of oral bioavailability of furosemide: In vitro and in vivo evaluation/sub-acute toxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Salma El-Sayed; Sokar, Magda Samir; Abdelmonsif, Doaa Ali; El-Kamel, Amal Hassan

    2017-06-30

    The aim of this study was to formulate and evaluate chitosan (CS)/alginate (ALG) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with furosemide (FSM) in an attempt to enhance its release, permeability and bioavailability. Non-everted gut sac method was used to evaluate the ex vivo permeation of FSM from its suspension and the selected CS/ALG NPs formulation. The pharmacokinetic parameters of FSM subsequent to oral administration of the selected formulation were assessed in rats. In vivo subacute toxicity study of the prepared blank and FSM loaded formulations was evaluated in rats. The selected optimized formulation (F3) showed optimum particle size (PS), polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential (ZP) and acceptable percentage entrapment efficiency (%EE) of 253.8nm±4.6, 0.25±0.03, -35mV±1 and 96%±1, respectively. The release profile of FSM from the selected formulation was characterized by initial burst effect in 0.1N HCl. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) demonstrated a smooth surface and spherical shape for the lyophilized optimized NPs. Selected CS/ALG NPs (F3) presented a significant enhancement (p≤0.01) in permeation parameters of FSM as well as in T max , C max , AUC 0-24 and AUC 0-∞ . Subacute toxicity study results revealed that the selected formulation was safe and nontoxic. The histopathological inspection of the stomach and small intestine tissues of the loaded NPs (F3) and blank groups reflected no obvious signs of cellular toxicity or inflammatory reaction. CS/ALG NPs loaded with FSM enhanced both drug release and mucus-penetrating ability leading to an overall increase in FSM bioavailability. In addition, the in vivo subacute toxicity study results indicated the safety of the prepared NPs for oral drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of copper toxicity on response inhibition processes: a study in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Reuner, Ulrike; Gohil, Krutika; Beste, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare genetic disease causing copper deposits in various tissues. Given the specificity of the underlying pathology, it is a good model to investigate the effects of copper toxicity on cognitive functions in humans. If left untreated, WD results in neurodegeneration and organ failure, but irrespective of potential brain damage, the medication might reduce cortical norepinephrine (NE) levels. In line with this, dysexecutive symptoms including increased impulsivity have been reported for WD patients, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We investigated inhibition and the associated neurophysiological correlates in n = 26 WD patients with mild-to-moderate clinical symptoms and matched healthy controls who completed a Go/Nogo task, while an EEG was recorded. Although the behavioral data do not show increased impulsivity in WD, the neurophysiological data show that evaluative processing of successful inhibition (as reflected by the P3 component) was strongly compromised. This was reflected by a decrease in ACC activity which was positively correlated with the severity of WD symptoms, stressing the importance of copper (toxicity) for neurocognitive functioning and impulsivity. These changes are most likely due to a combination of NE deficiency induced by WD medication as well as WD-induced brain damage. The fact that changes were still evident on a neurophysiological level suggests that neurophysiological correlates of cognitive processes and functions provide a more sensitive index of toxicity and/or treatment efficiency than purely behavioral measures.

  18. Off-site toxic consequence assessment: a simplified modeling procedure and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Joe; Hoppe, Tom

    2008-11-15

    An assessment of off-site exposure from spills/releases of toxic chemicals can be conducted by compiling site-specific operational, geographic, demographic, and meteorological data and by using screening-level public-domain modeling tools (e.g., RMP Comp, ALOHA and DEGADIS). In general, the analysis is confined to the following: event-based simulations (allow for the use of known, constant, atmospheric conditions), known receptor distances (on the order of miles or less), short time scale for the distances considered (order of 10's of minutes or less), gently sloping rough terrain, dense and neutrally buoyant gas dispersion, known chemical inventory and infrastructure (used to define source-term), and known toxic endpoint (defines significance). While screening-level models are relatively simple to use, care must be taken to ensure that the results are meaningful. This approach allows one to assess risk from catastrophic release (e.g., via terrorism), or plausible release scenarios (related to standard operating procedures and industry standards). In addition, given receptor distance and toxic endpoint, the model can be used to predict the critical spill volume to realize significant off-site risk. This information can then be used to assess site storage and operation parameters and to determine the most economical and effective risk reduction measures to be applied.

  19. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

  20. Mechanistic study of the toxicity of ionizing radiation in Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisot, F.; Alonzo, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Laboratoire d' Ecotoxicologie des Radionucleides, Cadarache (France); Bourdineaud, J.P. [UMR CNRS 5805 EPOC - OASU Station Marine d' Arcachon Universite Bordeaux 1, Arcachon (France); Poggiale, J.C. [Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography - MIO - UMR 7294 Pytheas Institute - OSU, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France)

    2014-07-01

    In the last decade, the ecological impact of ionizing radiation has emerged as a growing scientific concern for ecosystems protection. However, the assessment of potential radiological effects on the environment is hampered by both a gap of available scientific data and a lack in proven methods. Understanding how ionizing radiation affects wildlife at biologically and ecologically relevant scales is a major issue in environmental protection. This issue is one of the objectives of the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) developed in the framework of the European program STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology). In this context, the present PhD project aims to evaluate chronic effects of external Cs-137 gamma radiation at low doses on a representative species of aquatic ecosystems, the cladoceran crustacean Daphnia magna. More precisely, the objectives of this study are to evaluate multi-generational effects of irradiation on: (i) genotoxic effects and their potential consequences on survival, somatic growth and fecundity, (ii) the energy budget and (iii) the population dynamics of Daphnia. An experimental design was developed to expose daphnids to low doses of ionizing radiation ranging from 0,008 to 32 mGy.h{sup -1} across 3 successive generations (75 days). DNA damages were assessed using random amplified polymorphic DNA and real time PCR (RAPD - PCR). Effects on survival, somatic growth and fecundity were monitored for 21-25 days in each generation, from hatching to release of brood 5. Our aim is to: examine a potential correlation between molecular (DNA) damage and effects observed at the individual level (survival, somatic growth and fecundity) across generations and test the suitability of DNA damage as an early indice of future trans-generational effects. As a future perspective, individual and molecular effects data will be analysed using a DEBtox model (Dynamic Energy Budget Applied to Toxicology) in order to identify the metabolic modes of action of ionizing

  1. Repeated dose toxicity study (28 days) in rats and mice with N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, D E; Malley, L A; Slone, T W; Elliott, G S; Kennedy, G L; Mellert, W; Deckardt, K; Gembardt, C; Hildebrand, B; Murphy, S R; Bower, D B; Wright, G A

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-eight day feeding studies were conducted to evaluate the repeated dose toxicity of NMP, a widely used industrial solvent, in Crl:CD BR rats and B6C3F1 mice. Groups of 5 male and 5 female rats each were fed either 0, 2,000, 6,000, 18,000, or 30,000 ppm NMP; similar groups of mice were fed either 0, 500, 2,500, 7,500, or 10,000 ppm. In vivo parameters, hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, and complete pathology evaluations were conducted after approximately 28 days. Decrements in mean body weight gains, reflecting decreases in food consumption and efficiency, were seen in male rats fed 18,000 ppm and in both sexes fed 30,000 ppm. In rats, clinical chemical changes, indicating possible compound-related alterations in lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism, occurred at 18,000 ppm in males and 30,000 ppm in both sexes. No histopathological changes in rats were judged to be directly related to NMP exposure. Hematological (mild to moderate leukopenia) and histopathological alterations (hypocellular bone marrow, testicular degeneration and atrophy, and thymic atrophy) were judged to be secondary to nutritional and body weight effects in male and/or female rats at 30,000 ppm. In mice, cloudy swelling of the epithelia of the distal parts of the renal tubuli was observed in 4 males and 3 females at 10,000 ppm and in 2 male mice at 7,500 ppm. For both rats and mice, abnormal urine coloration was observed (in mice at 2,500 ppm and above, and in rats at 18,000 ppm and above). The discoloration was interpreted as a sign of systemic availability of the test substance, but not as an adverse effect. The NOAEL was 6,000 ppm for male rats and 18,000 ppm for female rats. In mice, the NOAEL was 2,500 ppm based on the kidney histopathology.

