WorldWideScience

Sample records for submicron metal oxide

  1. A Novel Step-Doping Fully-Depleted Silicon-on-Insulator Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor for Reliable Deep Sub-micron Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahipanah, Hossein; Orouji, Ali A.

    2009-11-01

    For first time, we report a novel deep sub-micron fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (FD SOI MOSFET) where the channel layer consists of two sections with a step doping (SD) region in order to increase performance and reliability of the device. This new structure that called SD FD SOI structure (SDFD-SOI MOSFET), were used for reaching suitable threshold voltage upon device scaling and reliability improvement. We demonstrate that the electric field was modified in the channel and common peak near the source junction have been reduced in the SDFD-SOI structure. The device demonstrates large enhancements in performance areas such as current drive capability, output resistance, hot-carrier reliability and threshold voltage roll-off. It was found that the device performance is very much dependent upon the SD region parameters. Simulation results show that the proposed structure improved on/off current ratio, and saturated output characteristics compared with conventional SOI structure (C-SOI MOSFET). Also, it was shown that substrate current of SDFD-SOI MOSFET is much lower than the C-SOI MOSFET which presented the lower hot-carrier degradation in proposed MOSFET. Results show that the most short-channel problems in very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI) could be solved and the proposed SDFD-SOI MOSFETs can work very well in deep sub-micron and nanoscale regime.

  2. Submicron optical waveguides and microring resonators fabricated by selective oxidation of tantalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Payam; Ma, Jichi; Khan, Saeed; Chiles, Jeff; Fathpour, Sasan

    2013-03-25

    Submicron tantalum pentoxide ridge and channel optical waveguides and microring resonators are demonstrated on silicon substrates by selective oxidation of the refractory metal, tantalum. The novel method eliminates the surface roughness problem normally introduced during dry etching of waveguide sidewalls and also simplifies fabrication of directional couplers. It is shown that the measured propagation loss is independent of the waveguide structure and thereby limited by the material loss of tantalum pentoxide in waveguides core regions. The achieved microring resonators have cross-sectional dimensions of ~600 nm × ~500 nm, diameters as small as 80 µm with a quality, Q, factor of 4.5 × 10(4), and a finesse of 120.

  3. Submicron and nano formulations of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide stimulate unique cellular toxicological responses in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Cindy, E-mail: c.gunawan@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Sirimanoonphan, Aunchisa [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Teoh, Wey Yang [Clean Energy and Nanotechnology (CLEAN) Laboratory, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Marquis, Christopher P., E-mail: c.marquis@unsw.edu.au [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Amal, Rose [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Uptake of TiO{sub 2} solids by C. reinhardtii generates ROS as an early stress response. • Submicron and nanoTiO{sub 2} exhibit benign effect on cell proliferation. • Uptake of ZnO solids and leached zinc by C. reinhardtii inhibit the alga growth. • No cellular oxidative stress is detected with submicron and nano ZnO exposure. • The toxicity of particles is not necessarily mediated by cellular oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The work investigates the eco-cytoxicity of submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} and ZnO, arising from the unique interactions of freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to soluble and undissolved components of the metal oxides. In a freshwater medium, submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exist as suspended aggregates with no-observable leaching. Submicron and nano ZnO undergo comparable concentration-dependent fractional leaching, and exist as dissolved zinc and aggregates of undissolved ZnO. Cellular internalisation of solid TiO{sub 2} stimulates cellular ROS generation as an early stress response. The cellular redox imbalance was observed for both submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exposure, despite exhibiting benign effects on the alga proliferation (8-day EC50 > 100 mg TiO{sub 2}/L). Parallel exposure of C. reinhardtii to submicron and nano ZnO saw cellular uptake of both the leached zinc and solid ZnO and resulting in inhibition of the alga growth (8-day EC50 ≥ 0.01 mg ZnO/L). Despite the sensitivity, no zinc-induced cellular ROS generation was detected, even at 100 mg ZnO/L exposure. Taken together, the observations confront the generally accepted paradigm of cellular oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity of particles. The knowledge of speciation of particles and the corresponding stimulation of unique cellular responses and cytotoxicity is vital for assessment of the environmental implications of these materials.

  4. Rapid heterogeneous oxidation of organic coatings on submicron aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C. Y.; Browne, E. C.; Sugrue, R. A.; Kroll, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Laboratory studies have found that heterogeneous oxidation can affect the composition and loading of atmospheric organic aerosol particles over time scales of several days, but most studies have examined pure organic particles only. In this study, in order to probe the reactivity of organic species confined near the particle surface, the rates and products of the OH-initiated oxidation of pure squalane particles are compared to oxidation of thin coatings of squalane on ammonium sulfate particles. The squalane reaction rate constant shows a linear dependence on the organic surface area-to-volume ratio, with rate constants for coated particles up to 10 times larger than for pure particles. Changes in the carbon oxidation state and fraction of particulate carbon remaining show similar enhancements, implying that heterogeneous oxidation may exhibit a stronger effect on the loadings and properties of organic aerosol than previously estimated from laboratory studies.

  5. Effective Use of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) in Investigating Fundamental Mechanical Properties of Metals at the Sub-Micron Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Julia R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in the 2-beam focused ion beams technology (FIB) have enabled researchers to not only perform high-precision nanolithography and micro-machining, but also to apply these novel fabrication techniques to investigating a broad range of materials' properties at the submicron and nano-scales. In our work, the FIB is utilized in manufacturing of sub-micron cylinders, or nano-pillars, as well as of TEM cross-sections to directly investigate plasticity of metals at thes...

  6. Ultrathin oxides for the SCM analysis of sub-micron doping profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciampolini, Lorenzo; Bertin, F.; Hartmann, J.M.; Rochat, N.; Holliger, Ph.; Laugier, F.; Chabli, A

    2003-09-15

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) have been used to characterize oxides used for the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) technique. SCM has been used to study boron and phosphorous doped Si test structures epitaxially grown on (100) Si substrates. SCM samples have one-dimensional (1D) doping profiles with sub-micron features, with staircase-like steps in the unipolar sample and a smoother profile in the bipolar sample, as obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiling. Cross-sectional SCM results obtained on samples oxidized by the standard low-temperature UV-ozone method are presented, discussed and compared to results obtained on cleaved samples oxidized by a simple exposure to air. The results show that the native oxide covering a (110) cleaved section may yield SCM images of sufficient quality, with no contrast reversal on a wide range of doping levels, as well as observed on sections prepared with the UV-ozone technique. However, the long-term stability of the SCM signal on native oxides is poor, and UV-ozone oxidation can be used to recover a valid SCM signal. Realistic ultrathin oxide thickness data obtained by SE on (110) substrates are presented together with ATR results, which confirm the superior quality of UV-ozone oxides with respect to other kinds of oxides.

  7. Role of carboxylate ion and metal oxidation state on the morphology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sub-micron rods and spheres of cobalt succinate sesquihydrate and iron succinate trihydrate/pentahydrate respectively have been synthesized by the reverse micellar route. These precursors are an excellent source for the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles. Cubes of (edge length ∼ 150 nm) Fe3O4 and ...

  8. Physical properties of an oxide photoresist film for submicron pattern lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Donyau [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 30076, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chun-Ming [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shi-Wei [Nano Science Group, Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu, 30076, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chin-Tien [Nanotechnology Research Center, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, 31040, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Wen-Jeng [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-02

    The minimum etched pits of 300 nm diameter and the trenches of 300 nm width with a 50 nm depth for both geometries are prepared in the GeSbSn oxide photoresist on the silicon substrates. The lithographic patterns are recorded by direct laser writing, using a 405 nm laser diode and 0.9 numerical aperture media disc mastering system. The developed pit diameters in an inorganic oxide photoresist are smaller than the exposed laser beam spot diameter due to thermal lithography. The crystal structures of the as-sputtered and the annealed powder samples scraped from the sputtered films are examined by X-ray diffractometer. The effect of the heating rate on the crystallization temperatures is evaluated by a differential scanning calorimeter and the crystallization activation energy is determined from Kissinger's plot. The optical and absorption characteristics of the oxides are strongly dependent on the oxygen flow rate during the reactive magnetron sputtering process. The transmittance of the deposited films increases and the absorption decreases with increasing oxygen flow rate, which implies that at high oxygen flow rate, the film resembles dielectric material. The oxygen flow rate during the deposition process is defined within a limited range to obtain the proper extinction coefficient. The working extinction coefficients of the films ranging from 0.5 to 0.8 are applied in this study to achieve the sharp and vertical edge of the etched pits and trenches of 50 nm depth. - Highlights: • A photoresist layer consisting GeSbSnO with submicron patterning for optical device applications. • The thermal, optical properties and crystallization behaviors are reported. • A better working extinction coefficient ranges are decided experimentally. • The ranges define minimum size of the etched marks with smooth boundary. • Thermal lithography concept is introduced to explain experimental results.

  9. Neurotoxicity of low-dose repeatedly intranasal instillation of nano- and submicron-sized ferric oxide particles in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bing; Feng Weiyue, E-mail: fengwy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Zhu Motao; Wang Yun; Wang Meng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Gu Yiqun [Maternity Hospital of Haidian District (China); Ouyang Hong; Wang Huajian; Li Ming; Zhao Yuliang, E-mail: zhaoyuliang@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Chai Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Wang Haifang [Peking University, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China)

    2009-01-15

    Olfactory tract has been demonstrated to be an important portal for inhaled solid nanoparticle transportation into the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously demonstrated that intranasally instilled Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could transport into the CNS via olfactory pathway. In this study, we investigated the neurotoxicity and size effect of repeatedly low-dose (130 {mu}g) intranasal exposure of nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (21 nm and 280 nm) to mice. The biomarkers of oxidative stress, activity of nitric oxide synthases and release of monoamine neurotransmitter in the brain were studied. Our results showed that significant oxidative stress was induced by the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The activities of GSH-Px, Cu,Zn-SOD, and cNOS significantly elevated and the total GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio significantly decreased in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus after the nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle treatment (p < 0.05). The nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally induced greater alteration and more significant dose-effect response than the submicron-sized particle did. Some slight perturbation of monoamine neurotransmitters were found in the hippocampus after exposure to the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle. The TEM image showed that some ultrastructural alterations in nerve cells, including neurodendron degeneration, membranous structure disruption and lysosome increase in the olfactory bulb, slight dilation in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome increase in the hippocampus were induced by the nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment. In contrast, in the submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treated mice, slightly swollen mitochondria and some vacuoles were observed in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, respectively. These results indicate that intranasal exposure of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could induce more severe oxidative stress and nerve cell damage in the brain than the

  10. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  11. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  12. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  13. Annual trends in occurrence of submicron particles in ambient air and health risk posed by particle bound metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhar, Saifi; Goel, Anubha; Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Risk analysis is highly important in toxicology and public health studies. Health risk related to exposure to toxic metals of PM1 was assessed. Concentrations of 13 heavy metals, adsorbed to submicron particulate matter PM1 were experimentally examined but only 12 metals were found at detectable levels inside IIT Kanpur campus in 2008-2009 for all months excluding June and October. A total of 90 samples collected for 8 h sampling time by a single stage round nozzle, grease impaction substrate based impactor type PM1 sampler were analysed by ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry). Results showed daily average PM1 concentration is 102.46 ± 35.9 μg/m(3) and metal concentration followed the trend: Ca > Fe > Mg > Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Ni > Se > Cd > V > As. Contamination level assessment using geo-accumulation index showed Ca, Fe and Mg exhibited non contamination whereas metals like Cr, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, Se, Ni and Cu exhibited ranges from moderate to extreme contamination. Ingestion is found to be the major exposure pathway for heavy metals. Non-carcinogenic health risk assessment for Pb, Cd and Cr (HI > 1) signified strong chances of adverse impact on children whereas adults are well under safe limit. Cancer Risk for adults and children followed the same decreasing order, Cr(VI)>Cd > Ni > As > Pb. It was found to be higher than permissible limits (10(-6)) for adults and children both. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectral photosensitivity of an organic semiconductor in a submicron metal grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L. M., E-mail: lev39blinov@gmail.com; Lazarev, V. V.; Yudin, S. G.; Palto, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The photoelectric effect in films of the copper phthalocyanine organic semiconductor (α-CuPc) has been experimentally studied for two fundamentally different geometries. A sample in the first, normal geometry is fabricated in the form of a sandwich with an α-CuPc film between a transparent SnO{sub 2} electrode on a substrate and an upper reflecting Al electrode. In the second case of the planar geometry, the semiconductor is deposited on the substrate with a system of submicron chromium interdigital electrodes. It has been found that the effective photoconductivity in the planar geometry is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that in the normal geometry. In addition to the classical model (without excitons), a simple exciton model has been proposed within which a relation has been obtained between the probability of the formation of electron–hole pairs and the characteristic recombination and dissociation times of excitons. An increase in the photoconductivity in the planar geometry has been explained within the exciton model by an increase in the rate of dissociation of excitons into electron–hole pairs owing to acceptor oxygen molecules, which diffuse more efficiently into the film in the case of the planar geometry where the upper electrode is absent.

  15. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  16. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  17. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  18. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  19. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  20. Ni-functionalized submicron mesoporous silica particles as a sorbent for metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyukov, Dmitry A; Chernova, Ekaterina N; Russkikh, Yana V; Eurov, Daniil A; Sokolov, Vasily V; Bykova, Anna A; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V; Keltsieva, Olga A; Ubyivovk, Eugenii V; Anufrikov, Yuri A; Fedorova, Anna V; Selyutin, Artem A; Sukhodolov, Nicolay G; Podolskaya, Ekaterina P; Golubev, Valery G

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a novel IMAC sorbent with high specificity for chlorine-containing compounds was developed. Ni-functionalized monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles of 500±25nm diameter were synthesized and their metal affinity properties were studied with the use of diclofenac as the model substance. The particles were aggregatively stable in the pH range of 3-12. The sorbent demonstrated a high adsorption capacity (0.60±0.06μg of DCF per 1mg of the sorbent) and high adsorption/desorption rate (20 and 5min was enough for the sorbent saturation and desorption of DCF, correspondingly). A mixture of eluents with addition of PFOS providing the almost complete recovery (98%) of diclofenac was first proposed. The monodispersity and the high sedimentation and aggregative stability of the particles provide the formation of a stable hydrosol even under ultrasound treatment which makes the mSiO2/Ni particles suitable for batch chromatography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Graphene-supported metal oxide monolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika A.; Wang, Yinmin; Ye, Jianchao; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-01-10

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, wherein the graphene sheets are coated by at least one metal oxide such as iron oxide or titanium oxide. Also provided is an electrode comprising the aforementioned graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, wherein the electrode can be substantially free of any carbon-black and substantially free of any binder.

  2. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...... of nitrogen oxides with ammonia or urea as reductant, oxidations of alcohols or aldehydes with dioxygen or air to provide aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids, and photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)....

  3. Role of ammonium ion and transition metals in the formation of secondary organic aerosol and metallo-organic complex within fog processed ambient deliquescent submicron particles collected in central part of Indo-Gangetic Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-08-01

    In this study we observed the role of ammonium ion (NH4+) and transition metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, and Cu) present in ambient submicron particles in stabilizing and enhancing the yield of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). A good correlation of WSOC with transition metals and NH4+ was found (R2 = 0.87 and 0.71), respectively within foggy episode collected ambient PM1 (particles having aerodynamic diameter ≤1.0 μm) suggesting plausibleness of alternate oxidation (primarily various carbonyls into their respective organic acids, esters and other derivatives.) and aging mechanisms. Molar concentration of ammonium ion was observed to be exceeded over and above to require in neutralizing the sulphate and nitrate which further hints its role in the neutralization, stabilization and enhancement of subset of WSOC such as water soluble organic acids. Transition metals were further apportioned using enrichment factor analysis. The source of Fe, Mn, and Cr was found to be crustal and Cu was tagged to anthropogenic origin. This study also described the plausible role of significant predictors (Fe and Cu) in the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through effect of Fenton chemistry. Mass-to-charge ratio of identified oxalic acid from our published recent field study (carried out from same sampling location) was used for understanding the possible metallo-organic complex with Fe supports the substantial role of Fe in SOA formation in the deliquescent submicron particles facilitated by aqueous-phase chemistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  5. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1993-12-31

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  6. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Mendoza, Daniel [Santa Fe, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  8. Nanocrystalline Metal Oxides for Methane Sensors: Role of Noble Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane is an important gas for domestic and industrial applications and its source is mainly coalmines. Since methane is extremely inflammable in the coalmine atmosphere, it is essential to develop a reliable and relatively inexpensive chemical gas sensor to detect this inflammable gas below its explosion amount in air. The metal oxides have been proved to be potential materials for the development of commercial gas sensors. The functional properties of the metal oxide-based gas sensors can be improved not only by tailoring the crystal size of metal oxides but also by incorporating the noble metal catalyst on nanocrystalline metal oxide matrix. It was observed that the surface modification of nanocrystalline metal oxide thin films by noble metal sensitizers and the use of a noble metal catalytic contact as electrode reduce the operating temperatures appreciably and improve the sensing properties. This review article concentrates on the nanocrystalline metal oxide methane sensors and the role of noble metals on the sensing properties.

  9. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets

  11. Three-dimensional Hierarchical Metal oxide-Carbon Electrode Material for High Efficient Microbial Electrosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Mengmeng; Nie, Huarong; Zhang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    pore structure in a microwave oven is demonstrated. Microwave pyrolysis of ferrocene using carbon felt as a microwave absorber, a method that is rapid (tens of seconds), does not require harsh conditions nor costly equipment is utilized, and can be readily scaled up. The produced material has a high......The production of hierarchical hybrid conductive materials that are mesoporous, with pores spanning from sub-micron to microns in size, is important for large-area electrode applications. Here, a simple one-step, low-cost method to fabricate a metal oxide-carbon hybrid materials with a hierarchical...

  12. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  13. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  14. Recent developments in complex metal oxide photoelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Fatwa F.; Berglund, Sean P.

    2017-05-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting, a process that directly produces hydrogen from water and sunlight using semiconductor materials, is an attractive form of renewable energy production. The hydrogen that is produced can be easily transported, stored, and utilized as a fuel without the emission of greenhouse gasses. However, many scientific and engineering challenges need to be overcome before PEC water splitting can be implemented on a large scale. One of the biggest challenges is the identification of suitable semiconductor materials to use in the construction of photoelectrodes. This topical review highlights a promising class of materials, complex metal oxides, which can be used as photoelectrodes for PEC water splitting. The advantages and limitations of complex metal oxides are first discussed, and strategies to overcome the limitations are outlined using the model case of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4), one of the highest performing complex metal oxide photoanodes reported to date. Building on the success story of BiVO4, we discuss pathways towards achieving even higher water splitting performance, including bandgap engineering as well as the development of alternative complex metal oxides with more appropriate bandgaps for obtaining high solar-to-hydrogen efficiency. Several classes of complex metal oxides (e.g. delafossites, tungstates, vanadates, spinels) are presented as promising candidates for photoelectrode materials. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the key properties of these complex metal oxides and providing an outlook towards expedited discovery of new and novel complex metal oxides for use as photoelectrodes.

  15. Catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattler, Jesper J H B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328235601; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341386405; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323171958; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2014-01-01

    A study is conducted to demonstrate catalytic dehydrogenation of light alkanes on metals and metal oxides. The study provides a complete overview of the materials used to catalyze this reaction, as dehydrogenation for the production of light olefins has become extremely relevant. Relevant factors,

  16. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2, manganese dioxide (MnO2, nickel oxides (NiO and cobalt oxide (Co3O4, have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4, and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors.

  17. High surface area, electrically conductive nanocarbon-supported metal oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Han, Thomas Yong-Jin; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cervantes, Octavio; Gash, Alexander E.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2015-07-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust.

  18. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, Michael M [Naperville, IL; Kim, Jeom-Soo [Naperville, IL; Johnson, Christopher S [Naperville, IL

    2008-01-01

    An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  19. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  20. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of different metal oxide nanostructures by simple electrolysis based oxidation of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh Pratap; Srivastava, Onkar Nath

    2009-09-01

    We report the Synthesis of different metal oxide (Cu2O, SnO2, Fe3O4 and PbO2) nanostructures by simple electrolysis based oxidation of metals (Cu, Sn, Fe and Pb). We have utilized the two electrode set up for the electrolysis and used different metal electrodes as anode and platinum as cathode. The synthesized nanomaterials were delaminated in the electrolyte. The microstructural characterization of synthesized materials in electrolytes after electrolysis at different electrode potentials revealed that the nanostructures strongly depend on the applied voltage between the electrodes. Various nanostructures (nanothreads, nanowires, nanocubes, nanotetrapods and hexagons-like) of metal oxides have been synthesized by this method. In case of copper electrode we have found nanothreads and nanowires of cuprous oxide. Tin electrode resulted nanothreads, nanotetrapod and nanocube like structures of tin oxide. Iron electrode resulted, nanowire like structures of iron oxide and lead sheet transformed into hexagon like and six petals like structures of lead oxide.

  2. Metal/Metal-Oxide Nanoclusters for Gas Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesh, Ahmad I.

    2016-01-01

    The development of gas sensors that are based on metal/metal-oxide nanoclusters has attracted intensive research interest in the last years. Nanoclusters are suitable candidates for gas sensor applications because of their large surface-to-volume ratio that can be utilized for selective and rapid detection of various gaseous species with low-power consuming electronics. Herein, nanoclusters are used as building blocks for the construction of gas sensor where the electrical conductivity of the...

  3. Oxidation-Mediated Fingering in Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Hight, David C.; O'Regan, John D.; Dickey, Michael D.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2017-10-01

    We identify and characterize a new class of fingering instabilities in liquid metals; these instabilities are unexpected due to the large interfacial tension of metals. Electrochemical oxidation lowers the effective interfacial tension of a gallium-based liquid metal alloy to values approaching zero, thereby inducing drastic shape changes, including the formation of fractals. The measured fractal dimension (D =1.3 ±0.05 ) places the instability in a different universality class than other fingering instabilities. By characterizing changes in morphology and dynamics as a function of droplet volume and applied electric potential, we identify the three main forces involved in this process: interfacial tension, gravity, and oxidative stress. Importantly, we find that electrochemical oxidation can generate compressive interfacial forces that oppose the tensile forces at a liquid interface. The surface oxide layer ultimately provides a physical and electrochemical barrier that halts the instabilities at larger positive potentials. Controlling the competition between interfacial tension and oxidative (compressive) stresses at the interface is important for the development of reconfigurable electronic, electromagnetic, and optical devices that take advantage of the metallic properties of liquid metals.

  4. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  5. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2010-06-08

    An uncycled preconditioned electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.yO.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 in which 0lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. The xLi.sub.2-yH.sub.y.xM'O.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.1-zH.sub.zMO.sub.2 material is prepared by preconditioning a precursor lithium metal oxide (i.e., xLi.sub.2M'O.sub.3.(1-x)LiMO.sub.2) with a proton-containing medium with a pH<7.0 containing an inorganic acid. Methods of preparing the electrodes are disclosed, as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

  6. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  7. Improved description of metal oxide stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Thomas Stenbæk; Olsen, Thomas; Bligaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    transition-metal oxides. The mean absolute error relative to experiments is 0.21 eV and 0.38 eV per oxygen atom for rAPBE and RPA, respectively, and thus the rAPBE method greatly improves the description of metal-oxygen bonds across a wide range of oxides. The failure of the RPA can be partly attributed...... to the lack of error cancellation between the correlation energy of the oxide on the one hand and the bulk metal and oxygen molecule on the other hand, which are all separately predicted much too negative by the RPA. We ascribe the improved performance of the rAPBE to its significantly better description...... of absolute correlation energies which reduces the need for error cancellation. The rAPBE is just one out of an entire class of renormalized exchange-correlation kernels which should be further investigated....

  8. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarata, Antonio, E-mail: cammaant@fel.cvut.cz [Department of Control Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 16627 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-05-23

    CaFeO{sub 3} is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO{sub 3}. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  9. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Antonio; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-05-01

    CaFeO3 is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO3. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  10. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  11. Multi-metal oxide ceramic nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin

    2016-06-07

    A convenient and versatile method for preparing complex metal oxides is disclosed. The method uses a low temperature, environmentally friendly gel-collection method to form a single phase nanomaterial. In one embodiment, the nanomaterial consists of Ba.sub.AMn.sub.BTi.sub.CO.sub.D in a controlled stoichiometry.

  12. The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals with sub-micron squalane particles: a model system for understanding the oxidative aging of ambient aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. D.; Kroll, J. H.; Cappa, C. D.; Che, D. L.; Liu, C. L.; Ahmed, M.; Leone, S. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2009-05-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles, in the presence of O2, is used as a model system to explore the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the oxidative aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Detailed kinetic measurements combined with elemental mass spectrometric analysis reveal that the reaction proceeds sequentially by adding an average of one oxygenated functional group per reactive loss of squalane. The reactive uptake coefficient of OH with squalane particles is determined to be 0.3±0.07 at an average OH concentration of ~1×1010 molecules cm-3. Based on a comparison between the measured particle mass and model predictions it appears that significant volatilization of a reduced organic particle would be extremely slow in the real atmosphere. However, as the aerosols become more oxygenated, volatilization becomes a significant loss channel for organic material in the particle-phase. Together these results provide a chemical framework in which to understand how heterogeneous chemistry transforms the physiochemical properties of particle-phase organic matter in the troposphere.

  13. The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals with sub-micron squalane particles: a model system for understanding the oxidative aging of ambient aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Smith

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with sub-micron squalane particles, in the presence of O2, is used as a model system to explore the fundamental chemical mechanisms that control the oxidative aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Detailed kinetic measurements combined with elemental mass spectrometric analysis reveal that the reaction proceeds sequentially by adding an average of one oxygenated functional group per reactive loss of squalane. The reactive uptake coefficient of OH with squalane particles is determined to be 0.3±0.07 at an average OH concentration of ~1×1010 molecules cm−3. Based on a comparison between the measured particle mass and model predictions it appears that significant volatilization of a reduced organic particle would be extremely slow in the real atmosphere. However, as the aerosols become more oxygenated, volatilization becomes a significant loss channel for organic material in the particle-phase. Together these results provide a chemical framework in which to understand how heterogeneous chemistry transforms the physiochemical properties of particle-phase organic matter in the troposphere.

  14. Submicron Silicon MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.

    1986-01-01

    Process for making metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) results in gate-channel lengths of only few hundred angstroms about 100 times as small as state-of-the-art devices. Gates must be shortened to develop faster MOSFET's; proposed fabrication process used to study effects of size reduction in MOS devices and eventually to build practical threedimensional structures.

  15. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  16. 3D online submicron scale observation of mixed metal powder's microstructure evolution in high temperature and microwave compound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Dong, Bo; Xiao, Yu; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT) technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37  μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  17. 40 CFR 721.5549 - Lithiated metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithiated metal oxide. 721.5549... Substances § 721.5549 Lithiated metal oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as lithiated metal oxide (LiNiO2) (PMN P-96-19...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10006 - Mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed metal oxide (generic). 721.10006... Substances § 721.10006 Mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxide (PMN P-99-511...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4610 - Mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.4610... Substances § 721.4610 Mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxides (PMN P-98-0002...

  20. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    James, D W

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including coba...

  1. Metal/Metal-Oxide Nanoclusters for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad I. Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gas sensors that are based on metal/metal-oxide nanoclusters has attracted intensive research interest in the last years. Nanoclusters are suitable candidates for gas sensor applications because of their large surface-to-volume ratio that can be utilized for selective and rapid detection of various gaseous species with low-power consuming electronics. Herein, nanoclusters are used as building blocks for the construction of gas sensor where the electrical conductivity of the nanoclusters changes dramatically upon exposure to the target gas. In this review, recent progress in the fabrication of size-selected metallic nanoclusters and their utilization for gas sensor applications is presented. Special focus will be given to the enhancement of the sensing performance through the rational functionalization and utilization of different nanocluster materials.

  2. Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2013-01-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

  3. Surface Embedded Metal Oxide Sensors (SEMOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Talat Ali, Syed; Pleth Nielsen, Lars

    SEMOS is a joint project between Aalborg University, Danish Technological Institute and Danish Technical University in which micro temperature sensors and metal oxide-based gas sensors are developed and tested in a simulated fuel cell environment as well as in actual working fuel cells. Initially......, sensors for measuring the temperatures in an operating HT-PEM (High Temperature-Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell are developed for detecting in-plane temperature variations. 5 different tracks for embedded thermal sensors are investigated. The fuel cell MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly) is quite...... complex and sensors are not easily implemented in the construction. Hence sensor interface and sensor position must therefore be chosen carefully in order to make the sensors as non-intrusive as possible. Metal Oxide Sensors (MOX) for measuring H2, O2 and CO concentration in a fuel cell environment...

  4. Topological crystalline insulators in transition metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Fiete, Gregory A

    2013-04-12

    Topological crystalline insulators possess electronic states protected by crystal symmetries, rather than time-reversal symmetry. We show that the transition metal oxides with heavy transition metals are able to support nontrivial band topology resulting from mirror symmetry of the lattice. As an example, we consider pyrochlore oxides of the form A2M2O7. As a function of spin-orbit coupling strength, we find two Z2 topological insulator phases can be distinguished from each other by their mirror Chern numbers, indicating a different topological crystalline insulators. We also derive an effective k·p Hamiltonian, similar to the model introduced for Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te, and discuss the effect of an on-site Hubbard interaction on the topological crystalline insulator phase using slave-rotor mean-field theory, which predicts new classes of topological quantum spin liquids.

  5. Metal oxide nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Ghulam Nabi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers on nanoparticles and nanostructures has received a great deal of attention not only in the area of synthesis and characterization but also in their potential application in various high-technological applications. Nanomaterials are widely used not only for environmental and biological applications but also for electronic and sensing applications. Among various classes of nanomaterials, the metal oxide nanostructures possess particular important because of their significa...

  6. Plant Response to Engineered Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2017-01-01

    All metal oxide nanoparticles influence the growth and development of plants. They generally enhance or reduce seed germination, shoot/root growth, biomass production and physiological and biochemical activities. Some plant species have not shown any physiological change, although significant variations in antioxidant enzyme activity and upregulation of heat shock protein have been observed. Plants have evolved antioxidant defence mechanism which involves enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic co...

  7. Process for Producing Metal Compounds From Graphite Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be fiber processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  8. Electrochromic device containing metal oxide nanoparticles and ultraviolet blocking material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Guillermo; Koo, Bonil; Gregoratto, Ivano; Basu, Sourav; Rosen, Evelyn; Holt, Jason; Thomsen, Scott

    2017-10-17

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant. The electrochromic device also includes nanoparticles containing one or more transparent conducting oxide (TCO), a solid state electrolyte, a counter electrode, and at least one protective layer to prevent degradation of the one or more nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) and visible radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  9. Growth and sacrificial oxidation of transition metal nanolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsarfati,; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, R.; F. Bijkerk,

    2009-01-01

    Growth and oxidation of Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu, Ru, Ni and Co layers of 0.3-4.3 nm thickness on Mo have been investigated with ARPES and AFM. Co and Ni layers oxidize while the Mo remains metallic. For nobler metals, the on top O and oxidation state of subsurface Mo increase, suggesting sacrificial e(-)

  10. Growth and sacrificial oxidation of transition metal nanolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsarfati, T.; Tsarfati, Tim; Zoethout, E.; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    Growth and oxidation of Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Cu, Ru, Ni and Co layers of 0.3–4.3 nm thickness on Mo have been investigated with ARPES and AFM. Co and Ni layers oxidize while the Mo remains metallic. For nobler metals, the on top O and oxidation state of subsurface Mo increase, suggesting sacrificial e−

  11. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachecka, Malgorzata; Lee, Christopher James; Sturm, J.M.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show

  12. Electrolysis of water on (oxidized) metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    relations are assumed to be obeyed exactly, this leads to a universal relationship between the catalytic rate and the oxygen binding energy. Finally, we conclude that for systems obeying these relations, there is a limit to how good a water splitting catalyst an oxidized metal surface can become. (c) 2005......Density functional theory calculations are used as the basis for an analysis of the electrochemical process, where by water is split to form molecular oxygen and hydrogen. We develop a method for obtaining the thermochemistry of the electrochemical water splitting process as a function of the bias...... directly from the electronic structure calculations. We consider electrodes of Pt(111) and Au(111) in detail and then discuss trends for a series of different metals. We show that the difficult step in the water splitting process is the formation of superoxy-type (OOH) species on the surface...

  13. Sustainable, Oxidative, and Metal-Free Annulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Luis; Manna, Srimanta; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2017-08-16

    Annulation has received steadily growing interest in the interplay with the increasing emphasis towards selective C-H bond functionalization reactions. Metal-free oxidative annulation through functionalization of inert and abundant C-H bonds offers great improvements in terms of atom- and step-economics as well as reduced waste production under mild reaction conditions. Annulation is considered to be a highly efficient strategy for the construction of cyclic molecules because at least two new bonds are formed within a single reaction step. The combination of annulation and direct C-H bond functionalization allows the efficient and straightforward synthesis of carbo- and heterocyclic molecules using simple and non-prefunctionalized precursors. This Concept highlights novel strategies and recent breakthroughs for metal-free annulation through C-H bond functionalization giving access to a variety of important structural motifs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Covalent bonding in heavy metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Hrovat, Dave A.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2017-04-07

    Novel theoretical methods were used to quantify the magnitude and the energetic contributions of 4f/5f-O2p and 5d/6d-O2p interactions to covalent bonding in lanthanide and actinide oxides. Although many analyses have neglected the involvement of the frontier d orbitals, the present study shows that f and d covalency are of comparable importance. Two trends are identified. As is expected, the covalent mixing is larger when the nominal oxidation state is higher. More subtly, the importance of the nf covalent mixing decreases sharply relative to (n+1)d as the nf occupation increases. Atomic properties of the metal cations that drive these trends are identified.

  15. Nanotoxicity: oxidative stress mediated toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Sil, Parames Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are often used as industrial catalysts or to improve product's functional properties. Recent advanced nanotechnology have been expected to be used in various fields, ranging from sensors, environmental remediation to biomedicine, medical biology and imaging, etc. However, the growing use of nanoparticles has led to their release into environment and increased levels of these particles at nearby sites or the surroundings of their manufacturing factories become obvious. The toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles on humans, animals, and certainly to the environment has become a major concern to our community. However, controversies still remain with respect to the toxic effects and the mechanisms of these nanoparticles. The scientific community now feels that an understanding of the toxic effects is necessary to handle these nanoparticles and their use. A new discipline, named nanotoxicology, has therefore been developed that basically refers to the study of the interactions of nanoparticles with biological systems and also measures the toxicity level related to human health. Nanoparticles usually generate reactive oxygen species to a greater extent than micro-sized particles resulting in increased pro-inflammatory reactions and oxidative stress via intracellular signaling pathways. In this review, we mainly focus on the routes of exposure of some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles and how these nanoparticles affect us or broadly the cells of our organs. We would also like to discuss the responsible mechanism(s) of the nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species mediated organ pathophysiology. A brief introduction of the characterization and application of these nanoparticles has also been included in the article.

  16. One-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures for heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Jia, Xinli; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2013-08-21

    Metal oxides are of paramount importance in heterogeneous catalysis as either supports or active phases. Controlled synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) metal oxide nanostructures has received enormous attention in heterogeneous catalysis due to the possibility of tailoring the properties of metal oxides by tuning their shapes, sizes, and compositions. This feature article highlights recent advances in shape controlled synthesis of 1D metal oxide nanostructures and their applications in heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of introducing new insights into the heterogeneous catalyst design.

  17. An improved method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns an improved method of preparation of nanoparticular vanadium oxide/anatase titania catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular vanadium oxide/anatase titania catalyst precursors comprising...... combustible crystallization seeds upon which the catalyst metal oxide is coprecipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step....

  18. Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Photoresists for EUV Patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    © 2014SPST. Previous studies of methacrylate based nanoparticle have demonstrated the excellent pattern forming capability of these hybrid materials when used as photoresists under 13.5 nm EUV exposure. HfO2 and ZrO2 methacrylate resists have achieved high resolution (∼22 nm) at a very high EUV sensitivity (4.2 mJ/cm2). Further investigations into the patterning process suggests a ligand displacement mechanism, wherein, any combination of a metal oxide with the correct ligand could generate patterns in the presence of the suitable photoactive compound. The current investigation extends this study by developing new nanoparticle compositions with transdimethylacrylic acid and o-toluic acid ligands. This study describes their synthesis and patterning performance under 248 nm KrF laser (DUV) and also under 13.5 nm EUV exposures (dimethylacrylate nanoparticles) for the new resist compositions.

  19. Preparation of novel polymer–metal oxide nanocomposites with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 34; Issue 7. Preparation of novel polymer–metal oxide nanocomposites with nanophase separated hierarchical structure ... This article deals with preparation of nanocomposite which comprised of nanophase separated structure of polymer chains and metal oxide.

  20. Recent Development in Metal Oxides and Related Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Recent Development in Metal Oxides and. Related Materials. FOREWORD. This special issue of the Journal of Chemical Sciences contains a col- lection of articles contributed by the participants of Recent Development in Metal Oxides and ... double perovskities, synthesis by molten salt method, layered hydrox- ides and its ...

  1. Solder for oxide layer-building metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A low temperature solder and method for soldering an oxide layer-building metal such as aluminum, titanium, tantalum or stainless steel. The comosition comprises tin and zinc; germanium as a wetting agent; preferably small amounts of copper and antimony; and a grit, such as silicon carbide. The grit abrades any oxide layer formed on the surface of the metal as the germanium penetrates beneath and loosens the oxide layer to provide good metal-to-metal contact. The germanium comprises less than aproximatley 10% by weight of the solder composition so that it provides sufficient wetting action but does not result in a melting temperature above approximately 300.degree. C. The method comprises the steps rubbing the solder against the metal surface so the grit in the solder abrades the surface while heating the surface until the solder begins to melt and the germanium penetrates the oxide layer, then brushing aside any oxide layer loosened by the solder.

  2. Selective Metallization Induced by Laser Activation: Fabricating Metallized Patterns on Polymer via Metal Oxide Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihai; Zhou, Tao; Wen, Liang

    2017-03-15

    Recently, metallization on polymer substrates has been given more attention due to its outstanding properties of both plastics and metals. In this study, the metal oxide composite of copper-chromium oxide (CuO·Cr 2 O 3 ) was incorporated into the polymer matrix to design a good laser direct structuring (LDS) material, and the well-defined copper pattern (thickness =10 μm) was successfully fabricated through selective metallization based on 1064 nm near-infrared pulsed laser activation and electroless copper plating. We also prepared polymer composites incorporated with CuO and Cr 2 O 3 ; however, these two polymer composites both had very poor capacity of selective metallization, which has no practical value for LDS technology. In our work, the key reasons causing the above results were systematically studied and elucidated using XPS, UV-vis-IR, optical microscopy, SEM, contact angle, ATR FTIR, and so on. The results showed that 54.0% Cu 2+ in the polymer composite of CuO·Cr 2 O 3 (the amount =5 wt %) is reduced to Cu 0 (elemental copper) after laser activation (irradiation); however, this value is only 26.8% for the polymer composite of CuO (the amount =5 wt %). It was confirmed that to achieve a successful selective metallization after laser activation, not only was the new formed Cu 0 (the catalytic seeds) the crucial factor, but the number of generated Cu 0 catalytic seeds was also important. These two factors codetermined the final results of the selective metallization. The CuO·Cr 2 O 3 is very suitable for applications of fabricating metallic patterns (e.g., metal decoration, circuit) on the inherent pure black or bright black polymer materials via LDS technology, which has a prospect of large-scale industrial applications.

  3. Miscibility and oxidation rate of the simulated metallic spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, K. S.; Joo, J. S.; Shin, Y. J.; Oh, S. C. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-10-01

    The simulated metallic spent fuel was fabricated by using Uranium, Neodymium and Palladium in order to study the miscibility of Neodymium and Palladium with Uranium. For analysis of long-term safty on the metallized spent fuel, the simulated metallic spent fuel was oxidized under pure oxygen environment at 183{approx}250 deg C. From the results, the oxidation rate correlation and activation energy were obtained.

  4. Synthesis of Mesoporous Metal Oxides by Structure Replication: Thermal Analysis of Metal Nitrates in Porous Carbon Matrices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christian Weinberger; Jan Roggenbuck; Jan Hanss; Michael Tiemann

    2015-01-01

    .... Thermal conversion of the metal nitrates into the respective metal oxides, and subsequent removal of the carbon matrix by thermal combustion, provides a versatile means to prepare mesoporous metal oxides...

  5. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  6. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  7. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  8. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Metal oxide nanostructures by a simple hot water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Nawzat S; Hassan, Laylan B; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-08-02

    Surfaces with metal oxide nanostructures have gained considerable interest in applications such as sensors, detectors, energy harvesting cells, and batteries. However, conventional fabrication techniques suffer from challenges that hinder wide and effective applications of such surfaces. Most of the metal oxide nanostructure synthesis methods are costly, complicated, non-scalable, environmentally hazardous, or applicable to only certain few materials. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a simple metal oxide nanostructure fabrication method that can overcome all these limitations and pave the way to the industrial application of such surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that a wide variety of metals can form metal oxide nanostructures on their surfaces after simply interacting with hot water. This method, what we call hot water treatment, offers the ability to grow metal oxide nanostructures on most of the metals in the periodic table, their compounds, or alloys by a one-step, scalable, low-cost, and eco-friendly process. In addition, our findings reveal that a "plugging" mechanism along with surface diffusion is critical in the formation of such nanostructures. This work is believed to be of importance especially for researchers working on the growth of metal oxide nanostructures and their application in functional devices.

  10. Atomic XAFS as a Tool To Probe the Reactivity of Metal Oxide Catalysts: Quantifying Metal Oxide Support Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Airaksinen, S.M.K.; Krause, A.O.I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Koningsberger, D.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073704342

    2007-01-01

    The potential of atomic XAFS (AXAFS) to directly probe the catalytic performances of a set of supported metal oxide catalysts has been explored for the first time. For this purpose, a series of 1 wt % supported vanadium oxide catalysts have been prepared differing in their oxidic support material

  11. Metal-core@metal oxide-shell nanomaterials for gas-sensing applications: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, A.; Janghorban, K.; Hashemi, B.; Neri, G.

    2015-09-01

    With an ever-increasing number of applications in many advanced fields, gas sensors are becoming indispensable devices in our daily life. Among different types of gas sensors, conductometric metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) gas sensors are found to be the most appealing for advanced applications in the automotive, biomedical, environmental, and safety sectors because of the their high sensitivity, reduced size, and low cost. To improve their sensing characteristics, new metal oxide-based nanostructures have thus been proposed in recent years as sensing materials. In this review, we extensively review gas-sensing properties of core@ shell nanocomposites in which metals as the core and metal oxides as the shell structure, both of nanometer sizes, are assembled into a single metal@metal oxide core-shell. These nanostructures not only combine the properties of both noble metals and metal oxides, but also bring unique synergetic functions in comparison with single-component materials. Up-dated achievements in the synthesis and characterization of metal@metal oxide core-shell nanostructures as well as their use in MOS sensors are here reported with the main objective of providing an overview about their gas-sensing properties.

  12. Systematic study of metal-insulator-metal diodes with a native oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, E.; Gammon, P. M.; Pang, J. S.; Petrov, P. K.; Alford, N. McN.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a systematic analysis of native oxides within a Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) diode is carried out, with the goal of determining their practicality for incorporation into a nanoscale Rectenna (Rectifying Antenna). The requirement of having a sub-10nm oxide scale is met by using the native oxide, which forms on most metals exposed to an oxygen containing environment. This, therefore, provides a simplified MIM fabrication process as the complex, controlled oxide deposition step is omitted. We shall present the results of an investigation into the current-voltage characteristics of various MIM combinations that incorporate a native oxide, in order to establish whether the native oxide is of sufficient quality for good diode operation. The thin native oxide layers are formed by room temperature oxidation of the first metal layer, deposited by magnetron sputtering. This is done in-situ, within the deposition chamber before depositing the second metal electrode. Using these structures, we study the established trend where the bigger the difference in metal workfunctions, the better the rectification properties of MIM structures, and hence the selection of the second metal is key to controlling the device's rectifying properties. We show how leakage current paths through the non-optimised native oxide control the net current-voltage response of the MIM devices. Furthermore, we will present the so-called diode figures of merit (asymmetry, non-linearity and responsivity) for each of the best performing structures.

  13. Systematic study of metal-insulator-metal diodes with a native oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Donchev, E.

    2014-10-07

    © 2014 SPIE. In this paper, a systematic analysis of native oxides within a Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) diode is carried out, with the goal of determining their practicality for incorporation into a nanoscale Rectenna (Rectifying Antenna). The requirement of having a sub-10nm oxide scale is met by using the native oxide, which forms on most metals exposed to an oxygen containing environment. This, therefore, provides a simplified MIM fabrication process as the complex, controlled oxide deposition step is omitted. We shall present the results of an investigation into the current-voltage characteristics of various MIM combinations that incorporate a native oxide, in order to establish whether the native oxide is of sufficient quality for good diode operation. The thin native oxide layers are formed by room temperature oxidation of the first metal layer, deposited by magnetron sputtering. This is done in-situ, within the deposition chamber before depositing the second metal electrode. Using these structures, we study the established trend where the bigger the difference in metal workfunctions, the better the rectification properties of MIM structures, and hence the selection of the second metal is key to controlling the device\\'s rectifying properties. We show how leakage current paths through the non-optimised native oxide control the net current-voltage response of the MIM devices. Furthermore, we will present the so-called diode figures of merit (asymmetry, non-linearity and responsivity) for each of the best performing structures.

  14. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sushko, Maria L., E-mail: maria.sushko@pnnl.gov; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  15. A general approach to mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Zhao

    2012-04-26

    Catalytic microspheres: A general approach is demonstrated for the facile preparation of mesoporous metal oxide microspheres loaded with noble metal nanoparticles (see TEM image in the picture). Among 18 oxide/noble metal catalysts, TiO 2/0.1 mol Pd microspheres showed the highest turnover frequency in NaBH 4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol (see picture). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Displacement method and apparatus for reducing passivated metal powders and metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell,; Jonathan S. , Ripley; Edward, B [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-05

    A method of reducing target metal oxides and passivated metals to their metallic state. A reduction reaction is used, often combined with a flux agent to enhance separation of the reaction products. Thermal energy in the form of conventional furnace, infrared, or microwave heating may be applied in combination with the reduction reaction.

  17. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachecka, M.; Lee, C. J.; Sturm, J. M.; Bijkerk, F.

    2017-08-01

    The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show that Sn adsorbs rather weakly to a non-oxidized Sc surface, and is etched relatively easily by atomic hydrogen. In contrast, the presence of native oxide on Sc allows Sn to adsorb more strongly to the surface, slowing the etching. Furthermore, thinner layers of scandium oxide result in weaker Sn adsorption, indicating that the layer beneath the oxide plays a significant role in determining the adsorption strength. Unexpectedly, for Sn on Sc2O3, and, to a lesser extent, for Sn on Sc, the etch rate shows a variation over time, which is explained by surface restructuring, temperature change, and hydrogen adsorption saturation.

  18. Tin etching from metallic and oxidized scandium thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pachecka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of oxide on Sn adhesion to Sc surfaces was studied with in-situ ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron microscopy. Sn etching with hydrogen radicals was performed on metallic Sc, metallic Sc with a native oxide, and a fully oxidized Sc layer. The results show that Sn adsorbs rather weakly to a non-oxidized Sc surface, and is etched relatively easily by atomic hydrogen. In contrast, the presence of native oxide on Sc allows Sn to adsorb more strongly to the surface, slowing the etching. Furthermore, thinner layers of scandium oxide result in weaker Sn adsorption, indicating that the layer beneath the oxide plays a significant role in determining the adsorption strength. Unexpectedly, for Sn on Sc2O3, and, to a lesser extent, for Sn on Sc, the etch rate shows a variation over time, which is explained by surface restructuring, temperature change, and hydrogen adsorption saturation.

  19. Heavy metal removal from water/wastewater by nanosized metal oxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ming; Zhang, Shujuan; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Quanxing

    2012-04-15

    Nanosized metal oxides (NMOs), including nanosized ferric oxides, manganese oxides, aluminum oxides, titanium oxides, magnesium oxides and cerium oxides, provide high surface area and specific affinity for heavy metal adsorption from aqueous systems. To date, it has become a hot topic to develop new technologies to synthesize NMOs, to evaluate their removal of heavy metals under varying experimental conditions, to reveal the underlying mechanism responsible for metal removal based on modern analytical techniques (XAS, ATR-FT-IR, NMR, etc.) or mathematical models, and to develop metal oxide-based materials of better applicability for practical use (such as granular oxides or composite materials). The present review mainly focuses on NMOs' preparation, their physicochemical properties, adsorption characteristics and mechanism, as well as their application in heavy metal removal. In addition, porous host supported NMOs are particularly concerned because of their great advantages for practical application as compared to the original NMOs. Also, some magnetic NMOs were included due to their unique separation performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic trapping of superconducting submicron particles produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Suzuki, Junpei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Tokawa, Yurina; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Ashida, Masaaki; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2017-02-01

    We produced spherical superconducting submicron particles by laser ablation of their base metal tips in superfluid helium, and trapped them using a quadrupole magnetic field owing to the diamagnetism caused by the Meissner effect. We also measured their critical temperatures of superconductivity, by observing the threshold temperatures for the confinement of superconducting submicron particles in the trap.

  1. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  2. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Duc Hoa; Nguyen Van Duy; Sherif A. El-Safty; Nguyen Van Hieu,

    2015-01-01

    Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas...

  3. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO2, SnO2, NbO2, ZrO2, SiO2, Ta2O5 and Nb2O5) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied...... in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum...... dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtOx (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO2 might...

  4. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas sensor applications are introduced. The advantages of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides are also presented, taking into account the crystallinity and ordered/disordered porous structures. Second, the synthesis methods of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides including the soft-template, hard-template, and temple-free methods are introduced, in which the advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are figured out. Third, the applications of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides as gas sensors are presented. The gas nanosensors are designed based on meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for effective detection of toxic gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the meso-/nanoporous gas nanosensors are also discussed. Finally, some conclusions and an outlook are presented.

  5. Influence of metal contaminants on oxidation stability of Jatropha biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, Amit [Department of Applied Sciences, Amritsar College of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar-143001 (India); Arora, Rajneesh; Singh, N.P. [Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India); Sharma, Meeta; Malhotra, R.K. [Indian oil Corporation Ltd., R and D Centre, Sector-13, Faridabad-121007 (India)

    2009-09-15

    According to proposed National Mission on biodiesel in India, we have undertaken studies on stability of biodiesel from tree borne non-edible oil seeds Jatropha. European biodiesel standard EN-14214 calls for determining oxidation stability at 110 C with a minimum induction time of 6 h by the Rancimat method (EN-14112). Neat Jatropha biodiesel (JBD) exhibited oxidation stability of 3.95 h and research was conducted to investigate influence of presence of transition metals, likely to be present in the metallurgy of storage tanks and barrels, on oxidation stability of Jatropha methyl ester. It was found that influence of metal was detrimental to oxidation stability and catalytic. Even small concentrations of metal contaminants showed nearly same influence on oxidation stability as large amounts. Copper showed strongest detrimental and catalytic effect. The dependence of the oxidation stability on the type of metal showed that long-term storage tests in different types of metal containers for examining the influence of container material on oxidation stability of biodiesel may be replaced by significantly faster Rancimat test serving as an accelerated storage test. (author)

  6. Electrochemical activity of heavy metal oxides in the process of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The influence of heavy metal oxides on the chloride induced corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete was studied. Significant inhibition and stimulation of chloride induced corrosion have been observed. Basicity and acidity of the relevant metal ions, and their ability to form complexes are considered as the main factors ...

  7. Nanoparticles of complex metal oxides synthesized using the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 65; Issue 5. Nanoparticles of complex metal oxides synthesized using the reverse-micellar and polymeric precursor routes ... In addition we also discuss the synthesis of some transition metal (Mn and Cu) oxalate nanorods using the reverse-micellar route.

  8. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases.

  9. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  10. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  11. A Method for Determination of Metals in Hybrid Metal Oxide/Metal-Carbon Nanotubes Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bok-Badura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs, due to their special structure and unique properties, are still one of the most interesting materials for scientists. Recently, carbon nanotubes were proposed as a new type of carbon support for catalysts. Fe, Pt, Ni, Co, and other metals anchored to CNTs are used in various reactions. Due to the fact that production processes are usually unpredictable and the total amount of metal/metal oxide deposited on the CNTs may only be estimated, the methods for examining the chemical composition are necessary. In this study, fast and simple inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES with slurry nebulization was proposed for metal content determination in hybrid CeZrO2/CNT, Ni-CeZrO2/CNT, and Ni/CNT materials. Slurries were prepared by 30 min ultrasonication of appropriate amount of investigated material in 1% Triton X-100 solution. Optimal range of slurry concentration and optimal RF plasma power were established (40–400 mg L−1, 1.2 kW, resp.. Obtained results proved that this method may be applied for determination of Ce, Zr, and Ni in hybrid CNT-based materials.

  12. Dynamic Stabilization of Metal Oxide-Water Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    McBriarty, M. E.; von Rudorff, G. F.; Stubbs, J. E.; Eng, P. J.; Blumberger, J.; Ross, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of water with metal oxide surfaces plays a crucial role in the catalytic and geochemical behavior of metal oxides. In a vast majority of studies, the interfacial structure is assumed to arise from a relatively static lowest energy configuration of atoms, even at room temperature. Using hematite (α-Fe2O3) as a model oxide, we show through a direct comparison of in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering with density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations that the stru...

  13. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  14. Emerging applications of liquid metals featuring surface oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Michael D

    2014-11-12

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide "skin" enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects.

  15. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  16. Metal Oxide Nanostructures and Their Gas Sensing Properties: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Huai Liu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide gas sensors are predominant solid-state gas detecting devices for domestic, commercial and industrial applications, which have many advantages such as low cost, easy production, and compact size. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly-sensitive properties. Lots of metal oxide nanostructures have been developed to improve the gas sensing properties such as sensitivity, selectivity, response speed, and so on. Here, we provide a brief overview of metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties from the aspects of particle size, morphology and doping. When the particle size of metal oxide is close to or less than double thickness of the space-charge layer, the sensitivity of the sensor will increase remarkably, which would be called “small size effect”, yet small size of metal oxide nanoparticles will be compactly sintered together during the film coating process which is disadvantage for gas diffusion in them. In view of those reasons, nanostructures with many kinds of shapes such as porous nanotubes, porous nanospheres and so on have been investigated, that not only possessed large surface area and relatively mass reactive sites, but also formed relatively loose film structures which is an advantage for gas diffusion. Besides, doping is also an effective method to decrease particle size and improve gas sensing properties. Therefore, the gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanostructures assembled by nanoparticles are reviewed in this article. The effect of doping is also summarized and finally the perspectives of metal oxide gas sensor are given.

  17. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  18. Heterogeneous Metal Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Eaqub Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation reactions may be considered as the heart of chemical synthesis. However, the indiscriminate uses of harsh and corrosive chemicals in this endeavor are threating to the ecosystems, public health, and terrestrial, aquatic, and aerial flora and fauna. Heterogeneous catalysts with various supports are brought to the spotlight because of their excellent capabilities to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions with low cost. They also minimize the use of chemicals in industries and thus are friendly and green to the environment. However, heterogeneous oxidation catalysis are not comprehensively presented in literature. In this short review, we clearly depicted the current state of catalytic oxidation reactions in chemical industries with specific emphasis on heterogeneous catalysts. We outlined here both the synthesis and applications of important oxidation catalysts. We believe it would serve as a reference guide for the selection of oxidation catalysts for both industries and academics.

  19. Activation of CO2 on transition metal surfaces and oxide supported metal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujata; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2009-03-01

    Using first principles simulations based on Density Functional Theory, we have investigated the adsorption and activation properties of CO2 on a variety of transition metal surfaces and oxide supported metal thin films. We intend to focus on the chemical conversion of CO2 through heterogeneous catalysis using surfaces and interfaces where there is nanoscale control over charge density at the reactive sites. The activation of CO2 on clean metal surfaces is possible at very high temperatures and the situations changes drastically when reaction happens on oxide supported metal thin film. The chemical reactivity of the molecule on the surface depends on the charge rearrangement at the metal-alkaline earth oxide interface. We want to understand the possible catalytic systems and characterize the relevant geometrical and electronic parameters related to the reaction mechanisms, rates and yield.

  20. Hot-filament metal oxide deposition (HFMOD: a novel method for depositing thin films of metallic oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxinol F. Paulo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This short report describes a novel method for the synthesis of metal oxide thin films. The experimental setup consists of a metal filament installed inside a vacuum chamber. The filament can be heated by an ac power supply while oxygen is admitted into the chamber using a mass flowmeter. From reactions between oxygen and the heated metal filament, volatile oxide species, Me xOy, where Me is the metal, can be formed, condensing on a nearby substrate. We have observed that thin films of WxOy and Mo xOy can be satisfactorily deposited by this novel method. Although several techniques were used to characterize the oxides, this note emphasizes the results obtained by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS.

  1. Biomimetic metal oxides for the extraction of nanoparticles from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Ramakrishna; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2013-04-21

    Contamination of nanomaterials in the environment will pose significant health risks in the future. A viable purification method is necessary to address this problem. Here we report the synthesis and application of a series of metal oxides prepared using a biological template for the removal of nanoparticles from the aqueous environment. A simple synthesis of metal oxides such as ZnO, NiO, CuO, Co3O4 and CeO2 employing eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate is reported. The morphology of the metal oxide powders was characterized using electron microscopes and the lattice structure was established using X-ray diffraction methods. Extraction of nanoparticles from water was carried out to compare the efficiency of metal oxides. NiO showed good extraction efficiency in removing gold and silver nanoparticles from spiked water samples within an hour. Easy access and enhanced stability of metal oxides makes them interesting candidates for applications in industrial effluent treatments and water purifications.

  2. Nanoporous metal oxides with tunable and nanocrystalline frameworks via conversion of metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Lee, Kyung Joo; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Lee, Jae Hwa; Joo, Sang Hoon; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2013-06-19

    Nanoporous metal oxide materials are ubiquitous in the material sciences because of their numerous potential applications in various areas, including adsorption, catalysis, energy conversion and storage, optoelectronics, and drug delivery. While synthetic strategies for the preparation of siliceous nanoporous materials are well-established, nonsiliceous metal oxide-based nanoporous materials still present challenges. Herein, we report a novel synthetic strategy that exploits a metal-organic framework (MOF)-driven, self-templated route toward nanoporous metal oxides via thermolysis under inert atmosphere. In this approach, an aliphatic ligand-based MOF is thermally converted to nanoporous metal oxides with highly nanocrystalline frameworks, in which aliphatic ligands act as the self-templates that are afterward evaporated to generate nanopores. We demonstrate this concept with hierarchically nanoporous magnesia (MgO) and ceria (CeO2), which have potential applicability for adsorption, catalysis, and energy storage. The pore size of these nanoporous metal oxides can be readily tuned by simple control of experimental parameters. Significantly, nanoporous MgO exhibits exceptional CO2 adsorption capacity (9.2 wt %) under conditions mimicking flue gas. This MOF-driven strategy can be expanded to other nanoporous monometallic and multimetallic oxides with a multitude of potential applications.

  3. A comparison in activity between transition-metal oxides and transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Transition-metal oxides are widely used materials in catalysis as substrates and promoters, but also as the active catalyst materials themselves. We compare the reactivity of transition-metal oxides with the one of transition metals. The comparison is exemplified for the ammonia synthesis reaction. First we show that there exist characteristic Brønsted-Evans Polanyi (BEP) relations (linear relations between transition state and dissociation energies) for dissociation of molecules on transition-metal oxides in the rutile and perovskite structure. It is well-known that the (211) metal surface is several orders of magnitude more reactive than the (111) metal surface due to the lower BEP line for the 211 facet. We find that both rutiles and perovskites follow BEP relations that are lower than the one of the 211 facet. Second we utilize the established BEP relations together with calculated adsorption energetics in a micro-kinetic model to obtain a volcano plot for the catalytic activity. We find that oxides have a higher turn over frequency as compared with metals. Hence, oxides intrinsically have a great advantage in terms of catalytic activity which opens up for catalyst design.

  4. A metallic metal oxide (Ti5O9)-metal oxide (TiO2) nanocomposite as the heterojunction to enhance visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L H; Deng, Z X; Xiao, J X; Yang, G W

    2015-01-26

    Coupling titanium dioxide (TiO2) with other semiconductors is a popular method to extend the optical response range of TiO2 and improve its photon quantum efficiency, as coupled semiconductors can increase the separation rate of photoinduced charge carriers in photocatalysts. Differing from normal semiconductors, metallic oxides have no energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied levels, but they can excite electrons between bands to create a high carrier mobility to facilitate kinetic charge separation. Here, we propose the first metallic metal oxide-metal oxide (Ti5O9-TiO2) nanocomposite as a heterojunction for enhancing the visible-light photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles and we demonstrate that this hybridized TiO2-Ti5O9 nanostructure possesses an excellent visible-light photocatalytic performance in the process of photodegrading dyes. The TiO2-Ti5O9 nanocomposites are synthesized in one step using laser ablation in liquid under ambient conditions. The as-synthesized nanocomposites show strong visible-light absorption in the range of 300-800 nm and high visible-light photocatalytic activity in the oxidation of rhodamine B. They also exhibit excellent cycling stability in the photodegrading process. A working mechanism for the metallic metal oxide-metal oxide nanocomposite in the visible-light photocatalytic process is proposed based on first-principle calculations of Ti5O9. This study suggests that metallic metal oxides can be regarded as partners for metal oxide photocatalysts in the construction of heterojunctions to improve photocatalytic activity.

  5. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra, E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO{sub 2} > ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO{sub 2}, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO{sub 2} and a-ZrO{sub 2} than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO{sub 2} was lower than on the c-TiO{sub 2}.

  6. Electrocatalytic oxidation of Epinephrine and Norepinephrine at metal oxide doped phthalocyanine/MWCNT composite sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mphuthi, Ntsoaki G; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Ebenso, Eno E

    2016-01-01

    ...) and functionalized MWCNTs, and the electrocatalytic properties were studied. Successful synthesis of the metal oxide nanoparticles and the MO/Pc/MWCNT composite were confirmed using FTIR, Raman and SEM techniques...

  7. Thermodynamic aspects of oxidation of metallic impurities and steel surfaces in heavy liquid metal melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Lavrova

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that the composition and stability of the iron-based oxide system in molten liquid heavy metals is determined by the temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the related external environment. A change in any of these parameters changes the oxide phase composition with the oxygen fraction increase or decrease.

  8. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  9. Co Oxidation Properties Of Selective Dissoluted Metallic Glass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.-Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Porous metallic materials have been widely used in many fields including aerospace, atomic energy, electro chemistry and environmental protection. Their unique structures make them very useful as lightweight structural materials, fluid filters, porous electrodes and catalyst supports. In this study, we fabricated Ni-based porous metallic glasses having uniformly dispersed micro meter pores by the sequential processes of ball-milling and chemical dissolution method. We investigated the application of our porous metal supported for Pt catalyst. The oxidation test was performed in an atmosphere of 1% CO and 3% O2. Microstructure observation was performed by using a scanning electron microscope. Oxidation properties and BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller were analyzed to understand porous structure developments. The results indicated that CO Oxidation reaction was dependent on the specific surface area.

  10. Electrocatalytic oxidation of Epinephrine and Norepinephrine at metal oxide doped phthalocyanine/MWCNT composite sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Mphuthi, Ntsoaki G.; Abolanle S. Adekunle; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with metal oxides (MO?=?Fe3O4, ZnO) nanoparticles doped phthalocyanine (Pc) and functionalized MWCNTs, and the electrocatalytic properties were studied. Successful synthesis of the metal oxide nanoparticles and the MO/Pc/MWCNT composite were confirmed using FTIR, Raman and SEM techniques. The electrodes were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. The electrocatalytic behaviour of the electrode towards epinephrine (EP) and norepinephri...

  11. Interaction of metals with humic acid isolated from oxidized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, S.; Baysal, A.; Akba, O.; Hamamci, C. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    The sorption behaviour of divalent cations M{sup 2+} (Cu, Pb and Zn) and trivalent cations M{sup 2+} (Fe, Al) with humic acid isolated from oxidized coal (Hazro, SE Anatolia,Turkey) was followed in aqueous solution. Coal humic acid and metal ion interaction was investigated with special emphasis on the effects of pH, metal ion concentration and humic acid concentration. It has been found that the interaction of humic acid with metal ions in solution increases with pH, decreases with metal ion concentration and increases with humic acid concentration. The differences in sorption ability of particular metal ions on oxidized coal-derived humic acid are Fe> Pb> Cu> Al> Zn and Fe> Pb> Al> Cu> Zn at pH 2.5 and 3.5, respectively, while they are Fe=Pb=Cu=Al> Zn at both pH 4.5 and 5.5. The interaction of some trivalent (Fe, Al) and divalent (Cu, Pb, Zn) metal ions with humic acid prepared from coal was also studied using FTIR spectroscopy. This has proven helpful with respect to metal binding to understand better the potential sites of binding within the humic acid. Infrared spectroscopy showed the participation of COOH and OH groups in binding to the metal ions.

  12. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  13. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Frei, Heinz

    2017-05-01

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. Combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  14. Combustion Kinetics of Metal Oxide and Halide Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-04

    often not obeyed. Particularly for exothermic and slightly endothermic reactions, order of magnitude errors can be made by extrap - 1olations based on the...schematic of the HTFFR, high-temperature fast-flow reactor , method we are using to generate the metallic radicals and measure their oxidation kinetics...TEMPERATURE INTERVALS. TECHNIQUE High-Temperature Fast-Flow Reactor FURNACE REACTION LENGTH-REACTION TIME SNA- LASER FLUORESCENCE OXIDANTIo CO2 METAL IN

  15. Microwave-assisted route for synthesis of nanosized metal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar Lagashetty et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted route for the synthesis of nanomaterials has gained importance in the field of synthetic technology because of its faster, cleaner and cost effectiveness than the other conventional and wet chemical methods for the preparation of metal oxide nanoparticles. In the present work, synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles viz., γ-Fe2O3, NiO, ZnO, CuO and Co-γ-Fe2O3 were carried out by microwave-assisted route through the thermal decomposition of their respective metal oxalate precursors employing polyvinyl alcohol as a fuel. The metal oxide nanoparticles are then characterized for their size and γ to α (in γ-Fe2O3 transition and structure by employing powder X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD pattern and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectral studies. The morphology of the samples ranged from nanorods to irregular-shaped particles for different metal oxide samples on the basis of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Frequency-dependent dielectric study of the ferrite samples (γ-Fe2O3 and Co-Fe2O3 showed a similar behaviour, where the dielectric constant decreased rapidly with increase in frequency. Possible explanation for this behaviour is given.

  16. Preparation and utilization of metal oxide fine powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Metal oxide fine powders are used as new materials in many industrial fields. It is necessary to develop the technology for manufacturing such powders to improve the domestic industry. The purpose of present research is to develop technologies for the preparation and utilization of metal oxide fine powders. This research project is consisted of two main subjects. One is to develop processing technology on ultrafine silica powder of less than 100 nanometer in particle size, the other is on antimony trioxide powder which is used as flame retardant in plastic rubber, and textile industries. (author). 46 refs., 19 tabs., 35 figs.

  17. Thermodynamic study of metal sulphides conversion to oxides in hydrometallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bocan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents thermodynamic study of the conversion of metal sulphides to oxides of the CuAg sulphide concentrate as a final product after mechano-chemical leaching of tetrahedrite. The conversion of sulphides to oxides is carried out by oxidation leaching in NaOH solution. The thermodynamic calculation was performed for the sulphide concentrate containing the following sulphides: CuS, CuFeS2, FeS, Sb2S3, As2S3, Bi2S3 and HgS. Based on the change of Gibbs free energy (ΔG° and the equilibrium constant (K, conversion of metal sulphides to oxides from the qualitative assessment of the chemical reaction can occur as the result of the thermodynamic reaction abilities.

  18. Sonochemical water splitting in the presence of powdered metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosini, Vincent; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of hydrogen formation was explored as a new chemical dosimeter allowing probing the sonochemical activity of argon-saturated water in the presence of micro- and nano-sized metal oxide particles exhibiting catalytic properties (ThO2, ZrO2, and TiO2). It was shown that the conventional sonochemical dosimeter based on H2O2 formation is hardly applicable in such systems due to catalytic degradation of H2O2 at oxide surface. The study of H2 generation revealed that at low-frequency ultrasound (20 kHz) the sonochemical water splitting is greatly improved for all studied metal oxides. The highest efficiency is observed for relatively large micrometric particles of ThO2 which is assigned to ultrasonically-driven particle fragmentation accompanied by mechanochemical water molecule splitting. The nanosized metal oxides do not exhibit particle size reduction under ultrasonic treatment but nevertheless yield higher quantities of H2. The enhancement of sonochemical water splitting in this case is most probably resulting from better bubble nucleation in heterogeneous systems. At high-frequency ultrasound (362 kHz), the effect of metal oxide particles results in a combination of nucleation and ultrasound attenuation. In contrast to 20 kHz, micrometric particles slowdown the sonolysis of water at 362 kHz due to stronger attenuation of ultrasonic waves while smaller particles show a relatively weak and various directional effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metal Phosphate-Supported Pt Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang Qian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxides (such as SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CeO2 have often been used to prepare supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation and other reactions, whereas metal phosphate-supported Pt catalysts for CO oxidation were rarely reported. Metal phosphates are a family of metal salts with high thermal stability and acid-base properties. Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO46(OH2, denoted as Ca-P-O here also has rich hydroxyls. Here we report a series of metal phosphate-supported Pt (Pt/M-P-O, M = Mg, Al, Ca, Fe, Co, Zn, La catalysts for CO oxidation. Pt/Ca-P-O shows the highest activity. Relevant characterization was conducted using N2 adsorption-desorption, inductively coupled plasma (ICP atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR. This work furnishes a new catalyst system for CO oxidation and other possible reactions.

  20. Reversible electron-transfer reactions within a nanoscale metal oxide cage mediated by metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Christopher; Long, De-Liang; McMillan, Nicola; Johnston, Jacqueline; Bovet, Nicolas; Dhanak, Vin; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Kögerler, Paul; Cronin, Leroy; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2008-04-01

    Transition metal oxides exhibit a rich collection of electronic properties and have many practical applications in areas such as catalysis and ultra-high-density magnetic data storage. Therefore the development of switchable molecular transition metal oxides has potential for the engineering of single-molecule devices and nanoscale electronics. At present, the electronic properties of transition metal oxides can only be tailored through the irreversible introduction of dopant ions, modifying the electronic structure by either injecting electrons or core holes. Here we show that a molybdenum(VI) oxide 'polyoxometalate' molecular nanocluster containing two embedded redox agents is activated by a metallic surface and can reversibly interconvert between two electronic states. Upon thermal activation two electrons are ejected from the active sulphite anions and delocalized over the metal oxide cluster cage, switching it from a fully oxidized state to a two-electron reduced state along with the concomitant formation of an S-S bonding interaction between the two sulphur centres inside the cluster shell.

  1. Dextran templating for the synthesis of metallic and metal oxide sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Dominic; Arcelli, Laura; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo; Mann, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    Silver or gold-containing porous frameworks have been used extensively in catalysis, electrochemistry, heat dissipation and biofiltration. These materials are often prepared by thermal reduction of metal-ion-impregnated porous insoluble supports (such as alumina and pumice), and have surface areas of about 1 m2 g-1, which is typically higher than that obtained for pure metal powders or foils prepared electrolytically or by infiltration and thermal decomposition of insoluble cellulose supports. Starch gels have been used in association with zeolite nanoparticles to produce porous inorganic materials with structural hierarchy, but the use of soft sacrificial templates in the synthesis of metallic sponges has not been investigated. Here we demonstrate that self-supporting macroporous frameworks of silver, gold and copper oxide, as well as composites of silver/copper oxide or silver/titania can be routinely prepared by heating metal-salt-containing pastes of the polysaccharide, dextran, to temperatures between 500 and 900 °C. Magnetic sponges were similarly prepared by replacing the metal salt precursor with preformed iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles. The use of dextran as a sacrificial template for the fabrication of metallic and metal oxide sponges should have significant benefits over existing technologies because the method is facile, inexpensive, environmentally benign, and amenable to scale-up and processing.

  2. Global DNA methylation and oxidative stress biomarkers in workers exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wu, Wei-Te; Liao, Hui-Yi [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chao-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Jung, Wei-Ting [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling, E-mail: huilinglee3573@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • Global methylation and oxidative DNA damage levels in nanomaterial handling workers were assessed. • 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate of workers exposed to nanoparticles was higher. • 8-OHdG was negatively correlated with global methylation. • Exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles may lead to global methylation and DNA oxidative damage. - Abstract: This is the first study to assess global methylation, oxidative DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation in workers with occupational exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials (NMs). Urinary and white blood cell (WBC) 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) 8-isoprostane were measured as oxidative stress biomarkers. WBC global methylation was measured as an epigenetic alteration. Exposure to TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2,} and indium tin oxide (ITO) resulted in significantly higher oxidative biomarkers such as urinary 8-OHdG and EBC 8-isoprostane. However, significantly higher WBC 8-OHdG and lower global methylation were only observed in ITO handling workers. Significant positive correlations were noted between WBC and urinary 8-OHdG (Spearman correlation r = 0.256, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was found between WBC 8-OHdG and global methylation (r = −0.272, p = 0.002). These results suggest that exposure to metal oxide NMs may lead to global methylation, DNA oxidative damage, and lipid peroxidation.

  3. Improved adhesion of metal oxide layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide layer, which method comprises the steps of: a) mixing zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in water or methanol and b) filtering out solids; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and AlOH (OAc)2 in aqueous or m...

  4. All-alkoxide synthesis of strontium-containing metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making strontium-containing metal-oxide ceramic thin films from a precursor liquid by mixing a strontium neo-pentoxide dissolved in an amine solvent and at least one metal alkoxide dissolved in a solvent, said at least one metal alkoxide selected from the group consisting of alkoxides of calcium, barium, bismuth, cadmium, lead, titanium, tantalum, hafnium, tungsten, niobium, zirconium, yttrium, lanthanum, antimony, chromium and thallium, depositing a thin film of the precursor liquid on a substrate, and heating the thin film in the presence of oxygen at between 550 and 700.degree. C.

  5. Characterization of Metal Oxide-Based Gas Nanosensors and Microsensors Fabricated via Local Anodic Oxidation Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bráulio S. Archanjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on nanoscale and microscale metal oxide gas sensors, consisting of metal-semiconductor-metal barriers designed via scanning probe microscopy. Two distinct metal oxides, molybdenum and titanium oxides, were tested at different temperatures using CO2 and H2 as test gases. Sensitivities down to ppm levels are demonstrated, and the influence of dry and humid working atmospheres on these metal oxide conductivities was studied. Furthermore, the activation energy was evaluated and analyzed within working sensor temperature range. Finally, full morphological, chemical, and structural analyses of the oxides composites are provided allowing their identification as MoO3 and Ti.

  6. A liquid metal reaction environment for the room-temperature synthesis of atomically thin metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Ou, Jian Zhen; Carey, Benjamin J.; Syed, Nitu; Orrell-Trigg, Rebecca; Mayes, Edwin L. H.; Xu, Chenglong; Kavehei, Omid; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Kaner, Richard B.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Daeneke, Torben

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) oxides have a wide variety of applications in electronics and other technologies. However, many oxides are not easy to synthesize as 2D materials through conventional methods. We used nontoxic eutectic gallium-based alloys as a reaction solvent and co-alloyed desired metals into the melt. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, we predicted the composition of the self-limiting interfacial oxide. We isolated the surface oxide as a 2D layer, either on substrates or in suspension. This enabled us to produce extremely thin subnanometer layers of HfO2, Al2O3, and Gd2O3. The liquid metal–based reaction route can be used to create 2D materials that were previously inaccessible with preexisting methods. The work introduces room-temperature liquid metals as a reaction environment for the synthesis of oxide nanomaterials with low dimensionality.

  7. Visibly transparent metal oxide diodes prepared by solution processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kah-Yoong; Ng, Zi-Neng; Au, Benedict Wen-Cheun; Knipp, Dietmar

    2018-01-01

    Visibly transparent metal oxide diodes were fabricated using p-type doped zinc oxide on tin doped indium oxide coated substrates by sol-gel solution processing. The influence of various nitrogen doping concentration on the hole carrier concentration and the device operation of the diodes was investigated. The diodes exhibit high optical transmission in the visible spectra and high on/off ratios at low operating voltages. The operation is limited by the low hole carrier concentration, which affects the ideality factor and the series resistance of the diode. The influence of the carrier concentration on electronic properties of the diode will be discussed.

  8. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0oxidation state and with at least one ion being Ni, and where M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state. Complete cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  9. Nearly free electrons in a 5d delafossite oxide metal

    OpenAIRE

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Sunko, Veronika; Moll, P. J. W.; Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathon Mark; Nandi, Nabhanila; Rosner, H.; Schmidt, M. P.; F. Arnold; Hassinger, E.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; MacKenzie, Andrew; KING, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of electron correlations in strong spin-orbit transition-metal oxides is key to the realization of numerous exotic phases including spin-orbit–assisted Mott insulators, correlated topological solids, and prospective new high-temperature superconductors. To date, most attention has been focused on the 5d iridium-based oxides. We instead consider the Pt-based delafossite oxide PtCoO2. Our transport measurements, performed on single-crystal samples etched to well-defined g...

  10. Single sheet metal oxides and hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lizhi

    The synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) provides a relatively easy and traditional way to build versatile chemical compounds with a rough control of the bulk structure. The delamination of LDHs to form their single host layers (2D nanosheets) and the capability to reassemble them offer ......) Delamination of the LDHs structure (oxGRC12) with the formation of single sheet iron (hydr)oxide (SSI). (3) Assembly of the new 2D nanosheets layer by layer to achieve desired functionalities....

  11. Actinomycetes-mediated biogenic synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, M; Kannabiran, K

    2017-06-01

    Actinomycetes-mediated biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activities are well documented. Actinomycetes facilitate both intracellular and extracellular metal nanoparticles synthesis and are efficient candidates for the production of polydispersed, stable and ultra-small size metal nanoparticles. Secondary metabolites and new chemical entities derived from Actinomycetes have not been extensively studied for the synthesis of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles. The present review focuses on biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles from Actinomycetes and the scope for exploring Actinomycetes-derived compounds (enzymes, organics acids and bioactive compounds) as metal and metal oxide reducing agents for the synthesis of desired nanoparticles. This review also focuses on challenges faced in the applications of nanoparticles and the methods to synthesize biogenic metal nanoparticles with desired physiochemical properties such as ultra-small size, large surface to mass ratio, high reactivity etc. Methods to evade their toxicity and unique interactions with biological systems to improve their chance as an alternative therapeutic agent in medical and pharmaceutical industry are also discussed. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  13. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  14. Anti-oxidative, metal chelating and radical scavenging effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate protein hydrolysates and membrane ultrafiltration fractions of blue-spotted stingray for metal chelating and radical scavenging activities, as well as protection against oxidative protein damage. Methods: Stingray protein isolates were hydrolysed with alcalase, papain and trypsin for 3 h. Alcalase ...

  15. A review of liquid metal anode solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIYA TOLEUOVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC variant that uses liquid metal electrodes (anodes with the advantage of greater fuel tolerance and the ability to operate on solid fuel. Key features of the approach are discussed along with the technological and research challenges that need to be overcome for scale-up and commercialisation.

  16. Pulsed photonic fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Briley B.; Luo, Sijun; Riggs, Brian C.; Adireddy, Shiva; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2017-09-01

    Nanostructured metal oxide thin films with a large specific surface area are preferable for practical device applications in energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report instantaneous (milliseconds) photonic synthesis of three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructured metal oxide thin films through the pulsed photoinitiated pyrolysis of organometallic precursor films made by chemical solution deposition. High wall-plug efficiency-pulsed photonic irradiation (xenon flash lamp, pulse width of 1.93 ms, fluence of 7.7 J/cm2 and frequency of 1.2 Hz) is used for scalable photonic processing. The photothermal effect of subsequent pulses rapidly improves the crystalline quality of nanocrystalline metal oxide thin films in minutes. The following paper highlights pulsed photonic fabrication of 3-D nanostructured TiO2, Co3O4, and Fe2O3 thin films, exemplifying a promising new method for the low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing of nanostructured metal oxide thin films for energy applications.

  17. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and composition dependent structural and ... tions have been studied to understand the effects of particle size, cluster size and magnetic inter-particle inter- actions. The sizes of the .... vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM-5, TOEI Industry. Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan).

  18. Metal Oxides as Efficient Charge Transporters in Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, Mohammed

    2017-07-10

    Over the past few years, hybrid halide perovskites have emerged as a highly promising class of materials for photovoltaic technology, and the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has accelerated at an unprecedented pace, reaching a record value of over 22%. In the context of PSC research, wide-bandgap semiconducting metal oxides have been extensively studied because of their exceptional performance for injection and extraction of photo-generated carriers. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the synthesis and applications of metal oxides as electron and hole transporters in efficient PSCs with both mesoporous and planar architectures. Metal oxides and their doped variants with proper energy band alignment with halide perovskites, in the form of nanostructured layers and compact thin films, can not only assist with charge transport but also improve the stability of PSCs under ambient conditions. Strategies for the implementation of metal oxides with tailored compositions and structures, and for the engineering of their interfaces with perovskites will be critical for the future development and commercialization of PSCs.

  19. Trends in Metal Oxide Stability for Nanorods, Nanotubes, and Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Vallejo, Federico Calle

    2011-01-01

    The formation energies of nanostructures play an important role in determining their properties, including their catalytic activity. For the case of 15 different rutile and 8 different perovskite metal oxides, we used density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of (2,2) na...

  20. Metal oxide blended ZSM-5 nanocomposites as ethanol sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nano-ZSM-5 is synthesized without organic template via microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. The synthesized nano-ZSM-5 zeolite is blended with metal oxides (ZnO and TiO 2 ) to have novel composites as ethanol sensors. The composites are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared ...

  1. High Temperature Reactions of Uranium Dioxide with Various Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-02-20

    difficulties described in (2) and (3). However, sagging of the helix, blocking the line of sight, was a troublesome problem . REFRACTORY METAL HEATER...Jr., Uranium oxide phase equilibrium systems: IV, UOr- ThOg , J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 36, 397 (1953). [20] H. von Wartenberg and E. Prophet, Melting diagrams

  2. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Luisa; Vogt, Christian; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Tröster, Gerhard [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Münzenrieder, Niko [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Sensor Technology Research Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Faber, Hendrik; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In

  3. Biocidal properties of metal oxide nanoparticles and their halogen adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggstrom, Johanna A.; Klabunde, Kenneth J.; Marchin, George L.

    2010-03-01

    Nanosized metal oxide halogen adducts possess high surface reactivities due to their unique surface morphologies. These adducts have been used as reactive materials against vegetative cells, such as Escherichia coli as well as bacterial endospores, including Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis (Δ Sterne strain). Here we report high biocidal activities against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and endospores. The procedure consists of a membrane method. Transmission electron micrographs are used to compare nanoparticle-treated and untreated cells and spores. It is proposed that the abrasive character of the particles, the oxidative power of the halogens/interhalogens, and the electrostatic attraction between the metal oxides and the biological material are responsible for high biocidal activities. While some activity was demonstrated, bacterial endospores were more resistant to nanoparticle treatment than the vegetative bacteria.

  4. Dynamics of metal oxides surfaces and the connection to reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Micael Bo

    2000-08-01

    Many interesting chemical and physical phenomena which take place on surfaces of metal oxides rely on the material's ability to repeatedly alter the electronic surface structure. For most metal oxides this functionality is connected to the degree of non- stoichiometry and the presence of structural defects. In many catalytic applications, for example, the metal oxide surfaces display optimal performance at rather high temperatures, and it is therefore essential to include thermal distortions in any investigation of the mechanisms behind the functionality. It can be expected that dynamical changes in the surface structure will drastically alter the electronic structure, and thereby also the catalytic characteristics of the surface. For metal oxide surfaces, experimental as well as theoretical data on surface dynamics (at non-zero temperatures) are virtually non-existent. The very few MD simulation studies that exist in the literature have exclusively dealt with the effect of temperature on stability, structure and ordering. This thesis describes molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent quantum-chemical calculations of metal oxide surfaces, and how the surface properties vary with temperature, crystal face and depth from the surface for three structurally different materials. The surfaces studied are the low-index faces of MgO, α-Al 2O3(0001), undoped and doped low-index CeO2 surfaces, and the α- Al2O3(0001⊥,010 ∥)/CeO2(0111⊥,011∥) interface. The emphasis lies on dynamic quantities, and the ionic motion is analysed in terms of mean-square displacements, ion migrations, instantaneous ionic displacements, as well as vibrational densities-of- states. Other properties discussed include surface energies, interplanar relaxations, and pair distribution functions. The thesis also discusses the implication of short-time atomic-level dynamical changes on reactivity.

  5. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiali Ying; Ting Zhang; Meng Tang

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterial...

  6. Oxides in metal fixed points of the ITS-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Martin; Rudtsch, Steffen

    2009-10-01

    In the range between 0 °C and 961 °C, the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) depends to a great extent on the freezing points of the pure metals gallium, indium, tin, zinc, aluminium and silver. An up-to-date realization of these fixed points is based on cells containing metals of ultra-high purity (6N or better) and should include a correction for the influence of relevant impurities. Still, chemical analyses of the fixed-point material can show large amounts of oxygen, which had to be neglected so far, because of the lack of detailed knowledge about it, presuming it could be removed from the cell by applying a vacuum (less than 1 Pa) for a few hours. In this paper we discuss an equilibrium of several forms of oxygen in a fixed-point cell, gaseous in the cell's atmosphere, dissolved in the fixed-point metal and as oxide in a separate (solid) phase. We will conclude that in many fixed points most of the oxygen is not dissolved in the metal, but bound in oxides of the fixed-point metal as well as oxides of some impurities. To demonstrate the impact that the precipitation of impurity oxides has on thermometry, two indium fixed-point cells were doped with magnesium and chromium, which leave the fixed-point temperature unchanged. Further evidence is drawn from earlier work. All these results support the presumed existence of (at least one) persistent separate oxide phase in the fixed points of indium, tin, zinc and aluminium, which renders them eutectic or peritectic points and is a more likely reason why the oxygen content of a cell does not influence the fixed-point temperature. To complement these studies, thermodynamic calculations show how to treat the equilibrium in the cell quantitatively. Using available chemical data, a list is provided that indicates for each fixed-point metal (including the other metal fixed points of the ITS-90: mercury, gold, copper) the impurities that probably build oxides. Due to the agreement of the calculated values

  7. Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using Plant Extract: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Is Fatimah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is an emerging technology and it is related to various applications. Related to nanotechnology development, the use of green chemistry concept, low cost technology and sustainability is a must. Synthesis of nanoparticles using plant extract is a developing technique within the scheme. In this paper, study on metal/metal oxide synthesis and its aspects is presented for describing the potency of natural resources for nanoparticle synthesis within green chemistry approach.

  8. Direct electroplated metallization on indium tin oxide plastic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Nga Yu; Chang, Ya-Huei; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wei, Tzu-Chien; Feng, Shien-Ping

    2014-01-14

    Looking foward to the future where the device becomes flexible and rollable, indium tin oxide (ITO) fabricated on the plastic substrate becomes indispensable. Metallization on the ITO plastic substrate is an essential and required process. Electroplating is a cost-effective and high-throughput metallization process; however, the poor surface coverage and interfacial adhesion between electroplated metal and ITO plastic substrate limits its applications. This paper develops a new method to directly electroplate metals having strong adhesion and uniform deposition on an ITO plastic substrate by using a combination of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and a sweeping potential technique. An impedance capacitive analysis supports the proposed bridging link model for MPS SAMs at the interface between the ITO and the electrolyte.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of metal films and diffusion in NiO for data storage

    OpenAIRE

    Unutulmazsoy, Yeliz

    2016-01-01

    The growth of pore-free oxide layers on metals is determined by formation and migration of point defects and thus is an issue of fundamental importance. So far, mainly oxidation kinetics of thick metal films, crystals, and bulk samples were investigated in the literature. The oxidation of thin metal films on insulating substrates can easily be monitored by measuring the conductivity of the remaining metal. This dissertation focuses on understanding the processes that determine the oxide growt...

  10. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Jiali Ying; Ting Zhang; Meng Tang

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomateri...

  11. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-06-21

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L(-1) and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.

  12. Dynamic Stabilization of Metal Oxide-Water Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBriarty, Martin E; von Rudorff, Guido Falk; Stubbs, Joanne E; Eng, Peter J; Blumberger, Jochen; Rosso, Kevin M

    2017-02-22

    The interaction of water with metal oxide surfaces plays a crucial role in the catalytic and geochemical behavior of metal oxides. In a vast majority of studies, the interfacial structure is assumed to arise from a relatively static lowest energy configuration of atoms, even at room temperature. Using hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) as a model oxide, we show through a direct comparison of in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering with density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations that the structure of the (11̅02) termination is dynamically stabilized by picosecond water exchange. Simulations show frequent exchanges between terminal aquo groups and adsorbed water in locations and with partial residence times consistent with experimentally determined atomic sites and fractional occupancies. Frequent water exchange occurs even for an ultrathin adsorbed water film persisting on the surface under a dry atmosphere. The resulting time-averaged interfacial structure consists of a ridged lateral arrangement of adsorbed water molecules hydrogen bonded to terminal aquo groups. Surface pK a prediction based on bond valence analysis suggests that water exchange will influence the proton-transfer reactions underlying the acid/base reactivity at the interface. Our findings provide important new insights for understanding complex interfacial chemical processes at metal oxide-water interfaces.

  13. Submicron sized water-stable metal organic framework (bio-MOF-11) for catalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad Rizwan; Vijay, Periasamy; Tadé, Moses O; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-04-01

    Water-stable and active metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are important materials for mitigation of water contaminants via adsorption and catalytic reactions. In this study, a highly water-stable Co-based MOF, namely bio-MOF-11-Co, was synthesized by a simplified benign method. Moreover, it was used as a catalyst in successful activation of peroxymonsulfate for catalytic degradation of sulfachloropyradazine (SCP) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) as representatives of pharmaceuticals and personal care products, respectively. The bio-MOF-11-Co showed rapid degradation of both p-HBA and SCP and could be reused multiple times without losing the activity by simply water washing. The effects of catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature were further studied, showing that high catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature produced faster kinetic degradation of p-HBA and SCP. The generation of highly reactive and HO radicals during the degradation was investigated by quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance. A plausible degradation mechanism was proposed based on the functionalities in the bio-MOF-11-Co. The availability of electron rich nucleobase adenine reinforced the reaction kinetics by electron donation along with cobalt atoms in the bio-MOF-11-Co structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conductive transition metal oxide nanostructured electrochromic material and optical switching devices constructed thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Koo, Bonil; Garcia, Guillermo; Milliron, Delia J.; Trizio, Luca De; Dahlman, Clayton

    2017-10-10

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant, a solid state electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and visible spectrum radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  15. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. Catalytic oxidation of model soot by metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mul, Guido; Kapteijn, Freek; Moulijn, Jacob A. [Delft University of Technology, Industrial Catalysis, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-05-16

    Several metal chlorides were screened for their catalytic activity in the oxidation of model soot (Printex-U) in `loose contact` by means of TGA/DSC. HgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, and NiCl{sub 2} show little activity. Hydrated BiCl{sub 3} and FeCl{sub 3} are converted in air into BiOCl and FeOCl, which have a moderate soot oxidation activity. MoCl{sub 5} is converted into the corresponding metal oxide and also shows a moderate `loose contact` activity. PbCl{sub 2}, CuCl{sub 2} and CuCl are very active catalysts; the soot oxidation temperature is lowered by 200-275K. The activity of metal chlorides is thought to be induced by in situ formation of intimate contact between the soot and the metal chloride via `wetting` and/or gas phase transport. A correlation between the melting point and the catalytic activity was found. Furthermore, a catalytic cycle is proposed involving activation of oxygen on the surface of the (oxy)chloride, followed by transfer of activated oxygen to the soot surface. DRIFT analyses showed that this results in the formation of carbon surface oxygen complexes. Decomposition of those complexes yields CO and CO{sub 2}. Practical application of metal chlorides for the removal of soot from diesel exhaust is not recommended, because they suffer from instability or high vapour pressures

  17. Micro-optical elements fabricated by metal-transparent-metallic-oxides grayscale photomasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianming; Guo, Chuanfei; Wang, Yongsheng; Miao, Junjie; Tian, Ye; Liu, Qian

    2012-09-20

    One-step gray-tone lithography is the most effective approach to making three-dimensional (3D) micro-optical elements (MOEs). Metal-transparent-metallic-oxide (MTMO) grayscale masks are novel and quite cost effective. In this paper, through the successful fabrication of 3D SiO(2) MOEs by gray-tone lithography and reactive ion etching, we thoroughly investigate the practical technique needs of MTMO grayscale masks on metallic nanofilms. Design calibration, pattern transfer, resolution, lifetime, and mask protection of grayscale masks have been verified. This work shows that the MTMO grayscale photomask has good practical applicability in the laboratory and in industry.

  18. Theoretical framework for the normal state of copper oxide metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, C.M. [AT& T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Every transport property in the normal metallic state of copper oxide based superconductive materials has a temperature dependence unlike that in other metals. For example, the electrical resistivity has a linear temperature dependence down to T{sub c} and the thermal conductivity is very nearly a constant. Such long wavelength transport properties imply a transport relaxation rate {tau}{sup {minus}1} proportional to the temperature T. {tau}{sup {minus}1} {approximately} T can occur in metals in the classical range, for instance due to scattering from phonons or other excitations such as spin-waves at temperatures larger than their characteristic frequency. There are strong empirical and theoretical reasons, explained below, why this is not the case for copper oxide based metals. Then such a relaxation rate implies a breakdown of the quasiparticle concept. For the quasiparticle concept to hold the scattering rates must be much smaller than the energy, proportional to T, for thermal excitations. For instance, at low temperatures the scattering rate of normal metals due to electron-electron interactions is calculated and experimentally observed to be proportional to T{sup 2}, that due to electron-phonon scattering is no faster than T{sup 3} (for 3-dimensional phonons), etc.

  19. Dielectrophoretic alignment of metal and metal oxide nanowires and nanotubes: A universal set of parameters for bridging prepatterned microelectrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijenburg, A.W.; Maas, M.G.; Rodijk, E.J.B.; Ahmed, W.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Carlen, Edwin; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes were synthesized from metals and metal oxides using templated cathodic electrodeposition. With templated electrodeposition, small structures are electrodeposited using a template that is the inverse of the final desired shape. Dielectrophoresis was used for the alignment of

  20. Ball lightning from atmospheric discharges via metal nanosphere oxidation: from soils, wood or metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, John

    2002-01-15

    The slow (diffusion-limited) oxidation of metal nanoparticles has previously been proposed as the mechanism for ball lightning energy release, and argued to be the result of a normal lightning strike on soil. Here this basic model of networked nanoparticles is detailed further, and extended to lightning strikes on metal structures, and also to the action of other storm-related discharges or man-made discharges. The basic model predicted the important properties of "average" observed ball lightning, and the extension in this paper also covers high-energy examples of ball lightning. Laboratory checks of the theory are described, and predictions given of what conditions are necessary for observing ball lightning in the laboratory. Key requirements of the model are a sheltered region near the strike foot and starting materials which can generate a metal vapour under intensive heating, including soil, wood or a metal structure. The evolution of hydrocarbons (often plastics) along with metal vapour can ensure the local survival of the metal vapour even in an oxidizing atmosphere. Subsequent condensation of this vapour to metallic nanoparticles in networks provides the coherence of a ball structure, which also releases light over an extended time. Also discussed is the passage of ball lightning through a sheet of building material, including glass, and its occasional charring of flesh on close contact.

  1. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting [Ventura, CA

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  2. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  3. Nearly free electrons in a 5d delafossite oxide metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Sunko, Veronika; Moll, Philip J W; Bawden, Lewis; Riley, Jonathon M; Nandi, Nabhanila; Rosner, Helge; Schmidt, Marcus P; Arnold, Frank; Hassinger, Elena; Kim, Timur K; Hoesch, Moritz; Mackenzie, Andrew P; King, Phil D C

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the role of electron correlations in strong spin-orbit transition-metal oxides is key to the realization of numerous exotic phases including spin-orbit-assisted Mott insulators, correlated topological solids, and prospective new high-temperature superconductors. To date, most attention has been focused on the 5d iridium-based oxides. We instead consider the Pt-based delafossite oxide PtCoO2. Our transport measurements, performed on single-crystal samples etched to well-defined geometries using focused ion beam techniques, yield a room temperature resistivity of only 2.1 microhm·cm (μΩ-cm), establishing PtCoO2 as the most conductive oxide known. From angle-resolved photoemission and density functional theory, we show that the underlying Fermi surface is a single cylinder of nearly hexagonal cross-section, with very weak dispersion along k z . Despite being predominantly composed of d-orbital character, the conduction band is remarkably steep, with an average effective mass of only 1.14m e. Moreover, the sharp spectral features observed in photoemission remain well defined with little additional broadening for more than 500 meV below E F, pointing to suppressed electron-electron scattering. Together, our findings establish PtCoO2 as a model nearly-free-electron system in a 5d delafossite transition-metal oxide.

  4. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  5. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  6. Metal/oxide interfacial effects on the selective oxidation of primary alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guofeng; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongjia; Liu, Qingfei; Ji, Yongjun; Zhang, Yi; Niu, Zhiqiang; Mao, Junjie; Bao, Xinhe; Hu, Peijun; Li, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    A main obstacle in the rational development of heterogeneous catalysts is the difficulty in identifying active sites. Here we show metal/oxide interfacial sites are highly active for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and other industrially important primary alcohols on a range of metals and oxides combinations. Scanning tunnelling microscopy together with density functional theory calculations on FeO/Pt(111) reveals that benzyl alcohol enriches preferentially at the oxygen-terminated FeO/Pt(111) interface and undergoes readily O-H and C-H dissociations with the aid of interfacial oxygen, which is also validated in the model study of Cu2O/Ag(111). We demonstrate that the interfacial effects are independent of metal or oxide sizes and the way by which the interfaces were constructed. It inspires us to inversely support nano-oxides on micro-metals to make the structure more stable against sintering while the number of active sites is not sacrificed. The catalyst lifetime, by taking the inverse design, is thereby significantly prolonged.

  7. Synergistic effect of metal deactivator and antioxidant on oxidation stability of metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, Amit [Department of Applied Sciences, Amritsar College of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143001 (India); Arora, Rajneesh; Singh, N.P. [Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India); Sarin, Rakesh; Malhotra, R.K. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., R and D Centre, Sector-13, Faridabad 121007 (India); Sharma, Meeta [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., R and D Centre, Sector-13, Faridabad 121007 (India); University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110403 (India); Khan, Arif Ali [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110403 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Biodiesel is relatively unstable on storage and European biodiesel standard EN-14214 calls for determining oxidation stability at 110 C with a minimum induction time of 6 h by the Rancimat method (EN-14112). According to proposed National Mission on biodiesel in India, we have undertaken studies on stability of biodiesel from tree borne non-edible oil seeds Jatropha. Neat Jatropha biodiesel exhibited oxidation stability of 3.95 h. It is found possible to meet the desired EN specification for neat Jatropha biodiesel and metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel by using antioxidants; it will have a cost implication, as antioxidants are costly chemicals. Research was conducted to increase the oxidation stability of metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel by doping metal deactivator with antioxidant, with varying concentrations in order to meet the aforementioned standard required for oxidation stability. It was found that usage of antioxidant can be reduced by 30-50%, therefore the cost, even if very small amount of metal deactivator is doped in Jatropha biodiesel to meet EN-14112 specification. (author)

  8. Magnesium oxide as cause of metal fume fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, A.L.; Hartmann, W.; Buehlmann, A.A.

    1983-05-28

    Seven foundry workers are described who all developed pulmonary symptoms and in the majority of cases recurrent occupational fever; the onset of these episodes coincided with the introduction of a new founding technique resulting in exposure to magnesium oxide fumes. The foreman - most exposed because responsible for vaccination of the melted iron with metallic magnesium - developed disabling pneumopathy. The feverish episodes are interpreted as metal fume fever and in 6 patients the pneumopathy is considered to be due to alkalitoxic damage to the small airways and alveoli caused by the magnesium oxide fumes. The seventh patient suffered from allergic asthma bronchiale. Differentiation from hypersensitivity pneumonitis and from humidifier fever of nonallergic etiology is discussed.

  9. Understanding Organic Film Behavior on Alloy and Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides namely, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron and titanium were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates was examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  10. Metal inhibition on the reactivity of manganese dioxide toward organic contaminant oxidation in relation to metal adsorption and ionic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wang, Zhuopu; Chen, Yang; He, Anfei; Li, Jianliang; Sheng, G Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Coexisting metal ions may significantly inhibit the oxidative reactivity of manganese oxides toward organic contaminants in metal-organic multi-pollutant waters. While the metal inhibition on the oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxides has previously been reported, the extent of the inhibition in relation to metal properties has not been established. Six alkali, alkaline, and transition metals, as well as two testing metals were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit the reactivity of birnessite. Regardless of the pathways of phenol and diuron oxidation (polymerization vs. breakdown), the extent of metal inhibition depended mainly on the metal itself and its concentration. The observed metal inhibition efficiency followed the order of Mn2+ > Co2+ > Cu2+ > Al3+ > Mg2+ > K+, consistent with metal adsorption on birnessite. The first-order organic oxidation rate constant (kobs) was linearly negatively correlated with metal adsorption (qe) on birnessite. These observations demonstrated that the metal inhibition efficiency was determined by metal adsorption on birnessite. The slopes of the kobs-qe varied among metals and followed the order of K+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ > Co2+ > Cu2+ > Al3+. These slopes defined intrinsic inhibitory abilities of metals. As metals were adsorbed hydrated on birnessite, the intrinsic inhibitory ability was significantly linearly correlated with ionic potentials of metals, leading to a single straight line. Metals with multiple d electrons in the outermost orbit with polarizing energy that promotes hydrolysis sat slightly below the line, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Robust hybrid elastomer/metal-oxide superhydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshian, Sasha; Jokinen, Ville; Franssila, Sami

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of hybrid material: a nanostructured elastomer covered by a hard photoactive metal-oxide thin film resembling the exoskeleton of insects. It has extreme water repellency and fast self-recovery after damage. A new fabrication method for replicating high aspect ratio, hierarchical re-entrant aluminum structures into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. The method is based on a protective titania layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the aluminum templa...

  12. Tracking Energy Relaxation Within Plasmonic Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0378 Tracking Energy Relaxation Within Plasmonic Metal Oxide Nanocrystals Sean Roberts UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 101 EAST...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Texas at Austin 105 E. 24th St. Stop A5300 Austin, TX 78712 8...within it. We have also investigated how bandgap photoexcitation can be used to manipulate the plasmon resonance of WO3-x NCs. Adding additional

  13. Methanol Oxidation on Model Elemental and Bimetallic Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Rossmeisl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are a key enabling technology for clean energy conversion. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the methanol oxidation reaction on model electrodes. We discuss trends in reactivity for a set of monometallic and bimetallic transition metal surfaces, flat...... sites on the surface and to screen for novel bimetallic surfaces of enhanced activity. We suggest platinum copper surfaces as promising anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells....

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiromichi; Hakuta, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes specific features of supercritical hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide particles. Supercritical water allows control of the crystal phase, morphology, and particle size since the solvent's properties, such as density of water, can be varied with temperature and pressure, both of which can affect the supersaturation and nucleation. In this review, we describe the advantages of fine particle formation using supercritical water and describe which future tasks need to be solved. PMID:28883312

  15. Engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles for application in electrochemical devices

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Lídia Sofia Leitão

    2015-01-01

    The growing demand for materials and devices with new functionalities led to the increased inter-est in the field of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies. Nanoparticles, not only present a reduced size as well as high reactivity, which allows the development of electronic and electrochemical devices with exclusive properties, when compared with thin films. This dissertation aims to explore the development of several nanostructured metal oxides by sol-vothermal synthesis and its application i...

  16. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Gas Sensitive Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Stella Vallejos; Francesco Di Maggio; Tahira Shujah; Chris Blackman

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent research efforts and developments for the fabrication of metal-oxide gas sensors using chemical vapour deposition (CVD), presenting its potential advantages as a materials synthesis technique for gas sensors along with a discussion of their sensing performance. Thin films typically have poorer gas sensing performance compared to traditional screen printed equivalents, attributed to reduced porosity, but the ability to integrate materials directly with ...

  17. Recent Developments of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanocatalysts in Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makawana, Jigar A; Sangani, Chetan B; Yao, Yong-Fang; Duan, Yong-Tao; Lv, Peng-Cheng; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, various nanomaterials have been used in many organic transformations as efficient catalysts. The development of new catalysts by nanoscale design has emerged as a fertile field for research and innovation. The ability of nanotechnology to enhance catalytic activity opens the potential to replace expensive catalysts with lower amounts of inexpensive nanocatalysts. Besides, development of efficient and environmentally friendly synthetic methodologies for the synthesis of compound libraries of medicinal scaffolds is an attractive area of research in both academic and pharmaceutical industry. According to above reports and needs, this review deals with applications of nanoparticles as catalysts in various organic syntheses. We detail the topic of organic transformations using nanoparticles: Metal Nanoparticles and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles. In the latter part, different Metal Oxide Nanoparticles, such as ZnO Nanoparticle, TiO2 Nanoparticle, and CuO Nanoparticle are discussed.

  18. Metal oxide-encapsulated dye-sensitized photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Son, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-12

    Dye-sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films for photoanodes, photoanodes incorporating the films and DSCs incorporating the photoanodes are provided. Also provided are methods for making the dye sensitized semiconducting metal oxide films. The methods of making the films are based on the deposition of an encapsulating layer of a semiconducting metal oxide around the molecular anchoring groups of photosensitizing dye molecules adsorbed to a porous film of the semiconducting metal oxide. The encapsulating layer of semiconducting metal oxide is formed in such a way that it is not coated over the chromophores of the adsorbed dye molecules and, therefore, allows the dye molecules to remain electrochemically addressable.

  19. Directional dependence of the threshold displacement energies in metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Benjamin J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the directional dependence and the values of the threshold energies (TDEs) for the displacements of the oxygen and metal atoms and for producing stable Frenkel pairs in five metal oxides of Cr2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and MgO. The TDEs for the Frenkel pairs and atoms displacement are calculated in 66 crystallographic directions, on both the anion and cation sublattices. The performed simulations are for metal and oxygen PKA energies up to 350 and 400 eV, respectively. The calculated probability distributions for the atoms displacement and average number of Frenkel pairs produced in the different oxides are compared. The results revealed unique symmetrical patterns of the TDEs for the displacement of the atoms and the formation of stable Frenkel pairs, confirming the strong dependence on the direction and the crystalline structure of the oxides. Results also showed that the formation of stable Frenkel pairs is associated with the displacements of the PKAs and/or of the SKAs. The probabilities of the TDEs for the displacement of the oxygen and metal PKAs are consistently lower than those of the atoms in the crystal. In SiO2, TDEs for the displacement of oxygen and metal atoms and those for the formation of stable Frenkel pairs are the lowest, while those in TiO2 are among the highest. The results for Cr2O3 and Al2O3, which have the same crystal structure, are similar. The calculated TDEs for MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2 are generally in good agreement with the experimental values and the probability distributions of the TDEs for the PKAs in TiO2 are in good agreement with reported MD simulation results.

  20. High performance supercapacitors using metal oxide anchored graphene nanosheet electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2011-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles were chemically anchored onto graphene nanosheets (GNs) and the resultant composites - SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs (58% of GNs loading) - coated over conductive carbon fabric substrates were successfully used as supercapacitor electrodes. The results showed that the incorporation of metal oxide nanoparticles improved the capacitive performance of GNs due to a combination of the effect of spacers and redox reactions. The specific capacitance values (with respect to the composite mass) obtained for SnO2/GNs (195 F g-1) and RuO 2/GNs (365 F g-1) composites at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the present study are the best ones reported to date for a two electrode configuration. The resultant supercapacitors also exhibited high values for maximum energy (27.6, 33.1 and 50.6 W h kg-1) and power densities (15.9, 20.4 and 31.2 kW kg-1) for SnO2/GNs, MnO2/GNs and RuO2/GNs respectively. These findings demonstrate the importance and great potential of metal oxide/GNs based composite coated carbon fabric in the development of high-performance energy-storage systems. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Size characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles in commercial sunscreen products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Fong, Andrew; Linder, Sean W.

    2017-07-01

    There is an increase in the usage of engineered metal oxide (TiO2 and ZnO) nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens due to their pleasing esthetics and greater sun protection efficiency. A number of studies have been done concerning the safety of nanoparticles in sunscreen products. In order to do the safety assessment, it is pertinent to develop novel analytical techniques to analyze these nanoparticles in commercial sunscreens. This study is focused on developing analytical techniques that can efficiently determine particle size of metal oxides present in the commercial sunscreens. To isolate the mineral UV filters from the organic matrices, specific procedures such as solvent extraction were identified. In addition, several solvents (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, and tetrahydrofuran) have been investigated. The solvent extraction using tetrahydrofuran worked well for all the samples investigated. The isolated nanoparticles were characterized by using several different techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential centrifugal sedimentation, and x-ray diffraction. Elemental analysis mapping studies were performed to obtain individual chemical and morphological identities of the nanoparticles. Results from the electron microscopy techniques were compared against the bulk particle sizing techniques. All of the sunscreen products tested in this study were found to contain nanosized (≤100 nm) metal oxide particles with varied shapes and aspect ratios, and four among the 11 products were showed to have anatase TiO2.

  2. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces based on metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Xue-Mei; Cui, Jin-Feng; Sun, Han-Xue; Liang, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Zhao-Qi; An, Jin; Yang, Bao-Ping; La, Pei-Qing; Li, An, E-mail: lian2010@lut.cn

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces was developed by facile coating various metal oxide nanoparticles, including ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, on various substrates followed by treatment with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using ZnO nanoparticles as a model, the changes in the surface chemical composition and crystalline structures of the metal oxide nanoparticles by PDMS treatment were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. The results show that the combination of the improved surface roughness generated from of the nanoparticles aggregation with the low surface-energy of silicon-coating originated from the thermal pyrolysis of PDMS would be responsible for the surface superhydrophobicity. By a simple dip-coating method, we show that the metal oxide nanoparticles can be easily coated onto the surfaces of various textural and dimensional substrates, including glass slide, paper, fabric or sponge, for preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces for different purpose. The present strategy may provide an inexpensive and new route to surperhydrophobic surfaces, which would be of technological significance for various practical applications especially for separation of oils or organic contaminates from water.

  3. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  4. Silver nanowires-templated metal oxide for broadband Schottky photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Kim, Joondong, E-mail: joonkim@inu.ac.kr [Photoelectric and Energy Device Application Lab (PEDAL) and Department of Electrical Engineering, Incheon National University, 119 Academy Rd. Yeonsu, Incheon 406772 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyeong-Ho [Applied Device and Material Lab., Device Technology Division, Korea Advanced Nano Fab Center (KANC), Suwon 443270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-04

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs)-templated transparent metal oxide layer was applied for Si Schottky junction device, which remarked the record fastest photoresponse of 3.4 μs. Self-operating AgNWs-templated Schottky photodetector showed broad wavelength photodetection with high responsivity (42.4 A W{sup −1}) and detectivity (2.75 × 10{sup 15} Jones). AgNWs-templated indium-tin-oxide (ITO) showed band-to-band excitation due to the internal photoemission, resulting in significant carrier collection performances. Functional metal oxide layer was formed by AgNWs-templated from ITO structure. The grown ITO above AgNWs has a cylindrical shape and acts as a thermal protector of AgNWs for high temperature environment without any deformation. We developed thermal stable AgNWs-templated transparent oxide devices and demonstrated the working mechanism of AgNWs-templated Schottky devices. We may propose the high potential of hybrid transparent layer design for various photoelectric applications, including solar cells.

  5. Flexible Electronics Powered by Mixed Metal Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael

    A low temperature amorphous oxide thin film transistor (TFT) and amorphous silicon PIN diode backplane technology for large area flexible digital x-ray detectors has been developed to create 7.9-in. diagonal backplanes. The critical steps in the evolution of the backplane process include the qualification and optimization of the low temperature (200 °C) metal oxide TFT and a-Si PIN photodiode process, the stability of the devices under forward and reverse bias stress, the transfer of the process to flexible plastic substrates, and the fabrication and assembly of the flexible detectors. Mixed oxide semiconductor TFTs on flexible plastic substrates suffer from performance and stability issues related to the maximum processing temperature limitation of the polymer. A novel device architecture based upon a dual active layer improves both the performance and stability. Devices are directly fabricated below 200 ºC on a polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrate using mixed metal oxides of either zinc indium oxide (ZIO) or indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) as the active semiconductor. The dual active layer architecture allows for adjustment to the saturation mobility and threshold voltage stability without the requirement of high temperature annealing, which is not compatible with flexible plastic substrates like PEN. The device performance and stability is strongly dependent upon the composition of the mixed metal oxide; this dependency provides a simple route to improving the threshold voltage stability and drive performance. By switching from a single to a dual active layer, the saturation mobility increases from 1.2 cm2/V-s to 18.0 cm2/V-s, while the rate of the threshold voltage shift decreases by an order of magnitude. This approach could assist in enabling the production of devices on flexible substrates using amorphous oxide semiconductors. Low temperature (200°C) processed amorphous silicon photodiodes were developed successfully by balancing the tradeoffs

  6. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, Michael M [Naperville, IL; Johnson, Christopher S [Naperville, IL; Amine, Khalil [Oakbrook, IL

    2008-12-23

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0oxidation state and with at least one ion being Mn or Ni, and where M' is one or more ion with an average tetravalent oxidation state. Complete cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  7. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0oxidation state and with at least one ion being Ni, and where M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state. Complete cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  8. High-Temperature Oxidation of Plutonium Surrogate Metals and Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, Joshua C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    The Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA) is a nuclear non-proliferation agreement designed to remove 34 tons of weapons-grade plutonium from Russia and the United States. While several removal options have been proposed since the agreement was first signed in 2000, processing the weapons-grade plutonium to mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel has remained the leading candidate for achieving the goals of the PMDA. However, the MOX program has received its share of criticisms, which causes its future to be uncertain. One alternative pathway for plutonium disposition would involve oxidizing the metal followed by impurity down blending and burial in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This pathway was investigated by use of a hybrid microwave and a muffle furnace with Fe and Al as surrogate materials. Oxidation occurred similarly in the microwave and muffle furnace; however, the microwave process time was significantly faster.

  9. Enhanced sun protection of nano-sized metal oxide particles over conventional metal oxide particles: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Nanda, A

    2014-06-01

    A systematic and detailed study has been designed and conducted, taking into account some of the proposed benefits such as increased efficiency, transparency, unique texture, protection of active ingredient and higher consumer compliance of cosmetics containing nano-sized metal oxides. This study also presents an in vitro method to determine sun protection factor of the investigational sunscreen cream samples containing zinc oxide and titanium dioxide with a varied range of particle size. Finally, a comparative study has been conducted between metal oxide particles, conventional as well as nanoparticles. All the skin cosmetics formulated were thermally stable with a pH ranging from 7.9 to 8.2. Moreover, the fatty acid substance content and residue were found to be analogous to the standard values in each skin cosmetic. The skin cosmetics containing the titanium or zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to have improved spreadability as compared to skin cosmetics containing conventional titanium or zinc oxide particles, respectively. All skin cosmetics were found to have uniform distribution of the particles. The sunscreen creams containing zinc oxide nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found to have higher in vitro sun protection factor (SPF of 3.65 for ZnO nanoparticles and 4.93 for TiO2 nanoparticles) as compared to that of sunscreen creams containing conventional zinc oxide particles (SPF = 2.90) and conventional titanium dioxide (SPF = 1.29), clearly indicating the effect of reduction in particles size, from micro to nano, on the sun protection factor. Good texture, better spreadability and enhanced in vitro SPF proved the advantageous role of nanoparticles in cosmetics. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Ceria doped mixed metal oxide nanoparticles as oxidation catalysts: Synthesis and their characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.P. Sultana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mixed metal nanoparticles (NPs have attracted significant attention as catalysts for various organic transformations. In this study, we have demonstrated the preparation of nickel–manganese mixed metal oxide NPs doped with X% nano cerium oxide (X = 1, 3, 5 mol% by a facile co-precipitation technique using surfactant and surfactant free methodologies. The as-synthesized materials were calcined at different temperatures (300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C, and were characterized using various spectroscopic techniques, including, FTIR and XRD. SEM analysis, TEM analysis and TGA were employed to evaluate the structural properties of the as-prepared catalyst. These were evaluated for their catalytic behaviour towards the conversion of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, which was used as a model reaction with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Furthermore, the effect of the variation of the percentage of nano ceria doping and the calcination temperature on the performance of as-prepared mixed metal catalysts was also evaluated. The kinetic studies of the reactions performed employing gas chromatographic technique have revealed that the mixed metal oxide catalyst doped with 5% nano ceria displayed excellent catalytc activity, among various catalysts synthesized.

  11. Charge transfer stabilization of late transition metal oxide nanoparticles on a layered niobate support

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, Megan E.; Senftle, Thomas P.; Winterstein, Jonathan P.; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M.; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M.; Janik, Michael J.; Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial interactions between late transition metal/metal oxide nanoparticles and oxide supports impact catalysts��� activity and stability. Here, we report the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), electron microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) to explore periodic trends in the heats of nanoparticle-support interactions for late transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles on layered niobate and silicate supports. Data for Co(OH)2, hydroxyiridate-capped IrOx.nH2O, ...

  12. Contact resistance and overlapping capacitance in flexible sub-micron long oxide thin-film transistors for above 100 MHz operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenrieder, Niko; Salvatore, Giovanni A.; Petti, Luisa; Zysset, Christoph; Büthe, Lars; Vogt, Christian; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Tröster, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    In recent years new forms of electronic devices such as electronic papers, flexible displays, epidermal sensors, and smart textiles have become reality. Thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the basic blocks of the circuits used in such devices and need to operate above 100 MHz to efficiently treat signals in RF systems and address pixels in high resolution displays. Beyond the choice of the semiconductor, i.e., silicon, graphene, organics, or amorphous oxides, the junctionless nature of TFTs and its geometry imply some limitations which become evident and important in devices with scaled channel length. Furthermore, the mechanical instability of flexible substrates limits the feature size of flexible TFTs. Contact resistance and overlapping capacitance are two parasitic effects which limit the transit frequency of transistors. They are often considered independent, while a deeper analysis of TFTs geometry imposes to handle them together; in fact, they both depend on the overlapping length (LOV) between source/drain and the gate contacts. Here, we conduct a quantitative analysis based on a large number of flexible ultra-scaled IGZO TFTs. Devices with three different values of overlap length and channel length down to 0.5 μm are fabricated to experimentally investigate the scaling behavior of the transit frequency. Contact resistance and overlapping capacitance depend in opposite ways on LOV. These findings establish routes for the optimization of the dimension of source/drain contact pads and suggest design guidelines to achieve megahertz operation in flexible IGZO TFTs and circuits.

  13. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were

  14. Metal oxides modified NiO catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2014-06-01

    The sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of Zr, Ti, Mo, W, and V modified NiO based catalysts for the ethane oxidative dehydrogenation reaction. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, SEM and TPR techniques. The results showed that the doping metals could be highly dispersed into NiO domains without the formation of large amount of other bulk metal oxide. The modified NiO materials have small particle size, larger surface area, and higher reduction temperature in contrast to pure NiO. The introduction of group IV, V and VI transition metals into NiO decreases the catalytic activity in ethane ODH. However, the ethylene selectivity is enhanced with the highest level for the Ni-W-O and Ni-Ti-O catalysts. As a result, these two catalysts show improved efficiency of ethylene production in the ethane ODH reaction. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A General Route for Growing Metal Sulfides onto Graphene Oxide and Exfoliated Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Joana L; Estrada, Ana C; Fateixa, Sara; Ferro, Marta; Trindade, Tito

    2017-08-31

    Graphene-based materials are elective materials for a number of technologies due to their unique properties. Also, semiconductor nanocrystals have been extensively explored due to their size-dependent properties that make them useful for several applications. By coupling both types of materials, new applications are envisaged that explore the synergistic properties in such hybrid nanostructures. This research reports a general wet chemistry method to prepare graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with nanophases of semiconductor metal sulfides. This method allows the in situ growth of metal sulfides onto GO by using metal dialkyldithiocarbamate complexes as single-molecule precursors. In particular, the role of GO as heterogeneous substrate for the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals was investigated by using Raman spectroscopic and imaging methods. The method was further extended to other graphene-based materials, which are easily prepared in a larger scale, such as exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO).

  16. The crystal chemistry of inorganic metal borohydrides and their relation to metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Radovan; Schouwink, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structures of inorganic homoleptic metal borohydrides are analysed with respect to their structural prototypes found amongst metal oxides in the inorganic databases such as Pearson's Crystal Data [Villars & Cenzual (2015). Pearson's Crystal Data. Crystal Structure Database for Inorganic Compounds, Release 2014/2015, ASM International, Materials Park, Ohio, USA]. The coordination polyhedra around the cations and the borohydride anion are determined, and constitute the basis of the structural systematics underlying metal borohydride chemistry in various frameworks and variants of ionic packing, including complex anions and the packing of neutral molecules in the crystal. Underlying nets are determined by topology analysis using the program TOPOS [Blatov (2006). IUCr CompComm. Newsl. 7, 4-38]. It is found that the Pauling rules for ionic crystals apply to all non-molecular borohydride crystal structures, and that the latter can often be derived by simple deformation of the close-packed anionic lattices c.c.p. and h.c.p., by partially removing anions and filling tetrahedral or octahedral sites. The deviation from an ideal close packing is facilitated in metal borohydrides with respect to the oxide due to geometrical and electronic considerations of the BH4(-) anion (tetrahedral shape, polarizability). This review on crystal chemistry of borohydrides and their similarity to oxides is a contribution which should serve materials engineers as a roadmap to design new materials, synthetic chemists in their search for promising compounds to be prepared, and materials scientists in understanding the properties of novel materials.

  17. Metal-Organic Framework-Derived Nanoporous Metal Oxides toward Supercapacitor Applications: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Rahul R; Kaneti, Yusuf V; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2017-06-27

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) have attracted significant attention for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors due to their good electrical conductivity, high electrochemical response (by providing Faradaic reactions), low manufacturing costs, and easy processability. Despite exhibiting these attractive characteristics, the practical applications of TMOs for supercapacitors are still relatively limited. This is largely due to their continuous Faradaic reactions, which can lead to major changes or destruction of their structure as well phase changes (in some cases) during cycling, leading to the degradation in their capacitive performance over time. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop new synthesis methods, which will readily provide stable porous architectures, controlled phase, as well as useful control over dimensions (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) of the metal oxides for improving their performance in supercapacitor applications. Since its discovery in late 1990s, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have influenced many fields of material science. In recent years, they have gained significant attention as precursors or templates for the derivation of porous metal oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for next-generation supercapacitor applications. Even though these materials have widespread applications and have been widely studied in terms of their structural features and synthesis, it is still not clear how these materials will play an important role in the development of the supercapacitor field. In this review, we will summarize the recent developments in the field of MOF-derived porous metal oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications. Furthermore, the current challenges along with the future trends and prospects in the application of these materials for supercapacitors will also be discussed.

  18. Metal and Metal Oxide Interactions and Their Catalytic Consequences for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qingying; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Li, Jingkun; Liang, Wentao; Meng, Guangnan [ULVAC Technologies, Inc., 401; Che, Haiying [Shanghai; Zhang, Shiming [Shanghai; Ma, Zi-Feng [Shanghai; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Many industrial catalysts are composed of metal particles supported on metal oxides (MMO). It is known that the catalytic activity of MMO materials is governed by metal and metal oxide interactions (MMOI), but how to optimize MMO systems via manipulation of MMOI remains unclear, due primarily to the ambiguous nature of MMOI. Herein, we develop a Pt/NbOx/C system with tunable structural and electronic properties via a modified arc plasma deposition method. We unravel the nature of MMOI by characterizing this system under reactive conditions utilizing combined electrochemical, microscopy, and in situ spectroscopy. We show that Pt interacts with the Nb in unsaturated NbOx owing to the oxygen deficiency in the MMO interface, whereas Pt interacts with the O in nearly saturated NbOx, and further interacts with Nb when the oxygen atoms penetrate into the Pt cluster at elevated potentials. While the Pt–Nb interactions do not benefit the inherent activity of Pt toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the Pt–O interactions improve the ORR activity by shortening the Pt–Pt bond distance. Pt donates electrons to NbOx in both Pt–Nb and Pt–O cases. The resultant electron efficiency stabilizes low-coordinated Pt sites, hereby stabilizing small Pt particles. This determines the two characteristic features of MMO systems: dispersion of small metal particles and high catalytic durability. These findings contribute to our understandings of MMO catalytic systems.

  19. Liquid metal/metal oxide frameworks with incorporated Ga2O3 for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Naidu, Boddu S; Ou, Jian Zhen; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Chrimes, Adam F; Carey, Benjamin J; Wang, Yichao; Tang, Shi-Yang; Sivan, Vijay; Mitchell, Arnan; Bhargava, Suresh K; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-28

    Solvothermally synthesized Ga2O3 nanoparticles are incorporated into liquid metal/metal oxide (LM/MO) frameworks in order to form enhanced photocatalytic systems. The LM/MO frameworks, both with and without incorporated Ga2O3 nanoparticles, show photocatalytic activity due to a plasmonic effect where performance is related to the loading of Ga2O3 nanoparticles. Optimum photocatalytic efficiency is obtained with 1 wt % incorporation of Ga2O3 nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the sub-bandgap states of LM/MO frameworks, contributing to pseudo-ohmic contacts which reduce the free carrier injection barrier to Ga2O3.

  20. Structural implications for oxygen electrocatalysis in earthabundant transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Graeme Patrick

    Transition metal oxides and related nitrides/nitride-oxides represent a class of materials that have shown great promise as oxygen electrocatalysts to replace the otherwise non-scalable noble metal-based catalysts currently implemented in commercial technologies. That is, compounds in this class of materials have shown promise as electrocatalysts for both the oxygen evolution (OER) and oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The two aforementioned half-reactions are at the cornerstone of most renewable energy transformations, as oxygen is an inherently practical and abundant source and sink for electrons. In water electrolysis to produce hydrogen, oxygen is inevitably formed, and in a fuel cell the driving force for extracting electrochemical energy from hydrogen is pairing it with the reduction of oxygen to water. If this can be accomplished reversibly, the problem of "transient" renewable energy and its storage can be mitigated. We have examined many metal oxides and related compounds based upon Earth- abundant transition metals (primarily first row) that are crystalline, yet high surface area, for these important electrocatalytic reactions, and found that crystal structure plays a crucial role in determining activity. In fact, while most studies on heterogeneous catalysis focus on the synthesis of defect-rich, high surface area, practically amorphous materials to elicit high activity, we have found that particular crystalline phases possess not only the appropriate activity, but to some degree more importantly, the stability to be named good catalysts. In Chapter 2, we demonstrate that of the two structural types of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) - layered (R-3m) and cubic (Fd-3m) - only the cubic phase is revealed to be an efficient and stable catalyst for OER. Whether water oxidation is driven photochemically, or electrochemically, the cubic phase LiCoO2 possessing a spinel-like structure (AB 2O4) with [Co4O4] subunits within the crystal is more active. It is seen

  1. Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taujale, Saru; Zhang, Huichun

    2012-03-06

    Manganese oxides typically exist as mixtures with other metal oxides in soil-water environments; however, information is only available on their redox activity as single oxides. To bridge this gap, we examined three binary oxide mixtures containing MnO(2) and a secondary metal oxide (Al(2)O(3), SiO(2) or TiO(2)). The goal was to understand how these secondary oxides affect the oxidative reactivity of MnO(2). SEM images suggest significant heteroaggregation between Al(2)O(3) and MnO(2) and to a lesser extent between SiO(2)/TiO(2) and MnO(2). Using triclosan and chlorophene as probe compounds, pseudofirst-order kinetic results showed that Al(2)O(3) had the strongest inhibitory effect on MnO(2) reactivity, followed by SiO(2) and then TiO(2). Al(3+) ion or soluble SiO(2) had comparable inhibitory effects as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2), indicating the dominant inhibitory mechanism was surface complexation/precipitation of Al/Si species on MnO(2) surfaces. TiO(2) inhibited MnO(2) reactivity only when a limited amount of triclosan was present. Due to strong adsorption and slow desorption of triclosan by TiO(2), precursor-complex formation between triclosan and MnO(2) was much slower and likely became the new rate-limiting step (as opposed to electron transfer in all other cases). These mechanisms can also explain the observed adsorption behavior of triclosan by the binary oxide mixtures and single oxides.

  2. Metal oxide multilayer hard mask system for 3D nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhongmei; Salmi, Emma; Vehkamäki, Marko; Leskelä, Markku; Ritala, Mikko

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the preparation and exploitation of multilayer metal oxide hard masks for lithography and 3D nanofabrication. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) technologies are applied for mask deposition and mask patterning, respectively. A combination of ALD and FIB was used and a patterning procedure was developed to avoid the ion beam defects commonly met when using FIB alone for microfabrication. ALD grown Al2O3/Ta2O5/Al2O3 thin film stacks were FIB milled with 30 keV gallium ions and chemically etched in 5% tetramethylammonium hydroxide at 50 °C. With metal evaporation, multilayers consisting of amorphous oxides Al2O3 and Ta2O5 can be tailored for use in 2D lift-off processing, in preparation of embedded sub-100 nm metal lines and for multilevel electrical contacts. Good pattern transfer was achieved by lift-off process from the 2D hard mask for micro- and nano-scaled fabrication. As a demonstration of the applicability of this method to 3D structures, self-supporting 3D Ta2O5 masks were made from a film stack on gold particles. Finally, thin film resistors were fabricated by utilizing controlled stiction of suspended Ta2O5 structures.

  3. Studies of layered lithium metal oxide anodes in lithium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughey, J. T.; Geyer, Andrea M.; Fackler, Nathanael; Johnson, Christopher S.; Edstrom, K.; Bryngelsson, H.; Benedek, Roy; Thackeray, Michael M.

    Numerous efforts have been made to use metal oxides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we examined layered oxides of the type LiMO 2 (M = Co, Ni) and Li 2MO 3 (M = Mn, Mo, Sn) in lithium cells and found them to be electrochemically active while possessing a high capacity. In general, LiMO 2 electrodes provide higher reversible capacities than Li 2MO 3 electrodes. First-principles theoretical calculations were used as a guide to determine the most favorable reaction pathway from possible insertion (addition) reactions, decomposition reactions, and metal displacement reactions. For example, using in situ X-ray diffraction, LiCoO 2 was found to discharge first to CoO and Li 2O (decomposition reaction) and thereafter, upon further reduction, to Co metal and additional Li 2O (displacement reaction). On charging to 3.0 V, only CoO was reformed; the electrode cycled with a reversible capacity of 575 mAh g -1; this reaction pathway is in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  4. Studies of layered lithium metal oxide anodes in lithium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughey, J.T.; Geyer, Andrea M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Benedek, Roy; Thackeray, Michael M. [Chemical Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fackler, Nathanael [Department of Chemistry, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, NE 68504 (United States); Edstrom, K.; Bryngelsson, H. [Aangstrom Laboratory, Department of Materials Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-12-06

    Numerous efforts have been made to use metal oxides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we examined layered oxides of the type LiMO{sub 2} (M = Co, Ni) and Li{sub 2}MO{sub 3} (M = Mn, Mo, Sn) in lithium cells and found them to be electrochemically active while possessing a high capacity. In general, LiMO{sub 2} electrodes provide higher reversible capacities than Li{sub 2}MO{sub 3} electrodes. First-principles theoretical calculations were used as a guide to determine the most favorable reaction pathway from possible insertion (addition) reactions, decomposition reactions, and metal displacement reactions. For example, using in situ X-ray diffraction, LiCoO{sub 2} was found to discharge first to CoO and Li{sub 2}O (decomposition reaction) and thereafter, upon further reduction, to Co metal and additional Li{sub 2}O (displacement reaction). On charging to 3.0 V, only CoO was reformed; the electrode cycled with a reversible capacity of 575 mAh g{sup -1}; this reaction pathway is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. (author)

  5. Metal oxide films on glass and steel substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Sohi, A M

    1987-01-01

    in the pH8 electrolyte supports the view that the rate limiting reduction reaction is possibly oxygen (or water) reduction although some contribution from an organic 'impurity' cannot be ruled out. Coatings of Fe sub 3 O sub 4 on mild steel have been prepared by CVD using pneumatic spraying techniques and the corrosion behaviour of coated electrodes in organic-phosphate electrolyte (pH8) has been examined. A variety of thin (10-1000nm) metal oxide films have been deposited on flat glass substrates by the pyrolysis of an aerosol of metal acetylacetonates in a suitable carrier. The optical characteristics and thickness of the films have been measured and particular interest has centered on the use of a novel pin on disc apparatus to measure the physical durability of such thin films. Characteristic friction/penetration force traces have been established for 1st Series transition metal oxide films and some ranking in terms of 'hardness' established. The use of SnO sub 2 - coated glass for electrodes in a light m...

  6. Structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces and thin film structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Robert J.

    1999-12-14

    This project focused on three different aspects of oxide thin film systems: (1) Model metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interface studies were carried out by depositing ultra-thin metal (Al, K, Mg) and oxide (MgO, AlO{sub x}) films on TiO{sub 2}, NiO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal oxide substrates. (2) Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen plasma deposition was used to fabricate AlO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates, and film growth mechanisms and structural characteristics were investigated. (3) The friction and wear characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates in unlubricated sliding contact were studied and correlated with film microstructure. In these studies, thin film and interfacial regions were characterized using diffraction (RHEED, LEED, XRD), electron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS, AES), microscopy (AFM) and tribology instruments (pin-on-disk, friction microprobe, and scratch tester). By precise control of thin film microstructure, an increased understanding of the structural and chemical stability of interface regions and tribological performance of ultra-thin oxide films was achieved in these important ceramic systems.

  7. Spinel-based coatings for metal supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Elena; Neagu, Dragos; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Metal supports and metal supported half cells developed at DTU are used for the study of a solution infiltration approach to form protective coatings on porous metal scaffolds. The metal particles in the anode layer, and sometimes even in the support may undergo oxidation in realistic operating...... conditions leading to severe cell degradation. Here, a controlled oxidation of the porous metal substrate and infiltration of Mn and/or Ce nitrate solutions are applied for in situ formation of protective coatings. Our approach consists of scavenging the FeCr oxides formed during the controlled oxidation...

  8. Organic Membranes for Selectivity Enhancement of Metal Oxide Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Graunke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the characterization of organic polyolefin and thermoplastic membranes for the enhancement of the selectivity of metal oxide (MOX gas sensors. The experimental study is done based on theoretical considerations of the membrane characteristics. Through a broad screening of dense symmetric homo- and copolymers with different functional groups, the intrinsic properties such as the mobility or the transport of gases through the matrix were examined in detail. A subset of application-relevant gases was chosen for the experimental part of the study: H2, CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, ethanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, and water vapor. The gases have similar kinetic diameters and are therefore difficult to separate but have different functional groups and polarity. The concentration of the gases was based on the international indicative limit values (TWA, STEL. From the results, a simple relationship was to be found to estimate the permeability of various polar and nonpolar gases through gas permeation (GP membranes. We used a broadband metal oxide gas sensor with a sensitive layer made of tin oxide with palladium catalyst (SnO2:Pd. Our aim was to develop a low-cost symmetrical dense polymer membrane to selectively detect gases with a MOX sensor.

  9. 'Shape effects' in metal oxide supported nanoscale gold catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Matthew B; Goergen, Simone; Yi, Nan; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2011-02-21

    We report the activity of shape-controlled metal oxide (CeO(2), ZnO and Fe(3)O(4)) supported gold catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol (SRM) and the water gas shift (WGS) reactions. Metal oxide nanoshapes, prepared by controlled hydrolysis and thermolysis methods, expose different crystal surfaces, and consequently disperse and stabilize gold differently. We observe that similar to gold supported on CeO(2) shapes exposing the {110} and {111} surfaces, gold supported on the oxygen-rich ZnO {0001} and Fe(3)O(4) {111} surfaces shows higher activity for the SRM and WGS reactions. While the reaction rates vary among the Au-CeO(2), Au-ZnO and Au-Fe(3)O(4) shapes, the apparent activation energies are similar, indicating a common active site. TPR data further indicate that the reaction lightoff coincides with the activation of Au-O-M species on the surface of all three oxide supports evaluated here. Different shapes contain a different number of binding sites for the gold, imparting different overall activity.

  10. Impact of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on Plant: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Rastogi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An increasing need of nanotechnology in various industries may cause a huge environment dispersion of nanoparticles in coming years. A concern about nanoparticles interaction with flora and fauna is raised due to a growing load of it in the environment. In recent years, several investigators have shown impact of nanoparticles on plant growth and their accumulation in food source. This review examines the research performed in the last decade to show how metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are influencing the plant metabolism. We addressed here, the impact of nanoparticle on plant in relation to its size, concentration, and exposure methodology. Based on the available reports, we proposed oxidative burst as a general mechanism through which the toxic effects of nanoparticles are spread in plants. This review summarizes the current understanding and the future possibilities of plant-nanoparticle research.

  11. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffa, Alexander Bowman [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO2 hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  12. Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cihan Çakır

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively.

  13. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  14. The AMOS cell - An improved metal-semiconductor solar cell. [Antireflection coated Metal Oxide Semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y.-C. M.

    1975-01-01

    A new fabrication process is being developed which significantly improves the efficiency of metal-semiconductor solar cells. The resultant effect, a marked increase in the open-circuit voltage, is produced by the addition of an interfacial layer oxide on the semiconductor. Cells using gold on n-type gallium arsenide have been made in small areas (0.17 sq cm) with conversion efficiencies of 15% in terrestrial sunlight.

  15. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  16. Metal ions, not metal-catalyzed oxidative stress, cause clay leachate antibacterial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin C Otto

    Full Text Available Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4-5, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions.

  17. Impacts of metal oxide nanoparticles on marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert J; Lenihan, Hunter S; Muller, Erik B; Tseng, Nancy; Hanna, Shannon K; Keller, Arturo A

    2010-10-01

    Information on the toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of nanoparticles in marine ecosystems is needed for informed regulation of these emerging materials. We tested the effects of two types of metal oxide nanoparticles, TiO(2) and ZnO, on population growth rates of four species of marine phytoplankton representing three major coastal groups (diatoms, chlorophytes, and prymnesiophytes). These metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming common components in many industrial, household, and cosmetic products that are released into coastal ecosystems. Titania NPs showed no measurable effect on growth rates of any species, while ZnO NPs significantly depressed growth rate of all four species. ZnO NPs aggregated rapidly in seawater, forming particles >400 nm hydrodynamic diameter within 30 min, and dissolved quickly, reaching equilibrium concentrations within 12 h. Toxicity of ZnO NPs to phytoplankton was likely due to dissolution, release, and uptake of free zinc ions, but specific nanoparticulate effects may be difficult to disentangle from effects due to free zinc ions. A modeling approach based on a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) framework was used to estimate sublethal effects of the two NPs on phytoplankton populations. Concentrations that were estimated to have no effect on population growth (NEC) were (one standard error in parentheses) 428 (58) μg L(-1) ZnO for the diatom Skeletonema marinoi and 223 (56) μg L(-1) for Thalassiosira pseudonana. NEC could not be estimated for the other taxa but were within the range of 500-1000 μg L(-1). Our results suggest that effects of metal oxide NPs on marine organisms is likely to vary with particle type and organism taxonomy.

  18. Synthesis of Mesoporous Metal Oxides by Structure Replication: Thermal Analysis of Metal Nitrates in Porous Carbon Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Weinberger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of metal nitrates were filled into the pores of an ordered mesoporous CMK-3 carbon matrix by solution-based impregnation. Thermal conversion of the metal nitrates into the respective metal oxides, and subsequent removal of the carbon matrix by thermal combustion, provides a versatile means to prepare mesoporous metal oxides (so-called nanocasting. This study aims to monitor the thermally induced processes by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, coupled with mass ion detection (MS. The highly dispersed metal nitrates in the pores of the carbon matrix tend to react to the respective metal oxides at lower temperature than reported in the literature for pure, i.e., carbon-free, metal nitrates. The subsequent thermal combustion of the CMK-3 carbon matrix also occurs at lower temperature, which is explained by a catalytic effect of the metal oxides present in the pores. This catalytic effect is particularly strong for oxides of redox active metals, such as transition group VII and VIII metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Ce.

  19. In Situ Study of Noncatalytic Metal Oxide Nanowire Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    a catalyst is still widely disputed and unclear. Here, we show that the nanowire growth during metal oxidation is limited by a nucleation of a new layer. On the basis of in situ transmission electron microscope investigations we found that the growth occurs layer by layer at the lowest specific surface...... energy planes. Atomic layers nucleate at the edge of twin boundary ridges and form a long-range ordering along the twin boundary. We anticipate our study to be a starting point to employ defects for nanowire growth control and consequently shaping the geometry of nanowires in a similar manner...

  20. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  1. Electrically Induced Multiple Metal-Insulator Transitions in Oxide Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Javier; Kalcheim, Yoav; Trastoy, Juan; Charnukha, Aliaksei; Basov, Dimitri N.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2017-11-01

    We show that electrical resistive switching can trigger the appearance of multiple metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in VO2 and V2O3 planar nanodevices. We have fabricated planar devices to electrically induce oxygen vacancy drift and filament formation. We show that oxygen migration can create ordered vanadium-oxide phases of varying stoichiometry with an intrinsic MIT, resulting in well-defined hysteresis loops in the R vs T characteristics of the device. We also show that oxygen migration induces oxide phases displaying correlated behaviors. Our results open up the possibility to electrically control the MIT, enabling alternative functionalities in memristive devices and allowing for alternative paradigms in neuromorphic computing or memory applications.

  2. Biomedical application of hierarchically built structures based on metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, the use of hierarchically built structures in biology and medicine arouses much interest. The aim of this work is to review and summarize the available literature data about hierarchically organized structures in biomedical application. Nanoparticles can serve as an example of such structures. Medicine holds a special place among various application methods of similar systems. Special attention is paid to inorganic nanoparticles based on different metal oxides and hydroxides, such as iron, zinc, copper, and aluminum. Our investigations show that low-dimensional nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides have an inhibitory effect on tumor cells and possess an antimicrobial activity. At the same time, it is obvious that the large-scale use of nanoparticles by humans needs to thoroughly study their properties. Special attention should be paid to the study of nanoparticle interaction with living biological objects. The numerous data show that there is no clear understanding of interaction mechanisms between nanoparticles and various cell types.

  3. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jiali; Zhang, Ting; Tang, Meng

    2015-10-12

    Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR) studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  4. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  5. Solution processed reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrid electron transport layers for highly efficient polymer solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jayawardena, KDGI; Rhodes, R; Gandhi, KK; Prabhath, MRR; Dabera, GDMR; Beliatis, MJ; Rozanski, LJ; Henley, SJ; Silva, SRP

    2013-01-01

    We report new solution processable electron transport layers for organic photovoltaic devices based on composites of metal oxides and reduced graphene oxides. Low bandgap polymer cells fabricated using these nanohybrid transport layers display power conversion efficiencies in the range of 7.4-7.5% which is observed to be an improvement over conventional metal oxide or thermally evaporated electron transport layers. This efficiency enhancement is driven mainly by improvements in the short circ...

  6. CuO and ZnO nanoparticles: phytotoxicity, metal speciation, and induction of oxidative stress in sand-grown wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimkpa, Christian O., E-mail: cdimkpa@usu.edu [Utah State University, Department of Biological Engineering (United States); McLean, Joan E. [Utah State University, Utah Water Research Laboratory (United States); Latta, Drew E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Biosciences Division (United States); Manangon, Eliana [University of Utah, Department of Geology and Geophysics (United States); Britt, David W. [Utah State University, Department of Biological Engineering (United States); Johnson, William P. [University of Utah, Department of Geology and Geophysics (United States); Boyanov, Maxim I. [Argonne National Laboratory, Biosciences Division (United States); Anderson, Anne J. [Utah State University, Department of Biological Engineering (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to impact plant growth in hydroponic systems. This study describes the impact of commercial CuO (<50 nm) and ZnO (<100 nm) NPs on wheat (Triticum aestivum) grown in a solid matrix, sand. The NPs contained both metallic and non-metallic impurities to different extents. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy (AFM) assessments confirmed aggregation of the NPs to submicron sizes. AFM showed transformation of ZnO NPs from initial rhomboid shapes in water to elongated rods in the aqueous phase of the sand matrix. Solubilization of metals occurred in the sand at similar rates from CuO or ZnO NPs as their bulk equivalents. Amendment of the sand with 500 mg Cu and Zn/kg sand from the NPs significantly (p = 0.05) reduced root growth, but only CuO NPs impaired shoot growth; growth reductions were less with the bulk amendments. Dissolved Cu from CuO NPs contributed to their phytotoxicity but Zn release did not account for the changes in plant growth. Bioaccumulation of Cu, mainly as CuO and Cu(I)-sulfur complexes, and Zn as Zn-phosphate was detected in the shoots of NP-challenged plants. Total Cu and Zn levels in shoot were similar whether NP or bulk materials were used. Oxidative stress in the NP-treated plants was evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione in roots and decreased chlorophyll content in shoots; higher peroxidase and catalase activities were present in roots. These findings correlate with the NPs causing increased production of reactive oxygen species. The accumulation of Cu and Zn from NPs into edible plants has relevance to the food chain.

  7. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  8. A Review of Current Research into the Biogenic Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles via Marine Algae and Seagrasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Fawcett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today there is a growing need to develop reliable, sustainable, and ecofriendly protocols for manufacturing a wide range of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles. The biogenic synthesis of nanoparticles via nanobiotechnology based techniques has the potential to deliver clean manufacturing technologies. These new clean technologies can significantly reduce environmental contamination and decease the hazards to human health resulting from the use of toxic chemicals and solvents currently used in conventional industrial fabrication processes. The largely unexplored marine environment that covers approximately 70% of the earth’s surface is home to many naturally occurring and renewable marine plants. The present review summarizes current research into the biogenic synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles via marine algae (commonly known as seaweeds and seagrasses. Both groups of marine plants contain a wide variety of biologically active compounds and secondary metabolites that enables these plants to act as biological factories for the manufacture of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Characteristics and possibilities of software tool for metal-oxide surge arresters selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a procedure for the selection of metal-oxide surge arresters based on the instructions given in the Siemens and ABB catalogues, respecting their differences and the characteristics and possibilities of the software tool. The software tool was developed during the preparation of a Master's thesis titled, 'Automation of Metal-Oxide Surge Arresters Selection'. An example is presented of the selection of metal-oxide surge arresters using the developed software tool.

  10. Mesoporous metal oxide microsphere electrode compositions and their methods of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Bi, Zhonghe; Bridges, Craig A.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2017-04-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for treated mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The compositions include microspheres with an average diameter between about 200 nanometers and about 10 micrometers and mesopores on the surface and interior of the microspheres. The methods of making include forming a mesoporous metal oxide microsphere composition and treating the mesoporous metal oxide microspheres by at least annealing in a reducing atmosphere, doping with an aliovalent element, and coating with a coating composition.

  11. The performance of large area optical filters using dc magnetron sputtered metal thin films in oxide-metal-oxide sandwiches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, C.A.; Howson, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    The properties of metal filters with tin oxide dielectric matching layers is reported here when they are made by planar magnetron sputtering onto a flexible polyester sheet. Comparison with theoretical predictions indicate the point at which the structural effects in the film dominate the properties obtained. Silver films give visible transmittances of approximately 80% with an infrared reflectance of 90%. The performance of gold and copper are not so good. The difference between the deposited films and the theoretical performance can be explained by changes in the packing density of the film during deposition. (A.V.)

  12. Ultrathin and Atomically Flat Transition-Metal Oxide: Promising Building Blocks for Metal-Insulator Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qingsong; Sakhdari, Maryam; Chamlagain, Bhim; Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng; Zhou, Zhixian; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-12-21

    We present a new and viable template-assisted thermal synthesis method for preparing amorphous ultrathin transition-metal oxides (TMOs) such as TiO2 and Ta2O5, which are converted from crystalline two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) down to a few atomic layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to characterize the chemical composition and bonding, surface morphology, and atomic structure of these ultrathin amorphous materials to validate the effectiveness of our synthesis approach. Furthermore, we have fabricated metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes using the TiO2 and Ta2O5 as ultrathin insulating layers with low potential barrier heights. Our MIM diodes show a clear transition from direct tunneling to Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, which was not observed in previously reported MIM diodes with TiO2 or Ta2O5 as the insulating layer. We attribute the improved performance of our MIM diodes to the excellent flatness and low pinhole/defect densities in our TMO insulting layers converted from 2D TMDs, which enable the low-threshold and controllable electron tunneling transport. We envision that it is possible to use the ultrathin TMOs converted from 2D TMDs as the insulating layer of a wide variety of metal-insulator and field-effect electronic devices for various applications ranging from microwave mixing, parametric conversion, infrared photodetection, emissive energy harvesting, to ultrafast electronic switching.

  13. Hydrogenated - Metal Oxide Nanohybrids: AN Inventiveness Plinth for Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraneedharan, P.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    Graphene- a two dimensional sheet of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms has been considered as promising materials in sensor design for detection of target molecule. Charge carriers in graphene obey linear dispersion relation and it behaves like mass less relativistic particles which act as base for enhanced electron transport. Thus the electrons move ballistically without scattering giving higher mobility even at room temperature. Further, the presence of oxygen containing functional group and crystal defects assisted via hydrogenation process take vital part in electrochemical adsorption of electro active species and catalyses the same. Though issues with selectivity, stability and sensitivity are limited for several nanostructured metal oxides sensing, the hybrid system started its effective role in design of sensing platform. Thus considering the potential important of hydrogenated graphene -metal oxide systems, a nanohybrid system is developed and its structural, morphological and optical properties were understood using respective characterization tool. Further, the prepared hybrid nanosystem used as a platform for bimolecule detection, where the sensor exhibits higher range of sensitivity and selectivity.

  14. Pulsed-laser-induced nanoscale island formation in thin metal-on-oxide films

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, SJ; Carey, JD; Silva, SRP

    2005-01-01

    he mechanisms controlling the nanostructuring of thin metal-on-oxide films by nanosecond pulsed excimer lasers are investigated. When permitted by the interfacial energetics, the breakup of the metal film into nanoscale islands is observed. A range of metals (Au, Ag, Mo, Ni, Ti, and Zn) with differing physical and thermodynamic properties, and differing tendencies for oxide formation, are investigated. The nature of the interfacial metal-substrate interaction, the thermal conductivity of the ...

  15. Sensitivity Enhancement of Metal-Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John F.

    Metal-oxide chemical sensor technology has been praised as a cheap and efficient method of detecting both reducing and oxidizing gases depending on the metal-oxide's carrier type. The research conducted in this thesis explored methods of enhancing the sensitivity of an n-type metal-oxide material (indium tin oxide, ITO) to a volatile organic compound (VOC) through changes in both device and testing characteristics. Two methods of testing prototype sensors were developed which consisted of short and long-term exposure to ethanol at different temperatures and concentrations. Maximum sensitivity at 2000 ppm was achieved in devices with thin, annealed metal-oxide layers with a high temperature of operation; this sensitivity measurement was achieved using a prolonged exposure test with 100-nm of annealed ITO at an operating temperature of 360°C and yielded a sensitivity of 32.5%. A fabrication process consisting of two lift-off processes for the metal-oxide and contact metal was developed to create the prototype devices. Preliminary characterization on the metal-oxide materials confirmed its thickness, crystallinity / crystal structure, and grain size. In addition to the electrical tests, a future work chemical sensor was thermally and electrically simulated using SolidWorks and Silvaco Atlas, respectively; a proposed fabrication process of the device is also presented, along with a basic outline of future work experiments to further study sensitivity enhancements through other metal-oxide materials, noble catalytic metals, device architecture, and signal processing of proposed electrical testing.

  16. Metal Oxide-Carbon Nanocomposites for Aqueous and Nonaqueous Supercapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort focuses on development of novel metal-oxide-carbon nanocomposites for application in pseudocapacitive...

  17. [Formation and reactions of biogenic manganese oxides with heavy metals in environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, You-Ting; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2009-02-15

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are common minerals in natural environments that may play an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. Increasing evidences have shown that Mn (II) oxidation is a microbially-mediated process, and the Mn oxidizing microorganisms are thus recognized as the major drivers of the global Mn cycle. The major pathway for bacterial Mn (II) oxidation is catalysed by a multicopper oxidizing enzyme family. The primary Mn (IV) biooxides are phyllomanganate-like minerals most similar to delta-MnO2 or acid birnessite. Manganese oxides are known to have high sorption capacities for a wide variety of metal ions and considered to be the important environmental oxidant to many metal ions. This paper reviewed the mechanisms of biogenic manganese oxides formation and their reactions with heavy metal ions in environment.

  18. Radiation hardening of metal-oxide semi-conductor (MOS) devices by boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, V.

    1974-01-01

    Technique using boron effectively protects metal-oxide semiconductor devices from ionizing radiation without using shielding materials. Boron is introduced into insulating gate oxide layer at semiconductor-insulator interface.

  19. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS VIA BUILDING BLOCK SYNTHESES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig E. Barnes

    2013-03-05

    A broadly applicable methodology has been developed to prepare new single site catalysts on silica supports. This methodology requires of three critical components: a rigid building block that will be the main structural and compositional component of the support matrix; a family of linking reagents that will be used to insert active metals into the matrix as well as cross link building blocks into a three dimensional matrix; and a clean coupling reaction that will connect building blocks and linking agents together in a controlled fashion. The final piece of conceptual strategy at the center of this methodology involves dosing the building block with known amounts of linking agents so that the targeted connectivity of a linking center to surrounding building blocks is obtained. Achieving targeted connectivities around catalytically active metals in these building block matrices is a critical element of the strategy by which single site catalysts are obtained. This methodology has been demonstrated with a model system involving only silicon and then with two metal-containing systems (titanium and vanadium). The effect that connectivity has on the reactivity of atomically dispersed titanium sites in silica building block matrices has been investigated in the selective oxidation of phenols to benezoquinones. 2-connected titanium sites are found to be five times as active (i.e. initial turnover frequencies) than 4-connected titanium sites (i.e. framework titanium sites).

  20. Increased levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in metal oxides nanomaterial-handling workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Hui-Yi; Wang, Chien-Jen; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed oxidatively damaged DNA and antioxidant enzyme activity in workers occupational exposure to metal oxides nanomaterials. Exposure to TiO2, SiO2, and ITO resulted in significant lower antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase) and higher oxidative biomarkers 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) than comparison workers. Statistically significant correlations were noted between plasma and urine 8-oxodG, between white blood cells (WBC) and urine 8-oxodG, and between WBC and plasma 8-oxodG. In addition, there were significant negative correlations between WBC 8-oxodG and SOD and between urinary 8-oxodG and GPx levels. The results showed that urinary 8-oxodG may be considered to be better biomarker.

  1. Electrosprayed Metal Oxide Semiconductor Films for Sensitive and Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghimbeu, C.M.; Lumbreras, M.; Schoonman, J.; Siadat, M.

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor metal oxide films of copper-doped tin oxide (Cu-SnO2), tungsten oxide (WO3) and indium oxide (In2O3) were deposited on a platinum coated alumina substrate employing the electrostatic spray deposition technique (ESD). The morphology studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and

  2. Molecular orbital studies in oxidation: Sulfate formation and metal-metal oxide adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanisms for sulfate formation from sodium chloride and sulfur trioxide, which is a product of jet fuel combustion was determined. Molten sodium sulfate leads to hot corrosion of the protective oxide layers on turbine blades. How yttrium dopants in nidkel-aluminum alloys used in turbine blades reduce the spalling rate of protective alumina films and enhance their adhesion was also determined. Two other fulfate mechanisms were deduced and structure of carbon monoxide on a clean chronium and clean platinum-titanium alloys surfaces was determined. All studies were by use of the atom superposition and electron delocalization molecular orbital (ASED-MO) theory. Seven studies were completed. Their titles and abstracts are given.

  3. Redefining the metal/charge-transfer insulator paradigm in transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hung; Ai, Xinyuan; Marianetti, Chris; Millis, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The universality of the phase diagram in the variables of interaction strength and d-occupancy, shown for late transition metal oxides in Ref.[1], is examined for two series of early transition metal oxides: (SrVO3, SrCrO3, SrMnO3) and (LaTiO3, LaVO3, LaCrO3) using density functional theory (DFT), DFT+U and DFT+dynamical mean field theory methods. The interaction required to drive the metal-insulator transition is found to depend sensitively on the d-occupancy Nd, and beyond a threshold value of the d-occupancy an insulating state cannot be achieved for any practical value of the interaction. The critical Nd values are determined and compared to ab initio and experimental estimates where available. Additionally, the minimal model for the transition is determined and the crucial role played by the Hunds coupling is demonstrated. [4pt] [1] Xin Wang, M. J. Han, Luca de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and Andrew J. Millis (2011). arXiv:1110.2782

  4. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa; Dreher, Kevin

    particles induced similar increases in HO-1 mRNA levels at 6hr and 24hr post-exposure, respectively. The pattern of HO-1 gene induction was inconsistent with a role of oxidative stress in metal oxide induced BEAS2B cytokine gene expression. Pretreatment of BEAS2B cells with IKK inhibitor III BMS-345541......Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize NMs......2B cytotoxicity was observed for any particle following a 24hr exposure to concentrations upto100 μg/ml. The ability of TiO2 and CeO2 particles to induce inflammation and oxidative stress was assessed by gene induction using RT-PCR. At 50 μg/ml maximal IL-8 and IL-6 gene induction by TiO2 and CeO2...

  5. GRAPHENE BASED METAL AND METAL OXIDE NANOCOMPOSITES: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mujeeb

    2015-06-11

    Graphene, an atomically thin two-dimensional carbonaceous material, has attracted tremendous attention in the scientific community, due to its exceptional electronic, electrical, and mechanical properties. Indeed, with the recent explosion of methods for a large-scale synthesis of graphene, the number of publications related to graphene and other graphene based materials have increased exponentially. Particularly the easy preparation of graphene like materials, such as, highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) via reduction of graphite oxide (GO), offers a wide range of possibilities for the preparation of graphene based inorganic nanocomposites by the incorporation of various functional nanomaterials for a variety of applications. In this review, we discuss the current development of graphene based metal and metal oxide nanocomposites, with a detailed account of their synthesis and properties. Specifically, much attention has been given to their wide range of applications in various fields, including, electronics, electrochemical and electrical fields. Overall, by the inclusion of various references, this review covers in detail aspects of the graphene-based inorganic nanocomposites.

  6. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Development of metal supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, L. M.; Alava, I.; Antepara, I.; Castro, U.; Diez-Linaza, E.; Lecanda, N.; Montero, X.; Rivas, M.; Villarreal, I.; Laresgoiti, A.

    2005-07-01

    Metal supported solid oxide fuel cells have been developed by Ikerlan in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, as a promising way to reduce materials costs. This, in conjunction with cost-effective processing techniques, is vital for successful commercialisation of SOFC's. In this type of cells, the Ni/YSZ support anode has been replaced by a porous stainless steel support structure, and the Ni/YSZ anode is now limited to a thin catalytically active layer. The basic structure also includes a thin, 5-15 micron YSZ electrolyte and a cathode (LSF, LSCF or similar) of approximately 15-20 microns. This robust metal structure provides both high thermal and electronic conductivity, improves thermal shock resistance and allows for simple, cost effective sealing strategies. Metal supported SOFC technology, first patented in 1966 [1], has only recently received interest but the majority of current research is centred on relatively expensive fabrication techniques such as plasma spray [2] and metalorganic chemical vapour deposition [3]. Ceres Power [4,5] has, conversely, focused on the integration of low cost ceramic processes with metallic materials to develop doped ceria based electrolyte metal supported planar cells operating at 500-600C. Ikerlan, as part of Mondragon Corporacion Cooperativa (MCC), aims to develop metal supported SOFC tubular systems for small stationary applications based on natural gas, propane and similar fuels. The target temperature for operation is 700C, although studies are performed over a wider, 650-800C temperature range. Conventional low-cost processing and coating technologies, such as colloidal spray, dip coating and tape casting, are used to fabricate cofired ferritic supports, anodes and thin electrolytes under reducing atmospheres. The cathode is subsequently deposited and fired in air at temperatures below 1100C. The cofiring process adds several challenging requirements on the properties of the materials

  8. Absorbed dose assessment in particle-beam irradiated metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose was estimated after Monte Carlo simulation of proton and ion beam irradiation on metal-oxide and metal-nonmetal memristors. A memristive device comprises two electrodes, each of a nanoscale width, and a double-layer active region disposed between and in electrical contact with electrodes. Following materials were considered for the active region: titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, hafnium dioxide, strontium titanium trioxide and galium nitride. Obtained results show that significant amount of oxygen ion - oxygen and nonmetal ion - nonmetal vacancy pairs is to be generated. The loss of such vacancies from the device is believed to deteriorate the device performance over time. Estimated absorbed dose values in the memristor for different constituting materials are of the same order of magnitude because of the close values of treshold displacement energies for the investigated materials.

  9. Spin-on metal oxide materials with high etch selectivity and wet strippability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huirong; Mullen, Salem; Wolfer, Elizabeth; McKenzie, Douglas; Rahman, Dalil; Cho, JoonYeon; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Petermann, Claire; Hong, SungEun; Her, YoungJun

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide or metal nitride films are used as hard mask materials in semiconductor industry for patterning purposes due to their excellent etch resistances against the plasma etches. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques are usually used to deposit the metal containing materials on substrates or underlying films, which uses specialized equipment and can lead to high cost-of-ownership and low throughput. We have reported novel spin-on coatings that provide simple and cost effective method to generate metal oxide films possessing good etch selectivity and can be removed by chemical agents. In this paper, new spin-on Al oxide and Zr oxide hard mask formulations are reported. The new metal oxide formulations provide higher metal content compared to previously reported material of specific metal oxides under similar processing conditions. These metal oxide films demonstrate ultra-high etch selectivity and good pattern transfer capability. The cured films can be removed by various chemical agents such as developer, solvents or wet etchants/strippers commonly used in the fab environment. With high metal MHM material as an underlayer, the pattern transfer process is simplified by reducing the number of layers in the stack and the size of the nano structure is minimized by replacement of a thicker film ACL. Therefore, these novel AZ® spinon metal oxide hard mask materials can potentially be used to replace any CVD or ALD metal, metal oxide, metal nitride or spin-on silicon-containing hard mask films in 193 nm or EUV process.

  10. Atomic bonding and electrical potential at metal/oxide interfaces, a first principle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea, Eric; Huang, Jianqiu; Li, Guanchen; Hin, Celine

    2017-03-01

    A number of electronic devices involve metal/oxide interfaces in their structure where the oxide layer plays the role of electrical insulator. As the downscaling of devices continues, the oxide thickness can spread over only a few atomic layers, making the role of interfaces prominent on its insulating properties. The prototypical Al/SiO2 metal/oxide interface is investigated using first principle calculations, and the effect of the interfacial atomic bonding is evidenced. It is shown that the interface bonding configuration critically dictates the mechanical and electronic properties of the interface. Oxygen atoms are found to better delimit the oxide boundaries than cations. Interfacial cation-metal bonds allow the metal potential to leak inside the oxide layer, without atomic diffusion, leading to a virtual oxide thinning.

  11. Passivation ability of graphene oxide demonstrated by two-different-metal solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Tzu; Tsai, Zong-Sian; Chen, Liang-Chun; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Mei-Hsin; Song, Jenn-Ming; Lin, Chu-Hsuan

    2014-12-01

    The study on graphene oxide (GO) grows rapidly in recent years. We find that graphene oxide could act as the passivation material in photovoltaic applications. Graphene oxide has been applied on Si two-different-metal solar cells. The suitable introduction of graphene oxide could result in obvious enhancement on the efficiency. The simple chemical process to deposit graphene oxide makes low thermal budget, large-area deposition, and fast production of surface passivation possible. The different procedures to incorporate graphene oxide in Si two-different-metal solar cells are compared, and 21% enhancement on the efficiency is possible with a suitable deposition method.

  12. Electrocatalytic oxidation of Epinephrine and Norepinephrine at metal oxide doped phthalocyanine/MWCNT composite sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphuthi, Ntsoaki G.; Adekunle, Abolanle S.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-06-01

    Glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was modified with metal oxides (MO = Fe3O4, ZnO) nanoparticles doped phthalocyanine (Pc) and functionalized MWCNTs, and the electrocatalytic properties were studied. Successful synthesis of the metal oxide nanoparticles and the MO/Pc/MWCNT composite were confirmed using FTIR, Raman and SEM techniques. The electrodes were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. The electrocatalytic behaviour of the electrode towards epinephrine (EP) and norepinephrine (NE) oxidation was investigated using CV and DPV. Result showed that GCE-MWCNT/Fe3O4/2,3-Nc, GCE-MWCNT/Fe3O429H,31H-Pc, GCE-MWCNT/ZnO/2,3-Nc and GCE-MWCNT/ZnO/29H,31H-Pc electrodes gave enhanced EP and NE current response. Stability study indicated that the four GCE-MWCNT/MO/Pc modified electrodes were stable against electrode fouling effect with the percentage NE current drop of 5.56-5.88% after 20 scans. GCE-MWCNT/Fe3O4/29H,31H-Pc gave the lowest limit of detection (4.6 μM) towards EP while MWCNT/ZnO/29H,31H-Pc gave the lowest limit of detection (1.7 μM) towards NE. The limit of detection and sensitivity of the electrodes compared well with literature. Electrocatalytic oxidation of EP and NE on GCE-MWCNT/MO/Pc electrodes was diffusion controlled with some adsorption of electro-oxidation reaction intermediates products. The electrodes were found to be electrochemically stable, reusable and can be used for the analysis of EP and NE in real life samples.

  13. Integration of metal oxide nanowires in flexible gas sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comini, Elisabetta

    2013-08-15

    Metal oxide nanowires are very promising active materials for different applications, especially in the field of gas sensors. Advances in fabrication technologies now allow the preparation of nanowires on flexible substrates, expanding the potential market of the resulting sensors. The critical steps for the large-scale preparation of reliable sensing devices are the elimination of high temperatures processes and the stretchability of the entire final device, including the active material. Direct growth on flexible substrates and post-growth procedures have been successfully used for the preparation of gas sensors. The paper will summarize the procedures used for the preparation of flexible and wearable gas sensors prototypes with an overlook of the challenges and the future perspectives concerning this field.

  14. Transition metal oxide hierarchical nanotubes for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yongcheng; Wu, Hao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-01-01

    We report a general synthetic method for transition metal oxide (TMO) hierarchical nanotube (HNT) structures by a solution-phase cation exchange method from Cu2O nanowire templates. This method leads to the formation of hollow, tubular backbones with secondary, thin nanostructures on the tube surface, which substantially increases the surface reactive sites for electrolyte contacts and electrochemical reactions. As proofs-of-concept, several representative first-row TMO HNTs have been synthesized, including CoO x , NiO x , MnO x , ZnO x and FeO x , with specific surface areas much larger than nanotubes or nanoparticles of corresponding materials. An example of the potential energy storage applications of CoO x HNTs as supercapacitors is also demonstrated.

  15. Opportunities in nano-structured metal oxides based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, B. D.; Das, Maumita; Solanki, Pratima R.

    2012-04-01

    Nanomaterials are presently at the critical stage of the next technological revolution in solid-state electronics and are emerging as new structural materials, to serve as systems for controlled drug delivery, biomolecular electronics and are considered to have considerable impact in practically all domains of science. Among the various types of nanomaterials that have been developed, nanostructured metal oxides (NSMOs) have recently aroused much interest as immobilizing matrices for biosensors development. The unique properties of NSMOs offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction and for designing a new generation of bioelectronics devices that may exhibit novel functions. Among the NSMOs, biocompatible zirconia (ZrO2) and its composite especially with chitosan and carbon nanotubes are technologically important exhibits high bioactivity for biomolecules with rapid rand enhanced electrochemical signal. Efforts are being continuously made to explore the prospects and future challenges of NSMOs for the development of biosensing devices.

  16. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagby, L. F. [Fermilab; Gollapinni, S. [Kansas State U.; James, C. C. [Fermilab; Jones, B. J.P. [MIT; Jostlein, H. [Fermilab; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Naples, D. [Pittsburgh U.; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Rameika, R. [Fermilab; Schukraft, A. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Bern U., LHEP; Weber, M. S. [Bern U., LHEP; Wolbers, S. A. [Fermilab

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  17. Phytotoxicity by Lead as Heavy Metal Focus on Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Pinho

    2012-01-01

    since it can be prejudicial to human health through food chain. Pb is a common environmental contaminant, which originate numerous disturbances in plant physiological processes due to the bioacummulation of this metal pollutant in plant tissues. This review, focus on the uptake and interaction of lead by plants and how it can be introduced in food chain. Special attention was taken to address the oxidative stress by lead regarding the effects produced in plant physiological and biochemical processes. Furthermore, the antioxidant defence system was taken into consideration. Phytoremediation is applied on site or chronic polluted soils. This emerging technique is useful to bioaccumulate, degrade or decrease risks associated with contaminants in soils, water or air through the use of hyperaccumulaters. In addition, the impact of nanoparticles in plant science was also focused in this article since some improving properties in plants have been increasingly investigated.

  18. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Gas Sensitive Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Vallejos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of recent research efforts and developments for the fabrication of metal-oxide gas sensors using chemical vapour deposition (CVD, presenting its potential advantages as a materials synthesis technique for gas sensors along with a discussion of their sensing performance. Thin films typically have poorer gas sensing performance compared to traditional screen printed equivalents, attributed to reduced porosity, but the ability to integrate materials directly with the sensor platform provides important process benefits compared to competing synthetic techniques. We conclude that these advantages are likely to drive increased interest in the use of CVD for gas sensor materials over the next decade, whilst the ability to manipulate deposition conditions to alter microstructure can help mitigate the potentially reduced performance in thin films, hence the current prospects for use of CVD in this field look excellent.

  19. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. McIntyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  20. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rathnait D.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN) surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  1. Two-dimensional metal oxide and metal hydroxide nanosheets: synthesis, controlled assembly and applications in energy conversion and storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Yuan, H.; Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.

    2016-01-01

    The developments and state of the art in the research on two-dimensional nanosheets derived from layered metal oxides and layered metal hydroxides are reviewed in this paper, with emphasis on their promising applications in various new energy technologies, i.e., as supercapacitor electrodes, lithium

  2. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10044 - Metal oxide, modified with alkyl and vinyl terminated polysiloxanes (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal oxide, modified with alkyl... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metal oxide, modified with alkyl and... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL...

  4. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of transition metal based water oxidation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oversteeg, Christina H M; Doan, Hoang Q; de Groot, Frank M F; Cuk, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of the geometric and electronic structure of primarily heterogeneous Co, Ni, and Mn based water oxidation catalysts are reviewed. The X-ray absorption near edge and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the metal K-edge, characterize the metal oxidation state,

  5. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  6. Graphene-Metal Oxide Hybrid Nanostructured Materials for Electrocatalytic Sensing and Sustainable Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei; Chi, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    with specific metal oxide nanostructures, resulting nanohybrid materials can play a significant role in the cutting-edge development of state-of-the-art electrocatalysts using commercially available and low-cost precursors. Herein, we review the mostly recent advances in the development of noble metal free...... graphene supported electrocatalysts. This review includes an introduction to graphene-metal oxide based nanohybrid materials, different synthetic strategies for the preparation of graphene/metal oxide nanocomposites and their structural characterization, and an overview of various electrochemical...

  7. The atomic level journey from aqueous polyoxometalate to metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Fast, Dylan B.; Ruther, Rose E.; Amador, Jenn M.; Fullmer, Lauren B.; Decker, Shawn R.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Dolgos, Michelle R.; Nyman, May

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous precursors tailored for the deposition of thin film materials are desirable for sustainable, simple, low energy production of advanced materials. Yet the simple practice of using aqueous precursors is complicated by the multitude of interactions that occur between ions and water during dehydration. Here we use lithium polyoxoniobate salts to investigate the fundamental interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to oxide film. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions, total X-ray scattering of intermediate gels, and morphological and structural characterization of the lithium niobate thin films reveal the atomic level transitions between these states. The studies show that (1) lithium-[H2Nb6O19]6- has drastically different solution behaviour than lithium-[Nb6O19]8-, linked to the precursor salt structure (2) in both compositions, the intermediate gel preserves the polyoxoniobate clusters and show similar local order and (3) the morphology and phases of deposited films reflect the ions behaviour throughout the journey from cluster solution to metal oxide.

  8. The Biomechanisms of Metal and Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles’ Interactions with Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondra S. Teske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are increasingly exposed to nanoparticles (NPs in medicine and in industrial settings, where significant concentrations of NPs are common. However, NP interactions with and effects on biomolecules and organisms have only recently been addressed. Within we review the literature regarding proposed modes of action for metal and metal-oxide NPs, two of the most prevalent types manufactured. Iron-oxide NPs, for instance, are used as tracers for magnetic resonance imaging of oncological tumors and as vehicles for therapeutic drug delivery. Factors and theories that determine the physicochemical and biokinetic behaviors of NPs are discussed, along with the observed toxicological effects of NPs on cells. Key thermodynamic and kinetic models that explain the sources of energy transfer from NPs to biological targets are summarized, in addition to quantitative structural activity relationship (QSAR modeling efforts. Future challenges for nanotoxicological research are discussed. We conclude that NP studies based on cell culture are often inconsistent and underestimate the toxicity of NPs. Thus, the effect of NPs needs to be examined in whole animal systems.

  9. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Andrea; Pilger, Frank; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Stähli, Christoph; Bowen, Paul

    2015-06-08

    Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR), has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1-x)NixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape) and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO4)2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be obtained with a production rate of about 1-10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  10. Countering drug resistance, infectious diseases, and sepsis using metal and metal oxides nanoparticles: Current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2016-10-01

    One fourth of the global mortalities is still caused by microbial infections largely due to the development of resistance against conventional antibiotics among pathogens, the resurgence of old infectious diseases and the emergence of hundreds of new infectious diseases. The lack of funds and resources for the discovery of new antibiotics necessitates the search for economic and effective alternative antimicrobial agents. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles including silver and zinc oxide exhibit remarkable antimicrobial activities against pathogens and hence are one of the most propitious alternative antimicrobial agents. These engineered nanomaterials are approved by regulatory agencies such as USFDA and Korea's FITI, for use as antimicrobial agents, supplementary antimicrobials, food packaging, skin care products, oral hygiene, and for fortifying devices prone to microbial infections. Nevertheless, detailed studies, on molecular and biochemical mechanisms underlying their antimicrobial activity are missing. To take the full advantage of this emerging technology selective antimicrobial activity of these nanoparticles against pathogens should be studied. Optimization of these nanomaterials through functionalization to increase their efficacy and biocompatibility is also required. Urgent in vivo studies on the toxicity of nanomaterials at realistic doses are also needed before their clinical translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Testino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR, has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1−xNixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO42 nanoparticles (NPs can be obtained with a production rate of about 1–10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  12. Mesoporous metal oxide microsphere electrode compositions and their methods of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Liu, Hansan; Brown, Gilbert M.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe

    2016-12-06

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere compositions comprise (a) microspheres with an average diameter between 200 nanometers (nm) and 10 micrometers (.mu.m); (b) mesopores on the surface and interior of the microspheres, wherein the mesopores have an average diameter between 1 nm and 50 nm and the microspheres have a surface area between 50 m.sup.2/g and 500 m.sup.2/g. The methods of making comprise forming composite powders. The methods may also comprise refluxing the composite powders in a basic solution to form an etched powder, washing the etched powder with an acid to form a hydrated metal oxide, and heat-treating the hydrated metal oxide to form mesoporous metal oxide microspheres.

  13. Ultrathin amorphous zinc-tin-oxide buffer layer for enhancing heterojunction interface quality in metal-oxide solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Jaeyeong; Siah, Sin Cheng; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Brandt, Riley E.; Kim, Sang Bok; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Lee, Yun seog

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a tunable electron-blocking layer to enhance the performance of an Earth-abundant metal-oxide solar-cell material. A 5 nm thick amorphous ternary metal-oxide buffer layer reduces interface recombination, resulting in sizable open-circuit voltage and efficiency enhancements. This work emphasizes the importance of interface engineering in improving the performance of Earth-abundant solar cells.

  14. Low-Power Laser Ignition of Aluminum/Metal Oxide Nanothermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Al nanopowder (100 nm) was used as the fuel source, while the oxidizers were nanometric pow- ders of CuO (40 nm), MoO3 (100 nm), and Bi2O3 (200 nm...metal oxide is the oxidizer and, generally, the fuel is aluminum. The nanothermites are generally composed of aluminum and metal oxide nanopowders ...synthesis takes place and the thermo- dynamic products of alumina (Al2O3) and metal are formed. Several models suggest that the melting point of

  15. Enhanced metal recovery through oxidation in liquid and/or supercritical carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Blanco, Mario

    2017-08-24

    Process for enhanced metal recovery from, for example, metal-containing feedstock using liquid and/or supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and a source of oxidation. The oxidation agent can be free of complexing agent. The metal-containing feedstock can be a mineral such as a refractory mineral. The mineral can be an ore with high sulfide content or an ore rich in carbonaceous material. Waste can also be used as the metal-containing feedstock. The metal-containing feedstock can be used which is not subjected to ultrafine grinding. Relatively low temperatures and pressures can be used. The metal-containing feedstock can be fed into the reactor at a temperature below the critical temperature of the carbon dioxide, and an exotherm from the oxidation reaction can provide the supercritical temperature. The oxidant can be added to the reactor at a rate to maintain isothermal conditions in the reactor. Minimal amounts of water can be used as an extractive medium.

  16. A Comprehensive Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Metal-Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has opened new and exhilarating opportunities for exploring glucose biosensing applications of the newly prepared nanostructured materials. Nanostructured metal-oxides have been extensively explored to develop biosensors with high sensitivity, fast response times, and stability for the determination of glucose by electrochemical oxidation. This article concentrates mainly on the development of different nanostructured metal-oxide [such as ZnO, Cu(I/(II oxides, MnO2, TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, ZrO2, and other metal-oxides] based glucose biosensors. Additionally, we devote our attention to the operating principles (i.e., potentiometric, amperometric, impedimetric and conductometric of these nanostructured metal-oxide based glucose sensors. Finally, this review concludes with a personal prospective and some challenges of these nanoscaled sensors.

  17. A Comprehensive Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Metal-Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Saleh Ahammad, A. J.; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened new and exhilarating opportunities for exploring glucose biosensing applications of the newly prepared nanostructured materials. Nanostructured metal-oxides have been extensively explored to develop biosensors with high sensitivity, fast response times, and stability for the determination of glucose by electrochemical oxidation. This article concentrates mainly on the development of different nanostructured metal-oxide [such as ZnO, Cu(I)/(II) oxides, MnO2, TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, ZrO2, and other metal-oxides] based glucose biosensors. Additionally, we devote our attention to the operating principles (i.e., potentiometric, amperometric, impedimetric and conductometric) of these nanostructured metal-oxide based glucose sensors. Finally, this review concludes with a personal prospective and some challenges of these nanoscaled sensors. PMID:22399911

  18. Pure and multi metal oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, antibacterial and cytotoxic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Stankic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Th antibacterial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles has received marked global attention as they can be specifically synthesized to exhibit significant toxicity to bacteria. The importance of their application as antibacterial agents is evident keeping in mind the limited range and effectiveness of antibiotics, on one hand, and the plethora of metal oxides, on the other, along with the propensity of nanoparticles to induce resistance being much lower than that of antibiotics. Effective inhibition against a wide range of bacteria is well known for several nano oxides consisting of one metal (Fe3O4, TiO2, CuO, ZnO, whereas, research in the field of multi-metal oxides still demands extensive exploration. This is understandable given that the relationship between physicochemical properties and biological activity seems to be complex and difficult to generalize even for metal oxide nanoparticles consisting of only one metal component. Also, despite the broad scope that metal oxide nanoparticles have as antibacterial agents, there arise problems in practical applications taking into account the cytotoxic effects. In this respect, the consideration of polymetallic oxides for biological applications becomes even greater since these can provide synergetic effects and unify the best physicochemical properties of their components. For instance, strong antibacterial efficiency specific of one metal oxide can be complemented by non-cytotoxicity of another. This review presents the main methods and technological advances in fabrication of nanostructured metal oxides with a particular emphasis to multi-metal oxide nanoparticles, their antibacterial effects and cytotoxicity.

  19. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Mitra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause(s of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases.

  20. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  1. Heme-Containing Metal-Organic Frameworks for the Oxidative Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    coordinate cobaltous porphyrin site in a metal – organic framework: structural , EPR, and O, Inorg. Chem. Front., (04 2016): 536. doi: 10.1039...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project sought to employ heme-containing metal - organic framework (MOF) materials to carry out the oxidative...15-Apr-2015 14-Jan-2016 Final Report: Heme-Containing Metal - Organic Frameworks for the Oxidative Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents The views

  2. Electron magnetic resonance study of transition-metal magnetic nanoclusters embedded in metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Vincent; Brosseau, Christian

    2008-04-01

    Here, we report on the results of an electron magnetic resonance (EMR) study of a series of Ni/ZnO and Ni/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposites (NCs) to probe the resonance features of ferromagnetic (FM) Ni nanoclusters embedded in metal oxides. Interest in these NCs stems from the fact that they are promising for implementing the nonreciprocal functionality employed in many microwave devices, e.g., circulators. We observe that the EMR spectrum is strongly affected by the metallic FM content and its environment in the NC sample. We report the existence of broad and asymmetric features in the EMR spectra of these NCs. Our temperature dependent EMR data revealed larger linewidth and effective g factor, in the range of 2.1-3.7 (larger than the free electron value of ≈2 ), for all samples as temperature is decreased from room temperature to 150K . The line broadening and asymmetry of the EMR features are not intrinsic properties of the metallic nanophase but reflect the local (nonmagnetic or magnetic) environment in which they are embedded. Furthermore, the results of a systematic dependence of the room temperature EMR linewidth and resonant field on the Ni content and the corresponding effective microwave losses measured in previous works show a remarkable correlation. This correlation has been attributed to the dipolar coupling between magnetic nanoparticles in the NCs.

  3. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  4. ROLE OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES IN BIOSOLIDS AND BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS ON METAL BINDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosolids contain high levels of Fe, Mn, and Al. Surfaces of freshly precipitated metal oxides, especially Fe and Mn, are known to be highly active sites for most dissolved metal ion species. We nw have metal sorption/desorption data that illustrate the importance of Fe and Mn fr...

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS 3 Is a Chromatin-Associated Factor Involved in Tolerance to Heavy Metals and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cDNA expression library from Brassica juncea was introduced into the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe to select for transformants tolerant to cadmium. Transformants expressing OXIDATIVE STRESS 3 (OXS3) or OXS3-Like cDNA exhibited enhanced tolerance to a range of metals and oxidizing chemica...

  6. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314131116; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with

  7. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, Shyama Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  8. On the behavior of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations for transition metal oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Vallejo, Federico Calle; Guo, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Versatile Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site, and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP...

  9. Metal Fluorides, Metal Chlorides and Halogenated Metal Oxides as Lewis Acidic Heterogeneous Catalysts. Providing Some Context for Nanostructured Metal Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, David; Winfield, John M

    2017-01-28

    Aspects of the chemistry of selected metal fluorides, which are pertinent to their real or potential use as Lewis acidic, heterogeneous catalysts, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to β-aluminum trifluoride, aluminum chlorofluoride and aluminas γ and η, whose surfaces become partially fluorinated or chlorinated, through pre-treatment with halogenating reagents or during a catalytic reaction. In these cases, direct comparisons with nanostructured metal fluorides are possible. In the second part of the review, attention is directed to iron(III) and copper(II) metal chlorides, whose Lewis acidity and potential redox function have had important catalytic implications in large-scale chlorohydrocarbons chemistry. Recent work, which highlights the complexity of reactions that can occur in the presence of supported copper(II) chloride as an oxychlorination catalyst, is featured. Although direct comparisons with nanostructured fluorides are not currently possible, the work could be relevant to possible future catalytic developments in nanostructured materials.

  10. High-temperature oxidation and ignition of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul R; Adamson, David; Foland, Douglas H; Bressette, Walter E

    1956-01-01

    A study of the high-temperature oxidation of several aircraft construction materials was undertaken to assess the possibility of ignition under high-temperature flight conditions.Tests have been made both in open and closed jets, and, in addition, the burning of metals has been observed under static conditions in a pressurized vessel containing either air, oxygen, or nitrogen. When heated in an atmosphere of oxygen or when heated and plunged into a supersonic airstream, titanium, iron, carbon steel, and common alloys such as 4130 were found to have spontaneous-ignition temperatures in the solid phase (below melting) and they melted rapidly while burning. Inconel, copper, 18-8 stainless steel, Monel, and aluminum could not be made to ignite spontaneously at temperatures up to melting with the equipment available. Magnesium ignited spontaneously in either type of test at temperatures just above the melting temperature.A theory for the spontaneous ignition of metals, based on the first law of thermodynamics, is presented. Good correlation was obtained between calculated spontaneous-ignition temperatures and values measured in supersonic jet tests. There appears at the present time to be no need for concern regarding the spontaneous ignition of Inconel, the stainless steels, copper, aluminum, or magnesium for ordinary supersonic airplane or missile applications where the material temperature is kept within ordinary structural limits or at least below melting. For hypersonic applications where the material is to be melted away to absorb the heat of convection, the results of the present tests do not apply sufficiently to allow a conclusion.

  11. Doped carbon nanostructures as metal-free catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Jenssen, Kaia Andersson

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reactions are often carried out on various supported metals, these usually being noble metals or metal oxides. Even though metal based catalysts plays a major role in today s industrial processes, they still have several disadvantages, including high cost, proneness to gas poisoning, as well as disadvantageous effect on the environment. Recently, certain carbon nanomaterials have been in the spotlight of several research groups, as carbon has the advantages of wide availability, env...

  12. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  13. Rational synthesis of multifunctional mixed metal oxides by hydrothermal techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampler, Evan Scott

    Low temperature (bismuth copper oxide chalcogenides, hexagonal rare-earth manganites, and silver delafossites with mixed cations on the B-site. These materials are of particular interest because they combine multiple functional properties, such as transparency and conductivity, or magnetism and ferroelectricity, in a single-phase material, thus enabling innovative technological applications. Phase-pure products were achieved by the appropriate combination of starting reagents, pH, and reaction temperature to control the solubility of the reactants. Phase-pure BiCuOS and BiCuOSe have been synthesized in high yield by a single-step hydrothermal reaction at low temperature (250°C) and pressure (hydroxide and the subsequent reaction to yield the LnMnO3 phase. The high solubility of Ag2O, [Ag+] ≈ 10 -2.5 M, enabled the synthesis of two new silver delafossite solid solutions with the formulae AgAl1-xGaxO2 and AgSc1-xInxO2 and five mixed B-site silver delafossites with the formulae AgBe0.5Ti0.5O2, AgMg0.5Ti0.5O2, AgNi0.5Ti 0.5O2, AgCu0.5Ti0.5O2, and AgZn0.5Ti0.5O2 at a reaction temperature of 210°C. The former were observed when the solubilities of both B-site trivalent cations were ≥ 10-5 M and the difference in the solubilities of the B-site cations was approximately one order of magnitude. The enhanced reactivity of the soluble H2TiO3 precursor and relatively high solubility of the divalent metal oxides ([M2+] ≥ 10 -5 M) led to the formation of the co-substituted silver delafossites.

  14. Catalytic combustion over high temperature stable metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    This thesis presents a study of the catalytic effects of two interesting high temperature stable metal oxides - magnesium oxide and manganese substituted barium hexa-aluminate (BMA) - both of which can be used in the development of new monolithic catalysts for such applications. In the first part of the thesis, the development of catalytic combustion for gas turbine applications is reviewed, with special attention to alternative fuels such as low-BTU gas, e.g. produced in an air blown gasifier. When catalytic combustion is applied for such a fuel, the primary advantage is the possibility of decreasing the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO{sub x}, and achieving flame stability. In the experimental work, MgO was shown to have a significant activity for the catalytic combustion of methane, lowering the temperature needed to achieve 10 percent conversion by 270 deg C compared with homogeneous combustion.The reaction kinetics for methane combustion over MgO was also studied. It was shown that the heterogeneous catalytic reactions were dominant but that the catalytically initiated homogeneous gas phase reactions were also important, specially at high temperatures. MgO and BMA were compared. The latter showed a higher catalytic activity, even when the differences in activity decreased with increasing calcination temperature. For BMA, CO{sub 2} was the only product detected, but for MgO significant amounts of CO and C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons were formed. BMA needed a much lower temperature to achieve total conversion of other fuels, e.g. CO and hydrogen, compared to the temperature for total conversion of methane. This shows that BMA-like catalysts are interesting for combustion of fuel mixtures with high CO and H{sub 2} content, e.g. gas produced from gasification of biomass. 74 refs

  15. Metal Oxide/TiO2 Hybrid Nanotubes Fabricated through the Organogel Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Suzuki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanotube and its hybrid nanotubes (with various metal oxides such as Ta2O5, Nb2O5, ZrO2, and SiO2 were fabricated by the sol-gel polymerization in the ethanol gels formed by simple l-lysine-based organogelator. The self-assembled nanofibers (gel fibers formed by the gelator functioned as a template. The different calcination temperatures gave TiO2 nanotubes with various crystalline structures; e.g., anatase TiO2 nanotube was obtained by calcination at 600 °C, and rutile TiO2 nanotube was fabricated at a calcination temperature of 750 °C. In the metal oxide/TiO2 hybrid nanotubes, the metal oxide species were uniformly dispersed in the TiO2 nanotube, and the percent content of metal oxide species was found to correspond closely to the feed ratio of the raw materials. This result indicated that the composition ratio of hybrid nanotubes was controllable by the feed ratio of the raw materials. It was found that the metal oxide species inhibited the crystalline phase transition of TiO2 from anatase to rutile. Furthermore, the success of the hybridization of other metal oxides (except for TiO2 indicated the usefulness of the organogel route as one of the fabrication methods of metal oxide nanotubes.

  16. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad2001@yahoo.com; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions.

  17. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses in, cultured and wild, white seabream from Northwest Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marta; Caetano, Miguel; Costa, Joana; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Vale, Carlos; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda

    2008-12-15

    Metals are environmentally ubiquitous and can be found at high concentrations in seawater and subsequently in marine organisms. Metals with high redox potential can trigger oxidative stress mechanisms with damaging effects in biological tissues. In aquatic species, oxidative stress has been evaluated by assessing antioxidant enzymes activities and oxidative damages in tissues. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress biomarkers and metal residues in white seabream (Diplodus sargus), a species entering aquaculture production in Portugal. Metal residues (Cu, Cd, As and Pb), in liver and muscle, as well as oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed at different stages in the life cycle of white seabream under culture conditions and in wild specimens, of a marketable size. Metal concentrations in tissues were low, and below the established limits. However, wild white seabream showed higher accumulation than cultured ones. Antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were correlated with metal accumulation. Oxidative damages to tissues were low, with wild white seabream showing lower levels than cultured fish. This study showed that white seabream has a good antioxidant defense system, capable of reducing oxidative damages in tissues resulting from the presence of metals.

  18. Regenerable MgO promoted metal oxide oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Miller, Duane D.

    2014-08-19

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier comprised of a plurality of metal oxide particles in contact with a plurality of MgO promoter particles. The MgO promoter particles increase the reaction rate and oxygen utilization of the metal oxide when contacting with a gaseous hydrocarbon at a temperature greater than about 725.degree. C. The promoted oxide solid is generally comprised of less than about 25 wt. % MgO, and may be prepared by physical mixing, incipient wetness impregnation, or other methods known in the art. The oxygen carrier exhibits a crystalline structure of the metal oxide and a crystalline structure of MgO under XRD crystallography, and retains these crystalline structures over subsequent redox cycles. In an embodiment, the metal oxide is Fe.sub.2O.sub.3, and the gaseous hydrocarbon is comprised of methane.

  19. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  20. Electrochemical investigation of mixed metal oxide nanocomposite electrode for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghazanfar; Raza, Rizwan; Ashfaq Ahmad, M.; Ajmal Khan, M.; Jafar Hussain, M.; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Aziz, Hammad; Ahmad, Imran; Batool, Rida; Altaf, Faizah; Zhu, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Zinc-based nanostructured nickel (Ni) free metal oxide electrode material Zn0.60/Cu0.20Mn0.20 oxide (CMZO) was synthesized by solid state reaction and investigated for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) applications. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the synthesized electrode material were examined by XRD and SEM techniques respectively. The particle size of ZnO phase estimated by Scherer’s equation was 31.50 nm. The maximum electrical conductivity was found to be 12.567 S/cm and 5.846 S/cm in hydrogen and air atmosphere, respectively at 600∘C. The activation energy of the CMZO material was also calculated from the DC conductivity data using Arrhenius plots and it was found to be 0.060 and 0.075 eV in hydrogen and air atmosphere, respectively. The CMZO electrode-based fuel cell was tested using carbonated samarium doped ceria composite (NSDC) electrolyte. The three layers 13 mm in diameter and 1 mm thickness of the symmetric fuel cell were fabricated by dry pressing. The maximum power density of 728.86 mW/cm2 was measured at 550∘C.

  1. Process for producing metal oxide superconductor-polymer composites and composites thereby formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, J.C.W.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a process for producing copper based metal oxide superconductors having continuous foam-like morphology. It comprises: co-dissolving solutions other than metal oxides containing metal ions with a polymer or copolymer in an organic solvent in which the solutions and polymer or copolymer are soluble and of a polar organic solvent type selected from the group consisting of dimethyl formamide, dimethacetamide N-methyl pyrolidone and sulfolan, the the polymer or copolymer being selected from the group consisting of (poly)acrylic acid, (poly)methacrylic acid (poly)styrene sulfonic acid, and copolymers of malonic acid, citraconic acid, acrylonitriles, E-caprolactam, cyclic ethers and cyclic acetals having metal complexing or chelating functional pendant substituents, and a copolymer of vinyl acetate and acrylic acid, and the metals being of the type susceptible of forming high transition temperature metal oxide superconductors with at least some selected from the group consisting of Y, Ba, La and Sr.

  2. Design and Utility of Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Thioether End-Functionalized Polymeric Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumaila Razzaque

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The past few decades have witnessed significant advances in the development of functionalized metal/metal oxide nanoparticles including those of inorganic noble metals and magnetic materials stabilized by various polymeric ligands. Recent applications of such functionalized nanoparticles, including those in bio-imaging, sensing, catalysis, drug delivery, and other biomedical applications have triggered the need for their facile and reproducible preparation with a better control over their size, shape, and surface chemistry. In this perspective, the multidentate polymer ligands containing functional groups like thiol, thioether, and ester are important surface ligands for designing and synthesizing stable nanoparticles (NPs of metals or their oxides with reproducibility and high yield. These ligands have offered an unprecedented control over the particle size of both nanoparticles and nanoclusters with enhanced colloidal stability, having tunable solubility in aqueous and organic media, and tunable optical, magnetic, and fluorescent properties. This review summarizes the synthetic methodologies and stability of nanoparticles and fluorescent nanoclusters of metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and other transition metal oxides prepared by using thioether based ligands and highlights their applications in bio-imaging, sensing, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and catalysis. The future applications of fluorescent metal NPs like thermal gradient optical imaging, single molecule optoelectronics, sensors, and optical components of the detector are also envisaged.

  3. Behavior of metal oxide nanoparticles in natural aqueous matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. A.; Zhou, D.; Wang, H.

    2009-12-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials in consumer products that are exposed to environmental media has led to a need to understand their fate and transport. In particular, metal oxide (MeO) nanoparticles, such as TiO2, ZnO and CeO2, are increasingly incorporated into a wide range of products, from sunscreens to paints and other coatings, and catalysts. With regard to their transport, it is important to determine how far these nanoparticles will travel in different ambient waters, such as rivers, lakes and seawater. There have been a number of studies that have addressed the aggregation of different nanoparticles in simpler aqueous solutions. However, it is important to understand the combined effect of pH, ionic strength, ionic composition, NOM and other characteristics of the aqueous media in which the nanoparticles will be dispersed, which may result in either aggregation and settling, or stabilization and transport. This also affects the bioavailability of the nanomaterials, and the phase (water column or sediments) in which the bulk of the particles are likely to reside. For this study we considered several natural aqueous matrices, including seawater, freshwater, groundwater, rainwater and treated wastewater, as well as two different water matrices used in micro- and mesocosm studies of nanoparticle toxicity. We determined that the two most important water quality characteristics controlling the rate of aggregation, relatively independent of particle composition, are [NOM] and ionic strength.

  4. Structural, electrical and magnetic properties of transition metal nickel oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoqing

    Neutron powder diffraction, high pressure, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements, as well as x-ray powder diffraction and iodometric titration, have been conducted on transition metal nickel oxides (TMOs), representative Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases Lan+1NinO3n+1 (n = 1, 2, ..., infinity) and hole-doped La2-xSr xNiO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.2). The first complete study of La 2-xSrxNiO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.2) and La n+1NinO3n+1 (n = 2 and 3) phases under high pressure is produced. Strong direct experimental evidence for polaron dominated electrical conduction in these charge transfer (CT) gap La2-xSr xNiO4 compounds is provided. Temperature evolution of the crystal structure of La2-xSrxNiO4 (x = 1/4 and 1/3) is revealed through neutron powder diffraction, structural relationships among n = 1, 2, and 3 phases are exhibited, and charge density wave (CDW) in multilayer Lan+1NinO3n+1 phases is strongly suggested. No superconductivity is observed at pressures up to 1.6 GPa and temperatures down to 4.2 K.

  5. Metal-Oxide Film Conversions Involving Large Anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretty, S.; Zhang, X.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Wren, J.C. [The University of Western Ontario, Chemistry Department, 1151 Richmond St., N6A 5B7, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The main objective of my research is to establish the mechanism and kinetics of metal-oxide film conversions involving large anions (I{sup -}, Br{sup -}, S{sup 2-}). Within a given group, the anions will provide insight on the effect of anion size on the film conversion, while comparison of Group 6 and Group 7 anions will provide insight on the effect of anion charge. This research has a range of industrial applications, for example, hazardous radioiodine can be immobilized by reaction with Ag to yield AgI. From the perspective of public safety, radioiodine is one of the most important fission products from the uranium fuel because of its large fuel inventory, high volatility, and radiological hazard. Additionally, because of its mobility, the gaseous iodine concentration is a critical parameter for safety assessment and post-accident management. A full kinetic analysis using electrochemical techniques has been performed on the conversion of Ag{sub 2}O to (1) AgI and (2) AgBr. (authors)

  6. Artificial ionospheric modification: The Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Ronald G.; Pedersen, Todd R.; Groves, Keith M.; Hines, Jack; Cannon, Paul S.; Jackson-Booth, Natasha; Parris, Richard T.; Holmes, Jeffrey M.; Su, Yi-Jiun; Mishin, Evgeny V.; Roddy, Patrick A.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Ard, Shaun G.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Retterer, John; Kudeki, Erhan; Reyes, Pablo M.

    2017-05-01

    Clouds of vaporized samarium (Sm) were released during sounding rocket flights from the Reagan Test Site, Kwajalein Atoll in May 2013 as part of the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment. A network of ground-based sensors observed the resulting clouds from five locations in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of primary interest was an examination of the extent to which a tailored radio frequency (RF) propagation environment could be generated through artificial ionospheric modification. The MOSC experiment consisted of launches near dusk on two separate evenings each releasing 6 kg of Sm vapor at altitudes near 170 km and 180 km. Localized plasma clouds were generated through a combination of photoionization and chemi-ionization (Sm + O → SmO+ + e-) processes producing signatures visible in optical sensors, incoherent scatter radar, and in high-frequency (HF) diagnostics. Here we present an overview of the experiment payloads, document the flight characteristics, and describe the experimental measurements conducted throughout the 2 week launch window. Multi-instrument analysis including incoherent scatter observations, HF soundings, RF beacon measurements, and optical data provided the opportunity for a comprehensive characterization of the physical, spectral, and plasma density composition of the artificial plasma clouds as a function of space and time. A series of companion papers submitted along with this experimental overview provide more detail on the individual elements for interested readers.

  7. Oxidative Dissolution of Nickel Metal in Hydrogenated Hydrothermal Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemniak, S. E.; Guilmette, P. A.; Turcotte, R. A.; Tunison, H. M.

    2007-03-27

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of metallic nickel in hydrogenated ammonia and sodium hydroxide solutions between 175 and 315 C. The solubility measurements were interpreted by means of an oxidative dissolution reaction followed by a sequence of Ni(II) ion hydrolysis reactions: Ni(s) + 2H+(aq) = Ni2+(aq) + H2(g) and Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + nH{sub 2}O = Ni(OH){sub n}{sup 2-n}(aq) + nH{sup +}(aq) where n = 1 and 2. Gibbs energies associated with these reaction equilibria were determined from a least-squares analysis of the data. The extracted thermochemical properties ({Delta}fG{sup 0}, {Delta}fH{sup 0} and S{sup 0}) for Ni2{sup +}(aq), Ni(OH){sup +}(aq) and Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were found to be consistent with those determined in a previous solubility study of NiO/Ni(OH){sub 2} conducted in our laboratory. The thermodynamic basis of the Ni/NiO phase boundary in aqueous solutions is examined to show that Ni(s) is stable relative to NiO(s) in solutions saturated at 25 C with 1 atm H{sub 2} for temperatures below 309 C.

  8. Fate, behavior, and bioavailability of metal and metal oxide nanomaterials in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, P. M.; Unrine, J. M.; Judy, J.; Tsyusko, O.

    2012-12-01

    Despite the benefits that are currently being manifested and those transformative breakthroughs that will undoubtedly result from advances in nanotechnology, concerns surrounding the potential negative impacts to the environment and human health and welfare continue to emerge. Information on the transport and fate of manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) in the environment and on their potential effects to human and ecological receptors is emerging at an increasing rate. Notwithstanding these developments, the research enterprise focused on the environmental implications of nanotechnology is in its infancy and few unifying principles have yet to emerge. This lack of unanimity is related to many factors including, the vast diversity in chemical composition, size, shape, and surface chemical properties of MNMs, as well as the range of receptor species and cell lines investigated. Additionally, the large variation in exposure methodologies employed by various investigators as well as the discrepancies in the amount and quality of characterization data collected to support specific conclusions, provide major challenges for developing unifying concepts and principles. As the utilization of MNMs for a large variety of applications is currently in an exponential growth phase, there is great urgency to develop information that can be used to identify priority areas for assessing risks to humans and the environment, as well as in developing potential mitigation strategies. We have been investigating the fate, behavior, and potential impacts of MNMs released into terrestrial ecosystems by examining the bioavailability and toxicity as well as the trophic transfer of a range of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (Ag, Au, Cu, TiO2, ZnO, CeO2) to microorganisms, detritivores, and plants. Interdisciplinary studies include the characterization of the nanoparticles and aged nanoparticles in complex media, the distribution of nanoparticles in biological tissues, nanoparticle toxicity

  9. A feasible strategy to balance the crystallinity and specific surface area of metal oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. P.; Xu, X. N.; Liu, Y. T.; Xu, M.; Deng, S. H.; Chen, Y.; Yuan, H.; Yu, F.; Huang, Y.; Zhao, K.; Xu, S.; Xiong, G.

    2017-04-01

    Practical, efficient synthesis of metal oxide nanocrystals with good crystallinity and high specific surface area by a modified polymer-network gel method is demonstrated, taking ZnO nanocrystals as an example. A novel stepwise heat treatment yields significant improvement in crystal quality. Such nanophase materials can effectively degrade common organic dyes under solar radiation and can perform very well in photo-assisted detection of NO2 gas. Other typical metal oxide nanocrystals with good crystallinity and high specific surface area were also synthesized successfully under similar conditions. This work provides a general strategy for the synthesis of metal oxide nanocrystals, balancing the crystallinity and specific surface area.

  10. Porous, rigid metal(III)-carboxylate metal-organic frameworks for the delivery of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, Jarrod F.; Wheatley, Paul S.; Lebars, Gaëlle; McKinlay, Alistair C.; Leclerc, Hervé; Horcajada, Patricia; Daturi, Marco; Vimont, Alexandre; Morris, Russell E.; Serre, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The room temperature sorption properties of the biological gas nitric oxide (NO) have been investigated on the highly porous and rigid iron or chromium carboxylate based metal-organic frameworks Material Institut Lavoisier (MIL)-100(Fe or Cr) and MIL-127(Fe). In all cases, a significant amount of NO is chemisorbed at 298 K with a loading capacity that depends both on the nature of the metal cation, the structure and the presence of additional iron(II) Lewis acid sites. In a second step, the release of NO triggered by wet nitrogen gas has been studied by chemiluminescence and indicates that only a partial release of NO occurs as well as a prolonged delivery at the biological level. Finally, an in situ infrared spectroscopy study confirms not only the coordination of NO over the Lewis acid sites and the stronger binding of NO on the additional iron(II) sites, providing further insights over the partial release of NO only in the presence of water at room temperature.

  11. Porous, rigid metal(III-carboxylate metal-organic frameworks for the delivery of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod F. Eubank

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature sorption properties of the biological gas nitric oxide (NO have been investigated on the highly porous and rigid iron or chromium carboxylate based metal-organic frameworks Material Institut Lavoisier (MIL-100(Fe or Cr and MIL-127(Fe. In all cases, a significant amount of NO is chemisorbed at 298 K with a loading capacity that depends both on the nature of the metal cation, the structure and the presence of additional iron(II Lewis acid sites. In a second step, the release of NO triggered by wet nitrogen gas has been studied by chemiluminescence and indicates that only a partial release of NO occurs as well as a prolonged delivery at the biological level. Finally, an in situ infrared spectroscopy study confirms not only the coordination of NO over the Lewis acid sites and the stronger binding of NO on the additional iron(II sites, providing further insights over the partial release of NO only in the presence of water at room temperature.

  12. High performance high-κ/metal gate complementary metal oxide semiconductor circuit element on flexible silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-02-29

    Thinned silicon based complementary metal oxide semiconductor(CMOS)electronics can be physically flexible. To overcome challenges of limited thinning and damaging of devices originated from back grinding process, we show sequential reactive ion etching of silicon with the assistance from soft polymeric materials to efficiently achieve thinned (40 μm) and flexible (1.5 cm bending radius) silicon based functional CMOSinverters with high-κ/metal gate transistors. Notable advances through this study shows large area of silicon thinning with pre-fabricated high performance elements with ultra-large-scale-integration density (using 90 nm node technology) and then dicing of such large and thinned (seemingly fragile) pieces into smaller pieces using excimer laser. The impact of various mechanical bending and bending cycles show undeterred high performance of flexible siliconCMOSinverters. Future work will include transfer of diced silicon chips to destination site, interconnects, and packaging to obtain fully flexible electronic systems in CMOS compatible way.

  13. Low-temperature solution-processed metal oxide buffer layers fulfilling large area production requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubhan, T.; Litzov, I.; Li, Ning; Wang, H. Q.; Krantz, J.; Machui, F.; Steidl, M.; Oh, H.; Matt, G. J.; Brabec, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper is a review of our previous work on the field of low temperature, solution processed metal oxide buffer layers published in various journals. Our work focuses on zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as n-type and molybdenum oxide (MoO3) as p-type solution processed buffer layer. In addition to that, we investigate the surface modification of AZO using phosphonic acid-anchored aliphatic and fullerene self assembled monolayers (SAMs).

  14. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  15. Redox and electrochemical water splitting catalytic properties of hydrated metal oxide modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Richard L; Godwin, Ian J; Brandon, Michael P; Lyons, Michael E G

    2013-09-07

    This paper presents a review of the redox and electrocatalytic properties of transition metal oxide electrodes, paying particular attention to the oxygen evolution reaction. Metal oxide materials may be prepared using a variety of methods, resulting in a diverse range of redox and electrocatalytic properties. Here we describe the most common synthetic routes and the important factors relevant to their preparation. The redox and electrocatalytic properties of the resulting oxide layers are ascribed to the presence of extended networks of hydrated surface bound oxymetal complexes termed surfaquo groups. This interpretation presents a possible unifying concept in water oxidation catalysis - bridging the fields of heterogeneous electrocatalysis and homogeneous molecular catalysis.

  16. Comparison of properties of silver-metal oxide electrical contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosović V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in physical properties such as density, porosity, hardness and electrical conductivity of the Ag-SnO2 and Ag-SnO2In2O3 electrical contact materials induced by introduction of metal oxide nanoparticles were investigated. Properties of the obtained silver-metal oxide nanoparticle composites are discussed and presented in comparison to their counterparts with the micro metal oxide particles as well as comparable Ag-SnO2WO3 and Ag-ZnO contact materials. Studied silvermetal oxide composites were produced by powder metallurgy method from very fine pure silver and micro- and nanoparticle metal oxide powders. Very uniform microstructures were obtained for all investigated composites and they exhibited physical properties that are comparable with relevant properties of equivalent commercial silver based electrical contact materials. Both Ag-SnO2 and Ag- SnO2In2O3 composites with metal oxide nanoparticles were found to have lower porosity, higher density and hardness than their respective counterparts which can be attributed to better dispersion hardening i.e. higher degree of dispersion of metal oxide in silver matrix.

  17. Oxygen-assisted conversion of propane over metal and metal oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laate, Leiv

    2002-07-01

    An experimental set-up has been build and applied in activity/selectivity studies of the oxygen-assisted conversion of propane over metals and metal oxide catalysts. The apparatus has been used in order to achieve an improved understanding of the reactions between alkanes/alkenes and oxygen. Processes that have been studied arc the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over a VMgO catalyst and the selective combustion of hydrogen in the presence of hydrocarbons over Pt-based catalysts and metal oxide catalysts. From the experiments, the following conclusions are drawn: A study of the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over a vanadium-magnesium-oxide catalyst confirmed that the main problem with this system is the lack of selectivity due to complete combustion. Selectivity to propene up to about 60% was obtained at 10% conversion at 500{sup o}C, but the selectivity decreased with increasing conversion. No oxygenates were detected, the only by- products were CO and CO{sub 2}. The selectivity to propene is a strong function of the conversion of propane. The reaction rate of propane was found to be 1.0 {+-} 0.1 order in propane and 0.07 {+-} 0.02 order in oxygen. The kinetic results are in agreement with a Mars van Krevelen mechanism with the activation of the hydrocarbons as the slow step. The rate of propene oxidation to CO{sub 2} was studied and found to be significantly higher than that of propane. Another possible process involves the simultaneous equilibrium dehydrogenation of alkanes to alkenes and combustion of the hydrogen formed to shift the equilibrium dehydrogenation reaction further to the product alkenes. A study of the selective combustion of hydrogen in the presence of propane/propene was found to be possible under certain reaction conditions over some metal oxide catalysts. In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}, unsupported Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZSM-5 show the ability to combust hydrogen in a gas mixture with propane and oxygen with good selectivity. Bi{sub 2

  18. Elemental Metals or Oxides Distributed on a Carbon Substrate or Self-Supported and the Manufacturing Process Using Graphite Oxide as Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Chen (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a percursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be further processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  19. Superconductivity in the antiperovskite Dirac-metal oxide Sr3-xSnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudah, Mohamed; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Hausmann, Jan Niklas; Yonezawa, Shingo; Fukumoto, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Masatoshi; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of perovskite oxides triggered by the discovery of high-temperature and unconventional superconductors have had crucial roles in stimulating and guiding the development of modern condensed-matter physics. Antiperovskite oxides are charge-inverted counterpart materials to perovskite oxides, with unusual negative ionic states of a constituent metal. No superconductivity was reported among the antiperovskite oxides so far. Here we present the first superconducting antiperovskite oxide Sr3-xSnO with the transition temperature of around 5 K. Sr3SnO possesses Dirac points in its electronic structure, and we propose from theoretical analysis a possibility of a topological odd-parity superconductivity analogous to the superfluid 3He-B in moderately hole-doped Sr3-xSnO. We envision that this discovery of a new class of oxide superconductors will lead to a rapid progress in physics and chemistry of antiperovskite oxides consisting of unusual metallic anions.

  20. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  1. Metal Oxide-Carbon Nanocomposites for Aqueous and Nonaqueous Supercapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase 2 effort focuses on development of a supercapacitor energy storage device based on novel metal oxide-carbon...

  2. In vitro screening of metal oxide nanoparticles for effects on neural function using cortical networks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data describe the effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on total spikes and active electrodes after exposure to various concentrations for 1, 24 and 48 hrs, or after...

  3. Meeting in New Orleans: An Assessment of the Fate of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work assesses potential aqueous environmental metal oxide nanomaterial self-aggregation through the application of recent developments in surface complexation theory with historical DLVO procedures. Findings include: 1) nanomaterials with a Hamaker constant as large as 1E-1...

  4. Laser Irradiation of Metal Oxide Films and Nanostructures: Applications and Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Park, Jung Hwan; Maurya, Deepam; Peddigari, Mahesh; Hwang, Geon-Tae; Annapureddy, Venkateswarlu; Kim, Jong-Woo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Priya, Shashank; Lee, Keon Jae; Ryu, Jungho

    2018-02-07

    Recent technological advances in developing a diverse range of lasers have opened new avenues in material processing. Laser processing of materials involves their exposure to rapid and localized energy, which creates conditions of electronic and thermodynamic nonequilibrium. The laser-induced heat can be localized in space and time, enabling excellent control over the manipulation of materials. Metal oxides are of significant interest for applications ranging from microelectronics to medicine. Numerous studies have investigated the synthesis, manipulation, and patterning of metal oxide films and nanostructures. Besides providing a brief overview on the principles governing the laser-material interactions, here, the ongoing efforts in laser irradiation of metal oxide films and nanostructures for a variety of applications are reviewed. Latest advances in laser-assisted processing of metal oxides are summarized. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Single crystal particles of a mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide with a wormhole structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Lu, D; Kondo, J N; Domen, K

    2001-10-21

    A new type of mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide of Nb and Ta (NbTa-TIT-1) has been prepared through a two-step calcination, which consists of single crystal particles with wormhole mesoporous structure.

  6. Thermal and Physical Properties of Plutonium Dioxide Produced from the Oxidation of Metal: a Data Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-13

    The ARIES Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory removes plutonium metal from decommissioned nuclear weapons, and converts it to plutonium dioxide in a specially-designed Direct Metal Oxidation furnace. The plutonium dioxide is analyzed for specific surface area, particle size distribution, and moisture content. The purpose of these analyses is to certify that the plutonium dioxide powder meets or exceeds the specifications of the end-user, and the specifications for the packaging and transport of nuclear materials. Analytical results from plutonium dioxide from ARIES development activities, from ARIES production activities, from muffle furnace oxidation of metal, and from metal that was oxidized over a lengthy time interval in air at room temperature, are presented. The processes studied produce plutonium dioxide powder with distinct differences in measured properties, indicating the significant influence of oxidation conditions on physical properties.

  7. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  8. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haibao, E-mail: seabao8@gmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (Sun Yat-sen University) (China); Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn nanoparticles are highly dispersed on ZSM-5 and most efficient in benzene degradation in the VUV-OZCO process. - Highlights: • Vacuum UV irradiation is well combined with O{sub 3} catalytic oxidation. • O{sub 3} byproducts was used to enhance catalytic oxidation of VOCs. • Mn/ZSM-5 achieved the best catalytic activity for benzene degradation. - Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O{sub 3}, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O{sub 3} catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O{sub 3} removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O{sub 3} was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as ·OH and ·O for benzene oxidation.

  9. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Maezato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea.

  10. Custom-designed nanomaterial libraries for testing metal oxide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Suman; Nel, André E; Mädler, Lutz

    2013-03-19

    Advances in aerosol technology over the past 10 years have enabled the generation and design of ultrafine nanoscale materials for many applications. A key new method is flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), which produces particles by pyrolyzing a precursor solution in the gas phase. FSP is a highly versatile technique for fast, single-step, scalable synthesis of nanoscale materials. New innovations in particle synthesis using FSP technology, including variations in precursor chemistry, have enabled flexible, dry synthesis of loosely agglomerated, highly crystalline ultrafine powders (porosity ≥ 90%) of binary, ternary, and mixed-binary-and-ternary oxides. FSP can fulfill much of the increasing demand, especially in biological applications, for particles with specific material composition, high purity, and high crystallinity. In this Account, we describe a strategy for creating nanoparticle libraries (pure or Fedoped ZnO or TiO₂) utilizing FSP and using these libraries to test hypotheses related to the particles' toxicity. Our innovation lies in the overall integration of the knowledge we have developed in the last 5 years in (1) synthesizing nanomaterials to address specific hypotheses, (2) demonstrating the electronic properties that cause the material toxicity, (3) understanding the reaction mechanisms causing the toxicity, and (4) extracting from in vitro testing and in vivo testing in terrestrial and marine organisms the essential properties of safe nanomaterials. On the basis of this acquired knowledge, we further describe how the dissolved metal ion from these materials (Zn²⁺ in this Account) can effectively bind with different cell constituents, causing toxicity. We use Fe-S protein clusters as an example of the complex chemical reactions taking place after free metal ions migrate into the cells. As a second example, TiO₂ is an active material in the UV range that exhibits photocatalytic behavior. The induction of electron-hole (e⁻/h⁺) pairs followed by

  11. High-energy-surface engineered metal oxide micro- and nanocrystallites and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Qin; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-02-18

    Because many physical and chemical processes occur at surfaces, surface atomic structure is a critical factor affecting the properties of materials. Due to the presence of high-density atomic steps and edges and abundant unsaturated coordination sites, micro- and nanocrystallites with high-energy surfaces usually exhibit greater reactivity than those with low-energy surfaces. However, high-energy crystal surfaces are usually lost during crystal growth as the total surface energy is minimized. Therefore, the selective exposure of high-energy facets at the surface of micro- and nanocrystallites is an important and challenging research topic. Metal oxides play important roles in surface-associated applications, including catalysis, gas sensing, luminescence, and antibiosis. The synthesis of metal oxide micro- and nanocrystallites with specific surfaces, particularly those with high surface energies, is more challenging than the synthesis of metal crystals due to the presence of strong metal-oxygen bonds and diverse crystal structures. In this Account, we briefly summarize recent progress in the surface-structure-controlled synthesis of several typical metal oxide micro- and nanocrystallites, including wurtzite ZnO, anatase TiO2, rutile SnO2, and rocksalt-type metal oxides. We also discuss the improvement of surface properties, focusing on high-energy surfaces. Because of the huge quantity and diverse structure of metal oxides, this Account is not intended to be comprehensive. Instead, we discuss salient features of metal oxide micro- and nanocrystallites using examples primarily from our group. We first discuss general strategies for tuning the surface structure of metal oxide micro- and nanocrystallites, presenting several typical examples. For each example, we describe the basic crystallographic characteristics as well as the thermodynamic (i.e., tuning surface energy) or kinetic (i.e., tuning reaction rates) strategies we have used to synthesize micro- and

  12. Robust hybrid elastomer/metal-oxide superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshian, S; Jokinen, V; Franssila, S

    2016-08-21

    We introduce a new type of hybrid material: a nanostructured elastomer covered by a hard photoactive metal-oxide thin film resembling the exoskeleton of insects. It has extreme water repellency and fast self-recovery after damage. A new fabrication method for replicating high aspect ratio, hierarchical re-entrant aluminum structures into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. The method is based on a protective titania layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the aluminum template. The ALD titania transfers to the elastomeric scaffold via sacrificial release etching. The sacrificial release method allows for high aspect ratio, even 100 μm deep and successful release of overhanging structures, unlike conventional peeling. The ALD titania conformally covers the 3D multihierarchical structures of the template and protects the polymer during the release etch. Afterwards it prevents the high aspect ratio nanostructures from elasticity based collapse. The resulting nanostructured hybrid PDMS/titania replicas display robust superhydrophobicity without any further fluoro-coating or modification. Their mechanical and thermal robustness results from a thick nanostructured elastomeric layer which is conformally covered by ceramic titania instead of a monolayer hydrophobic coating. We have demonstrated the durability of these replicas against mechanical abrasion, knife scratches, rubbing, bending, peel tape test, high temperature annealing, UV exposure, water jet impingement and long term underwater storage. Though the material loses its superhydrophobicity in oxygen plasma exposure, a fast recovery from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic can be achieved after 20 min UV irradiation. UV-assisted recovery is correlated with the high photoactivity of ALD titania film. This novel hybrid material will be applicable to the large area superhydrophobic surfaces in practical outdoor applications.

  13. Metal Ions Removal Using Nano Oxide Pyrolox™ Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gładysz-Płaska, A.; Skwarek, E.; Budnyak, T. M.; Kołodyńska, D.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the use of Pyrolox™ containing manganese nano oxides used for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions. Their concentrations were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrometer SpectrAA 240 FS (Varian) as well as UV-vis method. For this purpose the static kinetic and equilibrium studies were carried out using the batch technique. The effect of solution pH, shaking time, initial metal ion concentrations, sorbent dosage, and temperature was investigated. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the sorption isotherm models proposed by Freundlich, Langmuir-Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich. The kinetic results showed that the pseudo second order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data well. The results indicate that adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) as well as U(VI) ions is strongly dependent on pH. The value of pH 4-7 was optimal adsorption. The time to reach the equilibrium was found to be 24 h, and after this time, the sorption percentage reached about 70%. Kinetics of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and U(VI) adsorption on the adsorbent can be described by the pseudo second order rate equation. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements for adsorbent characterization were performed. Characteristic points of the double layer determined for the studied Pyrolox™ sample in 0.001 mol/dm3 NaCl solution are pHPZC = 4 and pHIEP < 2.

  14. Fingerprints of spin-orbital entanglement in transition metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleś, Andrzej M

    2012-08-08

    The concept of spin-orbital entanglement on superexchange bonds in transition metal oxides is introduced and explained on several examples. It is shown that spin-orbital entanglement in superexchange models destabilizes the long-range (spin and orbital) order and may lead either to a disordered spin-liquid state or to novel phases at low temperature which arise from strongly frustrated interactions. Such novel ground states cannot be described within the conventionally used mean field theory which separates spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Even in cases where the ground states are disentangled, spin-orbital entanglement occurs in excited states and may become crucial for a correct description of physical properties at finite temperature. As an important example of this behaviour we present spin-orbital entanglement in the RV O(3) perovskites, with R = La,Pr,…,Y b,Lu, where the finite temperature properties of these compounds can be understood only using entangled states: (i) the thermal evolution of the optical spectral weights, (ii) the dependence of the transition temperatures for the onset of orbital and magnetic order on the ionic radius in the phase diagram of the RV O(3) perovskites, and (iii) the dimerization observed in the magnon spectra for the C-type antiferromagnetic phase of Y V O(3). Finally, it is shown that joint spin-orbital excitations in an ordered phase with coexisting antiferromagnetic and alternating orbital order introduce topological constraints for the hole propagation and will thus radically modify the transport properties in doped Mott insulators where hole motion implies simultaneous spin and orbital excitations.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation of organic carbonate based electrolyte solutions at lithium metal oxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, R.; Novak, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of carbonate based electrolyte solutions at practical lithium metal oxide composite electrodes was studied by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry. For propylene carbonate (PC), CO{sub 2} evolution was detected at LiNiO{sub 2}, LiCoO{sub 2}, and LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} composite electrodes. The starting point of gas evolution was 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} at LiNiO{sub 2}, whereas at LiCoO{sub 2} and LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} evolution was only observed above 4.8 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. In addition, various other volatile electrolyte decomposition products of PC were detected when using LiCoO{sub 2}, LiMn{sub 2}O4, and carbon black electrodes. In ethylene carbonate / dimethyl carbonate, CO{sub 2} evolution was only detected at LiNiO{sub 2} electrodes, again starting at about 4.2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. (author) 3 figs., 2 refs.

  16. MIS High-Purity Plutonium Oxide Metal Oxidation Product TS707001 (SSR123): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Max A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carillo, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-09

    A high-purity plutonium dioxide material from the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program inventory has been studied with regard to gas generation and corrosion in a storage environment. Sample TS707001 represents process plutonium oxides from several metal oxidation operations as well as impure and scrap plutonium from Hanford that are currently stored in 3013 containers. After calcination to 950°C, the material contained 86.98% plutonium with no major impurities. This study followed over time, the gas pressure of a sample with nominally 0.5 wt% water in a sealed container with an internal volume scaled to 1/500th of the volume of a 3013 container. Gas compositions were measured periodically over a six year period. The maximum observed gas pressure was 138 kPa. The increase over the initial pressure of 80 kPa was primarily due to generation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas in the first six months. Hydrogen and oxygen were minor components of the headspace gas. At the completion of the study, the internal components of the sealed container showed signs of corrosion, including pitting.

  17. Systematic investigation of the synthesis, characterization and switching mechanism of metal oxide nanoparticle resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siauw, Meiliana; Du, Ke; Valade, David; Trefonas, Peter; Thackeray, James W.; Whittaker, Andrew; Blakey, Idriss

    2016-03-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticle resists have recently emerged as next generation photoresist materials which exhibit promising performance for extreme ultraviolet lithography. In this present work, we are able to show our ability to synthesize and well characterize small uniform metal oxide nanoparticles, to present stability study of the nanoparticles in the resist solvent over time, to pattern ~20 nm features by electron beam lithography, and to provide an insight into the insolubilization mechanism of the resist system.

  18. Biomedical Detection via Macro- and Nano-Sensors Fabricated with Metallic and Semiconducting Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Hahm, Jong-In

    2013-01-01

    Originally developed as gas sensors, the benefits of metallic and semiconducting oxide materials are now being realized in other areas of sensing, such as chemical, environmental, and biomedical monitoring and detection. Metallic and semiconducting oxides have continuously expanded their roles to date, and have also established their significance in biosensing by utilizing a variety of modes for signal generation and detection mechanism. These sensors are typically based either on their optic...

  19. Mesoporous binary metal oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J., E-mail: praveenjella10@gmail.com; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Singh, Beer; Gopi, T.; Krishna, R.

    2016-04-15

    Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. They were synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis of X rays, X ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption data indicated the presence of pores with diameter ranging from 10 to 70 nm in the binary metal oxide nanocomposites and these materials exhibited surface area values in the range of 76–134 m{sup 2}/g. These binary metal oxide nanocomposites demonstrated large decontamination efficiencies against sulfur mustard when compared to their single component metal oxide nanoparticles. The binary metal oxide nanocomposites effectively decontaminated sulfur mustard into relatively non toxic products such as chloro ethyl vinyl sulfide, divinyl sulfide, 1,4-oxathiane, etc. The promising decontamination properties of binary metal oxide nanocomposites against sulfur mustard were attributed to the basic sites, Lewis acid sites, and the presence of these sites was confirmed by CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. - Highlights: • Binary metal oxide nanocomposites were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • They were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. • They decontaminated sulfur mustard into non toxic products. • MnO{sub 2}–ZnO and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO nanocomposites showed greater decontamination efficiency.

  20. Metal oxide and mercuric sulfide nanoparticles synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin

    Commercially available and laboratory-synthesized metal based nanoparticles (NPs), iron oxide (Fe2O3), copper oxide (CuO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and mercuric sulfide (HgS) were studied by comprehensive characterizations methods. The general synthesis process was modified sol-gel method. The size and morphology of NPs could be influenced by temperature, sonication, calcination, precursor concentration, pH and types of reaction media. All types of the laboratory-synthesized or commercially available NPs were characterized by physical and chemical processes. One characteristic of NP that can lead to ambiguous toxicity test results was the effect of agglomeration of primary nano-sized particles. Laser light scattering was used to measure the aggregated and particle size distribution. Aggregation effects were apparent and often extensive in some synthesis approaches. Electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) gave the images of those laboratory-synthesized particles and aggregation. The average single particle was about 5-20 nm of ZnO; 20-40 nm of CuO; 10-20 nm of TiO2; 20-35 nm of Fe2O3; 10-15 nm of HgS, while the aggregate size was in the range of a hundred nanometers or more. These five types of NPs were obtained with spherical and oblong formation and the agglomeration of ZnO, CuO, HgS and TiO2 was random, but Fe2O3 has web-like aggregation. Other measurements performed on the particles and aggregates include bandgap energies, surface composition, surface area, hydrodynamic radius, and particle surface charge. In aqueous environment, NPs are subject to processes such as solubilization and aggregation. These processes can be controlling factors in the fate of nanomaterials in environmental settings, including bioavailability to organisms. This study has focused primarily on measurement of the solubility in aqueous media of varying composition (pH, ionic strength, and organic carbon), sedimentation and stability. The aggregate size distribution was

  1. Interaction between submicron COD crystals and renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Yang, Ru-E

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the adhesion characteristics between submicron calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with a size of 150 ± 50 nm and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero cells) before and after damage, and to discuss the mechanism of kidney stone formation. Vero cells were oxidatively injured by hydrogen peroxide to establish a model of injured cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe Vero-COD adhesion. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry was used to quantitatively measure the amount of adhered COD microcrystals. Nanoparticle size analyzer and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to measure the change in the zeta potential on the Vero cell surface and the change in osteopontin expression during the adhesion process, respectively. The level of cell injury was evaluated by measuring the changes in malonaldehyde content, and cell viability during the adhesion process. The adhesion capacity of Vero cells in the injury group to COD microcrystals was obviously stronger than that of Vero cells in the control group. After adhesion to COD, cell viability dropped, both malonaldehyde content and cell surface zeta potential increased, and the fluorescence intensity of osteopontin decreased because the osteopontin molecules were successfully covered by COD. Submicron COD further damaged the cells during the adhesion process, especially for Vero cells in the control group, leading to an elevated amount of attached microcrystals. Submicron COD can further damage injured Vero cells during the adhesion process. The amount of attached microcrystals is proportional to the degree of cell damage. The increased amount of microcrystals that adhered to the injured epithelial cells plays an important role in the formation of early-stage kidney stones.

  2. Numerical evaluation of oxide growth in metallic support microstructures of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and its influence on mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiss, Georg; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    is evaluated by determining an effective diffusion coefficient and the equivalent electrical area specific resistance (ASR) due to diffusion over time. It is thus possible to assess the applicability (in terms of corrosion behaviour) of potential metallic supports without costly long-term experiments......Metal-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are developed as a durable and cost-effective alternative to the state-of-the-art cermet SOFCs. This novel technology offers new opportunities but also new challenges. One of them is corrosion of the metallic support, which will decrease the long......-term performance of the SOFCs. In order to understand the implications of the corrosion on the mass-transport through the metallic support, a corrosion model is developed that is capable of determining the change of the porous microstructure due to oxide scale growth. The model is based on high...

  3. Heavy Metal-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in Earthworms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hirano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms can be used as a bio-indicator of metal contamination in soil, Earlier reports claimed the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in earthworm tissues, while the metal-induced mutagenicity reared in contaminated soils for long duration. But we examined the metal-induced mutagenicity in earthworms reared in metal containing culture beddings. In this experiment we observed the generation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-Gua in earthworms exposed to cadmium and nickel in soil. 8-oxo-Gua is a major premutagenic form of oxidative DNA damage that induces GC-to-TA point mutations, leading to carcinogenesis.

  4. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors) of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices. PMID:24841244

  5. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  6. Catalytic decomposition of N2O on ordered crystalline metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Ren, Yu; Lu, Yanbin; Bruce, Peter G

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of mesoporous metal oxides using mesoporous silicas or carbons as hard templates has attracted growing interest recently, but the catalytic application of mesoporous metal oxides has not been studied sufficiently. In addition, few publications have compared the catalytic performance of a series of mesoporous metal oxides in the same reaction, and little is known about the influence of preparation details of mesoporous metal oxides on catalytic activity. Herein, ordered crystalline mesoporous metal oxides (i.e., CeO2, Co3O4, Cr2O3, CuO, alpha-Fe2O3, beta-MnO2, Mn2O3, Mn3O4, NiO) prepared using mesoporous SiO2 (KIT-6) as a hard template were tested in the decomposition of N2O, an environmental pollutant, and the catalytic performance was compared with that of commercial metal oxides with low surface areas. In particular, mesoporous Co3O4, beta-MnO2, and NiO showed high N2O conversions at 350 degrees C. The influence of preparation parameters of mesoporous Co3O4 on catalytic activity was then studied in more detail. Mesoporous Co3O4 samples with different pore sizes and wall thicknesses were prepared using KIT-6 synthesized under different hydrothermal or calcination temperatures. Interestingly, the catalytic activities of different mesoporous Co3O4 samples were found to be influenced by these preparation details.

  7. Metal oxide nanosensors using polymeric membranes, enzymes and antibody receptors as ion and molecular recognition elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-05-16

    The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors) of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  8. Association rule mining of cellular responses induced by metal and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; France, Bryan; George, Saji; Rallo, Robert; Zhang, Haiyuan; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Bradley, Kenneth; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-03-07

    Relationships among fourteen different biological responses (including ten signaling pathway activities and four cytotoxicity effects) of murine macrophage (RAW264.7) and bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells exposed to six metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) were analyzed using both statistical and data mining approaches. Both the pathway activities and cytotoxicity effects were assessed using high-throughput screening (HTS) over an exposure period of up to 24 h and concentration range of 0.39-200 mg L(-1). HTS data were processed by outlier removal, normalization, and hit-identification (for significantly regulated cellular responses) to arrive at reliable multiparametric bioactivity profiles for the NPs. Association rule mining was then applied to the bioactivity profiles followed by a pruning process to remove redundant rules. The non-redundant association rules indicated that "significant regulation" of one or more cellular responses implies regulation of other (associated) cellular response types. Pairwise correlation analysis (via Pearson's χ(2) test) and self-organizing map clustering of the different cellular response types indicated consistency with the identified non-redundant association rules. Furthermore, in order to explore the potential use of association rules as a tool for data-driven hypothesis generation, specific pathway activity experiments were carried out for ZnO NPs. The experimental results confirmed the association rule identified for the p53 pathway and mitochondrial superoxide levels (via MitoSox reagent) and further revealed that blocking of the transcriptional activity of p53 lowered the MitoSox signal. The present approach of using association rule mining for data-driven hypothesis generation has important implications for streamlining multi-parameter HTS assays, improving the understanding of NP toxicity mechanisms, and selection of endpoints for the development of nanomaterial structure-activity relationships.

  9. Covalency, Excitons, Double Counting and the Metal-Insulator Transition in Transition Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin

    2012-02-01

    We present single-site dynamical mean-field studies of realistic models of transition metal oxides, including the cuprate superconductors and rare earth nickelates (in bulk and superlattice form). We include orbital multiplet effects and hybridization to ligands. We explicitly calculate the d-d exciton spectra for cuprates, finding sharp exciton lines in both metallic and insulating phases, which should be visible in experiments. We also find that the additional d3z^2-r^2 orbital does not contribute to an additional Fermi surface at any reasonable doping, in contradiction to previous slave-boson studies. The hybridization to ligands is shown to have crucial effects, for example suppressing the ferro-orbital order previously found in Hubbard model studies of nickelates. Hybridization to ligands is shown to be most naturally parametrized by the d-orbital occupancy. For cuprates and nickelates, insulating behavior is found to be present only for a very narrow range of d-occupancy, irrespective of the Coulomb repulsion. The d-occupancy predicted by standard band calculations is found to be very far from the values required to obtain an insulating phase, calling into question the interpretation of these materials as charge transfer insulators. [4pt] This work is done in collaboration with A.J. Millis, M.J. Han, C.A. Marianetti, L. de' Medici, and H.T. Dang, and is supported by NSF-DMR-1006282, the Army Office of Scientific Research, and the Condensed Matter Theory Center and CNAM at University of Maryland. [4pt] [1] X. Wang, H. T. Dang, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 84, 014530 (2011).[0pt] [2] X. Wang, M. J. Han, L. de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, arXiv:1110.2782.[0pt] [3] M. J. Han, X. Wang, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 206804 (2011).

  10. Electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in acid medium: enhancement of activity of noble metal nanoparticles and their alloys by supporting or modifying them with metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Pawel J.; Pieta, Izabela S.; Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Wadas, Anna; Marks, Diana; Klak, Karolina; Stobinski, Leszek; Cox, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Different approaches to enhancement of electrocatalytic activity of noble metal nanoparticles during oxidation of small organic molecules (namely potential fuels for low-temperature fuel cells such as methanol, ethanol and formic acid) are described. A physical approach to the increase of activity of catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. platinum or palladium) involves nanostructuring to obtain highly dispersed systems of high surface area. Recently, the feasibility of enhancing activity of noble metal systems through the formation of bimetallic (e.g. PtRu, PtSn, and PdAu) or even more complex (e.g. PtRuW, PtRuSn) alloys has been demonstrated. In addition to possible changes in the electronic properties of alloys, specific interactions between metals as well as chemical reactivity of the added components have been postulated. We address and emphasize here the possibility of utilization of noble metal and alloyed nanoparticles supported on robust but reactive high surface area metal oxides (e.g. WO3, MoO3, TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5, and CeO2) in oxidative electrocatalysis. This paper concerns the way in which certain inorganic oxides and oxo species can act effectively as supports for noble metal nanoparticles or their alloys during electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen and representative organic fuels. Among important issues are possible changes in the morphology and dispersion, as well as specific interactions leading to the improved chemisorptive and catalytic properties in addition to the feasibility of long time operation of the discussed systems. PMID:24443590

  11. Production of Metal-Free Composites Composed of Graphite Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nitride Nanodots and Their Enhanced Photocatalytic Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Yeon; Oh, Junghoon; Park, Sunghee; Shim, Yeonjun; Park, Sungjin

    2016-04-04

    A novel metal-free composite (GN) composed of two types of carbon-based nanomaterials, graphite oxide (GO) and 2D oxidized carbon nitride (OCN) nanodots was produced. Chemical and morphological characterizations reveal that GN contains a main component of GO with well-dispersed 2D OCN nanodots. GN shows enhanced photocatalytic performance for degrading an organic pollutant, Rhodamine B, under visible light. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Trends in CO Oxidation Rates for Metal Nanoparticles and Close-Packed, Stepped, and Kinked Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Mowbray, Duncan; Dobrin, Sergey

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we study trends in the CO oxidation activity for different metals and surfaces. Specifically, we show how the activity of (111) close-packed surfaces, (211) stepped surfaces, (532) kinked surfaces, 55 atom cuboctahedral clusters, and 12 atom cluster...... models changes with the coordination number of atoms at the active sites. This effect is shown to be electronic in nature, as low coordinated metal atoms, which bind reactants most strongly, have the highest energy metal d states....

  13. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  14. Rational construction of strongly coupled metal-metal oxide-graphene nanostructure with excellent electrocatalytic activity and durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Yingju; Gao, Qiongzhi; Ruan, Weishuo; Lin, Xiaomin; Li, Xin

    2014-07-09

    The interaction within heterogeneous nanostructures can provide a great opportunity to radically enhance their electrocatalytic properties and increase their activity and durability. Here a rational, simple, and integrated strategy is reported to construct uniform and strongly coupled metal-metal oxide-graphene nanostructure as an electrocatalyst with high performance. We first simply synthesized the interacted SnO2-prGO (protected and reduced graphene oxide) hybrid with SnO2 nanoparticles (∼4 nm) selectively anchored on the oxygenated defects of rGO using an in situ redox and hydrolysis reaction. After the deposition of Pt, uniform Pt NPs are found to contact intimately and exclusively with the SnO2 phase in the SnO2-prGO hybrid. This constructed nanostructure (Pt-SnO2-prGO) exhibits significantly improved electrocatalytic activity (2.19-fold) and durability (2.08-fold) toward methanol oxidation over that of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst. The detailed explanation of the strong coupling between SnO2 and graphene as well as between Pt and SnO2 is discussed, revealing that such a process can be used to immobilize various metal catalysts on metal-oxide-decorated catalysts for realizing advanced catalytic systems with enhanced performance.

  15. Volcano Relation for the Deacon Process over Transition-Metal Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Hansen, Heine Anton

    2010-01-01

    We establish an activity relation for the heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of HCI (the Deacon Process) over rutile transition-metal oxide catalysts by combining density functional theory calculations (DFT) with microkinetic modeling. Linear energy relations for the elementary reaction steps are ...

  16. Thermal oxidation of Zr–Cu–Al–Ni amorphous metal thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleksak, R.P.; Hostetler, E.B.; Flynn, B.T. [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); McGlone, J.M.; Landau, N.P.; Wager, J.F. [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Stickle, W.F. [Hewlett-Packard Company, Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Herman, G.S., E-mail: greg.herman@oregonstate.edu [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The initial stages of thermal oxidation for Zr–Cu–Al–Ni amorphous metal thin films were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The as-deposited films had oxygen incorporated during sputter deposition, which helped to stabilize the amorphous phase. After annealing in air at 300 °C for short times (5 min) this oxygen was found to segregate to the surface or buried interface. Annealing at 300 °C for longer times leads to significant composition variation in both vertical and lateral directions, and formation of a surface oxide layer that consists primarily of Zr and Al oxides. Surface oxide formation was initially limited by back-diffusion of Cu and Ni (< 30 min), and then by outward diffusion of Zr (> 30 min). The oxidation properties are largely consistent with previous observations of Zr–Cu–Al–Ni metallic glasses, however some discrepancies were observed which could be explained by the unique sample geometry of the amorphous metal thin films. - Highlights: • Thermal oxidation of amorphous Zr–Cu–Al–Ni thin films was investigated. • Significant short-range inhomogeneities were observed in the amorphous films. • An accumulation of Cu and Ni occurs at the oxide/metal interface. • Diffusion of Zr was found to limit oxide film growth.

  17. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  18. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-30

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA, and on zirconia and stainless steel joining couples prepared using this braze filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation resistance of the brazed joint.

  19. Effective oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides with hydrogen peroxide under transition-metal-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golchoubian, Hamid; Hosseinpoor, Farideh

    2007-03-03

    A "green" highly selective oxidation of organic sulfides to the corresponding sulfoxides was developed using hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid under transition metal-free and mild conditions. The oxidation procedure is very simple and the products are easily isolated in excellent yields (90-99%).

  20. Effective Oxidation of Sulfides to Sulfoxides with Hydrogen Peroxide under Transition-Metal-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Hosseinpoor

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A “green” highly selective oxidation of organic sulfides to the corresponding sulfoxides was developed using hydrogen peroxide and glacial acetic acid under transition metal-free and mild conditions. The oxidation procedure is very simple and the products are easily isolated in excellent yields (90-99%.

  1. Tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide: a Potential Donor Impurity in the Organic Metal TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Bechgaard, Klaus; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1979-01-01

    Tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide, which because of its size similarity with tetrathiafulvalene is a potential ‘donor impurity’ in the organic metal TTF–TCNQ, was prepared and characterized spectroscopically. Experiments in which tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide was purposely doped into TTF–TCNQ indicate, how...

  2. Base-oxidant promoted metal-free N-demethylation of arylamines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A metal-free oxidative N-demethylation of arylamines with triethylamine as a base and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) as oxidant is reported in this paper. The reaction is general, practical, inexpensive, non-toxic, and the method followed is environmentally benign, with moderate to good yields. Keywords.

  3. Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts for H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Renhe, E-mail: yinrh@staff.shu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhao Yonggang, E-mail: zhaoyonggang8210@163.co [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu Shiyin; Wang Haomin; Cao Weimin [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Fan Qinbai, E-mail: fan@gastechnology.or [Gas Technology Institute, 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd., Des Plaines, IL 60018 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal/metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts is systematically investigated as a method of producing hydrogen at the cathode. The composition of the liquid catalyst was varied to determine its effect on the coal electrolysis. A spectrum of byproducts from the coal oxidation at the anode was analyzed. The Ti-supported metal oxide electrodes were prepared by thermal decomposition and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction results show that the composition of the electrodes was Ti/Pt, Ti/RuO{sub 2}, Ti/IrO{sub 2} and Ti/IrO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}. Coal oxidation tests on these electrodes indicate that Ti/IrO{sub 2} has the best electrocatalytic activity. Polarization curves reveal that redox catalysts, such as Fe{sup 3+}, K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}, KBr and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, bridge the coal particles and the solid electrode surface, thus increasing the rates of coal oxidation. The dynamic transition of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} is proven by a KMnO{sub 4} titration experiment, and the possible catalytic mechanism is discussed. Product analysis shows that pure H{sub 2} is generated at the cathode and that CO{sub 2} is the main product at the anode.

  4. Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts for H{sub 2} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, R.H.; Zhao, Y.G.; Lu, S.Y.; Wang, H.M.; Cao, W.M.; Fan, Q.B. [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-12-15

    Electrocatalytic oxidation of coal on Ti-supported metal/metal oxides coupled with liquid catalysts is systematically investigated as a method of producing hydrogen at the cathode. The composition of the liquid catalyst was varied to determine its effect on the coal electrolysis. A spectrum of byproducts from the coal oxidation at the anode was analyzed. The Ti-supported metal oxide electrodes were prepared by thermal decomposition and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction results show that the composition of the electrodes was Ti/Pt, Ti/RuO{sub 2}, Ti/IrO{sub 2} and Ti/IrO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 2}. Coal oxidation tests on these electrodes indicate that Ti/IrO{sub 2} has the best electrocatalytic activity. Polarization curves reveal that redox catalysts, such as Fe{sup 3+}, K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sup 6}, KBr and V2O5, bridge the coal particles and the solid electrode surface, thus increasing the rates of coal oxidation. The dynamic transition of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} is proven by a KMnO{sub 4} titration experiment, and the possible catalytic mechanism is discussed. Product analysis shows that pure H{sub 2} is generated at the cathode and that CO{sub 2} is the main product at the anode.

  5. Subnanometer to nanometer transition metal CO oxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Yasumatsu, Hisato

    2017-12-26

    The present invention provides a catalyst defined in part by a conductive substrate; a film overlaying a surface of the substrate; and a plurality of metal clusters supported by the layer, wherein each cluster comprises between 8 and 11 atoms. Further provided is a catalyst defined in part by a conductive substrate; a layer overlaying a surface of the substrate; and a plurality of metal clusters supported by the layer, wherein each cluster comprises at least two metals.

  6. Surfactants and submicron sea spray generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellegri, K.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Yoon, Y.J.; Jennings, S.G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to elucidate the role of surfactants on the primary marine aerosol production of submicron marine aerosols. A synthetic surfactant SDS was used in conjunction with artificially generated seawater, and the resultant bubble-mediated aerosol produced was

  7. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  8. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  9. Metal oxide targets produced by the polymer-assisted deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Mitch A., E-mail: mitch@berkeley.ed [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ali, Mazhar N.; Chang, Noel N.; Parsons-Moss, T. [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ashby, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gates, Jacklyn M. [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stavsetra, Liv [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Nitsche, Heino [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-11

    The polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) method was used to create crack-free homogenous metal oxide films for use as targets in nuclear science applications. Metal oxide films of europium, thulium, and hafnium were prepared as models for actinide oxides. Films produced by a single application of PAD were homogenous and uniform and ranged in thickness from 30 to 320 nm. Reapplication of the PAD method (six times) with a 10% by weight hafnium(IV) solution resulted in an equally homogeneous and uniform film with a total thickness of 600 nm.

  10. Chemoselective Oxidation of Bio-Glycerol with Nano-Sized Metal Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hu; Kotni, Ramakrishna; Zhang, Qiuyun

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol, a major co-product in the process of biodiesel production, is a promising precursor to a variety of high value fine chemicals such as glyceric acid, dihydroxyacetone, lactic acid and tartronic acid via the corresponding chemoselective oxidation reactions. One of the prospective routes...... to selectively oxidize glycerol and yield products with good selectivity is the use of nano-sized metal particles as heterogeneous catalysts. In this short review, recent developments in chemoselective oxidation of glycerol to specific products over nano-sized metal catalysts are described. Attention is drawn...

  11. Patterning with metal-oxide EUV photoresist: patterning capability, resist smoothing, trimming, and selective stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ming; Lazzarino, Frederic; De Schepper, Peter; De Simone, Danilo; Piumi, Daniele; Luong, Vinh; Yamashita, Fumiko; Kocsis, Michael; Kumar, Kaushik

    2017-03-01

    Inpria metal-oxide photoresist (PR) serves as a thin spin-on patternable hard mask for EUV lithography. Compared to traditional organic photoresists, the ultrathin metal-oxide photoresist ( 12nm after development) effectively mitigates pattern collapse. Because of the high etch resistance of the metal-oxide resist, this may open up significant scope for more aggressive etches, new chemistries, and novel integration schemes. We have previously shown that metal-oxide PR can be successfully used to pattern the block layer for the imec 7-nm technology node[1] and advantageously replace a multiple patterning approach, which significantly reduces the process complexity and effectively decreases the cost. We also demonstrated the formation of 16nm half pitch 1:1 line/space with EUV single print[2], which corresponds to a metal 2 layer for the imec 7-nm technology node. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using Inpria's metal-oxide PR for 16nm line/space patterning. In meanwhile, we also explore the different etch process for LWR smoothing, resist trimming and resist stripping.

  12. Heavy metal bioaccumulation and biomarkers of oxidative stress in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human activities can have dramatic effects on animal populations around urban areas with heavy metal contamination being a primary cause of harm. Amphibians, as residents of aquatic systems and with their semi-permeable skin are especially susceptible to heavy metal contamination. To better understand the effect of ...

  13. Research Update: Strategies for efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting using metal oxide photoanodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungho Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical (PEC water splitting to hydrogen is an attractive method for capturing and storing the solar energy in the form of chemical energy. Metal oxides are promising photoanode materials due to their low-cost synthetic routes and higher stability than other semiconductors. In this paper, we provide an overview of recent efforts to improve PEC efficiencies via applying a variety of fabrication strategies to metal oxide photoanodes including (i size and morphology-control, (ii metal oxide heterostructuring, (iii dopant incorporation, (iv attachments of quantum dots as sensitizer, (v attachments of plasmonic metal nanoparticles, and (vi co-catalyst coupling. Each strategy highlights the underlying principles and mechanisms for the performance enhancements.

  14. Application of Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnesh N. Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nanaparticles based nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  15. Bi–Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Fa-Nian, E-mail: fshi@ua.pt [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, 110870 Shenyang (China); Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rosa Silva, Ana [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bian, Liang [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China)

    2015-05-15

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn–Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi{sub 2}O(1,3,5-BTC){sub 2}]{sub n} (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi{sub 4}O{sub 2}(COO){sub 12} clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO){sub 6} fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of (4{sup 13}.6{sup 2})(4{sup 13}.6{sup 8})(4{sup 16}.6{sup 5})(4{sup 18}.6{sup 10})(4{sup 22}.6{sup 14})(4{sup 3}) corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones. - Graphical abstract: This metal organic framework (MOF) is the essence of a 2D metal organic oxide (MOO). - Highlights: • New concept of metal organic oxide (MOO) was defined and made difference from metal organic framework. • New MOO of MOOMnBi was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Crystal structure of MOOMnBi was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. • The catalytic activity of MOOMnBi was studied showing reusable after 2 cycles.

  16. Preparation of bioactive titania films on titanium metal via anodic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X; Kim, H-M; Kawashita, M; Wang, L; Xiong, T; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2009-01-01

    To research the crystal structure and surface morphology of anodic films on titanium metal in different electrolytes under various electrochemical conditions and investigate the effect of the crystal structure of the oxide films on apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Titanium oxide films were prepared using an anodic oxidation method on the surface of titanium metal in four different electrolytes: sulfuric acid, acetic acid, phosphoric acid and sodium sulfate solutions with different voltages for 1 min at room temperature. Anodic films that consisted of rutile and/or anatase phases with porous structures were formed on titanium metal after anodizing in H(2)SO(4) and Na(2)SO(4) electrolytes, while amorphous titania films were produced after anodizing in CH(3)COOH and H(3)PO(4) electrolytes. Titanium metal with the anatase and/or rutile crystal structure films showed excellent apatite-forming ability and produced a compact apatite layer covering all the surface of titanium after soaking in SBF for 7d, but titanium metal with amorphous titania layers was not able to induce apatite formation. The resultant apatite layer formed on titanium metal in SBF could enhance the bonding strength between living tissue and the implant. Anodic oxidation is believed to be an effective method for preparing bioactive titanium metal as an artificial bone substitute even under load-bearing conditions.

  17. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhenium with metal oxide additives. 1: Feasibility demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, F. A.; Page, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating small rhenium parts with metal oxide additives by means of slip casting and extrusion techniques is described. The metal oxides, ZrO2 and HfO2 were stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3. Additions of metal oxide to the rhenium of up to 15 weight percent were used. Tubes of 17 mm diameter with 0.5 mm walls were slip cast by adapting current ceramic oxide techniques. A complete cast double conical nozzle demonstrated the ability to meet shapes and tolerances. Extrusion of meter long tubing lengths of 3.9 mm o.d. x 2.3 mm i.d. final dimension is documented. Sintering schedules are presented to produce better than 95% of theoretical density parts. Finished machining was found possible were requried by electric discharge machining and diamond grinding.

  19. On the electrical and optical properties of oxide nanolayers produced by the thermal oxidation of metal tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabtsev, S. V., E-mail: ryabtsev@phys.vsu.ru; Chuvenkova, O. A.; Kannykin, S. V.; Popov, A. E.; Ryabtseva, N. S.; Voischev, S. S.; Turishchev, S. Yu.; Domashevskaya, E. P. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Thin SnO{sub 2–x} layers, 30 nm in thickness, are produced by the thermal oxidation of metal tin nanolayers at a temperature of 450–750°C. The electrical and optical properties of the layers are studied. During the thermal oxidation of tin nanolayers, an unsteady variation in their conductivity is observed. For the oxide films produced at 450 and 550°C, an absorption band at 340 nm (3.65 eV) is detected in the optical spectra. The conductivity-activation energy is determined for samples oxidized to different degrees. On the basis of experimental data and the data reported in publications, an oxidation mechanism controlling the properties of Sn nanolayers is proposed.

  20. Electronically conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-09-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a conducting oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the conducting oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The conducting metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.17/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.-1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at the gas stream temperature. The optical response of the conducting oxide materials is proposed to result from the high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity of the conducting metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity. These changes in effective carrier densities and electronic conductivity of conducting metal oxide films and nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary conducting metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  1. Biomedical Detection via Macro- and Nano-Sensors Fabricated with Metallic and Semiconducting Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-In

    2013-01-01

    Originally developed as gas sensors, the benefits of metallic and semiconducting oxide materials are now being realized in other areas of sensing, such as chemical, environmental, and biomedical monitoring and detection. Metallic and semiconducting oxides have continuously expanded their roles to date, and have also established their significance in biosensing by utilizing a variety of modes for signal generation and detection mechanism. These sensors are typically based either on their optical, electrochemical, electrical, gravimetric, acoustic, and magnetic properties for signal transduction. This article reviews such biosensors that employ metallic and semiconducting oxides as active sensing elements to detect nucleic acids, proteins, cells, and a variety of important biomarkers, both in thin film and one-dimensional forms. Specific oxide materials (Mx Oy ) examined comprehensively in this article include M = Fe, Cu, Si, Zn, Sn, In. The derivatives of these oxide materials resulting from incorporation of dopants are examined as well. The crystalline structures and unique properties that may be exploited for various biosensing applications are discussed, and recent efforts investigating the feasibility of using these oxide materials in biosensor technology are described. Key biosensor characteristics resulting from reduced dimensionality are overviewed under the motif of planar and one-dimensional sensors. This article also provides insight into current challenges facing biosensor applications for metallic and semiconducting oxides. In addition, future outlook in this particular field as well as different impacts on biology and medicine are addressed. PMID:23627064

  2. Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-01-28

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a doped oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the doped oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The doped metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.18/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at a temperature of 25.degree. C. The optical response of the doped oxide materials results from the high carrier concentration of the doped metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration. These changes in effective carrier densities of conducting metal oxide nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary doped metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  3. Mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide and layered metal oxide nanosheets: useful precursors for the porous nanocomposites and hybrid films of graphene/metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Ri; Kim, In Young; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2012-02-20

    Homogeneously mixed colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide, or RGO, and layered manganate nanosheets have been synthesized by a simple addition of the exfoliated colloid of RGO into that of layered MnO(2). The obtained mixed colloidal suspensions with the RGO/MnO(2) ratio of ≤0.3 show good colloidal stability without any phase separation and a negatively charged state with a zeta (ζ) potential of -30 to -40 mV. The flocculation of these mixed colloidal suspensions with lithium cations yields porous nanocomposites of Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) with high electrochemical activity and a markedly expanded surface area of around 70-100 m(2)  g(-1). Relative to the Li/RGO and Li/layered MnO(2) nanocomposites (≈116 and ≈167 F g(-1)), the obtained Li/RGO-layered MnO(2) nanocomposites deliver a larger capacitance of approximately 210 F g(-1) with good cyclability of around 95-97 % up to the 1000th cycle, thus indicating the positive effect of hybridization on the electrode performances of RGO and lithium manganate. Also, an electrophoretic deposition of the mixed colloidal suspensions makes it possible to easily fabricate uniform hybrid films composed of graphene and manganese oxide. The obtained films show a distinct electrochemical activity and a homogeneous distribution of RGO and MnO(2). The present experimental findings clearly demonstrate that the utilization of the mixed colloidal suspensions as precursors provides a facile and universal methodology to synthesize various types of graphene/metal oxide hybrid materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Charge Transfer Stabilization of Late Transition Metal Oxide Nanoparticles on a Layered Niobate Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Megan E; Senftle, Thomas P; Winterstein, Jonathan P; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Janik, Michael J; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2015-12-30

    Interfacial interactions between late transition metal/metal oxide nanoparticles and oxide supports impact catalytic activity and stability. Here, we report the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), electron microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) to explore periodic trends in the heats of nanoparticle-support interactions for late transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles on layered niobate and silicate supports. Data for Co(OH)2, hydroxyiridate-capped IrOx·nH2O, Ni(OH)2, CuO, and Ag2O nanoparticles were added to previously reported data for Rh(OH)3 grown on nanosheets of TBA0.24H0.76Ca2Nb3O10 and a layered silicate. ITC measurements showed stronger bonding energies in the order Ag niobate support, as expected from trends in M-O bond energies. Nanoparticles with exothermic heats of interaction were stabilized against sintering. In contrast, ITC measurements showed endothermic interactions of Cu, Ni, and Rh oxide/hydroxide nanoparticles with the silicate and poor resistance to sintering. These trends in interfacial energies were corroborated by DFT calculations using single-atom and four-atom cluster models of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles. Density of states and charge density difference calculations reveal that strongly bonded metals (Rh, Ir) transfer d-electron density from the adsorbed cluster to niobium atoms in the support; this mixing is absent in weakly binding metals, such as Ag and Au, and in all metals on the layered silicate support. The large differences between the behavior of nanoparticles on niobate and silicate supports highlight the importance of d-orbital interactions between the nanoparticle and support in controlling the nanoparticles' stability.

  5. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products.

  6. Adsorbate-mediated strong metal-support interactions in oxide-supported Rh catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubu, John C.; Zhang, Shuyi; Derita, Leo; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Chen, Jingguang G.; Graham, George W.; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    The optimization of supported metal catalysts predominantly focuses on engineering the metal site, for which physical insights based on extensive theoretical and experimental contributions have enabled the rational design of active sites. Although it is well known that supports can influence the catalytic properties of metals, insights into how metal-support interactions can be exploited to optimize metal active-site properties are lacking. Here we utilize in situ spectroscopy and microscopy to identify and characterize a support effect in oxide-supported heterogeneous Rh catalysts. This effect is characterized by strongly bound adsorbates (HCOx) on reducible oxide supports (TiO2 and Nb2O5) that induce oxygen-vacancy formation in the support and cause HCOx-functionalized encapsulation of Rh nanoparticles by the support. The encapsulation layer is permeable to reactants, stable under the reaction conditions and strongly influences the catalytic properties of Rh, which enables rational and dynamic tuning of CO2-reduction selectivity.

  7. Non-hydrolytic metal oxide films for perovskite halide overcoating and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Kim, In Soo

    2017-09-26

    A method of protecting a perovskite halide film from moisture and temperature includes positioning the perovskite halide film in a chamber. The chamber is maintained at a temperature of less than 200 degrees Celsius. An organo-metal compound is inserted into the chamber. A non-hydrolytic oxygen source is subsequently inserted into the chamber. The inserting of the organo-metal compound and subsequent inserting of the non-hydrolytic oxygen source into the chamber is repeated for a predetermined number of cycles. The non-hydrolytic oxygen source and the organo-metal compound interact in the chamber to deposit a non-hydrolytic metal oxide film on perovskite halide film. The non-hydrolytic metal oxide film protects the perovskite halide film from relative humidity of greater than 35% and a temperature of greater than 150 degrees Celsius, respectively.

  8. Anti-Oxidative, Metal Chelating and Radical Scavenging Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    only due to their high abundance as well as their active participation in most cellular processes. Oxidative protein damage is associated with aging and human pathologies [15]. The < 3 kDa fraction was as potent as reduced glutathione in quenching hydroxyl radicals and in protecting against oxidative protein damage. The.

  9. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SiO2OSO3H) as a new oxidizing system is able to oxidize a variety of aliphatic or aromatic thiols to the corresponding disulfides. The process reported here is operationally simple, environmentally benign and reactions have been mildly and ...

  10. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanofibers and Their Environmental Remediation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Mondal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, wastewater treatment by photocatalytic oxidation processes with metal oxide nanomaterials and nanocomposites such as zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, etc. using ultraviolet (UV and visible light or even solar energy has added massive research importance. This waste removal technique using nanostructured photocatalysts is well known because of its effectiveness in disintegrating and mineralizing the unsafe organic pollutants such as organic pesticides, organohalogens, PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, surfactants, microorganisms, and other coloring agents in addition to the prospect of utilizing the solar and UV spectrum. The photocatalysts degrade the pollutants using light energy, which creates energetic electron in the metal oxide and thus generates hydroxyl radical, an oxidative mediator that can oxidize completely the organic pollutant in the wastewater. Altering the morphologies of metal oxide photocatalysts in nanoscale can further improve their photodegradation efficiency. Nanoscale features of the photocatalysts promote enhance light absorption and improved photon harvest property by refining the process of charge carrier generation and recombination at the semiconductor surfaces and in that way boost hydroxyl radicals. The literature covering semiconductor nanomaterials and nanocomposite-assisted photocatalysis—and, among those, metal oxide nanofibers—suggest that this is an attractive route for environmental remediation due to their capability of reaching complete mineralization of organic contaminants under mild reaction conditions such as room temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure with greater degradation performance. The main aim of this review is to highlight the most recent published work in the field of metal oxide nanofibrous photocatalyst-mediated degradation of organic pollutants and unsafe microorganisms present in wastewater. Finally, the recycling and reuse of photocatalysts for

  11. Variation in oxidative stress indices of two green seaweeds growing under different heavy metal stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Gehan A; Ismail, Mona M

    2017-02-01

    Concentrations of nine heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were determined in the green seaweed species Cladophora glomerata and Ulva compressa collected from El-Mex and Sidi Kirayr locations. The heavy metal concentrations in algal tissues were in direct correlation with their soluble concentrations in seawater with the descending order: FePbseaweeds from El-Mex bay. Additionally, the estimated metal pollution index and pollution load index for the tested algae and seawaters ensured their ability as metal pollution bioindicators for monitoring marine environment quality and as biomarkers for oxidative damage assessment.

  12. Solvent-Free Selective Oxidation of Toluene with O2 Catalyzed by Metal Cation Modified LDHs and Mixed Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of metal cation modified layered-double hydroxides (LDHs and mixed oxides were prepared and used to be the selective oxidation of toluene with O2. The results revealed that the modified LDHs exhibited much higher catalytic performance than their parent LDH and the modified mixed oxides. Moreover, the metal cations were also found to play important roles in the catalytic performance and stabilities of modified catalysts. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the highest toluene conversion reached 8.7% with 97.5% of the selectivity to benzyldehyde; moreover, the catalytic performance remained after nine catalytic runs. In addition, the reaction probably involved a free-radical mechanism.

  13. One-Dimensional Metal-Oxide Nanostructures for Solar Photocatalytic Water-Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyun; Song, Longfei; Zhang, Hongchao; Luo, Linqu; Wang, Dong; Tang, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Because of their unique physical and chemical properties, one-dimensional (1-D) metal-oxide nanostructures have been extensively applied in the areas of gas sensors, electrochromic devices, nanogenerators, and so on. Solar water-splitting has attracted extensive research interest because hydrogen generated from solar-driven water splitting is a clean, sustainable, and abundant energy source that not only solves the energy crisis, but also protects the environment. In this comprehensive review, the main synthesis methods, properties, and especially prominent applications in solar water splitting of 1-D metal-oxides, including titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), tungsten trioxide (WO3), iron oxide (Fe2O3), and copper oxide (CuO) are fully discussed.

  14. Morphology, structure, and metal binding mechanisms of biogenic manganese oxides in a superfund site treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, O W; Rivera, N A; Gardner, T G; Andrews, M Y; Santelli, C M; Polizzotto, M L

    2017-01-25

    Manganese oxides, which may be biogenically produced in both pristine and contaminated environments, have a large affinity for many trace metals. In this study, water and Mn oxide-bearing biofilm samples were collected from the components of a pump and treat remediation system at a superfund site. To better understand the factors leading to their formation and their effects on potentially toxic metal fate, we conducted a chemical, microscopic, and spectroscopic characterization of these biofilm samples. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of Mn oxides in close association with biological structures with morphologies consistent with fungi. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the oxides to be a mixture of layer and tunnel structure Mn(iv) oxides. In addition, XAS suggested that Ba, Co, and Zn all primarily bind to oxides in the biofilm in a manner that is analogous to synthetic or laboratory grown bacteriogenic Mn oxides. The results indicate that Mn oxides produced by organisms in the system may effectively scavenge metals, thus highlighting the potential utility of these organisms in designed remediation systems.

  15. Continuous Draw Spinning of Extra-Long Silver Submicron Fibers with Micrometer Patterning Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaopeng; Liao, Suiyang; Huang, Ya; Song, Jianan; Liu, Zhenglian; Fang, Minghao; Xu, Chencheng; Cui, Yi; Wu, Hui

    2017-03-08

    Ultrathin metal fibers can serve as highly conducting and flexible current and heat transport channels, which are essential for numerous applications ranging from flexible electronics to energy conversion. Although industrial production of metal fibers with diameters of down to 2 μm is feasible, continuous production of high-quality and low-cost nanoscale metal wires is still challenging. Herein, we report the continuous draw spinning of highly conductive silver submicron fibers with the minimum diameter of ∼200 nm and length of more than kilometers. We obtained individual AgNO3/polymer fibers by continuous drawing from an aqueous solution at a speed of up to 8 m/s. With subsequent heat treatment, freestanding Ag submicron fibers with high mechanical flexibility and electric conductivity have been obtained. Woven mats of aligned Ag submicron fibers were used as transparent electrodes with high flexibility and high performance with sheet resistance of 7 Ω sq(-1) at a transparency of 96%. Continuous draw spinning opened new avenues for scalable, flexible, and ultralow-cost fabrication of extra-long conductive ultrathin metal fibers.

  16. Electric-field-induced low temperature oxidation of metal and semiconductor nanostructures; Feldinduzierte Tieftemperaturoxidation nanoskaliger Metall- und Halbleiterstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Carsten

    2008-10-14

    At the surface of almost all metals and semiconductors oxide formation occurs when exposed to atmosphere. The oxidation reaction proceeds along a number of partial reaction steps with the reacting species usually being charged. Thus, electric fields change the driving force and therefore the kinetics of the reaction. This effect occurs very pronounced at free-standing nanoscale objects, since their strongly curved surface yields electric fields of the order of volts per nanometer even if only moderate voltages are applied. This experimental study focuses on the characterisation of the influence of electric fields on the oxidation behaviour of free-standing nanoscale tips. Tungsten, aluminium and silicon where used as model systems. Oxygen was provided as H{sub 2}O or as O{sub 2}, and experiments where carried out at a temperature of 296 K. It is shown that the oxidation behaviour of nanoscale tips under the influence of an electric field changes dramatically if H{sub 2}O is available for the reaction. There exists a critical electric field above which field-induced oxidation is observed. The critical field strength is of the order of some volts per nanometer and shows a specific dependence on the partial pressure of H{sub 2}O. Below the critical field strength the oxidation reaction is kinetically hindered. A detailed investigation of the partial reaction steps reveals that a reaction of H{sub 2}O at the oxide-vapour-interface is rate limiting for field-induced oxidation. Comparing the oxidation behaviour of the investigated model systems, it is concluded that field-induced oxidation is an universal, material independent effect. The critical field strength determines the region of kinetic stability against oxidation and thus gives a restriction for nanostructure applications. (orig.)

  17. Technology of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The growth of an oxide interfacial layer was recently found to increase the open-circuit voltage (OCV) and efficiency by up to 60 per cent in GaAs metal-semiconductor solar cells. Details of oxidation techniques to provide the necessary oxide thickness and chemical structure and using ozone, water-vapor-saturated oxygen, or oxygen gas discharges are described, as well as apparent crystallographic orientation effects. Preliminary results of the oxide chemistry obtained from X-ray, photoelectron spectroscopy are given. Ratios of arsenic oxide to gallium oxide of unity or less seem to be preferable. Samples with the highest OVC predominantly have As(+3) in the arsenic oxide rather than As(+5). A major difficulty at this time is a reduction in OCV by 100-200 mV when the antireflection coating is vacuum deposited.

  18. Emulsifier type, metal chelation and pH affect oxidative stability of n-3-enriched emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    -enriched oil-in-water emulsion. The selected food emulsifiers were Tween 80, Citrem, sodium caseinate and lecithin. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by determination of peroxide values and secondary volatile oxidation products. Moreover, the zeta potential and the droplet sizes were determined. Twen resulted......Recent research has shown that the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions is affected by the type of surfactant used as emulsifier. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of real food emulsifiers as well as metal chelation by EDTA and pH on the oxidative stability of a 10% n-3...... in the least oxidatively stable emulsions, followed by Citrem. When iron was present, caseinate-stabilized emulsions oxidized slower than lecithin emulsions at pH 3, whereas the opposite was the case at pH 7. Oxidation generally progressed faster at pH 3 than at pH 7, irrespective of the addition of iron. EDTA...

  19. A device for reduction of metal oxides generated in electrokinetic separation equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Kim, Il-Gook; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of the waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured 1.2 ton electrokinetic decontamination equipment. The optimum pH of electrolyte in cathode chamber for a reduction of volume of metal oxides was below 2.35. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil per batch was manufactured to remove uranium from soil with high removal efficiency during a short time. For a reduction of waste electrolyte volume and metal oxide volume, the reuse period of waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment and the method of a reduction of metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured electrokinetic equipment. Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment for treatment of 1.2 tons of the contaminated soil was manufactured to remove uranium from soil during a short time.

  20. Polyoxometalate electrocatalysts based on earth-abundant metals for efficient water oxidation in acidic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Ahicart, Marta; Soriano-López, Joaquín; Carbó, Jorge J.; Poblet, Josep M.; Galan-Mascaros, J. R.

    2018-01-01

    Water splitting is a promising approach to the efficient and cost-effective production of renewable fuels, but water oxidation remains a bottleneck in its technological development because it largely relies on noble-metal catalysts. Although inexpensive transition-metal oxides are competitive water oxidation catalysts in alkaline media, they cannot compete with noble metals in acidic media, in which hydrogen production is easier and faster. Here, we report a water oxidation catalyst based on earth-abundant metals that performs well in acidic conditions. Specifically, we report the enhanced catalytic activity of insoluble salts of polyoxometalates with caesium or barium counter-cations for oxygen evolution. In particular, the barium salt of a cobalt-phosphotungstate polyanion outperforms the state-of-the-art IrO2 catalyst even at pH < 1, with an overpotential of 189 mV at 1 mA cm-2. In addition, we find that a carbon-paste conducting support with a hydrocarbon binder can improve the stability of metal-oxide catalysts in acidic media by providing a hydrophobic environment.

  1. Tuning Selectivity of CO2 Hydrogenation Reactions at the Metal/Oxide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, Shyam; Liu, Ping; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-07-26

    The chemical transformation of CO2 not only mitigates the anthropogenic CO2 emission into the Earth's atmosphere but also produces carbon compounds that can be used as precursors for the production of chemicals and fuels. The activation and conversion of CO2 can be achieved on multifunctional catalytic sites available at the metal/oxide interface by taking advantage of the synergy between the metal nanoparticles and oxide support. Herein, we look at the recent progress in mechanistic studies of CO2 hydrogenation to C1 (CO, CH3OH, and CH4) compounds on metal/oxide catalysts. On this basis, we are able to provide a better understanding of the complex reaction network, grasp the capability of manipulating structure and combination of metal and oxide at the interface in tuning selectivity, and identify the key descriptors to control the activity and, in particular, the selectivity of catalysts. Finally, we also discuss challenges and future research opportunities for tuning the selective conversion of CO2 on metal/oxide catalysts.

  2. Heavy metal induced oxidative stress & its possible reversal by chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, S J S; Mittal, Megha; Mehta, Ashish

    2008-10-01

    Exposure to heavy metals is a common phenomenon due to their environmental pervasiveness. Metal intoxication particularly neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, or carcinogenicity is widely known. This review summarizes our current understanding about the mechanism by which metalloids or heavy metals (particularly arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury) induce their toxic effects. The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for all these metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The toxic manifestations of these metals are caused primarily due to imbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis which is termed as oxidative stress. Besides these metals have high affinity for thiol groups containing enzymes and proteins, which are responsible for normal cellular defense mechanism. Long term exposure to these metals could lead to apoptosis. Signaling components affected by metals include growth factor receptors, G-proteins, MAP kinases and transcription factors. Chelation therapy with chelating agents like calcium disodium ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (CaNa(2)EDTA), British Anti Lewisite (BAL), sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane 1-sulfonate (DMPS), meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) etc., is considered to be the best known treatment against metal poisoning. Despite many years of research we are still far away from effective treatment against toxicity caused due to exposure to heavy metals/metalloids. The treatment with these chelating agents is compromised with number of serious side-effects. Studies show that supplementation of antioxidants along-with a chelating agent prove to be a better treatment regimen than monotherapy with chelating agents. This review attempts a comprehensive account of recent developments in the research on heavy metal poisoning particularly the role of oxidative stress/free radicals in the toxic manifestation, an update about the recent strategies for the treatment with chelating agents and a

  3. Oxidation in ceria infiltrated metal supported SOFCs – A TEM investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of the Fe–Cr alloy backbone structure of metal supported solid oxide fuel cells is significantly improved when infiltrated with gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) particles. The mechanism for the improved oxidation behaviour is elucidated using various analytical transmission...... electron microscopy (TEM) techniques including energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of focus ion beamed TEM samples. The infiltrated CGO is predominately converted into CeFeO3 after high temperature processing, protecting the alloy. A thin layer of Cr-oxide is observed...

  4. Oxidation behavior of base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions of SMAW weldment in ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ravindra [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: ravirs_2002@rediffmail.com; Tewari, V.K.; Prakash, Satya [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-06-24

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) was used to weld together ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel. The oxidation studies were conducted on different regions of shielded metal arc weldment i.e., base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) specimens after exposure to air at 900 deg. C under cyclic conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of oxidation. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products. Base metal showed more weight gain than that of weld metal and HAZ. The HAZ specimen showed the least weight gain due to the formation of densely inner oxide scale.

  5. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenzhen

    2015-06-12

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide respectively. As a proof of concept, we synthesized gold and copper oxide (Au/CuO) composite with unique one-dimensional nanocauliflowers structure. Due to the nature of the synthesis method, no any foreign binder was needed in keeping either Au or CuO in place. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in combining metal oxide and noble metal in a binder-free style for fabricating nonenzymatic glucose sensor. The Au/CuO nanocauliflowers with large electrochemical active surface and high electrolyte contact area would promise a wide linear range and high sensitive detection of glucose with good stability and reproducibility due to its good electrical conductivity of Au and high electrocatalytic activity of CuO.

  6. Control of spontaneous emission of quantum dots using correlated effects of metal oxides and dielectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S M; Wing, W J; Gutha, R R; Capps, L

    2017-03-03

    We study the emission dynamics of semiconductor quantum dots in the presence of the correlated impact of metal oxides and dielectric materials. For this we used layered material structures consisting of a base substrate, a dielectric layer, and an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide. After depositing colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on the top of the metal oxide, we used spectral and time-resolved techniques to show that, depending on the type and thickness of the dielectric material, the metal oxide can characteristically change the interplay between intrinsic excitons, defect states, and the environment, offering new material properties. Our results show that aluminum oxide, in particular, can strongly change the impact of amorphous silicon on the emission dynamics of quantum dots by balancing the intrinsic near band emission and fast trapping of carriers. In such a system the silicon/aluminum oxide charge barrier can lead to large variation of the radiative lifetime of quantum dots and control of the photo-ejection rate of electrons in quantum dots. The results provide unique techniques to investigate and modify physical properties of dielectrics and manage optical and electrical properties of quantum dots.

  7. Low-Temperature UV-Assisted Fabrication of Metal Oxide Thin Film Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuanglin

    Solution processed metal oxide semiconductors have attracted intensive attention in the last several decades and have emerged as a promising candidate for the application of thin film transistor (TFT) due to their nature of transparency, flexibility, high mobility, simple processing technique and potential low manufacturing cost. However, metal oxide thin film fabricated by solution process usually requires a high temperature (over 300 °C), which is above the glass transition temperature of some conventional polymer substrates. In order to fabricate the flexible electronic device on polymer substrates, it is necessary to find a facile approach to lower the fabrication temperature and minimize defects in metal oxide thin film. In this thesis, the electrical properties dependency on temperature is discussed and an UV-assisted annealing method incorporating Deep ultraviolet (DUV)-decomposable additives is demonstrated, which can effectively improve electrical properties solution processed metal oxide semiconductors processed at temperature as low as 220 °C. By studying a widely used indium oxide (In2O3) TFT as a model system, it is worth noted that compared with the sample without UV treatment, the linear mobility and saturation mobility of UV-annealing sample are improved by 56% and 40% respectively. Meanwhile, the subthreshold swing is decreased by 32%, indicating UV-treated device could turn on and off more efficiently. In addition to pure In2O3 film, the similar phenomena have also been observed in indium oxide based Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (IGZO) system. These finding presented in this thesis suggest that the UV assisted annealing process open a new route to fabricate high performance metal oxide semiconductors under low temperatures.

  8. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM; Lesman, Zayd [UNM; Soliman, Haytham [UNM; Zea, Hugo [UNM

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  9. Experimental Investigations on the Influence of Adhesive Oxides on the Metal-Ceramic Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Enghardt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the influence of selected base metals, which act as oxide formers, on the metal-ceramic bond of dental veneer systems. Using ion implantation techniques, ions of Al, In and Cu were introduced into near-surface layers of a noble metal alloy containing no base metals. A noble metal alloy with base metals added for oxide formation was used as a reference. Both alloys were coated with a low-temperature fusing dental ceramic. Specimens without ion implantation or with Al2O3 air abrasion were used as controls. The test procedures comprised the Schwickerath shear bond strength test (ISO 9693-1, profile height (surface roughness measurements (ISO 4287; ISO 4288; ISO 25178, scanning electron microscopy (SEM imaging, auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Ion implantation resulted in no increase in bond strength. The highest shear bond strengths were achieved after oxidation in air and air abrasion with Al2O3 (41.5 MPa and 47.8 MPa respectively. There was a positive correlation between shear bond strength and profile height. After air abrasion, a pronounced structuring of the surface occurred compared to ion implantation. The established concentration shifts in alloy and ceramic could be reproduced. However, their positive effects on shear bond strength were not confirmed. The mechanical bond appears to be of greater importance for metal-ceramic bonding.

  10. Structure, Bonding and Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxide Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    ligand coatings, using a new fast-flow reactor . New experiments have isolated ligand-coated oxides of Co, Cr and Al, as well as pure aluminum...stabilized with ligand coatings, using a new fast-flow reactor . We are interested in the structure of these clusters and its influence on their...reactivity, which is most relevant for their applications in catalysis . New experiments have isolated ligand-coated oxides of Co, Cr and Al, as well

  11. Metal Doped Manganese Oxide Thin Films for Supercapacitor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Mai Thanh; Thuy, Hoang Thi Bich; Hang, Le Thi Thu

    2015-09-01

    Co and Fe doped manganese oxide thin films were prepared by anodic deposition at current density of 50 mA cm(-2) using the electrolyte containing manganese sulfate and either cobalt sulfate or ferrous sulfate. Surface morphology and crystal structure of oxides were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical composition of materials was analyzed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS), iodometric titration method and complexometric titration method, respectively. Supercapacitive behavior of Co and Fe doped manganese oxide films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the doped manganese oxides are composed of nano fiber-like structure with radius of 5-20 nm and remain amorphous structure after heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 2 hours. The average valence of manganese increases from +3.808 to +3.867 after doping Co and from +3.808 to +3.846 after doping Fe. The doped manganese oxide film electrodes exhibited preferably ideal pseudo-capacitive behavior. The specific capacitance value of deposited manganese oxide reaches a maximum of 175.3 F/g for doping Co and 244.6 F/g for doping Fe. The thin films retained about 84% of the initial capacity even after 500 cycles of charge-discharge test. Doping Co and Fe decreases diffusion and charge transfer resistance of the films. The electric double layer capacitance and capacitor response frequency are increased after doping.

  12. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    ...) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique...

  13. Trends in Adhesion Energies of Metal Nanoparticles on Oxide Surfaces: Understanding Support Effects in Catalysis and Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingson, Stephanie L; Campbell, Charles T

    2017-02-28

    Nanoparticles on surfaces are ubiquitous in nanotechnologies, especially in catalysis, where metal nanoparticles anchored to oxide supports are widely used to produce and use fuels and chemicals, and in pollution abatement. We show that for hemispherical metal particles of the same diameter, D, the chemical potentials of the metal atoms in the particles (μM) differ between two supports by approximately -2(Eadh,A - Eadh,B)Vm/D, where Ead,i is the adhesion energy between the metal and support i, and Vm is the molar volume of the bulk metal. This is consistent with calorimetric measurements of metal vapor adsorption energies onto clean oxide surfaces where the metal grows as 3D particles, which proved that μM increases with decreasing particle size below 6 nm and, for a given size, decreases with Eadh. Since catalytic activity and sintering rates correlate with metal chemical potential, it is thus crucial to understand what properties of catalyst materials control metal/oxide adhesion energies. Trends in how Eadh varies with the metal and the support oxide are presented. For a given oxide, Eadh increases linearly from metal to metal with increasing heat of formation of the most stable oxide of the metal (per mole metal), or metal oxophilicity, suggesting that metal-oxygen bonds dominate interfacial bonding. For the two different stoichiometric oxide surfaces that have been studied on multiple metals (MgO(100) and CeO2(111), the slopes of these lines are the same, but their offset is large (∼2 J/m(2)). Adhesion energies increase as MgO(100) ≈ TiO2(110) < α-Al2O3(0001) < CeO2(111) ≈ Fe3O4(111).

  14. Micromagnetic Simulations of Submicron Cobalt Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.J.; Cerjan, C.

    1999-08-30

    Numerical simulations of submicron Co extruded elliptical dots were performed to illustrate the relative importance of different physical parameters on the switching behavior in the easy direction. Shape, size, magnetic moment magnitude and crystalline anisotropy, both magnitude and distribution, were varied. The simulation includes calculation of the magnetostatic, exchange and crystalline anisotropy fields on a structured mesh using finite difference techniques. The smooth boundary of the dots are accurately represented by use of the Embedded Curve Boundary method.

  15. Submicron Surface-Patterned Fibers and Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    The patterned fiber surface behaves as an optical diffraction grating when the feature size is comparable with visible light wavelengths. A red laser...the optical fiber gratings For the first diffraction order of the micron and submicron patterned fiber , we utilize the formula α tanh (where s...e) SEM images of patterned PMMA fiber are depicted. The inset shows the cross- section of this fiber . Submitted to 20 Figure S3

  16. Porous metal oxide particles and their methods of synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin; Liu, Qiang

    2013-03-12

    Methods are generally disclosed for synthesis of porous particles from a solution formed from a leaving agent, a surfactant, and a soluble metal salt in a solvent. The surfactant congregates to form a nanoparticle core such that the metal salt forms about the nanoparticle core to form a plurality of nanoparticles. The solution is heated such that the leaving agent forms gas bubbles in the solution, and the plurality of nanoparticles congregate about the gas bubbles to form a porous particle. The porous particles are also generally disclosed and can include a particle shell formed about a core to define an average diameter from about 0.5 .mu.m to about 50 .mu.m. The particle shell can be formed from a plurality of nanoparticles having an average diameter of from about 1 nm to about 50 nm and defined by a metal salt formed about a surfactant core.

  17. Determining the Chemical Composition of Corrosion Inhibitor/Metal Interfaces with XPS: Minimizing Post Immersion Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Monika S; Morales-Gil, Perla; Belashehr, Turia; Kousar, Kiran; Arellanes Lozada, Paulina; Lindsay, Robert

    2017-03-15

    An approach for acquiring more reliable X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data from corrosion inhibitor/metal interfaces is described. More specifically, the focus is on metallic substrates immersed in acidic solutions containing organic corrosion inhibitors, as these systems can be particularly sensitive to oxidation following removal from solution. To minimize the likelihood of such degradation, samples are removed from solution within a glove box purged with inert gas, either N2 or Ar. The glove box is directly attached to the load-lock of the ultra-high vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrument, avoiding any exposure to the ambient laboratory atmosphere, and thus reducing the possibility of post immersion substrate oxidation. On this basis, one can be more certain that the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy features observed are likely to be representative of the in situ submerged scenario, e.g. the oxidation state of the metal is not modified.

  18. Facile synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opra, Denis P.; Gnedenkov, Sergey V.; Sokolov, Alexander A.; Minaev, Alexander N.; Kuryavyi, Valery G.; Sinebryukhov, Sergey L.

    2017-09-01

    At all times, energy storage is one of the greatest scientific challenge. Recently, Li-ion batteries are under special attention due to high working voltage, long cycle life, low self-discharge, reliability, no-memory effect. However, commercial LIBs usage in medium- and large-scale energy storage are limited by the capacity of lithiated metal oxide cathode and unsafety of graphite anode at high-rate charge. In this way, new electrode materials with higher electrochemical performance should be designed to satisfy a requirement in both energy and power. As it known, nanostructured transition metal oxides are promising electrode materials because of their elevated specific capacity and high potential vs. Li/Li+. In this work, the perspective of an original facile technique of pulsed high-voltage plasma discharge in synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries has been demonstrated.

  19. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2013-11-11

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  20. Mesoporous metal oxide microsphere electrode compositions and their methods of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Bi, Zhonghe; Bridges, Craig A; Brown, Gilbert M

    2014-12-16

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for treated mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The compositions comprise (a) microspheres with an average diameter between 200 nanometers (nm) and 10 micrometers (.mu.m); (b) mesopores on the surface and interior of the microspheres, wherein the mesopores have an average diameter between 1 nm and 50 nm and the microspheres have a surface area between 50 m.sup.2/g and 500 m.sup.2/g, and wherein the composition has an electrical conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-7 S/cm at 25.degree. C. and 60 MPa. The methods of making comprise forming a mesoporous metal oxide microsphere composition and treating the mesoporous metal oxide microspheres by at least one method selected from the group consisting of: (i) annealing in a reducing atmosphere, (ii) doping with an aliovalent element, and (iii) coating with a coating composition.

  1. Giant and switchable surface activity of liquid metal via surface oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Rashed; Eaker, Collin B; Bowden, Edmond F; Dickey, Michael D

    2014-09-30

    We present a method to control the interfacial tension of a liquid alloy of gallium via electrochemical deposition (or removal) of the oxide layer on its surface. In sharp contrast with conventional surfactants, this method provides unprecedented lowering of surface tension (∼ 500 mJ/m(2) to near zero) using very low voltage, and the change is completely reversible. This dramatic change in the interfacial tension enables a variety of electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The ability to manipulate the interfacial properties of the metal promises rich opportunities in shape-reconfigurable metallic components in electronic, electromagnetic, and microfluidic devices without the use of toxic mercury. This work suggests that the wetting properties of surface oxides--which are ubiquitous on most metals and semiconductors--are intrinsic "surfactants." The inherent asymmetric nature of the surface coupled with the ability to actively manipulate its energetics is expected to have important applications in electrohydrodynamics, composites, and melt processing of oxide-forming materials.

  2. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon supported metal/metal oxide nanocomposites and their application in water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Gunawan

    A novel, easy, and cost effective method for synthesizing carbon supported metal/metal oxide nanocomposites has been studied. Carbon supported metal/metal oxide nanocomposites have niche applications in the area of catalysis, fuel cells, electrodes, and more. The method utilizes a commercial microwave and features the addition of a developed graphite-jacket technique with renewable carbon resources, tannin and lignin. The method has been successfully used to synthesize carbon/nickel, carbon/iron oxide, and carbon/nickel phosphide nanocomposites. The method has shown its versatility in the synthesis of carbon nanocomposites. The process is much simpler when compared with the available methods for synthesizing carbon nanocomposites. The synthesized nanocomposites were classified using several characterization techniques, such as electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and spectrophotometric studies. One application of the carbon nanocomposite is in wastewater remediation. The synthesized carbon/iron oxide nanocomposite was noted as being useful for removing arsenic (As) and phosphorus (P) from contaminated water. The adsorption process of the nanocomposite was critically studied in order to understand the process of removing pollutants from contaminated water. The study shows that the nanocomposites are capable of removing As and P from contaminated water. Kinetic and adsorption isotherm studies were applied to understand the adsorption of As and P onto the adsorbent. Several methods, such as pseudo-first and second order kinetic models, Elovich's equation, and the Weber-Morris intraparticle diffusion model were used to explain the kinetic aspects of the adsorption process. For the adsorption isotherm study, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied.

  3. Highly Acidic Ambient Particles, Soluble Metals, and Oxidative Potential: A Link between Sulfate and Aerosol Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting; Guo, Hongyu; Zeng, Linghan; Verma, Vishal; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J

    2017-03-07

    Soluble transition metals in particulate matter (PM) can generate reactive oxygen species in vivo by redox cycling, leading to oxidative stress and adverse health effects. Most metals, such as those from roadway traffic, are emitted in an insoluble form, but must be soluble for redox cycling. Here we present the mechanism of metals dissolution by highly acidic sulfate aerosol and the effect on particle oxidative potential (OP) through analysis of size distributions. Size-segregated ambient PM were collected from a road-side and representative urban site in Atlanta, GA. Elemental and organic carbon, ions, total and water-soluble metals, and water-soluble OP were measured. Particle pH was determined with a thermodynamic model using measured ionic species. Sulfate was spatially uniform and found mainly in the fine mode, whereas total metals and mineral dust cations were highest at the road-side site and in the coarse mode, resulting in a fine mode pH metals and OP peaked at the intersection of these modes demonstrating that sulfate plays a key role in producing highly acidic fine aerosols capable of dissolving primary transition metals that contribute to aerosol OP. Sulfate-driven metals dissolution may account for sulfate-health associations reported in past studies.

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  5. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  6. Oxidation behavior of metallic interconnect in solid oxide fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Wenying; Yang, Jiajun; Yan, Dong; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Jian, Li

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation behavior of integrated interconnect with bipolar plate and corrugated sheet made by ferrite steel SUS430 is investigated and compared in simulated environment and in a realistic stack. Electrical current is found to have a direction-related impact on the thickness of the Cr2O3/MnCr2O4 composite oxide scale. Oxide scale of the interconnect aged in the stack exhibits a dual-layered structure of a complex Mn-Cr oxide layer covered by iron oxide. The oxidation rates vary greatly depending on its local environment, with different thermal, electrical density, as well as gas composition conditions. By analyzing the thickness distribution of oxide scale and comparing them with the simulated test result, the oxidation behavior of interconnect in stack is described in high definition. ASR distribution is also conducted by calculation, which could help further understanding the behavior of stack degradation.

  7. Green synthesis of metal/C and metal oxide/C films by using natural membrane as support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cheng-Zhen; Ma, Hai-Feng; Gao, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A protocol aiming at making use of the huge amount of naturally existing wastes such as defoliation, pericarp and egg shell for nanostructured composite materials was proposed. In this study, a green synthetic route using naturally existing membrane as support was developed for the synthesis of nanostructured and porous metal- or metal oxide-carbon composite films. Different metallic ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Mn2+ or Cu2+) can be easily adsorbed onto egg membranes and the followed calcination process results in the formation of Co/C, Ni/C, Fe3O4/C, MnO/C or Cu/Cu2O/CuO/C composite films. The electrochemical studies demonstrate that such composite films would have potential applications in energy fields. This method would provide a general green concept for chemical synthesis and be beneficial to the global sustainable future.

  8. Development of Mixed Ion-Electron Conducting Metal Oxides for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Wang Hay

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is an energy conversion device, which directly converts chemical fuels (e.g., H2, C xHy) into electricity and heat with high efficiency up to 90%. The by-product of CO2 can be safely sequestrated or subsequently chemically transformed back into fuels (e.g., CO, CH 4) by electrolysis using renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. The state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ anode is de-activated in the presence of ppm level of H2S and forming coke in hydrocarbons. Currently, mixed ion and electron conductors (MIECs) are considered as alternatives for Ni-YSZ in SOFCs. The key goal of the research was to develop mixed ion-electron conducting metal oxides based on B-site disordered perovskite-type Ba(Ca,Nb)1-x MxO3-delta (M = Mn, Fe, Co), the B-site 1:1 ordered perovskite-type (M = Mn, Fe, Co) and the Sr2PbO4-type Sr2Ce1-xPrxO4 for SOFCs. Ba2(Ca,Nb)2-xMxO6-delta was chemically stable in 30 ppm levels of H2S at 600 °C for 24 h and in pure CO2 at 800 °C for 24 h. The thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) of the as-prepared ordered perovskites was found to be comparable to Zr0.84Y0.16O1.92 (YSZ). The near-surface concentration of Fe2+ in Ba2Ca 0.67Fe0.33NbO6-delta was found to be about 3 times higher than that in the bulk sample. The electrochemical performance of Ba2Ca0.67M0.33NbO6-delta was assessed by ac impedance spectroscopy using a YSZ supported half-cell. The area specific polarization resistance (ASR) of all samples was found to decrease with increasing temperature. The ASR for H2 gas oxidation can be correlated to the higher concentration of low valence Fe2+ species near-surface (nano-scale). BaCa0.335M0.165Nb0.5O3-delta crystallizes in the B-site disordered primitive perovskite (space group Pm-3m) at 900 °C in air, which can be converted into the B-site 1:2 ordered perovskite (space group P-3m1) at 1200 °C and the B-site 1:1 ordered double perovskite phase (space group Fm-3m ) at 1300 °C. The chemical stability of the perovskites in CO

  9. Approach to Multifunctional Device Platform with Epitaxial Graphene on Transition Metal Oxide (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-23

    layers, respectively. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Heterostructures, two-dimensional materials, van der Waals interaction , 2D graphene, metal oxide (TiO2...sample holder with a 10.6 μ m CO2 IR laser . The laser output power was adjusted until the target temperature was reached. The temperature of the sample... Laser Deposited Transition- Metal Carbides for Field-Emission Cathode Coatings. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 5, 9241–9246 (2013). 13. Swift, G. A

  10. Zeolites Modified Metal Cations as Catalysts in Hydrocarbon Oxidation and the Alkyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadadsh Makhmud Aliyev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the creation of highly metalltceolitnyh systems and the study of their catalytic activities in the oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons (ethylene to acetaldehyde, acetone, propylene, butylene methyl ethyl ketone; aliphatic C1-C5 alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid esters; oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes in the alicyclic diene hydrocarbons and the oxidative dimerization of methane to acetylene. It has been established that the selectivity of these catalysts determined optimal combination of metal components with the acidity and the structure of the zeolite. Selected highly effective catalysts for the reactions studied. Based on the results of experimental studies of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation of lower olefin hydrocarbons and aliphatic alcohols, the oxidative dehydrogenation of naphthenes and oxidative coupling of methane on the synthesized catalysts are represented by their probable stepwise mechanism and kinetic models developed reactions.

  11. Screen printed metal oxide gas sensors with microminiature gas separation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, K.; King, C. [Capteur Sensors and Analysers, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    An active area of research is that of microminiature chemical analysis systems, also known as 'micro total analysis systems' ({mu}-TAS). Such systems may incorporate sampling, separation, microreactors and analysis devices onto micromachined substrates. Gas sensitive resistors based on semiconducting metal oxides are readily fabricated using conventional thick film ceramic processes. Partial selectivity towards target gases is achieved by tailoring the properties of the sensing material. In this paper we describe novel devices which combine many of the attributes of {mu}-TAS systems with metal oxide gas sensors, while being manufacturable by screen printing onto alumina substrates, without requiring complex micromachining or etching processes. (orig.)

  12. Metal Oxide-Supported Platinum Overlayers as Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity and stability of n=(1, 2, 3) platinum layers supported on a number of rutile metal oxides (MO2; M=Ti, Sn, Ta, Nb, Hf and Zr). A suitable oxide support can alleviate the problem of carbon corrosion and platinum dissolution in Pt/C catalysts. Moreover, it can increase...... the activity of platinum if the interaction between the support and the metal is optimal. We found that both the activity and the stability depend on the number of platinum layers and, as expected, both converge toward platinum bulk values if the number of layers is increased. With use of a simple volcano...

  13. Microwave irradiation assisted, one pot synthesis of simple and complex metal oxide nanoparticles: a general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate a standard approach for the growth of binary/ternary metal oxide nanostructures within 5 min at a low temperature (Fe2O3, NiO, CdO, Ga2O3, Gd2O3, ZnFe2O4, ZnMn2O4) are synthesized and the structure/microstructure is analyzed to ensure the phase and crystallinity. This synthesis procedure can be extended to the large scale production of many other simple and complex metal oxides.

  14. First-principles Exploration of Ferromagnetic and Ferroelectric Double-perovskite Transition-metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Uratani, Yoshitaka; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Ishii, Fumiyuki; Oguchi, Tamio

    2006-01-01

    Possible ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases are explored for bismuth transition-metal oxides with doubleperovskite structure A2BB0O6 on the basis of first-principles calculations within the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). It is found that a lattice instability of the cubic to a non-centrosymmetric phase always happens in the all cases of lead and bismuth perovskite oxides with the 3d transition-metal ions at the B site. Placing bismuth...

  15. Frontiers of 4d- and 5d-transition metal oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at advanced undergraduates, graduate students and other researchers who possess an introductory background in materials physics and/or chemistry, and an interest in the physical and chemical properties of novel materials, especially transition metal oxides.New materials often exhibit novel phenomena of great fundamental and technological importance. Contributing authors review the structural, physical and chemical properties of notable 4d- and 5d-transition metal oxides discovered over the last 10 years. These materials exhibit extraordinary physical properties that differ s

  16. Electron enrichment in 3d transition metal oxide hetero-nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronawitter, Coleman X; Bakke, Jonathan R; Wheeler, Damon A; Wang, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chinglin; Antoun, Bonnie R; Zhang, Jin Z; Guo, Jinghua; Bent, Stacey F; Mao, Samuel S; Vayssieres, Lionel

    2011-09-14

    Direct experimental observation of spontaneous electron enrichment of metal d orbitals in a new transition metal oxide heterostructure with nanoscale dimensionality is reported. Aqueous chemical synthesis and vapor phase deposition are combined to fabricate oriented arrays of high-interfacial-area hetero-nanostructures comprised of titanium oxide and iron oxide nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques with high spectral resolution are utilized to directly probe the titanium and oxygen orbital character of the interfacial region's occupied and unoccupied densities of states. These data demonstrate the interface to possess electrons in Ti 3d bands and an emergent degree of orbital hybridization that is absent in parent oxide reference crystals. The carrier dynamics of the hetero-nanostructures are studied by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, which reveals the presence of a dense manifold of states, the relaxations from which exhibit multiple exponential decays whose magnitudes depend on their energetic positions within the electronic structure.

  17. On the behavior of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations for Transition Metal Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2011-08-22

    Versatile Broensted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a 'cyclic' behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide.

  18. Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Multi-Component Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts FINAL Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    The focus of the project was on developing an atomic-level understanding of how transition metal oxide catalysts function. Over the course of several renewals the specific emphases shifted from understanding how local structure and oxidation state affect how molecules adsorb and react on the surfaces of binary oxide crystals to more complex systems where interactions between different transition metal oxide cations in an oxide catalyst can affect reactivity, and finally to the impact of cluster size on oxide stability and reactivity. Hallmarks of the work were the use of epitaxial growth methods to create surfaces relevant to catalysis yet tractable for fundamental surface science approaches, and the use of scanning tunneling microscopy to follow structural changes induced by reactions and to pinpoint adsorption sites. Key early findings included the identification of oxidation and reduction mechanisms on a tungsten oxide catalyst surface that determine the sites available for reaction, identification of C-O bond cleavage as the rate limiting step in alcohol dehydration reactions on the tungsten oxide surface, and demonstration that reduction does not change the favored reaction pathway but rather eases C-O bond cleavage and thus reduces the reaction barrier. Subsequently, a new reconstruction on the anatase phase of TiO2 relevant to catalysis was discovered and shown to create sites with distinct reactivity compared to other TiO2 surfaces. Building on this work on anatase, the mechanism by which TiO2 enhances the reactivity of vanadium oxide layers was characterized and it was found that the TiO2 substrate can force thin vanadia layers to adopt structures they would not ordinarily form in the bulk which in turn creates differences in reactivity between supported layers and bulk samples. From there, the work progressed to studying well-defined ternary oxides where synergistic effects between the two cations can induce

  19. Magnetopolaron-induced optical response in transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. M.; Fontcuberta, J.; Herranz, G.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the optical response of different magnetic oxides (manganites, ruthenates, and magnetite) and show that for photons with energies ≈1.5-3.5 eV the intensity of light reflected by these epitaxial oxide thin films is strongly modulated by magnetic fields. We argue that this behavior is related to the magnetopolaron physics, and the magnitude of the magnetoreflectance is a fingerprint and a measure of the electron-lattice coupling strength. Our research provides the basis for a fresh experimental approach to the physics of strongly correlated electronic systems.

  20. Preparation of the Nanostructured Radioisotope Metallic Oxide by Neutron Irradiation for Use as Radiotracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ei Seo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metallic oxides manganese dioxide (MnO2, samarium oxide (Sm2O3, and dysprosium oxide (Dy2O3 with nanorod-like structures were synthesized by the hydrothermal synthesis method, respectively. Subsequently, the nanostructured radioisotopes MnO2 with Mn-56, Sm2O3 with Sm-153, and Dy2O3 with Dy-165 were prepared by neutron irradiation from the HANARO research reactor, respectively. The three different elements, Mn, Sm, and Dy, were selected as radiotracers because these elements can be easily gamma-activated from neutrons (activation limits: 1 picogram (Dy, 1–10 picogram (Mn, 10–100 picogram (Sm. Furthermore, the synthesized radioisotopes can be used as radiotracers in Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis as the rare earth metals Dy and Sm were not present in the Korean environment. The successful synthesis of the radioisotope metallic oxides was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, and gamma spectroscopy analysis. The synthesized nanostructured radioisotope metallic oxides may be used as radiotracers in scientific, environmental, engineering, and industrial fields.

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunctions and Altered Metals Homeostasis: New Weapons to Counteract HCV-Related Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Arciello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV infection produces several pathological effects in host organism through a wide number of molecular/metabolic pathways. Today it is worldwide accepted that oxidative stress actively participates in HCV pathology, even if the antioxidant therapies adopted until now were scarcely effective. HCV causes oxidative stress by a variety of processes, such as activation of prooxidant enzymes, weakening of antioxidant defenses, organelle damage, and metals unbalance. A focal point, in HCV-related oxidative stress onset, is the mitochondrial failure. These organelles, known to be the “power plants” of cells, have a central role in energy production, metabolism, and metals homeostasis, mainly copper and iron. Furthermore, mitochondria are direct viral targets, because many HCV proteins associate with them. They are the main intracellular free radicals producers and targets. Mitochondrial dysfunctions play a key role in the metal imbalance. This event, today overlooked, is involved in oxidative stress exacerbation and may play a role in HCV life cycle. In this review, we summarize the role of mitochondria and metals in HCV-related oxidative stress, highlighting the need to consider their deregulation in the HCV-related liver damage and in the antiviral management of patients.

  2. The way to cover prediction for cytotoxicity for all existing nano-sized metal oxides by using neural network method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorova, Natalja; Novic, Marjana; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor

    2017-05-01

    The regulatory agencies should fulfil the data gap in toxicity for new chemicals including nano-sized compounds, like metal oxides nanoparticles (MeOx NPs) according to the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH) legislation policy. This study demonstrates the perspective capability of neural network models for prediction of cytotoxicity of MeOx NPs to bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for the widest range of metal oxides extracted from Periodic table. The counter propagation artificial neural network (CP ANN) models for prediction of cytotoxicity of MeOx NPs for data sets of 17, 36 and 72 metal oxides were employed in the study. The cytotoxicity of studied metal oxide NPs was correlated with (i) χ-metal electronegativity (EN) by Pauling scale and composition of metal oxides characterised by (ii) number of metal atoms in oxide, (iii) number of oxygen atoms in oxide and (iv) charge of metal cation in oxide. The paper describes the models in context of five OECD principles of validation models accepted for regulatory use. The recommendations were done for the minimal number of cytotoxicity tests needs for evaluation of the large set of MeOx with different oxidation states. The methodology is expected to be useful for potential hazard assessment of MeOx NPs and prioritisation for further testing and risk assessment.

  3. Metal oxide/polyaniline nanocomposites: Cluster size and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanocomposites of iron oxide with conducting polymer in the form of powders of varying compositions have been studied to understand the effects of particle size, cluster size and magnetic inter-particle interactions. The sizes of the nanoparticles were estimated to be ∼ 10–20 nm from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the ...

  4. Surface Chemistry of Nano-Structured Mixed Metal Oxide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    dehydration . Steady-state reactive molecular beam scattering (RMBS) shows that dehydration is the dominant reaction pathway on clean Mo(1 1 0), while C–Mo(1 1...photoelectrochemical water oxidation performance under simulated solar irradiation of hematite (α-Fe2O3) films synthesized by coevaporation of pure Si and Fe

  5. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrified Metal-Oxide Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Greeley, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are attractive devices in a sustainable energy context because of their fuel flexibility and potentially highly efficient conversion of chemical to electrical energy. The performance of the device is to a large extent determined by the atomic structure of the electrode-elec...

  6. Potassium silicate-zinc oxide solution for metal finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Examples of zinc dust formulations, which are not subject to cracking or crazing, are fire retardant, and have high adhesive qualities, are listed. The potassium silicate in these formulations has mol ratios of dissolved silica potassium oxide in the range 4.8 to 1 - 5.3 to 1.

  7. The growth of thin film epitaxial oxide-metal heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, C

    1998-01-01

    films with lowest IR emissivity are those made from the purest targets despite their having comparable roughnesses to films from lower purity targets. The lowest emissivity achieved was in the range of 1.64% to 1.72% measured at 3.8 mu m for 1.5 to 1.8 mu m thick films. Modifications to standard idealized Drude theory have been made which, in a phenomenological way, take account of imperfections in the sputtered Al film, oxidation state and roughness. in electric properties of the Nb film and the reduction in crystalline quality of the MgO layer. The reduction of transition temperature to the superconducting state, Tc, and the similarly systematic increase in the Nb lattice parameter were observed consistent with oxygen content data reported in the literature, as the Nb became heavily oxidized. Examination of the surface of clean and oxidized Nb by atomic force microscopy, and deposition of MgO in UHV onto a previously oxidized Nb surface, suggested that the decrease in crystalline quality of the MgO can be a...

  8. Metal-free oxidative coupling of thiols to disulfides using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    454. Arash Ghorbani-Choghamarani et al. Table 1. Oxidative coupling of thiols to the corresponding disulfides using combination of guanidinium nitrate I or nitro urea II in the presence of silica sulfuric acid III in dichloromethane at room temperature. Entry. Substrate. Product. Substrate/Reagents (mmol)a. Time. Yield. Mp (.

  9. Transition metal oxide loaded MCM catalysts for photocatalytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    –20 Apart from TiO2, we have loaded Fe2O3 and CoO in MCM-41 and MCM-48 for photocatalytic reactions. Karunakaran et al.21–25 have extensively studied semiconductor photocatalysis over a large number of oxide materials including ...

  10. First Principles Design of Non-Centrosymmetric Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joshua Aaron

    The lack of an inversion center in a material's crystal structure can result in many useful material properties, such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity and non-linear optical behavior. Recently, the desire for low power, high efficiency electronic devices has spurred increased interest in these phenomena, especially ferroelectricity, as well as their coupling to other material properties. By studying and understanding the fundamental structure-property relationships present in non-centrosymmetric materials, it is possible to purposefully engineer new compounds with the desired "acentric" qualities through crystal engineering. The families of ABO3 perovskite and ABO2.5 perovskite-derived brownmillerite oxides are ideal for such studies due to their wide range of possible chemistries, as well as ground states that are highly tunable owing to strong electron-lattice coupling. Furthermore, control over the B-O-B bond angles through epitaxial strain or chemical substitution allows for the rapid development of new emergent properties. In this dissertation, I formulate the crystal-chemistry criteria necessary to design functional non-centrosymmetric oxides using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Recently, chemically ordered (AA')B2O 6 oxides have been shown to display a new form of rotation-induced ferroelectric polarizations. I now extend this property-design methodology to alternative compositions and crystal classes and show it is possible to induce a host of new phenomena. This dissertation will address: 1) the formulation of predictive models allowing for a priori design of polar oxides, 2) the optimization of properties exhibited by these materials through chemical substitution and cation ordering, and 3) the use of strain to control the stability of new phases. Completion of this work has led to a deeper understanding of how atomic structural features determine the physical properties of oxides, as well as the successful elucidation of

  11. Formation of self-organized nanoporous anodic oxide from metallic gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bipin; Thapa, Prem S; Higgins, Daniel A; Ito, Takashi

    2012-09-25

    This paper reports the formation of self-organized nanoporous gallium oxide by anodization of solid gallium metal. Because of its low melting point (ca. 30 °C), metallic gallium can be shaped into flexible structures, permitting the fabrication of nanoporous anodic oxide monoliths within confined spaces like the inside of a microchannel. Here, solid gallium films prepared on planar substrates were employed to investigate the effects of anodization voltage (1, 5, 10, 15 V) and H(2)SO(4) concentration (1, 2, 4, 6 M) on anodic oxide morphology. Self-organized nanopores aligned perpendicular to the film surface were obtained upon anodization of gallium films in ice-cooled 4 and 6 M aqueous H(2)SO(4) at 10 and 15 V. Nanopore formation could be recognized by an increase in anodic current after a current decrease reflecting barrier oxide formation. The average pore diameter was in the range of 18-40 nm with a narrow diameter distribution (relative standard deviation ca. 10-20%), and was larger at lower H(2)SO(4) concentration and higher applied voltage. The maximum thickness of nanoporous anodic oxide was ca. 2 μm. In addition, anodic formation of self-organized nanopores was demonstrated for a solid gallium monolith incorporated at the end of a glass capillary. Nanoporous anodic oxide monoliths formed from a fusible metal will lead to future development of unique devices for chemical sensing and catalysis.

  12. Coexistence of two types of metal filaments in oxide memristors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One generally considers the conducting filament in ZnO-based valence change memristors (VCMs as an aggregation of oxygen vacancies. Recently, the transmission electron microscopy observation showed the filament is composed of a Zn-dominated ZnOx. In this study, careful analysis of the temperature dependence of the ON state resistance demonstrates that the formation/rupture of a Zn filament is responsible for the resistive switching in ZnO VCMs. Cu/ZnO/Pt memristive devices can be operated in both VCM and ECM (electrochemical metallization memristor modes by forming different metal filaments including Cu, Zn and a coexistence of these two filaments. The device operation can be reversibly switched between ECM and VCM modes. The dual mode operation capability of Cu/ZnO/Pt provides a wide choice of select devices for constructing memristive crossbar architectures.

  13. Synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles via a robust ``solvent-deficient'' method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stacey J.; Huang, Baiyu; Liu, Shengfeng; Liu, Qingyuan; Olsen, Rebecca E.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Woodfield, Brian F.

    2014-11-01

    We report an efficient, general methodology for producing high-surface area metal oxide nanomaterials for a vast range of metal oxides, including at least one metal oxide nanomaterial from nearly every transition metal and semi-metal group in the periodic table (groups 3-4 and 6-15) as well as several from the lanthanide group (see Table 1). The method requires only 2-3 simple steps; a hydrated metal salt (usually a nitrate or chloride salt) is ground with bicarbonate (usually NH4HCO3) for 10-30 minutes to form a precursor that is then either untreated or rinsed before being calcined at relatively low temperatures (220-550 °C) for 1-3 hours. The method is thus similar to surfactant-free aqueous methods such as co-precipitation but is unique in that no solvents are added. The resulting ``solvent-deficient'' environment has interesting and unique consequences, including increased crystallinity of the products over other aqueous methods and a mesoporous nature in the inevitable agglomerates. The products are chemically pure and phase pure with crystallites generally 3-30 nm in average size that aggregate into high surface area, mesoporous agglomerates 50-300 nm in size that would be useful for catalyst and gas sensing applications. The versatility of products and efficiency of the method lend its unique potential for improving the industrial viability of a broad family of useful metal oxide nanomaterials. In this paper, we outline the methodology of the solvent-deficient method using our understanding of its mechanism, and we describe the range and quality of nanomaterials it has produced thus far.We report an efficient, general methodology for producing high-surface area metal oxide nanomaterials for a vast range of metal oxides, including at least one metal oxide nanomaterial from nearly every transition metal and semi-metal group in the periodic table (groups 3-4 and 6-15) as well as several from the lanthanide group (see Table 1). The method requires only 2

  14. Quantifying ligand effects in high-oxidation-state metal catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billow, Brennan S.; McDaniel, Tanner J.; Odom, Aaron L.

    2017-09-01

    Catalysis by high-valent metals such as titanium(IV) impacts our lives daily through reactions like olefin polymerization. In any catalysis, optimization involves a careful choice of not just the metal but also the ancillary ligands. Because these choices dramatically impact the electronic structure of the system and, in turn, catalyst performance, new tools for catalyst development are needed. Understanding ancillary ligand effects is arguably one of the most critical aspects of catalyst optimization and, while parameters for phosphines have been used for decades with low-valent systems, a comparable system does not exist for high-valent metals. A new electronic parameter for ligand donation, derived from experiments on a high-valent chromium species, is now available. Here, we show that the new parameters enable quantitative determination of ancillary ligand effects on catalysis rate and, in some cases, even provide mechanistic information. Analysing reactions in this way can be used to design better catalyst architectures and paves the way for the use of such parameters in a host of high-valent processes.

  15. Treatment of metallurgical wastes : recovery of metal values from smelter slags by pressure oxidative leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Perederiy, I.; Papangelakis, V.G. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Vast quantities of slag are produced and dumped as waste by-products during the production of base metals by smelting operations. These slags contain large amounts of valuable metals which lead to a decrease in metal yield and, combined with the entrapped sulphur, pose a danger to the environment. The dissolution of fayalite is important for the selective recovery of valuable metals and the cleanup of slags in high pressure oxidative leaching. The nature of base metals and iron in solidified slag must be investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the process. This paper discussed the application of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the characterization of a smelter slag microstructure. The study used leaching tests with the same smelter slag to measure and monitor the results of leaching, including metal extraction levels, the extent of iron dissolution as well as impurity contents. The paper provided information on the experiment with particular reference to slag leaching, chemical analysis, and characterization. It was concluded that slag consists of several solid phases with base metal sulfide and oxide droplets entrapped in the fayalite matrix or silica regions. Therefore, nickel, copper, cobalt, and zinc need to be exposed either chemically or mechanically to promote their recovery. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Metal-free oxidation of aromatic carbon-hydrogen bonds through a reverse-rebound mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changxia; Liang, Yong; Hernandez, Taylor; Berriochoa, Adrian; Houk, Kendall N; Siegel, Dionicio

    2013-07-11

    Methods for carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond oxidation have a fundamental role in synthetic organic chemistry, providing functionality that is required in the final target molecule or facilitating subsequent chemical transformations. Several approaches to oxidizing aliphatic C-H bonds have been described, drastically simplifying the synthesis of complex molecules. However, the selective oxidation of aromatic C-H bonds under mild conditions, especially in the context of substituted arenes with diverse functional groups, remains a challenge. The direct hydroxylation of arenes was initially achieved through the use of strong Brønsted or Lewis acids to mediate electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions with super-stoichiometric equivalents of oxidants, significantly limiting the scope of the reaction. Because the products of these reactions are more reactive than the starting materials, over-oxidation is frequently a competitive process. Transition-metal-catalysed C-H oxidation of arenes with or without directing groups has been developed, improving on the acid-mediated process; however, precious metals are required. Here we demonstrate that phthaloyl peroxide functions as a selective oxidant for the transformation of arenes to phenols under mild conditions. Although the reaction proceeds through a radical mechanism, aromatic C-H bonds are selectively oxidized in preference to activated Csp3-H bonds. Notably, a wide array of functional groups are compatible with this reaction, and this method is therefore well suited for late-stage transformations of advanced synthetic intermediates. Quantum mechanical calculations indicate that this transformation proceeds through a novel addition-abstraction mechanism, a kind of 'reverse-rebound' mechanism as distinct from the common oxygen-rebound mechanism observed for metal-oxo oxidants. These calculations also identify the origins of the experimentally observed aryl selectivity.

  17. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  18. Metal oxide nanowire growth for nanotechnology-enhanced device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oye, M. M.; Gacusan, J.; Lenz, O.; Ngo-Duc, T.; Velazquez, J. M.; Arreola, E.; Jethani, H.; Rohovie, M.; Gigante, B.; Kar, A.; Kim, B.; Hannon, A.; Savvinov, A.; Lu, Y.; Li, Ji.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents our on-going nano-epitaxial efforts to grow tin oxide (SnO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) for nanotechnology-enhanced devices. The applicable devices involve piezoelectric energy harvesting devices and nanomaterial-enhanced chemical sensors, with the Systems-level vision involving the piezoelectric energy harvesting devices that could self-power chemical sensors for a stand-alone, self-powered device that could harvest its own power from mechanical vibrations. To this end, device concepts are presented herein and preliminary details for ZnO, SnO2, and PZT material synthesis are presented. The growth of nanowires and nanotetrapods are presented for said device applications using vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), solution synthesis, as well as the results from other synthesis processes. Characterization was done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  19. Electrical Switching in Thin Film Structures Based on Transition Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pergament

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical switching, manifesting itself in the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics with S- and N-type NDR (negative differential resistance, is inherent in a variety of materials, in particular, transition metal oxides. Although this phenomenon has been known for a long time, recent suggestions to use oxide-based switching elements as neuristor synapses and relaxation-oscillation circuit components have resumed the interest in this area. In the present review, we describe the experimental facts and theoretical models, mainly on the basis of the Mott transition in vanadium dioxide as a model object, of the switching effect with special emphasis on the emerging applied potentialities for oxide electronics.

  20. Investigations of the metal-oxide semiconductors promising for photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aroutiounian, Vladimir M.; Arakelyan, Valeri M.; Shahnazaryan, Gohar E. [Department of Physics of Semiconductors and Microelectronics, Yerevan State University, 1 Alek Manookian St., Yerevan, 375025 (Republic of Armenia)

    2005-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to present results of investigations of different metal-oxide semiconductors for photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy obtained in Armenia. Possible ways to increase the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photoelectrodes are analyzed. It is shown that the development of new compact photoelectrodes made of solid solutions and more complicated multi-component compositions is most promising. Some possibilities to use porous and nanocrystalline oxide photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemistry are also discussed. Photoelectrolysis setups for the photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy into hydrogen realized in Yerevan are briefly described. (author) [Oxide semiconductor; Photoelectrode; Photoelectrochemical conversion].

  1. Gas Sensors Based on Semiconducting Metal Oxide One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a comprehensive review of recent (2008 and 2009 progress in gas sensors based on semiconducting metal oxide one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. During last few years, gas sensors based on semiconducting oxide 1D nanostructures have been widely investigated. Additionally, modified or doped oxide nanowires/nanobelts have also been synthesized and used for gas sensor applications. Moreover, novel device structures such as electronic noses and low power consumption self-heated gas sensors have been invented and their gas sensing performance has also been evaluated. Finally, we also point out some challenges for future investigation and practical application.

  2. Metal Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan

    2006-04-01

    Interconnect development is identified by the US Department of energy as a key technical area requiring focused research to meet the performance and cost goals under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance initiative. In the Phase I SECA Core Technology Program, Ceramatec investigated a commercial ferritic stainless steel composition for oxidation resistance properties by measuring the weight gain when exposed to air at the fuel cell operating temperature. A pre-treatment process that results in a dense, adherent scale was found to reduce the oxide scale growth rate significantly. A process for coating the surface of the alloy in order to reduce the in-plane resistance and potentially inhibit chromium oxide evaporation was also identified. The combination of treatments provided a very low resistance through the scale. The resistance measured was as low as 10 milliohm-cm2 at 750 C in air. The oxide scale was also found to be stable in humidified air at 750 C. The resistance value was stable over several thermal cycles. A similar treatment and coating for the fuel side of the interconnect also showed an exceptionally low resistance of one milliohm-cm2 in humidified hydrogen at 750 c, and was stable through multiple thermal cycles. Measurement of interconnect resistance when it was exposed to both air and humidified hydrogen on opposite sides also showed low, stable resistance after additional modification to the pre-treatment process. Resistance stacks, using an interconnect stack with realistic gas flows, also provided favorable results. Chromium evaporation issue however requires testing of fuel stacks and was outside of the scope of this project. based on results to-date, the alloy selection and the treatment processes appear to be well suited for SOFC interconnect application.

  3. Where does the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles come from: The nanoparticles, the ions, or a combination of both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Ting; Yao, Zhifeng; Qin, Mengnan; Zheng, Shourong; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-05

    The toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) has aroused great concern over the past few years. However, there still remains the question whether the toxicity of the metal oxide NPs originates from the released ions or the NPs themselves. In this study, the metal ion release of CuO, Fe2O3, ZnO, Co3O4, Cr2O3, and NiO NPs in aqueous media was investigated, and their contributions to the metal oxide NPs' inhibition on the bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum were studied. It was found that the ions release of the metal oxide NPs in aqueous media was complex, depending on both the dissolution and adsorption processes of the metal oxide NPs. The relationships between the metal oxide NPs' antibacterial effects and their released metal ions could be divided into three categories: (1) the ZnO NPs' antibacterial effect was due solely to the released Zn(2+); (2) the CuO NPs' antibacterial effect originated from both the released Cu(2+),and the CuO particles; and (3) the antibacterial effects of Fe2O3, Co3O4, Cr2O3, and NiO NPs were caused by the NPs themselves. Our findings suggest that the ions release and their contributions to the NPs' toxicity should be considered in the toxicity evaluations of the metal oxide NPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A general route for RuO2 deposition on metal oxides from RuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Laursen, Anders Bo; Cavalca, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the deposition of RuO2 from RuO4(g) on diverse metal oxides has been developed by grafting dopamine onto the otherwise un-reactive metal oxide surface. Oxygen evolution reaction on TiO2 and the photoelectrochemical improvement of WO3 by deposition of RuO2 are just a few examples...

  5. Laser direct writing using submicron-diameter fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Guoguang; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Hou, Changlun; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, a novel direct writing technique using submicron-diameter fibers is presented. The submicron-diameter fiber probe serves as a tightly confined point source and it adopts micro touch mode in the process of writing. The energy distribution of direct writing model is analyzed by Three-Dimension Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Experiments demonstrate that submicron-diameter fiber direct writing has some advantages: simple process, 350-nm-resolution (lower than 442-nm-wavelength), large writing area, and controllable width of lines. In addition, by altering writing direction of lines, complex submicron patterns can be fabricated.

  6. Metal Organic Framework-Metal Oxide Composites for Toxic Gas Adsorption and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    coordination polymer of Oslo Cu(NO3)2 copper nitrate CUS coordinatively unsaturated sites CVD chemical vapor deposition DA Dubinin-Astakhov DFT... intrinsically , with the difference between members being only the metal node. These unsaturated metal centers are investigated for their impact on...attributed to a cavitation phenomenon occurring when mesopores are partially blocked.109 Combined with decreased pore sizes and loss of microporosity , this

  7. The control of histone methylation and gene expression by oxidative stress, hypoxia, and metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervona, Yana; Costa, Max

    2012-09-01

    The harmful consequences of carcinogenic metals, such as nickel, arsenic, and chromium, are thought to be in part due to their ability to induce oxidative stress. The ubiquity of oxidative stress in biological systems has made it a fairly obvious culprit in causing cellular damage and/or development of disease. However, the full extent of oxidative stress-induced damage is not limited to its direct effects on cellular components, such as lipids, proteins, and DNA, but may extend to its ability to alter gene expression. Gene expression regulation is an important component of cellular and/or tissue homeostasis, and its alteration can have detrimental consequences. Therefore, a growing amount of interest is being paid to understanding how oxidative stress can influence gene expression. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic dysregulation in the form of posttranslational histone modifications, in particular, is a popular topic of research. This review will therefore primarily focus on discussing the role of oxidative stress and hypoxia on histone methylation and/or gene expression alterations. The sources of oxidative stress discussed here are carcinogenic metals, such as, nickel, arsenic, and chromium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The control of histone methylation and gene expression by oxidative stress, hypoxia and metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervona, Yana; Costa, Max

    2012-01-01

    The harmful consequences of carcinogenic metals, such as nickel, arsenic and chromium, are thought to be in part due to their ability to induce oxidative stress. The ubiquity of oxidative stress in biological systems has made it a fairly obvious culprit in causing cellular damage and/or development of disease. However, the full extent of oxidative stress-induced damage is not limited to its direct effects on cellular components, such as lipids, proteins and DNA, but may extend to its ability to alter gene expression. Gene expression regulation is an important component of cellular and/or tissue homeostasis, and its alteration can have detrimental consequences. Therefore, a growing amount of interest is being paid to understanding how oxidative stress can influence gene expression. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic dysregulation in the form of post-translational histone modifications, in particular, is a popular topic of research. This review will therefore primarily focus on discussing the role of oxidative stress and hypoxia on histone methylation and/or gene expression alterations. The sources of oxidative stress discussed here are carcinogenic metals, such as, nickel, arsenic and chromium. PMID:22841757

  9. Superconductivity in the antiperovskite Dirac-metal oxide Sr3−xSnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudah, Mohamed; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Hausmann, Jan Niklas; Yonezawa, Shingo; Fukumoto, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Masatoshi; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of perovskite oxides triggered by the discovery of high-temperature and unconventional superconductors have had crucial roles in stimulating and guiding the development of modern condensed-matter physics. Antiperovskite oxides are charge-inverted counterpart materials to perovskite oxides, with unusual negative ionic states of a constituent metal. No superconductivity was reported among the antiperovskite oxides so far. Here we present the first superconducting antiperovskite oxide Sr3−xSnO with the transition temperature of around 5 K. Sr3SnO possesses Dirac points in its electronic structure, and we propose from theoretical analysis a possibility of a topological odd-parity superconductivity analogous to the superfluid 3He-B in moderately hole-doped Sr3−xSnO. We envision that this discovery of a new class of oxide superconductors will lead to a rapid progress in physics and chemistry of antiperovskite oxides consisting of unusual metallic anions. PMID:27941805

  10. Two-Dimensional Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Next-Generation Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Liao, Ting; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Ziqi

    2017-12-01

    The exponential increase in research focused on two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides has offered an unprecedented opportunity for their use in energy conversion and storage devices, especially for promising next-generation rechargeable batteries, such as lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium-ion batteries (NIBs), as well as some post-lithium batteries, including lithium-sulfur batteries, lithium-air batteries, etc. The introduction of well-designed 2D metal oxide nanomaterials into next-generation rechargeable batteries has significantly enhanced the performance of these energy-storage devices by providing higher chemically active interfaces, shortened ion-diffusion lengths, and improved in-plane carrier-/charge-transport kinetics, which have greatly promoted the development of nanotechnology and the practical application of rechargeable batteries. Here, the recent progress in the application of 2D metal oxide nanomaterials in a series of rechargeable LIBs, NIBs, and other post lithium-ion batteries is reviewed relatively comprehensively. Current opportunities and future challenges for the application of 2D nanomaterials in energy-storage devices to achieve high energy density, high power density, stable cyclability, etc. are summarized and outlined. It is believed that the integration of 2D metal oxide nanomaterials in these clean energy devices offers great opportunities to address challenges driven by increasing global energy demands. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Oxidative Etching and Metal Overgrowth of Gold Nanorods within Mesoporous Silica Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Tian Song; Van Der Hoeven, Jessi E S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412757818; Yalcin, Anil O.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Van Huis, Marijn A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304097586; Van Blaaderen, Alfons|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946488

    2015-01-01

    Composite noble metal-based nanorods for which the surface plasmon resonances can be tuned by composition and geometry are highly interesting for applications in biotechnology, imaging, sensing, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and catalysis. Here, we present an approach for the oxidative etching and

  12. Chemical to electrical transduction mechanisms from single metal oxide nanowire measurements: response time constant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    Insight into chemical to electrical transduction mechanisms taking place at the surface of a single metal oxide nanowire is reported due to its outstanding importance for determining the characteristics of resistive solid state gas sensors. The surface chemical reaction kinetics is discussed considering competitiveness phenomena among different active sites and gas species on the nanowire taken as a metal oxide monocrystal at the nanoscale level. Experimental results for different representative gas molecules are shown to determine and understand sensor selectivity. The reported gas species are carbon monoxide and water vapour as general reference molecules, and ethanol and ammonia species as special references for gas-solid interactions, respectively, on acid and basic sites. Kinetic properties are proposed as particular signatures for each of the possible surface chemical reactions, allowing their identification and distinction. Likewise, features such as thermal inertia limitation and effects of the molecular and monoatomic absorbed oxygen are also estimated considering operation working modes based on nanowire self-heating. Furthermore, the applicability of a surface electrical field on a one-dimensional metal oxide nanostructure to enhance the surface ionization of the absorbed molecules is also reviewed as a new type of metal oxide based nanosensor for achieving improved selectivity.

  13. Gas Sensors Based on One Dimensional Nanostructured Metal-Oxides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. M. A. Haseeb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently one dimensional (1-D nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, In2O3, WOx, AgVO3, CdO, MoO3, CuO, TeO2 and Fe2O3. Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research.

  14. Epitaxial diodes of a half-metallic ferromagnet on an oxide semiconductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, F.M.; Ramaneti, R.; Banerjee, T.; Gokcan, H.; Haq, E.; Blank, D.H.A.; Jansen, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and electrical characterization of epitaxial Schottky diodes of a half-metallic ferromagnet on an oxide semiconductor. La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films are grown by pulsed laser deposition on niobium-doped SrTiO3 semiconductor substrates with two doping concentrations and a

  15. In Situ Growth of Free-Standing All Metal Oxide Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo-Si; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Zhang, Si-Wen; Liu, Chang; Ren, Qing-Qing; Ke, Ke

    2016-10-05

    Metal oxides have attracted renewed interest in applications as energy storage and conversion devices. Here, a new design is reported to acquire an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled by all free-standing metal oxides. The positive electrode is made of 3D NiO open porous nanoribbons network on nickel foam and the negative electrode is composed of SnO2/MnO2 nanoflakes grown on carbon cloth (CC) substrate. The combination of two metal oxide electrodes which replaced the traditional group of carbon materials together with metal oxide has achieved a higher energy density. The self-supported 3D NiO nanoribbons network demonstrates a high specific capacitance and better cycle performance without obvious mechanical deformation despite of undergoing harsh bulk redox reactions. The SnO2/MnO2 nanoflakes as the pseudocapacitive electrode exhibit a wide range of voltage window (-1 to 1 V), which is conducive to electrochemical energy storage. The (CC/SnO2/MnO2)(-)//(NiO/Ni foam)(+) asymmetric supercapacitor device delivers an energy density of 64.4 Wh kg-1 (at a power density of 250 W kg-1) and two devices in series are applied to light up 24 red LEDs for about 60 s. The outstanding electrochemical properties of the device hold great promise for long-life, high-energy, and high-power energy storage/conversion applications.

  16. Two different zinc (II)-aqua complexes held up by a metal-oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 120; Issue 1. Two different zinc(II)-aqua complexes held up by a metal-oxide based support: Synthesis, crystal ... Keywords. Inorganic-organic hybrid material; polyoxometalate supported zinc complexes; crystal structure; supramolecular interactions; catalytic activity.

  17. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and γ-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  18. Effects of quantum coupling on the performance of metal-oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    De; 85.30.Tv; 73.40.Gk; 73.40.Qv. 1. Introduction. Continuous success in downscaling MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor) has brought the gate length scaled down into sub-50 nm regime. Thus two non-classical physical ...

  19. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Sol-gel/hydrothermal synthesis of mixed metal oxide of Titanium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed metal oxides of titanium and zinc nanocomposites were prepared through sol-gel method under hydrothermal condition using titanium oxy-(1, 2 - pentadione) and zinc acetate without hazardous additives. The resulting composites were characterized by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope ...