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Sample records for submicron particles collected

  1. On the dry deposition of submicron particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08

    The air-surface exchange of particles can have a strong role in determining the amount, size, and chemical composition of particles in the troposphere. Here the authors consider only dry processes (deposition processes not directly aided by precipitation) and mostly address particles less than about 2 {micro}m in diameter (often referred to as submicron particles because most of such particles are less than 1 {micro}m in diameter). The processes that control the dry exchange of particulate material between the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth are numerous, highly varied, and sometimes poorly understood. As a result, determining which of the surface processes to parameterize or simulate in modeling the tropospheric mass budget of a particulate substance can be a significant challenge. Dry deposition, for example, can be controlled by a combination of Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, and gravitational settling, depending on the size of the particles, the roughness of the surface on both micrometeorological and microscopic scales, the geometrical structure of vegetative canopies, and other surface characteristics such as wetness. Particles can be added to the lower atmosphere by resuspension from land surfaces and sea spray. The roles of rapid gas-to-particle conversion and growth or shrinkage of particles as a result of water condensation or evaporation in the lower few meters of the atmosphere can also have a significant impact on particle concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Here, a few micrometeorological observations and inferences on particle air-surface exchange are briefly addressed.

  2. Development of high efficient ESP for submicron particle collection. Sabumikuron ryushi no kokoritsu shujin hoshiki no kaihatsu. ; Seiden gyoshu sochi naizo denki shujin hoshiki no gyoshusayo to shujin koritsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Suda, T.

    1989-11-01

    The result of testing the operation of an electrostatic agglomeration appratus (ESA) is reported, which has been developed at Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI). Details of the apparatus is given in the authors {prime} previous papaer (1988). At first a description is given of an apparatus which produces the aerosol for laboratory use comprising submicron-sized carbon particles and micron-sized flyash particles. This aerosol is similar in quality to that produced by a combustion furnance at CRIEPI. An apparatus provided with mesh electrodes for charging aerosol particles is also developed. Thus preparing aerosol samples, the effect of agglomeration produced by the ESA On the samples is examined to demonstrate that particle sizes in diameter are increased by a factor of four on average and the percentage of submicron-sized particles (less than 1 {mu} m in diameter) is reduced by 20% in weight. Combined with this type of ESA, the efficiency of ESP (electrostatic precipitator) in collecting submicron-sized particles is theoretically calculated to increase by about 1 - 3% when it is used at a thermal power plant of 520MW. 4refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. UV Light–Induced Aggregation of Titania Submicron Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, aggregation of TiO2 (rutile and anatase submicron particles in deionized (DI water under ultra-violet (UV light irradiation was investigated. While no aggregation was observed in the dark, rutile and anatase submicron particles started aggregating upon application of UV light and ceased aggregation in about 2 and 8.4 h, respectively. It has been demonstrated that UV light directly mitigated the particle mobility of TiO2, resulting in a neutralization effect of the Zeta potential. It was also observed that rutile particles aggregated much faster than anatase particles under UV radiation, indicating that the Zeta potential of as-prepared rutile is less than that of anatase in deionized (DI water. In addition, the interaction energy of rutile and anatase particles was simulated using the Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO model. The results showed a significant reduction of barrier energy from 118.2 kBT to 33.6 kBT for rutile and from 333.5 kBT to 46.1 kBT for anatase, respectively, which further validated the remarkable influence of UV irradiation on the aggregation kinetics of rutile and anatase submicron particles. This work presents a further understanding of the aggregation mechanism of light-controlled submicron particles and has a promising potential application in environmental remediation.

  4. Submicron particle chemistry: Vapor condensation analogous to liquid solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Neil T.; Eagar, Thomas W.

    2003-06-01

    The chemical composition of submicron particles condensed from vapor can vary with particle size. This chemical variation with size affects industrial health estimates and technological innovation. A model based on similar behavior during the solidification of liquids is proposed to explain this behavior.

  5. Submicron particles of Co, Ni and Co–Ni alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 24; Issue 5 ... Magnetic Materials Volume 24 Issue 5 October 2001 pp 515-521 ... Magnetic sub-micron sized particles (with diameters in the range 100–600 nm) of Co, Ni and Co–Ni alloys, protected with polyvinylpyrrolidone have been prepared in gram quantities ...

  6. Role of ammonium ion and transition metals in the formation of secondary organic aerosol and metallo-organic complex within fog processed ambient deliquescent submicron particles collected in central part of Indo-Gangetic Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-08-01

    In this study we observed the role of ammonium ion (NH4+) and transition metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, and Cu) present in ambient submicron particles in stabilizing and enhancing the yield of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). A good correlation of WSOC with transition metals and NH4+ was found (R2 = 0.87 and 0.71), respectively within foggy episode collected ambient PM1 (particles having aerodynamic diameter ≤1.0 μm) suggesting plausibleness of alternate oxidation (primarily various carbonyls into their respective organic acids, esters and other derivatives.) and aging mechanisms. Molar concentration of ammonium ion was observed to be exceeded over and above to require in neutralizing the sulphate and nitrate which further hints its role in the neutralization, stabilization and enhancement of subset of WSOC such as water soluble organic acids. Transition metals were further apportioned using enrichment factor analysis. The source of Fe, Mn, and Cr was found to be crustal and Cu was tagged to anthropogenic origin. This study also described the plausible role of significant predictors (Fe and Cu) in the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through effect of Fenton chemistry. Mass-to-charge ratio of identified oxalic acid from our published recent field study (carried out from same sampling location) was used for understanding the possible metallo-organic complex with Fe supports the substantial role of Fe in SOA formation in the deliquescent submicron particles facilitated by aqueous-phase chemistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ionizer assisted air filtration for collection of submicron and ultrafine particles-evaluation of long-term performance and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingbing; Ekberg, Lars

    2015-06-02

    Previous research has demonstrated that unipolar ionization can enhance the filter performance to collect airborne particles, aeroallergens, and airborne microorganisms, without affecting the filter pressure drop. However, there is a lack of research on the long-term system performance as well as the influence of environmental and operational parameters. In this paper, both field and laboratory tests were carried out to evaluate the long-term particle collection efficiency of a synthetic filter of class M6 with and without ionization. The effect of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity, and particle concentration were further investigated in laboratory tests. Results showed that ionization enhanced the filtration efficiency by 40%-units during most of the operation time. When the ionization system was managed by periodically switching the ionizer polarity, the filtration efficiency against PM0.3-0.5 was maintained above 50% during half a year. Furthermore, the pressure drop of the ionizer-assisted M6 filter was 25-30% lower than that of a filter of class F7. The evaluation of various influencing factors demonstrated that (1) air moisture reduced the increase of filtration efficiency; (2) higher upstream particle concentration and air velocity decreased the filtration efficiency; and (3) the air temperature had very limited effect on the filtration efficiency.

  8. Submicron particle monitoring of paving and related road construction operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alice; Zuckerman, Norman; Baum, Lisa; Milek, Debra

    2012-01-01

    This study identified activities and sources that contribute to ultrafine and other submicron particle exposure that could trigger respiratory symptoms in highway repair workers. Submicron particle monitoring was conducted for paving, milling, and pothole repair operations in a major metropolitan area where several highway repair workers were identified as symptomatic for respiratory illness following exposures at the 2001 World Trade Center disaster site. Exposure assessments were conducted for eight trades involved in road construction using a TSI P-Trak portable condensation particle counter. Direct readings near the workers' breathing zones and observations of activities and potential sources were logged on 7 days on 27 workers using four different models of pavers and two types of millers. Average worker exposure levels ranged from 2 to 3 times background during paving and from 1 to 4 times background during milling. During asphalt paving, average personal exposures to submicron particulates were 25,000-60,000, 28,000-70,000, and 23,000-37,000 particles/ cm(3) for paver operators, screed operators, and rakers, respectively. Average personal exposures during milling were 19,000-111,000, 28,000-81,000, and 19,000 particles/cm(3) for the large miller operators, miller screed operators, and raker, respectively. Personal peak exposures were measured up to 467,000 and 455,000 particles/cm(3) in paving and milling, respectively. Several sources of submicron particles were identified. These included the diesel and electric fired screed heaters; engine exhaust from diesel powered construction vehicles passing by or idling; raking, dumping, and paving of asphalt; exhaust from the hotbox heater; pavement dust or fumes from milling operations, especially when the large miller started and stopped; and secondhand cigarette smoke. To reduce the potential for health effects in workers, over 40 recommendations were made to control exposures, including improved maintenance of

  9. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  10. Short range investigation of sub-micron zirconia particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caracoche, M C; Martinez, J A [Departamento de Fisica, IFLP, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, CICPBA, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Rivas, P C [IFLP-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Bondioli, F; Cannillo, V [Dipartimento di Ingegniria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ferrari, A M, E-mail: cristina@fisica.unlp.edu.a [Dipartimento di Scienza a Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2009-05-01

    The Perturbed Angular Correlations technique was used to determine the configurations around Zirconium ions and their thermal behavior in non-aggregated sub-micron zirconia spherical particles. Three residues containing- Zr surroundings were determined for the non-crystalline starting particles, which were identified under the assumption of a certain chemical reactions sequence during synthesis. While the one made up mainly by hydroxyl groups was common to both samples, the two involving mainly organic residues were particle size dependent. Upon crystallization, both samples stabilized in the t'- and t- tetragonal forms and the Xc-cubic form but their amounts and temperatures of appearance were different. On heating, the structure of the smaller particles became gradually monoclinic achieving total degradation upon the subsequent cooling to RT.

  11. Discovering sub-micron ice particles across Dione' surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Schenk, Pual; Tosi, Federico; Clark, Roger; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Combe, Jean-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Water ice is the most abundant component of Saturn’s mid-sized moons. However, these moons show an albedo asymmetry - their leading sides are bright while their trailing side exhibits dark terrains. Such differences arise from two surface alteration processes: (i) the bombardment of charged particles from the interplanetary medium and driven by Saturn’s magnetosphere on the trailing side, and (ii) the impact of E-ring water ice particles on the satellites’ leading side. As a result, the trailing hemisphere appears to be darker than the leading side. This effect is particularly evident on Dione's surface. A consequence of these surface alteration processes is the formation or the implantation of sub-micron sized ice particles.The presence of such particles influences and modifies the surfaces' spectrum because of Rayleigh scattering by the particles. In the near infrared range of the spectrum, the main sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators are: (i) asymmetry and (ii) long ward minimum shift of the absorption band at 2.02 μm (iii) a decrease in the ratio between the band depths at 1.50 and 2.02 μm (iv) a decrease in the height of the spectral peak at 2.6 μm (v) the suppression of the Fresnel reflection peak at 3.1 μm and (vi) the decrease of the reflection peak at 5 μm relative to those at 3.6 μm.We present results from our ongoing work mapping the variation of sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators across Dione' surface using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). To characterize the global variations of spectral indicators across Dione' surface, we divided it into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.We will investigate if there exist a correspondence with water ice abundance variations by producing water ice' absorption band depths at 1.25, 1.52 and 2.02 μm, and with surface morphology by comparing the results with ISS color maps in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared

  12. Magnetic trapping of superconducting submicron particles produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Suzuki, Junpei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Tokawa, Yurina; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Ashida, Masaaki; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2017-02-01

    We produced spherical superconducting submicron particles by laser ablation of their base metal tips in superfluid helium, and trapped them using a quadrupole magnetic field owing to the diamagnetism caused by the Meissner effect. We also measured their critical temperatures of superconductivity, by observing the threshold temperatures for the confinement of superconducting submicron particles in the trap.

  13. Penetration of sub-micron particles into dentinal tubules using ultrasonic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, N; Sammons, R L; Pikramenou, Z; Palin, W M; Dehghani, H; Walmsley, A D

    2017-01-01

    Functionalised silica sub-micron particles are being investigated as a method of delivering antimicrobials and remineralisation agents into dentinal tubules. However, their methods of application are not optimised, resulting in shallow penetration and aggregation. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of cavitation occurring around ultrasonic scalers for enhancing particle penetration into dentinal tubules. Dentine slices were prepared from premolar teeth. Silica sub-micron particles were prepared in water or acetone. Cavitation from an ultrasonic scaler (Satelec P5 Newtron, Acteon, France) was applied to dentine slices immersed inside the sub-micron particle solutions. Samples were imaged with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess tubule occlusion and particle penetration. Qualitative observations of SEM images showed some tubule occlusion. The particles could penetrate inside the tubules up to 60μm when there was no cavitation and up to ∼180μm when there was cavitation. The cavitation bubbles produced from an ultrasonic scaler may be used to deliver sub-micron particles into dentine. This method has the potential to deliver such particles deeper into the dentinal tubules. Cavitation from a clinical ultrasonic scaler may enhance penetration of sub-micron particles into dentinal tubules. This can aid in the development of novel methods for delivering therapeutic clinical materials for hypersensitivity relief and treatment of dentinal caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deciphering sub-micron ice particles on Enceladus surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, F.; Schenk, P.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Clark, R.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Ore, C. M. Dalle

    2017-07-01

    The surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus is composed primarily by pure water ice. The Cassini spacecraft has observed present-day geologic activity at the moon's South Polar Region, related with the formation and feeding of Saturn's E-ring. Plumes of micron-sized particles, composed of water ice and other non-ice contaminants (e.g., CO2, NH3, CH4), erupt from four terrain's fractures named Tiger Stripes. Some of this material falls back on Enceladus' surface to form deposits that extend to the North at ∼40°W and ∼220°W, with the highest concentration found at the South Pole. In this work we analyzed VIMS-IR data to identify plumes deposits across Enceladus' surface through the variation in band depth of the main water ice spectral features. To characterize the global variation of water ice band depths across Enceladus, the entire surface was sampled with an angular resolution of 1° in both latitude and longitude, and for each angular bin we averaged the value of all spectral indices as retrieved by VIMS. The position of the plumes' deposits predicted by theoretical models display a good match with water ice band depths' maps on the trailing hemisphere, whereas they diverge significantly on the leading side. Space weathering processes acting on Enceladus' surface ionize and break up water ice molecules, resulting in the formation of particles smaller than one micron. We also mapped the spectral indices for sub-micron particles and we compared the results with the plumes deposits models. Again, a satisfactory match is observed on the trailing hemisphere only. Finally, we investigated the variation of the depth of the water ice absorption bands as a function of the phase angle. In the visible range, some terrains surrounding the Tiger Stripes show a decrease in albedo when the phase angle is smaller than 10°. This unusual effect cannot be confirmed by near infrared data, since observations with a phase angle lower than 10° are not available. For phase angle

  15. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NanoSight) for Characterization of Proteinaceous Submicron Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, X.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Baunsgaard, D.; Henriksen, A.; Rischel, C.; Jiskoot, W.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) has attracted great interest for application in the field of submicron particle characterization for biopharmaceuticals. It has the virtue of direct sample visualization and particle-by-particle tracking, but the complexity of method development has limited its

  16. Thermophoretic motion behavior of submicron particles in boundary-layer-separation flow around a droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Song, Qiang; Ji, Bingqiang; Yao, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    As a key mechanism of submicron particle capture in wet deposition and wet scrubbing processes, thermophoresis is influenced by the flow and temperature fields. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the characteristics of the flow and temperature fields around a droplet at three droplet Reynolds numbers (Re) that correspond to three typical boundary-layer-separation flows (steady axisymmetric, steady plane-symmetric, and unsteady plane-symmetric flows). The thermophoretic motion of submicron particles was simulated in these cases. Numerical results show that the motion of submicron particles around the droplet and the deposition distribution exhibit different characteristics under three typical flow forms. The motion patterns of particles are dependent on their initial positions in the upstream and flow forms. The patterns of particle motion and deposition are diversified as Re increases. The particle motion pattern, initial position of captured particles, and capture efficiency change periodically, especially during periodic vortex shedding. The key effects of flow forms on particle motion are the shape and stability of the wake behind the droplet. The drag force of fluid and the thermophoretic force in the wake contribute jointly to the deposition of submicron particles after the boundary-layer separation around a droplet.

  17. Assessment of Sub-Micron Particles by Exploiting Charge Differences with Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Romero-Creel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis, separation, and enrichment of submicron particles are critical steps in many applications, ranging from bio-sensing to disease diagnostics. Microfluidic electrokinetic techniques, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP have proved to be excellent platforms for assessment of submicron particles. DEP is the motion of polarizable particles under the presence of a non-uniform electric field. In this work, the polarization and dielectrophoretic behavior of polystyrene particles with diameters ranging for 100 nm to 1 μm were studied employing microchannels for insulator based DEP (iDEP and low frequency (<1000 Hz AC and DC electric potentials. In particular, the effects of particle surface charge, in terms of magnitude and type of functionalization, were examined. It was found that the magnitude of particle surface charge has a significant impact on the polarization and dielectrophoretic response of the particles, allowing for successful particle assessment. Traditionally, charge differences are exploited employing electrophoretic techniques and particle separation is achieved by differential migration. The present study demonstrates that differences in the particle’s surface charge can also be exploited by means of iDEP; and that distinct types of nanoparticles can be identified by their polarization and dielectrophoretic behavior. These findings open the possibility for iDEP to be employed as a technique for the analysis of submicron biological particles, where subtle differences in surface charge could allow for rapid particle identification and separation.

  18. Bacterial characterization in ambient submicron particles during severe haze episodes at Ji'nan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Caihong; Wei, Min; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhu, Chao; Li, Jiarong; Zheng, Lulu; Sui, Guodong; Li, Weijun; Wang, Wenxing; Zhang, Qingzhu; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2017-02-15

    In January 2014, severe haze episodes which sweep across Chinese cities have attracted public concern and interest at home and abroad. In addition to the physicochemical properties of air pollutants, bacteria are thought to be responsible for the spread of respiratory diseases and various allergies. We attempted the bacterial characterization of submicron particles (PM 0.18-0.32 , PM 0.32-0.56 , and PM 0.56-1 ) under severe haze episodes using high-throughput sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR detecting system based on 21 samples collected from January to March 2014 at Ji'nan, China. The high bacterial concentration in PM 0.32-0.56 (7314cells m -3 ), PM 0.18-0.32 (7212cells m -3 ), and PM 0.56-1 (6982cells m -3 ) showed significant negative correlations with SO 2 , NO 2, and O 3 . Under sufficient sequencing depth, 37 phyla, 71 classes, 137 orders, 236 families, and 378 genera were classified, and the bacterial community structure varied significantly in different size fractions. For example, Holophagaceae (Acidobacteria) in PM 0.32-0.56 showed 6-fold higher abundance than that in PM 0.18-0.32 . Moreover, functional categories and bacterial species (Lactococcus piscium, Pseudomonas fragi, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Pseudomonas cichorii) that may potentially be responsible for infections and allergies were also discovered. Source track analysis showed that the ambient bacteria mainly originated from soils, leaf surfaces, and feces. Our results highlighted the importance of airborne microbial communities by understanding the concentration, structure, ecological and health effects, especially those in submicron particles during haze episodes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Influence of PEG Stoichiometry on Structure-Tuned Formation of Self-Assembled Submicron Nickel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxue Pu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled submicron nickel particles were successfully synthesized via the one-step surfactant-assisted solvothermal method. The impact of surfactant and reducing agent stoichiometry is investigated in this manuscript. Different morphologies and structures of Ni particles, including flower-like nanoflakes, hydrangea-like structures, chain structures, sphere-like structures, and hollow structures were prepared through different processing conditions with two parameters such as temperature and time. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, the submicron nickel particles show good saturation magnetization and excellent thermal stabilities with a possible growth mechanism for the variety of the structure-tuned formation. Importantly, the microwave absorption properties of the submicron nickel particles were studied. The lowest reflection loss of Ni-P9/T200/H15 with a thin layer thickness of 1.7 mm can reach −42.6 dB at 17.3 GHz.

  20. Strong magnetic response of submicron silicon particles in the infrared

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Etxarri, A; Gómez-Medina, R; Froufe-Pérez, L S; López, C; Chantada, L; Scheffold, F; Aizpurua, J; Nieto-Vesperinas, M; Sáenz, J J

    2011-01-01

    .... However, we find that Silicon particles with index of refraction∼3.5 and radius∼200 nm present strong electric and magnetic dipolar resonances in telecom and near-infrared frequencies, (i.e. at wavelengths≈1.2-2 mm...

  1. Nano-ring arrays for sub-micron particle trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue; Truong, Viet Giang; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2017-04-01

    Plasmonic tweezers based on nano-ring arrays on gold thin film are demonstrated. A cylindrical surface plasmon resonance is generated in the aperture of a nano-ring and a transmission peak results. When nano-slits are included to connect the nano-rings, the transmission peak becomes narrower. When the size of the aperture of the nano-ring is reduced, this peak is red-shifted. Both 0.5 μm and 1 μm polystyrene particles are trapped successfully by nano-ring arrays. A self-induced back-action effect is observed when a red-shifted laser beam is used. With multiple trapping sites provided by the nano-ring array, this type of plasmonic tweezers has huge potential to be integrated in lab-on-a-chip systems for life sciences research.

  2. Physics of sub-micron cosmic dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, N. L.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory tests with simulated micrometeoroids to measure the heat transfer coefficient are discussed. Equations for ablation path length for electrically accelerated micrometeoroids entering a gas target are developed which yield guidelines for the laboratory measurement of the heat transfer coefficient. Test results are presented for lanthanum hexaboride (LaB sub 6) microparticles in air, argon, and oxygen targets. The tests indicate the heat transfer coefficient has a value of approximately 0.9 at 30 km/sec, and that it increases to approximately unity at 50 km/sec and above. Test results extend to over 100 km/sec. Results are also given for two types of small particle detectors. A solid state capacitor type detector was tested from 0.61 km/sec to 50 km/sec. An impact ionization type detector was tested from 1.0 to 150 km/sec using LaB sub 6 microparticles.

  3. A Facile Method for Separating and Enriching Nano and Submicron Particles from Titanium Dioxide Found in Food and Pharmaceutical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, James J; Doudrick, Kyle; Yang, Yu; Capco, David G; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the presence of nano-scale titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an additive in human foodstuffs, but a practical protocol to isolate and separate nano-fractions from soluble foodstuffs as a source of material remains elusive. As such, we developed a method for separating the nano and submicron fractions found in commercial-grade TiO2 (E171) and E171 extracted from soluble foodstuffs and pharmaceutical products (e.g., chewing gum, pain reliever, and allergy medicine). Primary particle analysis of commercial-grade E171 indicated that 54% of particles were nano-sized (i.e., particle analysis of five consumer goods intended to be ingested revealed differences in the percent of nano-sized particles from 32%‒58%. Separation and enrichment of nano- and submicron-sized particles from commercial-grade E171 and E171 isolated from foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals was accomplished using rate-zonal centrifugation. Commercial-grade E171 was separated into nano- and submicron-enriched fractions consisting of a nano:submicron fraction of approximately 0.45:1 and 3.2:1, respectively. E171 extracted from gum had nano:submicron fractions of 1.4:1 and 0.19:1 for nano- and submicron-enriched, respectively. We show a difference in particle adhesion to the cell surface, which was found to be dependent on particle size and epithelial orientation. Finally, we provide evidence that E171 particles are not immediately cytotoxic to the Caco-2 human intestinal epithelium model. These data suggest that this separation method is appropriate for studies interested in isolating the nano-sized particle fraction taken directly from consumer products, in order to study separately the effects of nano and submicron particles.

  4. Submicron polycaprolactone particles as a carrier for imaging contrast agent for in vitro applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Robin, Sophie; Humbert, Philippe; Viennet, Céline; Agusti, Geraldine; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent materials have recently attracted considerable attention due to their unique properties and high performance as imaging agent in biomedical fields. Different imaging agents have been encapsulated in order to restrict its delivery to a specific area. In this study, a fluorescent contrast agent was encapsulated for in vitro application by polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer. The encapsulation was performed using modified double emulsion solvent evaporation technique with sonication. Fluorescent nanoparticles (20 nm) were incorporated in the inner aqueous phase of double emulsion. A number of samples were fabricated using different concentrations of fluorescent contrast agent. The contrast agent-containing submicron particle was characterized by a zetasizer for average particle size, SEM and TEM for morphology observations and fluorescence spectrophotometer for encapsulation efficiency. Moreover, contrast agent distribution in the PCL matrix was determined by confocal microscopy. The incorporation of contrast agent in different concentrations did not affect the physicochemical properties of PCL particles and the average size of encapsulated particles was found to be in the submicron range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cefquinome Controlled Size Submicron Particles Precipitation by SEDS Process Using Annular Gap Nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefeng Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An annular gap nozzle was applied in solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids (SEDS process to prepare cefquinome controlled size submicron particles so as to enhance their efficacy. Analysis results of orthogonal experiments indicated that the concentration of solution was the primary factor to affect particle sizes in SEDS process, and feeding speed of solution, precipitation pressure, and precipitation temperature ranked second to fourth. Meanwhile, the optimal operating conditions were that solution concentration was 100 mg/mL, feeding speed was 9 mL/min, precipitation pressure was 10 MPa, and precipitation temperature was 316 K. The confirmatory experiment showed that D50 of processed cefquinome particles in optimal operating conditions was 0.73 μm. Moreover, univariate effect analysis showed that the cefquinome particle size increased with the increase of concentration of the solution or precipitation pressure but decreased with the increase of solution feeding speed. When precipitation temperature increased, the cefquinome particle size showed highest point. Moreover, characterization of processed cefquinome particles was analyzed by SEM, FT-IR, and XRD. Analysis results indicated that the surface appearance of processed cefquinome particles was flakes. The chemical structure of processed cefquinome particles was not changed, and the crystallinity of processed cefquinome particles was a little lower than that of raw cefquinome particles.

  6. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  7. Impact-disrupted gunshot residue: A sub-micron analysis using a novel collection protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Spathis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR has played an integral role within the legal system in relation to shooting cases. With a characteristic elemental composition of lead, antimony, barium, and a typically discriminative spheroidal morphology, the presence and distribution of GSR can aid in firearm investigations. In this experiment, three shots of low velocity rim-fire ammunition were fired over polished silicon collection substrates placed at six intervals over a 100 cm range. The samples were analysed using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope (FEG-SEM in conjunction with an X-flash Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX detector, allowing for GSR particle analyses of composition and structure at the sub-micron level. The results of this experiment indicate that although classic spheroidal particles are present consistently throughout the entire range of samples their sizes vary significantly, and at certain distances from the firearm particles with an irregular morphology were discerned, forming “impact-disrupted” GSR particles, henceforth colloquially referred to as “splats”. Upon further analysis, trends with regards to the formation of these splat particles were distinguished. An increase in splat frequency was observed starting at 10 cm from the firearm, with 147 mm−2 splat density, reaching a maximal flux at 40 cm (451 mm−2, followed by a gradual decrease to the maximum range sampled. Moreover, the structural morphology of the splats changes throughout the sampling range. At the distances closest to the firearm, molten-looking particles were formed, demonstrating the metallic residues were in a liquid state when their flight path was disrupted. However, at increased distances-primarily where the discharge plume was at maximum dispersion and moving away from the firearm, the residues have had time to cool in-fight resulting in semi-congealed and solid particles that subsequently disrupted upon impact, forming more

  8. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-06-19

    Covering 71% of the Earth’s surface, oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. The size and composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) affect their ability to serve as cloud seeds and thus understanding the factors controlling their composition is critical to predicting their impact on clouds and climate. SSA particles have been shown to be an external mixture of particles with different compositions. Film and jet drop production mechanisms ultimately determine the individual particle compositions which are comprised of an array of salt/organic mixtures ranging from pure sea salt to nearly pure organic particles. It is often assumed that the majority of submicron SSA are formed by film drops produced from bursting hydrophobic organic-rich bubble film caps at the sea surface, and in contrast, jet drops are postulated to produce larger supermicron particles from underlying seawater comprised largely of salts and water soluble organic species. However, here we show that jet drops produced by bursting sub-100 m bubbles account for up to 40 % of all submicron particles. They have distinct chemical compositions, organic volume fractions and ice nucleating activities from submicron film drops. Thus a substantial fraction of submicron particles will not necessarily be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer as has been assumed in many studies. This finding has significant ramifications for the size-resolved mixing states of SSA particles which must be taken into consideration when accessing SSA impacts on clouds.

  9. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliquevis, T.; Kuwata, M.; Karl, T. G.; Guenther, A.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    Real-time mass spectra of the non-refractory species in submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon Basin during the wet season from February to March 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic material accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. There was insufficient ammonium to neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-rich, HO2-dominant environment, positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the 99% of the variance in the signal intensities of the organic constituents. The first factor was identified as associated with regional and local pollution and labeled "HOA" for its hydrocarbon-like characteristics. A second factor was associated with long-range transport and labeled "OOA-1" for its oxygenated characteristics. A third factor, labeled "OOA-2," was implicated as associated with the reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially of epoxydiols to acidic haze, fog, or cloud droplets. A fourth factor, labeled "OOA-3," was consistent with an association with the fresh production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the mechanism of gas-phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic precursors followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products. The suffixes 1, 2, and 3 on the OOA labels signify ordinal ranking with respect to the extent of oxidation represented by the factor. The process of aqueous-phase oxidation of water-soluble products of gas-phase photochemistry might also have been associated to some extent with the OOA-2 factor. The campaign-average factor loadings had a ratio of 1.4:1 for OOA-2 : OOA-3, suggesting the comparable importance of particle-phase compared to gas-phase pathways for the production of SOM during the study period.

  10. Thermal, structural and morphological properties of High Density Polyethylene matrix composites reinforced with submicron agro silica particles and Titania particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyemi O. Daramola

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HDPE—based composites samples filled with 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt.% submicron agro-waste silica particles extracted from rice husk ash (RHA at constant 0.3 wt.% Titania loading were prepared using rapra single screw extruder at temperature of 200–230 °C. The extrudates were compressed with a laboratory carver press at a temperature of 230 °C for 10 min under applied pressure of 0.2 kPa and water cooled at 20 °C min−1. Thermal, structural and morphological properties of the composites were studied. The results of the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA revealed that the composites with 10 wt.% SiO2 have the best maximum thermal degradation temperature of 438.73 °C. The crystal structure of neat HDPE, and the siliceous composites developed revealed two obvious diffractive peaks of about 21.3° and 23.7° corresponding to typical crystal plane (1 1 0 and (2 0 0 of orthorhombic phase respectively. The diffractive peaks do not shift with the addition of silica particles; this clearly indicates that the addition of silica particles did not exert much effect on the crystalline structure of HDPE. There is no much difference in the interplanar distance (d-value. Lamellar thickness (L of HDPE increases with the addition of silica particles, which implies that silica particles aid the formation of more perfect crystals. Scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that there were chains inter diffusion and entanglement between HDPE matrix and the silica particles at lower weight fraction (2–4 wt.% of submicron silica particles which resulted into homogeneous dispersion of the particles within the matrix.

  11. Synthesis of gelatin nano/submicron particles by binary nonsolvent aided coacervation (BNAC) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Shamayita; Basak, Piyali; Tibarewala, D N

    2016-02-01

    A newly developed modified coacervation method is utilized to synthesize gelatin nano/submicron particles (GN/SPs) as a drug carrier. Binary nonsolvent aided coacervation (BNAC) method is a modified single step coacervation method, which has yielded approximately a threefold lower particle size and higher average yield in terms of weight percentage of around 94% in comparison to the conventional phase separation methods. In this study 0.5% (w/v) gelatin aqueous solution with a binary nonsolvent system of acetone and ethanol was used. Nanoparticle synthesis was optimized with respect to nonsolvent system type and pH. pH7 has resulted a minimum particle size of 55.67 (±43.74) nm in anhydrous medium along with a swollen particle size of 776nm (±38.57) in aqueous medium with a zeta potential of (-16.3±3.51) mV in aqueous medium. Swelling ratio of 13.95 confirms the crosslinked hydrogel nature of the particles. Furthermore, drug loading efficiency of the gelatin particles prepared at 7pH was observed with nitrofurazone as the model drug. Results of drug release study indicate the potential use of GN/SPs as drug loading matrix for wound management such as burn wound management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative cellular uptake of double fluorescent core-shelled model submicronic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Lara, E-mail: leclerc@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Boudard, Delphine [LINA (France); Pourchez, Jeremie; Forest, Valerie [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Marmuse, Laurence; Louis, Cedric [NANO-H S.A.S (France); Bin, Valerie [LINA (France); Palle, Sabine [Universite Jean Monnet, Centre de Microscopie Confocale Multiphotonique (France); Grosseau, Philippe; Bernache-Assollant, Didier [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Cottier, Michele [LINA (France)

    2012-11-15

    The relationship between particles' physicochemical parameters, their uptake by cells and their degree of biological toxicity represent a crucial issue, especially for the development of new technologies such as fabrication of micro- and nanoparticles in the promising field of drug delivery systems. This work was aimed at developing a proof-of-concept for a novel model of double fluorescence submicronic particles that could be spotted inside phagolysosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) particles were synthesized and then conjugated with a fluorescent pHrodo Trade-Mark-Sign probe, red fluorescence of which increases in acidic conditions such as within lysosomes. After validation in acellular conditions by spectral analysis with confocal microscopy and dynamic light scattering, quantification of phagocytosis was conducted on a macrophage cell line in vitro. The biological impact of pHrodo functionalization (cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress) was also investigated. Results validate the proof-of-concept of double fluorescent particles (FITC + pHrodo), allowing detection of entirely engulfed pHrodo particles (green and red labeling). Moreover incorporation of pHrodo had no major effects on cytotoxicity compared to particles without pHrodo, making them a powerful tool for micro- and nanotechnologies.

  13. Minimizing biases associated with tracking analysis of submicron particles in heterogeneous biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Nunn, Kenetta L; Harit, Dimple; McKinley, Scott A; Lai, Samuel K

    2015-12-28

    Tracking the dynamic motion of individual nanoparticles or viruses offers quantitative insights into their real-time behavior and fate in different biological environments. Indeed, particle tracking is a powerful tool that has facilitated the development of drug carriers with enhanced penetration of mucus, brain tissues and other extracellular matrices. Nevertheless, heterogeneity is a hallmark of nanoparticle diffusion in such complex environments: identical particles can exhibit strongly hindered or unobstructed diffusion within microns of each other. The common practice in 2D particle tracking, namely analyzing all trackable particle traces with equal weighting, naturally biases towards rapidly diffusing sub-populations at shorter time scales. This in turn results in misrepresentation of particle behavior and a systematic underestimate of the time necessary for a population of nanoparticles to diffuse specific distances. We show here via both computational simulation and experimental data that this bias can be rigorously corrected by weighing the contribution by each particle trace on a 'frame-by-frame' basis. We believe this methodology presents an important step towards objective and accurate assessment of the heterogeneous transport behavior of submicron drug carriers and pathogens in biological environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of major air pollutants and submicron particles in New York City and Long Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, M.; Hopke, P. K.; Felton, H. D.; Frank, B. P.; Rattigan, O. V.; Wurth, M. J.; LaDuke, G. H.

    2017-01-01

    A year-long sampling campaign of major air pollutants and submicron particle number size distributions was conducted at two sites taken as representative of city-wide air quality in New York City and Long Island, respectively. A number of species were quantified with hourly time resolution, including particle number concentrations in 6 size ranges (20-30 nm, 30-50 nm, 50-70 nm, 70-100 nm, 100-200 nm, and >200 nm), nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, PM2.5 mass concentration and some PM major components (sulfate, organic and elemental carbon). Hourly concentrations of primary and secondary organic carbon were estimated using the EC tracer method. Data were matched with weather parameters and air parcel back-trajectories. A series of tools were thus applied to: (i) study the seasonal, weekly, diurnal cycles of pollutants; (ii) investigate the relationships amongst pollutants through correlation and lagged correlation analyses; (iii) depict the role of atmospheric photochemical processes; (iv) examine the location of the potential sources by mean of conditional bivariate probability function analysis and (v) investigate the role of regional transport of air masses to the concentrations of analyzed species. Results indicate that concentrations of NOx, SO2, CO, non-methane hydrocarbons, primary OC and EC are predominantly determined by local sources, but are also affected by regional transports of polluted air masses. On the contrary, the transport of continental polluted air masses has a main effect in raising the concentrations of secondary PM2.5 (sulfate and secondary organic carbon). By providing direct information on the concentrations and trends of key pollutants and submicron particle number concentrations, this study finally enables some general considerations about air quality status and atmospheric processes over the New York City metropolitan area.

  15. Formation of stable submicron peptide or protein particles by thin film freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Keith P.; Engstrom, Joshua; Williams, III, Robert O.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods for preparing micron-sized or submicron-sized particles by dissolving a water soluble effective ingredient in one or more solvents; spraying or dripping droplets solvent such that the effective ingredient is exposed to a vapor-liquid interface of less than 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 200, 400 or 500 cm.sup.-1 area/volume to, e.g., increase protein stability; and contacting the droplet with a freezing surface that has a temperature differential of at least 30.degree. C. between the droplet and the surface, wherein the surface freezes the droplet into a thin film with a thickness of less than 500 micrometers and a surface area to volume between 25 to 500 cm.sup.-1.

  16. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong-Hoon Choi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe2O4-HPs-FAs of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS, which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP, and folic acid (FA molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe2O4 particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe2O4 nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe2O4-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe2O4-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe2O4-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  17. The role of adsorbed water on the friction of a layer of submicron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammis, Charles G.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously low values of friction observed in layers of submicron particles deformed in simple shear at high slip velocities are explained as the consequence of a one nanometer thick layer of water adsorbed on the particles. The observed transition from normal friction with an apparent coefficient near μ = 0.6 at low slip speeds to a coefficient near μ = 0.3 at higher slip speeds is attributed to competition between the time required to extrude the water layer from between neighboring particles in a force chain and the average lifetime of the chain. At low slip speeds the time required for extrusion is less than the average lifetime of a chain so the particles make contact and lock. As slip speed increases, the average lifetime of a chain decreases until it is less than the extrusion time and the particles in a force chain never come into direct contact. If the adsorbed water layer enables the otherwise rough particles to rotate, the coefficient of friction will drop to μ = 0.3, appropriate for rotating spheres. At the highest slip speeds particle temperatures rise above 100°C, the water layer vaporizes, the particles contact and lock, and the coefficient of friction rises to μ = 0.6. The observed onset of weakening at slip speeds near 0.001 m/s is consistent with the measured viscosity of a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water, with a minimum particle radius of approximately 20 nm, and with reasonable assumptions about the distribution of force chains guided by experimental observation. The reduction of friction and the range of velocities over which it occurs decrease with increasing normal stress, as predicted by the model. Moreover, the analysis predicts that this high-speed weakening mechanism should operate only for particles with radii smaller than approximately 1 μm. For larger particles the slip speed required for weakening is so large that frictional heating will evaporate the adsorbed water and weakening will not occur.

  18. Water ice and sub-micron ice particles on Tethys and Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Nordheim, Tom; Clark, Roger Nelson; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Tosi, Federico; Schenk, Paul M.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.

    2017-10-01

    IntroductionWe present our ongoing work, mapping the variation of the main water ice absorption bands, and the distribution of the sub-micron particles, across Mimas and Tethys’ surfaces using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). We present our results in the form of maps of variation of selected spectral indicators (depth of absorption bands, reflectance peak height, spectral slopes).Data analysisVIMS acquires hyperspectral data in the 0.3-5.1 μm spectral range. We selected VIMS cubes of Tethys and Mimas in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). For all pixels in the selected cubes, we measured the band depths for water-ice absorptions at 1.25, 1.5 and 2.02 μm and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak. Moreover, we considered the spectral indictors for particles smaller than 1 µm [1]: (i) the 2 µm absorption band is asymmetric and (ii) it has the minimum shifted to longer λ (iii) the band depth ratio 1.5/2.0 µm decreases; (iv) the reflection peak at 2.6 µm decreases; (v) the Fresnel reflection peak is suppressed; (vi) the 5 µm reflectance is decreased relative to the 3.6 µm peak. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths, and of sub-micron particles spectral indicators, across Mimas and Tethys, we sampled the two satellites’ surfacees with a 1°x1° fixed-resolution grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.3. ResultsFor both moons we find that large geologic features, such as the Odysseus and Herschel impact basins, do not correlate with water ice’s abundance variation. For Tethys, we found a quite uniform surface on both hemispheres. The only deviation from this pattern shows up on the trailing hemisphere, where we notice two north-oriented, dark areas around 225° and 315°. For Mimas, the leading and trailing hemispheres appear to be quite similar in water ice abundance, the trailing portion having water ice absorption bands lightly more suppressed than the leading side

  19. Oxygenated organic functional groups and their sources in single and submicron organic particles in MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF were used to measure organic functional groups and elements of submicron particles collected during MILAGRO in March 2006 on three platforms: the Mexico City urban area (SIMAT, the high altitude site at 4010 m (Altzomoni, and the NCAR C130 aircraft. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS were applied to single particle organic functional group abundance analysis of particles simultaneously collected at SIMAT and C130. Correlations of elemental concentrations showed different groups of source-related elements at SIMAT, Altzomoni, and C130, suggesting different processes affecting the air masses sampled at the three platforms. Cluster analysis resulted in seven distinct clusters of FTIR spectra, with the last three clusters consisting of spectra collected almost exclusively on the C130 platform, reflecting the variety of sources contributing to C130 samples. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF of STXM-NEXAFS spectra identified three main factors representing soot, secondary, and biomass burning type spectra. PMF of FTIR spectra resulted in two fossil fuel combustion factors and one biomass burning factor, the former representative of source regions to the northeast and southwest of SIMAT. Alkane, carboxylic acid, amine, and alcohol functional groups were mainly associated with combustion related sources, while non-acid carbonyl groups were likely from biomass burning events. The majority of OM and O/C was attributed to combustion sources, although no distinction between direct emissions and atmospherically processed OM could be identified.

  20. Heated submicron particle fluxes using an optical particle counter in urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vogt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From May 2008 to March 2009 aerosol emissions were measured using the eddy covariance method covering the size range 0.25 to 2.5 μm diameter (Dp from a 105 m tower, in central Stockholm, Sweden. Supporting chemical aerosol data were collected at roof and street level. Results show that the inorganic fraction of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and sea salt accounts for approximately 15% of the total aerosol mass Dp (PM1 with water soluble soil contributing 11% and water insoluble soil 47%. Carbonaceous compounds were at the most 27% of PM1 mass. It was found that heating the air from the tower to 200 °C resulted in the loss of approximately 60% of the aerosol volume at 0.25 μm Dp whereas only 40% of the aerosol volume was removed at 0.6 μm Dp. Further heating to 300 °C caused very little additional losses Dp. The chemical analysis did not include carbonaceous compounds, but based on the difference between the total mass concentration and the sum of the analyzed non-carbonaceous materials, it can be assumed that the non-volatile particulate material (heated to 300 °C consists mainly of carbonaceous compounds, including elemental carbon. Furthermore, it was found that the non-volatile particle fraction Dp correlated (r2 = 0.4 with the BC concentration at roof level in the city, supporting the assumption that the non-volatile material consists of carbonaceous compounds. The average diurnal cycles of the BC emissions from road traffic (as inferred from the ratio of the incremental concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx and BC measured on a densely trafficked street and the fluxes of non-volatile material at tower level are in close agreement, suggesting a traffic source of BC. We have estimated the emission factors (EFs for non-volatile particles Dp to be 2.4 ± 1.4 mg veh−1 km−1 based on either CO2 fluxes or traffic activity data. Light (LDV and heavy duty vehicle (HDV EFs were estimated using multiple linear regression and reveal that for non

  1. A comparative study of submicron particle sizing platforms: accuracy, precision and resolution analysis of polydisperse particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Will; Kozak, Darby; Coleman, Victoria A; Jämting, Åsa K; Trau, Matt

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of a polydisperse or multimodal system can often be difficult to obtain due to the inherent limitations in established measurement techniques. For this reason, the resolution, accuracy and precision of three new and one established, commercially available and fundamentally different particle size analysis platforms were compared by measuring both individual and a mixed sample of monodisperse, sub-micron (220, 330, and 410 nm - nominal modal size) polystyrene particles. The platforms compared were the qNano Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor, Nanosight LM10 Particle Tracking Analysis System, the CPS Instruments's UHR24000 Disc Centrifuge, and the routinely used Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS Dynamic Light Scattering system. All measurements were subjected to a peak detection algorithm so that the detected particle populations could be compared to 'reference' Transmission Electron Microscope measurements of the individual particle samples. Only the Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor and Disc Centrifuge platforms provided the resolution required to resolve all three particle populations present in the mixed 'multimodal' particle sample. In contrast, the light scattering based Particle Tracking Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering platforms were only able to detect a single population of particles corresponding to either the largest (410 nm) or smallest (220 nm) particles in the multimodal sample, respectively. When the particle sets were measured separately (monomodal) each platform was able to resolve and accurately obtain a mean particle size within 10% of the Transmission Electron Microscope reference values. However, the broadness of the PSD measured in the monomodal samples deviated greatly, with coefficients of variation being ~2-6-fold larger than the TEM measurements across all four platforms. The large variation in the PSDs obtained from these four, fundamentally different platforms, indicates that great care must still be taken in

  2. Number size distributions and seasonality of submicron particles in Europe 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Laj, P.; Fjaeraa, A.-M.; Sellegri, K.; Birmili, W.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Zdimal, V.; Zikova, N.; Putaud, J.-P.; Marinoni, A.; Tunved, P.; Hansson, H.-C.; Fiebig, M.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Ulevicius, V.; Aalto, P. P.; Swietlicki, E.; Kristensson, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalivitis, N.; Kalapov, I.; Kiss, G.; de Leeuw, G.; Henzing, B.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Jennings, S. G.; Flentje, H.; Weinhold, K.; Meinhardt, F.; Ries, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-06-01

    Two years of harmonized aerosol number size distribution data from 24 European field monitoring sites have been analysed. The results give a comprehensive overview of the European near surface aerosol particle number concentrations and number size distributions between 30 and 500 nm of dry particle diameter. Spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols in the particle sizes most important for climate applications are presented. We also analyse the annual, weekly and diurnal cycles of the aerosol number concentrations, provide log-normal fitting parameters for median number size distributions, and give guidance notes for data users. Emphasis is placed on the usability of results within the aerosol modelling community. We also show that the aerosol number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles (with 100 nm dry diameter as a cut-off between modes) are related, although there is significant variation in the ratios of the modal number concentrations. Different aerosol and station types are distinguished from this data and this methodology has potential for further categorization of stations aerosol number size distribution types. The European submicron aerosol was divided into characteristic types: Central European aerosol, characterized by single mode median size distributions, unimodal number concentration histograms and low variability in CCN-sized aerosol number concentrations; Nordic aerosol with low number concentrations, although showing pronounced seasonal variation of especially Aitken mode particles; Mountain sites (altitude over 1000 m a.s.l.) with a strong seasonal cycle in aerosol number concentrations, high variability, and very low median number concentrations. Southern and Western European regions had fewer stations, which decreases the regional coverage of these results. Aerosol number concentrations over the Britain and Ireland had very high variance and there are indications of mixed air masses from several source regions; the

  3. Sub-micron particle number size distribution characteristics at two urban locations in Leicester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Sarkawt M. L.; Cordell, Rebecca L.; Kos, Gerard P. A.; Weijers, E. P.; Monks, Paul S.

    2017-09-01

    The particle number size distribution (PNSD) of atmospheric particles not only provides information about sources and atmospheric processing of particles, but also plays an important role in determining regional lung dose. Owing to the importance of PNSD in understanding particulate pollution two short-term campaigns (March-June 2014) measurements of sub-micron PNSD were conducted at two urban background locations in Leicester, UK. At the first site, Leicester Automatic Urban Rural Network (AURN), the mean number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken, accumulation modes, the total particles, equivalent black carbon (eBC) mass concentrations were 2002, 3258, 1576, 6837 # cm-3, 1.7 μg m-3, respectively, and at the second site, Brookfield (BF), were 1455, 2407, 874, 4737 # cm-3, 0.77 μg m-3, respectively. The total particle number was dominated by the nucleation and Aitken modes, with both consisting of 77%, and 81% of total number concentrations at AURN and BF sites, respectively. This behaviour could be attributed to primary emissions (traffic) of ultrafine particles and the temporal evolution of mixing layer. The size distribution at the AURN site shows bimodal distribution at 22 nm with a minor peak at 70 nm. The size distribution at BF site, however, exhibits unimodal distribution at 35 nm. This study has for the first time investigated the effect of Easter holiday on PNSD in UK. The temporal variation of PNSD demonstrated a good degree of correlation with traffic-related pollutants (NOX, and eBC at both sites). The meteorological conditions, also had an impact on the PNSD and eBC at both sites. During the measurement period, the frequency of NPF events was calculated to be 13.3%, and 22.2% at AURN and BF sites, respectively. The average value of formation and growth rates of nucleation mode particles were 1.3, and 1.17 cm-3 s-1 and 7.42, and 5.3 nm h-1 at AURN, and BF sites, respectively. It can suggested that aerosol particles in Leicester originate mainly

  4. Measurements of Submicron Particle Adsorption and Particle Film Elasticity at Oil-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; York, David W; Reichert, Matthew D; Anna, Shelly L; Walker, Lynn M; Williams, Richard A; Biggs, Simon R

    2016-05-03

    The influence of particle adsorption on liquid/liquid interfacial tension is not well understood, and much previous research has suggested conflicting behaviors. In this paper we investigate the surface activity and adsorption kinetics of charge stabilized and pH-responsive polymer stabilized colloids at oil/water interfaces using two tensiometry techniques: (i) pendant drop and (ii) microtensiometer. We found, using both techniques, that charge stabilized particles had little or no influence on the (dynamic) interfacial tension, although dense silica particles affected the "apparent" measured tension in the pendent drop, due to gravity driven elongation of the droplet profile. Nevertheless, this apparent change additionally allowed the study of adsorption kinetics, which was related qualitatively between particle systems by estimated diffusion coefficients. Significant and real interfacial tension responses were measured using ∼53 nm core-shell latex particles with a pH-responsive polymer stabilizer of poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (pMMA-b-pDMAEMA) diblock copolymer. At pH 2, where the polymer is strongly charged, behavior was similar to that of the bare charge-stabilized particles, showing little change in the interfacial tension. At pH 10, where the polymer is discharged and poorly soluble in water, a significant decrease in the measured interfacial tension commensurate with strong adsorption at the oil-water interface was seen, which was similar in magnitude to the surface activity of the free polymer. These results were both confirmed through droplet profile and microtensiometry experiments. Dilational elasticity measurements were also performed by oscillation of the droplet; again, changes in interfacial tension with droplet oscillation were only seen with the responsive particles at pH 10. Frequency sweeps were performed to ascertain the dilational elasticity modulus, with measured values being significantly higher

  5. Neurotoxicity of low-dose repeatedly intranasal instillation of nano- and submicron-sized ferric oxide particles in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bing; Feng Weiyue, E-mail: fengwy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Zhu Motao; Wang Yun; Wang Meng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Gu Yiqun [Maternity Hospital of Haidian District (China); Ouyang Hong; Wang Huajian; Li Ming; Zhao Yuliang, E-mail: zhaoyuliang@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Chai Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Wang Haifang [Peking University, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China)

    2009-01-15

    Olfactory tract has been demonstrated to be an important portal for inhaled solid nanoparticle transportation into the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously demonstrated that intranasally instilled Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could transport into the CNS via olfactory pathway. In this study, we investigated the neurotoxicity and size effect of repeatedly low-dose (130 {mu}g) intranasal exposure of nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (21 nm and 280 nm) to mice. The biomarkers of oxidative stress, activity of nitric oxide synthases and release of monoamine neurotransmitter in the brain were studied. Our results showed that significant oxidative stress was induced by the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The activities of GSH-Px, Cu,Zn-SOD, and cNOS significantly elevated and the total GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio significantly decreased in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus after the nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle treatment (p < 0.05). The nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally induced greater alteration and more significant dose-effect response than the submicron-sized particle did. Some slight perturbation of monoamine neurotransmitters were found in the hippocampus after exposure to the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle. The TEM image showed that some ultrastructural alterations in nerve cells, including neurodendron degeneration, membranous structure disruption and lysosome increase in the olfactory bulb, slight dilation in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome increase in the hippocampus were induced by the nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment. In contrast, in the submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treated mice, slightly swollen mitochondria and some vacuoles were observed in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, respectively. These results indicate that intranasal exposure of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could induce more severe oxidative stress and nerve cell damage in the brain than the

  6. Toward Quantifying the Mass-Based Hygroscopicity of Individual Submicron Atmospheric Aerosol Particles with STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey Piens, D.; Kelly, S. T.; OBrien, R. E.; Wang, B.; Petters, M. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The hygroscopic behavior of atmospheric aerosols influences their optical and cloud-nucleation properties, and therefore affects climate. Although changes in particle size as a function of relative humidity have often been used to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles, it has been noted that calculations of hygroscopicity based on size contain error due to particle porosity, non-ideal volume additivity and changes in surface tension. We will present a method to quantify the hygroscopic behavior of submicron aerosol particles based on changes in mass, rather than size, as a function of relative humidity. This method results from a novel experimental approach combining scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near-edge x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), as well as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) on the same individual particles. First, using STXM/NEXAFS, our methods are applied to aerosol particles of known composition ‒ for instance ammonium sulfate, sodium bromide and levoglucosan ‒ and validated by theory. Then, using STXM/NEXAFS and SEM/EDX, these methods are extended to mixed atmospheric aerosol particles collected in the field at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Planes sampling site in Oklahoma, USA. We have observed and quantified a range of hygroscopic behaviors which are correlated to the composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles. These methods will have implications for parameterizing aerosol mixing state and cloud-nucleation activity in atmospheric models.

  7. Submicron Particles during Macro- and Micro-Weldings Procedures in Industrial Indoor Environments and Health Implications for Welding Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Avino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the emerging risks in the engineering and electronic industries is the exposure of workers to ultrafine particles during (micro-welding operations, i.e., processes used for joining two metal parts heated locally, which constitute the base metal, with or without addition of another metal which is the filler metal, melted between the edges to be joined. The process is accompanied by formation of metallic fumes arising from the molten metal as well as by the emission of metal fumes of variable composition depending on the alloys welded and fused. The aim of this paper is to investigate the number, concentration and size distribution of submicron particles produced by (micro-welding processes. Particle number size distribution is continuously measured during (micro-welding operations by means of two instruments, i.e., Fast Mobility Particle Sizer and Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor. The temporal variation of the particle number size distribution across the peaks evidences the strong and fast-evolving contribution of nucleation mode particles: peak values are maintained for less than 10 s. The implication of such contribution on human health is linked to the high deposition efficiency of submicronic particles in the alveolar interstitial region of the human respiratory system, where gas exchange occurs.

  8. Submicron Y2O3 particles codoped with Eu and Tb ions: size controlled synthesis and tuning the luminescence emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaev, Timur Sh; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2012-05-01

    Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) codoped Y(2)O(3) submicron particles were prepared using the simple urea homogeneous precipitation method. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the synthesized particles to have a pure cubic Y(2)O(3) structure. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and field-emission transmission electron microscopy showed that the synthesized particles had almost uniform spherical shapes. The luminescence color emission of the synthesized particles could be tuned from red due to the effective (5)D(0)→(7)F(j) (j=0, 1, 2 and 3) transitions within Eu(3+) to green due to the (5)D(4)→(7)F(5) transition within Tb(3+) by switching the excitation wavelength from 255 to 310 nm. Luminescence quenching was observed at high dopant concentrations. Strong and effective color-tunable emission is expected to find a wide range of applications in industry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Photothermal heating enabled by plasmonic nanoantennas for electrokinetic manipulation and sorting of submicron particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndukaife, Justus C.; Mishra, Avanish; Guler, Urcan

    2014-01-01

    The photo-induced collective heating enabled by a plasmonic nanoantenna array is for the first time harnessed for rapid concentration, manipulation and sorting of particles, with high throughput. This work could find application in biosensing, and surface enhanced spectroscopies © 2014 OSA....

  10. Cathepsin K-targeted sub-micron particles for regenerative repair of vascular elastic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewine, Brenton; Fox, Jonathan; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) involve slow dilation and weakening of the aortic wall due to breakdown of structural matrix components, such as elastic fibers by chronically overexpressed matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), primarily, MMPs-2 and -9. Auto-regenerative repair of disrupted elastic fibers by smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the AAA site is intrinsically poor and together with chronic proteolysis prevents restoration of elastin homeostasis, necessary to enable AAA growth arrest or regression to a healthy state. Oral doxycycline (DOX) therapy can inhibit MMPs to slow AAA growth, but has systemwide side-effects and inhibits new elastin deposition within AAA tissue, diminishing prospects for restoring elastin homeostasis preventing the arrest/regression of AAA growth. We have thus developed cationic amphiphile (DMAB)-modified submicron particles (SMPs) that uniquely exhibit pro-elastogenic and anti-proteolytic properties, separate from similar effects of the encapsulated drug. These SMPs can enable sustained, low dose DOX delivery within AAA tissue to augment elastin regenerative repair. To provide greater specificity of SMP targeting, we have conjugated the DOX-SMP surface with an antibody against cathepsin K, a lysosomal protease that is highly overexpressed within AAA tissue. We have determined conditions for efficient cathepsin K Ab conjugation onto the SMPs, improved SMP binding to aneurysmal SMCs in culture and to injured vessel walls ex vivo, conjugation did not affect DOX release from the SMPs, and improved pro-elastogenic and anti-proteolytic effects due to the SMPs likely due to their increased proximity to cells via binding. Our study results suggest that cathepsin K Ab conjugation is a useful targeting modality for our pro-regenerative SMPs. Future studies will investigate SMP retention and biodistribution following targeting to induced AAAs in rat models through intravenous or catheter-based aortal infusion and thereafter their efficacy for

  11. Annual trends in occurrence of submicron particles in ambient air and health risk posed by particle bound metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhar, Saifi; Goel, Anubha; Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Risk analysis is highly important in toxicology and public health studies. Health risk related to exposure to toxic metals of PM1 was assessed. Concentrations of 13 heavy metals, adsorbed to submicron particulate matter PM1 were experimentally examined but only 12 metals were found at detectable levels inside IIT Kanpur campus in 2008-2009 for all months excluding June and October. A total of 90 samples collected for 8 h sampling time by a single stage round nozzle, grease impaction substrate based impactor type PM1 sampler were analysed by ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry). Results showed daily average PM1 concentration is 102.46 ± 35.9 μg/m(3) and metal concentration followed the trend: Ca > Fe > Mg > Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Ni > Se > Cd > V > As. Contamination level assessment using geo-accumulation index showed Ca, Fe and Mg exhibited non contamination whereas metals like Cr, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, Se, Ni and Cu exhibited ranges from moderate to extreme contamination. Ingestion is found to be the major exposure pathway for heavy metals. Non-carcinogenic health risk assessment for Pb, Cd and Cr (HI > 1) signified strong chances of adverse impact on children whereas adults are well under safe limit. Cancer Risk for adults and children followed the same decreasing order, Cr(VI)>Cd > Ni > As > Pb. It was found to be higher than permissible limits (10(-6)) for adults and children both. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of submicron ammonium sulfate particles on the growth and yield of komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. var. perviridis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motai, Akira; Nakaba, Satoshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Watanabe, Makoto; Wada, Yoshiharu; Izuta, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of submicron ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. cv. Hakkei) plants. First, we optimized a leaf-washing method to measure the amount of AS particles deposited on the leaf surface of the plants. Then, we used this method to determine the retention time of particles deposited on the leaf surface of the plants. We also investigated the effects of AS particles on the growth and yield of the plants. Almost all the AS particles deposited on the leaf surface were removed within 1 min washing time with ultrapure water, and ion leaching from the leaf was relatively slow but continuous during the leaf-washing procedure. On the basis of these results, we determined that 1 min was a suitable washing time to remove most of the AS particles while minimizing the influence of ion leaching from the leaf. The amount of particulate SO42- deposited on the leaf surface decreased over time, probably because AS particles deposited on the leaf surface deliquesced, allowing ions such as SO42- in the deliquescence solution to be absorbed into the leaf. The plants were grown and exposed to AS particles for 16 days in naturally lit phytotrons. The daily mean increase in the concentration of SO42- in PM2.5 by the exposure to AS particles was 22.5 μg m-3 in the phytotrons. The growth and yield of the plants were significantly reduced by the exposure to AS particles. The exposure to AS particles did not affect the leaf concentrations of nitrogen and chlorophyll, but significantly reduced stomatal conductance. Therefore, stomatal closure is one of the reasons for the AS particle-induced reductions in the growth and yield of komatsuna plants.

  13. Aerosols in the tropical and subtropical UT/LS: in-situ measurements of submicron particle abundance and volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borrmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Processes occurring in the tropical upper troposphere (UT, the Tropical Transition Layer (TTL, and the lower stratosphere (LS are of importance for the global climate, for stratospheric dynamics and air chemistry, and for their influence on the global distribution of water vapour, trace gases and aerosols. In this contribution we present aerosol and trace gas (in-situ measurements from the tropical UT/LS over Southern Brazil, Northern Australia, and West Africa. The instruments were operated on board of the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 "Geophysica" and the DLR Falcon-20 during the campaigns TROCCINOX (Araçatuba, Brazil, February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Darwin, Australia, December 2005, and SCOUT-AMMA (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, August 2006. The data cover submicron particle number densities and volatility from the COndensation PArticle counting System (COPAS, as well as relevant trace gases like N2O, ozone, and CO. We use these trace gas measurements to place the aerosol data into a broader atmospheric context. Also a juxtaposition of the submicron particle data with previous measurements over Costa Rica and other tropical locations between 1999 and 2007 (NASA DC-8 and NASA WB-57F is provided. The submicron particle number densities, as a function of altitude, were found to be remarkably constant in the tropical UT/LS altitude band for the two decades after 1987. Thus, a parameterisation suitable for models can be extracted from these measurements. Compared to the average levels in the period between 1987 and 2007 a slight increase of particle abundances was found for 2005/2006 at altitudes with potential temperatures, Θ, above 430 K. The origins of this increase are unknown except for increases measured during SCOUT-AMMA. Here the eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano in the Caribbean caused elevated particle mixing ratios. The vertical profiles from Northern hemispheric mid-latitudes between 1999 and 2006 also are

  14. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  15. A novel method to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles and submicron particles in tissue by sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Cassandra E; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Assemi, Shoeleh; Miller, Jan D; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M

    2008-01-01

    A novel methodology to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles was experimentally demonstrated using a mixture of nano-sized (70 nm) and submicron (250 nm) silicon dioxide particles added to mammalian tissue. The size and concentration of environmentally relevant inorganic particles in a tissue sample can be determined by a procedure consisting of matrix digestion, particle recovery by centrifugation, size separation by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), and detection by light scattering. Background Laboratory nanoparticles that have been labeled by fluorescence, radioactivity, or rare elements have provided important information regarding nanoparticle uptake and translocation, but most nanomaterials that are commercially produced for industrial and consumer applications do not contain a specific label. Methods Both nitric acid digestion and enzyme digestion were tested with liver and lung tissue as well as with cultured cells. Tissue processing with a mixture of protease enzymes is preferred because it is applicable to a wide range of particle compositions. Samples were visualized via fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to validate the SdFFF results. We describe in detail the tissue preparation procedures and discuss method sensitivity compared to reported levels of nanoparticles in vivo. Conclusion Tissue digestion and SdFFF complement existing techniques by precisely identifying unlabeled metal oxide nanoparticles and unambiguously distinguishing nanoparticles (diameter<100 nm) from both soluble compounds and from larger particles of the same nominal elemental composition. This is an exciting capability that can facilitate epidemiological and toxicological research on natural and manufactured nanomaterials. PMID:19055780

  16. Application of I-structure though-glass interconnect filled with submicron gold particles to a hermetic sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okada, Akiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Ogashiwa, Toshinori; Mizuno, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We propose hermetic sealing of a glass-to-glass structure with an I-structure through-glass interconnect via (TGV) filled with submicron Au particles. The top and bottom bumps and the TGV were formed by a simple filling process with a bump-patterned dry film resist. The sealing devices consisting of two glass substrates were bonded via Au interlayers. Vacuum ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of oxygen gas (VUV/O3) pretreatment was used for low-temperature Au-Au bonding at 200 °C. The bonded samples showed He leakage rates of less than 1.3  ×  10-9 Pa m3 s-1. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscope images of the fabricated I-structure TGV showed perfect adhesion between the I-structure TGV and glass substrate. These results indicate that the proposed I-structure TGV is suitable for hermetic sealing devices.

  17. A novel method to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles and submicron particles in tissue by sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yost Garold S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel methodology to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles was experimentally demonstrated using a mixture of nano-sized (70 nm and submicron (250 nm silicon dioxide particles added to mammalian tissue. The size and concentration of environmentally relevant inorganic particles in a tissue sample can be determined by a procedure consisting of matrix digestion, particle recovery by centrifugation, size separation by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF, and detection by light scattering. Background Laboratory nanoparticles that have been labeled by fluorescence, radioactivity, or rare elements have provided important information regarding nanoparticle uptake and translocation, but most nanomaterials that are commercially produced for industrial and consumer applications do not contain a specific label. Methods Both nitric acid digestion and enzyme digestion were tested with liver and lung tissue as well as with cultured cells. Tissue processing with a mixture of protease enzymes is preferred because it is applicable to a wide range of particle compositions. Samples were visualized via fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to validate the SdFFF results. We describe in detail the tissue preparation procedures and discuss method sensitivity compared to reported levels of nanoparticles in vivo. Conclusion Tissue digestion and SdFFF complement existing techniques by precisely identifying unlabeled metal oxide nanoparticles and unambiguously distinguishing nanoparticles (diameter

  18. Organic composition of single and submicron particles in different regions of western North America and the eastern Pacific during INTEX-B 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Day

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Single particles were collected from an aircraft platform as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment – Phase B (INTEX-B conducted over the eastern Pacific and western North America. Single particle spectra were obtained using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy-near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS. Bulk submicron particles were also collected and organic functional group and elemental concentrations were quantified with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF. Single particle spectra were classified into metaclasses associated with different sources and atmospheric processing. Particles with spectra indicative of secondary organic aerosol production and combustion sources were found at several locations and a range of altitudes. At lower altitudes, particles with spectra resembling soil dust and biomass burning fingerprints were commonly observed. The types of particle spectra most commonly observed aloft were similar to those observed during a previous study over the northwestern Pacific, indicating that long-range transport may have been an important particle source. Single particle spectra provided evidence that condensation and surface-limited oxidation contributed to particle growth. Organic mass (OM concentrations ranged from 1 to 7 μg m−3 and averaged 2.4–4.1 μg m−3. Alkane functional groups were the largest fraction of OM, averaging 1.9–2.1 μg m−3 or 50–76% of OM, followed by alcohol functional groups (0.35–0.39 μg m−3, 9–14%. Organic and elemental concentrations are compared within and among geographical air mass regions: "Pacific" free troposphere, "Continental" free troposphere, "Seattle" metropolitan region, and the California "Central Valley". OM concentrations were highest and most variable in the Central Valley (3.5±2 μg m−3. Oxygen-to-carbon ratios were

  19. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  20. [Submicron particles in smoke resulting from welding alloys and cast alloy in metalworking industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avino, P; Manigrasso, M; Fanizza, Carla; Carrai, P; Solfanelli, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of welding fumes depends on both chemical composition and ability to penetrate and deposit deeply in the lungs. Their penetration and deposition in the regions of the respiratory system is mainly determined by their size. The knowledge of the size distribution of welding fumes is a crucial information towards the estimate of the doses of toxic compounds delivered into the respiratory tract. Particle number size distribution was continuously measured during different welding operations by means of a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer, which counts and classifies particles, according to their electrical mobility, in 32 size-channels, in the range from 5.6 to 523 nm, with is time resolution. The temporal evolution of submicrometric particles (6-523 nm), nucleation mode particles (6-16 nm) and the fraction 19-523 nm before, during and after the welding operations performed with/without local exhaust ventilation are reported and extensively discussed. Before welding, nucleation mode particles represent about 7% of submicrometric particles; after about 40 s from the welding start, the percent contribution of nucleation mode particles increases to 60%. Total and nucleation mode particle concentrations increase from 2.1 x 10(4) to 2.0 x 10(6) and from 1.6 x 10(3) to 1.0 x 10(6), respectively. The temporal variation of the particle number size distribution across the peaks, evidences the strong and fast-evolving contribution of nucleation mode particles: peak values are maintained for less than 10 s. The implication of such contribution on human health is linked to high deposition efficiency of the submicrometric particles in the alveolar interstitial region of the human respiratory system, where gas exchange occurs.

  1. Cold Spray Coating of Submicronic Ceramic Particles on Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Dry and Hydrogel States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David; Borit, François; Corté, Laurent; Guipont, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We report an approach using cold spray technology to coat poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in polymer and hydrogel states with hydroxyapatite (HA). Using porous aggregated HA powder, we hypothesized that fragmentation of the powder upon cold spray could lead to formation of a ceramic coating on the surface of the PVA substrate. However, direct spraying of this powder led to complete destruction of the swollen PVA hydrogel substrate. As an alternative, HA coatings were successfully produced by spraying onto dry PVA substrates prior to swelling in water. Dense homogeneous HA coatings composed of submicron particles were obtained using rather low-energy spraying parameters (temperature 200-250 °C, pressure 1-3 MPa). Coated PVA substrates could swell in water without removal of the ceramic layer to form HA-coated hydrogels. Microscopic observations and in situ measurements were used to explain how local heating and impact of sprayed aggregates induced surface roughening and strong binding of HA particles to the molten PVA substrate. Such an approach could lead to design of ceramic coatings whose roughness and crystallinity can be finely adjusted to improve interfacing with biological tissues.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  3. Ozone and limonene in indoor air: a source of submicron particle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainman, T; Zhang, J; Weschler, C J; Lioy, P J

    2000-01-01

    Little information currently exists regarding the occurrence of secondary organic aerosol formation in indoor air. Smog chamber studies have demonstrated that high aerosol yields result from the reaction of ozone with terpenes, both of which commonly occur in indoor air. However, smog chambers are typically static systems, whereas indoor environments are dynamic. We conducted a series of experiments to investigate the potential for secondary aerosol in indoor air as a result of the reaction of ozone with d-limonene, a compound commonly used in air fresheners. A dynamic chamber design was used in which a smaller chamber was nested inside a larger one, with air exchange occurring between the two. The inner chamber was used to represent a model indoor environment and was operated at an air exchange rate below 1 exchange/hr, while the outer chamber was operated at a high air exchange rate of approximately 45 exchanges/hr. Limonene was introduced into the inner chamber either by the evaporation of reagent-grade d-limonene or by inserting a lemon-scented, solid air freshener. A series of ozone injections were made into the inner chamber during the course of each experiment, and an optical particle counter was used to measure the particle concentration. Measurable particle formation and growth occurred almost exclusively in the 0.1-0.2 microm and 0.2-0.3 microm size fractions in all of the experiments. Particle formation in the 0.1-0.2 microm size range occurred as soon as ozone was introduced, but the formation of particles in the 0.2-0.3 microm size range did not occur until at least the second ozone injection occurred. The results of this study show a clear potential for significant particle concentrations to be produced in indoor environments as a result of secondary particle formation via the ozone-limonene reaction. Because people spend the majority of their time indoors, secondary particles formed in indoor environments may make a significant contribution to

  4. Submicron polyacrolein particles in situ embedded with upconversion nanoparticles for bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalova, A. N.; Kochneva, I. K.; Khaydukov, E. V.; Semchishen, V. A.; Guller, A. E.; Nechaev, A. V.; Shekhter, A. B.; Zubov, V. P.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new surface modification approach of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) structured as inorganic hosts NaYF4 codoped with Yb3+ and Er3+ based on their encapsulation in a two-stage process of precipitation polymerization of acrolein under alkaline conditions in the presence of UCNPs. The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide both as an initiator of acrolein polymerization and as an agent for UCNP hydrophilization made it possible to increase the polyacrolein yield up to 90%. This approach enabled the facile, lossless embedment of UCNPs into the polymer particles suitable for bioassay. These particles are readily dispersible in aqueous and physiological buffers, exhibiting excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical stability, and also allow the control of particle diameters. The feasibility of the as-produced photoluminescent polymer particles mean-sized 260 nm for in vivo optical whole-animal imaging was also demonstrated using a home-built epi-luminescence imaging system.We report a new surface modification approach of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) structured as inorganic hosts NaYF4 codoped with Yb3+ and Er3+ based on their encapsulation in a two-stage process of precipitation polymerization of acrolein under alkaline conditions in the presence of UCNPs. The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide both as an initiator of acrolein polymerization and as an agent for UCNP hydrophilization made it possible to increase the polyacrolein yield up to 90%. This approach enabled the facile, lossless embedment of UCNPs into the polymer particles suitable for bioassay. These particles are readily dispersible in aqueous and physiological buffers, exhibiting excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical stability, and also allow the control of particle diameters. The feasibility of the as-produced photoluminescent polymer particles mean-sized 260 nm for in vivo optical whole-animal imaging was also demonstrated using a home-built epi-luminescence imaging

  5. Chemical characteristics of submicron particles at the central Tibetan Plateau: insights from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed a significant influx of anthropogenic aerosol from South Asia to the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (TP during pre-monsoon period. In order to characterize the chemical composition, sources, and transport processes of aerosol in this area, we carried out a field study during June 2015 by deploying a suite of online instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP at Nam Co station (90°57′ E, 30°46′ N; 4730 m a.s.l. at the central of the TP. The measurements were made at a period when the transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon occurred. The average ambient mass concentration of submicron particulate matter (PM1 over the whole campaign was  ∼  2.0 µg m−3, with organics accounting for 68 %, followed by sulfate (15 %, black carbon (8 %, ammonium (7 %, and nitrate (2 %. Relatively higher aerosol mass concentration episodes were observed during the pre-monsoon period, whereas persistently low aerosol concentrations were observed during the monsoon period. However, the chemical composition of aerosol during the higher aerosol concentration episodes in the pre-monsoon season was on a case-by-case basis, depending on the prevailing meteorological conditions and air mass transport routes. Most of the chemical species exhibited significant diurnal variations with higher values occurring during afternoon and lower values during early morning, whereas nitrate peaked during early morning in association with higher relative humidity and lower air temperature. Organic aerosol (OA, with an oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O ∕ C of 0.94, was more oxidized during the pre-monsoon period than during monsoon (average O ∕ C ratio of 0.72, and an average O ∕ C was 0.88 over the entire campaign period, suggesting overall highly oxygenated aerosol in the central TP. Positive matrix factorization of the

  6. Preparation of chitosan-TPP sub-micron particles: Critical evaluation and derived recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rázga, Filip; Vnuková, Dominika; Némethová, Veronika; Mazancová, Petra; Lacík, Igor

    2016-10-20

    The controlled preparation of chitosan particles is far from being trivial due to a considerable number of experimental parameters. For chitosan-tripolyphosphate (TPP) particles we evaluate the impact of chemical (type of chitosan, concentration, chitosan to TPP ratio, pH, ionic strength) and process factors (dialysis, stirring rate, rate of TPP addition, temperature, needle diameter) on the size and colloidal stability. The particles were prepared at pH=6.0 at which chitosan adopts the coiled conformation that is discussed as the dominant factor in controlling the stoichiometry of crosslinking reaction shifted towards TPP. These conditions result in identical particle size around 400nm and zeta potential around 22mV. The colloidal stability evaluated 24 hours after preparation depends on the amount of TPP during crosslinking. Under the same conditions, the colloidal stability up to 1 month is demonstrated. Several recommendations are provided to increase the control over formation of chitosan-TPP particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ni-functionalized submicron mesoporous silica particles as a sorbent for metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyukov, Dmitry A; Chernova, Ekaterina N; Russkikh, Yana V; Eurov, Daniil A; Sokolov, Vasily V; Bykova, Anna A; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V; Keltsieva, Olga A; Ubyivovk, Eugenii V; Anufrikov, Yuri A; Fedorova, Anna V; Selyutin, Artem A; Sukhodolov, Nicolay G; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Golubev, Valery G

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a novel IMAC sorbent with high specificity for chlorine-containing compounds was developed. Ni-functionalized monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles of 500±25nm diameter were synthesized and their metal affinity properties were studied with the use of diclofenac as the model substance. The particles were aggregatively stable in the pH range of 3-12. The sorbent demonstrated a high adsorption capacity (0.60±0.06μg of DCF per 1mg of the sorbent) and high adsorption/desorption rate (20 and 5min was enough for the sorbent saturation and desorption of DCF, correspondingly). A mixture of eluents with addition of PFOS providing the almost complete recovery (98%) of diclofenac was first proposed. The monodispersity and the high sedimentation and aggregative stability of the particles provide the formation of a stable hydrosol even under ultrasound treatment which makes the mSiO2/Ni particles suitable for batch chromatography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bragg diffraction from sub-micron particles isolated by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan, E-mail: ygao0709@anl.gov; Harder, Ross; Southworth, Stephen; Guest, Jeffrey; Ocola, Leonidas; Young, Linda [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Scherer, Norbert; Yan, Zijie [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pelton, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We describe an apparatus using dynamic holographic optical tweezers which is capable of trapping and aligning a single micron scale anisotropic ZnO particle for x-ray Bragg diffraction experiments. The optical tweezers demonstrate enough stability to perform coherent x-ray diffraction imaging.

  9. Light transport through disordered layers of dense gallium arsenide submicron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, T.; Barthelemy, P.; Johnson, P. M.; Wiersma, D. S.; Lagendijk, A.

    2012-03-01

    We present a study of optical transport properties of powder layers with submicrometer, strongly scattering gallium arsenide (GaAs) particles. Uniform, thin samples with well controlled thicknesses were created through the use of varying grinding times, sedimentation fractionation, annealing, and a new sedimentation technique. These fabrication parameters were optimized to produce maximum scattering and minimum absorption. The physical properties were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction. The optical transport mean-free path, absorption length, and the diffusion constant were determined for each sample using both continuous wave and time-resolved methods. The samples scatter strongly in the near infrared region. Total reflection and transmission measurements show that all of these samples have high absorption. X-ray diffraction results suggest that the source of this absorption is grinding induced strain and/or defects in the crystal structure. For all the different grinded GaAs powder samples that we investigated, the absorption length was less than ten micrometers.

  10. The Effect of Submicron Second-Phase Particles on the Rate of Grain Refinement in a Copper-Oxygen Alloy During Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinyin; Brodusch, Nicolas; Descartes, Sylvie; Shockley, J. Michael; Gauvin, Raynald; Chromik, Richard R.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of non-deformable submicron second-phase particles ( d = 200-500 nm) on microstructural refinement during cold spray was examined. Using single particle impact testing, two types of splats were fabricated using two different feedstocks: a Cu-0.21wt.%O powder containing Cu2O second-phase particles and a single-phase Cu. Microstructural evolution analysis using high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction shows grain refinement occurred at a higher rate in the Cu-0.21wt.%O powder. That was due to dynamic recrystallization initiated by particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN). High-strain-rate deformation of cold spray was found to be the key to activate PSN. The present study suggests cold spray is a possible technique to fabricate ultrafine-grained materials by using feedstock containing second-phase particles.

  11. Characterization of size, morphology and elemental composition of nano-, submicron, and micron particles of street dust separated using field-flow fractionation in a rotating coiled column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, Petr S; Ermolin, Mikhail S; Karandashev, Vasily K; Ladonin, Dmitry V

    2014-12-01

    For the first time, nano- and submicron particles of street dust have been separated, weighted, and analyzed. A novel technique, sedimentation field-flow fractionation in a rotating coiled column, was applied to the fractionation of dust samples with water being used as a carrier fluid. The size and morphology of particles in the separated fractions were characterized by electronic microscopy before digestion and the determination of the concentration of elements by ICP-AES and ICP-MS. The elements that may be of anthropogenic origin (Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Sn, Pb) were found to concentrate mainly in particles present only about 0.1 mass% of the sample they are of special concern due to their increased mobility and ability to penetrate into the deepest alveolar area of the lungs. For rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) that are evidently of natural source and may be found in soil minerals, in contrary, higher concentrations were observed in large particles (10-100 μm). Sc was an exception that needs further studies. The proposed approach to the fractionation and analysis of nano-, submicron, and micron particles can be a powerful tool for risk assessment related to toxic elements in dust, ash, and other particulate environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Trace Elements Speciation of Submicron Particulate Matter (PM1) Collected in the Surroundings of Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kaczmarek, Konrad; Mainka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the concentrations of PM1 trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Se) content in highly mobile (F1), mobile (F2), less mobile (F3) and not mobile (F4) fractions in samples that were collected in the surroundings of power plants in southern Poland. It also reports source identification by enrichment factors (EF) and a principal component analysis (PCA). There is limited availability of scientific data concerning the chemical composition of dust, including fractionation analyses of trace elements, in the surroundings of power plants. The present study offers important results in order to fill this data gap. The data collected in this study can be utilized to validate air quality models in this rapidly developing area. They are also crucial for comparisons with datasets from similar areas all over the world. Moreover, the identification of the bioavailability of selected carcinogenic and toxic elements in the future might be used as output data for potential biological and population research on risk assessment. This is important in the context of air pollution being hazardous to human health. PMID:26501310

  13. Trace Elements Speciation of Submicron Particulate Matter (PM1 Collected in the Surroundings of Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwira Zajusz-Zubek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the concentrations of PM1 trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Se content in highly mobile (F1, mobile (F2, less mobile (F3 and not mobile (F4 fractions in samples that were collected in the surroundings of power plants in southern Poland. It also reports source identification by enrichment factors (EF and a principal component analysis (PCA. There is limited availability of scientific data concerning the chemical composition of dust, including fractionation analyses of trace elements, in the surroundings of power plants. The present study offers important results in order to fill this data gap. The data collected in this study can be utilized to validate air quality models in this rapidly developing area. They are also crucial for comparisons with datasets from similar areas all over the world. Moreover, the identification of the bioavailability of selected carcinogenic and toxic elements in the future might be used as output data for potential biological and population research on risk assessment. This is important in the context of air pollution being hazardous to human health.

  14. Second-hand smoke exposure generated by new electronic devices (IQOS® and e-cigs) and traditional cigarettes: submicron particle behaviour in human respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protano, C; Manigrasso, M; Avino, P; Sernia, S; Vitali, M

    2016-01-01

    Passive exposure profiles to submicronic particles (SMPs, 5.6-560 nm) of traditional cigarettes and new electronic commercial devices (e-cig and IQOS®, a new heat-not-burn smoking device) were compared. During smoking, SMPs released by traditional cigarettes resulted four-times higher than those released by electronic and heat-not-burn devices and remained high for at least one hour, while SMPs values returned immediately similar to background for electronic and heat-not-burn devices. In all experiments, approximately half of SMPs resulted so small to reach the alveolar region.

  15. Source apportionment of fine PM and sub-micron particle number concentrations at a regional background site in the western Mediterranean: a 2.5 year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cusack

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and sources of ambient fine particulate matter (PM1 over a period of 2.5 years for a regional background site in the western Mediterranean are presented in this work. Furthermore, sub-micron particle number concentrations and the sources of these particles are also presented. The mean PM1 concentration for the measurement period was 8.9 μg m−3, with organic matter (OM and sulphate comprising most of the mass (3.2 and 1.5 μg m−3 respectively. Six sources were identified in PM1 by Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF: secondary organic aerosol, secondary nitrate, industrial, traffic + biomass burning, fuel oil combustion and secondary sulphate. Typically anthropogenic sources displayed elevated concentrations during the week with reductions at weekends. Nitrate levels were elevated in winter and negligible in summer, whereas secondary sulphate levels underwent a contrasting seasonal evolution with highest concentrations in summer, similar to the fuel oil combustion source. The SOA source was influenced by episodes of sustained pollution as a result of anticyclonic conditions occurring during winter, giving rise to thermal inversions and the accumulation of pollutants in the mixing layer. Increased levels in summer were owing to higher biogenic emissions and regional recirculation of air masses. The industrial source decreased in August due to decreased emissions during the vacation period. Increases in the traffic + biomass burning source were recorded in January, April and October, which were attributed to the occurrence of the aforementioned pollution episodes and local biomass burning emission sources, which include agriculture and domestic heating systems. Average particle number concentrations (N9-825 nm from 5/11/2010 to 01/06/2011 and from 15/10/2011 to 18/12/2011 reached 3097 cm−3. Five emission sources of particle of sub-micron particles were determined by Principal Component Analysis (PCA; industrial

  16. The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals with sub-micron squalane particles: a model system for understanding the oxidative aging of ambient aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. D.; Kroll, J. H.; Cappa, C. D.; Che, D. L.; Liu, C. L.; Ahmed, M.; Leone, S. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2009-05-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles, in the presence of O2, is used as a model system to explore the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the oxidative aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Detailed kinetic measurements combined with elemental mass spectrometric analysis reveal that the reaction proceeds sequentially by adding an average of one oxygenated functional group per reactive loss of squalane. The reactive uptake coefficient of OH with squalane particles is determined to be 0.3±0.07 at an average OH concentration of ~1×1010 molecules cm-3. Based on a comparison between the measured particle mass and model predictions it appears that significant volatilization of a reduced organic particle would be extremely slow in the real atmosphere. However, as the aerosols become more oxygenated, volatilization becomes a significant loss channel for organic material in the particle-phase. Together these results provide a chemical framework in which to understand how heterogeneous chemistry transforms the physiochemical properties of particle-phase organic matter in the troposphere.

  17. The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals with sub-micron squalane particles: a model system for understanding the oxidative aging of ambient aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Smith

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles, in the presence of O2, is used as a model system to explore the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the oxidative aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Detailed kinetic measurements combined with elemental mass spectrometric analysis reveal that the reaction proceeds sequentially by adding an average of one oxygenated functional group per reactive loss of squalane. The reactive uptake coefficient of OH with squalane particles is determined to be 0.3±0.07 at an average OH concentration of ~1×1010 molecules cm−3. Based on a comparison between the measured particle mass and model predictions it appears that significant volatilization of a reduced organic particle would be extremely slow in the real atmosphere. However, as the aerosols become more oxygenated, volatilization becomes a significant loss channel for organic material in the particle-phase. Together these results provide a chemical framework in which to understand how heterogeneous chemistry transforms the physiochemical properties of particle-phase organic matter in the troposphere.

  18. Submicron sized ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particle analysis from revised SB Charité III total disc replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Ilona; Baxter, Ryan; van Ooij, André; Willems, Paul; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Kurtz, Steven; Steinbeck, Marla

    2011-09-01

    Submicron sized particles are frequently observed in retrieved total hip and knee periprosthetic tissues and appear to be critical in the activation of the phagocytic inflammatory response. In this paper the concentration, size and shape of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles between 0.05 and 2.00μm were determined after isolation from periprosthetic tissues from retrieved lumbar SB Charité III total disc replacements (TDR) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For comparison, UHMWPE wear particles were isolated from γ-radiation-air sterilized total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision tissues. The mean concentration of UHMWPE particles in TDR tissues was 1.6×10(9)g(-1)tissue (range 1.3-2.0), which was significantly lower than the concentration of 2.3×10(9)g(-1) THA revision tissue (range 1.8-3.2) (P=0.03). The mean particle size (equivalent circular diameter: TDR, 0.46μm; THA 0.53μm, P=0.60) and mean shape were comparable between TDR and THA (aspect ratio: TDR, 1.89; THA, 1.99, P=0.35; roundness: TDR, 0.58; THA, 0.56, P=0.35). However, the TDR particles tended to be smaller and more round. Although no correlations were found between visible damage to the UHMWPE core and the concentration or shape of the UHMWPE particles, a positive correlation was found between increasing particle size and increasing rim penetration of the TDR core (P=0.04). The presence of UHMWPE particles of similar size and shape in TDR tissue, albeit lower in concentration, might explain why, unlike THA, pain rather than osteolysis is the major reason for revision surgery. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced computational performance of the lattice Boltzmann model for simulating micron- and submicron-size particle flows and non-Newtonian fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Harwell, John R.; Nguyen, Hoa; Succi, Sauro

    2017-04-01

    Significant improvements in the computational performance of the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) model, coded in FORTRAN90, were achieved through application of enhancement techniques. Applied techniques include optimization of array memory layouts, data structure simplification, random number generation outside the simulation thread(s), code parallelization via OpenMP, and intra- and inter-timestep task pipelining. Effectiveness of these optimization techniques was measured on three benchmark problems: (i) transient flow of multiple particles in a Newtonian fluid in a heterogeneous fractured porous domain, (ii) thermal fluctuation of the fluid at the sub-micron scale and the resultant Brownian motion of a particle, and (iii) non-Newtonian fluid flow in a smooth-walled channel. Application of the aforementioned optimization techniques resulted in an average 21 × performance improvement, which could significantly enhance practical uses of the LB models in diverse applications, focusing on the fate and transport of nano-size or micron-size particles in non-Newtonian fluids.

  20. Separation of submicron particles from biofuel combustion with flue gas condensation or wet condensing electrostatic precipitator. Analysis of possibilities; Avskiljning av submikrona partiklar vid biobraenslefoerbraenning med roekgaskondensering eller kondenserande vaata elfilter. Analys av moejligheterna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennbaeck, Marie; Gustavsson, Lennart [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    Dust particles in flue gas larger than 1 {mu}m are well separated by conventional techniques, while submicron particles are poorly separated. As the use of biofuels with high ash content is increasing, as well as knowledge about negative health effects from inhalation of submicron particles, the interest for reduction of emissions of submicron particles will probably increase. The aim of this project is to investigate possible techniques for separation of submicron particles during flue gas condensation through modification of conventional technique, or with available techniques not usually used with combustion of biofuels, e.g. a wet electrostatic precipitator. Mechanisms for separation of dust particles are briefly described. Cyclones separates particles larger than about 1 {mu}m. Fabric filters separates all particles sizes, but the efficiency reduces as the size reduces. In flue gas condensers and scrubbers the speed and size of water droplets are important for the reduction efficiency. Dry electrostatic precipitators work for all particle sizes, but with reduced efficiency for sizes between 0.1 and 3 {mu}m. Wet electrostatic precipitators separates submicron particles much better. One reason for this is that the potential between the electrodes can be higher. Among conventional flue gas condensers and scrubbers there are two types that, properly designed, can separate submicron particles, namely 'type venturi scrubbers', i.e. a scrubber where a high flue gas velocity is used to form many, small water droplets by friction forces in a nozzle, and 'type scrubber with nozzles', i.e. a scrubber where nozzles supply droplets to the flue gas. For a scrubber with nozzles, the falling velocity of the droplets must be lower and the size smaller than is common today. Also the wet electrostatic precipitator separates submicron particles with high efficiency. They are used today mainly for problematic particles, e.g. sticky or corrosive ones, or for

  1. Hygroscopicity of Chemically Aged, sub-micron Squalane Particles: On the Role of Size and Composition towards the Hygroscopicity Parameter κ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, C. W.; Smith, J. D.; Che, D. L.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements presented herein explore cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of sub-micron squalane particles chemically aged by hydroxyl radicals as a function of size and OH exposure. As squalane particles are exposed to OH radicals, size-selected 100, 150, and 200 nm particles monotically decrease in size with increasing OH exposure. Concurrently, their CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter values, κ, increase with OH exposure until saturating at 0.165 in the 100 nm data set, 0.140 in the 150 nm data set, and reach a maximum value of 0.075 in the 200 nm data set at the highest level of OH exposure. The critical super-saturation relative humidity (RH) at which CCN activity is achieved decreases initially with increasing OH exposure and then increases with OH exposure, most notably for the 100 nm data set and weakly with the 150 nm data set. Chemically aged squalane particles from the 200 nm data set show a monotonic decrease in critical super-saturation RH with all values of increasing OH exposure between 0.1-2.5 × 10^13 s molec./cc. The measured O:C ratios of 160 nm chemically aged squalane particles, which were reported previously, are compared to κ values by the CCN derived relationship reported in literature: κ = 0.30*O:C and reasonable agreement is attained in the size-selected 150 nm data set. These values are also compared with the hygroscopic growth factor derived relationship in literature: κ = 0.49*(O:C -0.25) and reasonable agreement is attained at O:C > 0.35.

  2. Sub-micron particle behaviour and capture at an immuno-sensor surface in an ultrasonic standing wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Larisa A; Martin, Stacey P; Coakley, W Terence

    2005-12-15

    The capture of 200 nm biotinylated latex beads from suspensions of concentration 10(7) to 2.5 x 10(8) particle/ml on an immuno-coated surface of the acoustic reflector in an ultrasound standing wave (USW) resonator has been studied while the acoustic pathlength was less than one half wavelength (lambda/2). The particles were delivered to the reflector's surface by acoustically induced flow. The capture dependencies on suspension concentration, duration of experiments and acoustic pressure have been established at 1.09, 1.46 and 1.75 MHz. Five-fold capture increase has been obtained at 1.75 MHz in comparison to the control (no ultrasound) situation. The contrasting behaviours of 1, 0.5 and 0.2 mum fluorescent latex beads in a lambda/4 USW resonator at 1.46 MHz have been characterized. The particle movements were observed with an epi-fluorescent microscope and the velocities of the particles were measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The experiments showed that whereas the trajectories of 1 mum particles were mainly affected by the direct radiation force, 0.5 mum particles were influenced both by the radiation force and acoustic streaming. The 0.2 mum latex beads followed acoustic streaming in the chamber and were not detectably affected by the radiation force. The streaming-associated behaviour of the 200 nm particles has implications for enhanced immunocapture of viruses and macromolecules (both of which are also too small to experience significant acoustic radiation force).

  3. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B; Moore, Kathryn A; Ryder, Olivia S; Stokes, M Dale; Beall, Charlotte M; Collins, Douglas B; Santander, Mitchell V; Burrows, Susannah M; Sultana, Camille M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-07-03

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  4. The role of jet and film drops in controlling the mixing state of submicron sea spray aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Deane, Grant B.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Stokes, M. Dale; Beall, Charlotte M.; Collins, Douglas B.; Santander, Mitchell V.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Sultana, Camille M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    The oceans represent a significant global source of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles comprise sea salts and organic species in varying proportions. In addition to size, the overall composition of SSA particles determines how effectively they can form cloud droplets and ice crystals. Thus, understanding the factors controlling SSA composition is critical to predicting aerosol impacts on clouds and climate. It is often assumed that submicrometer SSAs are mainly formed by film drops produced from bursting bubble-cap films, which become enriched with hydrophobic organic species contained within the sea surface microlayer. In contrast, jet drops formed from the base of bursting bubbles are postulated to mainly produce larger supermicrometer particles from bulk seawater, which comprises largely salts and water-soluble organic species. However, here we demonstrate that jet drops produce up to 43% of total submicrometer SSA number concentrations, and that the fraction of SSA produced by jet drops can be modulated by marine biological activity. We show that the chemical composition, organic volume fraction, and ice nucleating ability of submicrometer particles from jet drops differ from those formed from film drops. Thus, the chemical composition of a substantial fraction of submicrometer particles will not be controlled by the composition of the sea surface microlayer, a major assumption in previous studies. This finding has significant ramifications for understanding the factors controlling the mixing state of submicrometer SSA particles and must be taken into consideration when predicting SSA impacts on clouds and climate.

  5. Consideration of the respiratory cycle asymmetry in the numerical modeling of the submicron particles deposition in the human nasal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Muchnaya, M. I.

    2017-10-01

    A detailed study of the behavior of the U-shaped curve was conducted, which described deposition efficiency of inhaled particles in human nasal cavity. The particles in the range from 1 nm to 20 µm are considered. Calculations of air flow and particles deposition were carried out for symmetrical (idealized) and asymmetrical (real) breathing cycles at the same volume of inhaled air, which corresponded to calm breathing. The calculations were performed on the base of the mathematical model of the nasal cavity of healthy person using software package ANSYS (FLUENT 12). The comparison of the results was made between these calculations, and also with the results obtained at quasi-stationary statement of the problem for several values of flow rate. The comparison of the results of quasi-stationary calculations with available calculated and experimental data (in vivo i in vitro) was fulfilled previously. Good agreement of the results was obtained. It is shown that the real distribution of deposition efficiency as a function of the particle size can be obtained via a certain combination of the results of quasi-stationary calculations, without the use of laborious and time-consuming non-stationary calculation.

  6. Highly porous acrylonitrile-based submicron particles for UO2(2+) absorption in an immunosensor assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Yu, Haini; Tan, Grace; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Blake, Diane A

    2012-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported an antibody-based assay for hexavalent uranium (UO(2)(2+)) that could be used on-site to rapidly assess uranium contamination in environmental water samples (Melton, S. J.; et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43, 6703-6709). To extend the utility of this assay to less-characterized sites of uranium contamination, we required a uranium-specific adsorbent that would rapidly remove the uranium from groundwater samples, while leaving the concentrations of other ions in the groundwater relatively unaltered. This study describes the development of hydrogel particles containing amidoxime groups that can rapidly and selectively facilitate the uptake of uranyl ions. A miniemulsion polymerization technique using SDS micelles was employed for the preparation of the hydrogel as linked submicrometer particles. In polymerization, acrylonitrile was used as the initial monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and 2-hydroxymethacrylate, 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, acrylic acid, or methacrylic acid were added as co-monomers after the initial seed polymerization of acrylonitrle. The particles were characterized by transmission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cryo-SEM. The amidoximated particles were superior to a commercially available resin in their ability to rapidly remove dissolved UO(2)(2+) from spiked groundwater samples. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Visualization and quantification of four steps in magnetic field induced two-dimensional ordering of superparamagnetic submicron particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajula, Gnana Prakash; Neves Petersen, Teresa; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2010-01-01

    , resolved growth steps (condensation, polarization, co-linearity and concatenation), the average chain growth rate, and inter-particle interaction length were calculated in the presence of a 120 G external magnetic field using optical microscopy and ‘in-house' developed image analysis software...

  8. Transglutaminase-induced or citric acid-mediated cross-linking of whey proteins to tune the characteristics of subsequently desolvated sub-micron and nano-scaled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Leila; Yarmand, Mohammadsaeed; Madadlou, Ashkan; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins were inter-connected either by the enzyme transglutaminase or citric acid and then desolvated with ethanol to generate particles. Both samples comprised of sub-micron (>300 nm) and nano-scaled (~100 nm) particles based on the hydrodynamic size measurements. Enzyme-induced cross-linking of proteins yielded more monodisperse particles and decreased the mean size of the major (nano-scaled) fraction of particles. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed a spherical morphology for all samples with mean sizes of particles from enzymatically cross-linked proteins. The mediating role of citric acid in bridging the proteins was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that pre-heating of protein solution before cross-linking and desolvation denatured the proteins entirely. In vitro degradation of whey protein particles in a simulated gastric fluid demonstrated that cross-linking of whey proteins before desolvation stage enhanced significantly the digestion stability of particles.

  9. Influence of biomass burning on mixing state of sub-micron aerosol particles in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecorius, Simonas; Ma, Nan; Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Zhang, Shenglan; Gröβ, Johannes; Spindler, Gerald; Müller, Konrad; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Hu, Min; Herrmann, Hartmut; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2017-09-01

    Particulate emissions from crop residue burning decrease the air quality as well as influence aerosol radiative properties on a regional scale. The North China Plain (NCP) is known for the large scale biomass burning (BB) of field residues, which often results in heavy haze pollution episodes across the region. We have been able to capture a unique BB episode during the international CAREBeijing-NCP intensive field campaign in Wangdu in the NCP (38.6°N, 115.2°E) from June to July 2014. It was found that aerosol particles originating from this BB event showed a significantly different mixing state compared with clean and non-BB pollution episodes. BB originated particles showed a narrower probability density function (PDF) of shrink factor (SF). And the maximum was found at shrink factor of 0.6, which is higher than in other episodes. The non-volatile particle number fraction during the BB episode decreased to 3% and was the lowest measured value compared to all other predefined episodes. To evaluate the influence of particle mixing state on aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), SSA at different RHs was simulated using the measured aerosol physical-chemical properties. The differences between the calculated SSA for biomass burning, clean and pollution episodes are significant, meaning that the variation of SSA in different pollution conditions needs to be considered in the evaluation of aerosol direct radiative effects in the NCP. And the calculated SSA was found to be quite sensitive on the mixing state of BC, especially at low-RH condition. The simulated SSA was also compared with the measured values. For all the three predefined episodes, the measured SSA are very close to the calculated ones with assumed mixing states of homogeneously internal and core-shell internal mixing, indicating that both of the conception models are appropriate for the calculation of ambient SSA in the NCP.

  10. Particle collection efficiency of the rotational particle separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The rotational particle separator is a patented technique for separating solid and/or liquid particles of 0.1 m and larger from gases. The core component is the rotating filter element which consists of a multitude of axially oriented channels which rotate as a whole around a common axis. Particles

  11. Seasonal variations of ultra-fine and submicron aerosols in Taipei, Taiwan: implications for particle formation processes in a subtropical urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheung

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the seasonal variations in the physicochemical properties of atmospheric ultra-fine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm and submicron particles (PM1, d ≤ 1 µm in an east Asian urban area, which are hypothesized to be affected by the interchange of summer and winter monsoons. An observation experiment was conducted at TARO (Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory, an urban aerosol station in Taipei, Taiwan, from October 2012 to August 2013. The measurements included the mass concentration and chemical composition of UFPs and PM1, as well as the particle number concentration (PNC and the particle number size distribution (PSD with size range of 4–736 nm. The results indicated that the mass concentration of PM1 was elevated during cold seasons with a peak level of 18.5 µg m−3 in spring, whereas the highest concentration of UFPs was measured in summertime with a mean of 1.64 µg m−3. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that the UFPs and PM1 were characterized by distinct composition; UFPs were composed mostly of organics, whereas ammonium and sulfate were the major constituents of PM1. The seasonal median of total PNCs ranged from 13.9  ×  103 cm−3 in autumn to 19.4  ×  103 cm−3 in spring. Median concentrations for respective size distribution modes peaked in different seasons. The nucleation-mode PNC (N4 − 25 peaked at 11.6  ×  103 cm−3 in winter, whereas the Aitken-mode (N25 − 100 and accumulation-mode (N100 − 736 PNC exhibited summer maxima at 6.0  ×  103 and 3.1  ×  103 cm−3, respectively. The change in PSD during summertime was attributed to the enhancement in the photochemical production of condensable organic matter that, in turn, contributed to the growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. In addition, clear photochemical production of particles was observed, mostly in the summer season

  12. Enhancement of nonlinear optical and temperature dependent dielectric properties of Ce:BaTiO3 nano and submicron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Thomas, Anitta Rose; Philip, Reji

    2017-08-01

    The solgel synthesized Ce: BaTiO3 (BT) particles are crystallized in tetragonal structure and the expansion of lattice along a-axis is ensured from the Rietveld refined XRD spectra. FTIR shows that the increase of force constant from 199.97 to 213.13 N m-1 is owing to an effective incorporation of heavier atomic mass of Ce in BT lattice. HRTEM reflects the discontinuous atomic planes in the form of Ti vacancies which is supported by EDS measurement. The modification of optical band structure of BT with Ce ions is validated through several absorption and defect emission bands. Energy dependent second harmonic generation is carried out to confirm the non saturated signal, thermal stability and maximum intensity 2483 counts attained for 2 mol% Ce at 200 mJ. Optical limiting characteristics of the samples is analysed at 532 nm using 5 ns laser pulses of energy 50, 100 and 150 µJ. The nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) is found to be enhanced upon Ce doping. Lower optical limiting thresholds of 2.8 and 3.3 J cm-2 are obtained in the case of 1 and 4 mol% Ce samples respectively. Dielectric properties in a broad temperature range (40-500 °C) and frequency (100 Hz-5 MHz) have been investigated in detail. The dielectric constant is increased from 1926 to 3750 on Ce doping and there are two semicircles in the Cole-Cole plot at 500 °C due to grain and grain boundaries and corresponding equivalent circuit model is proposed.

  13. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  14. Numerical calculation of particle collection efficiency in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The latter ionizes the air stream and transfers electric charge to particles which are then driven by electrostatic forces to the collecting plates on which they are deposited, and later removed. The collecting plates of ESP are often placed in tandem, one after another, to increase the total collection efficiency, as particles ...

  15. Collected abstracts on particle beam diagnostic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains a compilation of abstracts on work related to particle beam diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. The abstracts were gathered in early 1978 and represent the status of the various programs as of that date. It is not suggested that this is a comprehensive list of all the work that is going on in the development of particle beam diagnostics, but it does provide a representative view of the work in this field. For example, no abstracts were received from the U.S.S.R. even though they have considerable activity in particle beam diagnostics.

  16. Exposure to submicron particles (PM1.0) from diesel exhaust and pollen allergens of human lung epithelial cells induces morphological changes of mitochondria tonifilaments and rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Gennaro; Lucariello, Angela; Bianco, Andrea; Calabrese, Cecilia; Thanassoulas, Theodoros; Savarese, Leonilde; Fiumarella, Angelamaria; Esposito, Vincenzo; DE Luca, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In recent literature, little has been said regarding the morphological changes that occur in lung cells after treatment with particles and nanoparticles. Using an in vitro model of type-II lung epithelium (A549), we studied the effects of submicron particles (PM1.0), Parietaria officinalis (ALL), and PM1.0 + ALL together. To date several biochemical effects have been described, instead few data exist in literature regarding morphological events following these treatments, in particular we focused on the morphological changes and distribution of mitochondria, tonifilaments and rough endoplasmic reticulum, using a transmission electron microscopic (TEM) approach. After exposure to PM1.0 particles (PM1.0), Parietaria officinalis as allergen, and PM1.0 with P. officinalis, changes in the cytoplasmic area were observed, such as damage to mitochondria and morphological alterations of the tonifilaments and rough endoplasmic reticulum. The data obtained strongly support the hypothesis that cells in contact with submicron particles (PM1.0), or P. officinalis, undergo alteration of their metabolism. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: results from CARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyan, Ari; Zhang, Qi; Merkel, M.; Knighton, Walter B.; Sun, Y.; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Herndon, Scott C.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berg, Larry K.; Wiedensohler, A.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Subramanian, R.

    2012-09-11

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) took place in the Sacramento Valley of California in summer 2010. We present results obtained at Cool, CA, the T1 site of the project ({approx}40 km downwind of urban emissions from Sacramento), where we deployed an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) in parallel with complementary instrumentation to characterize the sources and processes of submicron particles (PM1). Cool is located at the foothill of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where intense biogenic emissions are periodically mixed with urban outflow transported by daytime southwesterly winds from the Sacramento metropolitan area. The particle mass loading was low (3.0 {micro}gm{sup -3} on average) and dominated by organics (80% of the PM1 mass) followed by sulfate (9.9 %). Organics and sulfate appeared to be externally mixed, as suggested by their different time series (r2 = 0.13) and size distributions. Sulfate showed a bimodal distribution with a droplet mode peaking at {approx}400nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter (Dva), and a condensation mode at {approx}150 nm, while organics generally displayed a broad distribution in 60-600nm (Dva). New particle formation and growth events were observed almost every day, emphasizing the roles of organics and sulfate in new particle growth, especially that of organics. The organic aerosol (OA) had a nominal formula of C{sub 1}H{sub 1.38}N{sub 0.004}O{sub 0.44}, thus an average organic mass-to-carbon (OM/OC) ratio of 1.70. Two different oxygenated OA (OOA, 90% of total OA mass) and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 10 %) were identified by Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high resolution mass spectra. The more oxidized MO-OOA (O/C = 0.54) corresponded to secondary OA (SOA) primarily influenced by biogenic emissions, while the less oxidized LO-OOA (O/C = 0.42) corresponded to SOA associated with urban transport. The HOA factor corresponded to primary emissions mainly

  18. Longitudinal collective echoes in coasting particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khateeb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal ballistic and collective beam echoes with diffusion effects are investigated theoretically. In the presence of the space-charge impedance, the collective echo amplitude is obtained as a closed form expression. In contrast to the ballistic case, the collective echo amplitude consists of one maximum at time t_{echo}. The echo amplitude grows up and damps down with a rate proportional to the Landau damping rate of space-charge waves. The effect of weak diffusion is found to modify the ballistic and the collective echo amplitudes in the same manner. This effect of diffusion was confirmed using a “noiseless,” grid-based simulation code. As a first application the amount of numerical diffusion in our simulation code was determined using the echo effect.

  19. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of [le] 10 [mu]m dia.

  20. Synchronization and collective motion of globally coupled Brownian particles

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla, Francisco J.; Dossetti, Victor; Heiblum-Robles, Alexandro

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study a system of passive Brownian (non-self-propelled) particles in two dimensions, interacting only through a social-like force (velocity alignment in this case) that resembles Kuramoto's coupling among phase oscillators. We show that the kinematical stationary states of the system go from a phase in thermal equilibrium with no net flux of particles, to far-from-equilibrium phases exhibiting collective motion by increasing the coupling among particles. The mechanism that le...

  1. Impedance technique for measuring dielectrophoretic collection of microbiological particles

    CERN Document Server

    Allsopp, D W E; Brown, A P; Betts, W B

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of the impedance change resulting from the collection of microbiological particles at coplanar electrodes is shown to be an effective and potentially quantitative method of detecting dielectrophoresis. Strong correlations between the frequency-dependent dielectrophoretic collection characteristics measured by impedance change and those observed using an established counting method based on image analysis have been obtained for Escherichia coli. In addition it is shown that the new electrical method can be used to sense dielectrophoretic collection of 19 nm diameter latex beads, particles too small to be resolved by conventional optical detection systems. (author)

  2. A turbulent bed contactor: energetic efficiency for particle collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Gimenes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle collection experiments were conducted in a fluidizing irrigated bed to evaluate the performance of mobile packings: 38 x 50 mm plain oblate spheroids 38 mm ID plain spheres and alternative perforated spheres with a 38 mm ID and 10% and 25% free areas were used as fluidizing media in a 0.264 m diameter and 1.20 m high turbulent bed contactor (TBC. Particle collection experiments were carried out above the minimum fluidization velocity, using as particulate test powder polysized alumina (size 1.5 to 5.5 mm. Experimental results demonstrated that the perforated spheres performed better in collecting particles than the other packings tested. The efficiency of particle collection was analysed based on energy consumption in the TBC, using the energetic efficiency concept. It was verified that not much more energy was consumed per unit of gas flow in fluidized beds of perforated packings than in those of conventional plain sphere packings, since the perforated spheres were more energetically efficient for particle collection than plain spheres and oblate spheroid packings.

  3. Physics of new methods of charged particle acceleration collective effects in dense charged particle ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Bonch-Osmolovsky, A G

    1994-01-01

    This volume discusses the theory of new methods of charged particle acceleration and its physical and mathematical descriptions. It examines some collective effects in dense charged particle ensembles, and traces the history of the development of the field of accelerator physics.

  4. Bottom-up synthesis of up-converting submicron-sized Er{sup 3+}-doped LiNbO{sub 3} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardiel, T., E-mail: jardiel@icv.csic.es [Departamento de Electroceramica, Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio-CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Caballero, A.C. [Departamento de Electroceramica, Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio-CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Marin-Dobrincic, M.; Cantelar, E.; Cusso, F. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, C-04, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Avda. Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    A new and simple wet chemical synthesis method is proposed to prepare submicron-sized Erbium-doped LiNbO{sub 3} powders. The synthesis procedure comprises the co-precipitation of lithium and erbium ions from common precursors and their subsequent reaction with niobium ethoxide. A systematic characterization by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-OES), Atomic Absorption (AAS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), as well as by the examination of the luminescence properties, evidence that with this method a congruent Er{sup 3+}-doped LiNbO{sub 3} single phase material can be obtained without using complex and time-consuming processing steps. The synthesized powders exhibit efficient IR to VIS up-conversion emissions under 974 nm pumping. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel chemical route to the preparation of LiNbO{sub 3} powders has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This process avoids complex and time-consuming processing steps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A congruent Er{sup 3+}-doped LiNbO{sub 3} single phase material can be obtained by this way. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The luminescence properties are the expected for this composition.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical characterization of lead selenide sub-micron particles capped with a benzoate ligand and prepared at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Weyshla A.; Colón, Jadiel; Guzmán, Roger; Rivera, Harry; Santiago-Berríos, Mitk'El B.

    2014-09-01

    Semiconductor materials offer several potential benefits as active elements in the development of harvesting-energy conversion technologies. In particular, lead selenide (PbSe) semiconductors have been used and proposed to design solar energy harvesting devices, IR sensors, FET devices, etc. Lead salts have drawn particular attention from the applied and fundamental research communities due to their exceptionally strong quantum confinement effects. Several syntheses of PbSe have been proposed using long chain surfactants to allow the formation of particles and nanoparticles. Here we present a synthesis using benzoic acid as the capping ligand in ambient atmosphere. Although the particles are not in nanometric size, we compare the crystal structure (using x-ray powder diffraction data), the near infrared and mid-infrared absorption properties of PbSe using oleic acid as the capping ligand with PbSe using benzoic acid as the capping ligand. The new synthetized particles were shown to have similar crystal structure and absorb light in the near infrared region at 1410 nm. We also performed cyclic voltammetry of these particles drop-casted in the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The particles showed electrochemical behavior with an oxidation peak near (-402 ± 5 mV) versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The particles seem to form a polymeric film at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode.

  6. Leonids' Particle Analyses from Stratospheric Balloon Collection on Xerogel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David

    Recovered from a stratospheric balloon above 20 km on 17-18 November 1998, at least eight candidate microparticles were collected and analyzed from low-density silica xerogel collection plates. Capture time at Leonids' storm peak was validated locally along the balloon trajectory by direct video imaging of meteor fluence up to 24/hr above 98% of the Earth's atmosphere. At least one 30 micron particle agrees morphologically to a smooth, unmelted spherule and compares most closely in non-volatile elemental ratios (Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si) to compositional data in surface/ocean meteorite collections. A Euclidean tree diagram based on composition makes a most probable identification as a non-porous stratospherically collected particle and a least probable identification as terrestrial matter or an ordinary chondrite. If of extraterrestrial origin, the mineralogical class would be consistent with a stony (S) type of silicate, olivine [(Mg,Fe)2SiO4] and pyroxene [(Mg, Fe)Si! O3)--or oxides, herecynite [(Fe,Mg) Al2O4].

  7. Leonid's Particle Analyses from Stratospheric Balloon Collection on Xerogel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David; Phillips, Tony; Horack, John; Porter, Linda; Myszka, Ed

    1999-01-01

    Recovered from a stratospheric balloon above 20 km on 17-18 November 1998, at least eight candidate microparticles were collected and analyzed from low-density silica xerogel collection plates. Capture time at Leonids' storm peak was validated locally along the balloon trajectory by direct video imaging of meteor fluence up to 24/hr above 98% of the Earth's atmosphere. At least one 30 micron particle agrees morphologically to a smooth, unmelted spherule and compares most closely in non-volatile elemental ratios (Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si) to compositional data in surface/ocean meteorite collections. A Euclidean tree diagram based on composition makes a most probable identification as a non-porous stratospherically collected particle and a least probable identification as terrestrial matter or an ordinary chondrite. If of extraterrestrial origin, the mineralogical class would be consistent with a stony (S) type of silicate, olivine [(Mg,Fe)2SiO4] and pyroxene [(Mg, Fe)Si!O3)--or oxides, herecynite [(Fe,Mg) Al2O4].

  8. Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosol collected from Atlanta, Georgia, during 2014-2015 using the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Croteau, Philip L.; Baumann, Karsten; Canonaco, Francesco; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Gold, Avram; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Surratt, Jason D.

    2017-10-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was redeployed at the Jefferson Street (JST) site in downtown Atlanta, Georgia (GA) for 1 year (March 20, 2014-February 08, 2015) to chemically characterize non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1) in near real-time and to assess whether organic aerosol (OA) types and amounts change from year-to-year. Submicron organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra were analyzed by season using multilinear engine (ME-2) to apportion OA subtypes to potential sources and chemical processes. A suite of real-time collocated measurements from the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network was compared with ME-2 factor solutions to aid in the interpretation of OA subtypes during each season. OA tracers measured from high-volume filter samples using gas chromatography interfaced with electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) also aided in identifying OA sources. The initial application of ME-2 to the yearlong ACSM dataset revealed that OA source apportionment by season was required to better resolve sporadic OA types. Spring and fall OA mass spectral datasets were separated into finer periods to capture potential OA sources resulting from non-homogeneous emissions during transitioning periods. NR-PM1 was highest in summer (16.7 ± 8.4 μg m-3) and lowest in winter (8.0 ± 5.7 μg m-3), consistent with prior studies. OA dominated NR-PM1 mass (56-74% on average) in all seasons. Hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) from primary emissions was observed in all seasons, averaging 5-22% of total OA mass. Strong correlations of HOA with carbon monoxide (CO) (R = 0.71-0.88) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) (R = 0.55-0.79) indicated that vehicular traffic was the likely source. Biomass burning OA (BBOA) was observed in all seasons, with lower contributions (2%) in summer and higher in colder seasons (averaging 8-20% of total OA mass). BBOA correlated strongly with levoglucosan (R = 0.78-0.95) during colder seasons

  9. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  10. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  11. submitter Introduction to Collective Effects in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The beam intensity and the beam brightness of particle accelerators or colliders operated for high - energy physics were, and are, often severely limited by “collective effects” (e.g.[1]). By contrast, new light sources, such as linac - based free electron lasers, may even rely on collective instabilities to accomplish their mission! The term “collective effects” refers to the interaction of beam particles with each other through a variety of processes, e.g. (1) non-delayed self-fields and image fields present even for constant perfectly conducting and magnetic boundaries (direct and indirect “space - charge effects”), (2) longer - lived electro-magnetic “wake fields” due to a finite chamber resistivity or geometric variation in the beam - pipe cross section, which typically affect later parts of the beam, (3) coherent synchrotron radiation, which on a curved trajectory may even influence earlier parts of the beam, giving rise to “non-causal” wake fields, otherwise not normally encountered...

  12. Collective motion of self-propelled particles with memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ken H; Sumino, Yutaka; Montagne, Raul; Aranson, Igor S; Chaté, Hugues

    2015-04-24

    We show that memory, in the form of underdamped angular dynamics, is a crucial ingredient for the collective properties of self-propelled particles. Using Vicsek-style models with an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process acting on angular velocity, we uncover a rich variety of collective phases not observed in usual overdamped systems, including vortex lattices and active foams. In a model with strictly nematic interactions the smectic arrangement of Vicsek waves giving rise to global polar order is observed. We also provide a calculation of the effective interaction between vortices in the case where a telegraphic noise process is at play, explaining thus the emergence and structure of the vortex lattices observed here and in motility assay experiments.

  13. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  14. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-01-15

    It is concluded that the laboratory tests should be conducted at high levels of SO[sub 3] such that the resulting resistivity is in the range of 10[sup 7]--10[sup 8] ohm-cm. There are several reasons leading to this conclusion. At SO[sub 3] concentrations of 30 ppM and greater, the curves for both dew point and resistivity are relatively flat so that changes in gas phase SO[sub 3] will have minimal impact on particle characteristics. In addition, the electrostatic forces are relatively flat in this range so that changes in flue gas conditions will that result in a change in resistivity by up to two orders of magnitude will have little effect on the magnitude of reentrainment. Finally, at the very low resistivity conditions, reentrainment will be the highest. Since the purpose of the laboratory resistivity tests is to determine the relative ability of the various additives to reduce resistivity, the greater the reentrainment, the easier it will be to measure an improvement. Tests were conducted by first operating at baseline conditions with no additives and then repeating the test with additives. The data collected during each test includes the resistivity of the material, thickness of the collected dust layer, and subjective indications of the dust characteristics. The candidate additives were from the polymer group, cellulose derivatives, starches and gums, and oils. No waxes or synthetic compounds have been tested to date in the laboratory apparatus. Of the seventeen additives tested, eight appeared to have a positive impact on either the ash layer thickness or the physical appearance of the dust layer. Excessive deposits on the discharge electrode resulted during injection of some of the additives. Three of the additives resulted in significant deposits in the injection chamber. The build up on the electrode was interpreted as a positive indicator of increase particle adhesion. The initial observations and comments for the eight additives are listed in Table 1.

  15. Performance of high flow rate samplers for respirable particle collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m(-3) in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size ((50)d(ae)) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 microm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2-11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the

  16. Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: results from CARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Setyan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS was deployed during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES that took place in northern California in June 2010. We present results obtained at Cool (denoted as the T1 site of the project in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where intense biogenic emissions are periodically mixed with urban outflow transported by daytime southwesterly winds from the Sacramento metropolitan area. During this study, the average mass loading of submicrometer particles (PM1 was 3.0 μg m−3, dominated by organics (80% and sulfate (9.9%. The organic aerosol (OA had a nominal formula of C1H1.38N0.004OM0.44, thus an average organic mass-to-carbon (OM/OC ratio of 1.70. Two distinct oxygenated OA factors were identified via Positive matrix factorization (PMF of the high-resolution mass spectra of organics. The more oxidized MO-OOA (O/C = 0.54 was interpreted as a surrogate for secondary OA (SOA influenced by biogenic emissions whereas the less oxidized LO-OOA (O/C = 0.42 was found to represent SOA formed in photochemically processed urban emissions. LO-OOA correlated strongly with ozone and MO-OOA correlated well with two 1st generation isoprene oxidation products (methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone, indicating that both SOAs were relatively fresh. A hydrocarbon like OA (HOA factor was also identified, representing primary emissions mainly due to local traffic. On average, SOA (= MO-OOA + LO-OOA accounted for 91% of the total OA mass and 72% of the PM1 mass observed at Cool. Twenty three periods of urban plumes from T0 (Sacramento to T1 (Cool were identified using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem. The average PM1 mass loading was considerably higher in urban plumes than in air masses dominated by biogenic SOA. The change in OA

  17. Laser source of neutral atoms for collective field particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykovskiy, Yu.A.; Mironov, V.E.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Sil' nov, S.M.; Sotnichenko, E.A.; Ter-Martirosyan, Z.A.; Shestakov, B.A.

    1984-03-01

    Laser sources for collective-field particle accelerators, of ions of almost all chemical elements, operate in deep vacuum (10/sup -8/ -10/sup -9/ torr) and in a strong alternating magnetic field (up to 20 kOe, 50 Hz). Under such conditions a laser source is required to deliver an atom flux of 10/sup 11/ -10/sup 12/ in pulses of 10-100 ms duration from a target to electron rings. Such a laser source has been designed for the collective-field heavy-ion accelerator at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research. It consists of a laser, focusing lens, and conical target of the material whose atoms are to be extracted. The equipment is laid out with the compressor tube mounted on a support inside the vacuum chamber and the laser source in front of the window on the extension of the compressor tube axis. This construction can be modified for large electron rings, with axicon optics that reshape the incoming laser beam into an annular beam for electron rings with radii longer than 8 cm or by moving the laser source from the axial location to a peripheral location relative to the compressor tube for electron rings with radii of 30-35 cm. These three variants of such a laser source were evaluated in an experimental test stand, with a Q-switched YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser (wavelength lambda = 1.06 ..mu..m) emitting radiation pulses of 0.06 J energy and 10 ns duration, and with lead, aluminum, iron, or copper used as target material. The results of measurements, accurate within 20%, indicate that the laser source is most effective with lead targets and least effective with copper targets. 9 references, 9 figures.

  18. Modelling Collective Opinion Formation by Means of Active Brownian Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, F; Schweitzer, Frank; Holyst, Janusz

    1999-01-01

    The concept of active Brownian particles is used to model a collective opinion formation process. It is assumed that individuals in community create a two-component communication field that influences the change of opinions of other persons and/or can induce their migration. The communication field is described by a reaction-diffusion equation, meaning that it has a certain lifetime, which models memory effects, further it can spread out in the community. Within our stochastic approach, the opinion change of the individuals is described by a master equation, while the migration is described by a set of Langevin equations, coupled by the communication field. In the mean-field limit which holds for fast communication, we derive a critical population size, above which the community separates into a majority and a minority with opposite opinions. The existence of external support (e.g. from mass media) can change the ratio between minority and majority, until above a critical external support the supported subpop...

  19. Collective dynamics of particles from viscous to turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The book surveys the state-of-the-art methods that are currently available to model and simulate the presence of rigid particles in a fluid flow. For particles that are very small relative to the characteristic flow scales and move without interaction with other particles, effective equations of motion for particle tracking are formulated and applied (e.g. in gas-solid flows). For larger particles, for particles in liquid-solid flows and for particles that interact with each other or possibly modify the overall flow detailed model are presented. Special attention is given to the description of the approximate force coupling method (FCM) as a more general treatment for small particles, and derivations in the context of low Reynolds numbers for the particle motion as well as application at finite Reynolds numbers are provided. Other topics discussed in the book are the relation to higher resolution immersed boundary methods, possible extensions to non-spherical particles and examples of applications of such met...

  20. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  1. Accurate stratospheric particle size distributions from a flat plate collection surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Flat plate particle collections have revealed the presence of a remarkable variety of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial material in the stratosphere. It is found that the ratio of terrestrial to extraterrestrial material and the nature of the material collected may vary significantly over short time scales. These fluctuations may be related to massive injections of volcanic ash, emissions from solid fuel rockets, or variations in the micrometeoroid flux. The variations in particle number density can be of great importance to the earth's atmospheric radiation balance, and, therefore, its climate. With the objective to assess the number density of solid particles in the stratosphere, an examination has been conducted of all particles exceeding 1 micron in average diameter for a representative suite of particles obtained from a single flat plate collection surface. Attention is given to solid particle size distributions in the stratosphere, and the origin of important stratospheric particle types.

  2. Fate of Multimeric Oligomers, Submicron, and Micron Size Aggregates of Monoclonal Antibodies Upon Subcutaneous Injection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Bee, Jared S; Bishop, Steven M; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens; Jiskoot, Wim

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the fate of differently sized protein aggregates upon subcutaneous injection in mice. A murine and a human monoclonal immunoglobulin G 1 (IgG1) antibody were labeled with a fluorescent dye and subjected to stress conditions to create aggregates. Aggregates fractionated by centrifugation or gel permeation chromatography were administered subcutaneously into SKH1 mice. The biodistribution was measured by in vivo fluorescence imaging for up to 1 week post injection. At several time points, mice were sacrificed and selected organs and tissues were collected for ex vivo analysis. Part of injected aggregated IgGs persisted much longer at the injection site than unstressed controls. Aggregate fractions containing submicron (0.1-1 μm) or micron (1-100 μm) particles were retained to a similar extent. Highly fluorescent "hot-spots" were detected 24 h post injection in spleens of mice injected with submicron aggregates of murine IgG. Submicron aggregates of human IgG showed higher accumulation in draining lymph nodes 1 h post injection than unstressed controls or micron size aggregates. For both tested proteins, aggregated fractions seemed to be eliminated from circulation more rapidly than monomeric fractions. The biodistribution of monomers isolated from solutions subjected to stress conditions was similar to that of unstressed control. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Submicron magnetic core conducting polypyrrole polymer shell: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório-Neto, Ernandes Taveira; Baraket, Abdoullatif; Kabbaj, Dounia; Zine, Nadia; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Fessi, Hatem; Kunita, Marcos Hiroiuqui; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic particles are of great interest in various biomedical applications, such as, sample preparation, in vitro biomedical diagnosis, and both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. For in vitro applications and especially in labs-on-a-chip, microfluidics, microsystems, or biosensors, the needed magnetic dispersion should answer various criteria, for instance, submicron size in order to avoid a rapid sedimentation rate, fast separations under an applied magnetic field, and appreciable colloidal stability (stable dispersion under shearing process). Then, the aim of this work was to prepare highly magnetic particles with a magnetic core and conducting polymer shell particles in order to be used not only as a carrier, but also for the in vitro detection step. The prepared magnetic seed dispersions were functionalized using pyrrole and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. The obtained core-shell particles were characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, magnetization properties, FTIR analysis, surface morphology, chemical composition, and finally, the conducting property of those particles were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained functional submicron highly magnetic particles are found to be conducting material bearing function carboxylic group on the surface. These promising conducting magnetic particles can be used for both transport and lab-on-a-chip detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Assessment of exhaust emissions from carbon nanotube production and particle collection by sampling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Hofmann, Mario; Hallock, Marilyn; Ellenbecker, Michael; Kong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    This study performed a workplace evaluation of emission control using available air sampling filters and characterized the emitted particles captured in filters. Characterized particles were contained in the exhaust gas released from carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Emitted nanoparticles were collected on grids to be analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). CNT clusters in the exhaust gas were collected on filters for investigation. Three types of filters, including Nalgene surfactant-free cellulose acetate (SFCA), Pall A/E glass fiber, and Whatman QMA quartz filters, were evaluated as emission control measures, and particles deposited in the filters were characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to further understand the nature of particles emitted from this CNT production. STEM analysis for collected particles on filters found that particles deposited on filter fibers had a similar morphology on all three filters, that is, hydrophobic agglomerates forming circular beaded clusters on hydrophilic filter fibers on the collecting side of the filter. CNT agglomerates were found trapped underneath the filter surface. The particle agglomerates consisted mostly of elemental carbon regardless of the shapes. Most particles were trapped in filters and no particles were found in the exhaust downstream from A/E and quartz filters, while a few nanometer-sized and submicrometer-sized individual particles and filament agglomerates were found downstream from the SFCA filter. The number concentration of particles with diameters from 5 nm to 20 µm was measured while collecting particles on grids at the exhaust piping. Total number concentration was reduced from an average of 88,500 to 700 particle/cm(3) for the lowest found for all filters used. Overall, the quartz filter showed the most consistent and highest particle reduction control, and exhaust particles containing nanotubes were successfully

  5. Factors affecting particle collection by electro-osmosis in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtar, Mohd Nazim; Hoettges, Kai F; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Alternating-current electro-osmosis, a phenomenon of fluid transport due to the interaction between an electrical double layer and a tangential electric field, has been used both for inducing fluid movement and for the concentration of particles suspended in the fluid. This offers many advantages over other phenomena used to trap particles, such as placing particles at an electrode centre rather than an edge; benefits of scale, where electrodes hundreds of micrometers across can trap particles from the molecules to cells at the same rate; and a trapping volume limited by the vortex height, a phenomenon thus far unstudied. In this paper, the collection of particles due to alternating-current electro-osmosis driven collection is examined for a range of particle concentrations, inter-electrode gap widths, chamber heights and media viscosity and density. A model of collection behaviour is described where particle collection over time is governed by two processes, one driven by the vortices and the other by sedimentation, allowing the determination of the maximum height of vortex-driven collection, but also indicates how trapping is limited by high particle concentrations and fluid velocities. The results also indicate that viscosity, rather than density, is a significant governing factor in determining the trapping behaviour of particles. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Characterization of size-resolved urban haze particles collected in summer and winter at Taiyuan City, China using quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hong; Jin, Chun-Song; Zhang, Dong-Peng; Wang, Shu-Rong; Xu, Xiao-Tian; Wang, Xu-Ran; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Li; Ro, Chul-Un

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize the size-resolved urban haze particles and investigate their modification in morphology and composition in summer and winter using the semi-quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) based on both scanning and transmission electron microscopies equipped with ultrathin-window energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (SEM-EDX and TEM-EDX). The haze and non-haze particles were collected through a seven-stage May cascade impactor on Dec. 29-30, 2009 and Jan. 8-9 and July 11-14, 2010 in Taiyuan, a typical inland city in the North China Plain. Approximately 3752 atmospheric particles in the size ranges of 4-2 μm, 2-1 μm, 1-0.5 μm, and 0.5-0.25 μm in aerodynamic diameter were measured and identified according to their secondary electron or TEM images and elemental atomic concentrations calculated through a Monte Carlo simulation program. Results show that on the haze days many reacted or aged mineral dust particles were encountered, in which the sulfate-containing ones outnumbered the nitrate-containing ones in the winter samples while it was on the contrary in the summer samples, suggesting different haze formation and evolution mechanisms in summer and winter. Furthermore, in the haze events (especially in summer), many CNOS-rich particles, likely mixtures of water-soluble organic carbon with (NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4, were observed not only in the submicron but also in the super-micron fractions. The simultaneous observation of the fresh and aged CNOS-rich particles in the same SEM or TEM images implied that the status and components of secondary particles were complicated and changeable. The significant increase of both elemental concentration ratios of [N]/[S] and [C]/[S] in the aged ones compared to the fresh ones indicated that NH4NO3 and secondary organic matter were likely absorbed onto (NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 particles and mixed with them. K-rich, Fe-rich, and heavy metal-containing particles in TEM-EDX measurement

  7. Collective and single particle states in medium mass vibrational nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Suliman, G

    2001-01-01

    The particle-core coupling model has been employed to describe the low lying nuclear excitations in the vibrational odd-A nuclei. In the frame of this model the following observables were calculated: excitation energies, spin and parity quantum numbers, electric quadrupole moments, magnetic dipole moments and reduced transition probabilities. Two computer codes were employed. The first one, PCOREC, diagonalized the Hamiltonian providing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues. The second one, PCORECTR, starts from the eigenvector computer by the first program and computes the observables which are compared we results of experiments. A good description of the experimental data has been obtained for the sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Sb, sup 1 sup 2 sup 3 Sb and sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 Sb nuclei. (authors)

  8. Oscillator Models and Collective Motion: Splay State Stabilization of Self-Propelled Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Paley, Derek; Leonard, Naomi; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a Lyapunov design for the stabilization of collective motion in a planar kinematic model of N particles moving at constant speed. We derive a control law that achieves asymptotic stability of the splay state formation, characterized by uniform rotation of N evenly spaced particles on a circle. In designing the control law, the particle headings are treated as a system of coupled phase oscillators. The coupling function which exponentially stabilizes th...

  9. Typical Household Vacuum Cleaners: The Collection Efficiency and Emissions Characteristics for Fine Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioy, Paul J; Wainman, Thomas; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Goldsmith, Susan

    1999-02-01

    The issue of fine particle (PM25) exposures and their potential health effects is a focus of scientific research because of the recently promulgated National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2 5. Before final implementation, the health and exposure basis for the standard will be reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency within the next five years. As part of this process, it is necessary to understand total particle exposure issues and to determine the relative importance of the origin of PM2 5 exposure in various micro-environments. The results presented in this study examine emissions of fine particles from a previously uncharacterized indoor source: the residential vacuum cleaner. Eleven standard vacuum cleaners were tested for the emission rate of fine particles by their individual motors and for their efficiency in collecting laboratory-generated fine particles. An aerosol generator was used to introduce fine potassium chloride (KC1) particles into the vacuum cleaner inlet for the collection efficiency tests. Measurements of the motor emissions, which include carbon, and the KCl aerosol were made using a continuous HIAC/Royco 5130A light-scattering particle detector. All tests were conducted in a metal chamber specifically designed to completely contain the vacuum cleaner and operate it in a stationary position. For the tested vacuum cleaners, fine particle motor emissions ranged from 9.6 x 104 to 3.34 x 108 particles/min, which were estimated to be 0.028 to 176 mg/min for mass emissions, respectively. The vast majority of particles released were in the range of 0.3-0.5 mm in diameter. The lowest particle emission rate was obtained for a vacuum cleaner that had a high efficiency (HEPA) filter placed after the vacuum cleaner bag and the motor within a sealed exhaust system. This vacuum cleaner removed the KC1particles that escaped the vacuum cleaner bag and the particles emitted by the motor. Results obtained for the KC1 collection efficiency tests

  10. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Avens, Larry R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  11. Anthropogenic influences on the physical state of submicron particulate matter over a tropical forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Gong, Zhaoheng; Harder, Tristan H.; de Sá, Suzane S.; Wang, Bingbing; Castillo, Paulo; China, Swarup; Liu, Yingjun; O& amp; apos; Brien, Rachel E.; Palm, Brett B.; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Cirino, Glauber G.; Thalman, Ryan; Adachi, Kouji; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Artaxo, Paulo; Bertram, Allan K.; Buseck, Peter R.; Gilles, Mary K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Laskin, Alexander; Manzi, Antonio O.; Sedlacek, Arthur; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Wang, Jian; Zaveri, Rahul; Martin, Scot T.

    2017-02-06

    The occurrence of nonliquid and liquid physical states of submicron atmospheric particulate matter (PM) downwind of an urban region in central Amazonia was investigated. Measurements were conducted during two intensive operating periods (IOP1 and IOP2) that took place during the wet and dry seasons of the GoAmazon2014/5 campaign. Air masses representing variable influences of background conditions, urban pollution, and regional- and continental-scale biomass burning passed over the research site. As the air masses varied, particle rebound fraction, an indicator of physical state, was measured in real time at ground level using an impactor apparatus. Micrographs collected by transmission electron microscopy confirmed that liquid particles adhered, while nonliquid particles rebounded. Relative humidity (RH) was scanned to collect rebound curves. When the apparatus RH matched ambient RH, 95 % of the particles adhered as a campaign average. Secondary organic material, produced for the most part by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds emitted from the forest, produces liquid PM over this tropical forest. During periods of anthropogenic influence, by comparison, the rebound fraction dropped to as low as 60 % at 95 % RH. Analyses of the mass spectra of the atmospheric PM by positive-matrix factorization (PMF) and of concentrations of carbon monoxide, total particle number, and oxides of nitrogen were used to identify time periods affected by anthropogenic influences, including both urban pollution and biomass burning. The occurrence of nonliquid PM at high RH correlated with these indicators of anthropogenic influence. A linear model having as output the rebound fraction and as input the PMF factor loadings explained up to 70 % of the variance in the observed rebound fractions. Anthropogenic influences can contribute to the presence of nonliquid PM in the atmospheric particle population through the combined effects of molecular species that increase viscosity

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  13. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  14. Organochlorine Pesticides and Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Atmospheric Particles Collected in Zagreb, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Dvoršćak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the occurrence and levels of hexachlorobenzene, α-, β-, and γ-hexachlorocyclo-hexane, 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDD, and 17 PCBs (six indicator and eleven other toxicologically significant congeners in PM10 and/or PM2.5 particle fractions collected between 2000 and 2003 and in 2010 at a site in the northern residential part of Zagreb, Croatia. Twenty-four-hour particle samples were collected on glass or quartz microfibre filters from approximately 100 m3 of ambient air per filter. Filters with particles collected over seven consecutive days were combined for ultrasonic extraction with 1:1 acetone:n-hexane mixture followed by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection. In the monitored periods, the mass concentrations of organochlorine compounds in atmospheric particles were characteristic of global environmental pollution and showed a decreasing trend. Local input was observed only for γ-hexachlorocyclohexane. There were no pronounced seasonal variations in the mass fraction levels of any pesticide or PCB in airborne particles. A decreasing trend in the mass concentrations of some compounds with higher air temperatures was mostly related to the lower particle concentrations in warmer seasons and, consequently, to less particle-bound organochlorine compounds in the atmosphere.

  15. Characteristics of Submicron Aerosols in 2013 summer of Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Yusheng; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the air pollution of North China Plain of China, CAREBEIJING-2013 field campaign (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) was conducted in summer of 2013. Submicron aerosols were measured at an urban site PKU (Peking University, 39° 59'21"N, 116° 18'25"E) from July 28th to September 31st 2013. A suite of integrated instruments was used to measure the size distribution, effective density and hygroscopicity of ambient particles. The chemical composition of submicron particles were measured by using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (Billerica, MA, USA). The average PM2.5 concentration was 73.0±70.7 μg m-3 during the measurement. The particulate pollution showed distinct 4-7 days cycles controlled by the meteorological conditions. Each cycle started with low PM2.5 mass concentrations (air mass was from relatively clean mountainous area. The particle number concentrations were high, but and the sizes were small (60 μg day-1, and the particle mean diameter grew to >100 nm. It is interesting to note that the mean diameters showed similar trend to PM2.5 mass concentrations, indicating the particle pollution attributed to the growth of the newly formed small particles. During the measurement, the average particle densities are between 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating organics and sulfate were dominant in the particles. The densities of smaller particles, i.e. 46 nm, 81nm, showed single peak at 1.3-1.5 g cm-3, indicating the particles are internal mixed sulfate and organics. While the 150nm and 240 nm particle densities exhibited bimodal distribution with an additional small peak at ˜1.1 g cm-3, which is considered as external mixed organic particles or aged soot particles. The particle hygroscopic growth factor for all the measured sizes at RH of 90% showed bimodal distribution, attributing to external mixed organics (or aged soot) and internal mixed organics and sulfate. Both the

  16. Electron acceleration via high contrast laser interacting with submicron clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lu; Chen Liming; Wang Weiming; Yan Wenchao; Yuan Dawei; Mao Jingyi; Wang Zhaohua; Liu Cheng; Shen Zhongwei; Li Yutong; Dong Quanli; Lu Xin; Ma Jinglong; Wei Zhiyi [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana [Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beams Science Directorate, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan); Li Dazhang [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-01-02

    We experimentally investigated electron acceleration from submicron size argon clusters-gas target irradiated by a 100 fs, 10 TW laser pulses having a high-contrast. Electron beams are observed in the longitudinal and transverse directions to the laser propagation. The measured energy of the longitudinal electron reaches 600 MeV and the charge of the electron beam in the transverse direction is more than 3 nC. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of the interaction has been performed and it shows an enhancement of electron charge by using the cluster-gas target.

  17. The possible existence of interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in collected interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    Extraterrestrial dust particles which are 3 to 50 microns in size are routinely collected in the stratosphere and are now available for general laboratory study. These grains represent true Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs). Issues associated with the carbon containing components of IDPs which occur in a variety of physical forms, including amorphous mantles and matrix materials, are addressed. The observed properties of the hydrocarbon phase in IDPs are compared with those expected for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  18. The surface characterisation and comparison of two potential sub-micron, sugar bulking excipients for use in low-dose, suspension formulations in metered dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jeff; Crean, Barry; Davies, Martyn; Toon, Richard; Jinks, Phil; Roberts, Clive J

    2008-09-01

    This study compares the surface characteristics and surface energetics of two potential bulking excipients, anhydrous sub-micron alpha-lactose and sub-micron sucrose, for use with low-dose, suspension formulations in pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Both sub-micron bulking excipients are processed from parent materials (alpha-lactose monohydrate/alpha-lactose monohydrate and silk grade sucrose, respectively) so the surface characteristics of each material were determined and compared. Additionally, the surface energetics and adhesive interactions between each sub-micron bulking excipient and some chosen active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) used in pMDI formulations were also determined. From this data, it was possible to predict the potential degree of interaction between the APIs and each sub-micron bulking excipient, thus determining suitable API-excipient combinations for pMDI formulation optimisation. Salmon calcitonin was also investigated as a potential API due to the current interest in, and the potential low-dose requirements for, the pulmonary delivery of proteins. The size and morphology of each sub-micron excipient (and parent materials) were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the crystalline nature of each sub-micron excipient and parent material was assessed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface chemistry of each sub-micron excipient was analysed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface energies of each sub-micron excipient, along with their respective parent materials and any intermediates, were determined using two techniques. The surface energies of these materials were determined via (a) single particle adhesive interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and (b) 'bulk' material surface interactions using contact angle measurements (CA). From the CA data, it was possible to calculate the theoretical work of adhesion values for each API-excipient interaction using the surface component

  19. Impact of beam ions on α-particle measurements by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedal, J.; Bindslev, H.; Budny, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask the measureme......Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask...

  20. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmania Heredia Rivera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX. The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt, metallic (mainly Fe, and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris. The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city.

  1. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt), metallic (mainly Fe), and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris). The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city. PMID:27706087

  2. Insight into interrelation between single-particle and collective diffusion in binary melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Elena V.; Evteev, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    The interrelation between the kinetics of single-particle (tracer) and collective diffusion in a binary melt is investigated theoretically within the framework of the Mori-Zwanzig formalism of statistical mechanics. An analytical expression for the Onsager coefficient for mass transport and two self-diffusion coefficients of species in a binary melt is derived using analysis based on the generalized Langevin equation. The derived expression naturally accounts for manifestation of microscopic (dynamic) cross-correlation effects in the kinetics of collective diffusion. Hence, it presents an explicit extension of the well-known Darken equation which is currently often used for expressing collective interdiffusion in terms of the two self-diffusion coefficients. An application of our analysis for interpretation of recent experimental data on the interrelation between the kinetics of single-particle and collective diffusion in Al-rich Ni-Al melts is demonstrated.

  3. Nontoxic colloidal particles impede antibiotic resistance of swarming bacteria by disrupting collective motion and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengtao; Liu, Fang; Xing, Bengang; Yeow, Edwin K. L.

    2015-12-01

    A monolayer of swarming B. subtilis on semisolid agar is shown to display enhanced resistance against antibacterial drugs due to their collective behavior and motility. The dynamics of swarming motion, visualized in real time using time-lapse microscopy, prevents the bacteria from prolonged exposure to lethal drug concentrations. The elevated drug resistance is significantly reduced when the collective motion of bacteria is judiciously disrupted using nontoxic polystyrene colloidal particles immobilized on the agar surface. The colloidal particles block and hinder the motion of the cells, and force large swarming rafts to break up into smaller packs in order to maneuver across narrow spaces between densely packed particles. In this manner, cohesive rafts rapidly lose their collectivity, speed, and group dynamics, and the cells become vulnerable to the drugs. The antibiotic resistance capability of swarming B. subtilis is experimentally observed to be negatively correlated with the number density of colloidal particles on the engineered surface. This relationship is further tested using an improved self-propelled particle model that takes into account interparticle alignment and hard-core repulsion. This work has pertinent implications on the design of optimal methods to treat drug resistant bacteria commonly found in swarming colonies.

  4. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  5. Collective behaviour of self-propelling particles with conservative kinematic constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratushna, Valeriya Igorivna

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis I considered the dynamics of self-propelling particles (SPP). Flocking of living organisms like birds, fishes, ants, bacteria etc. is an area where the theory of the collective behaviour of SPP can be applied. One can often see how these animals develop coherent motion, amazing the

  6. Feature of Dust Particles in the Spring Free Troposphere over Dunhuang in Northwestern China: Electron Microscopic Experiments on Individual Particles Collected with a Balloon-borne Impactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, M.; Iwasaka, Y., E-mail: kosa@t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Matsuki, A.; Trochkine, D.; Kim, Y. S. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University (Japan); Zhang, D. [Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences (Japan); Nagatani, T. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University (Japan); Shi, G.-Y. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (China); Nagatani, M.; Nakata, H. [Nagoya University, Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (Japan); Shen, Z. [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Science (China); Chen, B.; Li, G. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (China)

    2005-12-15

    Free tropospheric aerosol particles were collected using a balloon-borne particle impactor in August of 2002 and March of 2003 at Dunhuang in northwestern China (40{sup o}00'N, 94{sup o}30'E), and the morphology and elemental composition of the aerosol particles were analyzed in order to understand the mixing state of coarse dust particles (diameter >1 {mu}m) over the desert areas in the Asian continent in spring. Electron microscopic experiments on the particles revealed that dust particles were major constituents of coarse mode particles in the free troposphere over the Taklamakan Desert in spring and summer.Si-rich or Ca-rich particles are major components of dust particles collected in the free troposphere over dunhuang and the values of [number of Ca-rich particles]/[number of Si-rich particles] differs markedly between spring and summer, being about 0.3 in the spring of 2003 and about 1.0 in the summer of 2002 at heights 3-5 km above sea level. It is likely that the condition of the ground surface and the strength of vertical mixing in source areas of Asian dust are potential factors causing the difference in the chemical types of dust particles.Comparison of the elemental compositions of these particles with those of particles collected over Japan strongly suggests that these particles were chemically modified during their long-range transport in the free troposphere. Analysis of wind systems shows that both the predominating westerly wind in the free troposphere and the surface wind strongly controlled by the geographical structure of the Tarim Basin are important in the long-range transport of KOSA particles originating in the Taklamakan Desert.

  7. Hydrodynamically Induced Collective Motion of Optically Driven Colloidal Particles on a Circular Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2017-10-01

    Among typical active matter such as self-propelled micro-objects, the characteristic collective motion originating from the hydrodynamic interaction between constituents has been observed in both biological and artificial systems. In illustrating such motion of micrometer-size particles in a one-dimensional optically driven system with a low Reynolds number, we highlight the importance of the hydrodynamic interaction. We show the appearance of regular stationary and dynamic arrangements resembling "crystals" or "clusters" observed in the equilibrium state. A transition in the collective motion has been observed by varying the hydrodynamic interaction in a system of two particle sizes and in a spatially confined system. An optical manipulation technique and the related hydrodynamic equations are also discussed. These are useful tools for elucidating the complex collective behavior of the hydrodynamically coupled micro-objects.

  8. DUSTER: collection of meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles in the upper stratosphere .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, V.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Rotundi, A.; Ferrari, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Nanometer- to micrometer-size particles present in the upper stratosphere are a mixture of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial origins. They can be extraterrestrial particles condensed after meteor ablation. Meteoric dust in bolides is occasionally deposited into the lower stratosphere around 20 km altitude. Nanometer CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38 km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval), a balloon-borne instrument for the non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 microns. We report the collection of micron sized CaCO_3 (calcite) grains. Their morphologies show evidence of melting and condensation after vaporization suggest at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. The formation environment of the collected grains was probably a dense dust cloud formed by the disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the Earth� atmosphere. For the first time, DUSTER collected meteor ablation products that were presumably associated with the disintegration of a bolide crossing the Earth's atmosphere. The collected mostly CaO and pure carbon nanoparticles from the debris cloud of a fireball, included: 1) intact fragments; 2) quenched melted grains; and 3) vapor phase condensation products. The DUSTER project was funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), PRIN2008/MIUR (Ministero dell'Istruzione dell'Universitá e della Ricerca), PNRA 2013(Piano Nazionale Ricerca Antartide). CNES graciously provided this flight opportunity. We thank E. Zona and S. Inarta at the Laboratorio di Fisica Cosmica INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte-Universitá di Napoli Parthenope. F.J.M.R. was supported by grant NNX07AI39G from the NASA Cosmochemistry Program. We thank three anonymous reviewers who assisted us in introducing our new instrument.

  9. Weak size dependence of resuspended radiocesium adsorbed on soil particles collected after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Ohashi, Hideo; Suzuki, Fumie; Okuda, Tomoaki; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Akata, Naofumi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Most studies of the properties of airborne radionuclides emitted from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant have focused on the relatively early stages of the accident, and little is known about the characteristics of radiocesium in the long-term. In this study, we analyzed activity size distributions of airborne radiocesium collected over 5 months in Tsukuba, Japan. Radiocesium in the accumulation mode size range (0.1-2 μm in aerodynamic diameter) was overwhelming in the early aerosol samples and decreased with time, while that associated with coarse aerosols remained airborne. We examined the radiocesium adsorbed onto airborne soil particles, and found that the size dependence of 137Cs surface density adsorbed on soil particles was weak. That is, radiocesium was distributed homogeneously throughout the aerodynamic diameter range of 2.1-11 μm. This characteristic may be related to the reported structure of radiocesium-bearing soil particles collected from the ground, which consisted of an aggregate of specific clay minerals and other non-cesium adsorbing particles. The resuspension factors for the first two aerosol samples collected during late April and May 2011 were close to those in European cities in the months following the Chernobyl accident, despite different soil and weather conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurements of multi-particle correlations and collective flow with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bold, Tomasz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of flow harmonics of charged particles from $v_2$ to $v_7$ in Pb+Pb collisions in the wide range of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity provides not only a way to study the initial state of the nuclear collisions and soft particle collective dynamics, but also provides insight into jet quenching via the measurement of flow harmonics at high transverse momenta. The longitudinal fluctuations of the $v_n$ and event-plane angles $\\Psi_n$ are also presented. The longitudinal flow decorrelations have contributions from $v_n$-magnitude fluctuations and event plane twist. A four-particle correlator is used to separate these two effects. Results show both effects have a linear dependence on pseudorapidity separation from $v_2$ to $v_5$, and show a small but measurable variation with collision energy. While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, its evidence in pp collisions is less clear. In order to assess the collective nature of multi-particle production, the corre...

  11. Measurements of multi-particle correlations and collective flow with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bold, Tomasz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of flow harmonics of charged particles from v_2 to v_7 in Pb+Pb collisions in the wide range of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity provides not only a way to study the initial state of the nuclear collisions and soft particle collective dynamics, but also provides insight into jet quenching via the measurement of flow harmonics at high transverse momenta. The longitudinal fluctuations of the v_n and event-plane angles Psi_n are also presented. The longitudinal flow decorrelations have contributions from v_n-magnitude fluctuations and event plane twist. A four-particle correlator is used to separate these two effects. Results show both effects have a linear dependence on pseudorapidity separation from v_2 to v_5, and show a small but measurable variation with collision energy. While collectivity is well established in collisions involving heavy nuclei, its evidence in pp collisions is less clear. In order to assess the collective nature of multi-particle production, the correlation measurem...

  12. Evidence for collective multi-particle correlations in pPb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bierwagen, Katharina; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-06-29

    The second-order azimuthal anisotropy Fourier harmonics, $v_2$, are obtained in pPb and PbPb collisions over a wide pseudorapidity ($\\eta$) range based on correlations among six or more charged particles. The pPb data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 nb$^{-1}$, were collected during the 2013 LHC pPb run at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV by the CMS experiment. A sample of semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.5 $\\mu$b$^{-1}$ and covering a similar range of particle multiplicities as the pPb data, is also analyzed for comparison. The six- and eight-particle cumulant and the Lee-Yang zeros methods are used to extract the $v_2$ coefficients, extending previous studies of two- and four-particle correlations. For both the pPb and PbPb systems, the $v_2$ values obtained with correlations among more than four particles are consistent with previously published four-particle results. These data supp...

  13. Improved particle swarm optimization with a collective local unimodal search for continuous optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasomwan, Martins Akugbe; Adewumi, Aderemi Oluyinka

    2014-01-01

    A new local search technique is proposed and used to improve the performance of particle swarm optimization algorithms by addressing the problem of premature convergence. In the proposed local search technique, a potential particle position in the solution search space is collectively constructed by a number of randomly selected particles in the swarm. The number of times the selection is made varies with the dimension of the optimization problem and each selected particle donates the value in the location of its randomly selected dimension from its personal best. After constructing the potential particle position, some local search is done around its neighbourhood in comparison with the current swarm global best position. It is then used to replace the global best particle position if it is found to be better; otherwise no replacement is made. Using some well-studied benchmark problems with low and high dimensions, numerical simulations were used to validate the performance of the improved algorithms. Comparisons were made with four different PSO variants, two of the variants implement different local search technique while the other two do not. Results show that the improved algorithms could obtain better quality solution while demonstrating better convergence velocity and precision, stability, robustness, and global-local search ability than the competing variants.

  14. Improved Particle Swarm Optimization with a Collective Local Unimodal Search for Continuous Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Akugbe Arasomwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new local search technique is proposed and used to improve the performance of particle swarm optimization algorithms by addressing the problem of premature convergence. In the proposed local search technique, a potential particle position in the solution search space is collectively constructed by a number of randomly selected particles in the swarm. The number of times the selection is made varies with the dimension of the optimization problem and each selected particle donates the value in the location of its randomly selected dimension from its personal best. After constructing the potential particle position, some local search is done around its neighbourhood in comparison with the current swarm global best position. It is then used to replace the global best particle position if it is found to be better; otherwise no replacement is made. Using some well-studied benchmark problems with low and high dimensions, numerical simulations were used to validate the performance of the improved algorithms. Comparisons were made with four different PSO variants, two of the variants implement different local search technique while the other two do not. Results show that the improved algorithms could obtain better quality solution while demonstrating better convergence velocity and precision, stability, robustness, and global-local search ability than the competing variants.

  15. Mechanical and electrostatic experiments with dust particles collected in the inner coma of comet 67P by COSIMA onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Fischer, Henning; Langevin, Yves; Merouane, Sihane; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Stenzel, Oliver; Briois, Christelle; Kissel, Jochen; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Altobelli, Nicolas; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anais; Cottin, Herve; Engrand, Cecile; Fray, Nicolas; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Mellado, Eva Maria; Modica, Paola; Le Roy, Lena; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The in situ cometary dust particle instrument COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) onboard ESA's Rosetta mission has collected about 31 000 dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. The particles are identified by optical microscope imaging and analysed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After dust particle collection by low speed impact on metal targets, the collected particle morphology points towards four families of cometary dust particles. COSIMA is an in situ laboratory that operates remotely controlled next to the comet nucleus. The particles can be further manipulated within the instrument by mechanical and electrostatic means after their collection by impact. The particles are stored above 0°C in the instrument and the experiments are carried out on the refractory, ice-free matter of the captured cometary dust particles. An interesting particle morphology class, the compact particles, is not fragmented on impact. One of these particles was mechanically pressed and thereby crushed into large fragments. The particles are good electrical insulators and transform into rubble pile agglomerates by the application of an energetic indium ion beam during the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'.

  16. Collective motion in repulsive self-propelled particles in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Takayuki; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2017-11-01

    We study the collective dynamics of a simple model of repulsive self-propelled particles in three different geometries bounded by reflecting walls. Order-disorder transition is observed in all three cases and the behavior of the phase diagram is similar to that of a system with periodic boundary conditions, which supports a view that the coherent motion of particles is induced by a microscopic mechanism. We also find that some interesting quasistable dynamic patterns may appear during the ordering process. The long lifetime of the transient structures indicates that the boundaries hinder the propagation of correlations.

  17. Collectivity in diffusion of colloidal particles: from effective interactions to spatially correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, M.; Góra, P. F.

    2017-02-01

    The collectivity in the simultaneous diffusion of many particles, i.e. the interdependence of stochastic forces affecting different particles in the same solution, is a largely overlooked phenomenon with no well-established theory. Recently, we have proposed a novel type of thermodynamically consistent Langevin dynamics driven by spatially correlated noise (SCN) that can contribute to the understanding of this problem. This model draws a link between the theory of effective interactions in binary colloidal mixtures and the properties of SCN. In the current article, we review this model from the perspective of collective diffusion and generalize it to the case of multiple (N  >  2) particles. Since our theory of SCN-driven Langevin dynamics has certain issues that could not be resolved within this framework, in this article we also provide another approach to the problem of collectivity. We discuss the multi-particle Mori-Zwanzig model, which is fully microscopically consistent. Indeed, we show that this model supplies a lot of information, complementary to the SCN-based approach, e.g. it predicts the deterministic dynamics of the relative distance between the particles, it provides an approximation for non-equilibrium effective interactions and predicts the collective sub-diffusion of tracers in the group. These results provide the short-range, inertial limit of the earlier model and agree with its predictions under some general conditions. In this article we also review the origin of SCN and its consequences for a variety of physical systems, with emphasis on the colloids.

  18. Enhancement in electrical conductivity of pastes containing submicron Ag-coated Cu filler with palmitic acid surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2017-09-01

    The fabrication and applied use of submicron Ag-coated Cu (Cu@Ag) particles as a filler material for epoxy-based conductive pastes having the advantages of a lower material cost and antioxidation behavior were studied. Submicron Cu@Ag particles were successfully prepared and surface-modified using palmitic acid. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry results indicated the formation of an organic layer by the chemical interaction between the Cu@Ag surface and palmitic acid and the survival of the organic layer after treatment at 160 °C for 3 h in air. The printed pastes containing both commercial micron Cu@Ag flakes and the fabricated submicron Cu@Ag particles showed a greatly reduced electrical resistivity (4.68 × 10-4 Ω cm) after surface modification compared to an initial value of 1.85 × 10-3 Ω cm when cured.

  19. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  20. Collective magnetic behavior of biocompatible systems of maghemite particles coated with functional polymer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchenko, P.; Nedelko, N. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Mitina, N. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Lewińska, S.; Dłużewski, P. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Greneche, J.M. [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283, Université du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Ubizskii, S.; Navrotskyi, S.; Zaichenko, A. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Ślawska-Waniewska, A., E-mail: slaws@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    Three series of core–shell maghemite nanoparticles were prepared by a template synthesis using surface active oligoperoxides and further surface initiated grafting functional polymers, forming shell suitable for biomedical applications. Because the polymer shells prevent exchange coupling between maghemite particles, the overall magnetic properties of the samples studied are dominated by dipolar interparticle interactions. Only the sample with the highest polymer fraction displays superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena close to the room temperature. On cooling, the magnetostatic interactions lead to a disordered collective magnetic state that should be described in terms of a spin-glass phenomenology. This collective freezing cannot however be considered as a generic spin-glass phase transition at a well-defined temperature but rather as freezing to a metastable glass-like state of locally correlated structural domains (clusters) without a long-range order. A quasi static spin ordering is only achieved at temperatures much below the freezing temperature. - Highlights: • Core–shell γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/polymer particles were prepared using new surface active oligoperoxides. • Grafting of particle shells with functional polymers, suitable for biomedical applications. • Magnetic properties of nanocomposites are dominated by dipolar interactions. • On cooling magnetostatic interactions lead to a spin-glass-like state. • The most diluted maghemite particles display superparamagnetism at 300 K.

  1. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  2. Determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range for wood dust collected by air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S; Bartolucci, Al

    2002-10-01

    In the absence of methods for determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range with good discrimination, the samples collected by personal air sampling devices can only be characterized by their total mass. This parameter gives no information regarding the size distribution of the aerosol or the size-selection characteristics of different samplers in field use conditions. A method is described where the particles collected by a sampler are removed, suspended, and re-deposited on a mixed cellulose-ester filter, and examined by optical microscopy to determine particle aerodynamic diameters. This method is particularly appropriate to wood dust particles which are generally large and close to rectangular prisms in shape. Over 200 wood dust samples have been collected in three different wood-products industries, using the traditional closed-face polystyrene/acrylonitrile cassette, the Institute of Occupational Medicine inhalable sampler, and the Button sampler developed by the University of Cincinnati. A portion of these samples has been analyzed to determine the limitations of this method. Extensive quality control measures are being developed to improve the robustness of the procedure, and preliminary results suggest the method has an accuracy similar to that required of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods. The results should provide valuable insights into the collection characteristics of the samplers and the impact of these characteristics on comparison of sampler results to present and potential future limit values. The NIOSH Deep South Education and Research Center has a focus on research into hazards of the forestry and associated wood-products industry, and it is hoped to expand this activity in the future.

  3. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  4. Surfactants and submicron sea spray generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellegri, K.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Yoon, Y.J.; Jennings, S.G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to elucidate the role of surfactants on the primary marine aerosol production of submicron marine aerosols. A synthetic surfactant SDS was used in conjunction with artificially generated seawater, and the resultant bubble-mediated aerosol produced was

  5. Fabrication and characterization of submicron polymer waveguides by micro-transfer molding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Te-Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Various methods exist for fabrication of micron and submicron sized waveguide structures. However, most of them include expensive and time consuming semiconductor fabrication techniques. An economical method for fabricating waveguide structures is introduced and demonstrated in this thesis. This method is established based on previously well-developed photonic crystal fabrication method called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The waveguide in this work functions by a coupler structure that diffracts the incident light into submicron polymer rods. The light is then guided through the rods. Characterization is done by collecting the light that has been guided through the waveguide and exits the end of these submicron polymer bars. The coupling and waveguiding capabilities are demonstrated using two light sources, a laser and white light.

  6. Nanocrystalline oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, NiO) coatings on BaTiO{sub 3} submicron particles by precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassano, Alessio [University of Genoa, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering (Italy); Buscaglia, Vincenzo, E-mail: v.buscaglia@ge.ieni.cnr.i [National Research Council, Institute for Energetics and Interphases (Italy); Sennour, Mohamed [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre des Materiaux (France); Buscaglia, Maria Teresa; Viviani, Massimo [National Research Council, Institute for Energetics and Interphases (Italy); Nanni, Paolo [University of Genoa, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    Nanocoatings (5-20 nm) of different compounds on fine BaTiO{sub 3} particles were obtained by means of precipitation processes. Homogeneous and smooth shells of Y(OH)CO{sub 3} and Dy(OH)CO{sub 3} were grown from nitrate solutions in the presence of urea. An irregular coating consisting of zirconia nanoparticles was produced from zirconyl nitrate solution using ammonia as a precipitating agent after adsorption of a polymeric polyelectrolyte on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. Composite particles with a peculiar morphology were obtained by inducing heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Ni(OH){sub 2} lamellae on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The different shells can be transformed in a nanocrystalline coating of the corresponding oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, NiO) by calcination at moderate temperatures (400-700 {sup o}C). The overall results indicate that precipitation from solution represents a versatile process to grow a second-phase layer on the surface of BaTiO{sub 3} particles. This approach can be used as an alternative to mechanical wet mixing for controlled doping of ferroelectric materials and for the fabrication of composite materials with specific geometry of the two-phase assembly.

  7. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  8. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, $Q$, greater than that of the electron, $e$. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0~fb$^{-1}$ and 18.8~fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7~$TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=8~$TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of-flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to $1e \\leq |Q| \\leq 8e$. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724~GeV are excluded for $|Q|=1e$, $2e$, $3e$, $4e$, $5e$, $6e$, $7e$, and $8e$, respectivel...

  9. Porous Polyurethane Foam for Use as a Particle Collection Substrate in a Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Levi W D; Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Grassian, Vicki H; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Porous polyurethane foam was evaluated to replace the eight nylon meshes used as a substrate to collect nanoparticles in the Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition (NRD) sampler. Cylindrical (25-mm diameter by 40-mm deep) foam with 110 pores per inch was housed in a 25-mm-diameter conductive polypropylene cassette cowl compatible with the NRD sampler. Pristine foam and nylon meshes were evaluated for metals content via elemental analysis. The size-selective collection efficiency of the foam was evaluated using salt (NaCl) and metal fume aerosols in independent tests. Collection efficiencies were compared to the nanoparticulate matter (NPM) criterion and a semi-empirical model for foam. Changes in collection efficiency and pressure drop of the foam and nylon meshes were measured after loading with metal fume particles as measures of substrate performance. Substantially less titanium was found in the foam (0.173 μg sampler -1 ) compared to the nylon mesh (125 μg sampler -1 ), improving the detection capabilities of the NRD sampler for titanium dioxide particles. The foam collection efficiency was similar to that of the nylon meshes and the NPM criterion (R 2 = 0.98, for NaCl), although the semi-empirical model underestimated the experimental efficiency (R 2 = 0.38). The pressure drop across the foam was 8% that of the nylon meshes when pristine and changed minimally with metal fume loading (~ 19 mg). In contrast, the pores of the nylon meshes clogged after loading with ~ 1 mg metal fume. These results indicate that foam is a suitable substrate to collect metal (except for cadmium) nanoparticles in the NRD sampler.

  10. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1992-04-27

    The purpose of this research program is to identify and evaluate a variety of additives capable of increasing particle cohesion which could be used for improving collection efficiency in an ESP. A three-phase screening process will be used to provide the, evaluation of many additives in a logical and cost-effective manner. The three step approach involves the following experimental setups: 1. Provide a preliminary screening in the laboratory by measuring the effects of various conditioning agents on reentrainment of flyash particles in an electric field operating at simulated flue gas conditions. 2. Evaluate the successful additives using a 100 acfm bench-scale ESP operating on actual flue gas. 3. Obtain the data required for scaling up the technology by testing the two or three most promising conditioning agents at the pilot scale.

  11. Charge collection efficiency of GaAs detectors studied with low-energy heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R; Linhart, V; O'Shea, V; Pospísil, S; Raine, C; Smith, K; Sinor, M; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxially grown GaAs layers have recently been produced with sufficient thickness and low enough free carrier concentration to permit their use as radiation detectors. Initial tests have shown that the epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor as the depletion behaviour follows the square root dependency on the applied bias. This article presents the results of measurements of the growth of the active depletion depth with increasing bias using low-energy protons and alpha particles as probes for various depths and their comparison to values extrapolated from capacitance measurements. From the proton and alpha particle spectroscopic measurements, an active depth of detector material that collects 100% of the charge generated inside it was determined. The consistency of these results with independent capacitance measurements supports the idea that the GaAs epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor. (author)

  12. Aerodynamics and deposition effects of inhaled submicron drug aerosol in airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiyazuddin, Md; Mujahid, Md; Hussain, Talib; Siddiqui, Hefazat H; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Khar, Roop K; Ahmad, Farhan J

    2013-01-01

    Particle engineering is the prime focus to improve pulmonary drug targeting with the splendor of nanomedicines. In recent years, submicron particles have emerged as prettyful candidate for improved fludisation and deposition. For effective deposition, the particle size must be in the range of 0.5-5 μm. Inhalers design for the purpose of efficient delivery of powders to lungs is again a crucial task for pulmonary scientists. A huge number of DPI devices exist in the market, a significant number are awaiting FDA approval, some are under development and a large number have been patented or applied for patent. Even with superior design, the delivery competence is still deprived, mostly due to fluidisation problems which cause poor aerosol generation and deposition. Because of the cohesive nature and poor flow characteristics, they are difficult to redisperse upon aerosolization with breath. These problems are illustrious in aerosol research, much of which is vastly pertinent to pulmonary therapeutics. A technical review is presented here of advances that have been utilized in production of submicron drug particles, their in vitro/in vivo evaluations, aerosol effects and pulmonary fate of inhaled submicron powders.

  13. Influence of collecting substrates on the characterization of hygroscopic properties of inorganic aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Li, Xue; Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2014-03-04

    The influence of six collecting substrates with different physical properties on the hygroscopicity measurement of inorganic aerosol particle surrogates and the potential applications of these substrates were examined experimentally. Laboratory-generated single salt particles, such as NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4, 1-5 μm in size, were deposited on transmission electron microscopy grids (TEM grids), parafilm-M, Al foil, Ag foil, silicon wafer, and cover glass. The particle hygroscopic properties were examined by optical microscopy. Contact angle measurements showed that parafilm-M is hydrophobic, and cover glass, silicon wafer, Al foil, and Ag foil substrates are hydrophilic. The observed deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) values for NaCl, KCl, and (NH4)2SO4 on the TEM grids and parafilm-M substrates agreed well with the literature values, whereas the DRHs obtained on the hydrophilic substrates were consistently ∼1-2% lower, compared to those on the hydrophobic substrates. The water layer adsorbed on the salt crystals prior to deliquescence increases the Gibb's free energy of the salt crystal-substrate system compared to the free energy of the salt droplet-substrate system, which in turn reduces the DRHs. The hydrophilic nature of the substrate does not affect the measured efflorescence RH (ERH) values. However, the Cl(-) or SO4(2-) ions in aqueous salt droplets seem to have reacted with Ag foil to form AgCl or Ag2SO4, respectively, which in turn acts as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation of the original salts, leading to higher ERHs. The TEM grids were found to be most suitable for the hygroscopic measurements of individual inorganic aerosol particles by optical microscopy and when multiple analytical techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and/or Raman microspectrometry, are applied to the same individual particles.

  14. A novel inlet system for online chemical analysis of semi-volatile submicron particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, P.; Müller, M.; D'Anna, B.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-03-01

    We herein present a novel modular inlet system designed to be coupled to low-pressure gas analyzers for online chemical characterization of semi-volatile submicron particles. The "chemical analysis of aerosol online" (CHARON) inlet consists of a gas-phase denuder for stripping off gas-phase analytes, an aerodynamic lens for particle collimation combined with an inertial sampler for the particle-enriched flow and a thermodesorption unit for particle volatilization prior to chemical analysis. The denuder was measured to remove gas-phase organics with an efficiency > 99.999% and to transmit particles in the 100-750 nm size range with a 75-90% efficiency. The measured average particle enrichment factor in the subsampling flow from the aerodynamic lens was 25.6, which is a factor of 3 lower than the calculated theoretical optimum. We coupled the CHARON inlet to a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) which quantitatively detects most organic analytes and ammonia. The combined CHARON-PTR-ToF-MS setup is thus capable of measuring both the organic and the ammonium fraction in submicron particles in real time. Individual organic compounds can be detected down to levels of 10-20 ng m-3. Two proof-of-principle studies were carried out for demonstrating the analytical power of this new instrumental setup: (i) oxygenated organics and their partitioning between the gas and the particulate phase were observed from the reaction of limonene with ozone and (ii) nicotine was measured in cigarette smoke particles demonstrating that selected organic target compounds can be detected in submicron particles in real time.

  15. Hot gas path component cooling system having a particle collection chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2018-02-20

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component includes a substrate having an outer surface and an inner surface. The inner surface defines at least one interior space. A passage is formed in the substrate between the outer surface and the inner surface. An access passage is formed in the substrate and extends from the outer surface to the inner space. The access passage is formed at a first acute angle to the passage and includes a particle collection chamber. The access passage is configured to channel a cooling fluid to the passage. Furthermore, the passage is configured to channel the cooling fluid therethrough to cool the substrate.

  16. Micromagnetic Simulations of Submicron Cobalt Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.J.; Cerjan, C.

    1999-08-30

    Numerical simulations of submicron Co extruded elliptical dots were performed to illustrate the relative importance of different physical parameters on the switching behavior in the easy direction. Shape, size, magnetic moment magnitude and crystalline anisotropy, both magnitude and distribution, were varied. The simulation includes calculation of the magnetostatic, exchange and crystalline anisotropy fields on a structured mesh using finite difference techniques. The smooth boundary of the dots are accurately represented by use of the Embedded Curve Boundary method.

  17. Submicron Surface-Patterned Fibers and Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    The patterned fiber surface behaves as an optical diffraction grating when the feature size is comparable with visible light wavelengths. A red laser...the optical fiber gratings For the first diffraction order of the micron and submicron patterned fiber , we utilize the formula α tanh (where s...e) SEM images of patterned PMMA fiber are depicted. The inset shows the cross- section of this fiber . Submitted to 20 Figure S3

  18. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. First topical report, Results of laboratory screening of additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of {le} 10 {mu}m dia.

  19. Submicron ionography of nanostructures using a femtosecond-laser-driven-cluster-based source

    OpenAIRE

    Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Fukuda, Y.(Miyagi University of Education, Department of Physics, Sendai, Japan); Kando, M; Kotaki, H.; Homma, T.; KAWASE, K; Kameshima, T.; Pirozkhov, A.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hayashi, Y; Nakamura, T.

    2009-01-01

    An intense isotropic source of multicharged carbon and oxygen ions with energy above 300 keV and particle number >108 per shot was obtained by femtosecond Ti:Sa laser irradiation of submicron clusters. The source was employed for high-contrast contact ionography images with 600 nm spatial resolution. A variation in object thickness of 100 nm was well resolved for both Zr and polymer foils.

  20. Comprehensive investigation of the dynamics of micron and submicron lunar ejecta in heliocentric space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrave, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The forces which act on micron and submicron dust particles in interplanetary space are studied in detail. Particular attention is given to Mie scattering theory as it applies to the calculation of the force due to radiation pressure. All of the forces are integrated into a computer model to study the heliocentric orbits of lunar ejecta. It is shown that lunar ejecta contribute to a geocentric dust cloud, as well as to a heliocentric dust belt.

  1. Phase transformation and intense 2.7 μm emission from Er3+ doped YF3/YOF submicron-crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guanqi; Dong, Guoping; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhang, Qinyuan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Yttrium fluoride YF3:Er(3+) and yttrium oxyfluoride YOF:Er(3+) submicron-crystals with mid-infrared fluorescent emissions were synthesized for the first time. The rhombohedral phase YOF submicron-crystals were synthesized by the crystalline phase transformation from pure orthorhombic YF3 submicron-crystals, which were prepared by co-precipitation method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which showed that submicron-crystals were quasi-spherical with the particle size of ~400 nm. A novel formation mechanism of YOF submicron-crystals was proposed. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated the 2.7 μm emission of Er(3+) has remarkably enhanced with the increase of Er(3+) doping concentration, and a novel dynamic circulatory energy transfer mechanism was proposed. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) were used to demonstrate the change of hydroxyl content. These oxyfluoride submicron-crystals provide a new material for nano/submicron-crystals-glass composites, and open a brand new field for the realization of mid-infrared micro/nano-lasers.

  2. Laser direct writing using submicron-diameter fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Guoguang; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Hou, Changlun; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, a novel direct writing technique using submicron-diameter fibers is presented. The submicron-diameter fiber probe serves as a tightly confined point source and it adopts micro touch mode in the process of writing. The energy distribution of direct writing model is analyzed by Three-Dimension Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Experiments demonstrate that submicron-diameter fiber direct writing has some advantages: simple process, 350-nm-resolution (lower than 442-nm-wavelength), large writing area, and controllable width of lines. In addition, by altering writing direction of lines, complex submicron patterns can be fabricated.

  3. Evolution of Single Particle and Collective properties in the Neutron-Rich Mg Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Reiter, P; Wiens, A; Fitting, J; Lauer, M; Van duppen, P L E; Finke, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the single particle and collective properties of the neutron-rich Mg isotopes in transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation using REX-ISOLDE and MINIBALL. From the Coulomb excitation measurement precise and largely model independent B( E2 ; 0$^{+}_{g.s.}\\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}_{1}$ ) will be determined for the even-even isotopes. For the odd isotopes the distribution of the E2 strength over a few low-lying states will be measured. The sign of the M1/E2 mixing ratio, extracted from angular distributions, is characteristic of the sign of the deformation, as is the resulting level scheme. The neutron-pickup channel in the transfer reactions will allow for a determination of the single particle properties (spin, parity, spectroscopic factors) of these nuclei. This information will give new insights in changes of nuclear structure in the vicinity of the island of deformation around $^{32}$Mg. A total of 24 shifts of REX beam time is requested.

  4. Cytotoxicity and Characterization of Particles Collected From an Indium–Tin Oxide Production Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badding, Melissa A.; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.; Fix, Natalie R.; Cummings, Kristin J.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Occupational exposure to indium compound particles has recently been associated with lung disease among workers in the indium–tin oxide (ITO) industry. Previous studies suggested that excessive alveolar surfactant and reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a role in the development of pulmonary lesions following exposure to indium compounds. However, toxicity at the cellular level has not been comprehensively evaluated. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess which, if any, compounds encountered during ITO production are toxic to cultured cells and ultimately contribute to the pathogenesis of indium lung disease. The compounds used in this study were collected from eight different processing stages at an ITO production facility. Enhanced dark field imaging showed 5 of the compounds significantly associated with cells within 1 h, suggesting that cellular reactions to the compound particles may be occurring rapidly. To examine the potential cytotoxic effects of these associations, ROS generation, cell viability, and apoptosis were evaluated following exposures in RAW 264.7 mouse monocyte macrophage and BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cell lines. Both exhibited reduced viability with exposures, while apoptosis only occurred in RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggested that excessive ROS production is likely not the predominant mechanism underlying indium-induced lung disease. However, the effects on cell viability reveal that several of the compounds are cytotoxic, and therefore, exposures need to be carefully monitored in the industrial setting. PMID:25208660

  5. Collective motion of self-propelled particles with density-dependent switching effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiu-shi; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of density-dependent angular response on large scale collective motion, that particles are more likely to switch their moving direction within lower local density region. We show that the presence of density-dependent angular response leads to three typical phases: polar liquid, micro-phase separation and disordered gas states. In our model, the transition between micro-phase separation and disordered gas is discontinuous. Giant number fluctuation is observed in polar liquid phase with statistically homogeneous order. In the micro-phase separation parameter space, high order and high density bands dominate the dynamics. We also compare our results with Vicsek model and show that the density-dependent directional switching response can stabilize the band state to very low noise condition. This band stripe could recruit almost all the particles in the system, which greatly enhances the coherence of the system. Our results could be helpful for understanding extremely coherent motion in nature and also would have practical implications for designing novel self-organization pattern.

  6. Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Famiano, M.A.

    1997-07-07

    A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

  7. [Nasal submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract preparation technology research based on phase transfer of solute technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-jun; Shi, Jun-hui; Chen, Shi-bin; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Based on the demand of nasal drug delivery high drug loadings, using the unique phase transfer of solute, integrating the phospholipid complex preparation and submicron emulsion molding process of Scutellariae Radix extract, the study obtained the preparation of the high drug loadings submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract. In the study of drug solution dispersion method, the uniformity of drug dispersed as the evaluation index, the traditional mixing method, grinding, homogenate and solute phase transfer technology were investigated, and the solute phase transfer technology was adopted in the last. With the adoption of new technology, the drug loading capacity reached 1.33% (phospholipid complex was 4%). The drug loading capacity was improved significantly. The transfer of solute method and timing were studied as follows,join the oil phase when the volume of phospholipid complex anhydrous ethanol solution remaining 30%, the solute phase transfer was completed with the continued recycling of anhydrous ethanol. After drug dissolved away to oil phase, the preparation technology of colostrum was determined with the evaluation index of emulsion droplet form. The particle size of submicron emulsion, PDI and stability parameters were used as evaluation index, orthogonal methodology were adopted to optimize the submicron emulsion ingredient and main influential factors of high pressure homogenization technology. The optimized preparation technology of Scutellariae Radix extract nasal submicron emulsion is practical and stable.

  8. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Reid

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  9. Stochastic collective dynamics of charged-particle beams in the stability regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, N C; De Martino, S; De Siena, S; Illuminati, F

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a description of the collective transverse dynamics of charged (proton) beams in the stability regime by suitable classical stochastic fluctuations. In this scheme, the collective beam dynamics is described by time-reversal invariant diffusion processes deduced by stochastic variational principles (Nelson processes). By general arguments, we show that the diffusion coefficient, expressed in units of length, is given by lambda(c)sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles in the beam and lambda(c) the Compton wavelength of a single constituent. This diffusion coefficient represents an effective unit of beam emittance. The hydrodynamic equations of the stochastic dynamics can be easily recast in the form of a Schrödinger equation, with the unit of emittance replacing the Planck action constant. This fact provides a natural connection to the so-called "quantum-like approaches" to beam dynamics. The transition probabilities associated to Nelson processes can be exploited to model evolutions suitable to control the transverse beam dynamics. In particular we show how to control, in the quadrupole approximation to the beam-field interaction, both the focusing and the transverse oscillations of the beam, either together or independently.

  10. Collective motion of groups of self-propelled particles following interacting leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdinandy, Bence; Vicsek, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    In order to keep their cohesiveness during locomotion gregarious animals must make collective decisions. Many species boast complex societies with multiple levels of communities. A common case is when two dominant levels exist, one corresponding to leaders and the other consisting of followers. In this paper we study the collective motion of such two-level assemblies of self-propelled particles. We present a model adapted from one originally proposed to describe the movement of cells resulting in a smoothly varying coherent motion. We shall use the terminology corresponding to large groups of some mammals where leaders and followers form a group called a harem. We study the emergence (self-organization) of sub-groups within a herd during locomotion by computer simulations. The resulting processes are compared with our prior observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortob\\'agy, Hungary) which we use as results from a published case study. We find that the model reproduces key features of a herd composed of har...

  11. Collective motion of groups of self-propelled particles following interacting leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandy, B.; Ozogány, K.; Vicsek, T.

    2017-08-01

    In order to keep their cohesiveness during locomotion gregarious animals must make collective decisions. Many species boast complex societies with multiple levels of communities. A common case is when two dominant levels exist, one corresponding to leaders and the other consisting of followers. In this paper we study the collective motion of such two-level assemblies of self-propelled particles. We present a model adapted from one originally proposed to describe the movement of cells resulting in a smoothly varying coherent motion. We shall use the terminology corresponding to large groups of some mammals where leaders and followers form a group called a harem. We study the emergence (self-organization) of sub-groups within a herd during locomotion by computer simulations. The resulting processes are compared with our prior observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortobágy, Hungary) which we use as results from a published case study. We find that the model reproduces key features of a herd composed of harems moving on open ground, including fights for followers between leaders and bachelor groups (group of leaders without followers). One of our findings, however, does not agree with the observations. While in our model the emerging group size distribution is normal, the group size distribution of the observed herd based on historical data have been found to follow lognormal distribution. We argue that this indicates that the formation (and the size) of the harems must involve a more complex social topology than simple spatial-distance based interactions.

  12. Submicron particles of Co, Ni and Co–Ni alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Solid State Ionics 84 271. Ayyappan S, Gopalan R S, Subbanna G N and Rao C N R 1997. J. Mater. Res. 12 398. Bradley J S 1994 Clusters and colloids: From theory to appli- cations (eds) G Schmid (Weinheim: VCH) Ch. 1. Cullity B D 1972 Introduction to magnetic materials (Reading,. Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley).

  13. Collective Thomson scattering energetic particle diagnostic in high performance tokamaks. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, P.Y.; Aamodt, R.E.; Russell, D.A.

    1997-07-08

    This report summarizes the work performed under DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER54334. Lodestar was an active participant in the low power Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostic experiment at TFTR in collaboration with MIT. A simple and effective fitting technique was developed to extract key parameters from the scattered data. Utilizing this new technique, the concept of lower hybrid resonance scattering was adapted for a feasibility study of a low/medium power collective scattering diagnostic for ITER. The implementation and the testing of such a technique for actual parameter extraction using TFTR data, however, was severely limited due to experimental and instrumentation complications. Based on the studies the authors have performed up to date, it is believed that a combination of non-physics related effects such as multiple wall reflection of incident signal and spectral impurity problem o the gyrotron can account for the anomalous signal strength. A collaborative effort with GA was initiated and a feasibility study of developing and implementing a collective thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic for the detection of energetic particles at DIII-D was completed. Specifically, the process of selecting an optimum receiver location for the diagnostic is discussed in detailed. Results presented here include detailed signal to noise calculations and ray-tracing studies. Critical physics issues and selection criteria are discussed and a procedure to detect anisotropic energetic ion temperatures is also outlined. Favorable results, obtained in the feasibility study, indicate that it should be possible to develop and implement a CTS diagnostic at DIII-D.

  14. Microscopic imaging ellipsometry of submicron-scale bacterial cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microscopic imaging ellipsometry of submicron-scale bacterial cells. ... Conclusion: MIE is a sensitive non-optical technique that can be used to image biological systems without the need for labeling of molecules. Keywords: Objective plane, Imaging ellipsometry, Submicron-scale bacterial cells, Streptococcus mutans, ...

  15. Single-particle and collective motion in unbound deformed 39Mg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossez, K.; Rotureau, J.; Michel, N.; Liu, Quan; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-11-01

    Background: Deformed neutron-rich magnesium isotopes constitute a fascinating territory where the interplay between collective rotation and single-particle motion is strongly affected by the neutron continuum. The unbound f p -shell nucleus 39Mg is an ideal candidate to study this interplay. Purpose: In this work, we predict the properties of low-lying resonant states of 39Mg, using a suite of realistic theoretical approaches rooted in the open quantum system framework. Method: To describe the spectrum and decay modes of 39Mg we use the conventional shell model, Gamow shell model, resonating group method, density matrix renormalization group method, and the nonadiabatic particle-plus-rotor model formulated in the Berggren basis. Results: The unbound ground state of 39Mg is predicted to be either a Jπ=7/2 - state or a 3/2 - state. A narrow Jπ=7/2 - ground-state candidate exhibits a resonant structure reminiscent of that of its one-neutron halo neighbor 37Mg, which is dominated by the f7 /2 partial wave at short distances and a p3 /2 component at large distances. A Jπ=3/2 - ground-state candidate is favored by the large deformation of the system. It can be associated with the 1/2 -[321 ] Nilsson orbital dominated by the ℓ =1 wave; hence its predicted width is large. The excited Jπ=1/2 - and 5 /2- states are expected to be broad resonances, while the Jπ=9/2 - and 11/2 - members of the ground-state rotational band are predicted to have very small neutron decay widths. Conclusion: We demonstrate that the subtle interplay between deformation, shell structure, and continuum coupling can result in a variety of excitations in an unbound nucleus just outside the neutron drip line.

  16. Interplanetary dust particles collected from the stratosphere: Physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties and implications for their sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George J.

    1994-01-01

    The suggestion that significant quantities of interplanetary dust are produced by both main-belt asteroids and comets is based on the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) detection of dust trails or bands associated with these objects. Gravitational focusing strongly biases all near-Earth collections of interplanetary dust in favor of particles with the lowest geocentric velocities, that is the dust from main-belt asteroids spiraling into the Sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson radiation drag. The major dust bands in the main-belt appear to be associated with the catastrophic disruptions which produced the Eos, Themis and Koronis families of asteroids. If dust particles are produced in the catastrophic collision process, then Poynting-Robertson radiation drag is such an efficient transport mechanism from the main-belt to 1 AU that near-Earth collections of interplanetary dust should include, and perhaps be dominated by, this material. Interplanetary dust particles from 5 to 100 micrometers in diameter have been recovered from the stratosphere of the Earth by NASA sampling aircraft since the mid-1970s. The densities of a large fraction of these interplanetary dust particles are significantly lower than the densities of their constituent silicate mineral phases, indicating significant porosites. The majority of the particles are chemically and mineralogically similar to, but not identical to, the carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Most stony interplanetary dust particles have carbon contents exceeding those of Allende, a carbonaceous chondrite meteorite having a low albedo. Higher albedo particles corresponding to S-type asteroids are underrepresented or absent from the stratospheric collections, and primitive carbonaceous particles seem to be overrepresented in the stratospheric collections compared to the fraction of main-belt asteroids classified as primitive. This suggests that much of the interplanetary dust may be generated by a stochastic process

  17. Characterizing the size distribution of particles in urban stormwater by use of fixed-point sample-collection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and in collaboration with the Root River Municipal Stormwater Permit Group monitored eight urban source areas representing six types of source areas in or near Madison, Wis. in an effort to improve characterization of particle-size distributions in urban stormwater by use of fixed-point sample collection methods. The types of source areas were parking lot, feeder street, collector street, arterial street, rooftop, and mixed use. This information can then be used by environmental managers and engineers when selecting the most appropriate control devices for the removal of solids from urban stormwater. Mixed-use and parking-lot study areas had the lowest median particle sizes (42 and 54 (u or mu)m, respectively), followed by the collector street study area (70 (u or mu)m). Both arterial street and institutional roof study areas had similar median particle sizes of approximately 95 (u or mu)m. Finally, the feeder street study area showed the largest median particle size of nearly 200 (u or mu)m. Median particle sizes measured as part of this study were somewhat comparable to those reported in previous studies from similar source areas. The majority of particle mass in four out of six source areas was silt and clay particles that are less than 32 (u or mu)m in size. Distributions of particles ranging from 500 (u or mu)m were highly variable both within and between source areas. Results of this study suggest substantial variability in data can inhibit the development of a single particle-size distribution that is representative of stormwater runoff generated from a single source area or land use. Continued development of improved sample collection methods, such as the depth-integrated sample arm, may reduce variability in particle-size distributions by mitigating the effect of sediment bias inherent with a fixed-point sampler.

  18. Estimation of the Human Extrathoracic Deposition Fraction of Inhaled Particles Using a Polyurethane Foam Collection Substrate in an IOM Sampler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrah K. Sleeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extrathoracic deposition of inhaled particles (i.e., in the head and throat is an important exposure route for many hazardous materials. Current best practices for exposure assessment of aerosols in the workplace involve particle size selective sampling methods based on particle penetration into the human respiratory tract (i.e., inhalable or respirable sampling. However, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO has recently adopted particle deposition sampling conventions (ISO 13138, including conventions for extrathoracic (ET deposition into the anterior nasal passage (ET1 and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2. For this study, polyurethane foam was used as a collection substrate inside an inhalable aerosol sampler to provide an estimate of extrathoracic particle deposition. Aerosols of fused aluminum oxide (five sizes, 4.9 µm–44.3 µm were used as a test dust in a low speed (0.2 m/s wind tunnel. Samplers were placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel to simulate orientation-averaged personal sampling. Collection efficiency data for the foam insert matched well to the extrathoracic deposition convention for the particle sizes tested. The concept of using a foam insert to match a particle deposition sampling convention was explored in this study and shows promise for future use as a sampling device.

  19. Evaluation on the Collection Efficiency and Performance of the Sound Pressure Machine Equipped with a HEPA Filter Eliminating Asbestos Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Wha Me

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When the one-pass collection efficiency of each size of particles of the sound pressure machine equipped with a glass fiber HEPA filter to get rid of friable asbestos at the asbestos elimination field was evaluated, the collection efficiency of those with the size of 0.3um was examined to be 98.91%. That of the particles of 0.5um size was proved to be 99.21% on average, which is a little bit higher than that of 0.3um size. The 1.0um particles showed 100% of efficiency, and the collection efficiency of each size had statistically meaningful differences.

  20. Ablation of silicate particles in high-speed continuum and transition flow with application to the collection of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Miller, Wayne F.

    1991-04-01

    The ablative deceleration of spheres in the continuum and slip regimes is studied using spherical 7.1-micron-diam soda-lime glass particles launched from vacuum at about 4500 m/sec speed through a 13-micron-thick plastic film into a capture chamber containing Xe at 0.1 or 0.2 atm pressure and 295 K temperature. The results of SEM examinations of the collected ablated particles showed that the ratio of the ablated-particle radius (Rf) to the initial radius (R0) increased with gas pressure (from Rf/R0 about 0.67 at 0.1 atm, to about 0.88 at 0.2 atm). A model was developed to describe the ablation and deceleration of spheres in high-speed continuum and slip flow. The pressure dependence predicted by the model agreed with experimental results.

  1. Characteristics of metals in nano/ultrafine/fine/coarse particles collected beside a heavily trafficked road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Hwang, Wen-Ing; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2005-11-01

    Fine particles emitted from vehicles have adverse health effects because of their sizes and chemical compositions. Therefore, this study attempted to characterize the metals in nano (0.010 Nano-MOUDI. The nano particles were found to contain more of traffic-related metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Ba, and Ni) than particles of other sizes, although crustal metals accounted for over 90% of all the particulate metals. Most crustal metals, Ba, Ni, Pb, and Zn in ultrafine particles displayed Aitken modes due to their local origins. The Ag, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were 37, 50, 28, 30, 24, 64, 38, and 22% by mass, respectively, in nano particles were strongly associated with diesel fuel, while the Cu, Mn, and Sr in particles nano particles, more associated with diesel soot than with gasoline exhaust, is another health concern.

  2. Submicron and nano formulations of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide stimulate unique cellular toxicological responses in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Cindy, E-mail: c.gunawan@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Sirimanoonphan, Aunchisa [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Teoh, Wey Yang [Clean Energy and Nanotechnology (CLEAN) Laboratory, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Marquis, Christopher P., E-mail: c.marquis@unsw.edu.au [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Amal, Rose [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Uptake of TiO{sub 2} solids by C. reinhardtii generates ROS as an early stress response. • Submicron and nanoTiO{sub 2} exhibit benign effect on cell proliferation. • Uptake of ZnO solids and leached zinc by C. reinhardtii inhibit the alga growth. • No cellular oxidative stress is detected with submicron and nano ZnO exposure. • The toxicity of particles is not necessarily mediated by cellular oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The work investigates the eco-cytoxicity of submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} and ZnO, arising from the unique interactions of freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to soluble and undissolved components of the metal oxides. In a freshwater medium, submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exist as suspended aggregates with no-observable leaching. Submicron and nano ZnO undergo comparable concentration-dependent fractional leaching, and exist as dissolved zinc and aggregates of undissolved ZnO. Cellular internalisation of solid TiO{sub 2} stimulates cellular ROS generation as an early stress response. The cellular redox imbalance was observed for both submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exposure, despite exhibiting benign effects on the alga proliferation (8-day EC50 > 100 mg TiO{sub 2}/L). Parallel exposure of C. reinhardtii to submicron and nano ZnO saw cellular uptake of both the leached zinc and solid ZnO and resulting in inhibition of the alga growth (8-day EC50 ≥ 0.01 mg ZnO/L). Despite the sensitivity, no zinc-induced cellular ROS generation was detected, even at 100 mg ZnO/L exposure. Taken together, the observations confront the generally accepted paradigm of cellular oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity of particles. The knowledge of speciation of particles and the corresponding stimulation of unique cellular responses and cytotoxicity is vital for assessment of the environmental implications of these materials.

  3. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-04-30

    Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 μm, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 μm, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount of Fe mixed with Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and C. The difference in composition of the Fe-containing particles between the two subway stations was attributed to the different ballast tracks used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterisation of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Geng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyse individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13–18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October. Overall 3600 individual particles in PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5 fractions from 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were analysed. The analysed particles were classified, based on their X-ray spectral data together with their secondary electron images. The major particle types included organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC, sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMgCO3, etc., (NH42SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, K-containing, Fe-rich and fly ash particles. Their relative number abundance results showed that OC particles were significantly increased while sea-salts and mineral dust particles were significantly decreased (especially in PM1.0-2.5 fraction when haze occurred. For the other particle types (except Fe-rich particles in PM2.5-10 fraction, there were no significant differences in their relative abundances between haze and non-haze samples. On non-haze days, the nitrate-containing reacted sea-salt and mineral dust particles in PM1.0-2.5 fraction significantly outnumbered the sulfate-containing ones, whereas it was the reverse on haze days, implying that on haze days there were special sources or formation mechanisms for fine aerosol particles (≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter. The emission of air pollutants from motor vehicles and stagnant meteorological conditions, such as low wind speed and high relative humidity, might be responsible for the elevated level of OC particles on haze days.

  5. Chemical and isotopic properties and origin of coarse airborne particles collected by passive samplers in industrial, urban, and rural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volke; Gieré, Reto

    2012-12-01

    Passive air samplers have been installed in industrial, urban, rural and remote forested environments in order to collect coarse airborne particles for subsequent chemical characterization. To identify principal polluting sources, isotopic tracers, such as Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios, have been used. The mass deposition rates (MDRs) of trace metals, determined for each of the studied environments, clearly indicate that industrial and traffic sites are especially affected by air pollution. Elements such as V, Pb, Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, Cd, Ni, As, Sb and Zn are notably enriched in samples from industrial zones, whereas V, Mn, Ba, Sr, Al, U, Th, rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Y, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sn and Cu are principal components of the airborne particles collected close to areas influenced by heavy traffic. The chemical/isotopic baseline composition derived from the airborne particles is the result of mixing of particles from different industrial sources, traffic and fertilizers. The monthly analysis of trace-metal MDRs of the collected airborne particle samples from different stations around the industrial zone allows for the detection of distinct atmospheric dust-deposition events during the year, characterized by high MDRs. "Natural" dusts from regional soil re-suspension, including from more distant regions like the Sahara desert, might overprint the regional atmospheric baseline composition, as suggested by trace metal trajectories in ternary diagrams and by Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data.

  6. Particle production and collectivity in high-multiplicity pp and pPb collisions at the LHC with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Stephans, George Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Recent unexpected evidence for collectivity in high multiplicity pp and pPb collisions at LHC energies has challenged the notion that such small systems do not exhibit any of the properties that have been used to study the quark gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions. An overview of recent results concerning particle production and collectivity in such collisions using the CMS detector at the LHC is presented.

  7. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon [Department of Physics, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youn-Suk [Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jo-Chun [Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, HyeKyoung [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ro, Chul-Un, E-mail: curo@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined chemical species of floor dusts and airborne magnetic subway particles collected at underground subway stations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD, SEM/EDX, and VSM measurements provided information on their major iron species, which is relatively harmless iron metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. - Abstract: Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 {mu}m size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 {mu}m size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 {mu}m, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 {mu}m, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi

  8. Airborne studies of submicron aerosol in the troposphere over West Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchenko, M.V.; Zuev, V.E.; Belan, B.D.; Terpugova, S.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-04-01

    Submicron fraction particles that have the longest lifespan and are included in almost all atmospheric processes are of special importance among the great variety of sizes of particles present in the atmosphere. Submicron particles mainly determine the opticle state of the atmosphere in the visible spectral range, essentially cause the absorption of infrared radiation and, since they are the products and participants in all aerosol-to-gas transformations, accumulate of a lot of various chemical compounds and transfer them to large distances. Investigation of the processes of the spatial-temporal variability of aerosol particles for different climatic zones of the earth is the experimental base for studying their effect on climatically and ecologically significant factors and estimating their unfavorable tendencies. The increasing anthropogenic loading of the earth`s atmosphere is creating an urgency for aerosol research. Regardless of how perfect the analytical and numerical methods of solving radiation problems may be, success in forecasting climatic change is mainly determined by the reliability of the experimental data on optical parameters of the atmosphere and of the description of their variability under the effect of external factors.

  9. Hints for collective effects in identified particle spectra from p-Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226 (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    First hints for collective dynamics in high-multiplicity p-Pb collisions at LHC were observed in two-particle correlations of unidentified particles. We present results of a systematic fit using a simple blast wave parameterization to identified particle spectra from p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions as measured by ALICE at LHC. While in Pb-Pb collisions, a large number of particles can be commonly described by a single set of parameters including mass A=2 and A=3 nuclei, also spectra from high-multiplicity p-Pb collisions allow for a description within this rather simple model. Finally, we give predictions for spectra and the nuclear modification factor of mesons carrying a charm or bottom quark.

  10. Comprehensive characterization of ambient nanoparticles collected near an industrial science park: particle size distributions and relationships with environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhjeen; Hsu, Lingyen; Chang, Yunghsun

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of ambient particles and their relationships with various environmental factors, including gaseous pollutants (CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), total hydrocarbons (THC), NOx, CO, SO2), meteorological parameters (humidity, temperature), and time (day/night, workday/weekend). We used an electrical low-pressure cascade impactor to measure the number and size distributions of ambient particles (0.007-10 tm) that were collected approximately 1 km northwest of Hsinchu Science Park in Taiwan between February and May 2007. The number concentrations of particles were enhanced through photochemical reactions during the day. In addition, high traffic flow during workdays increased the formation of particulates. Except for SO2, all of the gaseous pollutants we studied (CH4, NMHC, THC, NOx, CO) correlated positively with the total number concentrations of ambient particles during daytime, indicating that they might contribute to the particulate burden. The poorer relationship between the SO2 level and the total number concentration of particles suggests that SO2 might participate indirectly in the nucleation process during particle formation, The high enrichment factors for Zn, Pb, Cu, and Mn, which mostly comprised the ultrafine particles (diameter: industrial area.

  11. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  12. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Sub-micron Cu/SSZ-13: Synthesis and application as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodinger, Sebastian; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Walter, Eric D.; Szanyi, János; Gao, Feng; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2017-02-01

    For the first time, sub-micron Cu/SSZ-13, obtained by modifying an existing synthesis procedure, was shown to be an effective and stable catalyst for selective catalytic reduction reactions, such as NO reduction. Characterization of the materials with X-ray diffraction, N2-physisorption and 27Al MAS NMR shows that hydrothermal aging, simulating SCR reaction conditions, is more destructive in respect to dealumination for smaller particles prior to Cu-exchange. However, the catalytic performance and hydrothermal stability for Cu/SSZ-13 is independent of the particle size. In particular, the stability of tetrahedral framework Al is improved in the sub-micron Cu/SSZ-13 catalysts of comparable Cu loading. This indicates that variations in the Al distribution for different SSZ-13 synthesis procedures have a more critical influence on stabilizing isolated Cu-ions during harsh hydrothermal aging than the particle size. This study is of high interest for applications in vehicular DeNOx technologies where high loadings of active species on wash coats can be achieved by using sub-micron Cu/SSZ-13. The authors would like to thank B. W. Arey and J. J. Ditto for performing electron microscope imaging. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. S. P and M. A. D also acknowledge support by the Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales (MS3 Initiative) conducted under the Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program at PNNL. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  14. Effects on asthma and induction of interleukin-8 caused by Asian dust particles collected in western Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Sano, Hiroyuki; Abe, Satoshi; Saito, Rumiko; Minato, Sayaka; Igishi, Tadashi; Burioka, Naoto; Sako, Takanori; Yasuda, Kazuhito; Mikami, Masaaki; Kurita, Shinichi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Ueda, Yasuto; Konishi, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Akira; Aiba, Setsuya; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-08-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) contain various airborne particles that may augment airway inflammation by increasing the level of interleukin-8. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of exposure to an ADS with worsening of symptoms of adult asthma and the effect of ADS particles on interleukin-8 transcriptional activity. The subjects were 112 patients with mild to moderate asthma who recorded scores for their daily upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms and measured morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) from March to May 2011. Interleukin-8 transcriptional activity was assessed in THP-G8 cells that were exposed to airborne particles collected during days of ADS exposure. Of the 112 patients, 31 had comorbid allergic rhinitis (AR) and/or chronic sinusitis (CS), and had worsened scores for upper respiratory tract symptoms on ADS days compared to non-ADS days. Scores for lower respiratory tract symptoms during ADS days were higher than non-ADS days in all patients. Three patients also had unscheduled hospital visits for exacerbation of asthma on ADS days. However, there was no significant difference in daily morning PEF between ADS and non-ADS days. Airborne particles collected on ADS days induced interleukin-8 transcriptional activity in THP-G8 cells compared to the original soil of the ADS. Exposure to an ADS aggravates upper and lower tract respiratory symptoms in patients with adult asthma. ADS airborne particles may increase airway inflammation through enhancement of interleukin-8 transcriptional activity.

  15. Abundance and Community Structure of Bacteria on Asian Dust Particles Collected in Beijing, China, during the Asian Dust Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Baba, Takashi; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Himezawa, Yuka; Enoki, Kanami; Saraya, Makoto; Li, Pin-Fang; Nasu, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 180 t/km(2) of Asian dust particles are estimated to fall annually on Beijing, China, and there is significant concern about the influence of microbes transported by Asian dust events on human health and downwind ecosystems. In this study, we collected Asian dust particles in Beijing, and analyzed the bacterial communities on these particles by culture-independent methods. Bacterial cells on Asian dust particles were visualized first by laser scanning microscopy, which demonstrated that Asian dust particles carry bacterial cells to Beijing. Bacterial abundance, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was 10(8) to 10(9) cells/g, a value about 10 times higher than that in Asian dust source soils. Inter-seasonal variability of bacterial community structures among Asian dust samples, as compared by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), was low during the Asian dust season. Several viable bacteria, including intestinal bacteria, were found in Asian dust samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Clone library analysis targeting 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences demonstrated that bacterial phylogenetic diversity was high in the dust samples, and most of these were environmental bacteria distributed in soil and air. The dominant species in the clone library was Segetibacter aerophilus (Bacteroidetes), which was first isolated from an Asian dust sample collected in Korea. Our results also indicate the possibility of a change in the bacterial community structure during transportation and increases in desiccation-tolerant bacteria such as Firmicutes.

  16. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle

  17. Solid-phase extraction of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosol particles collected with the particle-into-liquid sampler and analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Hartonen, Kari; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2010-01-15

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, collected with the particle-into-liquid sampler at SMEARII station in Finland in mid-August 2007, were analysed for biogenic acids. The sample pretreatment method, comprising solid-phase extraction with anion exchange and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance materials, was optimized. Extraction efficiencies of solid-phase extraction from 10 and 20ml samples were about 100%, with average relative standard deviation of 8.9%, in concentration range from 12.5 to 50ng/ml of the acid. Extraction of aldehydes was less successful, with efficiencies from 69 to 163% and average 10% deviation. Pretreated samples were analysed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Limits of detection achieved for organic acids with the analytical procedure developed ranged from 9 to 27microg/l of extracted sample, while limits of quantitation were from 31 to 90microg/l. Oxidation with ozone was used for the preparation of the acid of beta-caryophyllene (beta-caryophyllinic acid), which was also studied in aerosol samples. MS(2) experiments were used to confirm the identification of trans-pinic, trans-pinonic and beta-caryophyllinic acids. Azelaic, hexadecanoic, cis-pinonic, and cis- and trans-pinic acids were quantitated in the samples with use of authentic standards, while the concentrations of trans-pinonic and beta-caryophyllinic acids were determined with cis-pinonic acid as surrogate. Also, the contribution of beta-caryophyllene oxidation products to aerosol organic carbon was evaluated. Aldehydes could not be analysed in real samples due to the insufficient extraction. The particle-into-liquid sampler proved to be suitable for the collection of aerosol particles for the elucidation of daily and diurnal variation of selected species. The optimized sample pretreatment, together with the analysis method, offer a promising approach for the study of aerosol chemical composition, where artifact formation is

  18. Soot Particle Optical Properties: a Comparison between Numerical Calculations and Experimental Data Collected during the Boston College Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, N.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Onasch, T. B.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Wrobel, W.; Ahern, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Freitag, S.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Cappa, C. D.; Subramanian, R.

    2010-12-01

    A black carbon instrument inter-comparison study was conducted in July 2008 at Boston College to measure the optical, physical and chemical properties of laboratory generated soot under controlled conditions [1]. The physical, chemical and optical properties were measured on size-selected particles for: 1. Nascent soot particles 2. Nascent- denuded soot particles 3. Soot particles coated with sulfuric acid or DOS (dioctyl sebacate) across a range of coating thicknesses 4. Coated and then denuded soot particles. Instruments involved in the inter-comparison study fell into two broad categories: a) mass-based instruments and b) optically-based instruments. During this experiment, 7 mass-based and 9 optically-based instruments were deployed. Absorption scattering and extinction measurements were carried out in combination with mass-based instruments in order to obtain absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients for coated and denuded soot particles as a function of their mass, size and coating thickness. Particle samples were also collected on nuclepore filters to perform Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. The images obtained with the SEM elucidated the changes in particle morphology upon coating and denuding. The images were also used to determine morphological parameters for single soot aggregates (e.g. monomers number and diameter) used in the numerical estimation of aerosol optical properties. With the data collected during the experiment, we carry out a comparative study of the optical properties of soot particles obtained experimentally with those calculated using the two most commonly used numerical approximations (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) theory and Mie theory). Thus we validate the degree of agreement between theoretical models and experimental results. The laboratory optical, mass, size and morphological data can be used to elucidate the impact of these parameters on radiative forcing by atmospheric soot [2, 3]. References: 1. Cross, E. S

  19. Individual-collective crossover driven by particle size in dense assemblies of superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; Chaboussant, Grégory; Catala, Laure; Mazérat, Sandra; Rivière, Eric; Mallah, Talal

    2017-02-01

    Prussian blue analogues (PBA) ferromagnetic nanoparticles CsIxNiII[CrIII(CN)6 ]z·3(H2O) embedded in CTA+ (cetyltrimethylammonium) matrix have been investigated by magnetometry and magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Choosing particle sizes (diameter D = 4.8 and 8.6 nm) well below the single-domain radius and comparable volume fraction of particle, we show that the expected superparamagnetic regime for weakly anisotropic isolated magnetic particles is drastically affected due to the interplay of surface/volume anisotropies and dipolar interactions. For the smallest particles (D = 4.8 nm), magnetocrystalline anisotropy is enhanced by surface spins and drives the system into a regime of ferromagnetically correlated clusters characterized by a temperature-dependent magnetic correlation length Lmag which is experimentally accessible using magnetic SANS. For D = 8.6 nm particles, a superparamagnetic regime is recovered in a wide temperature range. We propose a model of interacting single-domain particles with axial anisotropy that accounts quantitatively for the observed behaviors in both magnetic regimes. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-70534-9

  20. Submicron Emulsions and Their Applications in Oral Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Veenu; Patel, Mitali; Sawant, Krutika

    2016-01-01

    A "submicron emulsion" is an isotropic mixture of drug, lipids, and surfactants, usually with hydrophilic cosolvents and with droplet diameters ranging from 10 to 500 nm. Submicron emulsions are of increasing interest in medicine due to their kinetic stability, high solubilizing capacity, and tiny globule size. Because of these properties, they have been applied in various fields, such as personal care, cosmetics, health care, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Submicron emulsions are by far the most advanced nanoparticulate systems for the systemic delivery of biologically active agents for controlled drug delivery and targeting. They are designed mainly for pharmaceutical formulations suitable for various routes of administration like parenteral, ocular, transdermal, and oral. This review article describes the marked potential of submicron emulsions for oral drug delivery owing to their numerous advantages like reduced first pass metabolism, inhibition of P-glycoprotein efflux system, and enhanced absorption via intestinal lymphatic pathway. To overcome the limitations of liquid dosage forms, submicron emulsions can be formulated into solid dosage forms such as solid self-emulsifying systems. This article covers various types of submicron emulsions like microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS), and their potential pharmaceutical applications in oral delivery with emphasis on their advantages, limitations, and advancements.

  1. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  2. Vectors and submicron precision: redundancy and 3D stacking in silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, E H M; Wong, W; Idarraga, J; Visser, J; Jakubek, J; Leroy, C; Turecek, D; Visschers, J; Pospisil, S; Ballabriga, R; Vykydal, Z; Vermeulen, J; Plackett, R; Heijne, E H M; Llopart, X; Boltje, D; Campbell, M

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are shown of GeV pions and muons in two 300 mu m thick, Si Medipix pixel detector assemblies that are stacked on top of each other, with a 25 mu m thick brass foil in between. In such a radiation imaging semiconductor matrix with a large number of pixels along the particle trail, one can determine local space vectors for the particle trajectory instead of points. This improves pattern recognition and track reconstruction, especially in a crowded environment. Stacking of sensor planes is essential for resolving directional ambiguities. Signal charge sharing can be employed for measuring positions with submicron precision. In the measurements one notices accompanying `delta' electrons that emerge outside the particle trail, far beyond the boundaries of the 55 mu m pixel cells. The frequency of such corrupted position measurements is similar to one per 2.5mm of traversed Si.

  3. Meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles collected in the upper stratosphere from an unanticipated source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ferrari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanometre CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38-km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval. This balloon-borne instrument was designed for non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 µm. We report here on micrometre CaCO3 (calcite grains with evidence of thermal erosion and smoke particles that formed after melting and vaporisation and complete dissociation of some of the CaCO3 grains at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. These conditions and processes suggest that the environment of this dust was a dense dust cloud that had formed after disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the atmosphere. The balloon-borne collector must have coincidentally travelled through the dust cloud of a recent bolide event that had penetrated between 38.5 and 37 km altitude. This work identified a previously unknown meteoric smoke forming process in addition to meteoric smoke particles due to photolysis-driven oxidation of mesospheric metals from meteor ablation that had settled into the upper stratosphere.

  4. Elemental Mixing State of Aerosol Particles Collected in Central Amazonia during GoAmazon2014/15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraund, Matthew; Pham, Don; Bonanno, Daniel; Harder, Tristan; Wang, Bingbing; Brito, Joel; de Sá, Suzane; Carbone, Samara; China, Swarup; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot; Pöhlker, Christopher; Andreae, Meinrat; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary; Moffet, Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Two complementary techniques, Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy/Near Edge Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), have been quantitatively combined to characterize individual atmospheric particles. This pair of techniques was applied to particle samples at three sampling sites (ATTO, ZF2, and T3) in the Amazon basin as part of the Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) field campaign during the dry season of 2014. The combined data was subjected to k-means clustering using mass fractions of the following elements: C, N, O, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn. Cluster analysis identified 12 particle types, across different sampling sites and particle sizes. Samples from the remote Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO, also T0a) exhibited less cluster variety and fewer anthropogenic clusters than samples collected at the sites nearer to the Manaus metropolitan region, ZF2 (also T0t) or T3. Samples from the ZF2 site contained aged/anthropogenic clusters not readily explained by transport from ATTO or Manaus, possibly suggesting the effects of long range atmospheric transport or other local aerosol sources present during sampling. In addition, this data set allowed for recently established diversity parameters to be calculated. All sample periods had high mixing state indices (χ) that were >0.8. Two individual particle diversity (Di) populations were observed, with particles <0.5 μm having a Di of ~2.4 and >0.5 μm particles having a Di of ~3.6, which likely correspond to fresh and aged aerosols respectively. The diversity parameters determined by the quantitative method presented here will serve to aid in the accurate representation of aerosol mixing state, source apportionment, and aging in both less polluted and more industrialized environments in the Amazon Basin.

  5. Elemental Mixing State of Aerosol Particles Collected in Central Amazonia during GoAmazon2014/15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Fraund

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two complementary techniques, Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy/Near Edge Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX, have been quantitatively combined to characterize individual atmospheric particles. This pair of techniques was applied to particle samples at three sampling sites (ATTO, ZF2, and T3 in the Amazon basin as part of the Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 field campaign during the dry season of 2014. The combined data was subjected to k-means clustering using mass fractions of the following elements: C, N, O, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn. Cluster analysis identified 12 particle types across different sampling sites and particle sizes. Samples from the remote Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO, also T0a exhibited less cluster variety and fewer anthropogenic clusters than samples collected at the sites nearer to the Manaus metropolitan region, ZF2 (also T0t or T3. Samples from the ZF2 site contained aged/anthropogenic clusters not readily explained by transport from ATTO or Manaus, possibly suggesting the effects of long range atmospheric transport or other local aerosol sources present during sampling. In addition, this data set allowed for recently established diversity parameters to be calculated. All sample periods had high mixing state indices (χ that were >0.8. Two individual particle diversity (Di populations were observed, with particles <0.5 µm having a Di of ~2.4 and >0.5 µm particles having a Di of ~3.6, which likely correspond to fresh and aged aerosols, respectively. The diversity parameters determined by the quantitative method presented here will serve to aid in the accurate representation of aerosol mixing state, source apportionment, and aging in both less polluted and more developed environments in the Amazon Basin.

  6. Experimental overview of collective flow with identified particles at RHIC and the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christakoglou Panos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropic flow studies play a crucial role in improving our understanding of the behaviour and the nature of matter created in collisions of heavy ions. In particular, the study of elliptic flow (υ2 for identified particles can be used to constrain the initial conditions and the value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio. It also allows to determine the role of the hadronic rescattering phase in the development of flow. In these proceedings I review the results from measurements of υ2 for identified particles from the RHIC and LHC heavy-ion physics programs.

  7. X, Ku-band microwave-absorption properties of polyarylene ether nitriles terminated with phthalonitrile/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid submicron spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lifen, E-mail: 361626614@qq.com; Pu, Zejun; Huang, Xu; Liu, Xiaobo, E-mail: liuxb@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • PEN-t-Ph/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid spheres were prepared via one-step solvothermal method. • Polymer compatibility is introduced into inorganic submicron spheres successfully. • PEN-t-Ph/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid submicron spheres possessed good ferrimagnetism. • Control the microwave absorption band of PEN-t-Ph/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid submicron spheres. - Abstract: A novel series of PEN-t-Ph/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid submicron spheres with different additions of PEN-t-Ph have been prepared successfully via solvothermal method, and their structures and morphologies were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the crystallinity, dispersity, and size of hybrid submicron spheres can be controlled by altering the addition content of PEN-t-Ph. Magnetization measurement showed that the PEN-t-Ph/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hybrid submicron spheres possessed good ferrimagnetism. The electromagnetic measurement indicated that the resonance peaks of complex permittivity, complex permeability, dielectric loss, and magnetic loss were shifted to the higher frequency as the addition of PEN-t-Ph increased. Moreover, the microwave absorption band was also shifted to higher frequency as the addition of PEN-t-Ph increased. Through this method, the polymer compatibility can be introduced into inorganic submicron spheres, which could provide the inorganic particles with more applications.

  8. An ET Origin for Stratospheric Particles Collected during the 1998 Leonids Meteor Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Phillips, James A.; Horack, John M.; Jerman, Gregory; Myszka, Ed

    1999-01-01

    On 17 November 1998, a helium-filled weather balloon was launched into tfle strato- sphere, equipped with a xerogel microparticle collector. The three-hour flight was designed to sample the dust environment in the stratosphere during the Leonid meteor shower, and possibly to capture Leonid meteoroids. Environmental Scanning Election Microscope analyses of the returned collectors revealed the capture of a -30-pm particle. with a smooth, multigranular shape, and partially melted, translucent rims; similar to known Antarctic micrometeorites. Energy-dispersive X-ray Mass Spectroscopy shows en- riched concentrations of the non-volatile elements, Mg, Al, and Fe. The particle possesses a high magnesium to iron ratio of 2.96, similar to that observed in 1998 Leonids meteors (Borovicka, et al. 1999) and sharply higher than the ratio expected for typical material from the earth's crust. A statistical nearest-neighbor analysis of the abundance ratios Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si demonstrates that the particle is most similar in composition to cosmic spherules captured during airplane flights throucrh the stratosphere. The mineralogical class is consistent with a stony (S) type of silicates. olivine [(Mg, Fe)2SiO4] and pyroxene [(Mg,Fe)SiO3]-or oxides, herecynite [(Fe,Mg) Al2O4]. Attribution to the debris stream of the Leonids' parent body, comet Tempel-Tuttle, would make it the first such material from beyond the orbit of Uranus positively identified on Earth.

  9. Investigation of the enhanced spatial density of submicron lunar ejecta between L values 1.2 and 3.0 in the earth's magnetosphere: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. M.; Tanner, W. G.; Goad, H. S.

    1987-01-01

    Initial results from the measurement conducted by the dust particle experiment on the lunar orbiting satellite Lunar Explorer 35 (LE 35) were reported with the data interpreted as indicating that the moon is a significant source of micrometeroids. Primary sporadic and stream meteoroids impacting the surface of the moon at hypervelocity was proposed as the source of micron and submicron particles that leave the lunar craters with velocities sufficient to escape the moon's gravitational sphere of influence. No enhanced flux of lunar ejecta with masses greater than a nanogram was detected by LE 35 or the Lunar Orbiters. Hypervelocity meteoroid simulation experiments concentrating on ejecta production combined with extensive analyses of the orbital dynamics of micron and submicron lunar ejecta in selenocentric, cislunar, and geocentric space have shown that a pulse of these lunar ejecta, with a time correlation relative to the position of the moon relative to the earth, intercepts the earth's magnetopause surface (EMPs). As shown, a strong reason exists for expecting a significant enhancement of submicron dust particles in the region of the magnetosphere between L values of 1.2 and 3.0. This is the basis for the proposal of a series of experiments to investigate the enhancement or even trapping of submicron lunar ejecta in this region. The subsequent interaction of this mass with the upper-lower atmosphere of the earth and possible geophysical effects can then be studied.

  10. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birmania Heredia Rivera; Martín Gerardo Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

      Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed...

  11. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed...

  12. Brownian agents and active particles collective dynamics in the natural and social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    ""This book lays out a vision for a coherent framework for understanding complex systems"" (from the foreword by J. Doyne Farmer). By developing the genuine idea of Brownian agents, the author combines concepts from informatics, such as multiagent systems, with approaches of statistical many-particle physics. This way, an efficient method for computer simulations of complex systems is developed which is also accessible to analytical investigations and quantitative predictions. The book demonstrates that Brownian agent models can be successfully applied in many different contexts, ranging from

  13. Electrospun submicron bioactive glass fibers for bone tissue scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H; Zhang, T; Wang, X P; Fang, Q F

    2009-03-01

    Submicron bioactive glass fibers 70S30C (70 mol% SiO(2), 30 mol% CaO) acting as bone tissue scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning method. The scaffold is a hierarchical pore network that consists of interconnected fibers with macropores and mesopores. The structure, morphological characterization and mechanical properties of the submicron bioactive glass fibers were studied by XRD, EDS, FIIR, SEM, N(2) gas absorption analyses and nanoindentation. The effect of the voltage on the morphology of electrospun bioactive glass fibers was investigated. It was found that decreasing the applied voltage from 19 to 7 kV can facilitate the formation of finer fibers with fewer bead defects. The hardness and Young's modulus of submicron bioactive glass fibers were measured as 0.21 and 5.5 GPa, respectively. Comparing with other bone tissue scaffolds measured by nanoindentation, the elastic modulus of the present scaffold was relatively high and close to the bone.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Submicron Semiconductor Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David; Jacoboni, C

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in the volume represent lectures delivered as a 1983 NATO ASI, held at Urbino, Italy. The lecture series was designed to identify the key submicron and ultrasubmicron device physics, transport, materials and contact issues. Nonequilibrium transport, quantum transport, interfacial and size constraints issues were also highlighted. The ASI was supported by NATO and the European Research Office. H. L. Grubin D. K. Ferry C. Jacoboni v CONTENTS MODELLING OF SUB-MICRON DEVICES.................. .......... 1 E. Constant BOLTZMANN TRANSPORT EQUATION... ... ...... .................... 33 K. Hess TRANSPORT AND MATERIAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR SUBMICRON DEVICES. . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .... ... .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 45 H. L. Grubin EPITAXIAL GROWTH FOR SUB MICRON STRUCTURES.................. 179 C. E. C. Wood INSULATOR/SEMICONDUCTOR INTERFACES.......................... 195 C. W. Wilms en THEORY OF THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES AND INTERFACES...................

  15. Contrasting organic aerosol particles from boreal and tropical forests during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 using coherent vibrational spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Ebben

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the vibrational sum frequency generation spectra of organic particles collected in a boreal forest in Finland and a tropical forest in Brazil. These spectra are compared to those of secondary organic material produced in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. By comparing coherent vibrational spectra of a variety of terpene and olefin reference compounds, along with the secondary organic material synthesized in the environmental chamber, we show that submicron aerosol particles sampled in Southern Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 are composed to a large degree of material similar in chemical composition to synthetic α-pinene-derived material. For material collected in Brazil as part of AMAZE-08, the organic component is found to be chemically complex in the coarse mode but highly uniform in the fine mode. When combined with histogram analyses of the isoprene and monoterpene abundance recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and AMAZE-08 campaigns, the findings presented here indicate that if air is rich in monoterpenes, submicron-sized secondary aerosol particles that form under normal OH and O3 concentration levels can be described in terms of their hydrocarbon content as being similar to α-pinene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles. If the isoprene concentration dominates the chemical composition of organic compounds in forest air, then the hydrocarbon component of secondary organic material in the submicron size range is not simply well-represented by that of isoprene-derived model secondary organic aerosol particles but is more complex. Throughout the climate-relevant size range of the fine mode, however, we find that the chemical composition of the secondary organic particle material from such air is invariant with size, suggesting that the particle growth does not change the chemical composition of the hydrocarbon component of the particles in a significant way.

  16. Novel Hamiltonian method for collective dynamics analysis of an intense charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing quadrupole lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startsev, Edward

    2010-11-01

    Identifying regimes for quiescent propagation of intense beams over long distances has been a major challenge in accelerator research. In particular, the development of systematic theoretical approaches that are able to treat self-consistently the applied oscillating force and the nonlinear self-field force of the beam simultaneously has been a major challenge of modern beam physics. Recently, a powerful new Hamiltonian averaging technique has been developed, which incorporated both the applied periodic focusing force and the self-field force of the beam. Typically, it is advantageous to eliminate fast oscillations from formalism and describe complex beam particle motion in a new non-oscillating coordinates. Standard Hamiltonian techniques are cumbersome due to use of mixed oscillating and non-oscillating independent variables. Newly developed technique is specially designed to avoid use of oscillating variables. The method is analogous to the Lie transform methods in using only non-oscillating variables. At the same time the new approach retains the advantages of simplicity of Hamiltonian methods. Making use of this new method equations determining the average self-field potential for general boundary conditions has been obtained for the first time by taking into account the average contribution of the charges induced on the boundary. For intense beams the boundary effects can be very important because they strongly affect the average self-fields experienced by the beam particles. For example, it has been shown that in the case of cylindrical conducting boundary the average self-field potential acquires an octupole component, which results in the average motion of some beam particles being non-integrable and their trajectories chaotic. This chaotic behavior of the beam particles may significantly change the nature of Landau damping (growth) of collective excitations supported by an intense charged particle beam.

  17. Magnetic and Optical Properties of Submicron-Size Hollow Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yoshikawa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic hollow spheres with a controlled diameter and shell thickness have emerged as an important class of magnetic nanomaterials. The confined hollow geometry and pronouncedly curved surfaces induce unique physical properties different from those of flat thin films and solid counterparts. In this paper, we focus on recent progress on submicron-size spherical hollow magnets (e.g., cobalt- and iron-based materials, and discuss the effects of the hollow shape and the submicron size on magnetic and optical properties.

  18. An introduction to deep submicron CMOS for vertex applications

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M; Cantatore, E; Faccio, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Jarron, P; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Snoeys, W; Wyllie, K

    2001-01-01

    Microelectronics has become a key enabling technology in the development of tracking detectors for High Energy Physics. Deep submicron CMOS is likely to be extensively used in all future tracking systems. Radiation tolerance in the Mrad region has been achieved and complete readout chips comprising many millions of transistors now exist. The choice of technology is dictated by market forces but the adoption of deep submicron CMOS for tracking applications still poses some challenges. The techniques used are reviewed and some of the future challenges are discussed.

  19. Single-particle And Collective Effects Of Cubic Nonlinearity In The Beam Dynamics Of Proton Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tran Hy, J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes some new studies of the effects of cubic nonlinearities arising from image-charge forces and octupole magnets on the transverse beam dynamics of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, and also a study of the damping of coherent oscillations using a feed-back damper. In the latter case, various corrective algorithms were modeled using linear one-turn maps. Kicks of fixed amplitude but appropriate sign were shown to provide linear damping and no coherent tune shift, though the rate predicted analytically was somewhat higher than that observed in simulations. This algorithm gave much faster damping (for equal power) than conventional proportional kicks, which damp exponentially. Two single-particle effects of the image-change force were investigated: distortion of the momentum dispersion function and amplitude dependence of the betatron tunes (resulting in tune spread). The former is calculated using transfer maps and the method of undetermined coefficients, the latter by solving the cubic ...

  20. Bloch-Wave Engineered Submicron Diameter Micropillars with Quality Factors Exceeding 10,000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofling, S.; Lermer, M.; Gregersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Adiabatic design submicron diameter quantum-dot micropillars have been designed and implemented for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. Ultra-high experimental quality factors (>10,000) are obtained for submicron diameters and strong light-matter interaction is observed.......Adiabatic design submicron diameter quantum-dot micropillars have been designed and implemented for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. Ultra-high experimental quality factors (>10,000) are obtained for submicron diameters and strong light-matter interaction is observed....

  1. A Novel Inlet System for On-line Chemical Analysis of Semi-Volatile Submicron Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisthaler, A.; Eichler, P.; Müller, M.; D'anna, B.

    2014-12-01

    We herein present the concept of a novel modular inlet system that allows using gas-phase analyzers for on-line chemical characterization of semi-volatile submicron particles. The "Chemical analysis of aerosol on-line" (CHARON) inlet consists of a gas-phase denuder for stripping off gas-phase analytes, an aerodynamic lens for particle enrichment in the sampling flow and a thermo-desorption unit for particle volatilization prior to chemical analysis. We coupled the CHARON inlet to a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) which quantitatively detects most organic analytes and ammonia. The combined set-up measures submicron organic and ammonium nitrate/sulfate particles online. Proof-of-principle studies were carried out for demonstrating the analytical power of the new set-up in analyzing primarily emitted and secondarily generated particles. A promising future application is the study of the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and the particulate phase.

  2. Effect of the orientational relaxation on the collective motion of patterns formed by self-propelled particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervanyov, A. I.; Gomez, H.; Thiele, U.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the collective behavior of self-propelled particles (SPPs) undergoing competitive processes of pattern formation and rotational relaxation of their self-propulsion velocities. In full accordance with previous work, we observe transitions between different steady states of the SPPs caused by the intricate interplay among the involved effects of pattern formation, orientational order, and coupling between the SPP density and orientation fields. Based on rigorous analytical and numerical calculations, we prove that the rate of the orientational relaxation of the SPP velocity field is the main factor determining the steady states of the SPP system. Further, we determine the boundaries between domains in the parameter plane that delineate qualitatively different resting and moving states. In addition, we analytically calculate the collective velocity v of the SPPs and show that it perfectly agrees with our numerical results. We quantitatively demonstrate that v does not vanish upon approaching the transition boundary between the moving pattern and homogeneous steady states.

  3. Presence of plastic particles in waterbirds faeces collected in Spanish lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Delgado, J.A.; Guijarro, Daniel; Gosálvez, Rafael U.; López-Iborra, Germán; Ponz, A.; Velasco García, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Plastic intake by marine vertebrates has been widely reported, but information about its presence in continental waterfowl is scarce. Here we analyzed faeces of waterbirds species (European coot, Fulica atra, mallard, Anas platyrhynchos and shelduck, Tadorna tadorna) for plastic debris in five wetlands in Central Spain. We collected 89 faeces of shelduck distributed in four lakes, 43.8% of them presented plastic remnants. Sixty percent of 10 faeces of European coot and 45% of 40 faeces of mal...

  4. Oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium particles from Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbu, B; Janssens, K; Lind, O C; Proost, K; Gijsels, L; Danesi, P R

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) particles were determined by synchrotron radiation based mu-XANES, applied to individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kuwait. Based on scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis prior to mu-XANES, DU particles ranging from submicrons to several hundred micrometers were observed. The median particle size depended on sources and sampling sites; small-sized particles (median 13 microm) were identified in swipes taken from the inside of DU penetrators holes in tanks and in sandy soil collected below DU penetrators, while larger particles (median 44 microm) were associated with fire in a DU ammunition storage facility. Furthermore, the (236)U/(235)U ratios obtained from accelerator mass spectrometry demonstrated that uranium in the DU particles originated from reprocessed fuel (about 10(-2) in DU from the ammunition facility, about 10(-3) for DU in swipes). Compared to well-defined standards, all investigated DU particles were oxidized. Uranium particles collected from swipes were characterized as UO(2), U(3)O(8) or a mixture of these oxidized forms, similar to that observed in DU affected areas in Kosovo. Uranium particles formed during fire in the DU ammunition facility were, however, present as oxidation state +5 and +6, with XANES spectra similar to solid uranyl standards. Environmental or health impact assessments for areas affected by DU munitions should therefore take into account the presence of respiratory UO(2), U(3)O(8) and even UO(3) particles, their corresponding weathering rates and the subsequent mobilisation of U from oxidized DU particles.

  5. Submicron/nano-structured icephobic surfaces made from fluorinated polymethylsiloxane and octavinyl-POSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yancai; Luo, Chenghao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Kaiqiang; Zhao, Yunhui; Zhu, Kongying; Yuan, Xiaoyan, E-mail: yuanxy@tju.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The submicron/nano-structured morphology induced by OVPOSS has a strong effect on ice attachment. The OVPOSS particles aggregated on the top surface could decrease the ice adhesion strength. - Highlights: • Fluorinated hybrid films were fabricated from PMHS–xFMA and OVPOSS. • The hybrid films presented icephobic surfaces in submicron/nano-structure. • PMHS–17FMA could enhance hydrophobicity rather than icephobic properties. • Proper OVPOSS content (10–15 wt%) favored reducing the ice adhesion strength. • Rougher surface morphology (R{sub q} > 90 nm) was benefit for repelling water droplets. - Abstract: Fluorinated hybrid films composed of fluorinated polymethylsiloxane (PMHS–xFMA, x = 6, 13, 17) and octavinyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (OVPOSS) were prepared for icephobic applications. PMHS–xFMA with diverse fluorinated side groups were synthesized via hydrosilylation of polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) with fluorinated methacrylate (xFMA), i.e., hexafluorobutyl methacrylate (6FMA), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA) and heptadecafluorodecyl methacrylate (17FMA), respectively. Characterizations of atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope indicated that surfaces of the hybrid films consisted of submicron/nano-scaled OVPOSS aggregates, and the root-mean-square roughness (S{sub q}) could vary from 42.6 nm to 145.2 nm with various OVPOSS content (5–20 wt%). Wettability measurements of the prepared films demonstrated that the relatively longer fluorinated side groups in PMHS–17FMA were beneficial for decreasing surface energy and enhancing hydrophobic properties. However, the fluorinated hybrid films with PMHS–17FMA presented higher ice shear strengths due to the stronger interfacial interactions between the film surface and ice/water. The film prepared by PMHS–13FMA and 10 wt% of OVPOSS with proper roughness (90.2 nm) performed the lowest ice shear strength (188.2 ± 13.4 kPa) among all the

  6. Nonlinear δf particle simulations of collective excitations and energy-anisotropy instabilities in high-intensity bunched beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects with strong coupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are of fundamental importance for applications of high-intensity bunched beams. The self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations are applied to high-intensity finite-length charge bunches, and a generalized δf particle simulation algorithm is developed for bunched beams with or without energy anisotropy. The nonlinear δf method exhibits minimal noise and accuracy problems in comparison with standard particle-in-cell simulations. Systematic studies are carried out under conditions corresponding to strong 3D nonlinear space-charge forces in the beam frame. For charge bunches with isotropic energy, finite bunch-length effects are clearly evident by the fact that the spectra for an infinitely long coasting beam and a nearly spherical charge bunch have strong similarities, whereas the spectra have distinctly different features when the bunch length is varied between these two limiting cases. For bunched beams with anisotropic energy, there exists no exact kinetic equilibrium because the particle dynamics do not conserve transverse energy and longitudinal energy separately. A reference state in approximate dynamic equilibrium has been constructed theoretically, and a quasi-steady state has been established in the simulations for the anisotropic case. Collective excitations relative to the reference state have been simulated using the generalized δf algorithm. In particular, the electrostatic Harris instability driven by strong energy anisotropy is investigated for a finite-length charge bunch. The observed growth rates are larger than those obtained for infinitely long coasting beams. However, the growth rate decreases for increasing bunch length to a value similar to the case of a long coasting beam. For long bunches, the instability is axially localized symmetrically relative to the beam center, and the characteristic wavelength in the longitudinal direction is

  7. THE EFFECT OF THE REYNOLDS NUMBER OF AIR FLOW TO THE PARTICLE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF A FIBROUS FILTER MEDIUM WITH CYLINDRICAL SECTION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George P Kouropoulos

    2014-01-01

      At this study, an attempt for the theoretical approach of the Reynolds number effect of air flow to the particle collection efficiency of a fibrous filter, with cylindrical section, will be made...

  8. Definition of key parameters for constructing an online reference micrographs collection of processed animal particles in feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinchon Crespo, C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Union Reference Laboratory for the detection of animal proteins in feedingstuffs (EURL-AP has developed an online micrographs collection supporting its network activities within the European Union for the detection of prohibited animal by-products in feed. So far, the only official method for detecting these by-products is light microscopy, which is highly dependent on the skills of a microscopist because it relies on particle recognition. In order to help the microscopist network to achieve high proficiency levels, it was necessary to create an online reference tool based on micrographs and accessible via an Intranet platform. Members of the National Reference Laboratories for animal proteins in feedingstuffs (NRL-AP and the International Association for Feedingstuff Analysis – Section Feedingstuff Microscopy (IAG have access to this micrographs collection. This paper describes how the online collection was created and what conditions had to be taken into account in creating such a tool. It also describes how information are periodically updated and managed within the context of the large amount of information included in each micrograph. The need for a robust back-office system as the foundation for all the research activities in this project is also covered, and the evaluation of the use of the online collection is discussed.

  9. Deep-submicron CMOS Single Photon Detectors and Quantum Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karami, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum parasitic effects and miniaturization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes in deep-submicron technologies have been studied in this thesis in detail. Tunneling noise and Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) noise have been the main two parasitic effects addressed comprehensively. While the fundamental

  10. Modeling and simulation of dielectrophoretic collective dynamics in a suspension of polarizable particles under the action of a gradient AC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Shigeru; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Zhiyong

    2017-06-01

    When a suspension of polarizable particles is subjected to a gradient AC electric field, the particles exhibit collective motion due to an interaction between the dipole induced in the particles and the spatial gradient of the electric field; this is known as dielectrophoresis. In the present study, the collective dynamics of suspended particles in a parallel-plate electric chamber was investigated by simulating numerically the trajectories of individual particles under the action of combined dielectrophoretic and dipole-dipole interparticle forces. The particles were transported by the dielectrophoretic forces toward the grounded electrodes. Before long, when the particles approached the site of the minimum field strength, attractive/repulsive interparticle forces became dominant and acted among the particles attempting to form a column-like cluster, having the particles distribution in concentric circles in its cross-section, in line with the centerline of the grounded electrodes. Our results also well reproduced the transient particle aggregation that was observed experimentally. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Physics of microswimmers—single particle motion and collective behavior: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgeti, J.; Winkler, R. G.; Gompper, G.

    2015-05-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed.

  12. Physics of microswimmers--single particle motion and collective behavior: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgeti, J; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-05-01

    Locomotion and transport of microorganisms in fluids is an essential aspect of life. Search for food, orientation toward light, spreading of off-spring, and the formation of colonies are only possible due to locomotion. Swimming at the microscale occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where fluid friction and viscosity dominates over inertia. Here, evolution achieved propulsion mechanisms, which overcome and even exploit drag. Prominent propulsion mechanisms are rotating helical flagella, exploited by many bacteria, and snake-like or whip-like motion of eukaryotic flagella, utilized by sperm and algae. For artificial microswimmers, alternative concepts to convert chemical energy or heat into directed motion can be employed, which are potentially more efficient. The dynamics of microswimmers comprises many facets, which are all required to achieve locomotion. In this article, we review the physics of locomotion of biological and synthetic microswimmers, and the collective behavior of their assemblies. Starting from individual microswimmers, we describe the various propulsion mechanism of biological and synthetic systems and address the hydrodynamic aspects of swimming. This comprises synchronization and the concerted beating of flagella and cilia. In addition, the swimming behavior next to surfaces is examined. Finally, collective and cooperate phenomena of various types of isotropic and anisotropic swimmers with and without hydrodynamic interactions are discussed.

  13. Micro- and Nanostructural Characteristics of Particles Before and After an Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Scrubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieke, Kirsten Inga; Rosenørn, Thomas; Pedersen, Jannik

    2013-01-01

    This work provides insight into the morphology and mixing state of submicron particles in diesel exhaust from a ship engine with an exhaust gas recirculation scrubber. Particles from this low-speed ship engine on test bed were collected using a microiner-tial impactor with transmission electron...... microscopy (TEM) grids on two stages. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of sin-gle particles were studied by TEM. Image analysis was carried out on overview and high-resolution images, revealing influence of the exhaust gas treatment (scrubber) on the particle morphology and mixing state. Soot...... agglomerates were found to be collapsed after scrubber, reflected by their change in fractal dimension (fly) from 1.88 to 2.13. Soot was predominantly found internally mixed with other components, with a higher degree of internal mix-ing observed after scrubber. Soot nanostructural characteristics on the near...

  14. High Proportions of Sub-micron Particulate Matter in Icelandic Dust Storms in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Magnusdottir, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    Iceland is extremely active dust region and desert areas of over 44,000 km2 acknowledge Iceland as the largest Arctic and European desert. Frequent dust events, up to 135 dust days annually, transport dust particles far distances towards the Arctic and Europe. Satellite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes exceeding 1,000 km. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 40.1 million tons yr-1. Two dust storms were measured in transverse horizontal profile about 90 km far from different dust sources in southwestern Iceland in the summer of 2015. Aerosol monitor DustTrak DRX 8533EP was used to measure PM mass concentrations corresponding to PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10 and the total PM15 at several places within the dust plume. Images from camera network operated by the Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. A numerical simulation of surface winds was carried out with the numerical model HIRLAM with horizontal resolution of 5 km and used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources. The in situ measurements inside the dust plumes showed that aeolian dust can be very fine. The study highlights that suspended volcanic dust in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations comparable to the polluted urban stations in Europe or Asia rather than reported dust event observations from around the world. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios are generally low during dust storms outside of Iceland, much lower than > 0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 found in our study. It shows that Icelandic volcanic dust consists of higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. The submicron particles are predicted to travel long distances. Moreover, such submicron particles pose considerable health risk because of high potential for entering the lungs. Icelandic volcanic glass has often fine pipe-vesicular structures known from asbestos and high content of heavy metals. Previous

  15. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Z.H.; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, IK

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H2O2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O-3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...... in the O-3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H2O2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co...

  16. Presence of plastic particles in waterbirds faeces collected in Spanish lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Delgado, J A; Guijarro, D; Gosálvez, R U; López-Iborra, G M; Ponz, A; Velasco, A

    2017-01-01

    Plastic intake by marine vertebrates has been widely reported, but information about its presence in continental waterfowl is scarce. Here we analyzed faeces of waterbirds species (European coot, Fulica atra, mallard, Anas platyrhynchos and shelduck, Tadorna tadorna) for plastic debris in five wetlands in Central Spain. We collected 89 faeces of shelduck distributed in four lakes, 43.8% of them presented plastic remnants. Sixty percent of 10 faeces of European coot and 45% of 40 faeces of mallard contained plastic debris. Plastic debris found was of two types, threads and fragments, and were identified as remnants of plastic objects used in agricultural fields surrounding the lakes. Differences in prevalence of plastic in faeces, number of plastic pieces per excrement and size of the plastic pieces were not statistically significant between waterfowl species. Thus, our results suggest that plastic may also be frequently ingested by waterfowl in continental waters, at least in our study area. Future studies should address this potential problem for waterbird conservation in other wetlands to evaluate the real impact of this pollutant on waterbirds living in inland water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonlinear canonical quantum system of collectively interacting particles via an exclusion-inclusion principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniadakis, G.; Quarati, P.; Scarfone, A. M.

    1998-11-01

    Recently [G. Kaniadakis, Phys. Rev. A 55, 941 (1997)], we introduced a Schrödinger equation containing a complex nonlinearity W(ρ,j)+i W(ρ,j) which describes the collective interaction introduced by an exclusion-inclusion principle (EIP). The EIP does not affect W(ρ,j) and determines W(ρ,j) univocally. In the above reference W(ρ,j) was deduced by means of a stochastic quantization approach, in this way obtaining a noncanonical quantum system. In this work we introduce a family of nonlinearities W(ρ,j) generating a family of nonlinear canonical quantum systems, and derive their Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian functions and the evolution equations of the fields. We derive also the Ehrenfest relations and study the soliton properties. The shape of the soliton, propagating in the system obeying the EIP, can be obtained by solving a first-order ordinary differential equation. We show that, in the case of soliton solutions, by means of a unitary transformation, the EIP potential is equivalent to a real algebraic nonlinear potential proportional to κ ρ2/(1+κ ρ).

  18. Disentangling random thermal motion of particles and collective expansion of source from transverse momentum spectra in high energy collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Rong; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of a multisource thermal model, we describe experimental results of the transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in gold-gold (Au-Au), copper-copper (Cu-Cu), lead-lead (Pb-Pb), proton-lead (p-Pb), and proton-proton (p -p) collisions at various energies, measured by the PHENIX, STAR, ALICE, and CMS Collaborations, by using the Tsallis-standard (Tsallis form of Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein), Tsallis, and two- or three-component standard distributions which can be in fact regarded as different types of ‘thermometers’ or ‘thermometric scales’ and ‘speedometers’. A central parameter in the three distributions is the effective temperature which contains information on the kinetic freeze-out temperature of the emitting source and reflects the effects of random thermal motion of particles as well as collective expansion of the source. To disentangle both effects, we extract the kinetic freeze-out temperature from the intercept of the effective temperature (T) curve as a function of particle’s rest mass (m 0) when plotting T versus m 0, and the mean transverse flow velocity from the slope of the mean transverse momentum ( ) curve as a function of mean moving mass (\\overline{m}) when plotting versus \\overline{m}.

  19. Microbiomes of the dust particles collected from the International Space Station and Spacecraft Assembly Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Probst, Alexander J; Vaishampayan, Parag; White, James R; Kumar, Deepika; Stepanov, Victor G; Fox, George E; Nilsson, Henrik R; Pierson, Duane L; Perry, Jay; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2015-10-27

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique built environment due to the effects of microgravity, space radiation, elevated carbon dioxide levels, and especially continuous human habitation. Understanding the composition of the ISS microbial community will facilitate further development of safety and maintenance practices. The primary goal of this study was to characterize the viable microbiome of the ISS-built environment. A second objective was to determine if the built environments of Earth-based cleanrooms associated with space exploration are an appropriate model of the ISS environment. Samples collected from the ISS and two cleanrooms at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, Pasadena, CA) were analyzed by traditional cultivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and propidium monoazide-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) assays to estimate viable microbial populations. The 16S rRNA gene Illumina iTag sequencing was used to elucidate microbial diversity and explore differences between ISS and cleanroom microbiomes. Statistical analyses showed that members of the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were dominant in the samples examined but varied in abundance. Actinobacteria were predominant in the ISS samples whereas Proteobacteria, least abundant in the ISS, dominated in the cleanroom samples. The viable bacterial populations seen by PMA treatment were greatly decreased. However, the treatment did not appear to have an effect on the bacterial composition (diversity) associated with each sampling site. The results of this study provide strong evidence that specific human skin-associated microorganisms make a substantial contribution to the ISS microbiome, which is not the case in Earth-based cleanrooms. For example, Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium (Actinobacteria) but not Staphylococcus (Firmicutes) species are dominant on the ISS in terms of viable and total bacterial community composition. The results obtained will

  20. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-01-15

    It is concluded that the laboratory tests should be conducted at high levels of SO{sub 3} such that the resulting resistivity is in the range of 10{sup 7}--10{sup 8} ohm-cm. There are several reasons leading to this conclusion. At SO{sub 3} concentrations of 30 ppM and greater, the curves for both dew point and resistivity are relatively flat so that changes in gas phase SO{sub 3} will have minimal impact on particle characteristics. In addition, the electrostatic forces are relatively flat in this range so that changes in flue gas conditions will that result in a change in resistivity by up to two orders of magnitude will have little effect on the magnitude of reentrainment. Finally, at the very low resistivity conditions, reentrainment will be the highest. Since the purpose of the laboratory resistivity tests is to determine the relative ability of the various additives to reduce resistivity, the greater the reentrainment, the easier it will be to measure an improvement. Tests were conducted by first operating at baseline conditions with no additives and then repeating the test with additives. The data collected during each test includes the resistivity of the material, thickness of the collected dust layer, and subjective indications of the dust characteristics. The candidate additives were from the polymer group, cellulose derivatives, starches and gums, and oils. No waxes or synthetic compounds have been tested to date in the laboratory apparatus. Of the seventeen additives tested, eight appeared to have a positive impact on either the ash layer thickness or the physical appearance of the dust layer. Excessive deposits on the discharge electrode resulted during injection of some of the additives. Three of the additives resulted in significant deposits in the injection chamber. The build up on the electrode was interpreted as a positive indicator of increase particle adhesion. The initial observations and comments for the eight additives are listed in Table 1.

  1. Thymol-based submicron emulsions exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium graminearum and inhibit Fusarium head blight in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, T A; Li, J; Saenger, M; Scofield, S R

    2016-10-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a very destructive fungal pathogen that leads to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat, a disease which costs growers millions of dollars annually both in crop losses and in remediation efforts. Current countermeasures include the deployment of wheat varieties with some resistance to FHB in conjunction with timed fungicide treatments. In this article, we introduce a fungicide based on thymol, a naturally occurring plant phenolic derived from essential oils. To overcome the hydrophobicity of thymol, the thymol active was incorporated into a low-surfactant submicron emulsion with and without a carrier oil. The minimum fungicidal concentration of F. graminearum was found to be both 0·02% for thymol emulsions with and without an oil component. Time-to-kill experiments showed that thymol emulsions were able to inactivate F. graminearum in as little as 10 s at concentrations above 0·06%. Spraying the thymol emulsions (~0·1% range) on the wheat variety Bobwhite demonstrated significant reductions in FHB infection rate (number of infected spikelets). However, with 0·5% thymol, the wheat heads exhibited premature senescence. Transmission and scanning electron micrographs suggest that the mechanism of antifungal action is membrane mediated, as conidia exposed to thymol showed complete organelle disorganization and evidence of lipid emulsification. The collective experimental data suggest that thymol emulsions may be an effective naturally derived alternative to the current thymol treatments, and chemical fungicides in ameliorating FHB. This is the first thymol-derived nanoemulsion particles resuspended into water and not DMSO, exhibiting the same antibacterial/antifungal activity as previously described thymol and thyme oil treatments. This drastically reduces the environmental footprint thymol will leave if utilized as a fungicide treatment on field crops. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Chemical characterization of individual particles and residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals collected on board research aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Glen, A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    Ambient particles and the dry residuals of mixed-phase cloud droplets and ice crystals were collected during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) near Barrow, Alaska, in spring of 2008. The collected particles were analyzed using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to identify physico-chemical properties that differentiate cloud-nucleating particles from the total aerosol population. A wide range of individually mixed components was identified in the ambient particles and residuals including organic carbon compounds, inorganics, carbonates, and black carbon. Our results show that cloud droplet residuals differ from the ambient particles in both size and composition, suggesting that both properties may impact the cloud-nucleating ability of aerosols in mixed-phase clouds. The percentage of residual particles which contained carbonates (47%) was almost four times higher than those in ambient samples. Residual populations were also enhanced in sea salt and black carbon and reduced in organic compounds relative to the ambient particles. Further, our measurements suggest that chemical processing of aerosols may improve their cloud-nucleating ability. Comparison of results for various time periods within ISDAC suggests that the number and composition of cloud-nucleating particles over Alaska can be influenced by episodic events bringing aerosols from both the local vicinity and as far away as Siberia.

  3. Changes of propagation light in optical fiber submicron wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Łukowski, A.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2013-05-01

    At the moment technology allows to miniaturize measurement system to several micrometers. Application of an optical fiber taper in such system needs to manufacture a new one with diameters below single micrometers which is very difficult and expensive. Another way to obtain this level of diameters is the process of tapering from the existing fibers. In the paper, experimental results of propagation light from a supercontinnum sources of the wavelength generates the wavelength of 350-2000 nm, in different optical fiber submicron wires made from tapers manufactured from single mode fibers are presented. Biconical optical fibers' tapers were manufactured in low pressure gas burner technique. There are presented spectral characteristics of a propagated beam. For the test, there was manufactured an optical fiber submicron wires with a different length of waist region with a diameter near one micrometer. We put to the test a taper made from a standard telecommunication fiber SMF-28 with a cutoff wavelength equal to 1260.

  4. Submicron bioactive glass tubes for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwei; Blough, Eric R; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2012-02-01

    Herein we describe a method to fabricate submicron bioactive glass tubes using sol-gel and coaxial electrospinning techniques for applications in bone tissue engineering. Heavy mineral oil and gel solution were delivered by two independent syringe pumps during the coaxial electrospinning process. Subsequently, submicron bioactive glass tubes were obtained by removal of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and heavy mineral oil via calcination at 600 °C for 5 h. Tubular structure was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy imaging. We examined the bioactivity of submicron bioactive glass tubes and fibers and evaluated their biocompatibility, using electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers--a bioinactive material--for comparison. The bioactivity of the glass tubes was examined in a simulated body fluid and they demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite-like minerals on both the outer and inner surfaces. In contrast, mineralization only occurred on their surface for bioactive glass solid fibers. Energy-dispersive X-ray data suggested that the bioactive glass tubes had a faster induction of mineral formation than the solid fibers. We demonstrate that the proliferation rate of mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on bioactive glass tubes was comparable to that on solid fibers. We also show that bioactive glass tubes can be loaded with a model protein drug, bovine serum albumin, and that these structures exhibit delayed release properties. The bioactivity of released lysozyme can be as high as 90.9%. Taken together, these data suggest that submicron bioactive glass tubes could hold great potential for use in bone tissue engineering as well as topical drug or gene delivery. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy Efficient Signaling in Deep-submicron Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Ben Dhaou

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In deep-submicron technology, global interconnect capacitances have started reaching several orders of magnitude greater than the intrinsic capacitances of the CMOS gates. The dynamic power consumption of a CMOS gate driving a global wire is the sum of the power dissipated due to (discharging (i the intrinsic capacitance of the gate, and (ii the wire capacitance. The latter is referred to as on-chip signaling power consumption.

  6. Submicron plasticity: yield stress, dislocation avalanches, and velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Ispánovity, Péter Dusán; Groma, István; Györgyi, Géza; Csikor, Ferenc F.; Weygand, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The existence of a well defined yield stress, where a macroscopic piece of crystal begins to plastically flow, has been one of the basic observations of materials science. In contrast to macroscopic samples, in micro- and nanocrystals the strain accumulates in distinct, unpredictable bursts, which makes controlled plastic forming rather difficult. Here we study by simulation, in two and three dimensions, plastic deformation of submicron objects under increasing stress. We show that, while the...

  7. Submicron Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Alarousu, Erkki

    2013-11-14

    Apparatuses and systems for submicron resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) are disclosed. The system may use white light sources having wavelengths within 400-1000 nanometers, and achieve resolution below 1 .mu.m. The apparatus is aggregated into a unitary piece, and a user can connect the apparatus to a user provided controller and/or light source. The light source may be a supercontinuum source.

  8. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtley, John R., E-mail: jkirtley@stanford.edu; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Moler, Kathryn A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Paulius, Lisa [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Spanton, Eric M. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Schiessl, Daniel [Attocube Systems AG, Königinstraße 11A, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Fung, Y.-K.K.; Gibson, Gerald W. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Huber, Martin E. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (United States); Ralph, Daniel C. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ketchen, Mark B. [OcteVue, Hadley, Massachusetts 01035 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2}. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  9. FEASIBILITY OF THE AEROSOL-TO-LIQUID PARTICLE EXTRACTION SYSTEM (ALPES) FOR COLLECTION OF VIABLE FRANCISELLA SP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitkamp, M

    2006-08-07

    Several Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area have tested positive for Francisella tularensis and there is a need to determine whether natural occurring Francisella-related microorganism(s) may be responsible for these observed positive reactions. The collection, culturing and characterization of Francisella-related natural microorganisms will provide the knowledge base to improve the future selectivity of Biowatch monitoring for Francisella. The aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPES) is a high-efficiency, dual mechanism collection system that utilizes a liquid collection medium for capture of airborne microorganisms. Since the viability of microorganisms is preserved better in liquid medium than on air filters, this project was undertaken to determine whether Francisella philomiragia and Francisella tularensis LVS maintain acceptable viability in the continuous liquid recirculation, high direct current voltage and residual ozone concentrations which occur during ALPES operation. Throughout a series of preliminary trial runs with representative gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms, several design modifications and improvements to the ALPES optimized liquid handling, electrical stability, sampling and overall performance for biological sampling. Initial testing with Francisella philomiragia showed viability was preserved better in PBS buffer than HBSS buffer. Trial runs at starting cell concentrations of 1.8 x 10{sup 6} and 2.5 x 10{sup 4} CFU/L showed less than a 1-log decrease in viability for F. philomiragia after 24 h in the ALPES. Francisella tularensis LVS (live vaccine strain) was used as a surrogate for virulent F. tularensis in ALPES trial runs conducted at starting cell concentrations of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/L. F. tularensis LVS was slow-growing and required highly selective growth media to prevent overgrowth by collected airborne microorganisms. In addition, one ALPES unit intake was HEPA filtered during

  10. Mass and elemental distributions of atmospheric particles nearby blast furnace and electric arc furnace operated industrial areas in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohiuddin, Kazi, E-mail: kazi.mohiuddin@students.mq.edu.au [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia); Strezov, Vladimir; Nelson, Peter F. [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia); Stelcer, Eduard [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Evans, Tim [Graduate School of the Environment, Department of Environment and Geography, Faculty of Science, Macquarie University, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    The improved understanding of mass and elemental distributions of industrial air particles is important due to their heterogeneous atmospheric behaviour and impact on human health and the environment. In this study, particles of different size ranges were collected from three sites in Australia located in the vicinity of iron and steelmaking industries and one urban background site with very little industrial influence. In order to determine the importance of the type of industrial activity on the urban atmospheric quality, the industrial sites selected in this study were in the close proximity to two blast furnace operated and one electric arc furnace based steelmaking sites. The chemical compositions of the collected air particles were analysed using the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. This study revealed significantly higher metal concentrations in the atmospheric particles collected in the industrial sites, comparing to the background urban site, demonstrating local influence of the industrial activities to the air quality. The modality types of the particles were found to be variable between the mass and elements, and among elements in the urban and industrial areas indicating that the elemental modal distribution is as important as particle mass for particle pollution modelling. The highest elemental number distribution at all studied sites occurred with particle size of 0.1 μm. Iron was found as the main dominant metal at the industrial atmosphere in each particle size range. The industrial Fe fraction in the submicron and ultrafine size particles was estimated at up to 95% which may be released from high temperature industrial activities with the iron and steelmaking industries being one of the major contributors. Hence, these industrial elemental loadings can highly influence the atmospheric pollution at local urban and regional levels and are required to consider in the atmospheric modelling settings. - Highlights: • Urban and

  11. Mineralogy and characterization of deposited particles of the aero sediments collected in the vicinity of power plants and the open pit coal mine: Kolubara (Serbia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Željko; Logar, Mihovil; Rosić, Aleksandra

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, particular attention was paid to the presence of aerosol solid particles, which occurred mainly as a result of exploitation and coal combustion in the thermal power plants of the Kolubara basin. Not all of the particles created by this type of anthropogenic pollution have an equal impact on human health, but it largely depends on their size and shape. The mineralogical composition and particle size distribution in the samples of aero sediments were defined. The samples were collected close to the power plant and open pit coal mine, in the winter and summer period during the year 2007. The sampling was performed by using precipitators placed in eight locations within the territory of the Lazarevac municipality. In order to characterize the sedimentary particles, several methods were applied: microscopy, SEM-EDX and X-ray powder diffraction. The concentration of aero sediments was also determined during the test period. Variety in the mineralogical composition and particle size depends on the position of the measuring sites, geology of the locations, the annual period of collecting as well as possible interactions. By applying the mentioned methods, the presence of inhalational and respiratory particles variously distributed in the winter and in the summer period was established. The most common minerals are quartz and feldspar. The presence of gypsum, clay minerals, calcite and dolomite as secondary minerals was determined, as well as the participation of organic and inorganic amorphic matter. The presence of quartz as a toxic mineral has a particular impact on human health.

  12. Effect of short-term regional traffic restriction on urban submicron particulate pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye

    2017-05-01

    During the 2013 and 2015 Lanzhou International Marathon Events (LIME1 and LIME2), the local government made a significant effort to improve traffic conditions and air quality by implementing traffic restriction measures. To fill the gap in information on the effect of short-period (several hours) traffic control on urban air quality, submicron particle size distributions and meteorological data were measured simultaneously during June 2013 and June 2015 in urban Lanzhou. The number and surface area concentrations of particles in the 100-200nm range declined by 67.2% and 65.0% for LIME1 due to traffic control, while they decreased by 39.2% and 37.1% for LIME2. The impact of traffic restriction on air pollution near the sampling site lagged behind the traffic control period for LIME2. In addition, the effect of traffic restriction on air pollution near the sampling site was dependent on the distance between the relative orientation of the sampling site and traffic-restricted zones, as well as meteorological conditions such as wind direction. The influence of traffic restrictions on the particle concentrations differed for different particle sizes. The size range most affected by traffic restriction was 60-200 and 60-300nm for number and surface area concentrations in the urban environment, respectively, while for the particle volume concentration it was the 100-600nm range. This study will provide a basis for implementation of future urban traffic-induced particulate pollution control measures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Search for long-lived neutral particle decays using the full statistic collected in Run I with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Verducci, M

    2016-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) include neutral weakly coupled particles that can be long-lived. These long-lived particles occur in many models, included gauge-mediated extensions of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM), MSSM with R-parity violation, inelastic dark matter and the Hidden Valley (HV) scenario. Results are presented on ATLAS searches at the LHC for scalar boson decays (including rare Higgs boson decays) to pair of neutral, long-lived hidden-sector particles that lead to final states containing fermion anti-fermion pairs or pairs of collimated lepton jets. No excess of events above the expected background has been observed for 20.3 fb$^{−1}$ of data collected in 2012 at a center of mass energy of 8TeV. Limits are presented as a function of the proper lifetime of the long-lived neutral particle.

  14. Search for long-lived neutral particle decays with first 1.9 fb−1 of 2011 data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM include neutral weakly-coupled particles that can be long-lived. These long-lived particles occur in many models, included gauge-mediated extensions of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM, MSSM with R-parity violation, inelastic dark matter and the Hidden Valley (HV scenario. Results are presented on the first ATLAS searches at the LHC for possible rare Higgs boson decays to pair of neutral, long-lived hidden-sector particles that lead to final states containing fermion anti-fermion pairs or pairs of collimated lepton jets. No excess of events above the expected background has been observed for 1.9 fb−1 of data collected in 2011 at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. Limits are presented as a function of the proper lifetime of the long-lived neutral particle.

  15. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-07-30

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the uptake of reactive gas species on atmospheric particles will be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of these types of phase transitions within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we observe the coexistence of two non-crystalline phases in particles generated from real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, Georgia, and in particles generated in the laboratory using atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. Using a box model, we show that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO3 and N2O5 in the Atlanta region, due to decreased particle uptake of N2O5.

  16. Interaction between submicron COD crystals and renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Yang, Ru-E

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the adhesion characteristics between submicron calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with a size of 150 ± 50 nm and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero cells) before and after damage, and to discuss the mechanism of kidney stone formation. Vero cells were oxidatively injured by hydrogen peroxide to establish a model of injured cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe Vero-COD adhesion. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry was used to quantitatively measure the amount of adhered COD microcrystals. Nanoparticle size analyzer and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to measure the change in the zeta potential on the Vero cell surface and the change in osteopontin expression during the adhesion process, respectively. The level of cell injury was evaluated by measuring the changes in malonaldehyde content, and cell viability during the adhesion process. The adhesion capacity of Vero cells in the injury group to COD microcrystals was obviously stronger than that of Vero cells in the control group. After adhesion to COD, cell viability dropped, both malonaldehyde content and cell surface zeta potential increased, and the fluorescence intensity of osteopontin decreased because the osteopontin molecules were successfully covered by COD. Submicron COD further damaged the cells during the adhesion process, especially for Vero cells in the control group, leading to an elevated amount of attached microcrystals. Submicron COD can further damage injured Vero cells during the adhesion process. The amount of attached microcrystals is proportional to the degree of cell damage. The increased amount of microcrystals that adhered to the injured epithelial cells plays an important role in the formation of early-stage kidney stones.

  17. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  18. Highly sensitive measurement of submicron waveguides based on Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Adrien; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Phan Huy, Kien

    2017-02-01

    Fabrication and characterization of submicron optical waveguides is one of the major challenges in modern photonics, as they find many applications from optical sensors to plasmonic devices. Here we report on a novel technique that allows for a complete and precise characterization of silica optical nanofibers. Our method relies on the Brillouin backscattering spectrum analysis that directly depends on the waveguide geometry. Our method was applied to several fiber tapers with diameter ranging from 500 nm to 3 μm. Results were compared to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and numerical simulations with very good agreement and similar sensitivity.

  19. Novel Translucent and Strong Submicron Alumina Ceramics for Dental Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M; Sun, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y

    2017-10-01

    An ideal ceramic restorative material should possess excellent aesthetic and mechanical properties. We hypothesize that the high translucency and strength of polycrystalline ceramics can be achieved through microstructural tailoring. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the superior optical and mechanical properties of a new class of submicron grain-sized alumina ceramics relative to the current state-of-the-art dental ceramic materials. The translucency, the in-line transmission ( TIT) in particular, of these submicron alumina ceramics has been examined with the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye light-scattering model. The theoretical predictions related very well with the measured TIT values. The translucency parameter ( TP) and contrast ratio ( CR) of the newly developed aluminas were measured with a reflectance spectrophotometer on a black-and-white background. For comparison, the TIT, TP, and CR values for a variety of dental ceramics, mostly measured in-house but also cited from the literature, were included. The flexural strength of the aluminas was determined with the 4-point bending test. Our findings have shown that for polycrystalline alumina ceramics, an average grain size <1 µm coupled with a porosity level <0.7% could yield translucency values ( TIT, TP, CR) similar to those of the commercial high-translucency porcelains. These values are far superior to the high-translucency lithium disilicate glass-ceramic and zirconias, including the most translucent cubic-containing zirconias. The strength of these submicron grain-sized aluminas was significantly higher than that of the cubic-containing zirconia (e.g., Zpex Smile) and lithia-based glass-ceramics (e.g., IPS e.max CAD HT). A coarse-grained alumina could also reach a translucency level comparable to that of dental porcelain. However, the relatively low strength of this material has limited its clinical indications to structurally less demanding applications, such as orthodontic brackets. With a combined high

  20. Nano to micro particle size distribution measurement in the fluid by interactive force apparatus for fine particle processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Okaya, Katsunori; Matsuo, Seiji; Wang, Li Pang; Onda, Kana; Otsuki, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The direct measurement of fine particles size distribution of dispersions or coagulations in liquid is important for water purification, fine particles separation for recycling and mineral processing, as well as the new material production. The nano to micro particle size is usually measured by light scattering method; however, it is difficult to measure at high concentration of suspension. Here, a novel dynamical method by using the interactive force measurement between particles in liquid under electric field is used for measuring distribution of fine particle. Three types of nano to submicron particles, that is well-dispersed nano particles, coagulated nano particles and settled submicron particles, have been measured by interactive force measurement method. The particle size distributions are compered with the size distributions of dried particles measured by TEM or SEM. The well-dispersed nano particle size distribution by interactive force measurement is influenced by the nano size surfactant micelles. The size distribution of coagulated nano particles in water is larger than the result by TEM. On the other hand, the submicron nickel particle size distribution is similar with the one analyzed by SEM.

  1. Enhanced hydrophobicity and volatility of submicron aerosols under severe emission control conditions in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing

    2017-04-01

    A series of strict emission control measures were implemented in Beijing and the surrounding seven provinces to ensure good air quality during the 2015 China Victory Day parade, rendering a unique opportunity to investigate anthropogenic impact of aerosol properties. Submicron aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility were measured during and after the control period using a hygroscopic and volatile tandem differential mobility analyzer (H/V-TDMA) system. Three periods, namely, the control clean period (Clean1), the non-control clean period (Clean2), and the non-control pollution period (Pollution), were selected to study the effect of the emission control measures on aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility. Aerosol particles became more hydrophobic and volatile due to the emission control measures. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 40-200 nm particles decreased by 32.0%-8.5% during the Clean1 period relative to the Clean2 period, while the volatile shrink factor (SF) of 40-300 nm particles decreased by 7.5%-10.5%. The emission controls also changed the diurnal variation patterns of both the probability density function of κ (κ-PDF) and the probability density function of SF (SF-PDF). During Clean1 the κ-PDF showed one nearly-hydrophobic (NH) mode for particles in the nucleation mode, which was likely due to the dramatic reduction in industrial emissions of inorganic trace gases. Compared to the Pollution period, particles observed during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods exhibited a more significant non-volatile (NV) mode throughout the day, suggesting a more externally-mixed state particularly for the 150 nm particles. Aerosol hygroscopicities increased as particle sizes increased, with the greatest increases seen during the Pollution period. Accordingly, the aerosol volatility became weaker (i.e., SF increased) during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods, but no apparent trend was observed during the Pollution period. Based on a correlation analysis of the number fractions

  2. Modelling size and structure of nanoparticles formed from drying of submicron solution aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A.; Pawar, Amol A.; Venkataraman, Chandra; Mehra, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Drying of submicron solution aerosols, under controlled conditions, has been explored to prepare nanoparticles for drug delivery applications. A computational model of solution drop evaporation is developed to study the evolution of solute gradients inside the drop and predict the size and shell thickness of precipitating nanoparticles. The model considers evaporation as a two-stage process involving droplet shrinkage and shell growth. It was corroborated that droplet evaporation rate controls the solute distribution within a droplet and the resulting particle structure (solid or shell type). At higher gas temperatures, rapid build-up of solute near drop surface from high evaporation rates results in early attainment of critical supersaturation solubility and a steeper solute gradient, which favours formation of larger, shell-type particles. At lower gas temperatures, formation of smaller, solid nanoparticles is indicated. The computed size and shell thickness are in good agreement with experimentally prepared lipid nanoparticles. This study indicates that solid or shell structure of precipitated nanoparticles is strongly affected by evaporation rate, while initial solute concentration in the precursor solution and atomized droplet size affect shell thickness. For the gas temperatures considered, evaporative cooling leads to droplet temperature below the melting point of the lipid solute. Thus, we conclude that control over nanoparticle size and structure, of thermolabile precursor materials suitable for drug delivery, can be achieved by controlling evaporation rates, through selection of aerosol processing conditions.

  3. Chemical compositions, sources and evolution processes of the submicron aerosols in Nanjing, China during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; He, Y.; Ge, X.; Wang, J.; Yu, H.; Chen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric particulate matter pollution is one of the most significant environmental issues in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Thus it is important to unravel the characteristics, sources and evolution processes of the ambient aerosols in order to improve the air quality. In this study, we report the real-time monitoring results on submicron aerosol particles (PM1) in suburban Nanjing during wintertime of 2015, using an Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). This instrument allows the fast measurement of refractory black carbon simultaneously with other aerosol components. Results show that organics was on average the most abundant species of PM1 (25.9%), but other inorganic species, such as nitrate (23.7%) and sulfate (23.3%) also comprised large mass fractions. As the sampling site is heavily influenced by various sources including industrial, traffic and other anthropogenic emissions, etc., six organic aerosol (OA) factors were identified from Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the SP-AMS OA mass spectra. These factors include three primary OA factors - a hydrocarbon-like OA, an industry-related OA (IOA) and a cooking OA (COA), and three secondary OA factors, i.e., a local OOA (LSOA), a semi-volatile OOA (SV-OOA) and a low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). Overall, the primary organic aerosol (POA) (HOA, IOA and COA) dominated the total OA mass. Behaviors and evolution processes of these OA factors will be discussed in combining with the other supporting data.

  4. A Synchrotron Based Facility for the In-situ Location, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of ~10 micron Particles Captured in Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G.; Lanzirotti, A.

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft is expected to return ~1000 dust particles >10 μm in size from Comet Wild -2. The particles will be captured in aerogel at ~6 km/sec, thus they will be embedded at depths ~millimeters. During capture some particles may fragment or vaporize, leaving particle fragments and/or vapor along the entry trail. It is critical to characterize this material before the particle is extracted, because these small fragments and vapor may be lost during particle extraction. In addition, it is important to develop techniques for in-situ chemical and mineralogical characterization of particles, because the extraction method and the allocation of individual particles may depend on particle type. We are developing a synchrotron-based facility to locate and characterize particles >10 μm as-collected in the aerogel cells. The facility will perform 6 tasks: 3-D Mapping of the Locations of Individual Particles - We plan to use computed microtomography (CMT) to detect and locate individual ~10 μm particles. This will be important if the aerogel is not transparent because of damage to its surface by impact of submicron particles or by collection of submicron particles. X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis - Since fluorescence xrays from heavy elements- have a range in low-density aerogel that is long compared to the depth of the captured ~10 μm particles, we will perform quantitative chemical analysis for the major and minor elements with z > Ca. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis - We plan to obtain x ray diffraction patterns allowing- us to determine the major mineralogy of particles >10 μm in size. Oxidization States ­ We plan to perform Xray Absorption Near-Edge Structure- (XANES) spectroscopy to determine Fe &Cr oxidization states in particles >10 μm. Mapping the Distribution of Particles Along an Entry Trail - We expect to perform high resolution CMT to determine in 3D the distribution of fragments along the trail. Chemical Characterization of Fragments or Vapor Along

  5. Imaging eubacteria and archaean cell abundance and nitrification activity on marine snow particles collected from the South Pacific using microscopy and nanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, R.; Santoro, A. E.; Tienken, D.; Littman, S.; Berelson, W.; Kuypers, M. M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The abundance and nitrification activity by marine-snow associated eubacteria and archaea were measured on particles collected in the South Pacific. The particles were first collected from 24 hour floating sediment traps moored at 100 and 200 m and later amended and incubated with 13C-bicarbonate and 15NH4 for 48 hours. Enrichment for 13C and 15N in cells above natural abundance was quantified using a coupled halogenated in situ hybridization assay with nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (HISH-SIMS). Approximately 82% ± 10 of the observed hybridized cells were Eubacterial, while 24% ± 5 were positively hybridized with the Archaean probe. There was high variability in 13C/12C and 15N/14N in both bacterial and archaeal cells. Complementary measurements of δ15NNO3 at the conclusion of the experiment indicated no detectible nitrification activity associated with the particles. Thin sections of the particles imaged with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) showed that a higher abundance of degrading phytoplanktonic cells, including numerous empty radiolarian and diatom frustules were associated with the deeper moored tap, while the shallow trap collected intact bacterial cells, including small picocyanobacteria. Single cell imaging and observations such as those presented here can provide subtle insights and measurements of cellular activity that are often diluted by bulk approaches and that are directly applicable to modeling N and C cycling.

  6. First evidence of collective alpha particle effect on TAE modes in the TFTR D-T experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.L.; Schmidt, G.; Batha, S.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The alpha particle effect on the excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) was investigated in deuterium-tritium (d-t) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). RF power was used to position the plasma near the instability threshold, and the alpha particle effect was inferred from the reduction of RF power threshold for TAE instability in d-t plasmas. Initial calculations indicate that the alpha particles contribute 10--30% of the total drive in a d-t plasma with 3 MW of peak fusion power.

  7. Particle Emissions from Domestic Gas Cookers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Livbjerg, Hans; Wagner, Ayten Yilmaz

    2010-01-01

    The authors experimentally studied the formation of submicron particles from a domestic gas cooker in a compartment free from external particle sources. The effects of fuel (methane, natural gas, odorant-free natural gas), primary aeration, flow rate, and fuel sulphur content on particle emissions...... of the emitted particles were found to have a mean value of about 7 nm for partially premixed flames, increasing to ∼10 nm for nonpremixed flames. The quantity of primary air had a strong impact on the particle emissions, showing a minimum at a primary aeration level of 60-65%. Presence of sulphur in small...

  8. Morphological and light-absorption characteristics of individual BC particles collected in an urban seaside area at Tokaimura, eastern central Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Fengfu [Key Lab of Analysis and Detecting Technology for Food Safety (Fuzhou University) of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Division of Environment and Radiation Sciences, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: fengfu@fzu.edu.cn; Watanabe, Kazuo; Shinohara, Nobuo [Division of Environment and Radiation Sciences, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Xu Xueqin; Xu Liangjun [Key Lab of Analysis and Detecting Technology for Food Safety (Fuzhou University) of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Akagi, Tasuku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    To observe surface morphology and light-absorption property of different black carbon (BC) particles, different-sized aerosols were collected in Tokaimura (36.27{sup o}N, 140.36{sup o}E), an urban seaside area of eastern central Japan, using a high-volume Andersen type sampler during a whole year (Jan. to Dec. in 2004). The morphology of individual BC particle separated from different-sized aerosols was observed with Scanning Electron Microscope with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX) and four types of morphology were observed: 50 nm spherical particles, micrometer-sized plates with homogeneous surfaces, micrometer-sized spherical particles with homogeneous surfaces and micrometer-sized spherical particles with small holes on surfaces. The light-absorption property of BC particles with different morphology has been determined by infrared spectrometry (IRS) with a photoacoustic technique in a region of 400-4000 wavenumbers (cm{sup -1}). All morphology BC particles showed a strong light-absorption during 500-3000 wavenumbers (cm{sup -1}) with two strong broad peaks in 750-1100 and 1200-2200 wavenumbers (cm{sup -1}), implying that all morphology BC particles can absorb a significant part of thermal infrared emitted from the earth (wavelength 4000-50,000 nm). The seasonal variation and the size-distribution of aerosols and its chemical components (e.g. C, Na, Cl, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Al, Ca, Mg and Fe) were also measured in this study. More than 55% of non-inorganic carbon (OC + BC) in the atmosphere was detected in the aerosols with a size smaller than 1.1 {mu}m and the concentration of non-inorganic carbon in the atmosphere showed only a faint variation during a whole year, although the concentrations of total aerosols and its chemical components exhibited a distinct variation.

  9. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  10. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-01

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of ‘pressure control’ to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  11. Distinct high molecular weight organic compound (HMW-OC) types in aerosol particles collected at a coastal urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Healy, R. M.; Wenger, J. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, D. C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Organic oligomers were discovered in laboratory-generated atmospheric aerosol over a decade ago. However, evidence for the presence of oligomers in ambient aerosols is scarce and mechanisms for their formation have yet to be fully elucidated. In this work, three unique aerosol particle types internally mixed with High molecular weight organic compounds (HMW-OC) species - likely oligomers - were detected in ambient air using single particle Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS) in Cork (Ireland) during winter 2009. These particle types can be described as follows: (1) HMW-OCs rich in organic nitrogen - possibly containing nitrocatechols and nitroguaiacols - originating from primary emissions of biomass burning particles during evening times; (2) HMW-OCs internally mixed with nitric acid, occurring in stagnant conditions during night time; and (3) HMW-OCs internally mixed with sea salt, likely formed via photochemical reactions during day time. The study exemplifies the power of methodologies capable of monitoring the simultaneous formation of organic and inorganic particle-phase reaction products. Primary emissions and atmospheric aging of different types of HMW-OC contributes to aerosol with a range of acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties, which can have different impacts on climate and health.

  12. One year online chemical speciation of submicron particulate matter (PM1) sampled at a French industrial and coastal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouwen; Riffault, Véronique; Dusanter, Sébastien; Augustin, Patrick; Fourmentin, Marc; Delbarre, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    The harbor of Dunkirk (Northern France) is surrounded by different industrial plants (metallurgy, petrochemistry, food processing, power plant, etc.), which emit gaseous and particulate pollutants such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sulfur (SO2), and submicron particles (PM1). These emissions are poorly characterized and their impact on neighboring urban areas has yet to be assessed. Studies are particularly needed in this type of complex environments to get a better understanding of PM1sources, especially from the industrial sector, their temporal variability, and their transformation. Several instruments, capable of real-time measurements (temporal resolution ≤ 30 min), were deployed at a site located downwind from the industrial area of Dunkirk for a one-year duration (July 2013-September 2014). An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and an Aethalometer monitored the main chemical species in the non-refractory submicron particles and black carbon, respectively. Concomitant measurements of trace gases and wind speed and direction were also performed. This dataset was analyzed considering four wind sectors, characteristics of marine, industrial, industrial-urban, and urban influences, and the different seasons. We will present a descriptive analysis of PM1, showing strong variations of ambient concentrations, as well as evidences of SO2 to SO4 gas-particle conversion when industrial plumes reached the monitoring site. The organic fraction measured by ACSM (37% of the total mass on average) was analyzed using a source-receptor model based on Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to identify chemical signatures of main emission sources and to quantify the contribution of each source to the PM1 budget given the wind sector. Four main factors were identified: hydrocarbon organic aerosol (HOA), oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) and cooking-like organic aerosol (COA). Overall, the total PM

  13. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzel, Christiane; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  14. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    KAUST Repository

    Helzel, Christiane

    2016-07-22

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  15. Synthesis and magnetic properties of Fe2O3-TiO2 nano-composite particles using pulsed laser gas phase evaporation-liquid phase collecting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suiyuan; Zhang, Yikun; Han, Weili; Wellburn, Daniel; Liang, Jing; Liu, Changsheng

    2013-10-01

    Fe2O3-TiO2 nano-composite particles were synthesized by a new method: pulsed laser gas phase evaporation-liquid phase collection. The targets are mixtures composed of 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% content micron-sized Fe2O3 powders each also mixed with micron-sized TiO2 powder. The morphology, structure, magnetic properties and synthesis mechanism of the samples were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, vibration magnetometer and other techniques. The results indicate that the Fe2O3-TiO2 nano-composite particles prepared with this new method are spherical, diameters of the primary particles range from 20 nm to 50 nm, and the particles have a tendency to form chain connections. All of the Fe2O3-TiO2 nano-composite particles contain TiO2 and Fe2O3 phases of both rutile and anatase crystal structures. With the addition of Fe2O3 content the magnetic saturation intensity and the coercivity both increase and the magnetic properties are obviously improved, the composite Fe2O3-TiO2 nanoparticles have added magnetic recovery functionality.

  16. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  17. Submicron Plasticity: Yield Stress, Dislocation Avalanches, and Velocity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispánovity, Péter Dusán; Groma, István; Györgyi, Géza; Csikor, Ferenc F.; Weygand, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    The existence of a well-defined yield stress, where a macroscopic crystal begins to plastically flow, has been a basic observation in materials science. In contrast with macroscopic samples, in microcrystals the strain accumulates in random bursts, which makes controlled plastic formation difficult. Here we study by 2D and 3D simulations the plastic deformation of submicron objects under increasing stress. We show that, while the stress-strain relation of individual samples exhibits jumps, its average and mean deviation still specify a well-defined critical stress. The statistical background of this phenomenon is analyzed through the velocity distribution of dislocations, revealing a universal cubic decay and the appearance of a shoulder due to dislocation avalanches.

  18. Microscopic methods in analysis of submicron phospholipid dispersions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płaczek Marcin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy belongs to the group of tests, used in pharmaceutical technology, that despite the lapse of time and the development of new analytical methods, still remain irreplaceable for the characterization of dispersed drug dosage forms (e.g., suspensions and emulsions. To obtain complete description of a specific drug formulation, such as parenteral colloidal products, a combination of different microscopic techniques is sometimes required. Electron microscopy methods are the most useful ones; however, even such basic methods as optical microscopy may be helpful for determination of some properties of a sample. The publication explicates the most popular microscopical techniques used nowadays for characterization of the morphology of nanoparticles suspended in pharmaceutical formulations; ad vantages and disadvantages of these methods are also discussed. Parenteral submicron formulations containing lecithin or a particular phospholipid were chosen as examples.

  19. Facile synthesis and stable cycling ability of hollow submicron silicon oxide–carbon composite anode material for Li-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong-Yeon; Nguyen, Dan Thien [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon-Sup [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seung-Wan, E-mail: swsong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Hollow submicron SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite material was synthesized using Si{sup 4+}-citrate chelation. • Composite material possessed a homogeneous distribution of SiO{sub 2} and carbon. • Composite electrode delivered ⩾600 mAh/g with a stable cycling stability. • This materials design and synthesis provides a useful platform for scalable production. - Abstract: Advanced SiO{sub 2}–carbon composite anode active material for lithium-ion battery has been synthesized through a simple chelation of silicon cation with citrate in a glyme-based solvent. The resultant composite material demonstrates a homogeneous distribution of constituents over the submicron particles and a unique hollow spherical microstructure, which provides an enhanced electrical conductivity and better accommodation of volume change of silicon during electrochemical charge–discharge cycling, respectively. As a result, the composite electrode exhibits a high cycling stability delivering the capacity retention of 91% at the 100th cycle and discharge capacities of 662–602 mAh/g and coulombic efficiencies of 99.8%. This material synthesis is scalable and cost-effective in preparing various submicron or micron composite electrode materials.

  20. Low density lipoprotein peptide conjugated submicron emulsions for combating prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengchao; Zhang, Nan; Hua, Haiying; Liang, Qian; Zhang, Xuexiao; Sun, Qian; Zhao, Yongxing

    2017-02-01

    Submicron emulsions (SEs) is an advanced formulation that possesses good biocompatibility, high loading of hydrophobic drugs, and good stability through autoclave sterilization. To enhance tumor targeting and tumor cell uptake, SEs could be modified with positive charge and targeting moieties. In the present study, three formulations were prepared: Docetaxel-loaded SEs (DocSEs), cationic DocSEs (DocCSEs), and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) targeted peptide-RLT (CEKLKEAFRLTRKRGLKLA) modified DocCSEs (RLT-DocCSEs). The optimized RLT-DocCSEs showed a particle size 182.2±10nm, a zeta potential 39.62±2.41mV, and a loading efficiency of Docetaxel (Doc) 98%. RLT-DocCSEs demonstrated sustained release in 96h and was stable for two months at 4°C. Compared to DocSEs and DocCSEs, RLT-DocCSEs caused significantly more PC-3 cell inhibition and cell apoptosis. RLT-DocCSEs also showed more cellular uptake and slower cellular elimination than that of DocSEs and DocCSEs. The present study indicated RLT-DocCSEs could be a potential formulation for injection of anti-cancer therapeutics with increased tumor targeting and anti-tumor efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A new circuit technique for reduced leakage current in Deep Submicron CMOS technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmitz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern CMOS processes in the Deep Submicron regime are restricted to supply voltages below 2 volts and further to account for the transistors' field strength limitations and to reduce the power per logic gate. To maintain the high switching performance, the threshold voltage must be scaled according with the supply voltage. However, this leads to an increased subthreshold current of the transistors in standby mode (VGS=0. Another source of leakage is gate current, which becomes significant for gate oxides of 3nm and below. We propose a Self-Biasing Virtual Rails (SBVR - CMOS technique which acts like an adaptive local supply voltage in case of standby mode. Most important sources of leakage currents are reduced by this technique. Moreover, SBVR-CMOS is capable of conserving stored information in sleep mode, which is vital for memory circuits. Memories are exposed to radiation causing soft errors. This well-known problem becomes even worse in standby mode of typical SRAMs, that have low driving performance to withstand alpha particle hits. In this paper, a 16-transistor SRAM cell is proposed, which combines the advantage of extremely low leakage currents with a very high soft error stability.

  2. Immunogenicity Studies of Bivalent Inactivated Virions of EV71/CVA16 Formulated with Submicron Emulsion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed two strategies for preparing candidate vaccines against hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD caused mainly by infections of enterovirus (EV 71 and coxsackievirus (CV A16. We firstly design and optimize the potency of adjuvant combinations of emulsion-based delivery systems, using EV71 candidate vaccine as a model. We then perform immunogenicity studies in mice of EV71/CVA16 antigen combinations formulated with PELC/CpG. A single dose of inactivated EV71 virion (0.2 μg emulsified in submicron particles was found (i to induce potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibody responses and (ii consistently to elicit broad antibody responses against EV71 neutralization epitopes. A single dose immunogenicity study of bivalent activated EV71/CVA16 virion formulated with either Alum or PELC/CpG adjuvant showed that CVA16 antigen failed to elicit CVA16 neutralizing antibody responses and did not affect EV71-specific neutralizing antibody responses. A boosting dose of emulsified EV71/CVA16 bivalent vaccine candidate was found to be necessary to achieve high seroconversion of CVA16-specific neutralizing antibody responses. The current results are important for the design and development of prophylactic vaccines against HFMD and other emerging infectious diseases.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of soft boson collective excitations in hot QCD plasma II: plasmon -- hard-particle scattering and energy losses

    OpenAIRE

    Markov, Y. A.; Markova, M. A.; Vall, A. N.

    2003-01-01

    In a general line with our first work (Ann.Phys.302(2002),172; hep-ph/0207316), within hard thermal loop approximation a general theory of the scattering for an arbitrary number of colorless plasmons off hard thermal particles of hot QCD-medium is considered. Using generalized Tsytovich correspondence principle, a connection between matrix elements of the scattering processes and a certain effective current, generating these processes is established. The iterative procedure of calculation of ...

  4. Studies on solvatochromic properties of aminophenylstyryl-quinolinum dye, LDS 798, and its application in studying submicron lipid based structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Pabak; Luchowski, Rafal; Raut, Sangram; Sabnis, Nirupama; Remaley, Alan; Lacko, Andras G; Thamake, Sanjay; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2010-12-01

    The styryl group of dyes has been used in cellular studies for over 20 years because of their solvatochromic and/or electrochromic properties. Here we report characterization of solubility and solvatochromic properties of a near infra-red styryl dye, styryl 11 or LDS 798. We have extended our studies to small unilamellar vesicles and lipid based nanoparticles and found that solvatochromic properties of this dye used in tandem with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can be used to efficiently determine the diffusion coefficient and hence the size of the submicron lipid based particles. This technique has the potential to provide essential information about liposomal and vesicular structures and their movement in vitro and in situ. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Pulmonary clearance kinetics and extrapulmonary translocation of seven titanium dioxide nano- and submicron materials following intratracheal administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Oshima, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Toshio; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Nakai, Makoto; Ichinose, Takayuki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Zhang, Guihua; Gamo, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated and compared the pulmonary clearance kinetics and extrapulmonary translocations of seven titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano- and submicron particles with different characteristics, including size, shape and surface coating. Varying doses of TiO2 nano- and submicron particles dispersed in 0.2% disodium phosphate solution were intratracheally administered to male F344 rats. The rats were euthanized under anesthesia for 3, 28 and 91 days after administration. Ti levels in pulmonary and various extrapulmonary organs were determined using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). The lungs, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), contained 55-89% of the administered TiO2 dose at 3 days after administration. The pulmonary clearance rate constants, estimated using a one-compartment model, were higher after administration of 0.375-2.0 mg/kg body weight (bw) (0.016-0.020/day) than after administration of 3.0-6.0 mg/kg bw (0.0073-0.013/day) for six uncoated TiO2. In contrast, the clearance rate constant was 0.011, 0.0046 and 0.00018/day following administration of 0.67, 2.0 and 6.0 mg/kg bw TiO2 nanoparticle with Al(OH)3 coating, respectively. Translocation of TiO2 from the lungs to the thoracic lymph nodes increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the translocation of TiO2 from the lungs to the thoracic lymph nodes after 91 days was higher when Al(OH)3 coated TiO2 was administered (0.93-6.4%), as compared to uncoated TiO2 (0.016-1.8%). Slight liver translocation was observed (kidney, spleen and brain.

  6. [Study on preparation of intravenous submicron emulsions of Oleum Cinnamomi oil of Miao nationality herbal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Ying-bo

    2007-11-01

    To study the prescription and preparation of intravenous submicron emulsion of Oleum Cinnamomi oil of Miao nationality herbal. Using the high speed blender mixed round the Oleum Cinnamomi oil with the soybean phospholipids and Pluronic F68 as emulsifier, then using the high pressure homogenizer made the intravenous submicron emulsion of the Oleum Cinnamomi oil and investigate its grain path and distributing. Having been done by using hydroextractor 4,500 r min(-1) 15 minutes the submicron emulsion grain path has well proportioned distribution. The preparation technology is simple and has good stability, so it can be used as a method to make the intravenous submicron emulsion of the Oleum Cinnamomi oil of Miao nationality herbal.

  7. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting [Ventura, CA

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  8. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijt; A.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron

  9. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  10. Rapid heterogeneous oxidation of organic coatings on submicron aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C. Y.; Browne, E. C.; Sugrue, R. A.; Kroll, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Laboratory studies have found that heterogeneous oxidation can affect the composition and loading of atmospheric organic aerosol particles over time scales of several days, but most studies have examined pure organic particles only. In this study, in order to probe the reactivity of organic species confined near the particle surface, the rates and products of the OH-initiated oxidation of pure squalane particles are compared to oxidation of thin coatings of squalane on ammonium sulfate particles. The squalane reaction rate constant shows a linear dependence on the organic surface area-to-volume ratio, with rate constants for coated particles up to 10 times larger than for pure particles. Changes in the carbon oxidation state and fraction of particulate carbon remaining show similar enhancements, implying that heterogeneous oxidation may exhibit a stronger effect on the loadings and properties of organic aerosol than previously estimated from laboratory studies.

  11. Chemical mapping of proterozoic organic matter at submicron spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z; Robert, François; Mostefaoui, Smail; Meibom, Anders; Selo, Madeleine; McKay, David S

    2006-12-01

    A NanoSIMS ion microprobe was used to map the submicron-scale distributions of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, and oxygen in organic microfossils and laminae in a thin section of the approximately 0.85 billion year old Bitter Springs Formation of Australia. The data provide clues about the original chemistry of the microfossils, the silicification process, and the biosignatures of specific microorganisms and microbial communities. Chemical maps of fossil unicells and filaments revealed distinct wall- and sheath-like structures enriched in C, N, and S, consistent with their accepted biological origin. Surprisingly, organic laminae, previously considered to be amorphous, also exhibited filamentous and apparently compressed spheroidal structures defined by strong enrichments in C, N, and S. By analogy to NanoSIMS data from the well-preserved microfossils, these structures were interpreted as being of biological origin, most likely representing densely packed remnants of microbial mats. Given that the preponderance of organic matter in Precambrian sediments is similarly "amorphous," our findings indicate that a re-evaluation of ancient specimens via in situ structural, chemical, and isotopic study is warranted. Our analyses have led us to propose new criteria for assessing the biogenicity of problematic kerogenous materials, and, thus, these criteria can be applied to assessments of poorly preserved or fragmentary organic residues in early Archean sediments and any that might occur in meteorites or other extraterrestrial samples.

  12. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Ţibu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe77.5Si7.5B15 amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  13. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ţibu, Mihai; Lostun, Mihaela; Rotărescu, Cristian; Atiţoaie, Alexandru; Lupu, Nicoleta; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian, E-mail: taovari@phys-iasi.ro; Chiriac, Horia [Department of Magnetic Materials and Devices, National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Iaşi, 700050 (Romania); Allwood, Dan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe{sub 77.5}Si{sub 7.5}B{sub 15} amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB) system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  14. Submicron Surface Vibration Profiling Using Doppler Self-Mixing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler self-mixing laser probing techniques are often used for vibration measurement with very high accuracy. A novel optoelectronic probe solution is proposed, based on off-the-shelf components, with a direct reflection optical scheme for contactless characterization of the target’s movement. This probe was tested with two test bench apparatus that enhance its precision performance, with a linear actuator at low frequency (35 µm, 5–60 Hz, and its dynamics, with disc shaped transducers for small amplitude and high frequency (0.6 µm, 100–2500 Hz. The results, obtained from well-established signal processing methods for self-mixing Doppler signals, allowed the evaluation of vibration velocity and amplitudes with an average error of less than 10%. The impedance spectrum of piezoelectric (PZ disc target revealed a maximum of impedance (around 1 kHz for minimal Doppler shift. A bidimensional scan over the PZ disc surface allowed the categorization of the vibration mode (0, 1 and explained its deflection directions. The feasibility of a laser vibrometer based on self-mixing principles and supported by tailored electronics able to accurately measure submicron displacements was, thus, successfully demonstrated.

  15. Enhancements of the refractory submicron aerosol fraction in the Arctic polar vortex: feature or exception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, R.; Volk, C. M.; Kandler, K.; Hösen, E.; Günther, G.; Vogel, B.; Grooß, J.-U.; Khaykin, S.; Belyaev, G. V.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    In situ measurements with a four-channel stratospheric condensation particle counter (CPC) were conducted at up to 20 km altitude on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica from Kiruna, Sweden, in January through March (EUPLEX 2003, RECONCILE 2010) and in December (ESSenCe 2011). During all campaigns air masses from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol into the lower stratosphere (Θ content of nitrous oxide (70 nmol mol-1 of N2O). This indicates that refractory aerosol originates from the upper stratosphere or the mesosphere. Derived from the mixing ratio of the simultaneously measured long-lived tracer N2O, an empirical index serves to differentiate probed air masses according to their origin: inside the vortex, the vortex edge region, or outside the vortex. Previously observed high fractions of refractory submicron aerosol in the 2003 Arctic vortex were ascribed to unusually strong subsidence during that winter. However, measurements under perturbed vortex conditions in 2010 and during early winter in December 2011 revealed similarly high values. Thus, the abundance of refractory aerosol in the lower stratosphere within the Arctic vortices appears to be a regular feature rather than the exception. During December, the import from aloft into the lower stratosphere appears to be developing; thereafter the abundance of refractory aerosol inside the vortex reaches its highest levels in March. The correlations of refractory aerosol with N2O suggest that, apart from mean subsidence, diabatic dispersion inside the vortex significantly contributes to the transport of particles to the Arctic lower stratosphere. A measurement-based estimate of the total mass of refractory aerosol inside the vortex is provided for each campaign. Based on the derived increase of particle mass in the lower stratospheric vortex (100-67 hPa pressure altitude) by a factor of 4.5 between early and

  16. Large area sub-micron chemical imaging of magnesium in sea urchin teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Weaver, James C

    2015-03-01

    The heterogeneous and site-specific incorporation of inorganic ions can profoundly influence the local mechanical properties of damage tolerant biological composites. Using the sea urchin tooth as a research model, we describe a multi-technique approach to spatially map the distribution of magnesium in this complex multiphase system. Through the combined use of 16-bit backscattered scanning electron microscopy, multi-channel energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental mapping, and diffraction-limited confocal Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate a new set of high throughput, multi-spectral, high resolution methods for the large scale characterization of mineralized biological materials. In addition, instrument hardware and data collection protocols can be modified such that several of these measurements can be performed on irregularly shaped samples with complex surface geometries and without the need for extensive sample preparation. Using these approaches, in conjunction with whole animal micro-computed tomography studies, we have been able to spatially resolve micron and sub-micron structural features across macroscopic length scales on entire urchin tooth cross-sections and correlate these complex morphological features with local variability in elemental composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. THE EFFECT OF THE REYNOLDS NUMBER OF AIR FLOW TO THE PARTICLE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF A FIBROUS FILTER MEDIUM WITH CYLINDRICAL SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Kouropoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At this study an attempt for the theoretical approach of the Re ynolds number effect of air flow to the particle collection efficiency of a fibrous fil ter with cylindrical section will be made. Initially, a report of the air filtration models to fibrous filter media will be presented along with an explanation of both the parameters and the physical quantities which govern the air filtration process. Furthermore, the resul ting equation from the mathematical model will be applied to a real filter medium and the characteristic curves of filter efficiency will be drawn. The change of a filter medi um efficiency with regard to the Reynolds number of air flow that passes through the filt er, derived from the curves, will be studied. The general conclusion that we have is that as the Reynolds number of filtered air increases, the collection efficiency of the filter decreases.

  18. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Plettner, Tomas; Spencer, James; Wisdom, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Laser driven particle accelerators based on the current generation of lasers will require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise beam guiding. Hence the fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such particle accelerators. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003 but with a variety of complications on the laser side. Fortunately, in recent years the fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss this area, its advantages such as the range of materials it provides and various ways to implement it followed by some different test examples that have been considered. One important goal of this approach is an integrated system that could avoid the necessity of having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  19. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML, equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE – a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1 species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc., black carbon (BC, and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate and oxygenated OA (OOA showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60% with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum

  20. Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Concentrations Enhanced on Sulfate-Containing Particles during Multi-Day Stagnation Events at Look Rock during SOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. M.; Liu, J.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Surratt, J. D.; McKinney, K. A.; Lee, A.; Claflin, M. S.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric gas and particle measurements were collected at Look Rock, Tennessee, during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on biogenic secondary organic aerosol (bSOA) formation. Submicron particles were collected on filters to quantify major organic functional groups by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and size-resolved, non-refractory chemical compositions of submicron particles were measured with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerodynamic mass spectrometer (HR-Tof-AMS) with Light-scattering (LS) module. Sources of OM were apportioned by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of both mass spectrometric data from AMS and IR spectra from FTIR. Three factors were identified by PMF from both AMS and FTIR and generally agreed with correlations of r>0.5. The anthropogenic factor accounts for 40% of OM while the two biogenic factors account for 20-30%. The first biogenic factor has FTIR and m/z spectra consistent with OM observed in regions with isoprene emissions in low NOx conditions and is considered "clean bSOA"; the second biogenic factor has m/z spectra consistent with chamber studies of isoprene oxidation by the IEPOX pathway and is correlated with sulfate, referred to as "sulfate-related bSOA." The FTIR spectra from chamber bSOA for low-NOx oxidation conditions were very similar to the atmospheric "clean bSOA". K-means clustering was applied to the AMS LS single particle measurements to identify three particle types. These three single-particle type had m/z spectra and time series very similar to the AMS PMF factors (m/z spectra cosine similarity > 0.7), consistent with particles from different sources retaining chemically distinct types. It is likely that the two types of bSOA condensed or formed on separate particles, with the "clean bSOA" condensing on all particles (but in larger amounts during times without other sources) and the "sulfate-related bSOA" type forming only

  1. Optimisation of sewage sludge anaerobic digestion through co-digestion with OFMSW: Effect of collection system and particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestre, Gracia [IRTA, GIRO Joint Research Unit IRTA-UPC, Torre Marimon, Barcelona (Spain); Ainia, Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Bioenergía e Higiene Industrial, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Bonmatí, August [IRTA, GIRO Joint Research Unit IRTA-UPC, Torre Marimon, Barcelona (Spain); Fernández, Belén, E-mail: belen.fernandez@irta.cat [IRTA, GIRO Joint Research Unit IRTA-UPC, Torre Marimon, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Methane production rate increased between 56% and 208% during OFMSW–SS codigestion. • The OFMSW particle size reduction from 20 to 8 mm did not affect the methane yield. • OFMSW–SS codigestion promoted β-oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenic activity. • The evolution of specific activity was a feasible tool to control the process. - Abstract: The effect of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) loading rate and particulate size on the sewage sludge (SS) mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion was assessed in continuous stirred tank reactor at hydraulic retention time of 20 days. The SS–OFMSW mixture composed by 54% of the volatile solids fed (inlet-VS), at OLR of 3.1 kg{sub COD} m{sup −3} d{sup −1} (1.9 kg{sub VS} m{sup −3} d{sup −1}), showed the highest increment on the volumetric methane production and yield of +200% and +59% respectively, under stable conditions. The effect of particulate size was assessed with the same mixture and same operational conditions but reducing the OFMSW particulate size from 20 mm to 8 mm with the aim to improve the hydrolysis step, but the results showed any influence in the OFMSW particulate size range analysed. In addition, specific biomass activity was assessed at the end of each co-digestion period. Results showed that OFMSW promoted β-oxidation syntrophic acetogens and the acetoclastic methanogens activity; although the last increase of the OFMSW percentage (from 47% to 54% inlet-VS) affected negatively the specific substrate activity, but not inhibitory effect was observed. Therefore, the results obtained in the continuous experiment could be related with some inhibitory or toxic effect and not due to hydrolysis limitation. The specific biomass activity test was demonstrated to be an interesting tool to evaluate and control the co-digestion process, especially when conventional parameters did not explain the behaviour of the biological system.

  2. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time, open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time, background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation, albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%, this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  3. Relative contribution of submicron and supermicron particles to aerosol light scattering in the marine boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefeld, C.; O'Dowd, C.D.; O'Reilly, S.; Jennings, S.G.; Aalto, P.; Becker, E.; Kunz, G.J.; Leeuw, G. de

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the aerosol light scattering coefficient (σsp) at a wavelength of λ - 550 nm were conducted at a coastal atmospheric research station in the east Atlantic Ocean during June 1999. Size distribution measurements between diameters of 3 nm and 40 um (at ambient humidity) were used to

  4. Characterization of submicron particles during biomass burning and coal combustion periods in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J K; Cheng, M T; Ji, D S; Liu, Z R; Hu, B; Sun, Y; Wang, Y S

    2016-08-15

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with other observation instruments to measure the characteristics of PM1 (particulate matter with a vacuum aerodynamic diameter of ≤1μm) during the biomass burning period (October 1 to 27; BBP) and the coal combustion period (December 10 to 31; CCP) in Beijing in 2014. The average PM1 mass concentrations during the BBP and CCP were 82.3 and 37.5μgm(-3), respectively. Nitrate, ammonium and other pollutants emitted by the burning processes, especially coal combustion, increased significantly in association with increased pollution levels. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to a unified high-resolution mass spectra database of organic species with NO(+) and NO2(+) ions to discover the relationships between organic and inorganic species. One inorganic factor was identified in both periods, and another five and four distinct organic factors were identified in the BBP and CCP, respectively. Secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) accounted for 55% of the total organic aerosols (OAs) during the BBP, which is higher than the proportion during the CCP (oxygenated OA, 40%). The organic nitrate and inorganic nitrate were first successfully separated through the PMF analysis based on the HR-ToF-AMS observations in Beijing, and organic nitrate components accounted for 21% and 18% of the total nitrate mass during the BBP and CCP, respectively. Although the PM1 mass concentration during the CCP was much lower than in the BBP, the average concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the CCP (107.3±171.6ngm(-3)) was ~5 times higher than that in the BBP (21.9±21.7ngm(-3)). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Process Intensification in Crystallization : Submicron Particle Generation Using Alternative Energy Forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radacsi, N.

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization is one of the oldest separation and product formation techniques that continues to be in use today. Despite its long history, it only started to develop significantly in the past few decades. In this thesis, the application of Process Intensification in crystallization is

  6. Process Intensification in Crystallization: Submicron Particle Generation Using Alternative Energy Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Radacsi, N.

    2012-01-01

    Crystallization is one of the oldest separation and product formation techniques that continues to be in use today. Despite its long history, it only started to develop significantly in the past few decades. In this thesis, the application of Process Intensification in crystallization is investigated. Process Intensification is a set of often radically innovative principles in process and equipment design, which can bring significant benefits in terms of process and chain efficiency, capital ...

  7. Quantification of the carbonaceous matter origin in submicron marine aerosol particles by dual carbon isotope analysis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Ceburnis; A. Garbaras; S. Szidat; M. Rinaldi; S. Fahrni; N. Perron; L. Wacker; S. Leinert; V. Remeikis; M. C. Facchini; A. S. H. Prevot; S. G. Jennings; C. D. O'Dowd

    2011-01-01

    Dual carbon isotope analysis has been performed for the first time demonstrating a potential in organic matter apportionment between three principal sources: marine, terrestrial (non-fossil) and fossil fuel due to unique isotopic signatures. The results presented here, utilising combinations of dual carbon isotope analysis, provides a conclusive evidence of a dominant biogenic organic fraction to organic aerosol over biologically active oceans. In particular, the NE Atlantic, which is...

  8. Study of Submicron Particle Size Distributions by Laser Doppler Measurement of Brownian Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-29

    acquisition and recording apparatus; and c) Development of appropriate software for analysis of signals obtained from the Brownian motion instrument...time scales (e.g., the transit time of the A-17 .- -. . , " 2.0 19 _j 1.2 08 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 500 1000 1500 2000 TIPOE STEP (10 ns/step) 2.0 1.8

  9. Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter and Microbes in Seawater through Sub-Micron Particle Size Analyses

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goes, J.I.; Balch, W.M.; Vaughn, J.M.; Gomes, H.R.

    processes responsible for the dynamics of DOM rely on monitoring the consumption and breakdown of specific compounds of phytoplankton origin, generally, through the use of labeled precursors and substrates (Kirchman et al., 1991; Fry et al., 1996; Rich et al... attempts to determine the molecular weight or size spectrum of DOM using size exclusion chromatography, but these have generally proven unsatisfactory (Beckett et al., 1987). One reason is that DOM is exposed to high shear stresses during separation...

  10. Ozone and Limonene in Indoor Air: A Source of Submicron Particle Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Wainman; Junfeng Zhang; Charles J. Weschler; Paul J. Lioy

    2000-01-01

    .... We conducted a series of experiments to investigate the potential for secondary aerosol in indoor air as a result of the reaction of ozone with d-limonene, a compound commonly used in air fresheners...

  11. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  12. Estimating chemical composition of atmospheric deposition fluxes from mineral insoluble particles deposition collected in the western Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure the mass flux of atmospheric insoluble deposition and to constrain regional models of dust simulation, a network of automatic deposition collectors (CARAGA has been installed throughout the western Mediterranean Basin. Weekly samples of the insoluble fraction of total atmospheric deposition were collected concurrently on filters at five sites including four on western Mediterranean islands (Frioul and Corsica, France; Mallorca, Spain; and Lampedusa, Italy and one in the southern French Alps (Le Casset, and a weighing and ignition protocol was applied in order to quantify their mineral fraction. Atmospheric deposition is both a strong source of nutrients and metals for marine ecosystems in this area. However, there are few data on trace-metal deposition in the literature, since their deposition measurement is difficult to perform. In order to obtain more information from CARAGA atmospheric deposition samples, this study aimed to test their relevance in estimating elemental fluxes in addition to total mass fluxes. The elemental chemical analysis of ashed CARAGA filter samples was based on an acid digestion and an elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES and mass spectrometry (MS in a clean room. The sampling and analytical protocols were tested to determine the elemental composition for mineral dust tracers (Al, Ca, K, Mg and Ti, nutrients (P and Fe and trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, V and Zn from simulated wet deposition of dust analogues and traffic soot. The relative mass loss by dissolution in wet deposition was lower than 1 % for Al and Fe, and reached 13 % for P due to its larger solubility in water. For trace metals, this loss represented less than 3 % of the total mass concentration, except for Zn, Cu and Mn for which it could reach 10 %, especially in traffic soot. The chemical contamination during analysis was negligible for all the elements except for Cd

  13. Laser and Particle Guiding Micro-Elements for Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, T.; Gaume, R.; Wisdom, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Spencer, J.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    Laser driven particle accelerators require sub-micron control of the laser field as well as precise electron-beam guiding so fabrication techniques that allow integrating both elements into an accelerator-on-chip format become critical for the success of such next generation machines. Micromachining technology for silicon has been shown to be one such feasible technology in PAC2003[1] but with a variety of complications on the laser side. However, fabrication of transparent ceramics has become an interesting technology that could be applied for laser-particle accelerators in several ways. We discuss the advantages such as the range of materials available and ways to implement them followed by some different test examples we been considered. One important goal is an integrated system that avoids having to inject either laser or particle pulses into these structures.

  14. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Xiao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS at the rural site Back Garden (BG, located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m−3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m−3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300–700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions. The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA, low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA. The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly

  15. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva) ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  16. Characterization of light-absorbing carbon particles at three altitudes in East Asian outflow by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology, microstructure, and composition of the submicron fraction of individual light-absorbing carbon (LAC particles collected by research aircraft during the ACE-Asia (Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment project above the Yellow Sea at altitudes of 120, 450 and 1500 m are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Two types of carbonaceous particles, small spherule soot with graphitic spherules and amorphous carbonaceous spheres (brown carbon, are found at all altitudes in high concentration. For soot particles, emphasis of the study is on the component subparticles (spherules. The nanoscopic structures of the small spherule soot show no significant difference at three altitudes although the size distribution of primary spherules showed that 70% of the total volume lies in the ranges 30–50, 50–85 and 30–50 nm, respectively. For the amorphous carbonaceous spheres, 70% of the total volume from three altitudes lies in the range 200–350, 160–470 and 150–320 nm, respectively. Within the size fraction studied (submicron, with most particles in the range 50 to 500 nm the number concentration ratios of the amorphous carbonaceous spheres to primary spherules in soot at altitudes of 120, 450 and 1500 m are about 1, 1.5 and 10, respectively and their volume ratios are about 260, 50 and 1400. Lower relative concentrations of large spherule soot with intermediate graphitic structure were observed at 120 m. Also, low relative number concentrations of carbon cenospheres were observed at 120 and 1500 m. A key result of the study is that in vertically stratified outflow from East Asia, the character of LAC may have strong variance with altitude thus resulting in optical characteristics that vary with altitude. Also, apparent "aging" of LAC deduced from samples at multiple ground stations may instead reflect differences in the original carbon aerosols.

  17. Characterization of light-absorbing carbon particles at three altitudes in East Asian outflow by transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Crozier, P. A.; Anderson, J. R.

    2013-07-01

    The morphology, microstructure, and composition of the submicron fraction of individual light-absorbing carbon (LAC) particles collected by research aircraft during the ACE-Asia (Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) project above the Yellow Sea at altitudes of 120, 450 and 1500 m are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Two types of carbonaceous particles, small spherule soot with graphitic spherules and amorphous carbonaceous spheres (brown carbon), are found at all altitudes in high concentration. For soot particles, emphasis of the study is on the component subparticles (spherules). The nanoscopic structures of the small spherule soot show no significant difference at three altitudes although the size distribution of primary spherules showed that 70% of the total volume lies in the ranges 30-50, 50-85 and 30-50 nm, respectively. For the amorphous carbonaceous spheres, 70% of the total volume from three altitudes lies in the range 200-350, 160-470 and 150-320 nm, respectively. Within the size fraction studied (submicron, with most particles in the range 50 to 500 nm) the number concentration ratios of the amorphous carbonaceous spheres to primary spherules in soot at altitudes of 120, 450 and 1500 m are about 1, 1.5 and 10, respectively and their volume ratios are about 260, 50 and 1400. Lower relative concentrations of large spherule soot with intermediate graphitic structure were observed at 120 m. Also, low relative number concentrations of carbon cenospheres were observed at 120 and 1500 m. A key result of the study is that in vertically stratified outflow from East Asia, the character of LAC may have strong variance with altitude thus resulting in optical characteristics that vary with altitude. Also, apparent "aging" of LAC deduced from samples at multiple ground stations may instead reflect differences in the original carbon aerosols.

  18. Estimation of gas-particle partitioning coefficients (Kp) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carbonaceous aerosols collected at Chiang-Mai, Bangkok and Hat-Yai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Ho, Kin Fai; Cao, Junji

    2013-01-01

    To assess environmental contamination with carcinogens, carbonaceous compounds, water-soluble ionic species and trace gaseous species were identified and quantified every three hours for three days at three different atmospheric layers at the heart of Chiang-Mai, Bangkok and Hat-Yai from December 2006 to February 2007. A DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer with the IMPROVE thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) protocol was used to quantify the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) contents in PM10. Diurnal and vertical variability was also carefully investigated. In general, OC and EC mass concentration showed the highest values at the monitoring period of 21.00-00.00 as consequences of human activities at night bazaar coupled with reduction of mixing layer, decreased wind speed and termination of photolysis at nighttime. Morning peaks of carbonaceous compounds were observed during the sampling period of 06:00-09:00, emphasizing the main contribution of traffic emission in the three cities. The estimation of incremental lifetime particulate matter exposure (ILPE) raises concern of high risk of carbonaceous accumulation over workers and residents living close to the observatory sites. The average values of incremental lifetime particulate matter exposure (ILPE) of total carbon at Baiyoke Suit Hotel and Baiyoke Sky Hotel are approximately ten times higher than those air samples collected at Prince of Songkla University Hat-Yai campus corpse incinerator and fish-can manufacturing factory but only slightly higher than those of rice straw burning in Songkla province. This indicates a high risk of developing lung cancer and other respiratory diseases across workers and residents living in high buildings located in Pratunam area. Using knowledge of carbonaceous fractions in PM10, one can estimate the gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Dachs-Eisenreich model highlights the crucial role of adsorption in gas-particle

  19. Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosol at an urban background and a road site in Barcelona (Spain during SAPUSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alier

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the contribution of potential sources to the submicron (PM1 organic aerosol (OA simultaneously detected at an urban background (UB and a road site (RS in Barcelona during the 30 days of the intensive field campaign of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies, September–October 2010. A total of 103 filters at 12 h sampling time resolution were collected at both sites. Thirty-six neutral and polar organic compounds of known emission sources and photo-chemical transformation processes were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The concentrations of the trace chemical compounds analyzed are herein presented and discussed. Additionally, OA source apportionment was performed by multivariate curve resolution–alternating least squares (MCR-ALS and six OA components were identified at both sites: two were of primary anthropogenic OA origin and three of secondary OA origin, while a sixth one was not clearly defined. Primary organics from emissions of local anthropogenic activities (urban primary organic aerosol, or POA Urban, mainly traffic emissions but also cigarette smoke, contributed 43% (1.5 μg OC m−3 and 18% (0.4 μg OC m−3 to OA at RS and UB, respectively. A secondary primary source – biomass burning (BBOA – was found in all the samples (average values 7% RS; 12% UB; 0.3 μg OC m−3, but this component was substantially contributing to OA only when the sampling sites were under influence of regional air mass circulation (REG.. Three secondary organic aerosol (SOA components (describing overall 60% of the variance were observed in the urban ambient PM1. Products of isoprene oxidation (SOA ISO – i.e. 2-methylglyceric acid, C5 alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols – showed the highest abundance at both sites when the city was under influence of inland air masses. The overall concentrations of SOA ISO were similar at both sites (0.4 and 0.3 μg m−3, or 16% and 7%, at

  20. Comparison of particle-wall interaction boundary conditions in the prediction of cyclone collection efficiency in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde Ramirez, M.; Coury, J.R.; Goncalves, J.A.S., E-mail: jasgon@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have appeared attempting to predict cyclone pressure drop and collection efficiency. While these studies have been able to predict pressure drop well, they have been only moderately successful in predicting collection efficiency. Part of the reason for this failure has been attributed to the relatively simple wall boundary conditions implemented in the commercially available CFD software, which are not capable of accurately describing the complex particle-wall interaction present in a cyclone. According, researches have proposed a number of different boundary conditions in order to improve the model performance. This work implemented the critical velocity boundary condition through a user defined function (UDF) in the Fluent software and compared its predictions both with experimental data and with the predictions obtained when using Fluent's built-in boundary conditions. Experimental data was obtained from eight laboratory scale cyclones with varying geometric ratios. The CFD simulations were made using the software Fluent 6.3.26. (author)

  1. Influences of Substrate Adhesion and Particle Size on the Shape Memory Effect of Polystyrene Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lewis M; Killgore, Jason P; Li, Zhengwei; Long, Rong; Sanders, Aric W; Xiao, Jianliang; Ding, Yifu

    2016-04-19

    Formulations and applications of micro- and nanoscale polymer particles have proliferated rapidly in recent years, yet knowledge of their mechanical behavior has not grown accordingly. In this study, we examine the ways that compressive strain, substrate surface energy, and particle size influence the shape memory cycle of polystyrene particles. Using nanoimprint lithography, differently sized particles are programmed into highly deformed, temporary shapes in contact with substrates of differing surface energies. Atomic force microscopy is used to obtain in situ measurements of particle shape recovery kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy is employed to assess differences in the profiles of particles at the conclusion of the shape memory cycle. Finally, finite element models are used to investigate the growing impact of surface energies at smaller length scales. Results reveal that the influence of substrate adhesion on particle recovery is size-dependent and can become dominating at submicron length scales.

  2. Airborne measurements of submicron aerosols across the coastline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    track in the east–west direction extended partly over land and partly over ocean. 2. Instrumentation. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Model. 3080, of TSI, installed onboard a beachcraft air- craft is used to make measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of aerosol par- ticles in the size range ...

  3. Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    While biomedicine and geoscience use grids to bring together many different sub-disciplines, particle physicists use grid computing to increase computing power and storage resources, and to access and analyze vast amounts of data collected from detectors at the world's most powerful accelerators (1 page)

  4. Rapid search and quantitative analysis of gunshot residue particles in the SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiedzik, J; Johnson, D L

    2000-01-01

    Automated scanning electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and X-ray micro analysis was used to characterize a variety of gunshot residue (GSR) samples. More than 500 rounds of commercially available ammunition and six different types of hand gulls were used in the study of 17 GSR and 19 reference specimens. The individual particle X-ray composition was determined for 12 different elements. Elemental composition of GSR particles was highly variable but consistent with compounds mixed into or associated with a barium oxide matrix. When present in a specimen, GSR could be adequately characterized with automated procedures in less than an hour by restricting analyses to features larger than 2 microm. In "clean" samples, a higher resolution particle search was required to avoid reporting false negatives. Careful control of the back scattered electron signal strength threshold, by reference to a standard, was needed to ensure both time-efficient and accurate analyses. Samples collected from non-shooting subjects. active in a physical environment which contained firearms discharge residue were seen to be easily contaminated by sub-micron GSR particles.

  5. Multi-scale analysis of collective behavior in 2D self-propelled particle models of swarms: An Advection-Diffusion with Memory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    Self-propelled particle models (SPP's) are a class of agent-based simulations that have been successfully used to explore questions related to various flavors of collective motion, including flocking, swarming, and milling. These models typically consist of particle configurations, where each particle moves with constant speed, but changes its orientation in response to local averages of the positions and orientations of its neighbors found within some interaction region. These local averages are based on `social interactions', which include avoidance of collisions, attraction, and polarization, that are designed to generate configurations that move as a single object. Errors made by the individuals in the estimates of the state of the local configuration are modeled as a random rotation of the updated orientation resulting from the social rules. More recently, SPP's have been introduced in the context of collective decision-making, where the main innovation consists of dividing the population into naïve and `informed' individuals. Whereas naïve individuals follow the classical collective motion rules, members of the informed sub-population update their orientations according to a weighted average of the social rules and a fixed `preferred' direction, shared by all the informed individuals. Collective decision-making is then understood in terms of the ability of the informed sub-population to steer the whole group along the preferred direction. Summary statistics of collective decision-making are defined in terms of the stochastic properties of the random walk followed by the centroid of the configuration as the particles move about, in particular the scaling behavior of the mean squared displacement (msd). For the region of parameters where the group remains coherent , we note that there are two characteristic time scales, first there is an anomalous transient shared by both purely naïve and informed configurations, i.e. the scaling exponent lies between 1 and

  6. The efficiency and stability of bubble formation by acoustic vaporization of submicron perfluorocarbon droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reznik, Nikita; Shpak, O.; Gelderblom, E.C.; Williams, Ross; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Burns, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Submicron droplets of liquid perfluorocarbon converted into microbubbles with applied ultrasound have been studied, for a number of years, as potential next generation extravascular ultrasound contrast agents. In this work, we conduct an initial ultra-high-speed optical imaging study to examine the

  7. Analysis and Design of Monolithic Inductors in Sub-micron CMOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Allan

    1997-01-01

    In the last few years the CMOS processes have gone into deep sub-micron channel lengths. This means that it is now possible to make GHz applications in CMOS. In analog GHz applications it is often necessary to have access to inductors. This report describes the development of a physical model of ...

  8. Submicron organic nanofiber devices with different anode-cathode materials: A simple approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Sturm, Heinz; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a simple general method for simultaneously producing tens of submicron electrode gaps with different cathode and anode materials on top of nanofibers, nanowires, and nanotubes, with an optional gap size variation. Using this method, an ensemble of para-hexaphenylene (p6P...

  9. Mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine for the production of submicron lignocellulose fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid Hoeger; Rolland Gleisner; Jose Negron; Orlando J. Rojas; J. Y. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    The elevated levels of tree mortality attributed to mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in western North American forests create forest management challenges. This investigation introduces the production of submicron or nanometer lignocellulose fibrils for value-added materials from the widely available resource represented by dead pines after...

  10. Computational Modelling of Gas-Particle Flows with Different Particle Morphology in the Human Nasal Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiao Inthavong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises current studies related to numerical gas-particle flows in the human nasal cavity. Of interest are the numerical modelling requirements to consider the effects of particle morphology for a variety of particle shapes and sizes such as very small particles sizes (nanoparticles, elongated shapes (asbestos fibres, rough shapes (pollen, and porous light density particles (drug particles are considered. It was shown that important physical phenomena needed to be addressed for different particle characteristics. This included the Brownian diffusion for submicron particles. Computational results for the nasal capture efficiency for nano-particles and various breathing rates in the laminar regime were found to correlate well with the ratio of particle diffusivity to the breathing rate. For micron particles, particle inertia is the most significant property and the need to use sufficient drag laws is important. Drag correlations for fibrous and rough surfaced particles were investigated to enable particle tracking. Based on the simulated results, semi-empirical correlations for particle deposition were fitted in terms of Peclet number and inertial parameter for nanoparticles and micron particles respectively.

  11. Characterization of trace metals in airborne carbonaceous aerosols by single-particle EDX – Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrodangelo A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fine and ultrafine metal particles has been evidenced in size segregated airborne carbonaceous aerosols collected at one industrial and two background (urban and rural sites during an extended field campaign in Central Italy. Analysis of the backscattered electrons (BSE by SEM – EDX demonstrated an effective potential in evidencing main structural features of the metal content in identified carbon aerosols. Many observed ultrafine metal particles appear embedded in the skeleton of carbonaceous individual particles and aggregates in the coarse fraction, while the same is not evident in the case of mixed carbon-sulphates aerosol that has been detected in the submicron size. These carbon-sulphates formations include indeed nano-sized metal particles that appear physically combined but not embedded. Also, larger metal particles (ranging around 1 μm physical size were observed close to carbon materials, but not included in their structure. Main compositional differences of metal particles with size segregation could be evidenced by energy – dispersive X ray spectrometry (EDX. Larger particles are mainly rich in Fe, frequently in presence of Mn, Cu, Cr and Zn in variable proportions; either oxidized or elemental metals were detected. On the other hand, ultrafine particles associated with carbon–sulphates aerosol are enriched in Pb and Zn, although the presence of other trace elements not detectable by SEM – EDX technique cannot be excluded. Moreover, Ce-enriched ultrafine particles were clearly determined in cenospheres. Conversely, inclusion of fine and ultrafine metal particles was rarely or not observed in soot aggregates.

  12. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosols measured in Senegal during the 2015 SHADOW campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-H. Rivellini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study offers the first chemical characterization of the submicron (PM1 fraction in western Africa at a high time resolution, thanks to collocated measurements of nonrefractory (NR species with an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM, black carbon and iron concentrations derived from absorption coefficient measurements with a 7-wavelength Aethalometer, and total PM1 determined by a TEOM-FDMS (tapered element oscillating microbalance–filtered dynamic measurement system for mass closure. The field campaign was carried out over 3 months (March to June 2015 as part of the SHADOW (SaHAran Dust Over West Africa project at a coastal site located in the outskirts of the city of Mbour, Senegal. With an averaged mass concentration of 5.4 µg m−3, levels of NR PM1 in Mbour were 3 to 10 times lower than those generally measured in urban and suburban polluted environments. Nonetheless the first half of the observation period was marked by intense but short pollution events (NR PM1 concentrations higher than 15 µg m−3, sea breeze phenomena and Saharan desert dust outbreaks (PM10 up to 900 µg m−3. During the second half of the campaign, the sampling site was mainly under the influence of marine air masses. The air masses on days under continental and sea breeze influences were dominated by organics (36–40 %, whereas sulfate particles were predominant (40 % for days under oceanic influence. Overall, measurements showed that about three-quarters of the total PM1 were explained by NR PM1, BC (black carbon and Fe (a proxy for dust concentrations, leaving approximately one-quarter for other refractory species. A mean value of 4.6 % for the Fe ∕ PM1 ratio was obtained. Source apportionment of the organic fraction, using positive matrix factorization (PMF, highlighted the impact of local combustion sources, such as traffic and residential activities, which contribute on average to 52 % of the total organic

  13. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosols measured in Senegal during the 2015 SHADOW campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivellini, Laura-Hélèna; Chiapello, Isabelle; Tison, Emmanuel; Fourmentin, Marc; Féron, Anaïs; Diallo, Aboubacry; N'Diaye, Thierno; Goloub, Philippe; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Riffault, Véronique

    2017-09-01

    The present study offers the first chemical characterization of the submicron (PM1) fraction in western Africa at a high time resolution, thanks to collocated measurements of nonrefractory (NR) species with an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM), black carbon and iron concentrations derived from absorption coefficient measurements with a 7-wavelength Aethalometer, and total PM1 determined by a TEOM-FDMS (tapered element oscillating microbalance-filtered dynamic measurement system) for mass closure. The field campaign was carried out over 3 months (March to June 2015) as part of the SHADOW (SaHAran Dust Over West Africa) project at a coastal site located in the outskirts of the city of Mbour, Senegal. With an averaged mass concentration of 5.4 µg m-3, levels of NR PM1 in Mbour were 3 to 10 times lower than those generally measured in urban and suburban polluted environments. Nonetheless the first half of the observation period was marked by intense but short pollution events (NR PM1 concentrations higher than 15 µg m-3), sea breeze phenomena and Saharan desert dust outbreaks (PM10 up to 900 µg m-3). During the second half of the campaign, the sampling site was mainly under the influence of marine air masses. The air masses on days under continental and sea breeze influences were dominated by organics (36-40 %), whereas sulfate particles were predominant (40 %) for days under oceanic influence. Overall, measurements showed that about three-quarters of the total PM1 were explained by NR PM1, BC (black carbon) and Fe (a proxy for dust) concentrations, leaving approximately one-quarter for other refractory species. A mean value of 4.6 % for the Fe / PM1 ratio was obtained. Source apportionment of the organic fraction, using positive matrix factorization (PMF), highlighted the impact of local combustion sources, such as traffic and residential activities, which contribute on average to 52 % of the total organic fraction. A new organic aerosol (OA) source

  14. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l. from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19–21 April, from the south (phase-II: 22–25 April, and from the northwest (phase-III: 26–28 April. Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM, new particle formation (NPF and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47–49%. In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%. NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10–22 nm in the morning to 56–96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon nanodots on TiO{sub 2} submicronic powders in vibrated fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadoret, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR CNRS 5503, Universite de Toulouse, ENSIACET/INPT, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 74233, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Rossignol, C.; Dexpert-Ghys, J. [CEMES, UPR CNRS 8011, UPS-Toulouse, 29 rue Jean Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Caussat, B., E-mail: Brigitte.Caussat@ensiacet.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR CNRS 5503, Universite de Toulouse, ENSIACET/INPT, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 74233, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-06-15

    Silicon nanodots have been deposited on TiO{sub 2} submicronic powders in a vibrated fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) reactor from silane SiH{sub 4}. Deposition conditions involving very low deposition rates have been studied. After treatment, powders are under the form of micronic agglomerates. In the operating range tested, this agglomerates formation mainly depends on the fluidization conditions and not on the CVD parameters. The best results have been obtained for anatase TiO{sub 2} powders for which the conditions of fluidization have been the most optimized. For these anatase powders, agglomerates are porous. SEM and TEM imaging prove that silicon nanodots (8-10 nm in size) have been deposited on the surface of particles and that this deposition is uniform on the whole powders and conformal around each grain, even if not fully continuous. Raman spectroscopy shows that the TiO{sub 2} powders have been partially reduced into TiO{sub 2-x} during deposition. The TiO{sub 2} stoichiometry can be recovered by annealing under air, and IR spectroscopy indicates that the deposited silicon nanodots have been at least partly oxidized into SiO{sub 2} after this annealing.

  16. Reducing DRIFT Backgrounds with a Submicron Aluminized-Mylar Cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Battat, J. S. R.; Daw, E.; Dorofeev, A.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Fox, J. R.; Gauvreau, J-L.; Gold, M; Harmon, L.; Harton, J.; Lafler, R.; Landers, J.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, E.R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background events in the DRIFT-IId dark matter detector, mimicking potential WIMP signals, are predominantly caused by alpha decays on the central cathode in which the alpha particle is completely or partially absorbed by the cathode material. We installed a 0.9 micron thick aluminized-mylar cathode as a way to reduce the probability of producing these backgrounds. We study three generations of cathode (wire, thin-film, and radiologically clean thin-film) with a focus on the ratio of backgrou...

  17. Filtration of submicrometer particles by pelagic tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Madin, Laurence P; Stocker, Roman

    2010-08-24

    Salps are common in oceanic waters and have higher per-individual filtration rates than any other zooplankton filter feeder. Although salps are centimeters in length, feeding via particle capture occurs on a fine, mucous mesh (fiber diameter d approximately 0.1 microm) at low velocity (U = 1.6 +/- 0.6 cmxs(-1), mean +/- SD) and is thus a low Reynolds-number (Re approximately 10(-3)) process. In contrast to the current view that particle encounter is dictated by simple sieving of particles larger than the mesh spacing, a low-Re mathematical model of encounter rates by the salp feeding apparatus for realistic oceanic particle-size distributions shows that submicron particles, due to their higher abundances, are encountered at higher rates (particles per time) than larger particles. Data from feeding experiments with 0.5-, 1-, and 3-microm diameter polystyrene spheres corroborate these findings. Although particles larger than 1 microm (e.g., flagellates, small diatoms) represent a larger carbon pool, smaller particles in the 0.1- to 1-microm range (e.g., bacteria, Prochlorococcus) may be more quickly digestible because they present more surface area, and we find that particles smaller than the mesh size (1.4 microm) can fully satisfy salp energetic needs. Furthermore, by packaging submicrometer particles into rapidly sinking fecal pellets, pelagic tunicates can substantially change particle-size spectra and increase downward fluxes in the ocean.

  18. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soichiro Kumamoto; Kazuya Okubo; Toru Fujii

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP...

  19. Moment expansion approach to calculate impact ionization rate in submicron silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Ken-ichiro; Yamaji, Mitsuru; Taniguchi, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Chihiro; Dunham, Scott T.

    1996-11-01

    A method to calculate the impact ionization rate in submicron silicon devices is developed using both an average energy and an average square energy of electrons. The method consists of an impact ionization model formulated with the average energy and conservation equations for the average square energy in the framework of an energy transport model. Parameters for the transport equations are extracted in such a way that calculated moments based on these equations match Monte Carlo simulation results. The impact ionization generation rate in an n+nn+ structure calculated with this method agrees well with the results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. The new method is also applied to a submicron n-MOSFET. The calculated distribution of the generation rate is found to be quite different from the results based on a conventional method.

  20. Effective Use of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) in Investigating Fundamental Mechanical Properties of Metals at the Sub-Micron Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Julia R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in the 2-beam focused ion beams technology (FIB) have enabled researchers to not only perform high-precision nanolithography and micro-machining, but also to apply these novel fabrication techniques to investigating a broad range of materials' properties at the submicron and nano-scales. In our work, the FIB is utilized in manufacturing of sub-micron cylinders, or nano-pillars, as well as of TEM cross-sections to directly investigate plasticity of metals at thes...

  1. Fine particle and trace element emission characterization from energy production and process industry; Energiantuotannon ja prosessiteollisuuden pienhiukkas- ja raskasmetallipaeaestoejen karakterisointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkinen, J.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Aurela, M.; Hillamo, R. [Finnish Meteorological Inst. (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    ashes, bottom ashes and fly ash particles collected with BLPI and filters were analyzed with ICP-MS (Ion Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectroscopy) and IC (Ion Chromatography) or XRF (X-Ray fluorescence). For fluidized bed combustion the filter collection efficiency was 98.0% to 99.9% of the total particulate mass. In the fine particle mode (particle diameter 0.1-1.0 p.m) ESP had lower efficiency 90% to 99%, while fabric filter had better than 99% efficiency also for fine particles. The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles: fine particles approximately 0.1-1.0 im in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 im in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels. In fluidized-bed combustion, also a third particle type is found that consists of fragmented bed material. The relative abundance of the different particle types depends on the fuel and combustion system as well as combustion conditions. Typically, for example, higher combustion temperature increases the amount of fine particles. Also, biomass combustion generally produces more fine particles than, for example, coal combustion due to the different mode of occurrence of the ash-forming compounds in the fuels. Many trace elements are relatively volatile during combustion and are consequently enriched in the fine particle fraction. In black liquor combustion the fine particle mode is at larger particles i.e. 1-3 im due to larger amount of volatilized material and hence mass concentration. In black liquor combustion the ESP efficiency is good also for fine particles. The measurements showed, that there is a relation between the fine particle mass concentration, the process temperature and Cl, S, K, Na, Pb, Cd, Cu and As concentrations in fuel. Higher process temperature and higher Chlorine content in fuel increase the concentration of these elements in submicron

  2. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  3. Continuous Draw Spinning of Extra-Long Silver Submicron Fibers with Micrometer Patterning Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaopeng; Liao, Suiyang; Huang, Ya; Song, Jianan; Liu, Zhenglian; Fang, Minghao; Xu, Chencheng; Cui, Yi; Wu, Hui

    2017-03-08

    Ultrathin metal fibers can serve as highly conducting and flexible current and heat transport channels, which are essential for numerous applications ranging from flexible electronics to energy conversion. Although industrial production of metal fibers with diameters of down to 2 μm is feasible, continuous production of high-quality and low-cost nanoscale metal wires is still challenging. Herein, we report the continuous draw spinning of highly conductive silver submicron fibers with the minimum diameter of ∼200 nm and length of more than kilometers. We obtained individual AgNO3/polymer fibers by continuous drawing from an aqueous solution at a speed of up to 8 m/s. With subsequent heat treatment, freestanding Ag submicron fibers with high mechanical flexibility and electric conductivity have been obtained. Woven mats of aligned Ag submicron fibers were used as transparent electrodes with high flexibility and high performance with sheet resistance of 7 Ω sq(-1) at a transparency of 96%. Continuous draw spinning opened new avenues for scalable, flexible, and ultralow-cost fabrication of extra-long conductive ultrathin metal fibers.

  4. Directed assembly of conducting polymers on sub-micron templates by electrical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jia; Wei, Ming [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Busnaina, Ahmed [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barry, Carol [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Mead, Joey, E-mail: Joey_Mead@uml.edu [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale patterns with dimensions of assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly to deposit PANi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly of PANi finished in less than 1 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of process parameters on assembly of PANi onto nanoscale pattern was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assembled PANi can be transferred to other flexible substrates. - Abstract: Patterning of conducting polymer into sub-micron patterns over large areas at high rate and low cost is significant for commercial manufacturing of novel devices. Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly provide an easily scaled approach with high fabrication rates. In this work, electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly were used to assemble polyaniline (PANi) into multiscale sub-micron size patterns in less than 1 min. The process was controlled by assembly time, amplitude, and frequency of the electric field. Dielectrophoretic assembly is preferable for manufacturing as it reduces damage to the templates used to control the assembly. Using this method, sub-micron patterns with dimensions of the assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated over large areas in short times. The assembled PANi was further transferred to other flexible polymer substrates by a thermoforming process, providing a fast, easily controlled and promising approach for fabrication of nanoscale devices.

  5. The study to reduce the hemolysis side effect of puerarin by a submicron emulsion delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Peng-Fei; Hai-Long Yuan, Hai-Long; Zhu, Wei-Feng; Cong, Long-Bo; Xie, Huan; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Lu-Jun; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2008-01-01

    A safe and effective delivery system with a submicron emulsion for puerarin was studied. Puerarin submicron emulsion was prepared by a novel complex-phase inversion-high press homogenization technology. The mechanism to reduce the hemolysis side effect of puerarin was studied by blood cell counts in rabbits. The average diameter, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency of the emulsion prepared was 198.14+/-8.61 nm, -29.45+/-1.47 mV, 87.32+/-0.34%, respectively. Compared with control group, the red blood cell values, packed cell volume, plasma hemoglobin level, haptoglobin level and osmotic fragility of puerarin i.v. group was significantly different (pemulsion group were not significantly different (p>0.05) in contrast to control group. Such observations indicated that the intravascular hemolysis occurred at 42, 43 d in puerarin i.v. group rabbits, the hemolysis did not occur for puerarin emulsion group rabbits. As an explanation for these results, it was proposed that the puerarin was either incorporated into the lipophilic core or intercalated between the phospholipid molecules at the interface. It could be concluded that puerarin submicron emulsions prepared markedly reduced the hemolysis effect of puerarin.

  6. A flow cytometry-based submicron-sized bacterial detection system using a movable virtual wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoungseon; Jeon, Chang Su; Hwang, Inseong; Ko, Juhui; Lee, Saram; Choo, Jaebum; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Taek Dong

    2014-07-07

    Detection of pathogenic bacteria requires a sensitive, accurate, rapid, and portable device. Given that lethal microbes are of various sizes, bacterial sensors based on DC (direct current) impedance on chips should be equipped with channels with commensurate cross sections. When it comes to counting and interrogation of individual bacteria on a microfluidic chip, very narrow channels are required, which are neither easy nor cost-effective to fabricate. Here, we report a flow cytometry-based submicron-sized bacterial detection system using a movable virtual wall made of a non-conducting fluid. We show that the effective dimension of a microfluidic channel can be adjusted by varying the respective flow rates of a sample solution as well as the liquid wall therein. Using such a virtual wall, we have successfully controlled the channel width and detected submicron-sized Francisella tularensis, a lethal, tularemia-causing bacterium. Since the system is capable of monitoring changes in DC impedance and fluorescence simultaneously, we were also able to discriminate between different types of bacterial mixtures containing F. tularensis and E. coli BL21 that have different gamuts of size distributions. The proposed flow cytometry-based system represents a promising way to detect bacteria including, but not limited to, submicron-sized pathogenic microbes.

  7. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for detecting the presence of a target analyte, ligand or molecule in a test fluid, comprising a light transmissive substrate on which an array of surface plasmon resonant (SPR) elements is mounted is described. A multi-channel sensor for detecting the presence of several targets with a single microchip sensor is described. A multi-channel sensor including collections of SPR elements which are commonly functionalized to one of several targets is also described. The detectors sense changes in the resonant response of the SPR elements indicative of binding with the targets.

  8. Fluxes of Submicron Organic Aerosol above London Measured by Eddy Covariance using the Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, G. J.; di Marco, C. F.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Nemitz, E.

    2009-12-01

    Urban centres are large sources of sub-micron particles. The myriad of emission sources combined with the complex interaction between regional aerosol and the particulate and gaseous photochemistry make for a complex system. It is evident that particulate emissions from cities will affect the regional atmosphere as well as the environment within the urban area. Aerosol particles have been associated with respiratory and cardio-vascular disease and are also linked with the climate through scattering of radiation and indirect effects such as cloud formation. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) provides a powerful tool to elucidate the sources and processing of organic aerosol in the urban atmosphere. Normally this is done through concentration measurements, by statistical analysis of the organic mass spectra, e.g. using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Recently the quadrupole based AMS (Q-AMS) has been used for the micrometeorological measurement of organic aerosol fluxes above several cities, based on high frequency measurements of individual masses (m/z) representative of different organic mass fractions. While providing a major step forward towards quantification of urban organic aerosol emissions and processing, the interpretation of Q-AMS flux data requires assumptions to scale up signals on individual m/z to total organic mass fluxes. In this paper we present chemically-speciated and size-segregated number aerosol fluxes measured using the next generation eddy covariance flux system based on the Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS, now capable of recording fast-response eddy-covariance time-series of all m/z simultaneously. This allows organic mass fluxes to be calculated more quantitatively and provides 'flux mass spectra' in addition to concentration mass spectra, which produces novel information on the local emission and processing of organic aerosols in the urban environment, while concentration analysis includes the regional background. The measurements were

  9. Sedimentation of active particles

    OpenAIRE

    Vachier, Jérémy; Marco G. Mazza

    2017-01-01

    Active particles convert energy from chemical, biochemical, or other processes into motion. Their collective motion has attracted enormous interest on account of the technological applications of artificial and biological particles. By combining theoretical arguments, and molecular dynamics simulations we explore the collective behavior of active particles under a gravity field in three dimensions. Dilute systems exhibit sedimentation, which we study with two approaches. Firstly, we solve ana...

  10. Mineral chemistry of MUSES-C Regio inferred from analysis of dust particles collected from the first- and second-touchdown sites on asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Wakita, Shigeru; Noguchi, Takaaki; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tanaka, Masahiko; Kimura, Makoto; Tshuchiyama, Akira; Ogami, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Takahito; Konno, Mitsuru; Uesugi, Masayuki; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Okazaki, Ryuji; Sandford, Scott. A.; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2014-02-01

    The mineralogy and mineral chemistry of Itokawa dust particles captured during the first and second touchdowns on the MUSES-C Regio were characterized by synchrotron-radiation X-ray diffraction and field-emission electron microprobe analysis. Olivine and low- and high-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, and merrillite compositions of the first-touchdown particles are similar to those of the second-touchdown particles. The two touchdown sites are separated by approximately 100 meters and therefore the similarity suggests that MUSES-C Regio is covered with dust particles of uniform mineral chemistry of LL chondrites. Quantitative compositional properties of 48 dust particles, including both first- and second-touchdown samples, indicate that dust particles of MUSES-C Regio have experienced prolonged thermal metamorphism, but they are not fully equilibrated in terms of chemical composition. This suggests that MUSES-C particles were heated in a single asteroid at different temperatures. During slow cooling from a peak temperature of approximately 800 °C, chemical compositions of plagioclase and K-feldspar seem to have been modified: Ab and Or contents changed during cooling, but An did not. This compositional modification is reproduced by a numerical simulation that modeled the cooling process of a 50 km sized Itokawa parent asteroid. After cooling, some particles have been heavily impacted and heated, which resulted in heterogeneous distributions of Na and K within plagioclase crystals. Impact-induced chemical modification of plagioclase was verified by a comparison to a shock vein in the Kilabo LL6 ordinary chondrite where Na-K distributions of plagioclase have been disturbed.

  11. FY 2000 Industrial science and technology research and development themes - cooperative project with academic circles. Report on the results of research and development of technologies for creating new bioaffinity molecules using submicron beads (Development of technologies for rational use of energy); 2000 nendo biryushi riyogata seitai ketsugo busshitsu nado sosei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Energy shiyo gorika gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 2000 results of the research and development for creating new bioaffinity molecules using submicron beads. The program for development of technology for analyzing chemical-biomolecule complexes using submicron affinity beads has developed a detachable linker which allows the complex, composed of ligand on the affinity latex particle surfaces and receptor bound thereto, to be detached directly from the particles, and also developed the prototype of magnetite-containing polymer particles with a diameter of submicron order, which facilitate recovery of the affinity latex. The program for development of technology to create chemical substances with new functions has successfully constructed the focused library composed of 400 compounds based on the split and pool method for FR225659 as a glucose modulator, chosen as the target material. It also has established the method of synthesizing opioid alkaloid as the target compound on the solid phase, and synthesized 39 opioid compounds with condensed indol rings, having diverse of several substituents. (NEDO)

  12. Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Submicron Aerosols in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Sterling, K.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2003-12-01

    Natural radionuclides can be useful in evaluating the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. Beryllium-7, which is produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and becomes adsorbed on fine aerosols, can be a useful indicator of upper air transport into a region. Lead-210 is produced by the decay of radon-222 out-gassed into the lower atmosphere from ground-based uranium deposits. Potassium-40, found in soils, can act as a measure of wind-blown dust and also comes from burning of wood and other biomass that is enriched in this natural radioisotope. Thus, both lead-210 and potassium-40 can aid in identification of aerosols sourced in the lower atmosphere. As part of our continuing interest in the lifetimes and sources of aerosols and their radiative effects, we report here measurements of fine aerosol radioactivity in Mexico City, one of the largest megacities in the world. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters by using cascade impactors (Sierra type, Anderson Instruments) and high-volume air samplers from the rooftop of the main laboratory of El Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental (CENICA). By using stage 4 of the impactor and timers, we were able to collect integrated samples of sizes > 1 micrometer and < 1 micrometer over 12-hr time periods daily for approximately one month in April 2003. Samples were counted at the University of Illinois at Chicago by using state-of-the-art gamma counting (beryllium-7, 477.6 keV; potassium-40, 1460.8 keV; lead-210, 46.5 keV). The beryllium-7 data indicate one possible upper-air transport event during April 2003. As expected, the lead-210 data indicate very little soil contribution to the fine aerosol. The potassium-40 data showed an increase in fine aerosol potassium during Holy Week that might be attributed to local combustion of biomass fuels. The data will be presented and discussed in light of future data analysis and comparison with other

  13. Evaluating model parameterizations of submicron aerosol scattering and absorption with in situ data from ARCTAS 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Alvarado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate modeling of the scattering and absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation by aerosols is essential for accurate simulations of atmospheric chemistry and climate. Closure studies using in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption can be used to evaluate and improve models of aerosol optical properties without interference from model errors in aerosol emissions, transport, chemistry, or deposition rates. Here we evaluate the ability of four externally mixed, fixed size distribution parameterizations used in global models to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption at three wavelengths using in situ data gathered during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS campaign. The four models are the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI Combo model, GEOS-Chem v9-02, the baseline configuration of a version of GEOS-Chem with online radiative transfer calculations (called GC-RT, and the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC v3.1 package. We also use the ARCTAS data to perform the first evaluation of the ability of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1 to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption when in situ data on the aerosol size distribution are used, and examine the impact of different mixing rules for black carbon (BC on the results. We find that the GMI model tends to overestimate submicron scattering and absorption at shorter wavelengths by 10–23 %, and that GMI has smaller absolute mean biases for submicron absorption than OPAC v3.1, GEOS-Chem v9-02, or GC-RT. However, the changes to the density and refractive index of BC in GC-RT improve the simulation of submicron aerosol absorption at all wavelengths relative to GEOS-Chem v9-02. Adding a variable size distribution, as in ASP v2.1, improves model performance for scattering but not for absorption, likely due to the assumption in ASP v2.1 that BC is present at a constant mass

  14. Variations in the chemical composition of the submicron aerosol and in the sources of the organic fraction at a regional background site of the Po Valley (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressi, Michael; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Belis, Claudio A.; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Fröhlich, Roman; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Petralia, Ettore; Prévôt, André S. H.; Berico, Massimo; Malaguti, Antonella; Canonaco, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM) levels and resulting impacts on human health are in the Po Valley (Italy) among the highest in Europe. To build effective PM abatement strategies, it is necessary to characterize fine PM chemical composition, sources and atmospheric processes on long timescales (> months), with short time resolution (organic fraction. Although previous studies have been conducted in this region, none of them addressed all these aspects together. For the first time in the Po Valley, we investigate the chemical composition of nonrefractory submicron PM (NR-PM1) with a time resolution of 30 min at the regional background site of Ispra during 1 full year, using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) under the most up-to-date and stringent quality assurance protocol. The identification of the main components of the organic fraction is made using the Multilinear-Engine 2 algorithm implemented within the latest version of the SoFi toolkit. In addition, with the aim of a potential implementation of ACSM measurements in European air quality networks as a replacement of traditional filter-based techniques, parallel multiple offline analyses were carried out to assess the performance of the ACSM in the determination of PM chemical species regulated by air quality directives. The annual NR-PM1 level monitored at the study site (14.2 µg m-3) is among the highest in Europe and is even comparable to levels reported in urban areas like New York City and Tokyo. On the annual basis, submicron particles are primarily composed of organic aerosol (OA, 58 % of NR-PM1). This fraction was apportioned into oxygenated OA (OOA, 66 %), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 11 % of OA) and biomass burning OA (BBOA, 23 %). Among the primary sources of OA, biomass burning (23 %) is thus bigger than fossil fuel combustion (11 %). Significant contributions of aged secondary organic aerosol (OOA) are observed throughout the year. The unexpectedly high degree of oxygenation

  15. Real-time gas and particle-phase organic acids measurement at a forest site using chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Jayne, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurement of organic acids in gas and aerosol particles conducted in a ponderosa pine forest during July and August 2011 as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS; http://tinyurl.com/BEACHON-RoMBAS). The measurement technique is based on chemical ionization, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and utilizes a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor [MOVI-CI-HR-ToFMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2010] to collect sub-micron aerosol particles while simultaneously measuring the gas-phase composition. The collected particles are subsequently analyzed by temperature-programmed thermal desorption. The reagent ion chosen for this campaign is the acetate anion (CH3C(O)O-, m/z 59), which reacts selectively via proton transfer with compounds that are stronger gas-phase acids than acetic acid [Veres et al., IJMS, 2008]. Preliminary results show substantial particle-phase concentrations of biogenic oxidation products such as hydroxy-glutaric acid, pinic acid, pinonic acid, and hydroxy-pinonic acid along with numerous lower and higher molecular weight organic acids. Correlations of the organic acid concentrations with meteorological, gas and aerosol parameters measured by other instrumentation are investigated in order to understand the formation, transformation, and partitioning of gas and particle-phase organic acids in a forested environment dominated by terpenes.

  16. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Soichiro; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF) test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages) in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  17. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumamoto Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP. To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  18. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  19. Characteristics and sources of submicron aerosols above the urban canopy (260 m) in Beijing, China during 2014 APEC summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, W. Q.; Du, W.; Zhou, L. B.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Gao, Z. Q.; Zhang, Q.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    The megacity of Beijing has experienced frequent severe fine particle pollution during the last decade. Although the sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles have been extensively investigated on the basis of ground measurements, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition and sources above the urban canopy in Beijing is rare. In this study, we conducted real-time measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) composition at 260 m at the 325 m Beijing Meteorological Tower (BMT) from 10 October to 12 November 2014, by using an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) along with synchronous measurements of size-resolved NR-PM1 composition at near ground level using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The NR-PM1 composition above the urban canopy was dominated by organics (46 %), followed by nitrate (27 %) and sulfate (13 %). The high contribution of nitrate and high NO3-/SO42- mass ratios illustrate an important role of nitrate in particulate matter (PM) pollution during the study period. The organic aerosol (OA) was mainly composed by secondary OA (SOA), accounting for 61 % on an average. Different from that measured at the ground site, primary OA (POA) correlated moderately with SOA, likely suggesting a high contribution from regional transport above the urban canopy. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit with strict emission controls provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol chemistry. All aerosol species were shown to have significant decreases of 40-80 % during APEC from those measured before APEC, suggesting that emission controls over regional scales substantially reduced PM levels. However, the bulk aerosol composition was relatively similar before and during APEC as a result of synergetic controls of aerosol precursors such as SO2, NOx, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In addition to emission controls, the routine

  20. Characteristics and sources of submicron aerosols above the urban canopy (260 m) in Beijing, China, during the 2014 APEC summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, W. Q.; Du, W.; Zhou, L. B.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Gao, Z. Q.; Zhang, Q.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    The megacity of Beijing has experienced frequent severe fine particle pollution during the last decade. Although the sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles have been extensively investigated on the basis of ground measurements, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition and sources above the urban canopy in Beijing is rare. In this study, we conducted real-time measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) composition at 260 m at the Beijing 325 m meteorological tower (BMT) from 10 October to 12 November 2014, by using an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) along with synchronous measurements of size-resolved NR-PM1 composition near ground level using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The NR-PM1 composition above the urban canopy was dominated by organics (46 %), followed by nitrate (27 %) and sulfate (13 %). The high contribution of nitrate and high NO3- / SO42- mass ratios illustrates an important role of nitrate in particulate matter (PM) pollution during the study period. The organic aerosol (OA) was mainly composed of secondary OA (SOA), accounting for 61 % on an average. Different from that measured at the ground site, primary OA (POA) correlated moderately with SOA, likely suggesting a high contribution from regional transport above the urban canopy. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit with strict emission controls provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol chemistry. All aerosol species were shown to have significant decreases of 40-80 % during APEC from those measured before APEC, suggesting that emission controls over regional scales substantially reduced PM levels. However, the bulk aerosol composition was relatively similar before and during APEC as a result of synergetic controls of aerosol precursors. In addition to emission controls, the routine circulations of mountain-valley breezes were also found to play

  1. Formation and behaviour of dust particle clouds in a radio-frequency discharge: results in the laboratory and under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikikian, M [Groupe de Recherches sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Boufendi, L [Groupe de Recherches sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Bouchoule, A [Groupe de Recherches sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Thomas, H M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching (Germany); Morfill, G E [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching (Germany); Nefedov, A P [Institute for High Energy Densities, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow, 127412 (Russian Federation); Fortov, V E [Institute for High Energy Densities, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow, 127412 (Russian Federation)

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we report the first observation on submicron dust particle clouds grown in a radio-frequency sputtering discharge under microgravity conditions. These results have been obtained in the PKE-Nefedov (Plasma Kristall Experiment) chamber in the framework of a French-German-Russian programme. A dust-free region, usually called the 'void', is observed in the laboratory and under microgravity conditions even with submicron particles. In this region, successive generations of particles can be grown, leading to the coexistence of particles with various sizes. Each generation of particles constitutes a cloud separated from the others by a definite sheath. Dynamics of these clouds have been investigated showing vortex-like motions or independent behaviour of small heaps of particles, emphasizing both attractive and repulsive effects between dust clouds. As these particles drastically influence the plasma properties, the growth kinetics is followed through the evolution of the discharge current.

  2. Evaluation of traffic exhaust contributions to ambient carbonaceous submicron particulate matter in an urban roadside environment in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Berto Paul; Kwok Keung Louie, Peter; Luk, Connie; Keung Chan, Chak

    2017-12-01

    Road traffic has significant impacts on air quality particularly in densely urbanized and populated areas where vehicle emissions are a major local source of ambient particulate matter. Engine type (i.e., fuel use) significantly impacts the chemical characteristics of tailpipe emission, and thus the distribution of engine types in traffic impacts measured ambient concentrations. This study provides an estimation of the contribution of vehicles powered by different fuels (gasoline, diesel, LPG) to carbonaceous submicron aerosol mass (PM1) based on ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements and vehicle count data in an urban inner city environment in Hong Kong with the aim to gauge the importance of different engine types to particulate matter burdens in a typical urban street canyon. On an average per-vehicle basis, gasoline vehicles emitted 75 and 93 % more organics than diesel and LPG vehicles, respectively, while EC emissions from diesel vehicles were 45 % higher than those from gasoline vehicles. LPG vehicles showed no appreciable contributions to EC and thus overall represented a small contributor to traffic-related primary ambient PM1 despite their high abundance (˜ 30 %) in the traffic mix. Total carbonaceous particle mass contributions to ambient PM1 from diesel engines were only marginally higher (˜ 4 %) than those from gasoline engines, which is likely an effect of recently introduced control strategies targeted at commercial vehicles and buses. Overall, gasoline vehicles contributed 1.2 µg m-3 of EC and 1.1 µ m-3 of organics, LPG vehicles 0.6 µg m-3 of organics and diesel vehicles 2.0 µg m-3 of EC and 0.7 µg m-3 of organics to ambient carbonaceous PM1.

  3. Evaluation of traffic exhaust contributions to ambient carbonaceous submicron particulate matter in an urban roadside environment in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic has significant impacts on air quality particularly in densely urbanized and populated areas where vehicle emissions are a major local source of ambient particulate matter. Engine type (i.e., fuel use significantly impacts the chemical characteristics of tailpipe emission, and thus the distribution of engine types in traffic impacts measured ambient concentrations. This study provides an estimation of the contribution of vehicles powered by different fuels (gasoline, diesel, LPG to carbonaceous submicron aerosol mass (PM1 based on ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and elemental carbon (EC measurements and vehicle count data in an urban inner city environment in Hong Kong with the aim to gauge the importance of different engine types to particulate matter burdens in a typical urban street canyon. On an average per-vehicle basis, gasoline vehicles emitted 75 and 93 % more organics than diesel and LPG vehicles, respectively, while EC emissions from diesel vehicles were 45 % higher than those from gasoline vehicles. LPG vehicles showed no appreciable contributions to EC and thus overall represented a small contributor to traffic-related primary ambient PM1 despite their high abundance (∼ 30 % in the traffic mix. Total carbonaceous particle mass contributions to ambient PM1 from diesel engines were only marginally higher (∼ 4 % than those from gasoline engines, which is likely an effect of recently introduced control strategies targeted at commercial vehicles and buses. Overall, gasoline vehicles contributed 1.2 µg m−3 of EC and 1.1 µ m−3 of organics, LPG vehicles 0.6 µg m−3 of organics and diesel vehicles 2.0 µg m−3 of EC and 0.7 µg m−3 of organics to ambient carbonaceous PM1.

  4. Imaging of vaporised sub-micron phase change contrast agents with high frame rate ultrasound and optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengtao; Zhang, Ge; Jamburidze, Akaki; Chee, Melisse; Leow, Chee Hau; Garbin, Valeria; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2018-01-31

    Phase-change ultrasound contrast agent (PCCA), or nanodroplet shows promises as an alternative to conventional microbubble agent over a wide range of diagnostic applications. In the meantime, high-frame-rate (HFR) ultrasound imaging with microbubbles enables unprecedentedly temporal resolution compared to traditional contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. The combination of HFR ultrasound imaging and PCCAs can offer opportunities to observe and better understand PCCA behaviour after vaporisation capturing the fast phenomenon at a high temporal resolution. In this study, we utilised HFR ultrasound at frame rates in the kilohertz range (5-20 kHz) to image the native and size-selected PCCA populations immediately after vaporisation in vitro with clinical acoustic parameters. The size-selected PCCAs through filtration are shown to preserve submicron-sized (mean diameter < 200 nm) population without micron-sized outliers (> 1 µm) that are originally from the native PCCA emulsion. The results demonstrate imaging signals with different amplitude and temporal features compared to that of microbubbles. Compared with microbubbles, both B-mode and Pulse-Inversion (PI) signals from vaporised PCCA populations were reduced significantly in the first tens of milliseconds, while only B-mode signals from the PCCAs recovered during the next 400 ms, suggesting significant changes to the size distribution of PCCAs after vaporisation. It is also shown that such recovery in signal over time is not evident when using size-selective PCCAs. Furthermore, it was found that signals from the vaporised PCCA populations are affected by the amplitude and frame rate of the HFR ultrasound imaging. Using high-speed optical camera observation (30 kHz), we observed the particle size change in the vaporised PCCA populations exposed to the HFR ultrasound imaging pulses. These findings can benefit the understandings of PCCA behaviour under HFR ultrasound imaging. © 2018 Institute of Physics and

  5. Simulation of monolithic active pixels in deep sub-micron technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulos, S; Turchetta, R

    2002-01-01

    The use of monolithic active pixels (MAPS) has quickly spread in a number of scientific fields ranging from imaging to high-energy particle physics applications. The success of MAPS is due to a number of reasons, for example their low power consumption, fast readout, high spatial resolution and low cost. The latter reflects the use of standard CMOS processes for fabrication. In this paper, the performance of MAPS designed in 0.25 mu m technology will be modelled by means of TCAD device simulation software. The dependence of the device performance on parameters that affect the detection of minimum ionising particles (MIP) will be studied aiming at the optimisation of the detector performance. More specifically, the simulations will focus on the influence of the epitaxial layer thickness on the amount of collected charge, that defines the signal and the cluster size, that affects the spatial resolution.

  6. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    -relativistic heavy ion reactions is an important hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. The flow analysis involves the particles, which have already been frozen out. Therefore, to perform realistic flow computations from the Multi Module Model we need a complete freeze out description and a well identified freeze out surface. However, the freeze out module is still not ready. Although we have not yet been able to evaluate collective flow using the Multi Module Model, the method and code for the calculation of flow components has been worked out in an independent module. This module is completed and can be coupled to the previous modules when those are ready for use. In order to test the code, we have calculated directed and elliptic flow from a tilted, ellipsoidally expanding source using a simple, blast wave type of model. This model was developed directly for this aim based on Buda-Lund hydro models. Although, this oversimplified blast wave model is not suitable to reproduce the experimental data--which will be an important task in the future to check our Multi Module Model--it has provided us with important information. We have found that the directed flow, is very sensitive to the correct identification of the reaction plane included the determination of the impact parameter vector, and can be misinterpreted by some experimental methods. We have shown that misidentification of the reaction plane may even set the directed flow to zero by construction. We have presented results of the rapidity dependence of the directed flow, v1, and elliptic flow, v2, furthermore, the transverse momentum dependence of v2. We have also investigated the dependence of the flow pattern on the initial geometry of the fireball by calculating flow components from two ellipsoidal sources with the same thermodynamical properties but different shape. The code determining the freeze out hypersurface should still be improved in order to avoid inaccuracies in the further

  7. Aerosol particles in the Mexican East Pacific Part I: processing and vertical redistribution by clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of aerosol particle size distributions were made in the Mexican Intertropical Convergence Zone. The volume concentrations of submicron and super micron particles at cloud base were compared with those in near-cloud regions over a range of altitudes. Of 78 near-cloud regions analyzed, 68% and 45% had enhanced volumes of submicron particles and supermicron particles, respectively. In addition, 35% of these regions had supermicron particles removed, presumably by precipitation. In 61% of the cases the enhancement in volume occurred over the size range from 0.1 to 50 μm whereas only submicron volumes were enhanced in 35% of the cases. In regions near clouds that were formed in air of maritime origin the frequency of volume enhancement decreased with increasing altitude and was twice as frequent on the dissipating side of clouds compared to the growing side. No such differences were found in the regions near clouds formed in air originating from the land. The frequency and average magnitude of volume enhancement are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with previous observational and theoretical studies that relate enhancements in particle mass to the uptake by cloud droplets of SO2 accompanied by additional growth by droplet coalescence.

  8. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a

  9. The study on the effect of fractional composition and ash particle diameter on the ash collection efficiency at the electrostatic precipitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Đurić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of experimental investigations shown in this paper is to estimate the operating efficiency degree of the electrostatic precipitator on a real industrial plant (a the thermal power plant „Gacko“ with the electric power of 310 MW, Bosnia & Herzegovina and to use the obtained results as a base of periodical engineering or continual measurement and compare them with the investigations of other investigators. The investigation of the electrostatic precipitator performance was done according to BAS ISO 9096:2003. In this paper, the electrostatic precipitator efficiency during the ash particle removal with a wide range of particle sizes from 1 to 250 μm is evaluated. The exploitational experience points out that electrostatic precipitators are efficient for the coals of different quality (coal particles with diameters bigger than 1 μm and that they could be optimized during the exploitation itself and for some following processes (e.g., flue gas desulphurization. Within the measurement plane, the measurements were made on 20 points per section. It has been noticed that ash removal degrees obtained experimentally (3 investigations have approximately equal value (95.93 to 97.78%. The best concordance with the results of experimental investigation shows the Deutsch equation, while theoretical models of Zhibin-Guoquan and Nobrega-Falaguasta-Coury do not correspond well to the results of experimental investigations. For the ash particles with the diameters less than 17.5 μm there is no good correlation between investigated theoretical models. The highest deviation of the model for ash particles with diameters less than 17.5 μm is notable in the case of using the Deutsch equation.

  10. Optical Response to Submicron Digital Elements Simulated by FDTD Wavelets with Refractive Impulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony J. Bourdillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate simulation from digital, submicron, optical elements is obtained by finite difference time domain (FDTD results that are phase analyzed as sources for Huygens wavelets on fine scales much shorter than the wavelength used. Results, from the MIT electromagnetic evaluation program, are renormalized by a method here called “refractive impulse.” This is valid for polarized responses from digital diffractive and focusing optics. The method is employed with plane wave incidence at any angle or with diverging or converging beams. It is more systematic, more versatile, and more accurate than commercial substitutes.

  11. Reduced impact of induced gate noise on inductively degenerated LNAs in deep submicron CMOS technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, P.; Svelto, F.; Mazzanti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Designers of radio-frequency inductively-degenerated CMOS low-noise-amplifiers have usually not followed the guidelines for achieving minimum noise figure. Nonetheless, state-of-the- art implementations display noise figure values very close to the theoretical minimum. In this paper, we point out...... that this is due to the effect of the parasitic overlap capacitances in the MOS device. In particular, we show that overlap capacitances lead to a significant induced-gate-noise reduction, especially when deep sub-micron CMOS processes are used....

  12. Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly(methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nain, Amrinder S; Filiz, Sinan; Ozdoganlar, O Burak; Sitti, Metin; Amon, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micro-/nanofibers are finding increasing use as sensors for novel applications. Here, we demonstrate the ability to deposit an array of poly(methyl methacyrlate) fibers with micron and submicron diameters in aligned configurations on customized piezoelectric shakers. Using lateral motion of an atomic force microscope tip, fibers are broken to obtain fiber cantilevers of high aspect ratio (length/diameter > 20). The resonant frequencies of fabricated microfiber cantilevers are experimentally measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. An average Young's modulus of 3.5 GPa and quality factor of 20 were estimated from the experimentally obtained frequency responses.

  13. Pressing Induced Polymorphic Phase Transition in Submicron-Sized Gamma-Hmx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.-Y.; Moore, D. S.

    2007-12-01

    Using Raman spectroscopy, a novel submicron-sized HMX (sm-HMX) was determined to be both the gamma polymorph and stable with respect to conversion to beta-HMX under ambient conditions for at least a year. Pressing of sm-HMX powder in a small diameter pellet press at pressures from 10,000 psi to 31,000 psi and 1 to 5 minute hold times was found to promote the gamma to beta polymorphic phase transition. The fraction converted and rate of conversion versus time after pellet removal from the press, measured using Raman spectroscopy, fit a sigmoidal curve, indicating nucleation and growth as a possible polymorphic transition mechanism.

  14. Bloch-wave engineered submicron-diameter quantum-dot micropillars for cavity QED experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Lermer, Matthias; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The semiconductor micropillar is attractive for cavity QED experiments. For strong coupling, the figure of merit is proportional to Q/√V, and a design combining a high Q and a low mode volume V is thus desired. However, for the standard submicron diameter design, poor mode matching between the ca...... the cavity and the DBR Bloch mode limits the Q. We present a novel adiabatic design where Bloch-wave engineering is employed to improve the mode matching, allowing the demonstration of a record-high vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 μeV and a Q of 13600 for a 850 nm diameter micropillar....

  15. An Empirical Algorithm for Power Analysis in Deep Submicron Electronic Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Huang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An empirical algorithm applied to logic level power analysis in deep submicron VLSI designs is introduced in the paper. The method explores a static analysis strategy using unit functions to represent signal transitions. It can be extended to the use of a Register Transfer Level (RTL power analysis after RTL codes are translated to Boolean equations. A new method for representing state-dependent power models is also introduced in the paper to reduce the complexity of power modeling and to improve the performance of power analysis. The modeling method supports not only the empirical power analysis, but also general simulation-based power analysis methods.

  16. Dye-doped spherical particles of optical cavity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shuichi; Yano, Tetsuji; Yamane, Masayuki

    1997-10-01

    Preparation of micrometer-sized spherical particles containing Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been investigated for spherical cavity structure. Hydrolysis and polymerization processes of phenyltriethoxysilane (PTES) as a starting material was pursued by observing the change of PTES/R6G in HCl solution with its optical absorption and viscosity. As the polymerization of PTES proceeded, increase of molecular size resulted in change its properties from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, and subsequently the solution separated into two layers of aqueous and organic. Polymerized PTES in the organic layer showed good affinity with incorporated R6G, and high monomer/dimer ratio in particles was achieved. Moreover, using them intermixing of unsuitable particles of submicron size was avoided, because hydrolyzed PTES of small molecular size that is the origin of submicron-sized particles was removed to the aqueous layer. With stirring, titration of diluted droplets containing polymerized PTES was suitable for preparing several micrometer sized particles, and followed by solidification in ammonia water. Degree of the polymerization of PTES and viscosity of liquid droplets were the key factors for determining the properties of R6G-doped spherical particles of optical cavity structure.

  17. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: sato.yuki@jaea.go.jp [Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS), Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, 2–1Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-10-21

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He{sup +}). On the other hand, compared with that of He{sup +}, silicon-ions (Si{sup +}) and gold-ions (Au{sup 3+}) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si{sup +} and 2 MeV-Au{sup 3+}, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  18. Formation of fine particles in co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel in a pulverized coal-fired power station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    appear to be an important formation mechanism. The elemental composition of the particles from coal combustion showed that S and Ca were significantly enriched in ultrafine particles and P was also enriched considerably. However, compared with supermicron particles, the contents of Al, Si and K were...... showed an ultrafine mode centered at approximately 0.1 μm. Compared with coal combustion, co-combustion of coal and SRF increased the formation of submicron particles, especially ultrafine particles below 0.2 μm. The morphology of the particles indicated that supermicron particles were primarily formed...

  19. Lunar surface phenomena - Solar flare track gradients, microcraters, and accretionary particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Fruland, R. M.; Mckay, D. S.; Morrison, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented concerning the energy spectra of solar flare particles and the distribution of particles producing submicron diameter craters. Processes which alter the albedo and possibly the chemistry of exposed lunar surfaces are also considered. Measurements are reported of solar flare track gradients in rock 64455 which is sufficiently young to have uneroded surfaces on its sides. Attention is also given to accretionary particles adhering to host surfaces, microcraters on soil particles, and microcraters on the oriented surfaces of sample 76015 from a boulder at Station 6 of the Apollo 17 site.

  20. Preparation of superhard cubic boron nitride sintered from commercially available submicron powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Kou, Zili; Lu, Jingrui; Yan, Xiaozhi; Liu, Fangming; Li, Xin; Ding, Wei; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Dejiang; Lei, Li; He, Duanwei

    2017-03-01

    Using submicron cubic boron nitride (cBN) powder as a starting material, polycrystalline cBN (PcBN) samples without additives were sintered from 8.0-14.0 GPa at 1750 °C, and their sintering behaviour and mechanical properties were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that high-density nanotwins could be generated from common submicron cBN grains during high pressure and high temperature treatment. The dislocation glide and (111) mechanical micro-twinning are the main mechanisms that underlie plastic deformation in the sintering process, and this contributes to the grain refinement. A refinement in the grain size (˜120 nm), micro-defect (nanotwin and stacking faults), and strong covalent bonding between the grains are crucial for improving the sample mechanical properties. The PcBN sintered at 11.0 GPa/1750 °C possessed outstanding mechanical properties, including a high Vickers hardness (˜72 GPa), fracture toughness (˜12.4 MPam1/2), and thermal stability (˜1273 °C in air).

  1. Laser smoothing of sub-micron grooves in hydroxyl-rich fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Nan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-491, Livermore, CA 94550-9234 (United States); Matthews, Manyalibo J., E-mail: ibo@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-491, Livermore, CA 94550-9234 (United States); Fair, James E.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Cooke, Diane; Elhadj, Selim; Yang, Steven T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-491, Livermore, CA 94550-9234 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Nano- to micrometer-sized surface defects on UV-grade fused silica surfaces are known to be effectively smoothed through the use of high-temperature localized CO{sub 2} laser heating, thereby enhancing optical properties. However, the details of the mass transport and the effect of hydroxyl content on the laser smoothing of defective silica at sub-micron length scales are still not completely understood. In this study, we examine the morphological evolution of sub-micron, dry-etched periodic surface structures on type II and type III SiO{sub 2} substrates under 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser irradiation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In situ thermal imaging was used to map the transient temperature field across the heated region, allowing assessment of the T-dependent mass transport mechanisms under different laser-heating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics simulations correlated well with experimental results, and showed that for large effective capillary numbers (N{sub c} > 2), surface diffusion is negligible and smoothing is dictated by capillary action, despite the relatively small spatial scales studied here. Extracted viscosity values over 1700-2000 K were higher than the predicted bulk values, but were consistent with the surface depletion of OH groups, which was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy.

  2. Single Mode ZnO Whispering-Gallery Submicron Cavity and Graphene Improved Lasing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jitao; Lin, Yi; Lu, Junfeng; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Yueyue; Shi, Zengliang; Dai, Jun

    2015-07-28

    Single-mode ultraviolet (UV) laser of ZnO is still in challenge so far, although it has been paid great attention along the past decades. In this work, single-mode lasing resonance was realized in a submicron-sized ZnO rod based on serially varying the dimension of the whispering-gallery mode (WGM) cavities. The lasing performance, such as the lasing quality factor (Q) and the lasing intensity, was remarkably improved by facilely covering monolayer graphene on the ZnO submicron-rod. The mode structure evolution from multimodes to single-mode was investigated systematically based on the total internal-wall reflection of the ZnO microcavities. Graphene-induced optical field confinement and lasing emission enhancement were revealed, indicating an energy coupling between graphene SP and ZnO exciton emission. This result demonstrated the response of graphene in the UV wavelength region and extended its potential applications besides many previous reports on the multifunctional graphene/semiconductor hybrid materials and devices in advanced electronics and optoelectronics areas.

  3. Laser smoothing of sub-micron grooves in hydroxyl-rich fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Matthews, M J; Fair, J E; Britten, J A; Nguyen, H T; Cooke, D; Elhadj, S; Yang, S T

    2009-10-30

    Nano- to micrometer-sized surface defects on UV-grade fused silica surfaces are known to be effectively smoothed through the use of high-temperature localized CO{sub 2} laser heating, thereby enhancing optical properties. However, the details of the mass transport and the effect of hydroxyl content on the laser smoothing of defective silica at submicron length scales is still not completely understood. In this study, we examine the morphological evolution of sub-micron, dry-etched periodic surface structures on type II and type III SiO{sub 2} substrates under 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser irradiation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). In-situ thermal imaging was used to map the transient temperature field across the heated region, allowing assessment of the T-dependent mass transport mechanisms under different laser-heating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics simulations correlated well with experimental results, and showed that for large effective capillary numbers (N{sub c} > 2), surface diffusion is negligible and smoothing is dictated by capillary action, despite the relatively small spatial scales studied here. Extracted viscosity values over 1700-2000K were higher than the predicted bulk values, but were consistent with the surface depletion of OH groups, which was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy.

  4. Accurate submicron edge detection using the phase change of a nano-scale shifting laser spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Hoang Hong; Chen, Liang-Chia; Nguyen, Duc Trung; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Yeh, Sheng Lih; Yao, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Accurate edge detection with lateral super-resolution has been a critical issue in optical measurement because of the barrier imposed by the optical diffraction limit. In this study, a diffraction model that applies scalar diffraction theory of Fresnel-Kirchhoff is developed to simulate phase variance and distribution along edge location. Edge position is detected based on the phase variation that occurs on the edge with a surface step-height jump. To detect accurate edge positioning beyond the optical diffraction limit, a nanopositioning stage is used to scan the super steep edge of a single-edge and multi-edges submicron grating with nano-scale, and its phase distribution is captured. Model simulation is performed to confirm the phase-shifting phenomenon of the edge. A phase-shifting detection algorithm is developed to spatially detect the edge when a finite step scanning with a pitch of several tenth nanometers is used. A 180 nm deviation can occur during detection when the step height of the detecting edge varies, or the detecting laser spot covers more than one edge. Preliminary experimental results show that for the edge detection of the submicron line width of the grating, the standard deviation of the optical phase difference detection measurement is 38 nm. This technique provides a feasible means to achieve optical super-resolution on micro-grating measurement.

  5. Surfactant-assisted solvothermal synthesis of pure nickel submicron spheres with microwave-absorbing properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Pu, Bingxue; Chen, Haiyuan; Yang, Jin; Zhou, Yajun; Yang, Jian; Bismark, Boateng; Li, Handong; Niu, Xiaobin

    2016-07-01

    Pure metallic nickel submicron spheres (Ni-SSs), flower-like nickel nanoflakes, and hollow micrometer-sized nickel spheres/tubes were controllably synthesized by a facile and efficient one-step solvothermal method with no reducing agent. The characteristics of these nickel nanostructures include morphology, structure, and purification. Possible synthesis mechanisms were discussed in detail. The resultant Ni-SSs had a wide diameter distribution of 200~800 nm through the aggregation of small nickel nanocrystals. The ferromagnetic behaviors of Ni-SSs investigated at room temperature showed high coercivity values. Furthermore, the microwave absorption properties of magnetic Ni-SSs were studied in the frequency range of 0.5-18.0 GHz. The minimum reflection loss reached -17.9 dB at 17.8 GHz with a thin absorption thickness of 1.2 mm, suggesting that the submicron spherical structures could exhibit excellent microwave absorption properties. More importantly, this one-pot synthesize route provides a universal and convenient way for preparation of larger scale pure Ni-SSs, showing excellent microwave absorption properties.

  6. Optimizing a manufacturing submicron CMOS process for low-voltage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Cheng, Sunny; Pryor, Bob; Klein, Kevin

    1996-09-01

    A low threshold voltage (Vt) is desired to improve a CMOS circuit performance when operating at reduced supply voltages to save power. In this paper, a practical approach to reduce Vt for a conventional, manufacturing submicron CMOS process is presented. This `evolutionary' approach to reduce Vt is taken so as the ensure manufacturability and to reduce process cost. This is found to be useful especially before a deep-submicron or a sophisticated process targeted for low voltage application becomes available and manufacturable. Vt reduction is achieved by the integration of a thinner, in the case presented here a 105 angstroms, gate oxide into a 0.65 micrometers process. The process is then optimized to provide the device with highest current-drive while obtaining lowest Vt with acceptable subthreshold leakage with conventional front-end and back-end process. It is shown that, with the minimal changes to the 0.65 micrometers conventional manufacturing process, the Vt's for nominal n- and p-channel devices can be reduced by 20% - 30%, with more than 1.5X improvement in current drive at 3.3 V compared to devices with 150 angstroms gate oxide. The enhancement of circuit performance is demonstrated with measurements of benchmark circuits including CPU, ROM, and FSRAM, where successful operation has been obtained near IV and operating frequencies are nearly doubled at supply voltage near 1.6 V compared to conventional 0.65 micrometers process.

  7. Single-Mode Lasers Based on Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Submicron Spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bing; Dong, Hongxing; Sun, Liaoxin; Zheng, Weihao; Wang, Qi; Sun, Fangfang; Jiang, Xiongwei; Pan, Anlian; Zhang, Long

    2017-11-28

    Single-mode laser is realized in a cesium lead halide perovskite submicron sphere at room temperature. All-inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX 3 , X = Cl, Br, I) microspheres with tunable sizes (0.2-10 μm) are first fabricated by a dual-source chemical vapor deposition method. Due to smooth surface and regular geometry structure of microspheres, whispering gallery resonant modes make a single-mode laser realized in a submicron sphere. Surprisingly, a single-mode laser with a very narrow line width (∼0.09 nm) was achieved successfully in the CsPbX 3 spherical cavity at low threshold (∼0.42 μJ cm -2 ) with a high cavity quality factor (∼6100), which are the best specifications of lasing modes in all natural nano/microcavities ever reported. By modulating the halide composition and sizes of the microspheres, the wavelength of a single-mode laser can be continuously tuned from red to violet (425-715 nm). This work illustrates that the well-controlled synthesis of metal cesium lead halide perovskite nano/microspheres may offer an alternative route to produce a widely tunable and greatly miniaturized single-mode laser.

  8. Development of eco-friendly submicron emulsions stabilized by a bio-derived gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis María; Ramírez, Pablo; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Santos, Jenifer; Muñoz, José

    2014-11-01

    Many traditional organic solvents are being gradually replaced by ecofriendly alternatives. D-Limonene is a terpenic (bio)-solvent that fulfils the requirements to be considered a green solvent. D-Limonene sub-micron emulsions suffer from Ostwald ripening destabilization. In this study, we examined the influence of the addition of a natural gum (rosin gum) to D-limonene in order to prevent Ostwald ripening. This contribution deals with the study of emulsions formulated with a mixture of D-limonene and rosin gum as dispersed phase and Pluronic PE9400 as emulsifier. The procedure followed for the development of these formulations was based on the application of product design principles. This led to the optimum ratio rosin gum/D-limonene and subsequently to the optimum surfactant concentration. The combination of different techniques (rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to assist in the prediction of the emulsions destabilization process. Not only did the addition of rosin gum highly increase the stability of these emulsions by inhibiting the Ostwald ripening, but it also reduced the emulsions droplet size. Thus, we found that stable sub-micron D-limonene-in-water emulsions have been obtained in the range 3-6 wt% Pluronic PE-9400 by means of a single-step rotor/stator homogenizing process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of chemical composition and mixing state on size-resolved hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity of submicron aerosols at a suburban site in northern Japan in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Kitamori, Yasuyuki; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2017-09-01

    Ambient hygroscopic properties, numbers of size-segregated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at different supersaturations (0.1%-0.8%), and the chemical composition of submicron particles were simultaneously measured at a suburban site in northern Japan in summer. Two distinct periods with different growth factors (GF), CCN activation diameters, and chemical compositions were observed. The data suggest that internally mixed sulfate aerosols dominated the accumulation size mode in relatively aged aerosols during the first period, whereas particles observed during the latter periods showed external mixing dominated by organics, which was linked to low hygroscopicity and CCN activity. In particular, the higher loading of water-soluble organic matter (WSOM; 60% of OM by mass) with increased WSOM/sulfate ratios corresponded to a low hygroscopicity parameter derived from the CCN measurement (κCCN = 0.15 ± 0.02) at a dry diameter (Ddry) of 146 nm. The results suggest that WSOM, likely dominated by the influence of biogenic sources, contributed to reducing the hygroscopicity and CCN activation at this particle size. Temporal variations in the number concentrations for low GF mode at Ddry = 49.6 nm were similar to those in the elemental carbon (EC) concentration, suggesting that EC contributed to reducing hygroscopicity at this smaller size. Our results suggest that chemical composition and mixing state are important factors controlling the hygroscopicity and CCN activation of submicron particles. These results provide useful data sets of size-resolved subsaturated and supersaturated hygroscopicity and highlight the importance of the abundance of OM relative to sulfate in predicting the effects on climate change.

  10. Effect of silica particle size on macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Kusaka

    Full Text Available Amorphous silica particles, such as nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter particles, are used in a wide variety of products, including pharmaceuticals, paints, cosmetics, and food. Nevertheless, the immunotoxicity of these particles and the relationship between silica particle size and pro-inflammatory activity are not fully understood. In this study, we addressed the relationship between the size of amorphous silica (particle dose, diameter, number, and surface area and the inflammatory activity (macrophage phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, IL-1β secretion, cell death and lung inflammation. Irrespective of diameter size, silica particles were efficiently internalized by mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages via an actin cytoskeleton-dependent pathway, and induced caspase-1, but not caspase-11, activation. Of note, 30 nm-1000 nm diameter silica particles induced lysosomal destabilization, cell death, and IL-1β secretion at markedly higher levels than did 3000 nm-10000 nm silica particles. Consistent with in vitro results, intra-tracheal administration of 30 nm silica particles into mice caused more severe lung inflammation than that of 3000 nm silica particles, as assessed by measurement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice, and by the micro-computed tomography analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that silica particle size impacts immune responses, with submicron amorphous silica particles inducing higher inflammatory responses than silica particles over 1000 nm in size, which is ascribed not only to their ability to induce caspase-1 activation but also to their cytotoxicity.

  11. Emission factors for carbonaceous particles and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential coal combustion in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yingjun Chen; Guoying Sheng; Xinhui Bi; Yanli Feng; Bixian Mai; Jiamo Fu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry

    2005-03-15

    Emission factors of carbonaceous particles, including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined for five coals, which ranged in maturity from sub-bituminous to anthracite. They were burned in the form of honeycomb briquettes in a residential coalstove, one of the most common fuel/stove combinations in China. Smoke samples were taken through dilution sampling equipment, with a high volume sampler that could simultaneously collect emissions in both particulate and gaseous phases, and a cascade impactor that could segregate particles into six fractions. Particulate BC and OC were analyzed by a thermal-optical method, and PAHs in emissions of both phases were analyzed by GC-MS. Burning of bituminous coals produced the highest emission factors of particulate matter (12.91 g/kg), BC (0.28 g/kg), OC (7.82 g/kg), and 20 PAHs (210.6 mg/kg) on the basis of burned dry ash-free (daf) coal, while the anthracite honeycomb-briquette was the cleanest household coal fuel. The size-segregated results show that more than 94% of the particles were submicron, and calculated mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of all particles were under 0.3 {mu}m. Based on the coal consumption in the residential sector of China, 290.24 Gg (gigagrams) of particulate matter, 5.36 Gg of BC, 170.33 Gg of OC, and 4.72 Gg of 20 PAHs mass were emitted annually from household honeycomb-briquette burning during 2000. Anthracite coal should be selected preferentially and more advanced burning conditions should be applied in domestic combustion, from the viewpoint of both climate change and adverse health effects. 61 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Polygamous particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kun-Ta; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Dreyfus, Rémi; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA is increasingly used as an important tool in programming the self-assembly of micrometer- and nanometer-scale particles. This is largely due to the highly specific thermoreversible interaction of cDNA strands, which, when placed on different particles, have been used to bind precise pairs in aggregates and crystals. However, DNA functionalized particles will only reach their true potential for particle assembly when each particle can address and bind to many different kinds of particles. ...

  13. Mechanical Properties of Individual Microgel Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Sara; Dufresne, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Microgels are important materials for both basic science and engineering and have wide applications from the study of phase transitions to the delivery of drugs. These micron and sub-micron particles, made of hydrogel materials, respond to solvent conditions. The most common microgels are environmentally sensitive, responding to temperature and pH. Our material of interest, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) or NIPAM, undergoes a deswelling transition above a critical temperature. The deswelling behavior of this polymeric material has been thoroughly studied in ensemble microgel systems as well as in bulk hydrogel samples. We present measurements of the elastic properties of single microgel particles using atomic force microscopy. We observe a stiffening of the Young's modulus by an order of magnitude at temperatures well above the transition, where the cross-linked polymer network has fully collapsed. Interestingly, near the transition we observe a comparable softening of the material.

  14. A Nordic project on high speed low power design in sub-micron CMOS technology for mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ole

    This paper is a survey paper presenting the Nordic CONFRONT project and reporting some results from the group at CIE/DTU, Denmark. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of sub-micron CMOS for the realisation of RF front-end circuits operating at frequencies in the 1...

  15. Do nanofill or submicron composites show improved smoothness and gloss? A systematic review of in vitro studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaizer, M.R.; Oliveira-Ogliari, A. de; Cenci, M.S.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Moraes, R.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite nanofill and submicron composites' aim to provide high initial polishing combined with superior smoothness and gloss retention, the question still remains whether clinicians should consider using these new materials over traditional microhybrids. The aim of this paper was to

  16. Submicron InP DHBT technology for high-speed high-swing mixed-signal ICs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godin, Jean; Nodjiadjim, V.; Riet, Muriel

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a submicron InP DHBT technology, optimized for the fabrication of 50-GHz-clock mixed signal ICs. In-depth study of device geometry and structure has allowed to get the needed performances and yield. Special attention has been paid to critical thermal behavior. Vari...

  17. In situ quantitative measurement of concentration profiles in a microreactor with submicron resolution using multiplex CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, D.; Squier, J.A.; van Maarseveen, J.; Bonn, D.; Bonn, M.; Müller, M.

    2008-01-01

    In situ quantitative imaging of concentration profiles of reactants and products inside a microfluidic reactor is achieved, with submicron spatial resolution with similar to mM sensitivity and on similar to ms time scales, for a given position. The label-free approach relies on quantitative

  18. Gold Wire-networks: Particle Array Guided Evaporation Lithograpy

    KAUST Repository

    Lone, Saifullah

    2015-06-29

    We exploited the combination of dry deposition of monolayer of 2D (two dimensional) templates, lift-up transfer of 2D template onto flat surfaces and evaporation lithography [1] to fabricate gold micro- and submicron size wire networks. The approach relies upon the defect free dry deposition of 2D monolayer of latex particles [2] on patterned silicon template and flat PDMS-substrate to create square centered and honey-comb wire networks respectively. The process is followed by lift-up transfer of 2D latex crystal on glass substrate. Subsequently, a small amount of AuNP-suspension is doped on top of the transferred crystal; the suspension is allowed to spread instantaneously and dried at low temperature. The liquid evaporates uniformly to the direction perpendicular to glass substrate. During evaporation, AuNPs are de-wetted along with the movement of liquid to self-assemble in-between the inter-particle spaces and therefore, giving rise to liquid-bridge networks which upon delayed evaporation, transforms into wire networks. The approach is used to fabricate both micro- and submicron wire-networks by simply changing the template dimensions. One of the prime motives behind this study is to down-scale the existing particle array template-based evaporation lithography process to fabricate connected gold wire networks at both micro- and submicron scale. Secondly, the idea of combining the patterned silicon wafer with lifted latex particle template creates an opportunity to clean and res-use the patterned wafer more often and thereby, saving fabrication time and resources. Finally, we illustrated the validity of this approach by creating an easy and high-speed approach to develop gold wire networks on a flexible substrate with a thin deposited adhesive. These advances will not only serve as a platform to scale up the production, but also demonstrated that the fabrication method can produce metallic wire networks of different scale and onto a variety of substrates.

  19. Ozone reaction with clothing and its initiated particle generation in an environmental chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Guo, Bing; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Zhang, Jianshun; Pei, Jingjing; Chen, Qingyan

    2013-10-01

    Ozone-initiated chemistry in indoor air can produce sub-micron particles, which are potentially harmful for human health. Occupants in indoor spaces constitute potential sites for particle generation through ozone reactions with human skin and clothing. This investigation conducted chamber experiments to examine particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing (a T-shirt) under different indoor conditions. We studied the effect of various factors such as ozone concentration, relative humidity, soiling levels of T-shirt with human skin oils, and air change rate on particle generation. The results showed that ozone reactions with the T-shirt generated sub-micron particles, which were enhanced by the soiling of the T-shirt with human skin oils. In these reactions, a burst of ultrafine particles was observed about one hour after ozone injection, and then the particles grew to larger sizes. The particle generation from the ozone reactions with the soiled T-shirt was significantly affected by the different factors studied and these reactions were identified as another potential source for indoor ultrafine particles.

  20. Organic solar cells with submicron-thick polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungsoo; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2010-09-01

    We report the viability of organic solar cells with submicron-thick bulk heterojunction films, which were fabricated by mixing poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester at a solid concentration of 90 mg/ml. To elucidate the physics behind the thick film solar cells, optical transmittance and electrical characteristics were compared for film thicknesses between 520 and 1000 nm. Results showed that the device (520 nm thick film; efficiency=3.68%) exhibited similar performance to that of a control device (170 nm thick). A decreasing device performance was measured for much thicker films (efficiency=0.34% for the 1000 nm thick device).

  1. Submicron optical waveguides and microring resonators fabricated by selective oxidation of tantalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Payam; Ma, Jichi; Khan, Saeed; Chiles, Jeff; Fathpour, Sasan

    2013-03-25

    Submicron tantalum pentoxide ridge and channel optical waveguides and microring resonators are demonstrated on silicon substrates by selective oxidation of the refractory metal, tantalum. The novel method eliminates the surface roughness problem normally introduced during dry etching of waveguide sidewalls and also simplifies fabrication of directional couplers. It is shown that the measured propagation loss is independent of the waveguide structure and thereby limited by the material loss of tantalum pentoxide in waveguides core regions. The achieved microring resonators have cross-sectional dimensions of ~600 nm × ~500 nm, diameters as small as 80 µm with a quality, Q, factor of 4.5 × 10(4), and a finesse of 120.

  2. Stochastic process variation in deep-submicron CMOS circuits and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zjajo, Amir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most notable features of nanometer scale CMOS technology is the increasing magnitude of variability of the key device parameters affecting performance of integrated circuits. The growth of variability can be attributed to multiple factors, including the difficulty of manufacturing control, the emergence of new systematic variation-generating mechanisms, and most importantly, the increase in atomic-scale randomness, where device operation must be described as a stochastic process. In addition to wide-sense stationary stochastic device variability and temperature variation, existence of non-stationary stochastic electrical noise associated with fundamental processes in integrated-circuit devices represents an elementary limit on the performance of electronic circuits. In an attempt to address these issues, Stochastic Process Variation in Deep-Submicron CMOS: Circuits and Algorithms offers unique combination of mathematical treatment of random process variation, electrical noise and temperature and ne...

  3. The fabrication of integrated carbon pipes with sub-micron diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. M.; Murray, T.; Bau, H. H.

    2005-08-01

    A method for fabricating integrated carbon pipes (nanopipettes) of sub-micron diameters and tens of microns in length is demonstrated. The carbon pipes are formed from a template consisting of the tip of a pulled alumino-silicate glass capillary coated with carbon deposited from a vapour phase. This method renders carbon nanopipettes without the need for ex situ assembly and facilitates parallel production of multiple carbon-pipe devices. An electric-field-driven transfer of ions in a KCl solution through the integrated carbon pipes exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) curves, markedly different from the Ohmic I-V curves observed in glass pipettes under similar conditions. The filling of the nanopipette with fluorescent suspension is also demonstrated.

  4. EQUIPMENT FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF SILICON WAFERS SUBMICRON TOPOLOGY DURING THE FABRICATION OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Chizhik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using an atomic force microscopy in manufacturing of submicron integrated circuits are described. The possibilities of characterizing the surface morphology and the etching profile for silicon substrate and bus lines, estimation of the periodicity and size of bus lines, geometrical stability for elementary bus line are shown. Methods of optical and atomic force microcopies are combined in one diagnostic unit. Scanning  probe  microscope  (SPM  200  is  designed  and  produced.  Complex  SPM  200  realizes  nondestructive control of microelectronics elements made on silicon wafers up to 200 mm in diameter and it is introduced by JSC «Integral» for the purpose of operational control, metrology and acceptance of the final product.

  5. Pressing induced polymorphic phase transition in submicron-sized gamma-HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David; Lee, Kien-Yin

    2007-06-01

    Submicron HMX has been produced and characterized to be less sensitive than impact standard HMX in small-scale sensitivity tests. The sm-HMX was found to be the gamma polymorph and to be stable under ambient conditions for at least a year. Pressing of sm-HMX in a small diameter pellet press at pressures from 10 000 psi to 31 000 psi and 1 to 5 minute hold times was found to promote the gamma to beta polymorphic phase transition. The fraction converted and rate of conversion versus time after pellet removal from the press were found to fit a sigmoidal curve, indicating nucleation and growth as a possible polymorphic transition mechanism.

  6. A 45 nm Stacked CMOS Image Sensor Process Technology for Submicron Pixel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Seiji; Huang, Yi-Min; Sze, Jhy-Jyi; Wu, Tung-Ting; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Hsu, Wei-Cheng; Tseng, Tung-Hsiung; Liao, King; Kuo, Chin-Chia; Chen, Tzu-Hsiang; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Chuang, Chun-Hao; Chou, Keng-Yu; Chung, Chi-Hsien; Chou, Kuo-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Hsien; Wang, Chuan-Joung; Yaung, Dun-Nien

    2017-12-05

    A submicron pixel's light and dark performance were studied by experiment and simulation. An advanced node technology incorporated with a stacked CMOS image sensor (CIS) is promising in that it may enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrated a low dark current of 3.2 e-/s at 60 °C, an ultra-low read noise of 0.90 e-·rms, a high full well capacity (FWC) of 4100 e-, and blooming of 0.5% in 0.9 μm pixels with a pixel supply voltage of 2.8 V. In addition, the simulation study result of 0.8 μm pixels is discussed.

  7. Trends and sources of ozone and sub-micron aerosols at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory during 2004-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Jaffe, D. A.; Hee, J.

    2016-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) and airborne particles have significant impacts on human health and the environment. The Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO, 2.8 km a.s.l.) in Central Oregon, USA, now has one of the longest continuous free tropospheric records of O3, CO and aerosols in North America. In this study, we report on sources and trends of O3 and sub-micron aerosol scattering at MBO for 2004-2015. For O3, the seasonal cycle shows a bimodal pattern with peaks in April and July, while aerosol scattering (σsp) is lognormally distributed with a very high average in August and a smaller maximum in May. Mean O3 concentrations show a positive and significant trend in all seasons except winter, with an increase of approximately 0.6 ppb/year. This trend appears to be driven by Asian pollution in spring and regional wildfires in summer. For aerosol scattering, we see a significant increase only in summer, driven by recent increases in wildfire activity in the western US. Monthly criteria for isolating free troposphere (FT) and boundary layer (BL) air masses at MBO were obtained based on comparison of MBO water vapor (WV) distributions to those of Salem (SLE) and Medford (MFR), Oregon at equivalent pressure level. In all seasons, FT O3 is, on average, higher than BL O3, but the seasonal patterns are rather similar. For σsp the mean in summer is significantly higher than the FT, indicating the importance of regional wildfire smoke. We have identified four types of air masses that impact O3, CO and aerosols: Asian long range transport (ALRT), regional wildfires, regional industrial pollution, and upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) intrusions. Over the 12 years of observations, we have identified 204 individual plume events based on the criteria of 8 consecutive polluted hours with elevated σsp, O3 or CO. Multi-pollutant correlations and backward trajectories were used to differentiate background source categories. A series of enhancement ratios (ERs) including

  8. Seasonal variations in high time-resolved chemical compositions, sources, and evolution of atmospheric submicron aerosols in the megacity Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Hu, Min; Hu, Wei-Wei; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wu, Yusheng; Guo, Song

    2017-08-01

    A severe regional haze problem in the megacity Beijing and surrounding areas, caused by fast formation and growth of fine particles, has attracted much attention in recent years. In order to investigate the secondary formation and aging process of urban aerosols, four intensive campaigns were conducted in four seasons between March 2012 and March 2013 at an urban site in Beijing (116.31° E, 37.99° N). An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed to measure non-refractory chemical components of submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). The average mass concentrations of PM1 (NR-PM1+black carbon) were 45.1 ± 45.8, 37.5 ± 31.0, 41.3 ± 42.7, and 81.7 ± 72.4 µg m-3 in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. Organic aerosol (OA) was the most abundant component in PM1, accounting for 31, 33, 44, and 36 % seasonally, and secondary inorganic aerosol (SNA, sum of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) accounted for 59, 57, 43, and 55 % of PM1 correspondingly. Based on the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF), the sources of OA were obtained, including the primary ones of hydrocarbon-like (HOA), cooking (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) and coal combustion OA (CCOA), and secondary component oxygenated OA (OOA). OOA, which can be split into more-oxidized (MO-OOA) and less-oxidized OOA (LO-OOA), accounted for 49, 69, 47, and 50 % in four seasons, respectively. Totally, the fraction of secondary components (OOA+SNA) contributed about 60-80 % to PM1, suggesting that secondary formation played an important role in the PM pollution in Beijing, and primary sources were also non-negligible. The evolution process of OA in different seasons was investigated with multiple metrics and tools. The average carbon oxidation states and other metrics show that the oxidation state of OA was the highest in summer, probably due to both strong photochemical and aqueous-phase oxidations. It was indicated by the good correlations

  9. Highly transparent poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-acryloisobutyl POSS) for 100 μm-thick submicron patterns with an aspect ratio over 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanghyun; Yu, Sunyoung; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Taegeon; Kim, Sang-Min; Kang, Se-Young; Han, Seung Min; Jang, Ji-Hyun

    2017-07-18

    This is the first report on the fabrication of defect-free submicron structures with more than 100 μm thickness and an aspect ratio over 100. Highly transparent poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-acryloisobutyl POSS) (PGP) was synthesized via radical polymerization. The mechanical properties of the PGP submicron structure displayed a Young's modulus of 6.09 GPa and a hardness of 0.16 GPa, 4.2 and 8 times, respectively, than those of SU8 nanopatterns. These enhancements enable the utilization of ultrathick 2D-/3D-submicron structures as an ideal platform for microelectromechanical systems, big data storage systems, energy devices, etc.

  10. Molecular Diversity of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles: Impact of Ocean Biology on Particle Composition and Hygroscopicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Laskina, Olga; Trueblood, Jonathan; Estillore, Armando D.; Morris, Holly S.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Sultana, Camile M.; Lee, Christopher; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Dowling, Jackie; Qin, Zhen; Cappa, Christopher; Bertram, Timothy; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Stone, Elizabeth; Prather, Kimberly; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of sea spray aerosol (SSA) on climate depends on the size and chemical composition of individual particles that make-up the total SSA ensemble. While the organic fraction of SSA has been characterized from a bulk perspective, there remains a lack of understanding as to the composition of individual particles within the SSA ensemble. To better understand the molecular components within SSA particles and how SSA composition changes with ocean biology, simultaneous measurements of seawater and SSA were made during a month-long mesocosm experiment performed in an ocean-atmosphere facility. Herein, we deconvolute the composition of freshly emitted SSA devoid of anthropogenic and terrestrial influences by characterizing classes of organic compounds as well as specific molecules within individual SSA particles. Analysis of SSA particles show that the diversity of molecules within the organic fraction varies between two size fractions (submicron and supermicron) with contributions from fatty acids, monosaccharides, polysaccharides and siliceous material. Significant changes in the distribution of these compounds within individual particles are observed to coincide with the rise and fall of phytoplankton and bacterial populations within the seawater. Furthermore, water uptake is impacted as shown by hygroscopicity measurements of model systems composed of representative organic compounds. Thus, the how changes in the hygroscopic growth of SSA evolves with composition can be elucidated. Overall, this study provides an important connection between biological processes that control the composition of seawater and changes in single particle composition which will enhances our ability to predict the impact of SSA on climate.

  11. Variations in the chemical composition of the submicron aerosol and in the sources of the organic fraction at a regional background site of the Po Valley (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bressi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fine particulate matter (PM levels and resulting impacts on human health are in the Po Valley (Italy among the highest in Europe. To build effective PM abatement strategies, it is necessary to characterize fine PM chemical composition, sources and atmospheric processes on long timescales (> months, with short time resolution (< day, and with particular emphasis on the predominant organic fraction. Although previous studies have been conducted in this region, none of them addressed all these aspects together. For the first time in the Po Valley, we investigate the chemical composition of nonrefractory submicron PM (NR-PM1 with a time resolution of 30 min at the regional background site of Ispra during 1 full year, using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM under the most up-to-date and stringent quality assurance protocol. The identification of the main components of the organic fraction is made using the Multilinear-Engine 2 algorithm implemented within the latest version of the SoFi toolkit. In addition, with the aim of a potential implementation of ACSM measurements in European air quality networks as a replacement of traditional filter-based techniques, parallel multiple offline analyses were carried out to assess the performance of the ACSM in the determination of PM chemical species regulated by air quality directives. The annual NR-PM1 level monitored at the study site (14.2 µg m−3 is among the highest in Europe and is even comparable to levels reported in urban areas like New York City and Tokyo. On the annual basis, submicron particles are primarily composed of organic aerosol (OA, 58 % of NR-PM1. This fraction was apportioned into oxygenated OA (OOA, 66 %, hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 11 % of OA and biomass burning OA (BBOA, 23 %. Among the primary sources of OA, biomass burning (23 % is thus bigger than fossil fuel combustion (11 %. Significant contributions of aged secondary organic aerosol (OOA

  12. Particle detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Introduction, interaction of radiation with matter measurement of momentum of charged particles, of energy of e/gamma, hadrons, identification of particles. Design of HEP detectors. Principle of operation and performance of tracking sub-detectors, calorimeters and muon system.

  13. Assessment of the diffusion battery for determining low concentration submicron aerosol distributions in microelectronics clean rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, B.R.; Donovan, R.P.; Ensor, D.S.; Caviness, A.L.

    Traditional particle size determinations for aerosols below 0.1 ..mu..m diameter have been made by both electrical mobility and diffusional methods. Difficulties in determining particle size spectra in the sub-0.1-..mu..m diameter range arise when air from microelectronics manufacturing cleanrooms is sampled because of the low concentration of particulates and the low sampling rates of currently available instruments. Previously reported data indicate that the differential electrical mobility method does not provide reliable aerosol distributions for concentrations below about 1 particle/cm/sup 3/. Laboratory and operating cleanroom measurements with the collimated hole diffusion battery gave particle distributions spanning the range from about 0.001 particles/cm/sup 3/ to 1 x 10/sup 5/ particles/cm/sup 3/. The low concentration particle spectra in cleanrooms at rest showed peak aerosol concentrations at about 0.1 ..mu..m with few particles at sizes below this peak.

  14. Particle size distribution effects on gas-particle mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Previous analyses have shown that the dominant mass transfer mechanism responsible for mercury capture within ESPs is gas-particle mass transfer during particulate collection. Whereas previous analyses assumed dispersions of uniform size, the present analysis reveals the effects of polydispersity on both gas-particle mass transfer and particle collection within an ESP. The analysis reveals that the idealized monodisperse particle size distribution provides the highest gas-particle mass transfer but results in the lowest particle collection efficiency (% mass). As the particle size distribution broadens, gas-particle mass transfer decreases and particle collection efficiency increases. The results suggest that more than just reporting mean particle diameter provided by the sorbent manufacturer, pilot- and field-tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control need to experimentally measure the particle size distribution of the sorbent as it is injected in order to facilitate interpretation of their results.

  15. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  16. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  17. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    becomes more likely when the particles are new and rough, but also after they have been through many collisions. Experiment 2: To create an even higher collision density and to understand the collective behaviour of these ice particles, a sample of them were placed to cover the tray of an electromagnetic shaker, mounted in an environment controlled chamber at -2°C. Continuous shaking of this system permitted observation of a spontaneous transition from dry granular behaviour to that of wetted granules. Vibrating with a fixed acceleration, image sequences were recorded every 10 min to show that at early stage (<15min) the particles adopted the dry granular flow (particles are free to bounce on the vibrating plate). After circa 40 min 90% particles became spontaneously immobile in an approximately hexagonally packed 2 dimensional sheet.

  18. Spectral photosensitivity of an organic semiconductor in a submicron metal grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L. M., E-mail: lev39blinov@gmail.com; Lazarev, V. V.; Yudin, S. G.; Palto, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The photoelectric effect in films of the copper phthalocyanine organic semiconductor (α-CuPc) has been experimentally studied for two fundamentally different geometries. A sample in the first, normal geometry is fabricated in the form of a sandwich with an α-CuPc film between a transparent SnO{sub 2} electrode on a substrate and an upper reflecting Al electrode. In the second case of the planar geometry, the semiconductor is deposited on the substrate with a system of submicron chromium interdigital electrodes. It has been found that the effective photoconductivity in the planar geometry is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that in the normal geometry. In addition to the classical model (without excitons), a simple exciton model has been proposed within which a relation has been obtained between the probability of the formation of electron–hole pairs and the characteristic recombination and dissociation times of excitons. An increase in the photoconductivity in the planar geometry has been explained within the exciton model by an increase in the rate of dissociation of excitons into electron–hole pairs owing to acceptor oxygen molecules, which diffuse more efficiently into the film in the case of the planar geometry where the upper electrode is absent.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and anti-tumor effect of low density lipoprotein peptide conjugated submicron emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Miao, Jinhong; Sun, Pengchao; Liang, Qian; Hua, Haiying; Xu, Yusheng; Zhao, Yongxing

    2016-08-01

    Docetaxel (Doc) is a potent chemotherapy for cancer but its application is limited by poor water solubility and high risk of side effects. To improve these issues, low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) targeted peptide-RLT (CEKLKEAFRLTRKRGLKLA) modified Docetaxel-loaded submicron emulsions (RLT-DocSEs) had been developed. Docetaxel-loaded SEs (DocSEs) and cationic DocSEs (DocCSEs) were also prepared for comparison. To evaluate the tumor-targeting ability and anti-tumor efficacy, DocSEs, DocCSEs, and RLT-DocSEs were administrated intravenously to rats respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters of three formulations were significantly different. In vivo distribution study was conducted in mice and the results indicated that RLT-DocSEs possessed increased tumor targeting ability than DocSEs and DocCSEs. RLT-DocSEs also resulted in a higher tumor inhibition rate and a better anti-tumor efficacy in mice. All the results suggested that RLT-DocSEs could be a potential formulation for the injection of Doc with enhanced tumor targeting and anti-tumor efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Sub-micron Hard X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Synthetic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Aryal, Baikuntha P.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Paunesku, Tatjana; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (SXFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurement such as μ-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used SXFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L3 or L2 edge as well as lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope 242Pu. Elemental maps reveal that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions for an average 202 μm2 cell is 1.4 fg Pu/cell or 2.9 × 10−20 moles Pu/μm2, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge SXFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its Lα X-ray emission. PMID:22444530

  1. Mechanically Robust, Stretchable Solar Absorbers with Submicron-Thick Multilayer Sheets for Wearable and Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Jung, Dae-Han; Kil, Tae-Hyeon; Kim, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Ki-Suk; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Choi, Won Jun; Baik, Jeong Min

    2017-05-31

    A facile method to fabricate a mechanically robust, stretchable solar absorber for stretchable heat generation and an enhanced thermoelectric generator (TEG) is demonstrated. This strategy is very simple: it uses a multilayer film made of titanium and magnesium fluoride optimized by a two-dimensional finite element frequency-domain simulation, followed by the application of mechanical stresses such as bending and stretching to the film. This process produces many microsized sheets with submicron thickness (∼500 nm), showing great adhesion to any substrates such as fabrics and polydimethylsiloxane. It exhibits a quite high light absorption of approximately 85% over a wavelength range of 0.2-4.0 μm. Under 1 sun illumination, the solar absorber on various stretchable substrates increased the substrate temperature to approximately 60 °C, irrespective of various mechanical stresses such as bending, stretching, rubbing, and even washing. The TEG with the absorber on the top surface also showed an enhanced output power of 60%, compared with that without the absorber. With an incident solar radiation flux of 38.3 kW/m 2 , the output power significantly increased to 24 mW/cm 2 because of the increase in the surface temperature to 141 °C.

  2. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Jaung, Jae Yun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  3. Size effects in piezoelectric cantilevers at submicron thickness levels due to flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Adriane G.; Erturk, Alper

    2017-04-01

    In elastic dielectrics, piezoelectricity is the response of polarization to applied mechanical strain, and vice versa. Piezoelectric coupling is controlled by a third-rank tensor and is allowed only in materials that are non-centrosymmetric. Flexoelectricity, however, is the generation of electric polarization by the application of a non-uniform mechanical strain field, i.e. a strain gradient, and is expected to be pronounced at submicron thickness levels, especially at the nano-scale. Flexoelectricity is controlled by a fourth-rank tensor and is therefore allowed in materials of any symmetry. As a gradient effect, flexoelectricity is size dependent, while piezoelectric coupling has no size dependence. Any ordinary piezoelectric cantilever model developed for devices above micron-level thickness has to be modified for nano-scale piezoelectric devices since the effect of flexoelectric coupling will change the electroelastic dynamics at such small scales. In this work, we establish and explore a complete analytical framework by accounting for both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects. The focus is placed on the development of governing electroelastodynamic piezoelectric-flexoelectric equations for the problems of energy harvesting, sensing, and actuation. The coupled governing equations are analyzed to obtain the frequency response. The coupling coefficient for the bimorph configuration is identified and its size dependence is explored.

  4. Fabrication of micron and submicron gratings by using plasma treatment on the curved polydimethylsiloxane surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiangtao; Tang, Jun; Guo, Hao; Liu, Wenyao; Shen, Chong; Liu, Jun; Qin, Li

    2017-10-01

    Here, a simple and low-cost fabrication strategy to efficiently construct well-ordered micron and submicron gratings on polymeric substrates by oxygen plasma treatment is reported. The Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate is prepared on the polyethylene (PET) by spin-coating method, then the curved PDMS-PET substrates are processed in oxygen plasma. After appropriate surface treatment time in plasma the curved substrates are flattened, and well-ordered wrinkling shape gratings are obtained, due to the mechanical buckling instability. It is also demonstrated that changing the curvature radius of PDMS-PET substrates and the time of plasma treatment, the period of the wrinkling patterns and the amplitude of grating also change accordingly. It is found the period of the wrinkling patterns increased with the radius of curvature; while the amplitude decreased with that. It also shows good optical performance in transmittance diffraction testing experiments. Thus the well-ordered grating approach may further develop portable and economical applications and offer a valuable method to fabricate other optical micro strain gauges devices.

  5. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. Ultrathin oxides for the SCM analysis of sub-micron doping profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciampolini, Lorenzo; Bertin, F.; Hartmann, J.M.; Rochat, N.; Holliger, Ph.; Laugier, F.; Chabli, A

    2003-09-15

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) have been used to characterize oxides used for the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) technique. SCM has been used to study boron and phosphorous doped Si test structures epitaxially grown on (100) Si substrates. SCM samples have one-dimensional (1D) doping profiles with sub-micron features, with staircase-like steps in the unipolar sample and a smoother profile in the bipolar sample, as obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiling. Cross-sectional SCM results obtained on samples oxidized by the standard low-temperature UV-ozone method are presented, discussed and compared to results obtained on cleaved samples oxidized by a simple exposure to air. The results show that the native oxide covering a (110) cleaved section may yield SCM images of sufficient quality, with no contrast reversal on a wide range of doping levels, as well as observed on sections prepared with the UV-ozone technique. However, the long-term stability of the SCM signal on native oxides is poor, and UV-ozone oxidation can be used to recover a valid SCM signal. Realistic ultrathin oxide thickness data obtained by SE on (110) substrates are presented together with ATR results, which confirm the superior quality of UV-ozone oxides with respect to other kinds of oxides.

  7. High energy density supercapacitors from lignin derived submicron activated carbon fibers in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sixiao; Zhang, Sanliang; Pan, Ning; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous submicron activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were robustly generated from low sulfonated alkali lignin and fabricated into supercapacitors for capacitive energy storage. The hydrophilic and high specific surface ACFs exhibited large-size nanographites and good electrical conductivity to demonstrate outstanding electrochemical performance. ACFs from KOH activation, in particular, showed very high 344 F g-1 specific capacitance at low 1.8 mg cm-2 mass loading and 10 mV s-1 scan rate in aqueous electrolytes. Even at relatively high scan rate of 50 mV s-1 and mass loading of 10 mg cm-2, a decent specific capacitance of 196 F g-1 and a remarkable areal capacitance of 0.55 F cm-2 was obtained, leading to high energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 based on averaged electrodes mass. Furthermore, over 96% capacitance retention rates were achieved after 5000 charge/discharge cycles. Such excellent performance demonstrated great potential of lignin derived carbons for electrical energy storage.

  8. Assessment of intrinsic small signal parameters of submicron SiC MESFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Mohammad; Ahmed, Muhammad Mansoor; Rafique, Umair; Ahmed, Umer Farooq

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a tech