  2. Evalution of toxicity of abcisic acid and gibberellic acid in rats: 50 days drinking water study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ismail; Tuluce, Yasin; Isik, Ismail

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, the influence of subchronic effects of two plant growth regulators (PGRs) [Abcisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3)] on antioxidant defense systems [reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde = MDA) in various tissues of the rat were investigated during treatment as a drinking water model. 75 ppm of ABA and GA3 in drinking water were continuously administered orally to rats (Sprague-Dawley albino) ad libitum for 50 days. The PGRs treatments caused different effects on the antioxidant defense systems and MDA content of dosed rats compared to controls. The lipid peroxidation end product MDA significantly increased in the lungs, heart and kidney of rats treated with GA3 without significant change in the spleen. ABA caused also a significant increase in MDA content in the spleen, lungs, heart and kidney. The GSH levels were significantly depleted in the spleen, lungs and stomach of rats treated with ABA without any change in the tissues of rats treated with GA3 except the kidney where it increased. Antioxidant enzyme activities such as SOD significantly increased in the lungs and stomach and decreased in the spleen and heart tissues of rats treated with GA3. Meanwhile, SOD significantly decreased in the spleen, heart and kidney and increased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA. While CAT activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with GA3, a significant increase occurred in the heart of rats treated with both PGRs. On the other hand, the ancillary enzyme GR activity in the tissues were either significantly depleted or not changed with PGRs treatment. The drug metabolizing enzyme GST activity significantly decreased in the lungs of rats treated with ABA but increased in the stomach of rats treated with both PGRs. As a conclusion, the rats resisted oxidative stress via the antioxidant

  3. Bacterial cellulose/acrylamide pH-sensitive smart hydrogel: development, characterization, and toxicity studies in ICR mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manisha; Mohamad, Najwa; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd

    2014-10-06

    The objective of this study is to synthesize and evaluate acute toxicity of the bacterial cellulose (BC)/acrylamide (Am) hydrogels as noncytotoxic and biocompatible oral drug delivery vehicles. A novel series of solubilized BC/Am hydrogels were synthesized using a microwave irradiation method. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), swelling ratio, porosity, drug release, and in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility experiments. FTIR spectra revealed that the BC crystallinity and gel fraction decreased as the NaOH concentration increased from 2% to 10% w/v, whereas the optical transparency, pH sensitivity, and porosity were enhanced with increasing alkali concentration. Theophylline was used as a model drug for drug loading and release studies. The percentage of drug released was higher at pH 7.4 compared to pH 1.5. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemolytic tests indicated that the BC/Am hydrogel is noncytotoxic and hemocompatible. Results of acute oral toxicity tests on ICR mice suggested that the hydrogels are nontoxic up to 2000 mg/kg when administered orally, as no toxic response or histopathological changes were observed in comparison to control mice. The results of this study demonstrated that the pH-sensitive smart hydrogel makes it a possible safe carrier for oral drug delivery.

  4. Toxicological evaluation of the flavonoid-rich extract from Maydis stigma: Subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ke-Zheng; Zhang, Song-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Li

    2016-11-04

    Maydis stigma (corn silk) has a long history of use as a traditional herbal medicine or functional food in China and many other countries and has been listed in the Chinese Pharmacopea. However, little data about its potential toxicity is available. In this study, we evaluated the subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of the flavonoid-rich extract from Maydis stigma (FMS) in mice. In the subchronic toxicity study, the FMS was administered orally to mice at doses of 2.50, 5.00 and 10.00g/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. At the end of experiment, general clinical signs, mortality, haematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters were examined. The genotoxicity of FMS was also evaluated by the micronucleus assay and the sperm malformation assay. All animals survived until the scheduled necropsy, and no statistically significant or toxicologically relevant differences were observed in any of the FMS-treatment groups, compared with the control group. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was determined as 10.00g/kg/day. Based on the results of the micronucleus assay and the sperm malformation assay, no evidence of genotoxicity was found either in somatic cells or germ cells even at an experimental upper limit dose (10.00g/kg/day). The results of the present studies might support the safe use of FMS as a functional food, food additive and natural remedy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Absorption enhancement, mechanistic and toxicity studies of medium chain fatty acids, cyclodextrins and bile salts as peroral absorption enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Varma, Manthena V S; Chawla, Harmander P S; Panchagnula, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate an oral 'drug delivery' approach, which involves co-administration of absorption enhancers (AEs). The representative low permeable hydrophilic (biopharmaceutic classification system (BCS) Class III) drugs used in the study comprised of cefotaxime sodium and ceftazidime pentahydrate, whereas low permeable lipophilic (BCS Class IV) drugs include cyclosporin A and lovastatin. AEs from three different chemical classes, namely, medium chain fatty acids (sodium caprylate and caprate), cyclodextrins (beta-cyclodextrin, hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin) and bile salts (sodium cholate and deoxycholate) were evaluated for absorption enhancement efficacy, mechanism of action and toxicity using in vitro everted intestinal sac model. These AEs were found to enhance intestinal permeability of drugs from 2- to 27-fold. Light microscopy studies of intestinal sac incubated with AEs for 120 min revealed morphological changes in absorptive mucosa and rank order of toxicity were cyclodextrins>bile salts congruent with medium chain fatty acids. Fluorescence polarization studies indicated that brush bordered membrane vesicles labeled with lipophilic (DPH, 12AS) and hydrophilic dyes (ANS), when treated with AEs exhibited concentration and time dependent decrease in fluorescence polarization. Total protein released in presence of AEs was more than control but considerably less than EDTA (0.58% w/v), which is known to cause toxic release of proteins from cell. Overall, AEs were found to significantly enhance drug permeability by decreasing lipid membrane fluidity and/or interacting with hydrophilic domains of membrane, and has the potential to improve oral delivery.

  6. BDSM Role Fluidity: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Investigating Switches Within Dominant/Submissive Binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Katherine

    2017-08-30

    This mixed-methods study of BDSM investigates the nuances of BDSM participants' role identities, role frequencies, and role fluidities-shifts in identities and play across time, location, scene, and play partner. Data were gathered from 202 online surveys and 25 semistructured interviews about participants' roles given their gender and sexual identities. These data reveal that men tend to self-identify as Dominant, Master, Top, or Sadist (DMTS) and always perform dominant roles, while women tend to self-identify as Submissive, Slave, Bottom, or Masochist (SSBM) and always perform submissive roles. Although this would seem to support the theory that BDSM reinforces gendered dominant/submissive binaries, further analyses indicate that women and queer/pansexual individuals disrupt this binary through their Switch identities and roles. Switching and queer identities, thus, offer the possibility for transforming dominant/submissive and other binaries.

  7. Toxicity profiling of marine surface sediments: a case study using rapid screening bioassays of exhaustive total extracts, elutriates and passive sampler extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vethaak, A.D.; Hamers, T.; Martinez-Gomez, C.; Kamstra, J.H.; de Weert, J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Smedes, F.

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the ICON project (Integrated Assessment of Contaminant Impacts on the North Sea) (Hylland et al., 2015) and aimed (1) to evaluate the toxicity of marine sediments using a battery of rapid toxicity bioassays, and; (2) to explore the applicability and

  8. Topological study on the toxicity of ionic liquids on Vibrio fischeri by the quantitative structure-activity relationship method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fangyou; Shang, Qiaoyan; Xia, Shuqian; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Peisheng

    2015-04-09

    As environmentally friendly solvents, ionic liquids (ILs) are unlikely to act as air contaminants or inhalation toxins resulting from their negligible vapor pressure and excellent thermal stability. However, they can be potential water contaminants because of their considerable solubility in water; therefore, a proper toxicological assessment of ILs is essential. The environmental fate of ILs is studied by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model is obtained by topological method using toxicity data of 157 ILs on Vibrio fischeri, which are composed of 74 cations and 22 anions. The topological index developed in our research group is used for predicting the V. fischeri toxicity for the first time. The MLR model is precise for estimating LogEC50 of ILs on V. fischeri with square of correlation coefficient (R(2)) = 0.908 and the average absolute error (AAE) = 0.278. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on the toxic interaction of methanol, ethanol and propanol against the bovine hemoglobin (BHb) on molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Chai; Xue, Yan; Liu, Rutao; Wang, Meijie

    2011-09-01

    The toxic interaction of methanol, ethanol and propanol with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) at protein molecular level was studied by resonance light scattering (RLS), fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible absorption (UV-vis) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The experimental results showed that the three alcohols all had toxic effects on BHb and the effects increased along with the increasing alcohol dose. The results of RLS and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that alcohols can denature BHb. They changed the microenvironment of amino acid residues and led to molecular aggregation. The decreasing order of the influence is propanol, ethanol and methanol. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that alcohols led to conformational changes of BHb, including the loosening of the skeleton structure and the decreasing of α-helix in the second structure. The changes generated by propanol were much larger than those by methanol and ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in an academic hospital setting: a 5-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Stocka-Łabno

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens–Johnson syndrome are acute life-threatening mucocutaneous reactions to drugs. The aims of the study were to identify these drugs and characterize population prone to these reactions. Materials and Methods: Data including demographics, culprit drug, clinical characteristics, course of disease, treatment given, and therapeutic responses were retrospectively collected from medical records of 31 patients admitted to Department of Dermatology from January 2009 to December 2014. Results: Drugs most commonly involved in Stevens–Johnson syndrome were antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, cefuroxime, trimethoprim, amoxicillin, clindamycin, co-trimoxazole (50% of patients and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: ibuprofen, naproxen, metamizole, piroxicam (29% of patients. Drugs involved in toxic epidermal necrolysis were antimicrobials: sulfasalazine, co-trimoxazole, cefuroxime, clindamycin (71% of patients and anticonvulsants: lamotrigine (29% of patients. The comorbidities’ characteristic for the group of patients affected by toxic epidermal necrolysis were psychiatric and autoimmune disorders. The most common complication was infection. Two patients died and in both cases the cause of death was sepsis. Conclusion: The study indicates that in observed population drugs with the highest risk of most severe reactions are lamotrigine (anticonvulsant and antimicrobials (most commonly sulfonamides, therefore it is advisable to consider carefully administration of these drugs, especially to patients with history of autoimmune reactions.

  11. Oral toxicity of 1,2-dichloropropane: Acute, short-term, and long-term studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckner, J.V.; MacKenzie, W.F.; Ramanathan, R.; Muralidhara, S.; Kim, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation characterized the acute and short- and long-term toxic potency of orally administered 1,2-dichloropropane (DCP). In the acute and short-term studies, male rats of 250-300 g were gavaged with 0, 100, 250, 500, or 1000 mg DCP/kg in corn oil once daily for up to 10 consecutive days. Although ingestion of DCP caused body weight loss and CNS depression, few other toxic effects were manifest 24 hr after a single dose of the chemical. Morphological changes were limited to liver centrilobular cells in 500 and 1000 mg/kg rats. Similarly, elevated activity of some serum enzymes occurred only at these two highest dose levels. Hepatic nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPS) levels were decreased and renal NPS levels increased at 24 hr. In the short-term study resistance developed to DCP hepatotoxicity over the 10 consecutive days of exposure, as reflected by progressively lower serum enzyme levels and by decreases in the severity and incidence of toxic hepatitis and periportal vacuolization. Nucleolar enlargement in hepatocytes, however, was observed at all dosage levels at 5 and 10 days. There were a number of manifestations of hemolytic anemia, including erythrophagocytosis in the liver, splenic hemosiderosis and hyperplasia of erythropoietic elements of the red pulp, renal tubular cell hemosiderosis, and hyperbilirubinemia.

  12. Formal recycling of e-waste leads to increased exposure to toxic metals: an occupational exposure study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Lundgren, Lennart; Skare, Lizbet; Grandér, Margaretha; Palm, Brita; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) contains multiple toxic metals. However, there is currently a lack of exposure data for metals on workers in formal recycling plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate workers' exposure to metals, using biomarkers of exposure in combination with monitoring of personal air exposure. We assessed exposure to 20 potentially toxic metals among 55 recycling workers and 10 office workers at three formal e-waste recycling plants in Sweden. Workers at two of the plants were followed-up after 6 months. We collected the inhalable fraction and OFC (37-mm) fraction of particles, using personal samplers, as well as spot samples of blood and urine. We measured metal concentrations in whole blood, plasma, urine, and air filters using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following acid digestion. The air sampling indicated greater airborne exposure, 10 to 30 times higher, to most metals among the recycling workers handling e-waste than among the office workers. The exposure biomarkers showed significantly higher concentrations of chromium, cobalt, indium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, and/or plasma of the recycling workers, compared with the office workers. Concentrations of antimony, indium, lead, mercury, and vanadium showed close to linear associations between the inhalable particle fraction and blood, plasma, or urine. In conclusion, our study of formal e-waste recycling shows that workers performing recycling tasks are exposed to multiple toxic metals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Copper(II) complexes with 2-pyridineformamide-derived thiosemicarbazones: Spectral studies and toxicity against Artemia salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Karina O.; Wardell, Solange M. S. V.; Wardell, James L.; Louro, Sonia R. W.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2009-07-01

    The copper(II) complexes [Cu(H2Am4DH)Cl 2] ( 1), [Cu(H2Am4Me)Cl 2] ( 2), [Cu(H2Am4Et)Cl 2] ( 3) and [Cu(2Am4Ph)Cl] ( 4) with 2-pyridineformamide thiosemicarbazone (H2Am4DH) and its N(4)-methyl (H2Am4Me), N(4)-ethyl (H2Am4Et) and N(4)-phenyl (H2Am4Ph) derivatives were studied by means of infrared and EPR spectral techniques. The crystal structure of 4 was determined. The studied compounds proved to be toxic to Artemia salina, suggesting that they could present cytotoxic activity against solid tumors. Among the free thiosemicarbazones H2Am4Ph presented higher toxicity than all other compounds, which showed comparable effects. In the case of complexes 2 and 3 toxicity is probably attributable to the complex as an entity or to a synergistic effect involving the thiosemicarbazone and copper. H2Am4Ph and complexes 2 and 3 revealed to be the most promising compounds as potential antineoplasic agents.

  14. In vitro antibacterial activity and acute toxicity studies of aqueous-methanol extract of Sida rhombifolia Linn. (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assam, Assam J P; Dzoyem, J P; Pieme, C A; Penlap, V B

    2010-07-27

    Many bacteria among the Enterobacteria family are involved in infectious diseases and diarrhoea. Most of these bacteria become resistant to the most commonly used synthetic drugs in Cameroon. Natural substances seem to be an alternative to this problem. Thus the aim of this research was to investigate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the methanol and aqueous-methanol extracts of Sida rhombifolia Linn (Malvaceae) against seven pathogenic bacteria involved in diarrhoea. Acute toxicity of the most active extract was determined and major bioactive components were screened. The agar disc diffusion and the agar dilution method were used for the determination of inhibition diameters and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) respectively. The acute toxicity study was performed according WHO protocol. The aqueous-methanol extract (1v:4v) was the most active with diameters of inhibition zones ranging from 8.7 - 23.6 mm, however at 200 microg/dic this activity was relatively weak compared to gentamycin. The MICs of the aqueous-methanol extract (1v:4v) varied from 49.40 to 78.30 microg/ml. Salmonella dysenteriae was the most sensitive (49.40 microg/ml). For the acute toxicity study, no deaths of rats were recorded. However, significant increase of some biochemical parameters such as aspartate amino-transferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and creatinine (CRT) were found. The phytochemical analysis of the aqueous methanol extract indicated the presence of tannins, polyphenols, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and saponins The results showed that the aqueous-methanol extract of S. rhombifolia exhibited moderate antibacterial activity. Some toxic effects were found when rats received more than 8 g/kg bw of extract.

  15. Influence of Exposure and Toxicokinetics on Measures of Aquatic Toxicity for Organic Contaminants: A Case Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Peter F; Chapman, Peter M; Neff, Jerry; Page, David S

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and case study review of dynamic exposures of aquatic organisms to organic contaminants examines variables important for interpreting exposure and therefore toxicity. The timing and magnitude of the absorbed dose change when the dynamics of exposure change. Thus, the dose metric for interpreting toxic responses observed during such exposure conditions is generally limited to the specific experiment and cannot be extrapolated to either other experiments with different exposure dynamics or to field exposures where exposure dynamics usually are different. This is particularly true for mixture exposures, for which the concentration and composition and, therefore, the timing and magnitude of exposure to individual components of different potency and potentially different mechanisms of action can vary. Aquatic toxicology needs studies that develop temporal thresholds for absorbed toxicant doses to allow for better extrapolation between conditions of dynamic exposure. Improved experimental designs are required that include high-quality temporal measures of both the exposure and the absorbed dose to allow better interpretation of data. For the short term, initial water concentration can be considered a conservative measure of exposure, although the extent to which this is true cannot be estimated specifically unless the dynamics of exposure as well as the toxicokinetics of the chemicals in the exposure scenario for the organism of interest are known. A better, but still limited, metric for interpreting the exposure and, therefore, toxicity is the peak absorbed dose, although this neglects toxicodynamics, requires appropriate temporal measures of accumulated dose to determine the peak concentration, and requires temporal thresholds for critical body residue for each component of the mixture. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2013; 9: 196–210. © 2012 SETAC PMID:23229376

  16. Social anxiety, submissiveness, and shame in men and women: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jacob; Morrison, Amanda S; Heimberg, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    Research suggests a positive relationship between social anxiety and shame; however, few studies have examined this relationship or potential mechanisms. Common behaviours of persons with social anxiety disorder (SAD), such as submissive behaviours, may be more consistent with societal expectations of women than men and therefore more likely to be associated with shame in socially anxious men than women. We examined the hypothesis that submissive behaviours would mediate the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not in women, with SAD. Moderated mediation was examined in a cross-sectional dataset. Gender was modeled to moderate the paths from social anxiety to submissive behaviours and from submissive behaviours to shame. We also examined an alternative model of the relationships among these variables and the potential contributory role of depression. Men (n = 48) and women (n = 40) with SAD completed the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Submissive Behaviour Scale, Internalized Shame Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. Analyses supported the hypothesized model. The relationship between submissive behaviours and shame was greater in men than women with SAD; the relationship between social anxiety and submissive behaviours was not. Controlling for depression, moderation remained evident although diminished. Results for the comparison model did not support gender moderation. Submissive behaviours mediated the relationship between social anxiety and shame in men, but not women, with SAD. These findings provide preliminary evidence for a model of shame in SAD and may help to further elucidate specific features of SAD that differ between men and women. Although researchers have argued that the display of submissive behaviours might allow the socially anxious individual to limit or prevent attacks on the self, our results suggest that there are greater costs, with regard to feelings of shame, associated with such behaviours for men. In men with SAD

  17. Studies on the antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity of Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell.) Bur. (Bignoniaceae) extracts and their main constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Maria Lysete A; Lima, Maria Raquel F; Conserva, Lucia M; Andrade, Vânia S; Rocha, Eliana MM; Lemos, Rosangela PL

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs, the emergence of human pathogenic microorganisms resistant to major classes of antibiotics has been increased and has caused many clinical problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate for the first time the in vitro antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp lethality of extracts and isolated compounds from Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell.) Bur., a species used in Brazilian folk medicine for treatment of cancer and skin diseases. Methods Using the disc diffusion method, bioautography assay and brine shrimp toxicity test (Artemia salina Leach), we studied the antimicrobial activity and lethality of extracts and isolated compounds against three microorganisms strains, including Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria and yeasts (Candida albicans). Results In this study, the extracts inhibited S. aureus (8.0 ± 0.0 to 14.0 ± 0.0 mm) and C. albicans (15.3 ± 0.68 to 25.6 ± 0.4 mm) growth. In the brine shrimp test, only two of them showed toxic effects (LC50 29.55 to 398.05 μg/mL) and some extracts were non-toxic or showed weak lethality (LC50 705.02 to > 1000 μg/mL). From these extracts, four flavones [5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (2), 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (3), and 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (4)] were isolated through bioassay-guided fractionation and identified based on the 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. By bioautography assays, compounds 1 [S. aureus (16.0 ± 0.0 mm) and C. albicans (20.0 ± 0.0 mm)] and 3 [S. aureus (10.3 ± 0.6 mm) and C. albicans (19.7 ± 0.6 mm)] inhibited both microorganisms while 2 inhibited only S. aureus (11.7 ± 0.6 mm). Compound 4 did not restrain the growth of any tested microorganism. Conclusion Our results showed that extracts and isolated flavones from Z. tuberculosa may be particularly useful against two pathogenic

  18. Studies on the antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity of Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell. Bur. (Bignoniaceae extracts and their main constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Eliana MM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs, the emergence of human pathogenic microorganisms resistant to major classes of antibiotics has been increased and has caused many clinical problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate for the first time the in vitro antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp lethality of extracts and isolated compounds from Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell. Bur., a species used in Brazilian folk medicine for treatment of cancer and skin diseases. Methods Using the disc diffusion method, bioautography assay and brine shrimp toxicity test (Artemia salina Leach, we studied the antimicrobial activity and lethality of extracts and isolated compounds against three microorganisms strains, including Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and yeasts (Candida albicans. Results In this study, the extracts inhibited S. aureus (8.0 ± 0.0 to 14.0 ± 0.0 mm and C. albicans (15.3 ± 0.68 to 25.6 ± 0.4 mm growth. In the brine shrimp test, only two of them showed toxic effects (LC50 29.55 to 398.05 μg/mL and some extracts were non-toxic or showed weak lethality (LC50 705.02 to > 1000 μg/mL. From these extracts, four flavones [5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (1, 5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (2, 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (3, and 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7-trimethoxyflavone (4] were isolated through bioassay-guided fractionation and identified based on the 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. By bioautography assays, compounds 1 [S. aureus (16.0 ± 0.0 mm and C. albicans (20.0 ± 0.0 mm] and 3 [S. aureus (10.3 ± 0.6 mm and C. albicans (19.7 ± 0.6 mm] inhibited both microorganisms while 2 inhibited only S. aureus (11.7 ± 0.6 mm. Compound 4 did not restrain the growth of any tested microorganism. Conclusion Our results showed that extracts and isolated flavones from Z. tuberculosa may be particularly useful against two pathogenic

  19. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akamatsu Akinori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine dioxide (CD gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to prove that the CD gas exposed up to 0.1 ppm (volume ratio is judged as safe on the basis of a battery of toxicological examinations. Methods CD gas at 0.05 ppm or 0.1 ppm for 24 hours/day and 7 days/week was exposed to rats for 6 months under an unrestrained condition with free access to chow and water in a chamber so as to simulate the ordinary lifestyle in human. The control animals were exposed to air only. During the study period, the body weight as well as the food and water consumptions were recorded. After the 6-month exposure and the 2-week recovery period, animals were sacrificed and a battery of toxicological examinations, including biochemistry, hematology, necropsy, organ weights and histopathology, were performed. Results Well regulated levels of CD gas were exposed throughout the chamber over the entire study period. No CD gas-related toxicity sign was observed during the whole study period. No significant difference was observed in body weight gain, food and water consumptions, and relative organ weight. In biochemistry and hematology examinations, changes did not appear to be related to CD gas toxicity. In necropsy and histopathology, no CD gas-related toxicity was observed even in expected target respiratory organs. Conclusions CD gas up to 0.1 ppm, exceeding the level effective against microbes, exposed to whole body in rats continuously for six months was not toxic, under a condition simulating the conventional lifestyle in human.

  20. A Comparative Study of Hollow Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles and Hollow Gold Nanospheres on Degradability and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liangran; Panderi, Irene; Yan, Daisy D.; Szulak, Kevin; Li, Yajuan; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B.; Seeram, Navindra; Ahmed, Aftab; Yan, Bingfang; Pantazatos, Dionysios; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Gold and copper nanoparticles have been widely investigated for photothermal therapy of cancer. However, degradability and toxicity of these nanoparticles remain concerns. Here, we compare hollow CuS nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) in similar particle sizes and morphology following intravenous administration to mice. The injected pegylated HCuSNPs (PEG-HCuSNPs) are eliminated through both hepatobiliary (67 percentage of injected dose, %ID) and renal (23 %ID) excretion within one month post injection. By contrast, 3.98 %ID of Au is excreted from liver and kidney within one month after i.v. injection of pegylated HAuNS (PEG-HAuNS). Comparatively, PEG-HAuNS are almost non-metabolizable, while PEG-HCuSNPs are considered biodegradable nanoparticles. PEG-HCuSNPs do not show significant toxicity by histological or blood chemistry analysis. Principal component analysis and 2-D peak distribution plots of data from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) of liver tissues demonstrated a reversible change in the proteomic profile in mice receiving PEG-HCuSNPs. This is attributed to slow dissociation of Cu ion from CuS nanoparticles along with effective Cu elimination for maintaining homeostasis. Nonetheless, an irreversible change in the proteomic profile is observed in the liver from mice receiving PEG-HAuNS by analysis of MALDI-TOF IMS data, probably due to the non-metabolizability of Au. This finding correlates with the elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase at 3 months after PEG-HAuNS injection, indicating potential long-term toxicity. The comparative results between the two types of nanoparticles will advance the development of HCuSNPs as a new class of biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy. PMID:24053214

  1. Toxic effect and biochemical study of chlorfluazuron, oxymatrine, and spinosad on honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabea, Entsar I; Nasr, Hoda M; Badawy, Mohamed E I

    2010-04-01

    Under laboratory conditions, the comparative effects of two insect growth regulators, chlorfluazuron and oxymatrine, and spinosad as a biopesticide were examined on honey bee workers (Apis mellifera L.). Separate groups of bees were left for 24 h to feed on 50% sucrose solution containing different concentrations of the tested insecticides, and the lethal concentration that caused 50% mortality (LC(50)) was estimated. The inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activities as biochemical indicators were determined in vivo after 24 h in head, thorax, and abdomen of surviving bees obtained after treatments with a view to explore the possible mode of action of these compounds. Results indicated that exposure to spinosad showed toxicity to honey bees with LC(50) value of 7.34 mg L(-1), followed by oxymatrine (LC(50) = 10.68 mg L(-1)), while chlorfluazuron was the least acutely toxic of the tested compounds (LC(50) = 2,526 mg L(-1)). Oxymatrine and spinosad at the same tested concentrations (2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1)) significantly inhibited AChE activity in different organs of honey bee workers, and high inhibition percentage was obtained with the enzyme isolated from the thorax. However, chlorfluazuron at 400, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 mg L(-1) caused high inhibition of AChE activity isolated from the head (39.65% and 44.22% at 2,000 and 4,000 mg L(-1), respectively). In addition, the toxic effects of the tested compounds on activity of ATPase indicated that spinosad caused the highest inhibitory effect in different organs compared with oxymatrine at the same concentrations, and high inhibition was found with ATPase isolated from the head. The results also indicated that oxymatrine was the least active compound for inhibition of AChE and ATPase.

  2. Antibacterial activity, computational analysis and host toxicity study of thymol-sulfonamide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Shasank S; Paidesetty, Sudhir K; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2017-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) are notorious pathogenic multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria in both hospital and community sectors, and today the first antibacterial drug sulfamethoxazole is ineffective. The monoterpene phenol, thymol was conjugated with seven sulfa drug derivatives individually, adopting the dye-azo synthesis protocol, and conjugates were characterized using spectral analysis techniques such as, UV, FTIR, MS, HPLC, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and SEM. Conjugates were assessed for antibacterial activity in vitro and in silico; the zone of inhibition, MIC and MBC values of each conjugate were determined against isolated MRSA and VRE strains from clinical samples. As 3-dimentional structures of dihydropteroate synthases (DHPSs) of targeted bacteria are not available in protein database, homology models of DHPS enzymes of both bacteria were generated and validated by Ramachandran plots. Seven conjugates were used as ligands in molecular docking against MRSA-DHPS and VRE-DHPS. Additionally bioinformatics tools, PASS prediction, Lipinski rules of five, computational LD50 value, toxicity class, HOMO, LUMO and EPS plots were carried out to assess standard drug-likeliness properties of conjugates. Zone size inhibition of the conjugate, 4b (thymol+sulfadiazine) against MRSA and VRE strains on agar plates were 20 and 40μg/mL as the lowest MIC and MBC values, respectively; while the reference antibiotic ampicillin had the lowest MIC and MBC values at 80 to 180μg/mL. In vitro host-toxicity testing was carried out with cultured human-lymphocytes from umbilical cord blood, and 4b was broadly non-toxic to human cells at 15,000mg/L. Thus, 4b could be promoted a newer antibacterial, against gruesome MDR bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental impact of toxic elements in red mud studied by fractionation and speciation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Ščančar, Janez

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is mostly produced from bauxite ore, which contains up to 70% of Al(2)O(3) (alumina). Before alumina is refined to aluminum metal, it is purified by hot alkaline extraction. As a waste by-product red mud is formed. Due to its high alkalinity and large quantities, it represents a severe disposal problem. In Kidričevo (Slovenia), red mud was washed with water before disposal, and after drying, covered with soil. In Ajka (Hungary), the red mud slurry was collected directly in a containment structure, which burst caused a major accident in October 2010. In the present work the environmental impact of toxic elements in red mud from Kidričevo and Ajka were evaluated by applying a sequential extraction procedure and speciation analysis. The predominant red mud fraction was the insoluble residue; nevertheless, environmental concern was focused on the highly mobile water-soluble fraction of Al and Cr. Al in the water-soluble Ajka mud fraction was present exclusively in form of toxic [Al(OH)(4)](-), while Cr existed in its toxic hexavalent form. Comparative assessment to red mud from Kidričevo (Slovenia) with a lower alkalinity (pH 9) with that from Ajka demonstrated significantly lower Al solubility and the presence of only trace amounts of Cr(VI), confirming that disposal of neutralized mud is environmentally much more acceptable and carries a smaller risk of ecological accidents. Since during the Ajka accident huge amounts of biologically available Al and moderate Cr(VI) concentrations were released into the terrestrial and aquatic environments, monitoring of Al and Cr(VI) set free during remedial actions at the contaminated site is essential. Particular care should be taken to minimize the risk of release of soluble Al species and Cr(VI) into water supplies and surface waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. South African Music Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles should be typed in Microsoft Word using 1.5 spacing for the text and single spacing for indented quotes (5 lines or longer), left-aligned, font 12 point Times New Roman. Short quotes, heightened words, and quotes within quotes should all use single quotation marks. Authors should consult SAMUS 28 and SAMUS ...

  5. Journal for Islamic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish, trans. A. Sheridan (New York: Pantheon, 1977). Chapter in an edited book. Shehada, Nahda Younis. “Justice without Drama: Observations from Gaza City Sharia Court,” in Inger Marie Okkenhaug and Ingvild Flaskerud (eds.), Gender, Religion and Change in the Middle East, 13-28 ...

  6. Experimental study on the toxicity of povidone-iodine solution in brain tissues of rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shu-Hua; Wang, Yu; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Kun; Hou, Yu-Chen; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether Povidone-iodine was toxic to brain tissues by rinsing the cerebral cortex of New Zealand rabbits with Povidone-iodine Solution of different concentrations. Methods: 12 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group A, B, C and D, 3 rabbits each group). In each group, the left cerebral cortex of rabbits was rinsed with physiological saline after the craniotomy; in Group A and B, the right cerebral cortex of rabbits was also locally rinsed with Po...

  7. Modulating and Measuring Intracellular H2O2 Using Genetically Encoded Tools to Study Its Toxicity to Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K; Stein, Kassi T; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-12-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 play paradoxical roles in mammalian physiology. It is hypothesized that low, baseline levels of H2O2 are necessary for growth and differentiation, while increased intracellular H2O2 concentrations are associated with pathological phenotypes and genetic instability, eventually reaching a toxic threshold that causes cell death. However, the quantities of intracellular H2O2 that lead to these different responses remain an unanswered question in the field. To address this question, we used genetically encoded constructs that both generate and quantify H2O2 in a dose-response study of H2O2-mediated toxicity. We found that, rather than a simple concentration-response relationship, a combination of intracellular concentration and the cumulative metric of H2O2 concentration multiplied by time (i.e., the area under the curve) determined the occurrence and level of cell death. Establishing the quantitative relationship between H2O2 and cell toxicity promotes a deeper understanding of the intracellular effects of H2O2 specifically as an individual reactive oxygen species, and it contributes to an understanding of its role in various redox-related diseases.

  8. Variations of sediment toxicity in a tidal estuary: a case study of the South Passage, Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinjuan; Shi, Huahong; Dai, Zhijun; Mei, Xuefei

    2015-06-01

    Sediments in estuaries, especially those containing a large reservoir of contaminants released from urban and industrial activities, have had great impacts on benthic fauna and associated species. A better understanding of the toxicity of contaminants in estuarine sediments is of great significance to ecological assessments. Here, based on the collected sediments from neap to spring tides in the South Passage, Changjiang Estuary, the toxicity of the sediments was first studied using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The results showed that the extracts of estuarine sediments induced multiple malformations in the embryos and that the phenotypes of malformation had two distinct patterns of variations corresponding to the tidal cycles. The phenotypes in the first pattern were dominated by hypopigmentation and edema of the heart, and the pattern was mainly controlled by fine-grained fractions. The phenotypes in the second pattern were dominated by edema of the heart and enlarged proctodeum, and it was mostly controlled by coarse-grain fractions. The sediment toxicity was higher during the spring and flood tides, which may be influenced by the grain size and sediment resuspension. Furthermore, obvious periodicities existed in the changes of the percentages of hatching (14-16 h and 6 h), enlarged proctodeum (15-18 h), and bent tail (5-7 h) due to the influence of tidal cycles. Moreover, our results also suggested that FETAX is an appropriate cost-effective biological monitoring tool to assess estuarine ecological health in contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CHEMOTHERAPY INTENSITY AND TOXICITY AMONG BLACK AND WHITE WOMEN WITH ADVANCED AND RECURRENT ENDOMETRIAL CANCER: A GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, John H.; Tian, Chunqiao; Rose, G. Scott; Brown, Carol L.; Birrer, Michael; Risinger, John I; Thigpen, J. Tate; Fleming, Gini F.; Gallion, Holly H.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to confirm whether Black and White women with endometrial cancer are equally tolerant of chemotherapy and identify factors that impact survival. METHODS: A retrospective review of 169 Black women and 982 White women with FIGO Stage III/IV or recurrent endometrial carcinoma was performed. All patients received doxorubicin combined with cisplatin. Chemotherapy parameters that were reviewed included relative dose (RD), relative time (RT), and relative dose intensity (RDI). Treatment cycles ≥ 7 were defined as treatment completion. RESULTS: Although Black patients were more likely to experience grade 3-4 anemia (20% vs. 14%) and genitourinary (5% vs. 1%) toxicity, and less likely to experience severe GI toxicity (10% vs. 17%), the overall incidence of grade 3-4 treatment-related chemotoxicity was the same between the two groups (82% vs. 82%). There were no differences in the number of cycles received, RD (0.57 vs. 0.58), RT (0.77 vs. 0.78), or RDI (0.76 vs. 0.76) for Black and White patients. CONCLUSION: Black patients with advanced stage or recurrent endometrial cancer, treated on four GOG protocols, had similar dose intensity and severe chemotherapy-related toxicity compared to White patients, suggesting that previously described racial disparities in survival among patients in GOG trials may have an novel etiology. PMID:19924790

  10. Elimination study of the chemotherapy drug tamoxifen by different advanced oxidation processes: Transformation products and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Anfruns, Alba; Aymerich, Ignasi; Corominas, Lluis; Barceló, Damià; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Tamoxifen is a chemotherapy drug considered as recalcitrant contaminant (with low biodegradability in conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment), bioaccumulative, ubiquitous, and potentially hazardous for the environment. This work studies the removal of Tamoxifen from water by advanced oxidation processes, paying special attention to the formation of transformation products (TPs) and to the evolution of toxicity (using the Microtox(®) bioassay) during the oxidation processes. Five types of treatments were evaluated combining different technologies based on ozone, hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation: i) O3, ii) O3/UV, iii) O3/H2O2 (peroxone), iv) UV and v) UV/H2O2. Complete removal of tamoxifen was achieved after 30 min for all the treatments carried out with O3 while a residual concentration (about 10% of initial one) was observed in the treatments based on UV and UV/H2O2 after 4 h of reaction. Eight TPs were tentatively identified and one (non-ionizable molecule) was suspected to be present by using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. An increase of toxicity was observed during all the oxidation processes. In the case of ozone-based treatments that increase was attributed to the presence of some of the TPs identified, whereas in the case of UV-based treatments there was no clear correlation between toxicity and the identified TPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sorafenib in metastatic uveal melanoma: efficacy, toxicity and health-related quality of life in a multicentre phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriaux, F; Servois, V; Parienti, J J; Lesimple, T; Thyss, A; Dutriaux, C; Neidhart-Berard, E M; Penel, N; Delcambre, C; Peyro Saint Paul, L; Pham, A D; Heutte, N; Piperno-Neumann, S; Joly, F

    2016-06-28

    The aim of the study was to analyse efficacy, safety, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for sorafenib treatment in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. A multicentre, single-arm phase II trial was conducted. The primary objective was to determine the non-progression rate (RECIST) at 24 weeks for patients receiving sorafenib at a dose of 800 mg per day. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity, and HRQoL. Thirty-two patients were included. Ten patients showed non-progression at 24 weeks (31.2%) without objective tumour responses. The estimated 24-week PFS was 31.2% (95% CI: 14.8%-47.6%) and the estimated 24-week OS was 62.5% (95% CI: 45.4%-79.6%). Ten patients (34.3%) had at least one grade 3 or 4 adverse reaction and 12 patients (41.4%) required dose modifications due to toxicity. At 24 weeks, no patient had an improvement in global HRQoL and 87.5% experienced a permanent increase in physical fatigue. Sorafenib demonstrated non-progression at 24 weeks in 31.2% of patients. However, 41.4% of patients required dose modifications due to toxicity and no improvement in HRQoL was demonstrated.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and toxicity studies of pyridinecarboxaldehydes and L-tryptophan derived Schiff bases and corresponding copper (II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakyan, Margarita; Babayan, Nelly; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Sarkisyan, Natalya; Tonoyan, Vahan; Tadevosyan, Davit; Matosyan, Vladimir; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Arakelyan, Arsen

    2016-01-01

    Schiff bases and their metal-complexes are versatile compounds exhibiting a broad range of biological activities and thus actively used in the drug development process. The aim of the present study was the synthesis and characterization of new Schiff bases and their copper (II) complexes, derived from L-tryptophan and isomeric (2-; 3-; 4-) pyridinecarboxaldehydes, as well as the assessment of their toxicity in vitro. The optimal conditions of the Schiff base synthesis resulting in up to 75-85% yield of target products were identified. The structure-activity relationship analysis indicated that the location of the carboxaldehyde group at 2-, 3- or 4-position with regard to nitrogen of the pyridine ring in aldehyde component of the L-tryptophan derivative Schiff bases and corresponding copper complexes essentially change the biological activity of the compounds. The carboxaldehyde group at 2- and 4-positions leads to the higher cytotoxic activity, than that of at 3-position, and the presence of the copper in the complexes increases the cytotoxicity. Based on toxicity classification data, the compounds with non-toxic profile were identified, which can be used as new entities in the drug development process using Schiff base scaffold. PMID:28344771

  13. (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach to study the toxic effects of herbicide butachlor on goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Dong; Wang, Jun-Song; Li, Ming-Hui; Liu, Yan; Chen, Ting; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2015-02-01

    Butachlor, one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, has been reported with high ecotoxicity to aquatic plants and animals. In this study, a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach combined with histopathological examination and biochemical assays was applied to comprehensively investigate the toxic effects of butachlor on four important organs (gill, brain, liver and kidney) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) for the first time. After 10 days' butachlor exposure at two dosages of 3.2 and 0.64 μmol/L, fish tissues (gill, brain, liver and kidney) and serum were collected. Histopathological inspection revealed severe impairment of gill filaments and obvious cellular edema in livers and kidneys. The increase of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in gill and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level in four tissues reflected the disturbance of antioxidative system in the intoxicated goldfish. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and creatinine (CRE) level were increased in butachlor exposure groups, suggesting liver and kidney injuries induced by butachlor. Orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) of NMR profiles disclosed metabolic changes that were related to the toxic effects of butachlor including oxidative stress, disorder of energy metabolism and amino acids metabolism, and disturbance of neurotransmitter balance in butachlor exposed goldfish. This integrated metabolomics approach provided a molecular basis underlying the toxicity of butachlor and demonstrated that metabolomics was a powerful and highly effective approach to elucidate the toxicity and underlying mechanisms of herbicides and pesticides, applicable for their risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction of clinical toxicity in localized cervical carcinoma by radio-induced apoptosis study in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Pedro C

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is treated mainly by surgery and radiotherapy. Toxicity due to radiation is a limiting factor for treatment success. Determination of lymphocyte radiosensitivity by radio-induced apoptosis arises as a possible method for predictive test development. The aim of this study was to analyze radio-induced apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods Ninety four consecutive patients suffering from cervical carcinoma, diagnosed and treated in our institution, and four healthy controls were included in the study. Toxicity was evaluated using the Lent-Soma scale. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated and irradiated at 0, 1, 2 and 8 Gy during 24, 48 and 72 hours. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide to determine early and late apoptosis. Lymphocytes were marked with CD45 APC-conjugated monoclonal antibody. Results Radiation-induced apoptosis (RIA increased with radiation dose and time of incubation. Data strongly fitted to a semi logarithmic model as follows: RIA = βln(Gy + α. This mathematical model was defined by two constants: α, is the origin of the curve in the Y axis and determines the percentage of spontaneous cell death and β, is the slope of the curve and determines the percentage of cell death induced at a determined radiation dose (β = ΔRIA/Δln(Gy. Higher β values (increased rate of RIA at given radiation doses were observed in patients with low sexual toxicity (Exp(B = 0.83, C.I. 95% (0.73-0.95, p = 0.007; Exp(B = 0.88, C.I. 95% (0.82-0.94, p = 0.001; Exp(B = 0.93, C.I. 95% (0.88-0.99, p = 0.026 for 24, 48 and 72 hours respectively. This relation was also found with rectal (Exp(B = 0.89, C.I. 95% (0.81-0.98, p = 0.026; Exp(B = 0.95, C.I. 95% (0.91-0.98, p = 0.013 for 48 and 72 hours respectively and urinary (Exp(B = 0.83, C.I. 95% (0.71-0.97, p = 0.021 for 24 hours toxicity. Conclusion Radiation induced apoptosis at different time points and radiation

  15. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An empirical study of the toxic capsule crisis in China: risk perceptions and behavioral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianjun; Keller, L Robin; Wu, Ping; Xu, Yifan

    2014-04-01

    The outbreak of the toxic capsule crisis during April 2012 aroused widespread public concern about the risk of chromium-contaminated capsules and drug safety in China. In this article, we develop a conceptual model to investigate risk perceptions of the pharmaceutical drug capsules and behavioral responses to the toxic capsule crisis and the relationship between associated factors and these two variables. An online survey was conducted to test the model, including questions on the measures of perceived efficacy of the countermeasures, trust in the State FDA (Food and Drug Administration), trust in the pharmaceutical companies, trust in the pharmaceutical capsule producers, risk perception, concern, need for information, information seeking, and risk avoidance. In general, participants reported higher levels of risk perception, concern, and risk avoidance, and lower levels of trust in the three different stakeholders. The results from the structural equation modeling procedure suggest that perceived efficacy of the countermeasures is a predictor of each of the three trust variables; however, only trust in the State FDA has a dampening impact on risk perception. Both risk perception and information seeking are significant determinants of risk avoidance. Risk perception is also positively related to concern. Information seeking is positively related to both concern and need for information. The theoretical and policy implications are also discussed. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Studies on polymer-coated zinc oxide nanoparticles: UV-blocking efficacy and in vivo toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girigoswami, Koyeli; Viswanathan, Meenakshi; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2015-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is explicitly used in sunscreens and cosmetic products; however, its effect in vivo is toxic in some cases. The UV blocking efficacy of ZnO nanoparticles is lost due to photocatalysis. To isolate a lower toxic species of sunblockers, ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized and coated with chitosan - a natural polymer (ZnO-CTS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) - a synthetic polymer (ZnO-PEG). Coating with CTS and PEG circumvented the photocatalytic activity, increased the stability and improved the UV absorption efficacy. The effect of ZnO, ZnO-CTS and ZnO-PEG nanoparticles in vivo on zebrafish embryo revealed lower deposition of ZnO-CTS and ZnO-PEG nanoparticles atop the eggs compared to ZnO. The survival of zebrafish embryos was always found to be higher in case of ZnO-CTS with respect to ZnO-treated ones. PEG coating exhibited better UV attenuation, but, in vivo it induced delayed hatching. Thus, one of the reasons for better survival could be attributed to lower aggregation of ZnO-CTS nanoparticles atop eggs thereby facilitating the breathing of embryos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An automated overlying water-renewal system for sediment toxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, G.M.; Wheat, J.V.; Carriger, J.F.; Lee, T.A

    2003-04-01

    A new system is described for sediment toxicity testing. - An automated water-renewal toxicity test system is described for exposing benthic invertebrates to whole sediments. The system will intermittently deliver laboratory or on-site water for overlying water replacement in sediment exposures. A range of cycle rates can be used to produce different volume additions of overlying water per day to exposure chambers. The system can be used with six different treatments and eight replicates per treatment producing 48 exposure chambers. Three formulated sediments with variable organic carbon (1.5%, 7.5%) and sand (14%, 63%) content were prepared to test the system exposing amphipods, Hyalella azteca and midges, Chironomus tentans in 10 day whole sediment tests. Intermittent water flow was used with a 90 min cycle time to create two volume additions of laboratory water per 24 h in exposure chambers (180 ml sediment, 320 ml water). Overlying water quality conditions, and survival and growth of both species were consistent and within acceptable limits for the testing requirements of the U.S. EPA guidelines for sediments with freshwater invertebrates.

  19. Crystal Structure and Density Functional Theory Studies of Toxic Quinone Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Ambati, Jyothirmai; Parkin, Sean; Rankin, Stephen E.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Lower chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are readily metabolized via hydroxylated metabolites to reactive PCB quinones. Although these PCB metabolites elicit biochemical changes by mechanisms involving cellular target molecules, such as the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and toxicity by interacting with enzymes like topoisomerases, only few PCB quinones have been synthesized and their conformational properties investigated. Similar to the parent compounds, knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of PCB quinones may therefore be important to assess their fate and risk. To address this gap in our knowledge, the gas phase molecular structure of a series of PCB quinones was predicted using HF/3-21G, B3LYP/6-31G** and UB3LYP/6-311G** calculations and compared to the respective solid state structure. All three methods overestimated the Cl-C bond length, but otherwise provided a reasonable approximation of the solid state bond angles and bond lengths. Overall, the UB3LYP/6-311G** level of theory yielded the best approximation of the molecular structure of PCB quinones in the solid state. Chlorine addition at the ortho position of both rings was found to increase the dihedral angle of the resulting quinone compound, which may have important implications for their interaction with cellular targets and, thus, their toxicity. PMID:21824639

  20. Insulin versus Lipid Emulsion in a Rabbit Model of Severe Propranolol Toxicity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective. Beta-blocker overdose may result in intractable cardiovascular collapse despite conventional antidotal treatments. High dose insulin/glucose (ING, and more recently intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE, have been proposed as potentially beneficial therapies in beta blocker intoxication. We compare efficacy of the novel antidotes ING, with ILE, in a rabbit model of combined enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity. Methods. Sedated, mechanically ventilated and invasively monitored New Zealand White rabbits underwent mini-laparotomy and enterostomy formation with 40 mg/kg propranolol instilled into the proximal small bowel. At 30 minutes propranolol infusion was commenced at 4 mg/kg/hr and continued to a target mean arterial pressure (MAP of 50% baseline MAP. Animals were resuscitated with insulin at 3 U/kg plus 0.5 g/kg glucose (ING group, or 10 mL/kg 20% Intralipid (ILE group. Results. Rate pressure product (RPP; RPP = heart rate × mean arterial pressure was greatest in the ING group at 60 minutes (P<.05. A trend toward greater heart rate was observed in the ING group (P=.06. No difference was observed in survival between groups (4/5 ING versus 2/5 ILE; P=.524. Conclusions. High dose insulin resulted in greater rate pressure product compared with lipid emulsion in this rabbit model of severe enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity.