WorldWideScience

Sample records for submersion accidental hypothermia

  1. Accidental Hypothermia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-03

    Physiological aspects of hypothermia. A, Ann Rev Physiol 1957; 19: 83. 241. Kearsley JH, Musso AF: Hypothermia and coma in the Wernicke- Korsakoff syndrome . Med 3...decline. Included in this group are patients with hypothalamic lesions and agenesis of the corpus callosum, termed the Shapiro Syndrome .46 1�...peculiar fIat affect is conuon. Psychomotor impairrrent resembles organic brain syndrome . 8 1� Appropriate adaptive behavior is often lacking.82 An

  2. Accidental hypothermia-an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paal, Peter; Gordon, Les; Strapazzon, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper provides an up-to-date review of the management and outcome of accidental hypothermia patients with and without cardiac arrest. METHODS: The authors reviewed the relevant literature in their specialist field. Summaries were merged, discussed and approved to produce this nar......BACKGROUND: This paper provides an up-to-date review of the management and outcome of accidental hypothermia patients with and without cardiac arrest. METHODS: The authors reviewed the relevant literature in their specialist field. Summaries were merged, discussed and approved to produce...... this narrative review. RESULTS: The hospital use of minimally-invasive rewarming for non-arrested, otherwise healthy, patients with primary hypothermia and stable vital signs has the potential to substantially decrease morbidity and mortality for these patients. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) has...... and post-resuscitation care. CONCLUSIONS: Based on new evidence, additional clinical experience and clearer management guidelines and documentation, the treatment of accidental hypothermia has been refined. ECLS has substantially improved survival and is the treatment of choice in the patient with unstable...

  3. Research progress in study of accidental hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui YUAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accidental hypothermia refers to a state of lowering of core body temperature down to 35 ℃induced by drowning, burial in snow and prolonged exposure to cold environment, etc. Hypothermia may affect the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, etc. The triad consisting "hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy" is an important factor accelerating the death of patients. Early, timely application of rewarming measures is regarded as the basic principle in treatment of hypothermia. A series of rewarming measures, such as infusion of warm fluids, inspiration of warm air, abdominal infusion of warm fluid, instruction of warm fluid into pleural cavity, intravenous infusion of warm fluid, rewarming through ECMO, etc. have been used recently. Advance in research on the classification of hypothermia, its impact to the body and the treatment methods are reviewed in present paper. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.15

  4. Accidental hypothermia in Poland – estimation of prevalence, diagnostic methods and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Darocha, Tomasz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Drwiła, Rafał

    2015-02-06

    The incidence of hypothermia is difficult to evaluate, and the data concerning the morbidity and mortality rates do not seem to fully represent the problem. The aim of the study was to estimate the actual prevalence of accidental hypothermia in Poland, as well as the methods of diagnosis and management procedures used in emergency rooms (ERs). A specially designed questionnaire, consisting of 14 questions, was mailed to all the 223 emergency rooms (ER) in Poland. The questions concerned the incidence, methods of diagnosis and risk factors, as well as the rewarming methods used and available measurement instruments. The analysis involved data from 42 ERs providing emergency healthcare for the population of 5,305,000. The prevalence of accidental hypothermia may have been 5.05 cases per 100.000 residents per year. Among the 268 cases listed 25% were diagnosed with codes T68, T69 or X31, and in 75% hypothermia was neither included nor assigned a code in the final diagnosis. The most frequent cause of hypothermia was exposure to cold air alongside ethanol abuse (68%). Peripheral temperature was measured in 57%, core temperature measurement was taken in 29% of the patients. Peripheral temperature was measured most often at the axilla, while core temperature measurement was predominantly taken rectally. Mild hypothermia was diagnosed in 75.5% of the patients, moderate (32-28°C) in 16.5%, while severe hypothermia (less than 28°C) in 8% of the cases. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was carried out in 7.5% of the patients. The treatment involved mainly warmed intravenous fluids (83.5%) and active external rewarming measures (70%). In no case was extracorporeal rewarming put to use. The actual incidence of accidental hypothermia in Polish emergency departments may exceed up to four times the official data. Core temperature is taken only in one third of the patients, the treatment of hypothermic patients is rarely conducted in intensive care wards and extracorporeal rewarming

  5. An atypical case of successful resuscitation of an accidental profound hypothermia patient, occurring in a temperate climate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, E

    2010-03-01

    Cases of accidental profound hypothermia occur most frequently in cold, northern climates. We describe an atypical case, occurring in a temperate climate, where a hypothermic cardiac-arrested patient was successfully resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation (ECC).

  6. Motion sickness increases the risk of accidental hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel, Gerard; Eiken, Ola; Tribukait, Arne; Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2006-09-01

    Motion sickness (MS) has been found to increase body-core cooling during immersion in 28 degrees C water, an effect ascribed to attenuation of the cold-induced peripheral vasoconstriction (Mekjavic et al. in J Physiol 535(2):619-623, 2001). The present study tested the hypothesis that a more profound cold stimulus would override the MS effect on peripheral vasoconstriction and hence on the core cooling rate. Eleven healthy subjects underwent two separate head-out immersions in 15 degrees C water. In the control trial (CN), subjects were immersed after baseline measurements. In the MS-trial, subjects were rendered motion sick prior to immersion, by using a rotating chair in combination with a regimen of standardized head movements. During immersion in the MS-trial, subjects were exposed to an optokinetic stimulus (rotating drum). At 5-min intervals subjects rated their temperature perception, thermal comfort and MS discomfort. During immersion mean skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the non-immersed right forearm and 3rd finger of the right hand (DeltaTff), oxygen uptake and heart rate were recorded. In the MS-trial, rectal temperature decreased substantially faster (33%, P < 0.01). Also, the DeltaTff response, an index of peripheral vasomotor tone, as well as the oxygen uptake, indicative of the shivering response, were significantly attenuated (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively) by MS. Thus, MS may predispose individuals to hypothermia by enhancing heat loss and attenuating heat production. This might have significant implications for survival in maritime accidents.

  7. Outcome of accidental hypothermia with or without circulatory arrest. Experience from the Danish Præstø Fjord boating accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Michael Christopher J; Sørensen, Lisbeth Agersnap; Ravn, Jesper Bohsen

    2012-01-01

    Resuscitation guidelines for the treatment of accidental hypothermia are based primarily on isolated cases. Mortality rates are high despite aggressive treatment aimed at restoring spontaneous circulation and normothermia.......Resuscitation guidelines for the treatment of accidental hypothermia are based primarily on isolated cases. Mortality rates are high despite aggressive treatment aimed at restoring spontaneous circulation and normothermia....

  8. A Case of Severe Accidental Hypothermia Successfully Treated with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfun M. Hatam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After missing for seven days, a 34-year-old female was found with a rectal temperature of 19.8oC. Instead of attempting aggressive rewarming in the emergency department she was directly transferred to the operating room for extracorporeal rewarming. She received cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB for 66 minutes at an initial warming rate of 12oC/ hour and warmed to 36.2oC. Her postoperative course was complicated by sepsis, which eventually led to bilateral below-knee amputations after refusing antibiotics. She was discharged 22 days after admission, with full neurologic recovery. This remarkable case highlights the emerging role of CPB as the definitive therapy for severe accidental hypothermia.

  9. Hipotermia acidental em um país tropical Accidental hypothermia cases in a tropical country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Golin

    2003-09-01

    hypothermia prevailed in the male sex with 75.9%. As age group prevailed the age between 30 and 59 years. In 70.3% of the patients the central temperature went lower than 32°C, and in 26.4% of these, the temperature was lower than 28°C. The association with infectious processes happened in 76.8% of the cases. The patients with mild hypothermia answered better at therapeutics (96.8% when compared with the moderate hypothermic (72.1% and serious (87.5% patients. The Osborn's wave was present in 42.6% of the patients. The general mortality was 38.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The accidental hypothermia in Emergency Services from Tropical Country is an undeniable fact. The paramedic and medics should be alert and trained to recognize this disease of high morbidity and mortality. The mortality increases with the presence of associated diseases, particularly infectious processes, malnutrition and chronic alcoholism.

  10. A Survey of Accidental Hypothermia Knowledge among Navy Members in China and the Implications for Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Accidental hypothermia (AH is a potentially life-threatening condition that can lead to significant morbidity and life-long effects. Navy personnel are always at a greater risk of AH due to frequent outdoor work, wilderness exposure, prolonged immobility and exhaustion. The purpose of the survey was to assess Chinese Navy members’ awareness of AH and to make recommendations with regard to better measures for improving it. Methods: 111 Navy members completed a written questionnaire that was subsequently analyzed. Results: 30.6% of the respondents have experienced AH and 64.9% rated their knowledge of AH as “low” or “none”. Over half of them identified the initial symptom of AH as obvious shivering (69.4% and apathy (45.0%. As for the aggravate symptoms, 60.9% chose the wrong answer of more obvious shivering instead of the right one—absence of shivering (5.4%. In the case of the treatment of mild AH, more than half of the respondents chose the wrong answers. Conclusions: This study suggests that the basic skills of recognition and treatment of AH are inadequate in the Chinese Navy. Further work is required to develop a systematical, comprehensive and corresponding education method that would promote correct actions during AH.

  11. Estudo da hipotermia acidental em idosos institucionalizados Study on accidental hypothermia in institutionalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Palma Seman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a prevalência, causas e evolução da hipotermia acidental em idosos institucionalizados. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo realizado entre janeiro e dezembro de 2004, no Hospital Geriátrico e de Convalescentes D. Pedro II, com 483 internos. Hipotermia foi confirmada por termômetro esofágico, utilizado em todos os pacientes com temperatura axilar menor ou igual a 35ºC (95ºF. Tanto o diagnóstico etiológico quanto as complicações da hipotermia foram observados em exames clínico e subsidiários de urgência como eletrocardiograma, radiografia de tórax, hemograma, gasometria arterial, glicemia, metabólitos, amilase, função hepática e renal, sorologias para HIV, sífilis e hepatite B e urina tipo I. Foram adotadas medidas de reaquecimento entre outras do protocolo de tratamento. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de hipotermia foi de 7,2% especialmente em mulheres (65,7%, e a média de idade do grupo foi 76,4 anos. A maioria dos pacientes (77,1% apresentava elevado grau de dependência (Katz "F" e "G". Hipotermia leve foi identificada na maioria dos idosos (71,4%. A taxa de mortalidade foi de 62,8%, sendo 31,4% em vigência de hipotermia e 31,4% após sua reversão. Em 100,0% dos casos, a etiologia foi infecciosa: pneumonia em 80%, infecção urinária em 60,0%, e úlceras por pressão em 17,1%. Em 60% dos casos havia mais de um foco infeccioso. CONCLUSÃO: A hipotermia em idosos institucionalizados é uma grave condição clínica, com altos índices de mortalidade. A prevenção, o diagnóstico precoce e medidas de reaquecimento central corroboram para um melhor prognóstico.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prevalence, causes and outcome of hypothermia in institutionalized elderly. METHODS: prospective study held from January to December, 2004 at the Hospital Geriátrico e de Convalescentes Dom Pedro II (Geriatric and Convalescent Hospital Dom Pedro II, with 483 long-term care beds. Hypothermia was diagnosed by esophageal thermometer

  12. The biomarkers neuron-specific enolase and S100b measured the day following admission for severe accidental hypothermia have high predictive values for poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kjærgaard, Benedict

    2017-01-01

    was analyzed for NSE and S100b. Follow-up was conducted after 30days and poor neurologic outcome was defined as a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 3-5. The predictive value of NSE and S100b was assessed as the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC). RESULTS: A total of 34......AIM: The aim of the present study was to assess the ability of the biomarkers neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium-binding protein b (S100b) to predict mortality and poor neurologic outcome after 30days in patients admitted with severe accidental hypothermia. METHODS: Consecutive patients...... in 30 unconscious and/or sedated patients. NSE and S100b achieved AUCs of 0.93 and 0.88, respectively, for prediction of 30day mortality and AUCs of 0.88 and 0.87, respectively, for prediction of poor neurologic outcome. CONCLUSIONS: In patients remaining unconscious the day following admission...

  13. Physiological responses to hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas; Thoresen, Marianne

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the only treatment currently recommended for moderate or severe encephalopathy of hypoxic‒ischaemic origin in term neonates. Though the effects of hypothermia on human physiology have been explored for many decades, much of the data comes from animal or adult studies; the latter originally after accidental hypothermia, followed by application of controlled hypothermia after cardiac arrest or trauma, or during cardiopulmonary bypass. Though this work is informative, the effects of hypothermia on neonatal physiology after perinatal asphyxia must be considered in the context of a prolonged hypoxic insult that has already induced a number of significant physiological sequelae. This article reviews the effects of therapeutic hypothermia on respiratory, cardiovascular, and metabolic parameters, including glycaemic control and feeding requirements. The potential pitfalls of blood‒gas analysis and overtreatment of physiological changes in cardiovascular parameters are also discussed. Finally, the effects of hypothermia on drug metabolism are covered, focusing on how the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and dosing requirements of drugs frequently used in neonatal intensive care may change during therapeutic hypothermia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypothermia--it's more than a toy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther J; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-04-01

    Perioperative hypothermia triples the incidence of adverse myocardial outcomes in high-risk patients; it significantly increases blood loss and augments allogeneic transfusion requirements. Even mild hypothermia increases the incidence of surgical wound infection following colon resection and therefore the duration of hospitalization. Hypothermia adversely affects antibody- and cell-mediated immune defenses, as well as the oxygen availability in the peripheral wound tissues. Mild perioperative hypothermia changes the kinetics and action of various anesthetic and paralyzing agents, increases thermal discomfort, and is associated with delayed postanesthetic recovery. On the other hand however, therapeutic hypothermia may be an interesting approach in various settings. Lowering core temperature to 32-34 degrees C may reduce cell injury by suppressing excitotoxins and oxygen radicals, stabilizing cell membranes, and reducing the number of abnormal electrical depolarizations. Evidence in animals indicates that even mild hypothermia provides substantial protection against cerebral ischemia and myocardial infarction. Mild hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome after cardiac arrest in humans. Randomized trials are in progress to evaluate the potential benefits of mild hypothermia during aneurysm clipping and after stroke or acute myocardial infarction. This article reviews recent publications in the field of accidental as well as therapeutic hypothermia, and tries to assess what evidence is available at the present time.

  15. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  16. Facts and Fiction: The Impact of Hypothermia on Molecular Mechanisms following Major Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Frink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous multiple trauma and surgical patients suffer from accidental hypothermia. While induced hypothermia is commonly used in elective cardiac surgery due to its protective effects, accidental hypothermia is associated with increased posttraumatic complications and even mortality in severely injured patients. This paper focuses on protective molecular mechanisms of hypothermia on apoptosis and the posttraumatic immune response. Although information regarding severe trauma is limited, there is evidence that induced hypothermia may have beneficial effects on the posttraumatic immune response as well as apoptosis in animal studies and certain clinical situations. However, more profound knowledge of mechanisms is necessary before randomized clinical trials in trauma patients can be initiated.

  17. Recognizing Hypothermia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    Hypothermia is a serious medical condition that strikes during very cold weather or when people are chilled from rain, sweat, or cold water.  Created: 11/1/2007 by Emergency Communications System.   Date Released: 12/13/2007.

  18. Hypothermia and targeted temperature management in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Andrea; Wright, Annie; Cortes, Yonaira

    2017-03-01

    To review current knowledge surrounding the effects, treatment, and prognosis of hypothermia in people, dogs, and cats, as well as the application of therapeutic hypothermia in clinical medicine. Hypothermia may be a primary or secondary condition, and may be due to environmental exposure, illness, medications, anesthesia, or trauma. Hypothermia has been applied therapeutically in human medicine for a variety of conditions, including postcardiac arrest. In veterinary medicine, the technique has been applied in cardiac surgeries requiring bypass and in a patient with intractable seizures. Hypothermia can be diagnosed based on presenting temperature or clinical signs, and appropriate diagnosis may require nontraditional thermometers. Rewarming is the primary treatment for accidental hypothermia, with intensity ranging from passive surface rewarming to extracorporeal rewarming. The goal is to return the core temperature to a level that restores normal physiologic function of all body processes. Other supportive therapies such as intravenous fluids are typically indicated, and if cardiopulmonary arrest is present, prolonged resuscitation may be required. In cases of secondary hypothermia, reversal of the underlying cause is important. There are few prognostic indicators in human and veterinary patients with hypothermia. Even the most severely affected individuals, including those presenting in cardiopulmonary arrest, have potential for complete recovery with appropriate therapy. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome in people following cardiac arrest. Further studies are needed to examine this application in veterinary medicine, as well as appropriate therapy and prognosis for cases of spontaneous hypothermia. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  19. Submersible energy storage apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccartney, J.F.; Rowe, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A submersible energy storage apparatus for an electrical power source is provided which includes an electrolysis unit feed water gas collection assembly and a fuel cell. The electrolysis unit feed water gas collection assembly includes a hydrogen container and an oxygen container wherein each container has a gas outlet and is capable of containing feed water as well as hydrogen and oxygen gases respectively. An electrolysis cell is provided which has a hydrogen outlet, an oxygen outlet and a feed water inlet. The hydrogen outlet is located in the hydrogen container, the oxygen outlet is located in the oxygen container, and the feed water inlet is located in one of the containers. Each of the containers has an opening to the submersible environment so as to be pressure responsive thereto. A barrier device is provided in association with the opening in each container for isolating the feed water in the container from water in the submersible environment. The fuel cell is operatively connected to the hydrogen and oxygen containers, and the electrical power source is operatively connected to the electrolysis cell. With this arrangement the electrolysis cell is capable of utilizing power from the power source during low electrical energy demand, and the fuel cell is capable of utilizing the hydrogen and oxygen gases for generating electricity during high demand periods

  20. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  1. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weuster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients’ life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals’ hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia.

  2. Hypothermia following antipsychotic drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marum, R.J. van; Wegewijs, M.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Beers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Hypothermia is an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of antipsychotic drug (APD) use. Risk factors for hypothermia in ADP users are unknown. We studied which risk factors for hypothermia can be identified based on case reports. Method: Case reports of hypothermia in APD-users found

  3. Hypothermia following antipsychotic drug use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marum, Rob J.; Wegewijs, Michelle A.; Loonen, Anton J. M.; Beers, Erna

    Objective Hypothermia is an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of antipsychotic drug (APD) use. Risk factors for hypothermia in ADP users are unknown. We studied which risk factors for hypothermia can be identified based on case reports. Methods Case reports of hypothermia in APD-users found in PUBMED or

  4. ECG Changes Due to Hypothermia Developed After Drowning: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiye YILMAZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drowning is one of the fatal accidents frequently encountered during the summer and is the most common cause of accidental death in the world. Anoxia, hypothermia, and metabolic acidosis are mainly responsible for morbidty. Cardiovascular effects may occur secondary to hypoxia and hypothermia. Atrial fibrillation, sinus dysrhythmias (rarely requiring treatment, and, in serious cases, ventricular fibrillation or asystole may develop, showing as rhythm problems on electrocardiogram and Osborn wave can be seen, especially during hypothermia. A 16-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital's emergency service with drowning is presented in this article. In our case, ventricular fibrillation and giant J wave (Osborn wave associated with hypothermia developed after drowning was seen. We present this case as a reminder of ECG changes due to hypothermia that develop after drowning. Response to cardiopulmonary resuscitation after drowning and hypothermia is not very good. Mortality is very high, so early resuscitation and aggressive treatment of cardiovascular and respiratory problems are important for life.

  5. Mild induced hypothermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Maria E; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik; Bestle, Morten H

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coagulopathy associates with poor outcome in sepsis. Mild induced hypothermia has been proposed as treatment in sepsis but it is not known whether this intervention worsens functional coagulopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interim analysis data from an ongoing randomized controlled...... trial; The Cooling And Surviving Septic shock (CASS) study. Patients suffering severe sepsis/septic shock are allocated to either mild induced hypothermia (cooling to 32-34°C for 24hours) or control (uncontrolled temperature). TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01455116. Thrombelastography (TEG) is performed three....... At enrollment, 3%, 38%, and 59% had a hypocoagulable, normocoagulable, and hypercoagulable TEG clot strength (MA), respectively. In the hypothermia group, functional coagulopathy improved during the hypothermia phase, measured by R and MA, in patients with hypercoagulation as well as in patients...

  6. New frontiers in hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ancora

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia has currently become a standard of care for asphyctic newborns with moderate-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Strict criteria are required to include these newborns in the hypothermic treatment. On some occasions, in the clinical practice, some discrepancies were found among the 3 inclusion criteria. In such circumstances the knowledge of the accuracy of each criterion, the knowledge of the evolution of clinical and neurophysiologic parameters in the few hours following birth, and the knowledge of the pathogenesis of the asphyxia can help to take the right decision on who to treat with hypothermia. The usefulness of hypothermia in newborns of gestational age lower than 36 weeks or when started beyond the 6th hour of life remains unclear. Perinatal stroke, as HIE, is an evolving process and if early diagnosed could benefit from hypothermia. In addition, infants may experience hypoxic-ischemic episodes that are not related to the birth such as early apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs or near miss events. Also in these cases hypothermia can be theoretically efficacious in preventing the progression of brain damage. The above issues will be discussed in the present paper. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  7. Accidental Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Robert D.; Devin, Lee; Sullivan, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Historical accounts of human achievement suggest that accidents can play an important role in innovation. In this paper, we seek to contribute to an understanding of how digital systems might support valuable unpredictability in innovation processes by examining how innovators who obtain value from...... they incorporate accidents into their deliberate processes and arranged surroundings. By comparing makers working in varied conditions, we identify specific factors (e.g., technologies, characteristics of technologies) that appear to support accidental innovation. We show that makers in certain specified...... conditions not only remain open to accident but also intentionally design their processes and surroundings to invite and exploit valuable accidents. Based on these findings, we offer advice for the design of digital systems to support innovation processes that can access valuable unpredictability....

  8. Preventing Hypothermia and Frostbite

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    Protect yourself against hypothermia and frostbite during cold weather. Wear warm clothing that covers your skin and remove any wet clothing immediately.  Created: 11/1/2007 by Emergency Communications System.   Date Released: 12/13/2007.

  9. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinq-Mars, Robert S; Burke, Timothy; Irish, James; Gustafson, Brian; Kirtley, James; Alawa, Aiman

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. Completed final reporting and deliverables

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  11. Stroke and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ozkan Kuscu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is significant cause of morbidity and mortality caused by disruption of blood flow. Neural injury occurs with two stage; while primary neural injury occurs with disruption of blood flow, after days and hours with metabolic processes secondary injury develops in tissues which is non injured in the first stage. Therefore it is important to prevent and treat the secondary injury as much as preventing and treating the primary neural injury. In this article developing pathophysiological changes after stroke, mechanisms of therapeutic hypothermia, application methods, the factors that determine the effectiveness, side effects and complications were reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 351-368

  12. The Submersible Threat to Maritime Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    successfully utilized both semi-submersible and fully-submersible vessels during naval engagements. David boats were cigar -shaped, steam driven, wooden vessels...Capabilities: Maximum diving depth of 40 feet. Features an Auto-Hover system, built-in SONAR, Fly-By-Wire Joystick, Electronic Buoyancy Control...Features include a Fly-By-Wire Joystick, Electronic Buoyancy Control, and Electrical Systems Monitor. Cost: $ 59,000 (USD) (International VentureCraft Corp

  13. Quality-Improvement Effort to Reduce Hypothermia Among High-Risk Infants on a Mother-Infant Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christine; Whatley, Colleen; Smith, Meaghan; Brayton, Emily Caron; Simone, Suzanne; Holmes, Alison Volpe

    2018-02-14

    Neonatal hypothermia is common in low birth weight (LBW) (preventive measures for LPIs and/or LBW infants in a mother-infant unit. We conducted plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles aimed at decreasing environmental hypothermia for LPIs and/or LBW infants in a mother-infant unit with no other indications for NICU-level care. Interventions included using warm towels after delivery, a risk identification card, an occlusive hat, delayed timing of first bath, submersion instead of sponge-bathing, and conducting all assessments under a radiant warmer during the initial hours of life. We implemented these interventions in 3 PDSA cycles and followed hypothermia rates by using statistical process control methods. The baseline mean monthly hypothermia rate among mother-infant unit LPIs and/or LBW infants was 29.8%. Postintervention, the rate fell to 13.3% (-16.5%; P = .002). This decrease occurred in a stepwise fashion in conjunction with the PDSA cycles. In the final, full-intervention period, the rate was 10.0% (-19.8%; P = .0003). A special-cause signal shift was observed in this final period. Targeted interventions can significantly reduce hypothermia in otherwise healthy LPIs and/or LBW newborns and allow them to safely remain in a mother-infant unit. If applied broadly, such preventive practices could decrease preventable hypothermia in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Hypothermia for treatment of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Youl Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major cause of neurological disability and death in industrialized nations. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to protect the brain from ischemia, stroke, and other acute neurological insults at the laboratory level. It has been shown to improve neurological outcome in certain clinical settings including anoxic brain injury due to cardiac arrest and hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypothermia seems to affect multiple aspects of brain physiology and it is likely that multiple mechanisms underlie its protective effect. Understanding the events that occur in the ischemic brain during hypothermia might help lead to an understanding of how to protect the brain against acute injuries.

  15. CT findings in neonatal hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, H.; Laufer, L.; Berginer, J.; Hertzanu, Y.; Hershkowitz, E.; Berenstein, T.; Sofer, S.; Maor, E.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Newborn infants are particularly prone to hypothermia, a condition with a high mortality. Objective. To study the CT brain patterns in infants with hypothermia and neurological symptoms. Materials and methods. We reviewed the brain CT of nine infants with neonatal hypothermia, multiple organ failure, seizures and coma. Results. Two infants had normal CT scans, acutely and at follow-up, and were clinically normal at follow-up. In seven infants, CT showed diffuse cerebral oedema, with reversal of the normal density relationship between grey and white matter and a relative increased density of the thalami, brainstem and cerebellum - the 'reversal sign'. In six surviving infants with severe developmental delay, follow-up CT revealed cerebral atrophy with multicystic encephalomalacia. Conclusions. The 'reversal sign' has been described in the abused child, birth asphyxia and anoxia due to drowning. Neonatal hypothermia is offered as a further cause. (orig.)

  16. CT findings in neonatal hypothermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, H.; Laufer, L.; Berginer, J.; Hertzanu, Y. [Department of Radiology, Soroka Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P. O. Box 151, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Hershkowitz, E.; Berenstein, T.; Sofer, S. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Soroka Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Maor, E. [Department of Pathology, Soroka Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    1998-06-01

    Background. Newborn infants are particularly prone to hypothermia, a condition with a high mortality. Objective. To study the CT brain patterns in infants with hypothermia and neurological symptoms. Materials and methods. We reviewed the brain CT of nine infants with neonatal hypothermia, multiple organ failure, seizures and coma. Results. Two infants had normal CT scans, acutely and at follow-up, and were clinically normal at follow-up. In seven infants, CT showed diffuse cerebral oedema, with reversal of the normal density relationship between grey and white matter and a relative increased density of the thalami, brainstem and cerebellum - the `reversal sign`. In six surviving infants with severe developmental delay, follow-up CT revealed cerebral atrophy with multicystic encephalomalacia. Conclusions. The `reversal sign` has been described in the abused child, birth asphyxia and anoxia due to drowning. Neonatal hypothermia is offered as a further cause. (orig.) With 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The detached intestinal epithelial cells in hypothermia group showed ... of apoptosis than those in normothermia group at 4 h (17.30 ± 2.56 vs. ... intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, which could be attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia.

  18. Radioprotective effect of local hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong-Su; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Higano, Shuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Hoshino, Fumihiko

    1985-01-01

    We attempted local hypothermia to prevent radiation dermatitis and stomatitis. With regard to parasternal skin reactions postoperatively irradiated breast cancer, dry and moist desquamation, which occasionally occurred with conventional irradiation was not observed in combination with local cooling. As for head and neck tumors, patients who complained of stomatitis decreased with the local cooling, and no one wanted a pause in irradiation before 40 Gy. As local hypothermia is free from danger and does not require special equipment, it was considered to be widely applicable. (author)

  19. OPEN HEART SURGERY UNDER HYPOTHERMIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pulmonary blood flow by operation under hypothermia; open heart surgery ... po ition with the right arm abducted and the left arm at the ideo The ... pulmonary valve stenosis is pre ent. Mobilization ... The anaesthetist must try and prevent shivering,. 2. HOURS .... The exploratory inci ion into the right atrial cavity is then clo ed ...

  20. Personal protective clothing against accidental immersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, David; Tipton, Michael [Surrey Univ., Robens Inst. of Health and Safety, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The requirements for protective clothing against accidental immersion are discussed and the advantages and limitations of the main types of immersion protection available are analysed. The variety of designs available reflects the various circumstances under which they may be used. In broad terms in the offshore industry these include the following activities: normal work without risk of immersion but with a possible need to abandon the rig or ship; work in areas where there is risk of accidentally falling into the sea; flying over the sea in a helicopter. The first response to sudden immersion in sea water, which must usually be considered to be cold, is a sudden gasp often followed by an immediate phase of uncontrolled breathing. Since control of ones breathing between and under the breaking waves is essential to staying alive, this is a critical time. After surviving this initial ``cold shock`` phase, the effects of body heat loss become hazardous. Protection against hypothermia has been the priority for those providing survival suits and protective clothing while the hazard of the immediate response to cold immersion has been unrecognised to a large extent. (UK)

  1. Study on installation of the submersible mixer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, F; Shi, W D; He, X H; Xu, Y H; Jiang, H

    2013-01-01

    Study on installation of the submersible mixer for sewage treatment has been limited. In this article, large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was adopted. ICEM software was used to build an unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. Agitation pools on four different installation location cases were simulated respectively, and the external characteristic of the submersible mixer and the velocity cloud of the axial section were respectively comparatively analyzed. The best stirring effect can be reached by the installation location of case C, which is near the bottom of the pool 600 mm and blade distance the bottom at least for 200 mm wide and wide edge and narrow edge distance by 4:3. The conclusion can guide the engineering practice

  2. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin

  3. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-21

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm -2 in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  4. Hypothermia-Related Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyawzaw Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is an inflammatory disease presenting from mild localized inflammation to severe infected necrotic pancreatic tissue. In the literature, there are a few cases of hypothermia-induced AP. However, the association between hypothermia and AP is still a myth. Generally, mortality from acute pancreatitis is nearly 3–6%. Here, we present a 40-year-old chronic alcoholic female who presented with acute pancreatitis induced by transient hypothermia. A 40-year-old chronic alcoholic female was hypothermic at 81°F on arrival which was improved to 91.7°F with warming blanket and then around 97°F in 8 h. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, lipid panel, and comprehensive metabolic panels were within the normal limit. Serum alcohol level was 0.01, amylase 498, lipase 1,200, ammonia 26, serum carboxyhemoglobin level 2.4, and β-HCG was negative. The entire sepsis workup was negative. During rewarming period, she had one episode of witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure. It was followed by transient hypotension. Fluid challenge was successful with 2 L of normal saline. Sonogram (abdomen showed fatty liver and trace ascites. CAT scan (abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of acute pancreatitis without necrosis, peripancreatic abscess, pancreatic mass, or radiopaque gallstones. The patient was managed medically and later discharged from the hospital on the 4th day as she tolerated a normal low-fat diet. In our patient, transient hypothermia from chronic alcohol abuse and her social circumstances might predispose to microcirculatory disturbance resulting in acute pancreatitis. Early and aggressive fluid resuscitation prevents complications.

  5. Effect of hypothermia on radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nias, A.H.W.; Perry, P.; Photiou, A.; Reghebi, K.

    1986-01-01

    The blood supply and oxygen tension have been measured in C3H mouse mammary tumours under hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen, and the enhancement of radiosensitivity by hyperbaric oxygen has been estimated in mice irradiated at different temperatures with and without anaesthesia. Measurement of xenon-133 clearance showed that the blood supply of a tumour tended to increase when anaesthetized mice became hypothermic. Oxygen cathode data showed that the oxygen tension tended to be relatively higher in tumours and lower in subcutaneous tissue when mice exposed to hyperbaric oxygen became hypothermic under anaesthesia. Hyperbaric oxygen enhanced the radiation response of the tumour in terms of an increase in regrowth delay by a factor of 1.7 when the mice had been anaesthetized, whether or not they became hypothermic. A lower factor of 1.4 was obtained without anaesthesia although induced hypothermia increased the response to a small extent. The authors conclude that anaesthesia and hypothermia affect oxygen metabolism in tumours by different mechanisms. (author)

  6. Doctor Ward's Accidental Terrarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the story of the accidental invention of the Wardian case, or terrarium, by Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward. Advocates the use of this story in teaching precollege biology as an illustration of how a chance event can lead to a major scientific advancement and as an example of the common occurrence of multiple discovery in botany. Contains 34…

  7. Development of submersible axial pump for wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Jeong Eui [Kangwon Nat' l Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    This study was performed to develop a high efficiency submersible axial pump for concentration wastewater treatment. To do this, we simulated the effect of some parameters such as the axial twist angle of a blade({beta}), the radial twist angle of a blade({alpha}) and the length of a blade ({iota}) on pump efficiency using commercial code, ANSYS CFX and BladeGen. The results showed that the axial twist angle of a blade({beta}) was the most sensible parameter on the pump efficiency. And the pump efficiency had a maximum at {beta}=20.deg, {alpha}=110.deg and {iota}=240mm.

  8. Cooling devices and methods for use with electric submersible pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Todd A; Hill, Dallas D

    2014-12-02

    Cooling devices for use with electric submersible pump motors include a refrigerator attached to the end of the electric submersible pump motor with the evaporator heat exchanger accepting all or a portion of the heat load from the motor. The cooling device can be a self-contained bolt-on unit, so that minimal design changes to existing motors are required.

  9. A submersible physics laboratory experiment. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972, NOAA (OOE and MUSandT) and the University of Washington Physics Department, have been associated in the underwater detection and analysis of cosmic radiation flux. The purpose of experiments described in this paper has been to take advantage of the nuclear cosmic-ray related qualities of the ocean water mass by allowing the experimenter(s) to work in situ on the sea floor, rather than attempting to try an impractical alternative: lowering a prepared photoemulsion detector to the bottom from a surface vessel, a method that would yield an unacceptably surface-radiation-cluttered emulsion. This report describes briefly the four elements that motivated or comprised the subject experiment: basic physics which motivated the mission; applied physics, including particle detection, emulsion chemistry, calibration, and scanning; engineering, including design and fabrication of supporting apparatus, use of a submersible (JSL was modified slightly to permit lock-on to the bottom chamber), and a bottom lockout chamber; and operations, including submersible dives, ship support, emulsion preparation, deployment, recovery, and development

  10. Flavour from accidental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, Luca; King, Stephen F.; Romanino, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    We consider a new approach to fermion masses and mixings in which no special 'horizontal' dynamics is invoked to account for the hierarchical pattern of charged fermion masses and for the peculiar features of neutrino masses. The hierarchy follows from the vertical, family-independent structure of the model, in particular from the breaking pattern of the Pati-Salam group. The lightness of the first two fermion families can be related to two family symmetries emerging in this context as accidental symmetries

  11. Radiative accidental matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal [IFPA, Dép. AGO, Université de Liège,Bât B5, Sart Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María - Departamento de Física,Casilla 110-V, Avda. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Simoes, C.; Wegman, D. [IFPA, Dép. AGO, Université de Liège,Bât B5, Sart Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2016-07-25

    Accidental matter models are scenarios where the beyond-the-standard model physics preserves all the standard model accidental and approximate symmetries up to a cutoff scale related with lepton number violation. We study such scenarios assuming that the new physics plays an active role in neutrino mass generation, and show that this unavoidably leads to radiatively induced neutrino masses. We systematically classify all possible models and determine their viability by studying electroweak precision data, big bang nucleosynthesis and electroweak perturbativity, finding that the latter places the most stringent constraints on the mass spectra. These results allow the identification of minimal radiative accidental matter models for which perturbativity is lost at high scales. We calculate radiative charged-lepton flavor violating processes in these setups, and show that μ→eγ has a rate well within MEG sensitivity provided the lepton-number violating scale is at or below 5×10{sup 5} GeV, a value (naturally) assured by the radiative suppression mechanism. Sizeable τ→μγ branching fractions within SuperKEKB sensitivity are possible for lower lepton-number breaking scales. We thus point out that these scenarios can be tested not only in direct searches but also in lepton flavor-violating experiments.

  12. Submersible purification system for radioactive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Michael L.; Lewis, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    A portable, submersible water purification system for use in a pool of water containing radioactive contamination includes a prefilter for filtering particulates from the water. A resin bed is then provided for removal of remaining dissolved, particulate, organic, and colloidal impurities from the prefiltered water. A sterilizer then sterilizes the water. The prefilter and resin bed are suitably contained and are submerged in the pool. The sterilizer is water tight and located at the surface of the pool. The water is circulated from the pool through the prefilter, resin bed, and sterilizer by suitable pump or the like. In the preferred embodiment, the resin bed is contained within a tank which stands on the bottom of the pool and to which a base mounting the prefilter and pump is attached. An inlet for the pump is provided adjacent the bottom of the pool, while the sterilizer and outlet for the system is located adjacent the top of the pool.

  13. [Near-Drowning with Good Outcome after ECMO-Therapy and Therapeutic Hypothermia Despite 20 Minutes of Anoxia and 16 Hours of Hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachon, Peter; Kalbhenn, Johannes; Walterspacher, Stephan; Bode, Christoph; Staudacher, Dawid

    2017-04-01

    Introduction  Drowning with submersion over 10 minutes is associated with a high mortality. Here, we present a case, in which a good neurological outcome was achieved after interdisciplinary, intensive care therapy despite submersion of 20 minutes followed by 16 hours of hypoxia. History  A 19 year old man drowned in fresh-water. After 20 minutes submersion he was localized and salvaged from 8 meters depth and primarily resuscitated successfully after 10 minutes. Within the next hour, there condition worsened by respiratory deterioration due to a massive capillary leak syndrome in addition to a disseminated intravascular coagulation. Treatment  This made implantation of a veno-venous ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) therapy necessary. Despite intensive care medicine including extracorporeal therapy a sufficient oxygenation (arterial pO 2 > 60 mmHg) was reached only 16 hours after the drowning. Clinical Course  During this time the patient was treated with a mild therapeutic hypothermia for cerebral protection. Despite the prolonged hypoxia, ECMO could be removed five days after the drowning and the patient was extubated after another five days without significant neurological deficits. Conclusion  Despite submersion of 20 minutes followed by prolonged hypoxia, a good neurological outcome could be achieved in our patient. This case suggests, that tolerance of hypoxia is possibly underestimated after drowning. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Submersion of alkali clusters in helium nano droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An der Lan, L.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of helium nano droplets (HND) with dopants has been an extensively studied Field, both experimentally and theoretically. First papers concerning this topic date back to the late 1960's. Still, on both sides (theory and experiment) were and are loose ends. One of such is the submersion behavior of alkali metals in HND. Although a theory of submersion was developed by Ancilotto et al., which can explain a lot of interesting features in this Field, this particular question (among others) remained unresolved. In 2010, a semiclassi- cal theory was developed by Kresin and Stark, which specifically addressed this problem and gave exact numbers for the critical submersion size. The scope of this doctoral thesis is to continuously build up towards this topic until Finally our results, confirming some of the theoretical Findings, are presented. Especially the critical submersion size for sodium and potassium clusters, 21 and 78, respectively, are confirmed by our experiments. (author) [de

  15. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and tap water pretreatments in the greenhouse and open field conditions on germination of bladder-Senna ( Colutea armena Boiss. and Huet.) seeds.

  16. AWWA E102-17 submersible vertical turbine pumps

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This standard describes minimum requirements for submersible vertical turbine pumps utilizing a discharge column pipe assembly, 5 hp or larger, used in water service, including materials, design, manufacture, inspection, and testing.

  17. Development of a Rat Model of Hypothermia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DuBose, David A; Morehouse, David H; Rufolo, Dennis; Blaha, Michael; Leon, Lisa R

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermia can significantly impact the outcome of military missions, since it is a seasonal and geographic pervasive physiological phenomenon that reduces not only soldier performance, but may lead to their death...

  18. Devices for Emergency Hypothermia and Military Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gill, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    Ongoing research by the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research and others, indicates the need for the development of compact, mobile, and portable devices for the induction of therapeutic hypothermia...

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stravitz, R.T.; Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2009-01-01

    transplantation or spontaneous liver regeneration follows in short order. To buy time, the induction of therapeutic hypothermia (core temperature 32 degrees C-35 degrees C) has been shown to effectively bridge patients to transplant. Similar to the experience in patients with cerebral edema after other neurologic...... insults, hypothermia reduces cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in patients with acute liver failure by decreasing splanchnic ammonia production, restoring normal regulation of cerebral hemodynamics, and lowering oxidative metabolism within the brain. Hypothermia may also ameliorate the degree...... of liver injury. Hypothermia has not been adequately studied for its safety and theoretically may increase the risk of infection, cardiac dysrhythmias, and bleeding, all complications independently associated with acute liver failure. Therefore, although an ample body of experimental and human data...

  20. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Induces Hypothermia During Acute Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis R; Govus, Andrew; Hewson, David; Taylor, Lee

    2017-11-01

    Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter drug used to treat pain and fever, but it has also been shown to reduce core temperature (T c ) in the absence of fever. However, this side effect is not well examined in humans, and it is unknown if the hypothermic response to acetaminophen is exacerbated with cold exposure. To address this question, we mapped the thermoregulatory responses to acetaminophen and placebo administration during exposure to acute cold (10 °C) and thermal neutrality (25 °C). Nine healthy Caucasian males (aged 20-24 years) participated in the experiment. In a double-blind, randomised, repeated measures design, participants were passively exposed to a thermo-neutral or cold environment for 120 min, with administration of 20 mg/kg lean body mass acetaminophen or a placebo 5 min prior to exposure. T c , skin temperature (T sk ), heart rate, and thermal sensation were measured every 10 min, and mean arterial pressure was recorded every 30 min. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models. Differences in thermal sensation were analysed using a cumulative link mixed model. Acetaminophen had no effect on T c in a thermo-neutral environment, but significantly reduced T c during cold exposure, compared with a placebo. T c was lower in the acetaminophen compared with the placebo condition at each 10-min interval from 80 to 120 min into the trial (all p  0.05). This preliminary trial suggests that acetaminophen-induced hypothermia is exacerbated during cold stress. Larger scale trials seem warranted to determine if acetaminophen administration is associated with an increased risk of accidental hypothermia, particularly in vulnerable populations such as frail elderly individuals.

  1. Accidentes en el hogar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereida Pacios Alfonso

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio descriptivo de los accidentes domésticos ocurridos durante un año en la población de un consultorio del Médico de la Familia. Resultan más afectados los sujetos del sexo femenino y los grupos en edades extremas de la vida. El horario de la tarde fue el más peligroso. La relación con el uso de bebidas alcohólicas estuvo ausente en menores de 15 años y ancianos; en adultos jóvenes el dato requiere de otros estudios. Las contusiones por caídas fue el tipo más frecuente de lesión; los miembros superiores, la región corporal más afectada. Hubo secuelas en la quinta parte de los lesionados. Sólo cuatro de cada diez accidentes ocurridos se diagnostican en consulta. Más de la mitad de la morbilidad es oculta y cada lesionado pierde un promedio de 10 días de vida plenaA descriptive study of those home accidents reported by the population of a family physician´s office during a year was conducted. Females and the group at extreme ages of life were the most affected. Afternions were more dangerous. Drinking was not present among patients under 15 and aged people. As to young adults, this datum should be further studied. Contusions caused by falls were the most frequent type of injuries, whereas the upper limbs were the most injured. A fifth of these had sequelae. Only 4 accidents out of 10 were diagnosed at the physician´s office. More than falf of morbidity was hidden and every injured person lost an average of 10 days of full life

  2. Submersible fans and pumps for cryogenic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Submersible electric motor driven fans of three sizes have been designed, built and operated at 21 0 K at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The largest is a 100-mm diameter, 2 stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity of 6 L/s at 2 m head. It is driven by a 4 pole, 3 phase induction motor that runs at 1750 rpm. The next smaller one is an 85-mm diameter centrifugal pump. It pumps 3 L/s at a head of 5 m. The third is a 75-mm single stage vaneaxial fan with a nominal capacity is 3 L/s at a head of 2 m. The 85-mm pump and the 75-mm fan are driven by 2 pole, 3 phase induction motors running at 3550 rpm. The motors were modified to operate submerged in the cryogenic fluid. The pumps have been operated in liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and pressurized helium gas at 21 0 K. They can also operate with denser fluids such as liquid nitrogen, but rotational speed, capacity, and head will be reduced. They have been operated while submerged in liquid helium

  3. A thermodynamic assessment of therapeutic hypothermia techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mady, Carlos Eduardo Keutenedjian; Henriques, Izabela Batista; Oliveira, Silvio de

    2015-01-01

    According to literature, therapeutic hypothermia has been applied for treating conditions that causes an interruption in the delivery of oxygen to the brain, giving the patient better chances of survival with a neurological recovery and without any irreversible damage to the brain. Hypothermia is also used during surgeries and circulatory arrest. In this article, the objective temperature of hypothermia is 32 °C, which is considered mild: 32–35 °C. Three techniques of hypothermia induction were considered: external blood cooling, endovascular cooling with a catheter insertion and water bath. Energy and exergy analyses were performed to determine the clinical effectiveness of these techniques and to evaluate the best test parameters, from which it was possible to calculate the body internal temperature, destroyed exergy and exergy efficiency. Moreover, it was proposed an exergy performance index, which takes into account the ability of a given technique to change the exergy of the body. Results indicate that therapeutic hypothermia takes the subject to a state of lower destroyed exergy and higher body exergy efficiency. The exergy performance index shows that lower rates of cooling lead to a better transformation of the exergy removed from the body into variation of the body exergy. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic study of the human body under mild hypothermia. • Energy and Exergy analysis were applied to the human thermal model. • Calculation of destroyed exergy, exergy efficiency. • Hypothermia led the body to a state of lower destroyed exergy. • EBC achieved higher values of destroyed exergy and exergy efficiency

  4. Hypothermia reduces sulphur mustard toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi Lei; Gong Wenrong; Nelson, Peggy; Martin, Leanne; Sawyer, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the development of sulphur mustard (HD)-induced toxicity was investigated in first passage cultures of human skin keratinocytes and on hairless guinea pig skin. When cells exposed to HD were incubated at 37 deg. C, a concentration-dependent decline in viability was observed that was maximal by 2 days. In contrast, no significant HD-induced toxicity was evident up to 4 days posttreatment when the cells were incubated at 25 deg. C. However, these protective effects were lost by 24 h when the cells were switched back to 37 deg. C. The protective effects of hypothermia were also demonstrated when apoptotic endpoints were examined. The HD concentration-dependent induction of fragmented DNA (as quantitated using soluble DNA and the TUNEL reaction), morphology, and p53 expression were all significantly depressed when cell cultures were incubated at 25 deg. C compared to 37 deg. C. When animals were exposed to HD vapour for 2, 4, and 6 min and left at room temperature, lesions were produced whose severity was dependent on exposure time and that were maximal by 72 h posttreatment. Moderate cooling (5-10 deg. C) of HD exposure sites posttreatment (4-6 h) significantly reduced the severity of the resultant lesions. However, in contrast to the in vitro results, these effects were permanent. It appears that the early and noninvasive act of cooling HD-exposed skin may provide a facile means of reducing the severity of HD-induced cutaneous lesions

  5. The accidental (acoustical) tourist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kirk, Wayne

    2002-11-01

    The acoustical phenomenon observed at an ancient temple in the Great Ball Court at Chichen Itza was described as ''little short of amazing--an ancient whispering gallery'' by Silvanus G. Morley, leader of the Carnegie Institute's archaeological team that excavated and restored these structures in the 1920s. Since then, many others have experienced the extraordinary acoustics at Chichen Itza and other Maya sites. Despite these reports, archaeologists and acousticians have until recently shown little interest in understanding these phenomena. After experiencing Chichen Itza's remarkable acoustics as a tourist in 1994, the author commenced collecting and disseminating information about acoustical phenomena there and at other Mayan sites, hoping to stimulate interest among archaeologists and acousticians. Were these designs accidental or intentional? If intentional, how was the knowledge obtained? How were acoustical features used? This paper highlights the author's collection of anecdotal reports of mysterious Mayan acoustics (http://http://www.ianlawton.com/pa1.htm), recommended reading for scientists and engineers who wish to pursue this fascinating study. Also recounted are some of the reactions of archaeologists-ranging from curious, helpful, and insightful to humorous and appalling--to outsiders' efforts to bring serious scientific attention to the new field of acoustical archaeology.

  6. Submersed macrophytes as indicators of the nutrient burden of Lake Constance (Untersee)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, K.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the submersed species react sensitively to changes in the site conditions during the investigation period; this shows the high value of submersed macrophytes as biological indicators of water pollution. (orig./EF) [de

  7. Use of sediment CO2 by submersed rooted plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Anders; Borum, Jens

    2009-01-01

    freshwater plants with different morphology and growth characteristics (Lobelia dortmanna, Lilaeopsis macloviana, Ludwigia repens, Vallisneria americana and Hydrocotyle verticillata) are able to support photosynthesis supplied by uptake of CO2 from the sediment. Methods: Gross photosynthesis was measured......Background and Aims: Submersed plants have different strategies to overcome inorganic carbon limitation. It is generally assumed that only small rosette species (isoetids) are able to utilize the high sediment CO2 availability. The present study examined to what extent five species of submersed......, the shoot to root ratio on an areal basis was the single factor best explaining variability in the importance of sediment CO2. For Ludwigia, diffusion barriers limited uptake or transport from roots to stems and transport from stems to leaves. Conclusions: Submersed plants other than isoetids can utilize...

  8. Hypothermia for Neuroprotection in Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legriel, Stephane; Lemiale, Virginie; Schenck, Maleka; Chelly, Jonathan; Laurent, Virginie; Daviaud, Fabrice; Srairi, Mohamed; Hamdi, Aicha; Geri, Guillaume; Rossignol, Thomas; Hilly-Ginoux, Julia; Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Louart, Benjamin; Malissin, Isabelle; Mongardon, Nicolas; Planquette, Benjamin; Thirion, Marina; Merceron, Sybille; Canet, Emmanuel; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Azoulay, Elie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-22

    Convulsive status epilepticus often results in permanent neurologic impairment. We evaluated the effect of induced hypothermia on neurologic outcomes in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. In a multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 270 critically ill patients with convulsive status epilepticus who were receiving mechanical ventilation to hypothermia (32 to 34°C for 24 hours) in addition to standard care or to standard care alone; 268 patients were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a good functional outcome at 90 days, defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of 5 (range, 1 to 5, with 1 representing death and 5 representing no or minimal neurologic deficit). The main secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days, progression to electroencephalographically (EEG) confirmed status epilepticus, refractory status epilepticus on day 1, "super-refractory" status epilepticus (resistant to general anesthesia), and functional sequelae on day 90. A GOS score of 5 occurred in 67 of 138 patients (49%) in the hypothermia group and in 56 of 130 (43%) in the control group (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.99; P=0.43). The rate of progression to EEG-confirmed status epilepticus on the first day was lower in the hypothermia group than in the control group (11% vs. 22%; odds ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.79; P=0.009), but there were no significant differences between groups in the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were more frequent in the hypothermia group than in the control group. In this trial, induced hypothermia added to standard care was not associated with significantly better 90-day outcomes than standard care alone in patients with convulsive status epilepticus. (Funded by the French Ministry of Health; HYBERNATUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01359332 .).

  9. Allegheny County Fatal Accidental Overdoses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Fatal accidental overdose incidents in Allegheny County, denoting age, gender, race, drugs present, zip code of incident and zip code of residence. Zip code of...

  10. 77 FR 65360 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Status (Centrifugal and Submersible Pumps); Auburn, NY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and... submersible pumps and related controllers at the Xylem Water Systems U.S.A., LLC, facilities located in Auburn...

  11. Hypothermia for Stroke: call to action 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macleod, Malcolm R; Petersson, Jesper; Norrving, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The European Hypothermia Stroke Research Workshop was held in January 2010, in response to the alarming prospects of a significant increase of stroke expected in the coming years globally. Considering that a minority of patients (around 10%) are currently eligible for thrombolytic treatment, ther...

  12. [Hypothermia in people in situations of precarity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Human beings are physiologically warm blooded. Confronted with extreme cold, they become subject to hypothermia. Between a mountain climber and a person living in the street, the functions of resistance to a drop in external temperature are not the same. Studies on this subject remain to be carried out.

  13. Safety and feasibility of local myocardial hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterspoor, L.C.; van 't Veer, M.; van Nunen, L.X.; Wijnbergen, I.F.; Tonino, W.A.L.; Pijls, N.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), reduction in time to reperfusion of the occluded coronary artery reduces infarct size. In animal models, an additional reduction of infarct size was observed when hypothermia was induced before reperfusion, despite a longer ischemic time.

  14. Machine Visual Guidance For An Autonomous Undersea Submersible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Kaomea, Peter K.; Heckman, Paul J.

    1988-12-01

    Optical imaging is the preferred sensory modality for underwater robotic activities requiring high resolution at close range, such as station keeping, docking, control of manipulator, and object retrieval. Machine vision will play a vital part in the design of next generation autonomous underwater submersibles. This paper describes an effort to demonstrate that real-time vision-based guidance and control of autonomous underwater submersibles is possible with compact, low-power, and vehicle-imbeddable hardware. The Naval Ocean Systems Center's EAVE-WEST (Experimental Autonomous Vehicle-West) submersible is being used as the testbed. The vision hardware consists of a PC-bus video frame grabber and an IBM-PC/AT compatible single-board computer, both residing in the artificial intelligence/vision electronics bottle of the submersible. The specific application chosen involves the tracking of underwater buoy cables. Image recognition is performed in two steps. Feature points are identified in the underwater video images using a technique which detects one-dimensional local brightness minima and maxima. Hough transformation is then used to detect the straight line among these feature points. A hierarchical coarse-to-fine processing method is employed which terminates when enough feature points have been identified to allow a reliable fit. The location of the cable identified is then reported to the vehicle controller computer for automatic steering control. The process currently operates successfully with a throughput of approximately 2 frames per second.

  15. IMPACT OF SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS ON PB CONSTITUENTS IN RESIDENTIAL WELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved lead in 51 domestic wells screened from 18 m to 48 m in glacial tills and outwash deposits were examined, from archived samples collected during 2001-2004, in conjunction with respective submersible pump characteristics. Pb concentrations of these residential water supp...

  16. Study on velocity distribution in a pool by submersible mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, F; Shi, W D; Lu, X N; Chen, B; Jiang, H

    2012-01-01

    To study the distribution of submersible mixers and agitating effect in the sewage treatment pool, Pro/E software was utilized to build the three-dimensional model. Then, the large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was used. ICEM software was used to build unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. The macro fluid field and each section velocity flow field distribution were analyzed to observe the efficiency of each submersible mixer. The average velocity and mixing area in the sewage pool were studied simultaneously. Results show that: the preferred project B, two submersible mixers speed is 980 r/min, and setting angles are all 30°. Fluid mixing area in the pool has reached more than 95%. Under the action of two mixers, the fluid in the sewage pool form a continuous circulating water flow. The fluid is mixed adequately and average velocity of fluid in the pool is at around 0.241m/s, which agreed with the work requirements. Consequently it can provide a reference basis for practical engineering application of submersible mixers by using this method.

  17. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit

    2010-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treatment of sewage sludge and simultaneous generate electricity. Stable power generation (145±5 mW/m2) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency...... of an effective system to treatment of sewage sludge and simultaneous recover energy....

  18. Hypothermia in a surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Castro, Maria A; Neves, Aida M; Landeiro, Nuno M; Santos, Cristina C

    2005-06-06

    Inadvertent hypothermia is not uncommon in the immediate postoperative period and it is associated with impairment and abnormalities in various organs and systems that can lead to adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence, the predictive factors and outcome of core hypothermia on admission to a surgical ICU. All consecutive 185 adult patients who underwent scheduled or emergency noncardiac surgery admitted to a surgical ICU between April and July 2004 were admitted to the study. Tympanic membrane core temperature (Tc) was measured before surgery, on arrival at ICU and every two hours until 6 hours after admission. The following variables were also recorded: age, sex, body weight and height, ASA physical status, type of surgery, magnitude of surgical procedure, anesthesia technique, amount of intravenous fluids administered during anesthesia, use of temperature monitoring and warming techniques, duration of the anesthesia, ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay and SAPS II score. Patients were classified as either hypothermic (Tc 35 degrees C). Univariate analysis and multiple regression binary logistic with an odds ratio (OR) and its 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) were used to compare the two groups of patients and assess the relationship between each clinical predictor and hypothermia. Outcome measured as ICU length of stay and mortality was also assessed. Prevalence of hypothermia on ICU admission was 57.8%. In univariate analysis temperature monitoring, use of warming techniques and higher previous body temperature were significant protective factors against core hypothermia. In this analysis independent predictors of hypothermia on admission to ICU were: magnitude of surgery, use of general anesthesia or combined epidural and general anesthesia, total intravenous crystalloids administrated and total packed erythrocytes administrated, anesthesia longer than 3 hours and SAPS II scores. In multiple logistic regression analysis

  19. Hypothermia in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landeiro Nuno M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadvertent hypothermia is not uncommon in the immediate postoperative period and it is associated with impairment and abnormalities in various organs and systems that can lead to adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence, the predictive factors and outcome of core hypothermia on admission to a surgical ICU. Methods All consecutive 185 adult patients who underwent scheduled or emergency noncardiac surgery admitted to a surgical ICU between April and July 2004 were admitted to the study. Tympanic membrane core temperature (Tc was measured before surgery, on arrival at ICU and every two hours until 6 hours after admission. The following variables were also recorded: age, sex, body weight and height, ASA physical status, type of surgery, magnitude of surgical procedure, anesthesia technique, amount of intravenous fluids administered during anesthesia, use of temperature monitoring and warming techniques, duration of the anesthesia, ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay and SAPS II score. Patients were classified as either hypothermic (Tc ≤ 35°C or normothermic (Tc> 35°C. Univariate analysis and multiple regression binary logistic with an odds ratio (OR and its 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI were used to compare the two groups of patients and assess the relationship between each clinical predictor and hypothermia. Outcome measured as ICU length of stay and mortality was also assessed. Results Prevalence of hypothermia on ICU admission was 57.8%. In univariate analysis temperature monitoring, use of warming techniques and higher previous body temperature were significant protective factors against core hypothermia. In this analysis independent predictors of hypothermia on admission to ICU were: magnitude of surgery, use of general anesthesia or combined epidural and general anesthesia, total intravenous crystalloids administrated and total packed erythrocytes administrated, anesthesia longer

  20. Postconditioning by xenon and hypothermia in the rat heart in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwiebert, Christian; Huhn, Ragnar; Heinen, Andre; Weber, Nina C.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Schlack, Wolfgang; Preckel, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective Hypothermia protects against myocardial reperfusion injury. However, inducing hypothermia takes time, which makes it unsuitable as an emergency treatment. Combining mild hypothermia with low-dose xenon, applied either simultaneously or one after the other, protects the

  1. Episodic spontaneous hypothermia: a periodic childhood syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cynthia; Gener, Blanca; Garaizar, Carmen; Prats, José M

    2003-04-01

    Episodic spontaneous hypothermia is an infrequent disorder, with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. A systemic cause or underlying brain lesion has not been found for the disease. We report four new patients, 3-9 years old, with episodic hypothermia lower than 35 degrees C, marked facial pallor, and absent shivering. The episodes could last a few hours or four days, and recurred once a week or every 2-3 months. Two patients also demonstrated bradycardia, mild hypertension, and somnolence during the events; in one of them, profuse sweating was also a feature, and all four presented with either headache, a periodic childhood syndrome, or both (recurrent abdominal pain, cyclic vomiting, or vertigo). Three patients reported a family history of migraine. Neurologic examination, endocrine function, and imaging studies were normal. Migraine prophylactic therapy was of moderate efficacy. Spontaneous resolution was observed in one patient. The clinical characteristics of the syndrome allow for its inclusion as a childhood periodic syndrome related to migraine.

  2. Atomoxetine Induced Hypothermia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abali, Osman; Yilmaz, Onat

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are common in drugs used during childhood and adolescence. Atomoxetine, a selective reuptake inhibitor, was introduced as a safe non-stimulant alternative treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Described common side effects of atomoxetine include: headache, abdominal pain, decreased appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and dizziness. In our case, we present an adolescent male who developed hypothermia under atomoxetine treatment. To our knowledge, this i...

  3. Comparison of three different prehospital wrapping methods for preventing hypothermia - a crossover study in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakariassen Erik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. Various methods for insulating and wrapping hypothermic patients are used worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the thermal insulating effects and comfort of bubble wrap, ambulance blankets / quilts, and Hibler's method, a low-cost method combining a plastic outer layer with an insulating layer. Methods Eight volunteers were dressed in moistened clothing, exposed to a cold and windy environment then wrapped using one of the three different insulation methods in random order on three different days. They were rested quietly on their back for 60 minutes in a cold climatic chamber. Skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption were measured, and metabolic heat production was calculated. A questionnaire was used for a subjective evaluation of comfort, thermal sensation, and shivering. Results Skin temperature was significantly higher 15 minutes after wrapping using Hibler's method compared with wrapping with ambulance blankets / quilts or bubble wrap. There were no differences in core temperature between the three insulating methods. The subjects reported more shivering, they felt colder, were more uncomfortable, and had an increased heat production when using bubble wrap compared with the other two methods. Hibler's method was the volunteers preferred method for preventing hypothermia. Bubble wrap was the least effective insulating method, and seemed to require significantly higher heat production to compensate for increased heat loss. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a combination of vapour tight layer and an additional dry insulating layer (Hibler's method is the most efficient wrapping method to prevent heat loss, as shown by increased skin temperatures, lower metabolic rate and better thermal comfort. This should then be the method of choice when wrapping a wet patient at risk of developing hypothermia in prehospital

  4. Refractory hypotension due to intraoperative hypothermia during spinal instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponniah Vanamoorthy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of inadvertent hypothermia leading to severe hypotension resistant to high dose vasopressors, which responded to temperature correction in a patient undergoing spinal instrumentation surgery. A 60-year-old female developed severe hypotension during spinal instrumentation surgery. After review of all factors it was found to be secondary to hypothermia. The patient did not respond to high dose vasopressors. However, when normothermia was restored she recovered uneventfully. Patients undergoing lengthy spinal procedures in prone position are vulnerable to develop hypothermia and consequent cardiovascular depression so adequate measures should be taken to prevent hypothermia.

  5. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit

    2011-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously generate electricity. Stable power generation (145± 5 mW/m2, 470 Ω) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The maximum power density reached 190±5 mW/m2. The corresponding total...... system to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously recover energy....

  6. What can be done about corrosion in submersible pumps?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minett, S.

    2000-09-01

    Useful advice and a survey of materials and techniques which can help counter corrosion risks in submersible pumps are provided. The greatest risk of corrosion is caused by sea water, hydrochloric acid, certain types of solvents, hydrogen sulphide, liquids with a high copper content, bases with a high pH value and certain liquids containing a mixture of acids. Counteractive strategies suggested include using a corrosion resistant material such as stainless steel, or other resistant coatings and materials for particular components that are exposed to high corrosion risks. Most submersible pumps are made of cast iron which should present no corrosion problems in normal domestic use. In mining and construction applications aluminum submersibles are common, which is resistant to a pH value of about 8. The use of stainless steel is recommended as the main material in submersible pumps when used for pumping acidic liquids, and when purity of the liquid pumped is of prime consideration. Coatings and anodes on conventional cast iron pumps are a less expensive and more flexible alternative against salt water corrosion. Among coatings epoxy coating is the most widely used. Zinc anodes are used in conjunction with epoxy coatings, which by setting up a micro current by contact with the cast iron prevent corrosion of areas of the cast iron that may be exposed as a result of post-production scratching. By being sacrificially corroded, the zinc anodes thus significantly extend the life of a coated pump. Impressed current from an external power source, is an effective, but more expensive alternative to the implanted anode method. Using resistant materials such as nitrile rubber, fluoro-carbon rubber, corrosion resistant cemented carbide, or chlorinated rubber for various components (rotating shaft seals, rubber 'O' rings, cable sheathing, etc) are other alternatives that may be depending on the application and the degree of exposure.

  7. Issues in offshore platform research - Part 1: Semi-submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Kim, Tae-Wan; Sha, O. P.; Misra, S. C.

    2010-09-01

    Availability of economic and efficient energy resources is crucial to a nation's development. Because of their low cost and advancement in drilling and exploration technologies, oil and gas based energy systems are the most widely used energy source throughout the world. The inexpensive oil and gas based energy systems are used for everything, i.e., from transportation of goods and people to the harvesting of crops for food. As the energy demand continues to rise, there is strong need for inexpensive energy solutions. An offshore platform is a large structure that is used to house workers and machinery needed to drill wells in the ocean bed, extract oil and/or natural gas, process the produced fluids, and ship or pipe them to shore. Depending on the circumstances, the offshore platform can be fixed (to the ocean floor) or can consist of an artificial island or can float. Semi-submersibles are used for various purposes in offshore and marine engineering, e.g. crane vessels, drilling vessels, tourist vessels, production platforms and accommodation facilities, etc. The challenges of deepwater drilling have further motivated the researchers to design optimum choices for semi-submersibles for a chosen operating depth. In our series of eight papers, we discuss the design and production aspects of all the types of offshore platforms. In the present part I, we present an introduction and critical analysis of semi-submersibles.

  8. Issues in offshore platform research - Part 1: Semi-submersibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sharma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Availability of economic and efficient energy resources is crucial to a nation's development. Because of their low cost and advancement in drilling and exploration technologies, oil and gas based energy systems are the most widely used energy source throughout the world. The inexpensive oil and gas based energy systems are used for everything, i.e., from transportation of goods and people to the harvesting of crops for food. As the energy demand continues to rise, there is strong need for inexpensive energy solutions. An offshore platform is a large structure that is used to house workers and machinery needed to drill wells in the ocean bed, extract oil and/or natural gas, process the produced fluids, and ship or pipe them to shore. Depending on the circumstances, the offshore platform can be fixed (to the ocean floor or can consist of an artificial island or can float. Semi-submersibles are used for various purposes in offshore and marine engineering, e.g. crane vessels, drilling vessels, tourist vessels, production platforms and accommodation facilities, etc. The challenges of deepwater drilling have further motivated the researchers to design optimum choices for semi-submersibles for a chosen operating depth. In our series of eight papers, we discuss the design and production aspects of all the types of offshore platforms. In the present part I, we present an introduction and critical analysis of semi-submersibles.

  9. WTEC panel report on research submersibles and undersea technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymore, Richard J.; Blidberg, D. Richard; Brancart, Claude P.; Gentry, Larry L.; Kalvaitis, Algis N.; Lee, Michael J.; Mooney, Brad; Walsh, Don

    1994-06-01

    This report covers research submersibles and related subsea technologies in Finland, France, Russia, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Manned, teleoperated, and autonomous submersibles were of interest. The panel found that, in contrast to the United States, Europe is making substantial progress in cooperative and coordinated research in subsea technology, including the development of standards. France is a leader in autonomous vehicle technology. Because much less was known a priori about the technologies in Russia and Ukraine, there were more new findings in those countries than in those Western European nations visited. However, Russia and Ukraine have a sizeable (and currently underutilized) infrastructure in this field, including a highly educated and experienced manpower pool, impressive (in some cases unique) facilities for physical testing, extensive fleets of seagoing research vessels capable of long voyages, and state-of-the-art facilities for conducting oceanographic investigations. The panel visited newly-formed commercial companies associated with long-standing submersible R&D and production centers in Russia and Ukraine. So far, these new efforts are undercapitalized, and as such represent opportunities at very low cost for Western nations, as detailed in the site reports.

  10. Acute Renal Failure following Accidental Potassium Bromate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accidental poisoning is common in children. Potassium bromate is a commonly used additive and raising agent in many edibles particularly bread, a staple food worldwide, yet its accidental poisoning has hitherto, not been documented in Nigeria. We report an unusual case of acute renal failure following accidental ...

  11. Post accidental small breaks analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depond, G.; Gandrille, J.

    1980-04-01

    EDF ordered to FRAMATOME by 1977 to complete post accidental long term studies on 'First Contrat-Programme' reactors, in order to demonstrate the safety criteria long term compliance, to get information on NSSS behaviour and to improve the post accidental procedures. Convenient analytical models were needed and EDF and FRAMATOME respectively developped the AXEL and FRARELAP codes. The main results of these studies is that for the smallest breaks, it is possible to manually undertake cooling and pressure reducing actions by dumping the steam generators secondary side in order to meet the RHR operating specifications and perform long term cooling through this system. A specific small breaks procedure was written on this basis. The EDF and FRAMATOME codes are continuously improved; the results of a French set of separate effects experiments will be incorporated as well as integral system verification

  12. Hypothermia for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Guillermo; Mayer, Stephan A

    2009-07-01

    Hypothermia is considered nature's "gold standard" for neuroprotection, and its efficacy for improving outcome in patients with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury as a result of cardiac arrest is well-established. Hypothermia reduces brain edema and intracranial pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury. By contrast, only a few small pilot studies have evaluated hypothermia as a treatment for acute ischemic stroke, and no controlled trials of hypothermia for hemorrhagic stroke have been performed. Logistic challenges present an important barrier to the widespread application of hypothermia for stroke, most importantly the need for high-quality critical care to start immediately in the emergency department. Rapid induction of hypothermia within 3 to 6 hrs of onset has been hampered by slow cooling rates, but is feasible. Delayed cooling for the treatment of cytotoxic brain edema does not provide definitive or lasting treatment for intracranial mass effect, and should not be used as an alternative to hemicraniectomy. Sustained fever control is feasible in patients with intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but has yet to be tested in a phase III study. Important observations from studies investigating the use of hypothermia for stroke to date include the necessity for proactive antishivering therapy for successful cooling, the importance of slow controlled rewarming to avoid rebound brain edema, and the high risk for infectious and cardiovascular complications in this patient population. More research is clearly needed to bring us closer to the successful application of hypothermia in the treatment for stroke.

  13. Preventing Hypothermia in Preterm Infants: A Program of Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal hypothermia is a worldwide problem and leads to increased morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. This paper describes a program of research to examine thermoregulation in premature infants and to decrease neonatal hypothermia. Our studies include 1) examining an intervention to reduce heat loss in ...

  14. Effects of a thermal ceiling on postoperative hypothermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Eklund, A; Joachimsson, P O

    1985-01-01

    Moderate per- and postoperative hypothermia initiates an increased metabolism in the postoperative period. The subsequent demands on oxygen transport may be critical in poor risk patients. Nineteen healthy young women with moderate hypothermia after abdominal surgery were studied for 2 h...

  15. Neonatal hypothermia in sub-Saharan Africa: A review | Onalo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result and Conclusion: Neonatal hypothermia is a major condition of public health importance in countries of sub- Saharan Africa. Awareness of the burden of the disease is still low in some communities. Risk factors for neonatal hypothermia in the region include poverty, home delivery, low birthweight, early bathing of ...

  16. Cellular mechanisms of the radiomodifying effect of hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmukhanov, S.B.; Karakulov, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The irradiation of experimental tumors with a dose of 2000 to 2500 rad (20 to 25 J/kg) under hypothermia promoted an inhibition of the growth to a greater degree than the irradiation under normal conditions. In Guerin's tumor the inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was more expressed after the irradiation under hypothermic conditions than under the irradiation, and/or hypothermia alone. After the irradiation of the Guerin's tumor under hypothermia the cells were synchronized during the presynthetic phase of the cycle (block G 1 to S), and the effect of synchronization was more expressed in the tumor than in the normal tissue. The irradiation under hypothermia decreased the proliferative pool to a greater degree than the irradiation and/or hypothermia alone. (author)

  17. Hypothermia in Uremic Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatchnick, E; Langston, C; Olson, B; Lamb, K E

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of uremic hypothermia (UH) and the effects of improving uremia on body temperature have not been determined in veterinary patients. To determine the prevalence of UH and correlations between uremia and body temperature in patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (IHD). Uremic dogs (n = 122) and cats (n = 79) treated by IHD at the Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center from 1997 to 2013. Retrospective review of medical records. The prevalence of hypothermia was 38% in azotemic cats and 20.5% in azotemic dogs. Statistically significant temperature differences were observed between uremic and nonuremic dogs (nonuremic: mean, 100.8°F; range, 91.2-109.5°F; uremic: mean, 99.9°F; range, 95.6-103.8°F; P cats (nonuremic: mean, 100.6°F; range, 94.0-103.8°F; uremic: mean, 99.3°F; range, 92.3-103.4°F; P dog dialysis patients, significant models included (1) timing (pre-dialysis versus post-dialysis) with weight class (small [P dogs), (2) timing with serum creatinine concentration (P = .021), and (3) timing with BUN concentration (P cat dialysis patients, there was a significant interaction between timing and weight as a categorical variable (cats and dogs. Uremic patients are hypothermic compared to ill nonuremic patients and body temperatures increase when uremia is corrected with IHD in dogs and in cats >5 kg. In cats, UH seems to be a more prevalent phenomenon driven by uremia. Uremic hypothermia does occur in dogs, but body weight is a more important predictor of body temperature. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  19. A new concept of submersed centrifugal pump protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Fabiano U.; Aguiar, Jose Luiz de M.; Hamdan, Adel C.; Doerwald, Bruno K.; Dutra, Diogenes; Ghiotto, Edson Carlos da S.; Meira, Marco Antonio A. de

    2000-01-01

    The present article is related to the development of one motor protection relay, which features include the electrical and mechanical device protection of machine. The main focus the purpose of this development, was the monitoring of the phenomena called 'Back Spin', which is common in oil production plant where 'Electrical Submersible Pump' (ESP) Technologies is used. The final results of this job is to present one equipment which is capable to completely protect the ESP Set, electrically and mechanically, and with additional functions of monitoring the mechanical set, with graphic interface to set all protection and monitoring functions using 'windows based' tools. (author)

  20. Accidental poisoning with autumn crocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrscek, Lucija; Lesnicar, Gorazd; Krivec, Bojan; Voga, Gorazd; Sibanc, Branko; Blatnik, Janja; Jagodic, Boris

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case of a 43-yr-old female with severe multiorgan injury after accidental poisoning with Colchicum autumnale, which was mistaken for wild garlic (Allium ursinum). Both plants grow on damp meadows and can be confused in the spring when both plants have leaves but no blossoms. The autumn crocus contains colchicine, which inhibits cellular division. Treatment consisted of supportive care, antibiotic therapy, and granulocyte-directed growth factor. The patient was discharged from the hospital after three weeks. Three years after recovery from the acute poisoning, the patient continued to complain of muscle weakness and intermittent episodes of hair loss.

  1. Mortalidad intrahospitalaria por accidente cerebrovascular

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Rodríguez Lucci; Virginia Pujol Lereis; Sebastián Ameriso; Guillermo Povedano; María F. Díaz; Alejandro Hlavnicka; Néstor A. Wainsztein; Sebastián F. Ameriso

    2013-01-01

    La mortalidad global por accidente cerebrovascular (ACV) ha disminuido en las últimas tres décadas, probablemente debido a un mejor control de los factores de riesgo vascular. La mortalidad hospitalaria por ACV ha sido tradicionalmente estimada entre 6 y 14% en la mayoría de las series comunicadas. Sin embargo, los datos de ensayos clínicos recientes sugieren que esta cifra sería sustancialmente menor. Se revisaron datos de pacientes internados con diagnóstico de ACV del Banco de Datos de Str...

  2. 36 CFR 3.19 - May I operate a submersible within park waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I operate a submersible within park waters? 3.19 Section 3.19 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... waters? The use of manned or unmanned submersibles may only occur in accordance with a permit issued by...

  3. Hypothalamic control of pituitary and adrenal hormones during hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, C; Miyazaki, M; Kuriyama, K

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate neuroendocrinological mechanisms of hypothermia, we determined the changes in plasma concentrations of corticosterone (CS), prolactin (PRL), and thyrotropin (TSH), and their correlations with alterations in hypothalamic dopamine (DA) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), in rats restrained and immersed in a water bath at various temperatures. A graded decrease of body temperature induced a progressive increase in the plasma level of CS, whereas that of PRL showed a drastic decrease. The plasma level of TSH also showed an increase during mild hypothermia (about 35 degrees C), but this increase was not evident during profound hypothermia (below 24 degrees C). The changes in these hormones were readily reversed by rewarming animals. Although DA content in the hypothalamus was not affected, its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), showed an increase following the decrease of body temperature. Pretreatment of the animals with sulpiride, a D2-antagonist, prevented the hypothermia-induced inhibition of PRL release. Hypothalamic TRH was significantly decreased during mild hypothermia, and it returned to control levels after rewarming. These results suggest that the decrease in plasma PRL induced by hypothermia may be associated with the activation of hypothalamic DA neurons, whereas the increase in plasma TSH during mild hypothermia seems to be caused by the increased release of TRH in the hypothalamus.

  4. Comportamiento de los accidentes laborales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gómez Vital

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza una valoración sobre la situación de la accidentalidad en centros de trabajo de la provincia de Villa Clara de 1993 a 1997. El total de accidentes registrados fue de 12 522. Últimamente han disminuido y su índice de incidencia. En el último año se redujo el promedio de días perdidos, pero el índice de gravedad alcanzó la cifra mayor. Se insiste en el cumplimiento del programa de prevención y reducción de accidentes laborales.The situation of the occupational accidents that occurred in the province of Villa Clara from 1993 to 1997 was assessed. 12 522 accidents were registered during that periods. A decrease of these accidents and of their incidence rate has been observed lately. The average of lost days was reduced during the last year, out the severity index reached the highest figure. Emphasis is made on the importance of fulfilling the program of prevention and reduction of occupational accidents.

  5. A new microcontroller supervised thermoelectric renal hypothermia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Hakan

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, a thermoelectric system controlled by a microcontroller is developed to induce renal hypothermia. Temperature value was managed by 8-byte microcontroller, PIC16F877, and was programmed using microcontroller MPASM package. In order to ensure hypothermia in the kidney 1-4 modules and sensors perceiving temperature of the area can be selected. Temperature values are arranged proportionately for the selected area and the determined temperature values can be monitored from an Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen. The temperature range of the system is between -50 and +50 degrees C. Renal hypothermia system was tried under in vivo conditions on the kidney of a dog.

  6. Technical Note: System for evaluating local hypothermia as a radioprotector of the rectum in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycushko, Brian A; Bing, Chenchen; Futch, Cecil; Wodzak, Michelle; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Medin, Paul M; Chopra, Rajiv

    2017-08-01

    The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments. This work describes the development of a system to evaluate local hypothermia for a radioprotective effect of the rat rectum during a large dose of radiation relevant to prostate SBRT. This includes the evaluation of a 3D-printed small animal rectal cooling device and the integration with a small animal irradiator. A 3-cm long, dual-lumen rectal temperature control apparatus (RTCA) was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The RTCA was capable of recirculating flow in a device small enough for insertion into the rat rectum, with a metal support rod for strength as well as visibility during radiation treatment planning. The outer walls of the RTCA comprised of thin heat shrink plastic, achieving efficient heat transfer into adjacent tissues. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within the rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. Integration with an image-guided small animal irradiator and associated treatment planning system included evaluation for imaging artifacts and effect of brass tubing on dose calculation. The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature to 15°C within 10-20 min from device insertion and was maintained at 15 ± 3°C during active cooling for the evaluated time of one hour. MR thermometry revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device with the desired

  7. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Mohammed; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  8. Prolonged drug-induced hypothermia in experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Reith, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    In experimental and human stroke, hypothermia is strongly related to a favorable outcome. Previous attempts to manipulate the core temperature in focal cerebral ischemia have been based on mechanical cooling. The purpose of the study is to establish a model for long-term drug-induced hypothermia...... in focal ischemia by pharmacological alteration of the central thermoregulatory set-point. We tested the hypothesis that the dopaminergic agonist Talipexole, which induces hypothermia, reduces infarct size. Body temperature was monitored by a radio-pill-implant. Rats had reversible occlusion of the middle...... that the core body temperature was reduced by 1.7 degrees C for 24 hours after MCAO in rats treated with Talipexole. This treatment induced a significant reduction of infarct volume at 7 days after focal ischemia by 47%. We suggest that the reduction in infarct volume is related to drug-induced hypothermia...

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Traumatic Spinal Injury: Morphological and Functional Correlates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yezierski, Robert P

    1998-01-01

    The general purpose of experiments carried out during the first year focused on the neuroprotective effects of systemic hypothermia and pharmacological treatments following moderate and severe spinal cord injury...

  10. Hypothermia Induction and Recovery in Free-Ranging Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DuBose, D. A; Leon, L. R; Morehouse, D. H; Rufolo, D. M; Blaha, M. D; Gordon, C. J

    2007-01-01

    1. To avoid anesthesia confounders, free-ranging rats were exposed to cool water, warm water, or temperate air to induce hypothermia, or control for water or novel environment stress, respectively. 2...

  11. Prognostic Value of EEG in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Researchers at Children’s Hospitals in Milan, Italy, determined the prognostic value of electroencephalographic patterns in 23 newborns with severe perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, treated with hypothermia.

  12. About Assessment Criteria of Driver's Accidental Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Yuliya I.; Glushko, Kirill V.

    2016-01-01

    The article points at the importance of studying the human factor as a cause of accidents of drivers, especially in loosely structured traffic situations. The description of the experiment on the measurement of driver's accidental abilities is given. Under accidental ability is meant the capability to ensure the security of driving as a behavior…

  13. Characterisation of childhood and adolescence accidental fatalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accidental death in childhood and adolescence is posing a public health problem in Nigeria, as most of these deaths were not caused by the victims. There is need to research into the pattern and circumstances surrounding the death. Aim: To characterise and study accidental deaths in childhood and ...

  14. Accidental Poisoning with Otapiapia: a Local Organophasphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children are prone to accidental poisoning. We report this fatal organophosphate poisoning of a 3-year-old Nigerian boy following accidental ingestion of a homemade cocktail of kerosene and 'Otapiapia': a local rodenticide to highlight the dangers inherent in un-regulated production, home use and storage of this ...

  15. Tension Pneumothorax following an Accidental Kerosene Poisoning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication following an accidental kerosene poisoning. In such situation, a bed-side needle thoracocentesis is performed because of its potential of becoming fatal; hence its clinical importance. A case of 15 month old boy with tension pneumothorax following accidental kerosene ...

  16. Interventions for treating inadvertent postoperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warttig, Sheryl; Alderson, Phil; Campbell, Gillian; Smith, Andrew F

    2014-11-20

    Inadvertent postoperative hypothermia (a drop in core body temperature to below 36°C) occurs as an effect of surgery when anaesthetic drugs and exposure of the skin for long periods of time during surgery result in interference with normal temperature regulation. Once hypothermia has occurred, it is important that patients are rewarmed promptly to minimise potential complications. Several different interventions are available for rewarming patients. To estimate the effectiveness of treating inadvertent perioperative hypothermia through postoperative interventions to decrease heat loss and apply passive and active warming systems in adult patients who have undergone surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1956 to 21 February 2014), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1982 to 21 February 2014), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1950 to 21 February 2014) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EBSCO host (1980 to 21 February 2014), as well as reference lists of articles. We also searched www.controlled-trials.com and www.clincialtrials.gov. Randomized controlled trials of postoperative warming interventions aiming to reverse hypothermia compared with control or with each other. Three review authors identified studies for inclusion in this review. One review author extracted data and completed risk of bias assessments; two review authors checked the details. Meta-analysis was conducted when appropriate by using standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 11 trials with 699 participants. Ten trials provided data for analysis. Trials varied in the numbers and types of participants included and in the types of surgery performed. Most trials were at high or unclear risk of bias because of inappropriate or unclear randomization procedures, and because blinding of assessors and participants generally was

  17. Neonatal hypothermia in sub-Saharan Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onalo, R

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a major factor in neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. High prevalence of hypothermia has been reported widely even from warmer tropical countries. In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendation of maintenance of warm chain in newborn care, hypothermia continues to be a common neonatal condition which has remained under-recognized, under-documented, and poorly-managed. This review aims at providing the incidence of and risk factors for neonatal hypothermia as well as provides a pathophysiological overview and management options for neonates with the condition in sub-Saharan Africa. All available published literature on neonatal hypothermia was searched electronically and manually. The principal electronic reference libraries and sites searched were PubMed, Embase, Ajol, Cochrane Reference Libraries and Google Scholar. The search terms used included 'neonatal hypothermia,' 'Cold stress in newborn' 'thermal care of the newborn,' 'neonatal thermogenesis,' 'neonatal cold injury,' among others. Pertinent books and monographs were accessed. Data in formats inaccessible to the reviewer were excluded. Neonatal hypothermia is a major condition of public health importance in countries of sub- Saharan Africa. Awareness of the burden of the disease is still low in some communities. Risk factors for neonatal hypothermia in the region include poverty, home delivery, low birthweight, early bathing of babies, delayed initiation of breastfeeding and inadequate knowledge among health workers. Low-tech facilities to prevent heat losses and provide warmth are available in sub-Saharan Africa and are thus recommended as well as continuous efforts at sensitizing caregivers on the thermal needs of newborns.

  18. The enhancement of immunological activity by mild hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawal, Takeo; Gu, Yeun Hwa; Miyata, Katuyuki

    2004-01-01

    In general, the term hypothermia is applied for the therapeutic method for the treatment of cancer using micro wave, RF wave thermal system or intra-tissue thermal device. It was found to be a tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which is one of cytokines secreted by macrophages 'P'j. With remarkable progress in the instruments and technique in recent years, fundamental and clinical research showed extensive development 'Q'j. At present, hypothermia is clinically very important as inter- disciplinary therapeutic method, and studies are being performed on combined effects with surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and gene therapy for the treatment of malignant tumor 'R'j. Also, hypothermia is characterized by its selective thermal effect on tumor 'S'j. In this sense, it is called mild hypothermia. There have been not many reports, which described mild hypothermia for the purpose of treating the cases with cancer. This suggests the possibility of immunological response by heating relatively mild temperature (39-42). In this respect, by experiments using mouse as model, we evaluated the effects of hypothermia under temperature of 42.5 and lower and demonstrated that the activation of immunological response is increased and anti-tumor effect can be obtained

  19. The enhancement of immunological activity by mild hypothermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawal, Takeo; Gu, Yeun Hwa; Miyata, Katuyuki [Graduate School of Suzuka Univ. of Med Sci. Master, Suzuka (Japan)] (and others)

    2004-11-15

    In general, the term hypothermia is applied for the therapeutic method for the treatment of cancer using micro wave, RF wave thermal system or intra-tissue thermal device. It was found to be a tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which is one of cytokines secreted by macrophages 'P'j. With remarkable progress in the instruments and technique in recent years, fundamental and clinical research showed extensive development 'Q'j. At present, hypothermia is clinically very important as inter- disciplinary therapeutic method, and studies are being performed on combined effects with surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and gene therapy for the treatment of malignant tumor 'R'j. Also, hypothermia is characterized by its selective thermal effect on tumor 'S'j. In this sense, it is called mild hypothermia. There have been not many reports, which described mild hypothermia for the purpose of treating the cases with cancer. This suggests the possibility of immunological response by heating relatively mild temperature (39-42). In this respect, by experiments using mouse as model, we evaluated the effects of hypothermia under temperature of 42.5 and lower and demonstrated that the activation of immunological response is increased and anti-tumor effect can be obtained.

  20. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Future Directions for Hypothermia following Severe Traumatic Brian Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Annie W; Hinson, Holly E

    2017-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious health care problem on both individual and public health levels. As a major cause of death and disability in the United States, it is associated with a significant economic and public health burden. Although the evidence to support the use of induced hypothermia on neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest is well established, its use in treating TBI remains controversial. Hypothermia has the potential to mitigate some of the destructive processes that occur as part of secondary brain injury after TBI. Hypothermia can be helpful in lowering intracranial pressure, for example, but its influence on functional outcome is unclear. There is insufficient evidence to support the broad use of prophylactic hypothermia for neuroprotection after TBI. Investigators are beginning to more carefully select patients for temperature modulating therapies, in a more personalized approach. Examples include targeting immunomodulation and scaling hypothermia to achieve metabolic targets. This review will summarize the clinical evidence for the use of hypothermia to limit secondary brain injury following acute TBI. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Size effect related to damping caused by water submersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    An important effect of water submersion on the dynamic response of a structure is the increase in effective damping. The dynamic response of submerged structures is of interest in the nuclear power industry for reasons of operational safety during seismic and other dynamic excitations. In this paper, the added damping contribution that results from the viscosity of water and the dependence of the contribution on structural size are examined. Other factors considered are the applicable range of viscous damping with respect to displacement amplitude and, as far as damping is concerned, how far neighboring members must be from each other to respond as if in open water. An expression is derived for relating the damping value to structural size. Estimated added-damping values for representative fuel elements, fuel bundles, and main steam-pressure-relief-valve lines are given based on our derived expression for added damping

  3. Special considerations for electric submersible pump applications in underpressured reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of electric submersible pump performance tolerances and minor speed variations on the producing rate of wells completed in underpressured reservoirs, and presents ESP design considerations which are unique for this class of wells. These wells require considerable head to initiate flow and have relatively flat well-load curves. Pumps that operate near their maximum recommended rate have steep performance curves. it is shown that this minimizes the effect of an underperforming pump on producing rate. Equations are developed for calculating the effects of pump performance and speed. Application requires evaluating the slopes of the pump performance curve and well-load curve at design rate. Utility of these equations is demonstrated by practical examples. It is also demonstrated that flow-stall can easily occur in underpressured reservoir applications when pumps designed to operate near their minimum recommended rate are installed

  4. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  5. Using Multispectral Sentinel-2 Data to Monitor Submerse Macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Patrick; Roessler, Sebastian; Schneider, Thomas; Melzer, Arnulf

    2012-04-01

    Due to climate change and the involved temperatures of Bavarian freshwater lakes, the invasive submerse macrophytes Elodea nuttallii and Najas marina exhibit a massive expansion. To map these processes, a monitoring system based on remote sensing methods is under development. The main part of the monitoring system is a coupled reflection-/growth-model, which derives biometrical parameters for the EU water framework directive (WFD) by inversion of the reflectance spectra. For operational monitoring tasks a high revisiting time is necessary. Hence, the Sentinel-2 sensor might be very promising, as filling the gap between RapidEye and WorldView2 and between hyperspectral an aerial images. This paper outlines principles, methods and first results of the project.

  6. Performance evaluation of a transformerless multiphase electric submersible pump system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Hakeem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Using of low-voltage variable-frequency drive followed by a step-up transformer is the most preferable way to feed an electrical submersible pump motor. The existence of long feeder between the motor and drive systems usually causes over-voltage problems because of the travelling wave phenomenon, which makes the employment of filter networks on the motor or inverter terminals mandatory. The so-called boost-inverter inherently can solve this problem with filter-less operation as it offers a direct sinusoidal output voltage. As boost inverters have voltage boosting capability, it can provide a transformer-less operation as well. This study investigates the performance of a five-phase modular winding induction machine fed from a boost-inverter through a long feeder. A simulation study using a 1000 Hp system and experimental investigation on a 1 Hp prototype machine are used to support the presented approach.

  7. Submersion Quenching of Undercooled Liquid Metals in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. The laboratory has recently added a new capability, a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals and alloys. This is the first submersion quench system inside an electrostatic levitator. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and silicon-cobalt alloys. This rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development, including studies of metastable phases and transient microstructures. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  8. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Life on the Edge 2004 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during twenty-five dives of the 2004 "Life on the Edge" expedition sponsored by...

  9. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Investigating the Charleston Bump 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during fourteen dives of the 2003 "Investigating the Charleston...

  10. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Operation Deep Scope 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during thirteen dives of the 2005 "Operation Deep Scope" expedition sponsored by...

  11. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during seventeen dives of the 2009 "Bioluminescence" expedition...

  12. Submersion criticality safety of tungsten-rhenium urania cermet fuel for space propulsion and power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, A.E., E-mail: aaron.craft@inl.gov [Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR), INL, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O’Brien, R.C., E-mail: Robert.OBrien@inl.gov [Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR), INL, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Howe, S.D., E-mail: Steven.Howe@inl.gov [Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR), INL, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, J.C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Criticality safety studies consider a generic space nuclear reactor in reentry scenarios. • Describes the submersion criticality behavior for a reactor fueled with a tungsten cermet fuel. • Study considers effects of varying fuel content, geometry, and other conditions. - Abstract: Nuclear thermal rockets are the preferred propulsion technology for a manned mission to Mars, and tungsten–uranium oxide cermet fuels could provide significant performance and cost advantages for nuclear thermal rockets. A nuclear reactor intended for use in space must remain subcritical before and during launch, and must remain subcritical in launch abort scenarios where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial materials (including seawater, wet sand, or dry sand). Submersion increases reflection of neutrons and also thermalizes the neutron spectrum, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is typically very significant for compact, fast-spectrum reactors. This paper provides a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor with a range of fuel compositions. Each submersion case considers both the rhenium content in the matrix alloy and the uranium oxide volume fraction in the cermet. The inclusion of rhenium significantly improves the submersion criticality safety of the reactor. While increased uranium oxide content increases the reactivity of the core, it does not significantly affect the submersion behavior of the reactor. There is no significant difference in submersion behavior between reactors with rhenium distributed within the cermet matrix and reactors with a rhenium clad in the coolant channels. The combination of the flooding of the coolant channels in submersion scenarios and the presence of a significant amount of spectral shift absorbers (i.e. high rhenium concentration) further decreases reactivity for short reactor cores compared to longer cores.

  13. Anticonvulsant treatment of asphyxiated newborns under hypothermia with lidocaine : efficacy, safety and dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Marcel P. H.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; van Straaten, Henrica L. M.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Toet, Mona C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Groenendaal, Floris

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is an antiarrythmicum used as an anticonvulsant for neonatal seizures, also during therapeutic hypothermia following (perinatal) asphyxia. Hypothermia may affect the efficacy, safety and dosing of lidocaine in these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and safety of

  14. [Functional and morphological study of the local and systemic hypothermia on dog's liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Venilton José; Taha, Murched Omar; Fagundes, Djalma José; Gomes, Paulo de Oliveira; Juliano, Yara; Bruzzadelli, Renata Marcon zanelatto; Caputto, Lucélia Rita Galdino

    2005-01-01

    To compare hepatic lesions produced by two types of hypothermia; the systemic and the local or topic. Twenty dogs distributed in two groups were studied: the first submitted to local hypothermia and the second to systemic hypothermia. In all groups, biochemical dosages for alanina allytransferase (A.L.T.), aspartate aminotrasnferase (A.S.T.) and direct bilirubin (T.D.), conventional optical microscopy and electronic transmission microscopy were performed in times T0, Test, and T60, that is, before the hypothermia (T0), after temperature stabilization at 10 degrees lower than initial temperature (Test), and after sixty minutes of hypothermia (T60). The data analysis, both of the biochemical profile and of the microscopy showed that in the group of animals with selective hypothermia, the hepatic lesions were more intense when compared to the systemic hypothermia group. The selective hypothermia causes more lesions to the liver than the systemic.

  15. Incidence of intraoperative hypothermia: adopting protocol for its prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qahtani, Ali S.; Messahel, Farouk M.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence of hypothermia during surgical procedures when adequate methods of preserving normothermia are applied .For this was a study in which patients ASA I-IV presented for surgery at the Armed Forces Hospital, Wadi Al- Dawasir, kingdom of Saudi Arabia ,during the period from July 2000 to February 2003 in whom body core temprature was between 35-37C ,were included. Ambient temperature of the operating room was thermostatically adjusted to record 26C and 24C if patents were < 10 year-old or above .Depending on type of surgery ;the patients were provided with space blankents and were lying on warm mattresses. Fluid or blood warmers and forced-air surface were used when needed for this. = Aggressive measures must be adopted to preserve normothermia as prevention of intraoperative hypothermia improves patients outcome .All patients shoud have their body temprature monitored during surgery .However application of available methods of keeping normothermia reduces the the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia but does not abolish it completely . Hypothermia patients should be closely moniterd during gradual rewarming preferably in the intensive care setting. A protocol for prevention of intraoperative hypothermia must be adopted by all operating theatres. (author)

  16. Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S4) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S 4 ) reactor, developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures, is presented. The S 4 reactor has a Mo-14% Re solid core, loaded with uranium nitride fuel, cooled by He-30% Xe and sized to provide 550 kWth for 7 years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector of the S 4 reactor is designed to completely disassemble upon impact on water or soil. The potential of using Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials in different forms to ensure that the reactor remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident is investigated. Nine potential SSAs are considered in terms of their effect on the thickness of the radial reflector and on the combined mass of the reactor and the radiation shadow shield. The SSA materials are incorporated as a thin (0.1 mm) coating on the outside surface of the reactor core and as core additions in three possible forms: 2.0 mm diameter pins in the interstices of the core block, 0.25 mm thick sleeves around the fuel stacks and/or additions to the uranium nitride fuel. Results show that with a boron carbide coating and 0.25 mm iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks the S 4 reactor has a reflector outer diameter of 43.5 cm with a combined reactor and shadow shield mass of 935.1 kg. The S 4 reactor with 12.5 at.% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, resulting in a smaller total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 at.% europium-151 added to the fuel, along with europium-151 sesquioxide for the pins and coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively

  17. Hypothermia in Preterm Infants in the First Hours after Birth : Occurrence, Course and Risk Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mank, Arenda; van Zanten, Henriëtte A; Meyer, Michael P; Pauws, Steffen; Lopriore, Enrico; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Preterm infants frequently have hypothermia when they are admitted to the NICU, but there is no data on the occurrence of hypothermia during the first hours after admission. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence

  18. Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Rasmussen, B H; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig

    2000-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients...

  19. The effect of induced hypothermia on respiratory parameters in mechanically ventilated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslami, Hamid; Binnekade, Jan M.; Horn, Janneke; Huissoon, Sandra; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Mild hypothermia is increasingly applied in the intensive care unit. Knowledge on the effects of hypothermia on respiratory parameters during mechanical ventilation is limited. In this retrospective study, we describe the effect of hypothermia on gas exchange in patients cooled for 24 h after a

  20. Drug-induced Hypothermia by 5HT1A Agonists Provide Neuroprotection in Experimental Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Hasseldam, Henrik; Nybro Smith, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced hypothermia reduces brain damage in animal stroke models and is an undiscovered potential in human stroke treatment. We studied hypothermia induced by the serotonergic agonists S14671 (1-[2-(2-thenoylamino)ethyl]-4[1-(7- methoxynaphtyl)]piperazine) and ipsapirone in a rat...... therapeutic hypothermia....

  1. Intraoperative hypothermia and its clinical outcomes in patients undergoing general anesthesia: National study in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yi

    Full Text Available Inadvertent intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature 2 h (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 2.09-3.24.The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in China is high, and the rate of active warming of patients during operation is low. Hypothermia is associated with more postoperative shivering, increased ICU admissions, and longer postoperative hospital days.

  2. Mortalidad intrahospitalaria por accidente cerebrovascular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Rodríguez Lucci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available La mortalidad global por accidente cerebrovascular (ACV ha disminuido en las últimas tres décadas, probablemente debido a un mejor control de los factores de riesgo vascular. La mortalidad hospitalaria por ACV ha sido tradicionalmente estimada entre 6 y 14% en la mayoría de las series comunicadas. Sin embargo, los datos de ensayos clínicos recientes sugieren que esta cifra sería sustancialmente menor. Se revisaron datos de pacientes internados con diagnóstico de ACV del Banco de Datos de Stroke de FLENI y los registros institucionales de mortalidad entre los años 2000 y 2010. Los subtipos de ACV isquémicos se clasificaron según criterios TOAST y los ACV hemorrágicos en hematomas intrapanquimatosos, hemorragias subaracnoideas aneurismáticas, malformaciones arteriovenosas y otros hematomas intraparenquimatosos. Se analizaron 1514 pacientes, 1079 (71% con ACV isquémico (grandes vasos 39%, cardioembólicos 27%, lacunares 9%, etiología indeterminada 14%, otras etiologías 11% y 435 (29% con ACV hemorrágico (intraparenquimatosos 27%, hemorragia subaracnoidea 30%, malformaciones arteriovenosas 25% y otros hematomas espontáneos 18%. Se registraron 38 muertes intrahospitalarias (17 ACV isquémicos y 21 ACV hemorrágicos, representando una mortalidad global del 2.5% (1.7% en ACV isquémicos y 4.8% en ACV hemorrágicos. No se registraron muertes asociadas al uso de fibrinolíticos endovenosos. La mortalidad intrahospitalaria en pacientes con ACV isquémico y hemorrágico en nuestro centro fue baja. El manejo en un centro dedicado a las enfermedades neurológicas y el enfoque multidisciplinario por personal médico y no médico entrenado en el cuidado de la enfermedad cerebrovascular podrían explicar, al menos en parte, estos resultados.

  3. Hypothermia and hypokalemia in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 36-year-old man with type-1 diabetes who was hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. On admission, he had hypothermia, hypokalemia and combined metabolic and respiratory alkalosis, in addition to hyperglycemia. Hypothermia, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis, with a concurrent respiratory alkalosis, are not commonly seen in DKA. After admission, intravenous infusion of 0.45% saline was administered, which resulted in the development of pure metabolic acidosis. After starting insulin infusion, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became evident and finally resulted in massive rhabdomyolysis. Hyperkalemia accompanying oliguric acute kidney injury (AKI warranted initiation of hemodialysis (HD on Day-five. On the 45th hospital day, his urine output started to increase and a total of 22 HD sessions were required. We believe that in this case severe dehydration, hypothermia and hypokalemia might have contributed to the initial symptoms of DKA as well as the prolongation of AKI.

  4. Hypothermia in neonatal piglets: Interactions and causes of individual differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Trine S; Pedersen, Lene Juul; Jørgensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hypothermia is a major cause of mortality in neonatal piglets. However, there are considerable individual differences in the successful recovery from postnatal hypothermia in the common farrowing environment, and so far the causes and interactions of causes have not been studied in detail. Using...... 635 crossbred neonatal piglets, the aim of this study was to identify the links among different physiological and behavioral measures and their connections to the piglets’ ability to overcome initial postnatal hypothermia, with rectal temperature at 2 h as the response variable. The data included......: birth weight, hypoxia at birth (viability score and lactate in umbilical cord blood), latency to first udder contact and first suckle, scans of individual piglet position during the first 2 h after birth, and rectal temperature at birth and 2 h post partum. A graphical chain model was used to analyze...

  5. Life extension of semi-submersible drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, I.; Sinclair, C.I.K. [TWI, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Structural Integrity Dept.; Magne, E. [Schlumberger Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the life extension of a semi-submersible drilling rig built in the early 1970`s. A nominal design life of 20 years was estimated at the time of building; however, in the interim period, numerous improvements have been made in fatigue life estimation ad life improvement techniques, raising the possibility that a further 20 years of operation could be considered. The life extension strategy made use of a number of aspects of offshore technology which were not available at the time of construction of the rig. Finite element studies and results from offshore research programs were used to gauge the effect of fatigue life improvement techniques. The program demonstrated the feasibility of extending the operation of the rig for a further 20 years, with the interval between in-service inspection increased to every five years. It also provided a valuable database of fracture toughness data for the rig materials, which may be used in future work to address reliability issues.

  6. The Bulgarian Emergency Response System for dose assessment in the early stage of accidental releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrakov, D.; Veleva, B.; Prodanova, M.; Popova, T.; Kolarova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) is being developed in the Bulgarian National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology since 1994. BERS is based on numerical weather forecast meteorological information and a numerical long-range dispersion model accounting for the transport, dispersion, chemical and radioactive transformations of pollutants. In the present paper, the further development of this system for a mixture of radioactive gaseous and aerosol pollutants is described. The basic module for the BERS, the numerical dispersion model EMAP, is upgraded with a 'dose calculation block'. Two scenarios for hypothetical accidental atmospheric releases from two NPPs, one in Western, and the other in Eastern Europe, are numerically simulated. The effective doses from external irradiation, from air submersion and ground shinning, effective dose from inhalation and absorbed dose by thyroid gland formed by 37 different radionuclides, significant for the early stage of a nuclear accident, are calculated as dose fields for both case studies and discussed

  7. Short- and Long-Term Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Infants with Admission Hypothermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yang Chang

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypothermia remains a common problem and is related to elevated morbidities and mortality. However, the long-term neurodevelopmental effects of admission hypothermia are still unknown. This study attempted to determine the short-term and long-term consequences of admission hypothermia in VLBW preterm infants.This retrospective study measured the incidence and compared the outcomes of admission hypothermia in very low birth weight (VLBW preterm infants in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit. Infants were divided into the following groups: normothermia (36.5-37.5°C, mild hypothermia (36.0-36.4°C, moderate hypothermia (32.0-35.9°C, and severe hypothermia (< 32°C. We compared the distribution, demographic variables, short-term outcomes, and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 24 months of corrected age among groups.We studied 341 infants: 79 with normothermia, 100 with mild hypothermia, 162 with moderate hypothermia, and 0 with severe hypothermia. Patients in the moderate hypothermia group had significantly lower gestational ages (28.1 wk vs. 29.7 wk, P < .02 and smaller birth weight (1004 g vs. 1187 g, P < .001 compared to patients in the normothermia group. Compared to normothermic infants, moderately hypothermic infants had significantly higher incidences of 1-min Apgar score < 7 (63.6% vs. 31.6%, P < .001, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS (58.0% vs. 39.2%, P = .006, and mortality (18.5% vs. 5.1%, P = .005. Moderate hypothermia did not affect neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years' corrected age. Mild hypothermia had no effect on short-term or long-term outcomes.Admission hypothermia was common in VLBW infants and correlated inversely with birth weight and gestational age. Although moderate hypothermia was associated with higher RDS and mortality rates, it may play a limited role among multifactorial causes of neurodevelopmental impairment.

  8. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres......AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level...

  9. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Mike; Herbert, James E.; Scheele, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m 3 to 4921 m 3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and product lubricated canned

  10. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Mike [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Herbert, James E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scheele, Patrick W. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  11. Accidental and retrospective dosimetry using TL method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesterházy, D.; Osvay, M.; Kovács, A.; Kelemen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry is one of the most important tools of accidental dosimetry for dose estimation when dose measurement was not planned. In the affected area many objects can be applied as natural dosimeters. The paper discusses our recent investigations on various electronic components and common salt (NaCl) having useful thermoluminescence (TL) properties. Among materials investigated the electronic components of cell phones seem promising for retrospective dosimetry purposes, having high TL responses, proper glow curve peaks and the intensity of TL peaks vs. gamma dose received provided nearly linear response in the dose range of 10 mGy–1.5 Gy. - Highlights: ► Electronic components and common salt were investigated for accidental and retrospective dosimetry. ► SMD resistors seem promising for retrospective dosimetry purposes. ► Table salt can be used effectively for accidental dosimetry purposes, as well.

  12. [Effects of craniocerebral hypothermia on the course of climacteric syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishenko, V I; Sherbina, N A; Lipko, O P

    1992-01-01

    Craniocerebral hypothermia was used in the treatment of 43 women aged 48 to 55, suffering from the climacteric syndrome of varying severity. The treatment efficacy was confirmed by EEG data and changes in blood levels of ACTH, LH, prolactin, and hydrocortisone.

  13. Neonatal hypothermia in sub-Saharan Africa: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Apr-Jun 2013 • Vol 16 • Issue 2 ... it is estimated that 17 million newborns develop hypothermia ... Transfer of radiant energy by radiation from the body ..... in the evaluation of critically ill patients for brain death. ... use of the condition in neonatal encephalopathies and.

  14. Cooling the crisis: Therapeutic hypothermia after sickle cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metske, Hennie A.; Postema, Pieter G.; Biemond, Bart J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The management of patients with sickle-cell disease and cardiac arrest presents special challenges. Mild therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival and neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, however, it may also precipitate sickling in patients with sickle-cell disease. Rigorous

  15. Neonatal Hypothermia and Associated Risk Factors at Baby Friendly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperatures were recorded immediately after birth and at the age of 1, 2 and 4 h after birth in order to estimate the prevalence of neonatal hypothermia, defined as axillary temperature less than ... Odds ratios (ORs) were assessed using maximum likelihood and associated 95% confidence intervals were computed.

  16. The incidence and risk factors for intra-operative hypothermia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... at the Kenyatta National Hospital is 30%. Gender (male), lower body temperature at induction, use of caudal block and the volume of intravenous fluids infused were significant independent predictors of core hypothermia. The most significant predictor was body temperature at the time of induction of general anaesthesia.

  17. Analysis of accidental UF6 releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yumao; Tan Rui; Gao Qifa

    2012-01-01

    As interim substance in the nuclear fuel enrichment process, Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) is widely applied in nuclear processing, enrichment and fuel fabrication plants. Because of its vivid chemical characteristics and special radiological hazard and chemical toxicity, great attention must be paid to accident of UF 6 leakage. The chemical reactions involved in UF 6 release processes were introduced, therewith potential release styles, pathways and characteristics of diffusion were analyzed. The results indicated that the accidental release process of UF 6 is not a simple passive diffusion. So, specific atmospheric diffusion model related to UF 6 releases need be used in order to analyze and evaluate accurately the accidental consequences. (authors)

  18. SU-C-213-07: Fabrication and Testing of a 3D-Printed Small Animal Rectal Cooling Device to Evaluate Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector During Prostate SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, B; Chopra, R; Futch, C; Bing, C; Wodzak, M; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Medin, P [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to SBRT treatments. Relevant to prostate SBRT, this work details the fabrication and testing of a 3D-printed cooling device to facilitate the investigation of the radioprotective effect of local hypothermia on the rat rectum. Methods: A 3cm long, two-channel rectal cooling device was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The water intake nozzle is connected to a 1mm diameter brass pipe from which water flows and circulates back around to the exit nozzle. Both nozzles are connected by plastic tubing to a water chiller pump. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within a rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. CBCT images from a small-animal irradiator were evaluated for imaging artifacts which could affect Monte Carlo dose calculations during treatment planning. Results: The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature (37°C) to 15°C in 10–20 minutes from device insertion. Rectal temperature was maintained at 15±3°C during active cooling. MRI thermometry tests revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device, with the desired temperature range maintained within the surrounding few millimeters. Conclusion: A 3D printed rectal cooling device was fabricated for the purpose of inducing local hypothermia in rat rectums. Rectal cooling capabilities were characterized in-vivo to facilitate an investigation of the radioprotective effect of hypothermia for late rectal

  19. SU-C-213-07: Fabrication and Testing of a 3D-Printed Small Animal Rectal Cooling Device to Evaluate Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector During Prostate SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycushko, B; Chopra, R; Futch, C; Bing, C; Wodzak, M; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Medin, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to SBRT treatments. Relevant to prostate SBRT, this work details the fabrication and testing of a 3D-printed cooling device to facilitate the investigation of the radioprotective effect of local hypothermia on the rat rectum. Methods: A 3cm long, two-channel rectal cooling device was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The water intake nozzle is connected to a 1mm diameter brass pipe from which water flows and circulates back around to the exit nozzle. Both nozzles are connected by plastic tubing to a water chiller pump. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within a rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. CBCT images from a small-animal irradiator were evaluated for imaging artifacts which could affect Monte Carlo dose calculations during treatment planning. Results: The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature (37°C) to 15°C in 10–20 minutes from device insertion. Rectal temperature was maintained at 15±3°C during active cooling. MRI thermometry tests revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device, with the desired temperature range maintained within the surrounding few millimeters. Conclusion: A 3D printed rectal cooling device was fabricated for the purpose of inducing local hypothermia in rat rectums. Rectal cooling capabilities were characterized in-vivo to facilitate an investigation of the radioprotective effect of hypothermia for late rectal

  20. Evaluation and prognosis of neonates with asphyxia treated by hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jannatdoust

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asphyxia is a perinatal accident with a high mortality rate, therapeutic hypothermia in both head or whole body was suggested as effective therapeutic methods. In this study, we compare these methods in neonates with asphyxia. Methods and Materials: 16 neonates with asphyxia in two hospitals including Alzahra(head hypothermia and Taleghani hospital (total body hypothermia went under the therapeutic hypothermia for 72 hours. Maintaining temperature controlled by several sensors precisely. Body cooling were performed on the trunk and limbs of the neonates. Temperature and vital signs controlled every 1 hour and biochemistry, and coagulation tests were performed regularly, early and late complications of patients including developmental disorders, were evaluated. Comparing two groups was performed using Chi square and Mann Whitney U test, on the software SPSS16 , p less than 0.05 was significant. Results: 16 cases with gestation age of 38 ± 2weeks were enrolled. Of 9 cases by head cooling 1 patient died and 2 patients got mild developmental disorders. Of the 7 newborns of whole body cooling trail, 3 died and 1 got minor developmental disorders and one case showed major.. Feeding time (head group 5±2 , body group 8±5 days and also discharge time (head group 15±8 days and body group 14±5 days had no significant differences . Conclusion: It seems head hypothermia method is associated with a lower mortality than the whole body method. In the above sample size, the differences were not statistically significant. Performing these procedures on larger samples could be approval.

  1. Passive hypothermia (≥35 - newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellam, Aurélie; Lode, Noëlla; Ayachi, Azzedine; Jourdain, Gilles; Dauger, Stéphane; Jones, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hypothermia initiated in the first six hours of life in term infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy reduces the risk of death and severe neurological sequelae. Our study's principal objective was to evaluate transport predictors potentially influencing arrival in NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) at a temperature ≥35-Newborns were selected for inclusion according to biological and clinical criteria before transport using passive hypothermia using a target temperature of ≥35-<36°C. Data on 120 of 126 inclusions were available for analysis. Thirty-three percent of the children arrived in NICU with the target temperature of ≥35-<36°C. The mean temperature for the whole group of infants on arrival in NICU was 35.4°C (34.3-36.5). The median age of all infants on arrival in NICU was 3h03min [2h25min-3h56min]. Three infants arrived in NICU with a temperature of <33°C and eleven with a temperature ≥37°C. Adrenaline during resuscitation was associated with a lower mean temperature on arrival in NICU. Our strategy using ≥35-<36°C passive hypothermia combined with short transport times had little effect on temperature after the arrival of Neonatal Transport Team although did reduce numbers of infants arriving in NICU in deep hypothermia. For those infants where hypothermia was discontinued in NICU our strategy facilitated re-warming. Re-adjustment to a lower target temperature to ≥34.5-<35.5°C may reduce the proportion of infants with high/normothermic temperatures.

  2. Evaluation and prognosis of neonates with asphyxia treated by hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jannatdoust

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asphyxia is a perinatal accident with a high mortality rate, therapeutic hypothermia in both head or whole body was suggested as effective therapeutic methods. In this study, we compare these methods in neonates with asphyxia.Methods and Materials: 16 neonates with asphyxia in two hospitals including Alzahra(head hypothermia and Taleghani hospital (total body hypothermia went under the therapeutic hypothermia for 72 hours. Maintaining temperature controlled by several sensors precisely. Body cooling were performed on the trunk and limbs of the neonates. Temperature and vital signs controlled every 1 hour and biochemistry, and coagulation tests were performed regularly, early and late complications of patients including developmental disorders, were evaluated. Comparing two groups was performed using Chi square and Mann Whitney U test, on the software SPSS16 , p less than 0.05 was significant.Results: 16 cases with gestation age of 38 ± 2weeks were enrolled. Of 9 cases by head cooling 1 patient died and 2 patients got mild developmental disorders. Of the 7 newborns of whole body cooling trail, 3 died and 1 got minor developmental disorders and one case showed major.. Feeding time (head group 5±2 , body group 8±5 days and also discharge time (head group 15±8 days and body group 14±5 days had no significant differences .Conclusion: It seems head hypothermia method is associated with a lower mortality than the whole body method. In the above sample size, the differences were not statistically significant. Performing these procedures on larger samples could be approval.

  3. Research and application of key technology of electric submersible plunger pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K.; Sun, Y. N.; Zheng, S.; Du, W. S.; Li, J. N.; Pei, G. Z.; Gao, Y.; Wu, N.

    2018-06-01

    Electric submersible plunger pump is a new generation of rodless oil production equipment, whose improvements and upgrades of key technologies are conducive to its large-scale application and reduce the cost and improve the efficiency. In this paper, the operating mechanism of the unit in-depth study, aimed at the problems existing in oilfield production, to propose an optimization method creatively, including the optimal design of a linear motor for submersible oil, development of new double-acting load-relief pump, embedded flexible closed-loop control technology, research and development of low-cost power cables. 90 oil wells were used on field application, the average pump inspection cycle is 608 days, the longest pump check cycle has exceeded 1037 days, the average power saving rate is 45.6%. Application results show that the new technology of optimization and upgrading can further improve the reliability and adaptability of electric submersible plunger pump, reduce the cost of investment.

  4. accidental injuries in children (physical child abuse)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-06

    Dec 6, 2016 ... are often due to minor accidental injuries. However ... In dark-skinned children, bruises may be confused with café-au-lait spots. .... A bruise should not be examined in isolation if reason- ... dren with intellectual disability, such as autism and hy- ... opmental stage, social and environmental factors includ-.

  5. Accidental injuries and cutaneous contaminations during general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that cutaneous, percutaneous, and mucous membrane exposure to patients blood and body fluids are common events during general surgical operations. Most accidental injuries were due to solid suture needle-sticks, mostly injured personnel were the primary operating surgeons, ...

  6. New Navigation Post-Processing Tools for Oceanographic Submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.; Howland, J. C.; Ferrini, V. L.; Hegrenas, O.

    2006-12-01

    We report the development of Navproc, a new set of software tools for post-processing oceanographic submersible navigation data that exploits previously reported improvements in navigation sensing and estimation (e.g. Eos Trans. AGU, 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract OS32A- 0225, 2003). The development of these tools is motivated by the need to have post-processing software that allows users to compensate for errors in vehicle navigation, recompute the vehicle position, and then save the results for use with quantitative science data (e.g. bathymetric sonar data) obtained during the mission. Navproc does not provide real-time navigation or display of data nor is it capable of high-resolution, three dimensional (3D) data display. Navproc supports the ASCII data formats employed by the vehicles of the National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Post-processing of navigation data with Navproc is comprised of three tasks. First, data is converted from the logged ASCII file to a binary Matlab file. When loaded into Matlab, each sensor has a data structure containing the time stamped data sampled at the native update rate of the sensor. An additional structure contains the real-time vehicle navigation data. Second, the data can be displayed using a Graphical User Interface (GUI), allowing users to visually inspect the quality of the data and graphically extract portions of the data. Third, users can compensate for errors in the real-time vehicle navigation. Corrections include: (i) manual filtering and median filtering of long baseline (LBL) ranges; (ii) estimation of the Doppler/gyro alignment using previously reported methodologies; and (iii) sound velocity, tide, and LBL transponder corrections. Using these corrections, the Doppler and LBL positions can be recomputed to provide improved estimates of the vehicle position compared to those computed in real-time. The data can be saved in either binary or ASCII

  7. Accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City: Still a problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accidental poisoning (AP) is a leading cause of ill – health and deaths among. Nigerian children. Reports on AP are infrequent in Nigeria. This retrospective descriptive study examined the prevailing pattern of accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City. Accidental poisonings were identified in 226 (3.3%) of the cases ...

  8. Can induced hypothermia be assured during brain MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Pia; Labrecque, Michelle; Hansen, Anne; Warfield, Simon K.; DeHart, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Until now, brain MRIs in asphyxiated neonates who are receiving therapeutic hypothermia have been performed after treatment is complete. However, there is increasing interest in utilizing early brain MRI while hypothermia is still being provided to rapidly understand the degree of brain injury and possibly refine neuroprotective strategies. This study was designed to assess whether therapeutic hypothermia can be maintained while performing a brain MRI. Twenty MRI scans were obtained in 12 asphyxiated neonates while they were treated with hypothermia. The median difference between esophageal temperature on NICU departure and return was 0.1 C (range: -0.8 to 0.8 C). We found that therapeutic hypothermia can be safely and reproducibly maintained during a brain MRI. Hypothermia treatment should not prevent obtaining an early brain MRI if clinically indicated. (orig.)

  9. Drug-Induced Hypothermia as Beneficial Treatment before and after Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming F; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypothermia is still unproven as beneficial treatment in human stroke, although in animal models, conditioning the brain with hypothermia has induced tolerance to insults. Here, we delineate the feasibility of drug-induced mild hypothermia in reducing ischemic brain damage when...... conditioning before (preconditioning) and after (postconditioning) experimental stroke. Methods: Hypothermia was induced in rats with a bolus of 6 mg/kg talipexole followed by 20 h continuous talipexole infusion of 6 mg/kg in total. Controls received similar treatment with saline. The core body temperature...... was continuously monitored. In preconditioning, hypothermia was terminated before either reversible occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60 min or global ischemia for 10 min with 2-vessel occlusion and hypotension. In postconditioning, rats experienced 60 min of MCAO before hypothermia was induced...

  10. Can induced hypothermia be assured during brain MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermark, Pia [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Montreal Children' s Hospital, Division of Newborn Medicine, Montreal, QC (Canada); Labrecque, Michelle; Hansen, Anne [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Warfield, Simon K.; DeHart, Stephanie [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Until now, brain MRIs in asphyxiated neonates who are receiving therapeutic hypothermia have been performed after treatment is complete. However, there is increasing interest in utilizing early brain MRI while hypothermia is still being provided to rapidly understand the degree of brain injury and possibly refine neuroprotective strategies. This study was designed to assess whether therapeutic hypothermia can be maintained while performing a brain MRI. Twenty MRI scans were obtained in 12 asphyxiated neonates while they were treated with hypothermia. The median difference between esophageal temperature on NICU departure and return was 0.1 C (range: -0.8 to 0.8 C). We found that therapeutic hypothermia can be safely and reproducibly maintained during a brain MRI. Hypothermia treatment should not prevent obtaining an early brain MRI if clinically indicated. (orig.)

  11. OUTCOMES in CHILDHOOD FOLLOWING THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA for NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY (HIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. PMID:27863707

  12. Outcomes in childhood following therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of risk factors on the improvement of hypothermia neonatal using fuzzy transition

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Salmani; Alireza Abadi; S. Mahmoud Taheri; Hamid Alavi Majd; Fatemeh Nayeri

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Neonatal hypothermia is a major risk factor for mortality after delivery. This study aims to identify the risk factors associated with transition in hypothermia state with new definition of hypothermia states.Methods:  Four hundred and seventy nine (479) neonates hospitalized in NICU of Valiasr in Tehran, Iran in 2005 participated in this study. The rectal temperature of neonatal was measured immediately after delivery and every 30 min afterwards, until neonates became nor...

  14. Self-Propelled Semi-Submersibles: The Next Great Threat to Regional Security and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    December.27 The FARC is also coordinating with Chinese gangs in the tri-border area of Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil .28 These gangs could... mangrove swamps in Western Colombia you can be ten feet away from where somebody‘s building a semi-submersible and never see it.‖63 D. INSPECTION OF

  15. Effects of four fungicides on nine non-target submersed macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belgers, J.D.M.; Aalderink, G.H.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the sensitivity of nine submersed macrophyte species to the fungicides chlorothalonil, pentachlorophenol, fluazinam, and carbendazim. Endpoints determined 3 weeks after the start of the treatment were based on shoot and root growth in water. Carbendazim proved not or only moderately toxic

  16. Competition between two submersed aquatic macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus and Potamogeton gramineus, across a light gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Submersed aquatic macrophyte communities, are often limited by the availability of light. Thus, they offer a unique opportunity to evaluate competition when light is the limiting resource. Competitive abilities of Potamogeton pectinatus (L.) Börner and Potamogeton gramineus L. were estimated using a...

  17. Geology of mud volcanos in the Eastern Mediterranean from combined sidescan and submersible surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitter, T.A.C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Submersible observations and seafloor mapping over areas of mud volcanism in the eastern Mediterranean Sea reveal an abundance of methane-rich fluid emissions, as well as specific seep-associated fauna (e.g. tubeworms, bivalves and chemosynthetic bacteria) and diagenetic deposits (i.e. carbonates

  18. Vaginal delivery to reduce the risk of hypothermia to newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulala, Nuli Nuryanti; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Sulistyaningsih

    2017-08-01

    The prevalence of hypothermia in the world is in the range of 8.5% to 52%, while in Indonesia it is around 47%. Hypothermia has caused 6.3% of neonatal deaths. The method in the process of giving birth determines the way to take care of the newborn. This study aims to observe the effect of the method of delivery on the hypothermia in newborn. This research has obtained an approval from the Ethics Committee of Aisyiyah University, Yogyakarta. This prospective cohort study was conducted to 74 newborns in November 2016. The research subjects were divided into the group of Caesarian section (n = 28) and the group of vaginal delivery (n = 46). Axillary temperature was measured using a digital thermometer at 1st minute, 30th minute, 60th minute, 6th hour, 12th hour and 24th hour. The average temperature difference between the caesarian section group and vaginal delivery group at the 1st minute was at 36°C vs. 36.4° C, at 30th minute at 35.7°C vs. 36.5°C, at 60th minute at 36°C vs. 36.5°C), at 6th hour at 36.2 °C vs. 36.6°C), 12th hour at 36.4°C vs. 36.7°C, and at 24th hour at 36.7°C vs. 36.8°C. The results of the study showed that vaginal delivery could reduce the risk of hypothermia by 1.5 times compared to caesarian section (ρ-value 0.004 CI 95% 1.154 to 1.880)

  19. Role of Neurotensin in Radiation-Induced Hypothermia in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    radiation-in- appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hylothemnia becaus duced hypothermia and to elucidate the mechanisms in- th mas cell stabilizer...of neurotensin an- tibody alone had no effect on body temperature. An ICV administration of the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromo- 30 3 120glycate...David Kopf Instruments. No. 320) A single cannula was in- pear to be centrally mediated (4. 5). H- stamine has been serteil aseptically into the

  20. Study on Control of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    The brain hypothermia treatment is an attractive therapy for the neurologist because of its neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients. The present paper deals with the possibility of controlling the brain and other viscera in different temperatures from the viewpoint of system control. It is theoretically attempted to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment to cool only the head but to warm the body by using the simple apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and warming blanket. For this purpose, a biothermal system concerning the temperature difference between the brain and the other thoracico-abdominal viscus is synthesized from the biothermal model of hypothermic patient. The output controllability and the asymptotic stability of the system are examined on the basis of its structure. Then, the maximum temperature difference to be realized is shown dependent on the temperature range of the apparatus and also on the maximum gain determined from the coefficient matrices A, B and C of the biothermal system. Its theoretical analysis shows the realization of difference of about 2.5°C, if there is absolutely no constraint of the temperatures of the cooling cap, muffler and blanket. It is, however, physically unavailable. Those are shown by simulation example of the optimal brain temperature regulation using a standard adult database. It is thus concluded that the surface cooling and warming apparatus do no make it possible to realize the special brain hypothermia treatment, because the brain temperature cannot be cooled lower than those of other viscera in an appropriate temperature environment. This study shows that the ever-proposed good method of clinical treatment is in principle impossible in the actual brain hypothermia treatment.

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Ng, Chee M; Dillon, Christina H; Barks, John D E; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Phenobarbital is the first-line treatment for neonatal seizures. Many neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are treated with therapeutic hypothermia, and about 40% have clinical seizures. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who undergo therapeutic hypothermia. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics, taking into account maturational changes. Level 3 neonatal ICU. Infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and suspected seizures, all treated with phenobarbital. Some of these infants also received treatment with therapeutic hypothermia. None. A retrospective cohort study of 39 infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with phenobarbital (20 were treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 19 were not). Data on phenobarbital plasma concentrations were collected in 39 subjects with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with or without therapeutic hypothermia. Using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital were developed with a total of 164 plasma concentrations. A one-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics. The clearance of phenobarbital was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age with a maturation half-life of 22.1 days. Therapeutic hypothermia did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital. Therapeutic hypothermia does not influence the clearance of phenobarbital after accounting for weight and age. Standard phenobarbital dosing is appropriate for the initial treatment of seizures in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  2. Computer code to assess accidental pollutant releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergast, M.M.; Huang, J.C.

    1980-07-01

    A computer code was developed to calculate the cumulative frequency distributions of relative concentrations of an air pollutant following an accidental release from a stack or from a building penetration such as a vent. The calculations of relative concentration are based on the Gaussian plume equations. The meteorological data used for the calculation are in the form of joint frequency distributions of wind and atmospheric stability

  3. Accidental poisoning with detomidine and butorphanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, N

    2010-09-01

    This is a case report concerning a veterinarian who spilled detomidine and butorphanol on dermatitic hands while sedating a horse. This resulted in acute poisoning from which the patient spontaneously recovered with supportive management. Veterinarians often suffer from occupational dermatitis and handle strong sedatives with no gloves while working around unpredictable animals. Thus, this group is at risk of accidental self-poisoning from this method.

  4. Variability in Glycemic Control with Temperature Transitions during Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal K. Haase

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH and continuous insulin may be at increased risk of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, particularly during temperature transitions. This study aimed to evaluate frequency of glucose excursions during each phase of TH and to characterize glycemic control patterns in relation to survival. Methods. Patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital for circulatory arrest and treated with both therapeutic hypothermia and protocol-based continuous insulin between January 2010 and June 2013 were included. Glucose measures, insulin, and temperatures were collected through 24 hours after rewarming. Results. 24 of 26 patients experienced glycemic excursions. Hyperglycemic excursions were more frequent during initiation versus remaining phases (36.3%, 4.3%, 2.5%, and 4.0%, p=0.002. Hypoglycemia occurred most often during rewarming (0%, 7.7%, 23.1%, and 3.8%, p=0.02. Patients who experienced hypoglycemia had higher insulin doses prior to rewarming (16.2 versus 2.1 units/hr, p=0.03. Glucose variation was highest during hypothermia and trended higher in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (13.38 versus 9.16, p=0.09. Frequency of excursions was also higher in nonsurvivors (32.3% versus 19.8%, p=0.045. Conclusions. Glycemic excursions are common and occur more often in nonsurvivors. Excursions differ by phase but risk of hypoglycemia is increased during rewarming.

  5. The thermoregulatory mechanism of melatonin-induced hypothermia in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenboim, I; Miara, L; Wolfenson, D

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of melatonin (Mel) in body temperature (Tb) regulation was studied in White Leghorn layers. In experiment 1, 35 hens were injected intraperitoneally with seven doses of Mel (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, or 160 mg Mel/kg body wt) dissolved in ethanol. Within 1 h, Mel had caused a dose-dependent reduction in Tb. To eliminate a possible vehicle effect, 0, 80, and 160 mg/kg body wt Mel dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was injected. NMP had no effect on Tb, with Mel again causing a dose-dependent hypothermia. In experiment 2 (n = 30), Mel injected before exposure of layers to heat reduced Tb and prevented heat-induced hyperthermia. Injection after heat stress had begun did not prevent hyperthermia. Under cold stress, Mel induced hypothermia, which was not observed in controls. In experiment 3 (n = 12), Mel injection reduced Tb and increased metatarsal and comb temperatures (but not feathered-skin temperature), respiratory rate, and evaporative water loss. Heart rate rose and then declined, and blood pressure increased 1 h after Mel injection. Heat production rose slightly during the first hour, then decreased in parallel to the Tb decline. We conclude that pharmacological doses of Mel induce hypothermia in hens by increasing nonevaporative skin heat losses and slightly increasing respiratory evaporation.

  6. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza eFaridar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is considered to improve survival with favorable neurological outcome in the case of global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. The efficacy of hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke (AIS and traumatic brain injury (TBI, however, is not well studied. Induction of TH typically requires a multimodal approach, including the use of both pharmacological agents and physical techniques. To date, clinical outcomes for patients with either AIS or TBI who received TH have yielded conflicting results; thus, no adequate therapeutic consensus has been reached. Nevertheless, it seems that by determining optimal TH parameters and also appropriate applications, cooling therapy still has the potential to become a valuable neuroprotective intervention.Among the various methods for hypothermia induction, intravascular cooling (IVC may have the most promise in the awake patient in terms of clinical outcomes. Currently, the IVC method has the capability of more rapid target temperature attainment and more precise control of temperature. However, this technique requires expertise in endovascular surgery that can preclude its application in the field and/or in most emergency settings. It is very likely that combining neuroprotective strategies will yield better outcomes than utilizing a single approach.

  7. A new microcontroller-based human brain hypothermia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidere, Metin; Ahiska, Raşit; Güler, Inan

    2005-10-01

    Many studies show that artificial hypothermia of brain in conditions of anesthesia with the rectal temperature lowered down to 33 degrees C produces pronounced prophylactic effect protecting the brain from anoxia. Out of the methods employed now in clinical practice for reducing the oxygen consumption by the cerebral tissue, the most efficacious is craniocerebral hypothermia (CCH). It is finding even more extensive application in cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, neurorenimatology and many other fields of medical practice. In this study, a microcontroller-based designed human brain hypothermia system (HBHS) is designed and constructed. The system is intended for cooling and heating the brain. HBHS consists of a thermoelectric hypothermic helmet, a control and a power unit. Helmet temperature is controlled by 8-bit PIC16F877 microcontroller which is programmed using MPLAB editor. Temperature is converted to 10-bit digital and is controlled automatically by the preset values which have been already entered in the microcontroller. Calibration is controlled and the working range is tested. Temperature of helmet is controlled between -5 and +46 degrees C by microcontroller, with the accuracy of +/-0.5 degrees C.

  8. Social evaluation of intentional, truly accidental, and negligently accidental helpers and harmers by 10-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Brandon M; Steckler, Conor M; Le, Doan T; Hamlin, J Kiley

    2017-11-01

    Whereas adults largely base their evaluations of others' actions on others' intentions, a host of research in developmental psychology suggests that younger children privilege outcome over intention, leading them to condemn accidental harm. To date, this question has been examined only with children capable of language production. In the current studies, we utilized a non-linguistic puppet show paradigm to examine the evaluation of intentional and accidental acts of helping or harming in 10-month-old infants. In Experiment 1 (n=64), infants preferred intentional over accidental helpers but accidental over intentional harmers, suggestive that by this age infants incorporate information about others' intentions into their social evaluations. In Experiment 2 (n=64), infants did not distinguish "negligently" accidental from intentional helpers or harmers, suggestive that infants may find negligent accidents somewhat intentional. In Experiment 3 (n=64), we found that infants preferred truly accidental over negligently accidental harmers, but did not reliably distinguish negligently accidental from truly accidental helpers, consistent with past work with adults and children suggestive that humans are particularly sensitive to negligently accidental harm. Together, these results imply that infants engage in intention-based social evaluation of those who help and harm accidentally, so long as those accidents do not stem from negligence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study.

  10. Glycemia in conditions of hypothermia in patients with intracranial aneurysmal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Олександрівна Дудукіна

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the proven effectiveness of hypothermia as a method of neuroprotection, the presence of significant side effects requires further development of detailed protocols of usage, especially glucose.Aim: Improving treatment outcomes of patients with subarachnoid aneurysmal hemorrhage by preventing the development of hyperglycemia during systemic hypothermia.Materials and Methods: The study involved 48 patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage of aneurysmal origin. All patients were conducted intracranial surgery - clipping aneurysms of cerebral vessels during regression of arterial vascular spasm (AVS in the systemic hypothermia prevention. Therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 29 patients with complicated disease course for 48 hours. It is evaluated the effectiveness of its own method of prevention and correction of hyperglycemia - permanent short-acting insulin before the warm saline at a dose of 2 units/hour during hypothermiaResults: During the prevention of hypothermia using methods of hyperglycemia episodes of above 10 mmol / L did not observe the rejection of a group of patients using the conventional method of correction of glycemia. Episodes of hypoglycemia do not observed in both groups of the study. Up to 48 hours of therapeutic hypothermia glucose levels remained stable, after 48 hours of hypothermia it is observed a significant increase in blood glucose that was cool termination criterion.Conclusions: Holding insulin infusion at short-acting dose of 2 units/hour during prophylactic hypothermia prevents episodes of hyperglycemia and consequently helps to maintain homeostasis. Carrying insulin infusion at short-acting dose of 2 units/hour during therapeutic hypothermia promotes stable blood glucose levels to 48 hours. After 48 hours of hypothermia in 51.72% of patients experienced a significant increase in blood glucose, which is one of the criteria for termination of cooling

  11. Remelting of Aluminium by Continuous Submersion of Rolled Scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farner, Snorre

    2000-12-01

    When remelting aluminium scrap, metal losses due to dross generation is a common problem. Reduction of these losses will give substantial economic and environmental benefits. Dross is generated when aluminium metal oxidizes and films of oxide envelope molten metal. When a cold metal object is immersed in a melt, the heat of the melt around this is transferred so rapidly into the object that a shell of melt often solidifies to the surface of the object. When scrap with low bulk density is charged to a melt, solidification of melt on the cold scrap prevents melt from entering the cavities in the bulk of the scrap, and the bulk density remains low. Thus the scrap tends to float on the melt surface. Submersion of this scrap is important to avoid oxidation and subsequent dross generation. One solution to this is to roll scrap to a strip and feed it into the melt. This system has been examined by studying feeding of a continuous, thin aluminium plate into molten aluminium. Also, the effect of lacquer was considered, as well as feeding the plate into a launder with melt flowing along the surface of the plate. An analytical, one-dimensional, steady-state model has been developed to describe the melting and the melting mechanisms. It is based on a shell solidifying on the plate surface and a gap introducing a thermal resistance 1/h{sub g} between the shell and the plate. The thermal resistance 1/h{sub l} of the boundary layer of the melt is included. Depending on these resistances, the initial temperature of the plate and the melt temperature, a shell will form, and the plate will penetrate a distance P into the melt before it melts away. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to feed aluminium plate from a coil into a melt bath at a specified velocity. The plate could be withdrawn rapidly to ''freeze'' the situation like it was below the melt surface. The penetration depth P of the plate could be measured and shell formation observed

  12. La prevención de accidentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchilla, M.

    1966-02-01

    Full Text Available Working accidents have a high moral and material impact, and are often easy to avoid, at least in about half the cases. Hence it is most important that campaigns for the reduction of these accidents should be correctly planned, so that such campaigns should not merely result in additional expense, and in a lowering of staff morale, when workers find themselves operating in an unpleasant and dangerous activity. In addition to special requirements, which may be studied in a later paper, and which must necessarily cover a very wide number of alternative cases, there are circumstances of a general nature, such as financial and moral consequences, and psychological repercussions, which influence the prevention of accidents and are the subject of this article.La notable repercusión moral y material que tienen los accidentes de trabajo y la fácil evitación de los mismos, por lo menos en la mitad de los casos, hacen sumamente importante que las campañas de prevención de accidentes estén bien orientadas y proyectadas, para evitar que se traduzcan, únicamente, en un gasto más y en una disminución de la moral del personal, al ver, éste, que está situado en medio de un ambiente desagradable y peligroso. Además de las normas particulares, que pueden ser objeto de otro trabajo posterior, y que han de ser forzosamente amplias, debido a la multiplicidad de factores que intervienen, hay, sin embargo, unas consideraciones de carácter general, tales como repercusiones económicas y morales y factores psicológicos que influyen en la prevención de accidentes y que son objeto del presente artículo.

  13. Post-hypothermia fever is associated with increased mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Hassager, Christian; Wanscher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Post-cardiac arrest fever has been associated with adverse outcome before implementation of therapeutic hypothermia (TH), however the prognostic implications of post-hypothermia fever (PHF) in the era of modern post-resuscitation care including TH has not been thoroughly investigated. The aim...

  14. Systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: outcomes of neo.nEURO.network RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simbruner, Georg; Mittal, Rashmi A; Rohlmann, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods.......Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods....

  15. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Deep Reef Habitat - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during one dive of the 2002 "Islands in the Stream - Deep Reef...

  16. vid113_0401p -- Point coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from theR/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  17. vid119_0601d -- Line coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  18. vid119_0601c-- Point coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  19. Modeling the Impacts of Suspended Sediment Concentration and Current Velocity on Submersed Vegetation in an Illinois River Pool, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    2004-01-01

    This technical note uses a modeling approach to examine the impacts of suspended sediment concentrations and current velocity on the persistence of submersed macrophytes in a shallow aquatic system...

  20. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Life on the Edge 2003: Exploring Deep Ocean Habitats - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during two of the seventeen dives of the 2003 "Life on the Edge -...

  1. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Pharmaceutical Discovery, Vision, and Bioluminescence - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during one dive of the 2002 "Islands in the Stream -...

  2. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2015-01-01

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model

  3. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly

  4. Development of regional cerebral sub-hypothermia with perfusion of hypothermic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Ji Xunming

    2007-01-01

    The neuroprotection of induced hypothermia has been investigated intensively and confirmed in animal models and it has been used clinically in many fields since the finding of sub-hypothermia can also reduce cerebral injury. However the use of hypothermia in clinics is limited by the simultaneously induced systemic complications. Recently the sub-hypothermia induced by hypothermic regional arterial perfusion is proved to be the most effective method to reach the goal, including hypothermic normal saline with no influences on whole body temperature, cardiac rhythm and blood coagulation. According to the well development, fruitful achievement in the present status of this field, the authors are surely to have the inspiration for the further investigation and development of regional cerebral sub-hypothermia with perfusion of hypothermic liquids. (authors)

  5. Proteomics in Hypothermia as Adjunctive Therapy in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammad, Moman A; Noc, Marco; Lang, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers in therapeutic hypothermia have been studied in cardiac arrest, but data on patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with therapeutic hypothermia are currently unavailable. A multiplex proximity extension assay allowed us...... patients with STEMI, randomized to hypothermia as adjunctive therapy to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or standard care with PCI only. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (0 hour), 6, 24, and 96 hours post PCI, and stored at -80°C until they were analyzed by PROSEEK Multiplex CVD and PROSEEK...... in the hypothermia group as compared with the control group. In addition, seven markers were slightly elevated in the hypothermia group (OPG, FGF21, FS, IL12B, PRL, TIM, IL6). In a prespecified subgroup analysis of anterior infarctions, two additional markers were reduced (PTX3 and SELE). In this explorative...

  6. A forgotten approach after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial ınfarction: Neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özçelik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia is defined as the reduction of body temperature to 32-34 ° C within the first 4-6 hours for neuroprotective purposes and to be maintained at this level for 12-24 hours after reaching the target temperature. Therapeutic hypothermia has been practiced since the 1940s. The aim of therapeutic hypothermia is to reduce cerebral edema, convulsive activity, metabolic demand and associated complications by providing low body heat. Therapeutic hypothermia is applied to increase life expectancy and quality of life. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, should be performed in comatose patients where initial rhythm is ventricular fibrillation and spontaneous circulation is returned. Herein, we present a 44 years old patient who had an aborted sudden cardiac death due to acute myocardial infarction and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 30 minutes and discharged after 6 days with a successful therapeutic hypothermia.

  7. Delayed minocycline but not delayed mild hypothermia protects against embolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Raza

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory reactions occurring in the brain after ischemia may contribute to secondary damage. In the present study, effects of minocycline, an anti-inflammatory agent, alone or in combination with mild hypothermia on focal embolic cerebral ischemia have been examined. Methods Focal ischemic injury was induced by embolizing a preformed clot into the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Infarction volume was measured at 48 h after the injury. Mortality was also recorded. Results Delayed administration of minocycline alone or delayed minocycline plus delayed mild hypothermia reduced the infarction volume significantly. However, delayed mild hypothermia alone was not protective and delayed mild hypothermia in combination with minocycline did not show any additive effect. Conclusions These results suggest that minocycline is beneficial in focal ischemic brain injury, and the lack of the enhanced neuroprotection may be due to the brief exposure to hypothermia.

  8. Systemic hypothermia for the treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, William Dalton; Cappuccino, Andrew; Cappuccino, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that affects approximately 12,000 patients each year in the United States. Major causes for spinal cord injury include motor vehicle accidents, sports-related injuries, and direct trauma. Moderate hypothermia has gained attention as a potential therapy due to recent experimental and clinical studies and the use of modest systemic hypothermia (MSH) in high profile case of spinal cord injury in a National Football League (NFL) player. In experimental models of spinal cord injury, moderate hypothermia has been shown to improve functional recovery and reduce overall structural damage. In a recent Phase I clinical trial, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be safe and provide some encouraging results in terms of functional recovery. This review will summarize recent preclinical data, as well as clinical findings that support the continued investigations for the use of hypothermia in severe cervical spinal cord injury.

  9. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritioff, A. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fritioff@botan.su.se; Kautsky, L. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Greger, M. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants.

  10. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritioff, A.; Kautsky, L.; Greger, M.

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants

  11. Accidental radioisotope burns - Management of late sequelae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Bipin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accidental radioisotope burns are rare. The major components of radiation injury are burns, interstitial pneumonitis, acute bone marrow suppression, acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Radiation burns, though localized in distribution, have systemic effects, and can be extremely difficult to heal, even after multiple surgeries. In a 25 year old male who sustained such trauma by accidental industrial exposure to Iridium192 the early presentation involved recurrent haematemesis, pancytopenia and bone marrow suppression. After three weeks he developed burns in contact areas in the left hand, left side of the chest, abdomen and right inguinal region. All except the inguinal wound healed spontaneously but the former became a non-healing ulcer. Pancytopenia and bone marrow depression followed. He was treated with morphine and NSAIDs, epidural buprinorphine and bupivicaine for pain relief, steroids, antibiotics followed by wound excision and reconstruction with tensor fascia lata(TFL flap. Patient had breakdown of abdominal scar later and it was excised with 0.5 cm margins up to the underlying muscle and the wound was covered by a latissimis dorsi flap. Further scar break down and recurrent ulcers occurred at different sites including left wrist, left thumb and right heel in the next two years which needed multiple surgical interventions.

  12. Medical management of accidentally exposed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, Jean-Claude [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1997-12-31

    Bone marrow aplasia is one of the main syndromes following a high dose accidental radiation exposure. Although both transfusion and bone marrow transplantation have been used with some success since the first treatments of patients, other therapeutic strategies are needed. New promising approaches of the treatment of aplasia have appeared with the development of experimental and clinical hematology. Some new trends for the treatment of the hematopoietic injury based on bone marrow transplantation rely on new sources of compatible donor cells, such as cord blood, on the selection of immature haemopoietic cells and on new transplant regimens. The hematopoietic growth factors stimulate proliferation and/or differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and possibly stem cells. Furthermore, they act on the functions of mature cells. They have now specific uses in hematology, related to their role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Some growth factors have already been used for the treatment of accidental radiation-induced aplasia and lessons have been learned from their medical management and follow-up. (author) 30 refs.

  13. Medical management of accidentally exposed individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Bone marrow aplasia is one of the main syndromes following a high dose accidental radiation exposure. Whilst transfusion and bone marrow transplantation have been used with some success starting with the first treatments of accident victims, other therapeutic strategies are needed. With the development of experimental and clinical haematology, promising new approaches to the treatment of aplasia have appeared. New trends for the treatment of haemopoietic injury based on bone marrow transplantation rely on new sources of compatible donor cells, such as cord blood, on the selection of immature haemopoietic cells and on new transplant regimens. Haemopoietic growth factors stimulate the proliferation and/or differentiation of haemopoietic progenitors and, possibly, stem cells. Furthermore, they act on the functions of mature cells. Currently, they have specific uses in haematology related to their role in the regulation of growth and in the differentiation of haemopoietic progenitor cells. Growth factors have already been used for the treatment of accidental radiation induced aplasia and lessons have been learned from their medical management and followup. (author)

  14. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Gildea, Marianne R; Scholefield, Barnaby R; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Berger, John T; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Newth, Christopher J L; Topjian, Alexis; Bennett, Kimberly S; Koch, Joshua D; Pham, Nga; Chanani, Nikhil K; Pineda, Jose A; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi J; Alten, Jeffrey; Schleien, Charles L; Goodman, Denise M; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Bhalala, Utpal S; Schwarz, Adam J; Porter, Melissa B; Shah, Samir; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Wu, Theodore; Skellett, Sophie; Thomas, Neal J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Baines, Paul B; Pappachan, John; Mathur, Mudit; Lloyd, Eric; van der Jagt, Elise W; Dobyns, Emily L; Meyer, Michael T; Sanders, Ronald C; Clark, Amy E; Dean, J Michael

    2017-01-26

    Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. In a trial conducted at 37 children's hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P=0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P=0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P=0.56). The incidences of blood-product use, infection, and serious adverse

  15. Surgery for pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta under moderate hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong-Hyup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta is a rare complication after cardiac surgery. Particularly, pseudoaneurysm due to postoperative infection in the ascending aorta requires surgical treatment with antibiotics. If a large sized pseudoaneurysm is located at the retrosternal space, then there is a very high risk of massive bleeding from rupture during performance of resternotomy. To avoid this risk, we performed femoro-femoral bypass under moderate hypothermia with transient circulatory arrest, and we report here on the successful result of this case.

  16. 21 CFR 1002.20 - Reporting of accidental radiation occurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Accidental Radiation Occurrence Reports (HFZ-240), Office of Communication, Education, and Radiation Programs, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850, and the reports and their envelopes shall be distinctly...

  17. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa; Nishimura, Hajime; Tokunaga, Sango

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  18. Motor impairment and neuronal damage following hypothermia in tropical amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daló, Nelson L; Bracho, Gustavo A; Piña-Crespo, Juan C

    2007-02-01

    Although the induction of mild to moderate cerebral hypothermia in mammals can have neuroprotective activity, some deleterious effects have been described when inducing deep hypothermia during cooling of the brain. In the spinal cord, rapid deep cooling can induce seizure activity accompanied by release of the excitatory neurotransmitters, glutamate and aspartate. We used cold-sensitive tropical amphibians as a model to determine (a) the critical temperature inside the central nervous system necessary to induce seizures during rapid cooling; (b) the survival rate during slow deep cooling of the whole animal; and (c) whether deep cooling can cause neuronal cell damage. Seizures induced by deep rapid (or=30 min) deep cooling of the whole animal (12 h at 2-3 degrees C), around 70% of animals died. Spinal reflexes were enhanced when temperatures within the spinal cord reached between 9.0 degrees C and 11.6 degrees C. A fivefold increase in blood glucose level was observed during slow deep cooling. Recovery after slow deep cooling was accompanied by motor impairment and the main histological findings were condensation of the cytoplasm and nuclear pyknosis. Severe neuronal cell damage was characterized by swelling, vacuolated cytoplasm with distended neuronal bodies. These results indicate that deep cooling can easily induce neuronal cell damage in the central nervous system of cold-sensitive animals. They also warn us to the potential sequels associated with the use of deep brain cooling as a neuroprotective strategy.

  19. Out-of-Hospital therapeutic hypothermia. A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nélida Conejo Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated therapeutic mild hypothermia improves neurological outcome of patients after suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.Other studies in animals suggest that the sooner hypothermia is started after return of spontaneous circulation, the lower neurological symptoms are suffered by patients.The aim of this work is to know the efficiency of the therapeutic moderated hipotermia after the cardiopulmonar resuscitation realized extra hospitable.Methods: We made a literature search in Medline (Pubmed, Cinahl, Cuiden, Cochrane Library and the Joanna Briggs Institute, combining mesh and free terms; and searched in the journals Circulation, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine Journal manually last year. We selected systematic reviews and randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials which had contrasted in-hospital and out-of-hospital TMH with over 18 years patients.Results: Only 5 articles met the inclusion criteria of the 35 selected: four randomized clinical trials and one nonrandomized. They were then subjected to a critical methodological evaluation (CASPe and statistic evaluation (IDIPaz.Conclusions: Pre hospital TMH is an effective and safe technique in comatose patients after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest, improving the neurological status at hospital discharge.

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  1. Infrared fibers for radiometer thermometry in hypothermia and hyperthermia treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, A.; Bowman, H.F.; Asfour, Y.; Zur, A.; Valeri, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition which results from prolonged exposure to a cold environment. Rapid and efficient heating is needed to rewarm the patient from 32-35 degrees C to normal body temperature. Hyperthermia in cancer treatment involves heating malignant tumors to 42.5-43.0 degrees C for an extended period (e.g., 30 min) in an attempt to obtain remission. Microwave or radio frequency heating is often used for rewarming in hypothermia or for temperature elevation in hyperthermia treatment. One severe problem with such heating is the accurate measurement and control of temperature in the presence of a strong electromagnetic field. For this purpose, we have developed a fiberoptic radiometer system which is based on a nonmetallic, infrared fiber probe, which can operate either in contact or noncontact mode. In preliminary investigations, the radiometer worked well in a strong microwave or radiofrequency field, with an accuracy of +/- 0.5 degrees C. This fiberoptic thermometer was used to control the surface temperature of objects within +/- 2 degrees C

  2. The effects of risk factors on the improvement of hypothermia neonatal using fuzzy transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Salmani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Neonatal hypothermia is a major risk factor for mortality after delivery. This study aims to identify the risk factors associated with transition in hypothermia state with new definition of hypothermia states.Methods:  Four hundred and seventy nine (479 neonates hospitalized in NICU of Valiasr in Tehran, Iran in 2005 participated in this study. The rectal temperature of neonatal was measured immediately after delivery and every 30 min afterwards, until neonates became normal.Results: The mean weight of neonatal was 2580±882.9 g and mean of delivery room temperature was 29.2±1.45 °C. Most of the neonatal were mild hypothermia. There were significant associations between weight of neonatal, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and Apgar score with hypothermia state (P<0.05.  Death of neonatal was related to hypothermia state.Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that a major risk factor for hypothermia was low weight of neonatal.

  3. Neonatal hypothermia and associated risk factors among newborns of southern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeClerq Steven C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal hypothermia is associated with an increased mortality risk for 28 days. There are few community-based data on specific risk factors for neonatal hypothermia. Estimates of association between neonatal hypothermia in the community and risk factors are needed to guide the design of interventions to reduce exposure. Methods A cohort of 23,240 babies in rural southern Nepal was visited at home by field workers who measured axillary temperatures for 28 days (213,316 temperature measurements. The cumulative incidence of hypothermia (defined as Results Ten percent of the babies (n = 2342 were observed with temperatures of 2500 g. Risk varied inversely along the entire weight spectrum: for every 100 g decrement hypothermia risk increased by 7.4%, 13.5% and 31.3%% for babies between 3000 g and 2500 g, 2500 g and 2000 g and Conclusions In addition to season in which the babies were born, weight is an important risk factor for hypothermia. Smaller babies are at higher relative risk of hypothermia during the warm period and do not receive the protective seasonal benefit apparent among larger babies. The need for year-round thermal care, early breastfeeding and maternal thermal care should be emphasized. Further work is needed to quantify the benefits of other simple neonatal thermal care practices.

  4. Fatal accidental inhalation of brake cleaner aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, F; Martz, W; Birngruber, C G; Dettmeyer, R B

    2018-04-23

    Brake cleaner liquid is commonly used for cleaning of engines and motor parts. The commercially available products usually contain mainly volatile organic compounds. As a consequence brake cleaner evaporates fast and almost completely from the cleaned surface. This case report presents a fatal accidental inhalation of brake cleaner liquid aerosols due to the attempted cleaning of a boat engine. A 16year old boy was found lifeless in the engine compartment of a boat engine. In close proximity to the body, the police found cleanings wipes soaked with brake cleaner as well as a pump spray bottle filled with brake cleaner. Essentially the autopsy revealed a cerebral oedema with encephalomalacia, no coagulated blood as well as increased blood and tissue fluid content of the lung. Toxicological analysis revealed brake cleaner fluid in the lung, gastric content and heart blood. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [The accidental detection of apical periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, P R

    2011-04-01

    Accidental detection of an asymptomatic apical periodontitis raises the question whether this lesion should be treated or not. Arguments favouring treatment are that the inflammation may cause pain in the future, may enlarge or may negatively affect the host's resistance. Reasons for not treating may be that treatment weakens the tooth, may cause iatrogenic damage and that treatment is expensive and burdensome for the patient and does not lead in all cases to complete healing. Scientific evidence supporting either choice, whether treating the lesion or not, is lacking. In making such decisions, therefore, personal judgments by the patient and the dentist concerning the impact on the quality of life of the patient play an important role.

  6. Is the tri-bimaximal mixing accidental?

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The Tri-bimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an "anarchical" structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry which differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain "flavor alignment" as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and sub-dominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understand the lepton mixing.

  7. Causes of accidental childhood deaths in China in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kit Yee; Yu, Xin-Wei; Lu, Jia-Peng

    2015-01-01

    -4 years in China, of which 31 633 (10.1%) were accidental. Accidental deaths contributed 7240 (4.0%) of all deaths in neonatal period, 8838 (10.5%) among all post-neonatal infant deaths, and 15 554 (31.7%) among children with 1-4 years of age. Among four tested models, the most predictive was used...

  8. Hypothermia and postconditioning after cardiopulmonary resuscitation reduce cardiac dysfunction by modulating inflammation, apoptosis and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Meybohm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest is neuroprotective, but its effect on myocardial dysfunction that is a critical issue following resuscitation is not clear. This study sought to examine whether hypothermia and the combination of hypothermia and pharmacological postconditioning are cardioprotective in a model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation following acute myocardial ischemia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty pigs (28-34 kg were subjected to cardiac arrest following left anterior descending coronary artery ischemia. After 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 2 minutes of basic life support, advanced cardiac life support was started according to the current AHA guidelines. After successful return of spontaneous circulation (n = 21, coronary perfusion was reestablished after 60 minutes of occlusion, and animals were randomized to either normothermia at 38 degrees C, hypothermia at 33 degrees C or hypothermia at 33 degrees C combined with sevoflurane (each group n = 7 for 24 hours. The effects on cardiac damage especially on inflammation, apoptosis, and remodeling were studied using cellular and molecular approaches. Five animals were sham operated. Animals treated with hypothermia had lower troponin T levels (p<0.01, reduced infarct size (34+/-7 versus 57+/-12%; p<0.05 and improved left ventricular function compared to normothermia (p<0.05. Hypothermia was associated with a reduction in: (i immune cell infiltration, (ii apoptosis, (iii IL-1beta and IL-6 mRNA up-regulation, and (iv IL-1beta protein expression (p<0.05. Moreover, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity was detected in the ischemic myocardium after treatment with mild hypothermia. Sevoflurane conferred additional protective effects although statistic significance was not reached. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothermia reduced myocardial damage and dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation possible via a reduced rate of apoptosis

  9. Recovery from near drowning and postanoxic status epilepticus with controlled hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pont, A C J M; de Jager, C P C; van den Bergh, W M; Schultz, M J

    2011-04-01

    A diver was resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to near drowning and was hypothermic on hospital arrival. During rewarming, status epilepticus occurred, previously identified as a predictor of poor outcome. The seizures responded well to treatment with antiepileptic drugs and controlled hypothermia. After six weeks, the patient had completely recovered. This case supports the hypothesis that hypothermia offers neuroprotection, even in the presence of status epilepticus. We recommend that near-drowning victims who are comatose after resuscitation for cardiac arrest be treated with controlled mild hypothermia for 12 to 24 hours.

  10. Hypothermia in Multiple Sclerosis: Beyond the Hypothalamus? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Berti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia is a rare and poorly understood complication of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We report on a 66-year-old patient currently with Secondary Progressive MS (SP-MS who developed unexplained hypothermia associated with multiple hospitalisations and we review the literature on this topic. In our case, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain failed to highlight hypothalamic disease, but spinal MRI identified a number of spinal cord lesions. Given the incidence and clinical significance of spinal involvement in MS and the hypothermic disturbances observed in high Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, we hypothesise that upper spinal cord pathology, along with hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunctions, can contribute to hypothermia.

  11. Moderate hypothermia technique for chronic implantation of a total artificial heart in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, Jamshid H; Grady, Patrick; Sinkewich, Martin; Sunagawa, Gengo; Dessoffy, Raymond; Byram, Nicole; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The benefit of whole-body hypothermia in preventing ischemic injury during cardiac surgical operations is well documented. However, application of hypothermia during in vivo total artificial heart implantation has not become widespread because of limited understanding of the proper techniques and restrictions implied by constitutional and physiological characteristics specific to each animal model. Similarly, the literature on hypothermic set-up in total artificial heart implantation has also been limited. Herein we present our experience using hypothermia in bovine models implanted with the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart.

  12. Analysis of Electric Propulsion Performance on Submersible with Motor DC, Supply Power 10260AH at Voltage 115VDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Ranu Kusuma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electric propulsion is the ship system using propulsion motor to replace performance of main engine. The application of diesel engine as propulsion system have some problems and weaknesses such as diesel engine unability to operate when submersible vessel is operating under sea. To overcome that problems in submersible vessel, alternative solution of ship propulsion is required. DC Motor can be used as this alternative solution. Submersible vessel use electric propulsion system with DC Motor because DC Motor has advantages of easy rotation setting and does not cause noise when submersible vessel is diving. This bachelor thesis will study the application of DC Motor as an electric propulsion system on submersible vessel with length 59,57 m in series and parallel circuit by simulation using MATLAB software. The simulation data obtained are rotation and torque of DC Motor. From these simulation, it can be concluded that parallel circuit rotation is greater than series circuit rotation. It caused the greater speed and lower power in parallel circuit. 

  13. Cerebral Pressure Passivity In Newborns With Encephalopathy Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinaswamy Bhavanandhan Govindan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We extended our recent modification of the power spectral estimation approach to quantify spectral coherence. We tested both the standard and the modified approaches on simulated data which showed that the modified approach was highly specific and sensitive to the coupling introduced in the simulation while the standard approach lacked these features. We also applied the modified and standard approaches to quantify the pressure passivity in 4 infants receiving therapeutic hypothermia. This was done by measuring the coupling between continuous cerebral hemoglobin differences and mean arterial blood pressure. Our results showed that the modified approach identified a lower pressure passivity index (PPI, percent time the coherence was above a predefined threshold than the standard approach ($P=0.0027$.

  14. Hypothermia in VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S; Irani, S R; Rajabally, Y A; Grubneac, A; Walters, R J; Yazaki, M; Clover, L; Vincent, A

    2008-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab)-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) is a recently described syndrome that broadens the spectrum of immunotherapy-responsive central nervous system disorders. Limbic encephalitis is typically characterised by a sub-acute onset of disorientation, amnesia and seizures, but the clinical spectrum is not yet fully defined and the syndrome could be under-diagnosed. We here describe the clinical profile of four patients with VGKC-Ab-associated LE who had intermittent, episodic hypothermia. One of the patients also described a prodrome of severe neuropathic pain preceding the development of limbic symptoms. Both of these novel symptoms responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, with concurrent amelioration of amnesia/seizures.

  15. SULEU NTP Core with Passive Reactivity Control and Enhanced Submersion Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eades, Michael J [The Ohio State University, Ohio (United States)

    2016-05-15

    In this summary, SULEU has been adapted to implement some of the latest developments of LEUNTP design efforts. These include the implementation of a rapid depletion burnable absorber to flatten the reactivity profile during operation and the addition of a lower axial reflector to help minimize the reactivity increase during the full submersion criticality accident. The purpose of this study is to show the state of current LEU-NTP designs in terms of resolving key issues such as minimizing control drum usage and resolving the full submersion criticality accident. Future work will include integrating the rapid depletion poison with other passive reactivity control devices (such as hydrogen density in the tie-tubes) and developing additional systems for mitigating the full submersion criticality accident. It is widely acknowledged that nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is an enabling technology for manned missions to Mars and other locations beyond low-Earth orbit. Without nuclear thermal propulsion, manned space travel will be severely limited by the propellant requirements of chemical propulsion and significantly longer travel times of electric propulsion. While the performance superiority of NTP is clear, its implementation has been to date unsuccessful due to the significant costs of development, implementation, and regulations associated with the heritage NTP designs. These new systems take heritage designs and experimental results and adapt them to use LEU fuel with minimum impact on the heritage system. This is done in order to ensure their continued relevance with existing NTP research efforts and enable their rapid implementation into existing NASA efforts for human Mars mission planning. Of the current baseline NTP designs being studied, this paper concerns itself with the improvement of the Superb Use of Low Enriched (SULEU) core.

  16. Thermal effects of whole head submersion in cold water on nonshivering humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Thea; Bristow, Gerald K; Steinman, Alan M; Giesbrecht, Gordon G

    2006-08-01

    This study isolated the effect of whole head submersion in cold water, on surface heat loss and body core cooling, when the confounding effect of shivering heat production was pharmacologically eliminated. Eight healthy male subjects were studied in 17 degrees C water under four conditions: the body was either insulated or uninsulated, with the head either above the water or completely submersed in each body-insulation subcondition. Shivering was abolished with buspirone (30 mg) and meperidine (2.5 mg/kg), and subjects breathed compressed air throughout all trials. Over the first 30 min of immersion, exposure of the head increased core cooling both in the body-insulated conditions (head out: 0.47 +/- 0.2 degrees C, head in: 0.77 +/- 0.2 degrees C; P body-exposed conditions (head out: 0.84 +/- 0.2 degrees C and head in: 1.17 +/- 0.5 degrees C; P body surface area) in the body-exposed conditions increased total heat loss by only 10%. In both body-exposed and body-insulated conditions, head submersion increased core cooling rate much more (average of 42%) than it increased total heat loss. This may be explained by a redistribution of blood flow in response to stimulation of thermosensitive and/or trigeminal receptors in the scalp, neck and face, where a given amount of heat loss would have a greater cooling effect on a smaller perfused body mass. In 17 degrees C water, the head does not contribute relatively more than the rest of the body to surface heat loss; however, a cold-induced reduction of perfused body mass may allow this small increase in heat loss to cause a relatively larger cooling of the body core.

  17. Study on global performances and mooring-induced damping of a semi-submersible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning; Zhao, Wen-hua; Kou, Yu-feng

    2016-10-01

    The harsh environmental conditions bring strong nonlinearities to the hydrodynamic performances of the offshore floating platforms, which challenge the reliable prediction of the platform coupled with the mooring system. The present study investigates a typical semi-submersible under both the operational and the survival conditions through numerical and experimental methods. The motion responses, the mooring line tensions, and the wave loads on the longitudinal mid-section are investigated by both the fully non-linearly coupled numerical simulation and the physical experiment. Particularly, in the physical model test, the wave loads distributed on the semi-submersible's mid-section were measured by dividing the model into two parts, namely the port and the starboard parts, which were rigidly connected by three six-component force transducers. It is concluded that both the numerical and physical model can have good prediction of the semi-submersible's global responses. In addition, an improved numerical approach is proposed for the estimation of the mooring-induced damping, and is validated by both the experimental and the published results. The characteristics of the mooring-induced damping are further summarized in various sea states, including the operational and the survival environments. In order to obtain the better prediction of the system response in deep water, the mooring-induced damping of the truncated mooring lines applied in the physical experiment are compensated by comparing with those in full length. Furthermore, the upstream taut and the downstream slack mooring lines are classified and investigated to obtain the different mooring line damping performances in the comparative study.

  18. Mild hypothermia as a treatment for central nervous system injuries: Positive or negative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazeh, Rami; Yan, Yi

    2013-10-05

    Besides local neuronal damage caused by the primary insult, central nervous system injuries may secondarily cause a progressive cascade of related events including brain edema, ischemia, oxida-tive stress, excitotoxicity, and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. Hypothermia is a beneficial strategy in a variety of acute central nervous system injuries. Mild hypothermia can treat high intra-cranial pressure following traumatic brain injuries in adults. It is a new treatment that increases sur-vival and quality of life for patients suffering from ischemic insults such as cardiac arrest, stroke, and neurogenic fever following brain trauma. Therapeutic hypothermia decreases free radical produc-tion, inflammation, excitotoxicity and intracranial pressure, and improves cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury and cerebral ischemia, thus protecting against central nervous system dam-age. Although a series of pathological and physiological changes as well as potential side effects are observed during hypothermia treatment, it remains a potential therapeutic strategy for central nervous system injuries and deserves further study.

  19. Hypothermia and acute alcohol intoxication in Dutch adolescents : The relationship between core and outdoor temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Claire J.; Van Hoof, Joris J.; van der Lely, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypothermia and its potential association with core and outdoor temperatures in adolescents suffering from acute alcohol intoxication. Methods: Data were derived from the Dutch Pediatric Surveillance System, which monitors alcohol intoxication among all Dutch adolescents.

  20. Induced hypothermia in patients with septic shock and respiratory failure (CASS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Johansen, Maria Egede; Bestle, Morten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models of serious infection suggest that 24 h of induced hypothermia improves circulatory and respiratory function and reduces mortality. We tested the hypothesis that a reduction of core temperature to 32-34°C attenuates organ dysfunction and reduces mortality in ventilator...... h of induced hypothermia (target 32-34°C) followed by 48 h of normothermia (36-38°C). The primary endpoint was 30 day all-cause mortality in the modified intention-to-treat population (all randomly allocated patients except those for whom consent was withdrawn or who were discovered to meet....... FINDINGS: Between Nov 1, 2011, and Nov 4, 2016, we screened 5695 patients. After recruitment of 436 of the planned 560 participants, the trial was terminated for futility (220 [50%] randomly allocated to hypothermia and 216 [50%] to routine thermal management). In the hypothermia group, 96 (44·2%) of 217...

  1. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial

  2. Preliminary Study on the Oxygen Consumption Dynamics During Brain Hypothermia Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ji, Yan

    2001-01-01

    .... Two cooling approaches (the surface cooling and volumetric cooling are applied to analyze the effect of hypothermia on the transient temperature and the oxygen consumption rate in different regions of brain...

  3. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia......=0.01. No significant differences were found in long-term survival (57% vs. 56% alive at 30 months), MMSE, or SF-36. Therapeutic hypothermia (hazard ratio: 0.15, p=0.007) and bystander CPR (hazard ratio 0.19, p=0.002) were significantly related to survival in the intervention period. CONCLUSION: CPC...... at discharge from hospital was significantly improved following implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients resuscitated from OCHA with VF/VT. However, significant improvement in survival, cognitive status or quality of life could not be detected at long-term follow-up....

  4. The pathways by which mild hypothermia inhibits neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that mild hypothermia exhibits a neuroprotective role and it can inhibit endothelial cell apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury by decreasing casp-ase-3 expression. It is hypothesized that mild hypothermia exhibits neuroprotective effects on neurons exposed to ischemia/reperfusion condition produced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. Mild hypothermia significantly reduced the number of apoptotic neurons, decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, with the peak of anti-apoptotic effect appearing between 6 and 12 hours after the injury. These findings indicate that mild hypothermia inhibits neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury by protecting the mitochondria and that the effective time window is 6-12 hours after ischemia/reperfusion injury

  5. Cytokine changes in newborns with therapeutic hypothermia after hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C J; Youn, Y A; Yum, S K; Sung, I K

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to examine changes in cytokines according to therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for newborn hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We studied 20 neonates who were admitted with a diagnosis of HIE in the neonatal intensive care unit. Cytokine concentration assay was carried out for neonates (n=12) who received TH and neonates (n=8) who were not treated with hypothermia by collecting blood sample at 12, 48 and 120 h after birth. At 48 h after birth, interleukin (IL)-6 in the normothermia group was higher than that in the hypothermia group (P=0.010). At 48 h after birth, IL-10 was higher in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (P=0.038). This study confirmed that TH performs a role in the prevention of inflammatory process by way of maintaining proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 at low levels and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 at high levels.

  6. Donor dopamine treatment limits pulmonary oedema and inflammation in lung allografts subjected to prolonged hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanusch, Christine; Nowak, Kai; Toerlitz, Patrizia; Gill, Ishar S.; Song, Hui; Rafat, Neysan; Brinkkoetter, Paul T.; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Van Ackern, Klaus C.; Yard, Benito A.; Beck, Grietje C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Endothelial barrier dysfunction severely compromises organ function after reperfusion. Because dopamine pretreatment improves hypothermia mediated barrier dysfunction, we tested the hypothesis that dopamine treatment of lung allografts positively affects tissue damage associated with

  7. Mild hypothermia for refractory focal status epilepticus in an infant with hemimegalencephaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, Jan Willem; van der Naalt, Joukje; Fock, Johanna Maria

    Hypothermia can reduce seizure frequency in animal models of status epilepticus, and its effectiveness in human status epilepticus has been reported occasionally. We report an infant with hemimegalencephaly who presented with generalized status epilepticus. After high dose intravenous drug therapy,

  8. "Cool" Topic: Feeding During Moderate Hypothermia After Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobak, Stephanie; Rincon, Fred

    2017-09-01

    Therapeutic moderate hypothermia (MH; T core 33°C-34°C) is being studied for treatment of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Nutrition assessment begins with accurate basal metabolic rate (BMR) determination. Although early enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved outcomes, it is often deferred until rewarming. We sought to determine the accuracy of predictive BMR equations and the safety and tolerance of EN during MH after ICH. Patients were randomized to 72 hours of MH or normothermia (NT; T core 36°C-37°C). Harris-Benedict (BMR-HB) and Penn-State equation (BMR-PS) calculations were compared with indirect calorimetry (IC) at day (D) 0 and D1-3. Patients with MH received trophic semi-elemental gastric EN. Occurrences of feeding intolerance, gastrointestinal (GI)-related adverse events, and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were analyzed with a double-sided matched pairs t test. Thirteen patients with ICH participated (6 MH, 7 NT). Mean time to initiate EN: 29.9 (MH) vs 18.4 (NT) hours ( P = .046). Average daily EN calories received D0-3: 398 (MH) vs 1006 (NT) ( P BMR-HB remained stable (1331 kcal), BMR-PS decreased (1511 vs 1145 kcal, P = .5), and IC decreased (1413 vs 985 kcal, P = .2). In patients with ICH undergoing MH, resting energy expenditure is decreased and predictive equations overestimate BMR. EN is feasible, although delayed EN initiation, high gastric residuals, and less EN provision are common. Future studies should focus on EN initiation within 24 hours, advanced EN rates, and postpyloric feeds during hypothermia.

  9. Angiogenesis dysregulation in term asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Shaikh

    Full Text Available Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns.This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns.Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns.Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns.These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery.

  10. Biomarkers of brain injury in neonatal encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, An N; Chang, Taeun; Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Scafidi, Joseph; Glass, Penny; McCarter, Robert; Baumgart, Stephen; Vezina, Gilbert; Nelson, Karin B

    2012-09-01

    To determine if early serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels are associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in newborns with encephalopathy. Patients who received therapeutic whole-body hypothermia were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. Serum specimens were collected at 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of cooling. S100B and NSE levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in surviving infants at 7-10 days of life. Standardized neurologic examination was performed by a child neurologist at 14 days of life. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between S100B and NSE levels and unfavorable outcome (death or severe magnetic resonance imaging injury/significant neurologic deficit). Cutoff values were determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Newborns with moderate to severe encephalopathy were enrolled (n = 75). Median pH at presentation was 6.9 (range, 6.5-7.35), and median Apgar scores of 1 at 1 minute, 3 at 5 minutes, and 5 at 10 minutes. NSE and S100B levels were higher in patients with unfavorable outcomes across all time points. These results remained statistically significant after controlling for covariables, including encephalopathy grade at presentation, Apgar score at 5 minutes of life, initial pH, and clinical seizures. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in encephalopathic newborns. These brain-specific proteins may be useful immediate biomarkers of cerebral injury severity. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiogenesis Dysregulation in Term Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Henna; Boudes, Elodie; Khoja, Zehra; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns. Design/Methods Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns. Results Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns. Conclusions These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery. PMID:25996847

  12. INTENSITY SETTER FOR A DEVICE OF SMOOTH START OF SUBMERSIBLE PUMP ELECTRIC MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Lobov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of an intensity setter, which in a rational law changes the opening thyristor the voltage regulator and effectively to changing power supply voltage stator windings of the electric pump deepening, ensuring a smooth start in a wide range. Methodology. Electric submersible pump belongs to the small inertia electric, since it is not significant total moment of inertia, not exceeding two moments of inertia of the motor and static moment on the shaft does not exceed forty percent of the nominal torque. For technical requirements that electric acceleration time should have no less than twenty seconds or more. Office starting modes of electric submersible pumps economically justified using thyristor voltage regulator by forming the dial changes the intensity of the necessary legislation in time voltage feeding the stator windings. This ensures a smooth start right rotor of the electric submersible pump. Results. A block diagram of the intensity setter that is: with control unit, two units that form the exponential voltage supply emitter follower and regulatory elements. The mathematical expressions for voltage at the stator windings of the motor, changing exponentially, opening the angle of thyristor power unit thyristor the voltage regulator, which is determined through the initial angle of opening. Provided formula for pick-up voltage and minimum voltage, time constants, which are determined from the basic equations of motion and mechanical characteristics of the electric motor. Analytical investigated by the voltage dependence violation by changing the time constant flowing and growing exhibitor supply voltage stator electric circuit deepening pump. Originality. Proposed in the initial time on the stator windings of the electric pick-up voltage is applied. Under the influence of this voltage, motor rotor begins to accelerate. At the same time, pick-up voltage decreases the minimum startup voltage varies exponentially in which

  13. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from prima...... prolonged the current generation and increased the power density by 7 and 1.5 times, respectively, in comparison with raw primary sludge. These findings suggest that energy recovery from primary sludge can be maximized using an advanced MFC system with optimum conditions....

  14. Innovative self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC) for biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC), in which a specially designed anode chamber and external electricity supply were not needed, was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. In batch experiments, the hydrogen production rate reached 17.8 m...... improvement of voltage output and reduction of electron losses were essential for efficient hydrogen generation. In addition, alternate exchanging the electricity-assisting and hydrogen-producing function between the two cell units of the SMEC was found to be an effective approach to inhibit methanogens...

  15. Hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: NICHD Neonatal Research Network contribution to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Seetha; Natarajan, Girija; Chalak, Lina; Pappas, Athina; McDonald, Scott A; Laptook, Abbot R

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we summarize the NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) trial of whole-body hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in relation to other randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of hypothermia neuroprotection. We describe the NRN secondary studies that have been published in the past 10 years evaluating clinical, genetic, biochemical, and imaging biomarkers of outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain hypothermia therapy for childhood acute encephalopathy based on clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    IMATAKA, GEORGE; ARISAKA, OSAMU

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported on the effectiveness of brain hypothermia therapy in childhood acute encephalopathy, additional studies in this field are necessary. In this review, we discussed brain hypothermia therapy methods for two clinical conditions for which sufficient evidences are currently available in the literature. The first condition is known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and occurs in newborns and the second condition is acute encephalopathy which occurs in adults ...

  17. The Artificial, the Accidental, the Aesthetic…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Koltick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available How do we define, discuss or assess aesthetics within a contemporary philosophical framework? The indefiniteness that accompanies attempts to formalize a definition of the aesthetic is a primary focus of this paper. This lack of a definition has occupied philosophers for hundreds of years in attempts to delineate the boundaries of an elusively formless concept. This formlessness speaks to the incredibly evasive character of such a pervasive feature recognized in both natural and artificial systems, agents and artefacts. With the rapid growth of artificially intelligent systems and an astounding diversity in computational creativity, in what ways may we approach aesthetics? How is the aesthetic recognized, determined and produced? This paper seeks to critically engage issues of non-human agency, inter-object relations, and aesthetic theory in relation to computational entities and autonomous systems. The ability of these systems to operate outside of human cognitive limitations including thought patterns and constructions which may preclude alternative aesthetic outcomes, afford them in some ways limitless potential in relation to aesthetics. The designation of the accidental or provisional is utilized as an alternative approach to the production and assessment of aesthetic occurrences of the non-human.

  18. Dose assessment under incidental and accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Dose assessment for the licesing process of a nuclear power plant covers the routine release of radioactive substances into the atmosphere as well as releases due to incidents. Source terms for these incidents are evaluated by the detailed incident analysis of the plant. The types of incidents to be covered are determined in the FRG by the ''Stoerfall-Leitlinien'' of the Ministry of the Interior. The calculation of dose equivalents in the environment of the plant differs from the calculation of doses due to routine releases, as incidents are single events occuring at undeterminate time, and the results must be conservative. Some details are being described. During the operation of the plant it is essential to measure not only the radioactivity release rates but also the necessary meteorological parameters for the instantaneous determination of the atmospheric dispersion in case of incidental or accidental releases of radioactivity. This instantaneous assessment assists in taking measurements of ground contamination and in deciding about countermeasures for the protection of plant personnell and population. (author) [pt

  19. Accidental hydroxychloroquine overdose resulting in neurotoxic vestibulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Peter B; Werth, Victoria P

    2017-04-12

    Hydroxychloroquine is an oral antimalarial medication commonly used off-label for a variety of rheumatological conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and dermatomyositis. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with acute onset headache, bilateral tinnitus, and left-sided facial numbness and tingling in the setting of accidentally overdosing on hydroxychloroquine. By the next morning, the patient began to experience worsening in the tingling sensation and it eventually spread to her left arm, thigh and distal extremities. The patient also complained of new onset blurring of her peripheral vision and feeling 'off balance.' Despite a complete neurological and ophthalmological work-up with unremarkable imaging and blood work, the patient has had no improvement in her tinnitus, left-sided paresthesias, visual disturbance or ataxia. This is a unique case of hydroxychloroquine overdose resulting in permanent neurotoxic vestibulopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Quick management of accidental tritium exposure cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V. P.; Badiger, N. M.; Managanvi, S. S.; Bhat, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    Removal half-life (RHL) of tritium is one of the best means for optimising medical treatment, reduction of committed effective dose (CED) and quick/easy handling of a large group of workers for medical treatment reference. The removal of tritium from the body depends on age, temperature, relative humidity and daily rainfall; so tritium removal rate, its follow-up and proper data analysis and recording are the best techniques for management of accidental acute tritium exposed cases. The decision of referring for medical treatment or medical intervention (MI) would be based on workers' tritium RHL history taken from their bodies at the facilities. The workers with tritium intake up to 1 ALI shall not be considered for medical treatment as it is a derived limit of annual total effective dose. The short-term MI may be considered for tritium intake of 1-10 ALI; however, if the results show intake ≥100 ALI, extended strong medical/therapeutic intervention may be recommended based on the severity of exposure for maximum CED reduction requirements and annual total effective dose limit. The methodology is very useful for pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) which are mainly operated by Canada and India and future fusion reactor technologies. Proper management will optimise the cases for medical treatment and enhance public acceptance of nuclear fission and fusion reactor technologies. (authors)

  1. Quick management of accidental tritium exposure cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Badiger, N M; Managanvi, S S; Bhat, H R

    2012-07-01

    Removal half-life (RHL) of tritium is one of the best means for optimising medical treatment, reduction of committed effective dose (CED) and quick/easy handling of a large group of workers for medical treatment reference. The removal of tritium from the body depends on age, temperature, relative humidity and daily rainfall; so tritium removal rate, its follow-up and proper data analysis and recording are the best techniques for management of accidental acute tritium exposed cases. The decision of referring for medical treatment or medical intervention (MI) would be based on workers' tritium RHL history taken from their bodies at the facilities. The workers with tritium intake up to 1 ALI shall not be considered for medical treatment as it is a derived limit of annual total effective dose. The short-term MI may be considered for tritium intake of 1-10 ALI; however, if the results show intake ≥100 ALI, extended strong medical/therapeutic intervention may be recommended based on the severity of exposure for maximum CED reduction requirements and annual total effective dose limit. The methodology is very useful for pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) which are mainly operated by Canada and India and future fusion reactor technologies. Proper management will optimise the cases for medical treatment and enhance public acceptance of nuclear fission and fusion reactor technologies.

  2. Static and mobile networks design for atmospheric accidental releases monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abida, R.

    2010-01-01

    The global context of my PhD thesis work is the optimization of air pollution monitoring networks, but more specifically it concerns the monitoring of accidental releases of radionuclides in air. The optimization problem of air quality measuring networks has been addresses in the literature. However, it has not been addresses in the context of surveillance of accidental atmospheric releases. The first part of my thesis addresses the optimization of a permanent network of monitoring of radioactive aerosols in the air, covering France. The second part concerns the problem of targeting of observations in case of an accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear plant. (author)

  3. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Oxidative Damage and Alters Antioxidant Defenses after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Fernanda S.; Medeiros, Tássia M.; Heemann, Fernanda M.; Behling, Camile S.; Putti, Jordana S.; Mahl, Camila D.; Verona, Cleber; da Silva, Ana Carolina A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Gonçalves, Carlos A. S.; Oliveira, Vanessa M.; Riveiro, Diego F. M.; Vieira, Silvia R. R.

    2017-01-01

    After cardiac arrest, organ damage consequent to ischemia-reperfusion has been attributed to oxidative stress. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has been applied to reduce this damage, and it may reduce oxidative damage as well. This study aimed to compare oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in patients treated with controlled normothermia versus mild therapeutic hypothermia during postcardiac arrest syndrome. The sample consisted of 31 patients under controlled normothermia (36°C) and 11 patients treated with 24 h mild therapeutic hypothermia (33°C), victims of in- or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Parameters were assessed at 6, 12, 36, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in the central venous blood samples. Hypothermic and normothermic patients had similar S100B levels, a biomarker of brain injury. Xanthine oxidase activity is similar between hypothermic and normothermic patients; however, it decreases posthypothermia treatment. Xanthine oxidase activity is positively correlated with lactate and S100B and inversely correlated with pH, calcium, and sodium levels. Hypothermia reduces malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, markers of oxidative damage. Concomitantly, hypothermia increases the activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase while decreasing the activity of serum paraoxonase-1. These findings suggest that mild therapeutic hypothermia reduces oxidative damage and alters antioxidant defenses in postcardiac arrest patients. PMID:28553435

  4. A study of cerebral circulation in patients on moderate hypothermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Kushida, Tsuyoshi; Nagao, Takeki; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Iekado

    2003-01-01

    Recently, moderate hypothermia with cooling of the brain to 32-33 deg C has been widely applied to patients with severe brain damage. We evaluated the cerebral circulation of patients treated with moderate hypothermia therapy. In 16 patients with severe brain damage, both Xe-CT and Perfusion CT were performed during moderate hypothermia. The study included 5 head injury patients, 6 anoxic brain patients, 2 subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, 2 cerebral embolization patients and 1 cerebral hemorrhage patient. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) values using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT) by Perfusion CT and calculated cerebral blood volume (CBV) using an AZ-7000W98 computer system. In 16 patients, moderate hypothermia decreased both CBF (21.4±14.0 ml/100 g/min) and CBV (3.4±2.9 ml/100 g) and increased MTT (9.6±l.9 sec) compared to normal volunteers. However, patients who became brain death during moderate hypothermia maintained high levels of CBF and CBV. Based on the present results, we propose that reduction of CBV and CBF by moderate hypothermia can play important role in protecting brain from damage. (author)

  5. Maintenance of whole-body therapeutic hypothermia during patient transport and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tai-Wei; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Seri, Istvan; Grimm, John; Bluml, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become standard treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), with brain MRI commonly performed after the child has been rewarmed. However, early imaging during hypothermia might provide information important in designing clinical trials that refine and personalize therapeutic hypothermia. We tested a protocol to ensure safety and maintenance of hypothermia during in-hospital transport and MRI. MRI during therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 13 newborns on the 2nd-3rd postnatal days. Mean one-way transport time was 20.0 ± 3.3 min. Mean rectal temperatures ( C) leaving the unit, upon arrival at the MR suite, during MRI scan and upon return to the unit were 33.5 ± 0.3 C, 33.3 ± 0.3 C, 33.1 ± 0.4 C and 33.4 ± 0.3 C, respectively. Using our protocol therapeutic hypothermia was safely and effectively continued during in-hospital transport and MRI without adverse effects. (orig.)

  6. Maintenance of whole-body therapeutic hypothermia during patient transport and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tai-Wei; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Seri, Istvan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Center for Fetal and Neonatal Medicine and the USC Division of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Grimm, John; Bluml, Stefan [University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become standard treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), with brain MRI commonly performed after the child has been rewarmed. However, early imaging during hypothermia might provide information important in designing clinical trials that refine and personalize therapeutic hypothermia. We tested a protocol to ensure safety and maintenance of hypothermia during in-hospital transport and MRI. MRI during therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 13 newborns on the 2nd-3rd postnatal days. Mean one-way transport time was 20.0 ± 3.3 min. Mean rectal temperatures ( C) leaving the unit, upon arrival at the MR suite, during MRI scan and upon return to the unit were 33.5 ± 0.3 C, 33.3 ± 0.3 C, 33.1 ± 0.4 C and 33.4 ± 0.3 C, respectively. Using our protocol therapeutic hypothermia was safely and effectively continued during in-hospital transport and MRI without adverse effects. (orig.)

  7. Mild Hypothermia May Offer Some Improvement to Patients with MODS after CPB Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To summarize the effect of mild hypothermia on function of the organs in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Methods: The patients were randomly divided into two groups, northermia group (n=71 and hypothermia group (n=89. We immediately began cooling the hypothermia group when test results showed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, meanwhile all patients of two groups were drawn blood to test blood gas, liver and kidney function, blood coagulation function, and evaluated the cardiac function using echocardiography from 12 to 36 hours. We compared the difference of intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation rate and mortality within one month after intensive care unit admission. Results: Among the 160 patients, 36 died, 10 (11.24% patients were from the hypothermia group and 26 (36.6% from the northermia group (P 0.05. But the platelet count has significantly difference between the two groups at the 36th hour (P <0.05. The aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and creatinine were improved significantly in the hypothermia group, and they were significantly better than the northermia group (P <0.05. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia is feasible and safe for patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

  8. [Assessment of therapeutic passive hypothermia in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy that need interhospital transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Ruiz, José A; Lagares-Franco, Carolina; Rodríguez-Molina, Óscar; Cordero-Cañas, Enrique; Benavente-Fernández, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    Induced hypothermia for the first hours of life in a newborn is an effective treatment to reduce mortality and serious effects in neonates that had suffered a hypoxia episode. This method needs an universal attendance independently of the place of birth being usually necessary a transfer to the reference hospital. To analyze the efficacy of the newborn with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy transfer in passive hypothermia. Descriptive study of series of cases with retrospective character of newborn from Cadiz's province that need induced hypothermia. 46 newborn were included in the study: 33 of them (71.74%) needed being transfer by the Critical Patients Transport service (CPT group), the rest (28.26%) were born into the reference hospital. Both groups are similar in age gestational at birth, sex, weight and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy degree. It analyzed variables related to hypothermia therapy and in addition in CPT group transfer specific variables. At discharge, it does not exist significant differences between groups in the efficiency-consequence of neuroprotection therapy with hypothermia (p = 0.159). It does not find complications derived from the interhospital move. Neonatal inter-hospital transfer in passive therapeutic hypothermia is effective, safe and necessary for the therapy compliance. It is required reach an agreement between the attendance and the reference service, setting up guides for the support and suitable range of temperature.

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia in the prevention of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy: new categories to be enrolled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancia, Paolo; Pomero, Giulia

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is now the standard of care for brain injury control in term infants with perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Accumulated evidence shows a reduction in mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental disability at 12-24 months of age, with more favourable effects in the less severe forms of HIE. Only few trials recruited newborns encephalopathy with base deficit (BD) newborns with stroke. Preterm HIE: Therapeutic hypothermia shows a good safety profile in clinical studies, and no adverse effects were noted in the preterm fetal animal model. Recently, it has been shown that mild hypothermia in preterm newborns with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) does not increase mortality, bleeding, infection, or need for inotropes in cooled newborns. A pilot study (NCT00620711) is currently recruiting newborns of > 32 but newborn. In a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies of focal cerebral ischemia, hypothermia reduced the infarct size by 44%. No specific neuroprotective interventions are available for the management of acute perinatal stroke. Hypothermia may decrease seizures in newborns with encephalopathy and a focal infarct, potentially improving the long-term outcome for these infants. Future studies of therapeutic hypothermia should include the categories of newborns excluded from the published clinical trials, that is infants encephalopathy not imputable to HIE. New entry criteria will allow significant number of newborns to benefit from the treatment.

  10. An unusual case of hypothermia associated with therapeutic doses of olanzapine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Shiroma L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of a 42-year-old man who had symptomatic hypothermia as a result of taking olanzapine for paranoid schizophrenia. According to published data, only a few cases of hypothermia associated with olanzapine have been reported since its introduction into clinical use. Case presentation A 42-year-old Sri Lankan man with schizophrenia who was being treated with a therapeutic dose of olanzapine presented with reduced level of consciousness. He had a core temperature of 32°C and was bradycardic. At the time of admission, the electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with J waves. He did not have any risk factors for developing hypothermia except the use of olanzapine. There was improvement in his clinical condition with reversal of electrocardiogram changes following gradual rewarming and the omission of olanzapine. Conclusion Hypothermia induced by antipsychotic medications is not uncommon, but olanzapine-induced hypothermia is rare and occurrence has been reported during initiation or increasing the dose. But here the patient developed hypothermia without dose adjustment.

  11. Twenty-four hours hypothermia has temporary efficacy in reducing brain infarction and inflammation in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Buga, Ana Maria; Balseanu, Adrian Tudor

    2016-01-01

    in aged animals. Because the duration of hypothermia in most clinical trials is between 24 and 48 hours, we questioned whether 24 hours exposure to gaseous hypothermia confers the same neuroprotective efficacy as 48 hours exposure. We found that a shorter exposure to hypothermia transiently reduced both...... inflammation and infarct size. However, after 1 week, the infarct size became even larger than in controls and after 2 weeks there was no beneficial effect on regenerative processes such as neurogenesis. Behaviorally, hypothermia also had a limited beneficial effect. Finally, after hydrogen sulfide......-induced hypothermia, the poststroke aged rats experienced a persistent sleep impairment during their active nocturnal period. Our data suggest that cellular events that are delayed by hypothermia in aged rats may, in the long term, rebound, and diminish the beneficial effects....

  12. A Hydraulic Motor-Alternator System for Ocean-Submersible Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aintablian, Harry O.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Jones, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    An ocean-submersible vehicle has been developed at JPL that moves back and forth between sea level and a depth of a few hundred meters. A liquid volumetric change at a pressure of 70 bars is created by means of thermal phase change. During vehicle ascent, the phase-change material (PCM) is melted by the circulation of warm water and thus pressure is increased. During vehicle descent, the PCM is cooled resulting in reduced pressure. This pressure change is used to generate electric power by means of a hydraulic pump that drives a permanent magnet (PM) alternator. The output energy of the alternator is stored in a rechargeable battery that powers an on-board computer, instrumentation and other peripherals.The focus of this paper is the performance evaluation of a specific hydraulic motor-alternator system. Experimental and theoretical efficiency data of the hydraulic motor and the alternator are presented. The results are used to evaluate the optimization of the hydraulic motor-alternator system. The integrated submersible vehicle was successfully operated in the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. A brief overview of the actual test results is presented.

  13. Mitigating with macrophytes: submersed plants reduce the toxicity of pesticide-contaminated water to zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2013-03-01

    In ecotoxicology, appreciation is growing for the influence that ecological interactions have on the toxicity of contaminants, such as insecticides, to sensitive species. Most previous studies, however, have focused on factors that exacerbate insecticide effects on species, while factors that may mitigate these effects have been relatively ignored. In aquatic habitats, a small number of studies have shown that submersed macrophytes can remove some insecticides from the water column via sorption. Although examining sorption dynamics is important for understanding the environmental fate of insecticides, whether and to what extent macrophytes actually mitigate insecticide effects on aquatic species remains unknown. In the present study, the authors examined how much and how quickly several realistic densities of the macrophyte Elodea canadensis decreased the toxicity of the insecticide malathion to Daphnia magna, a keystone aquatic herbivore. To do this, the authors quantified Daphnia survival in outdoor test systems (0.95 L) exposed to a factorial combination of five Elodea densities crossed with five malathion concentrations. The authors discovered that malathion's lethality to Daphnia decreased with increasing Elodea density. Furthermore, the rate at which Elodea reduced malathion's toxicity in the water column increased with macrophyte density. These results provide strong evidence that submersed macrophytes can mitigate the ecological impacts of a popular insecticide and further support that ecological interactions can strongly influence contaminant environmental effects. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  14. Submersible pumps: Energetic efficiency norm; Bombas sumergibles: norma de eficiencia energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Torres, R. A.; Buendia Dominguez, E. H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), supporting the Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), has prepared a preliminary project of the norm of energy efficiency for submersible pumps. This document has complied with the necessary formalities for the emission of the norm. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the submersible pumps, the energy savings, as well as the economic evaluation that sustains the norm project, additionally pointing out the environmental impact that will bring along the implantation of the same. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), apoyando a la Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), ha elaborado el anteproyecto de norma de eficiencia energetica para bombas sumergibles. Dicho documento ha cumplido con los tramites necesarios para la emision de una norma. En el presente articulo se mencionan los resultados del analisis de las bombas sumergibles, los ahorros energeticos, asi como la evaluacion economica que sustenta el proyecto de norma, indicandose ademas el impacto ambiental que tendra la implantacion de la misma.

  15. Submersible pumps: Energetic efficiency norm; Bombas sumergibles: norma de eficiencia energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Torres, R A; Buendia Dominguez, E H [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), supporting the Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), has prepared a preliminary project of the norm of energy efficiency for submersible pumps. This document has complied with the necessary formalities for the emission of the norm. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the submersible pumps, the energy savings, as well as the economic evaluation that sustains the norm project, additionally pointing out the environmental impact that will bring along the implantation of the same. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), apoyando a la Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), ha elaborado el anteproyecto de norma de eficiencia energetica para bombas sumergibles. Dicho documento ha cumplido con los tramites necesarios para la emision de una norma. En el presente articulo se mencionan los resultados del analisis de las bombas sumergibles, los ahorros energeticos, asi como la evaluacion economica que sustenta el proyecto de norma, indicandose ademas el impacto ambiental que tendra la implantacion de la misma.

  16. In Situ Detection of Macronutrients and Chloride in Seawater by Submersible Electrochemical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston; Cherubini, Thomas; Pankratova, Nadezda; Confalonieri, Fabio; Massa, Francesco; Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Abdou, Melina; Schäfer, Jörg; Bakker, Eric

    2018-04-03

    A new submersible probe for the in situ detection of nitrate, nitrite, and chloride in seawater is presented. Inline coupling of a desalination unit, an acidification unit, and a sensing flow cell containing all-solid-state membrane electrodes allows for the potentiometric detection of nitrate and nitrite after removal of the key interfering ions in seawater, chloride and hydroxide. Thus, the electrodes exhibited attractive analytical performances for the potentiometric detection of nitrate and nitrite in desalinated and acidified seawater: fast response time ( t 95 macronutrient levels with salinity cycles, which is of special interest in recessed coastal water bodies. The system is capable of autonomous operation during deployment, with routines for repetitive measurements (every 2 h), data storage and management, and computer visualization of the data in real time. In situ temporal profiles observed in the Arcachon Bay (France) showed valuable environmental information concerning tide-dependent cycles of nitrate and chloride levels in the lagoon, which are here observed for the first time using direct in situ measurements. The submersible probe based on membrane electrodes presented herein may facilitate the study of biogeochemical processes occurring in marine ecosystems by the direct monitoring of nitrate and nitrite levels, which are key chemical targets in coastal waters.

  17. Microbial Biofilm Community Variation in Flowing Habitats: Potential Utility as Bioindicators of Postmortem Submersion Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous formation of microbial communities found on surfaces in aqueous environments. These structures have been investigated as biomonitoring indicators for stream heath, and here were used for the potential use in forensic sciences. Biofilm successional development has been proposed as a method to determine the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI of remains because there are no standard methods for estimating the PMSI and biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. We sought to compare the development of epinecrotic (biofilms on Sus scrofa domesticus carcasses and epilithic (biofilms on unglazed ceramic tiles communities in two small streams using bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Epinecrotic communities were significantly different from epilithic communities even though environmental factors associated with each stream location also had a significant influence on biofilm structure. All communities at both locations exhibited significant succession suggesting that changing communities throughout time is a general characteristic of stream biofilm communities. The implications resulting from this work are that epinecrotic communities have distinctive shifts at the first and second weeks, and therefore the potential to be used in forensic applications by associating successional changes with submersion time to estimate a PMSI. The influence of environmental factors, however, indicates the lack of a successional pattern with the same organisms and a focus on functional diversity may be more applicable in a forensic context.

  18. Phytotoxicity of atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron to submersed macrophytes in outdoor mesocosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauert, Stefanie; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Knauer, Katja

    2010-01-01

    The submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton lucens were constantly exposed over a five-week period to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron, and their mixture in outdoor mesocosms. Effects were evaluated investigating photosynthetic efficiency (PE) of the three macrophytes and growth of M. spicatum and E. canadensis. Adverse effects on PE were observed on days 2 and 5 after application. M. spicatum was found to be the more sensitive macrophyte. E. canadensis and P. lucens were less sensitive to atrazine, diuron and the mixture and insensitive to isoproturon. PE of M. spicatum was similarly affected by the single herbicides and the mixture demonstrating concentration addition. Growth of E. canadensis and M. spicatum was not reduced indicating that herbicide exposure did not impair plant development. Although PE measurements turned out to be a sensitive method to monitor PSII herbicides, plant growth remains the more relevant ecological endpoint in risk assessment. - Short-term effects on photosynthesis did not result in growth reduction of submerse macrophytes exposed to PSII inhibitors.

  19. Phytotoxicity of atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron to submersed macrophytes in outdoor mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauert, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.knauert@basf.co [University of Basel, Department of Environmental Sciences, Hebelstrasse 1, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Uberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Knauer, Katja [University of Basel, Program Sustainability Research, Klingelbergstr. 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    The submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton lucens were constantly exposed over a five-week period to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron, and their mixture in outdoor mesocosms. Effects were evaluated investigating photosynthetic efficiency (PE) of the three macrophytes and growth of M. spicatum and E. canadensis. Adverse effects on PE were observed on days 2 and 5 after application. M. spicatum was found to be the more sensitive macrophyte. E. canadensis and P. lucens were less sensitive to atrazine, diuron and the mixture and insensitive to isoproturon. PE of M. spicatum was similarly affected by the single herbicides and the mixture demonstrating concentration addition. Growth of E. canadensis and M. spicatum was not reduced indicating that herbicide exposure did not impair plant development. Although PE measurements turned out to be a sensitive method to monitor PSII herbicides, plant growth remains the more relevant ecological endpoint in risk assessment. - Short-term effects on photosynthesis did not result in growth reduction of submerse macrophytes exposed to PSII inhibitors.

  20. Numerical simulation and performance prediction in multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W J; Li, G D; Wang, Y; Cui, Y R; Yin, G; Peng, S

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the inner flow field of multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump, the model named QD3-60/4-1.1 was selected. Steady turbulence characteristics of impellers, diffusers and return channel were calculated by Fluent software, the SIMPLEC algorithm and RNG κ-ε turbulence model with sliding mesh technology. Then, the distributions of pressure, velocity and Turbulence kinetic energy was obtained and the distributions of velocity field of a channel were analysed. The results show that the static pressure in impeller is increasing with the increasing of radius. The circumferential component of relative velocity is in the opposite direction of impeller rotating. At the same radius, the component value of pressure surface is larger than suction surface. With the increasing of flow rate, absolute velocity and relative velocity flow angle are becoming small, in opposite of the relative velocity and absolute velocity flow angle. The high turbulent zone of impeller is located in the gap of impellers and diffusers. Flow similarity and structure similarity of the multi-stage submersible pump are confirmed

  1. Study Of Calculation Of Degaussing System For Reducing Magnetic Field From Submersible Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardono Sarwito

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of maritime technology in the world to make Indonesia are also increasingly taking the development of maritime technology, such as in a Submersible Vehicle one is degaussing system, this technology should be owned by the vessel so that the vessel can avoid dangerous explosive equipment contained in the sea. Degaussing system is a system that is in use on the metal parts or electronic devices that are at risk of a magnetic field. This system is used to prevent the vessel from dangerous equipment in the sea which can trigger an explosion and the damage that utilize magnetic fields as a metal-detection sensor when the boat was doing dives. To the authors will plan the design degaussing system, and calculating the system in order to reduce the magnetic properties of the Submersible Vehicle which were obtained by the use of Coil Degaussing along 214,5 meters, a diameter of 0,2, with 500.000 coil that will generate a current of 0,0157 Ampere's 0.0787 Tesla generates a magnetic field.

  2. Main problems of external monitoring in the accidental zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrikov, O.K.; Gul'din, A.N.; Komarov, V.I.; Malkov, V.L.; Smirnov, N.V.; Sukhoruchkin, A.K.; Proskuryakov, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Operational experience of the external monitoring service during emergency response is analysed as applied to the problems of optimization of environmental monitoring under accidental conditions. Problems of rapid and strategical environmental radiation monitoring are considered

  3. Accidental transection of flexometallic endotracheal tube during partial maxillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma D Ladi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of an 18-year-old female patient in whom accidental sectioning of flexometallic endotracheal tube occurred during partial maxillectomy for mass lesion under general anaesthesia. She was managed successfully by tracheostomy.

  4. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry. Dose estimative in accidental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, O.R. dos; Campos, I.M.A. de.

    1988-01-01

    The methodology of cytogenetic biological dosimetry is studied. The application in estimation of dose in five cases of accidental exposure is reported. An hematological study and culture of lymphocytes is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Limits to radioactive effluents and countermeasures in accidental situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowotny, G.; Gonzalez, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the criteria used by the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, as competent authority, to set limits to radioactive effluents from nuclear installations. It also discusses the selection of action levels for carrying out countermeasures in accidental situations. (author)

  6. Ventricular fibrillation after accidental injection of bupivacaine into the pericardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Even, B. J.; de Jongh, R. F.; de Hert, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    A postoperative cardiac surgical patient developed ventricular fibrillation immediately after accidental pericardial injection of bupivacaine at room temperature. The possible causes, which include systemic toxicity, local vasoconstriction with myocardial ischaemia, local toxic effect of bupivacaine

  7. Dosimetric significance of cytogenetic examinations in human accidental over exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloy-Biola, M.T.; Lego, R.; Ducatez, G.; Lepetit, J.; Bourguignon, M.

    1975-01-01

    The damage to 13 workers following accidental exposures was assessed from lymphocyte chromosomal aberrations, and the results compared with those supplied by physical dosimetry and the clinical syndromes [fr

  8. Methodology for estimating accidental radioactive releases in nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, H.B.

    1979-01-01

    Estimation of the risks of accidental radioactive releases is necessary in assessing the safety of any nuclear waste management system. The case of a radioactive waste form enclosed in a barrier system is considered. Two test calculations were carried out

  9. Accidental sulphuric acid poisoning in a newborn | Abdulkadir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accidental sulphuric acid poisoning in a newborn. I Abdulkadir, L Hassan, F Abdullahi, FD Akeredolu, S Purdue, M Okpe, AM Sobowale, OA Adewumi, U Abdullahi, MA Onadiran, TT Sholadoye, S Baba, WN Ogala ...

  10. Lessons learned from accidental exposures in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The medical use of radiation is unique in that patients are intentionally exposed to radiation. The aim in radiation therapy is twofold: to deliver a dose and dose distribution that is adequate for tumour control, but which also minimizes complications in normal tissues. In therapeutic applications, the doses are high and a deviation from the prescribed dose may have severe or even fatal consequences. There is therefore a great need to ensure adequate radiation protection and safety in radiotherapy by verifying that all personnel involved are appropriately trained for their duties, that the equipment used meets relevant international specifications for radiation safety and that safety culture is embedded in routine activities in radiotherapy departments. Many individuals must interact and work together on highly technical measurements and calculations, and therefore the potential for mistakes is great. A review of the mistakes shows that most are due to human error. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115) require that a prompt investigation be conducted whenever an accidental medical exposure of patients occurs. The report of the investigation is to be disseminated to the appropriate parties so that lessons can be learned to prevent similar accidents or mitigate their consequences in the future. This Safety Report is a collection of a large number of events that may serve as a checklist against which to test the vulnerability of a facility to potential accidents, and to provide a basis for improving safety in the use of radiation in medical applications. A further purpose of this report is to encourage readers to develop a questioning and learning attitude, adopt measures for the prevention of accidents, and prepare for mitigation of the consequences of accidents if they occur

  11. Accidental oil spills - project management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobic, V.; Benkovic, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Planning and organisation, as well as actions taken during accidental discharging of hazardous substances (hydrocarbons) into the soil and water, show that without integrating all the functions of safety, occupational safety, fire and explosion protection, technical safety, all the way to the environmental protection, procedure of cleaning, rehabilitation and remediation of polluted areas into their original state cannot be successfully carried out. Neglecting any of the mentioned links/components of the procedure represents a risk to people's health and life, while pollution to the environment remains a constant threat. Development of technologies is quickly transforming the environment in which the professionals of all disciplines work. Therefore, the response to changes by application of new technologies and procedures in all domains is indispensable, however, through a comprehensive and expert perception and consideration of each of the essential correlations comprising the safety management in all the fields. Through management of safety projects in environmental protection, it has become obvious that a united management of different fields is necessary, as well as management of safety in general. Engineering, health, legislation, public, environmental standards, occupational safety, hazards, biophysical and socio-economic aspects are parts of an integral management. Experts joined efforts through interaction and communications are inter-disciplinary characteristics, i.e. multi-disciplinary safety management, but also the management of each project separately. Exactly this knowledge exchange is highly productive and becomes an indispensable element in recognition of indirect and cumulative actions, thus applicable in any field. Implementation of European standards and accreditation of procedures pursuant to the corresponding standards, from risk assessment through rehabilitation to independent expert confirmation of efficiency in implementing the entire

  12. Accidental symmetries and the effective Lagrangian of string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrut, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between accidental worldsheet symmetries of the string generating functional and target space invariance groups is discussed. Accidental symmetries are used to derive the invariance groups and effective low energy Lagrangian for the bosonic string, and the heterotic string compactified to four-dimensions on Z N orbifolds. The necessity of a new type of Green-Schwarz mechanism, associated with the auxiliary vector field in the four-dimensional N = 1 supergravity multiplet, is shown using these methods

  13. [THREE CASES OF ACCIDENTAL AUTO-INJECTION OF ADRENALINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Iikura, Katsuhito; Ogura, Kiyotake; Wang, Ling-jen; Asaumi, Tomoyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Reports on accidental auto-injection of adrenaline are few. We encountered three cases of accidental injection of adrenaline. In this study, we have examined and reported the clinical courses and symptoms of our cases. CASE 1 involved a female physician in her 50s who had attended an explanatory meeting on auto-injection of adrenaline. She mistook EpiPen® to be the EpiPen trainer and accidentally injected herself with 0.3 mg EpiPen®. Her systolic/diastolic pressure peaked at 7 min to reach 144/78 mmHg and decreased to 120/77 mmHg at 14 min. Except for palpitation after 7 min, the only subjective symptom was local pain at the injection site. CASE 2 was noted in a 6-year-old boy. He accidentally pierced his right forefinger with 0.15 mg EpiPen®, and after 20 min, his right forefinger was swollen. The swelling improved 80 min after the accidental injection. CASE 3 was noted in a 4-year-old girl. She accidentally injected herself with 0.15 mg EpiPen®. Her systolic/diastolic pressure peaked at 23 min to reach 123/70 mmHg and decreased to 96/86 mmHg at 28 min. Severe adverse effects of accidental auto-injection of adrenaline were not observed in these three cases. Our findings suggest that while handling adrenaline auto-injectors, we should keep in mind the possibility of accidental injection.

  14. A descriptive study of accidental skeletal injuries and non-accidental skeletal injuries of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Maha A H; Moustafa, Tarek A; Megahed, Haidy M; Salama, Naglaa; Ghitani, Sara A

    2018-02-01

    Lack of awareness and recognition of child maltreatment is the major reason behind underreporting. All victims often interact with the health care system for routine or emergency care. In several research works, non-accidental fractures are the second most common injury in maltreated children and it is represented up to one-third of cases. To determine the incidence of different types of accidental and non-accidental skeletal injuries among children, estimate the severity of injuries according to the modified injury severity score and to determine the degree of fractures either closed or opened (Gustiloe-Anderson open fracture classification). Moreover, identifying fractures resulting from child abuse and neglect. This aimed for early recognition of non-accidental nature of fractures in child maltreatment that can prevent further morbidity and mortality. A descriptive study was carried out on all children (109) with skeletal injuries who were admitted to both Main Alexandria and El-Hadara Orthopedic and Traumatology University Hospitals during six months. History, physical examination and investigations were done for the patients. A detailed questionnaire was taken to diagnose child abuse and neglect. Gustiloe-Anderson open fracture classification was used to estimate the degree of open fractures. Out of 109 children, twelve cases (11%) were categorized as child maltreatment. One case was physical abuse, eight cases (7.3%) were child neglect and three cases (2.8%) were labour exploitation. Road traffic accidents (RTA) was the commonest cause of skeletal injuries followed by falling from height. Regarding falls, they included 4 cases of stair falls in neglected children and another four cases of falling from height (balcony/window). The remaining 36 cases of falls were accidental. The skeletal injuries were in the form of fractures in 99 cases, dislocation in two cases, both fracture and/or dislocation in three cases, and bone deformity from brachial plexus injury

  15. A quality improvement project to reduce hypothermia in infants undergoing MRI scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Priti G.; Parekh, Uma; Dhar, Padmani; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Porath, Janelle; Mujsce, Dennis; Wang, Ming; Hulse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia prevention strategies during MRI scanning under general anesthesia in infants may pose a challenge due to the MRI scanner's technical constraints. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results related to increase or decrease in post-scan temperatures in children. We noted occurrences of post-scan hypothermia in anesthetized infants despite the use of routine passive warming techniques. The aims of our quality improvement project were (a) to identify variables associated with post-scan hypothermia in infants and (b) to develop and implement processes to reduce occurrence of hypothermia in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants undergoing MRI. One hundred sixty-four infants undergoing MRI scanning were prospectively audited for post-scan body temperatures. A multidisciplinary team identified potential variables associated with post-scan hypothermia and designed preventative strategies: protocol development, risk factor identification, vigilance and use of a vacuum immobilizer. Another audit was performed, specifically focusing on NICU infants. In the initial phase, we found that younger age (P = 0.002), lower weight (P = 0.005), lower pre-scan temperature (P < 0.01), primary anesthetic technique with propofol (P < 0.01), advanced airway devices (P = 0.02) and being in the NICU (P < 0.01) were associated with higher odds for developing post-scan decrease in body temperature. Quality improvement processes decreased the occurrence of hypothermia in NICU infants undergoing MRI scanning from 65% to 18% (95% confidence interval for the difference, 26-70%, P < 0.001). Several variables, including being in the NICU, are associated with a decrease in post-scan temperature in infants undergoing MRI scanning under sedation/general anesthesia. Implementation of strategies to prevent hypothermia in infants may be challenging in the high-risk MRI environment. We were able to minimize this problem in clinical practice by applying quality improvement

  16. Temperature control during therapeutic hypothermia for newborn encephalopathy using different Blanketrol devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptook, Abbot R; Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C ± 1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C ± 1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8% ± 0.1% vs. 95.8% ± 0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia.

  17. Under-humidification and over-humidification during moderate induced hypothermia with usual devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouche, François; Qader, Siham; Taille, Solenne; Lyazidi, Aissam; Brochard, Laurent

    2006-07-01

    In mechanically ventilated patients with induced hypothermia, the efficacy of heat and moisture exchangers and heated humidifiers to adequately humidify the airway is poorly known. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of different humidification devices during moderate hypothermia. Prospective, cross-over randomized study. Medical Intensive Care Unit in a University Hospital. Nine adult patients hospitalized after cardiac arrest in whom moderate hypothermia was induced (33 degrees C for 24[Symbol: see text]h). Patients were ventilated at admission (period designated "normothermia") with a heat and moisture exchanger, and were randomly ventilated during hypothermia with a heat and moisture exchanger, a heated humidifier, and an active heat and moisture exchanger. Core temperature, inspired and expired gas absolute and relative humidity were measured. Each system demonstrated limitations in its ability to humidify gases in the specific situation of hypothermia. Performances of heat and moisture exchangers were closely correlated to core temperature (r (2)[Symbol: see text]=[Symbol: see text]0.84). During hypothermia, heat and moisture exchangers led to major under-humidification, with absolute humidity below 25[Symbol: see text]mgH(2)O/l. The active heat and moisture exchanger slightly improved humidification. Heated humidifiers were mostly adequate but led to over-humidification in some patients, with inspiratory absolute humidity higher than maximal water content at 33 degrees C with a positive balance between inspiratory and expiratory water content. These results suggest that in the case of moderate hypothermia, heat and moisture exchangers should be used cautiously and that heated humidifiers may lead to over-humidification with the currently recommended settings.

  18. Deepwater marine litter densities and compsoition from submersible video-gransects around the ABC-islands, Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Vinke, E.; Wende, van der G.; Hylkema, A.; Reed, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Baseline data on anthropogenic seafloor debris contamination in the year 2000 is provided for 24 submersible video transects at depths of 80–900 m, off the Dutch ABC-islands (Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao), in the southeastern Caribbean Sea. In total, 202 objects were documented from a combined 21,184 m

  19. Towards improved management of coastal submersion crises – CRISMA-WAVE solution as an example of CRISMA Framework application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlich Marc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coping with various types of natural or man-made hazards the FP7 SECURITY CRISMA project (http://www.crismaproject.eu has designed and developed an experimental software framework allowing building crisis management simulation application. One of the five pilot applications of CRISMA dealing with preparedness to the coastal submersions was developed and implemented using return of experience of the reference Xynthia storm surge event in the Charente Maritime County in France. The paper addresses the generic CRISMA Framework applicability to simulate mitigation effects of a coastal submersion through CRISMA-Wave implementation of a full modelling cycle. The CRISMA-Wave paradigm reflects user needs for simulation of “what-if” scenarios for short and long-term actions and the paper describes in particular its different components : *Simulation of submersion effects at a range of temporal and spatial scales, *Preparedness Planning, *Assessment of impacts depending on scenarios based on options for managing the inundation risks, *Cascading effects and *Evaluation of damages with comparison of submersion defence scenarios based on cost-benefit and multi criteria analysis.

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy: a UK survey of opinion, practice and neuro-investigation at the end of 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Andrew; Azzopardi, Denis; Wyatt, John; Robertson, Nicola J

    2009-04-01

    The 2007 Cochrane review of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy (NE) indicates a significant reduction in adverse outcome. UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines are awaited. To benchmark current opinion and practice to inform future strategies for optimal knowledge transfer for therapeutic hypothermia. A web based questionnaire (30 sections related to opinion and practice of management of NE) sent to the clinical leads of Level I, II and III neonatal units throughout the UK in November/December 2007. One hundred and twenty-five (out of 195) UK neonatal units responded (response rate 66%). Ten percent, 37.5% and 51.5% responses were from level I, II and III units respectively. Twenty eight percent of all units provided therapeutic hypothermia locally (52% of level III units), however 80% of responders would offer therapeutic hypothermia if there was the facility. Overall, 57% of responders considered therapeutic hypothermia effective or very effective - similar for all unit levels; 43% considered more data are required. Regional availability of therapeutic hypothermia exists in 55% of units and 41% of units offer transfer to a regional centre for therapeutic hypothermia. In the UK in 2007, access to therapeutic hypothermia was widespread although not universal. More than half of responders considered therapeutic hypothermia effective. Fifty-five percent of perinatal networks have the facility to offer therapeutic hypothermia. The involvement of national bodies may be necessary to ensure the adoption of therapeutic hypothermia according to defined protocols and standards; registration is important and will help ensure universal neurodevelopmental follow up.

  1. Optimum water depth ranges of dominant submersed macrophytes in a natural freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bibi; Chu, Zhaosheng; Wu, Aiping; Hou, Zeying; Wang, Shengrui

    2018-01-01

    Macrophytes show a zonal distribution along the lake littoral zone because of their specific preferred water depths while the optimum growth water depths of dominant submersed macrophytes in natural lakes are not well known. We studied the seasonal biomass and frequency patterns of dominant and companion submersed macrophytes along the water depth gradient in Lake Erhai in 2013. The results showed that the species richness and community biomass showed hump-back shaped patterns along the water depth gradient both in polydominant and monodominant communities. Biomass percentage of Potamogenton maackianus showed a hump-back pattern while biomass percentages of Ceratophyllum demersum and Vallisneria natans appeared U-shaped patterns across the water depth gradient in polydominant communities whereas biomass percentage of V. natans increased with the water depth in monodominant communities. Dominant species demonstrated a broader distribution range of water depth than companion species. Frequency and biomass of companion species declined drastically with the water depth whereas those of dominant species showed non-linear patterns across the water depth gradient. Namely, along the water depth gradient, biomass of P. maackianus and V. natans showed hump-back patterns and biomasses of C. demersum displayed a U-shaped pattern in the polydominant communities but biomass of V. natans demonstrated a hump-back pattern in the monodominant communities; frequency of P. maackianus showed a hump-back pattern and C. demersum and V. natans maintained high frequencies in the two types of communities. We can speculate that in Lake Erhai the optimum growth water depths of P. maackianus and C. demersum in the polydominant communities are 2.5-4.5 m and 1-2 m or 5-6 m, respectively and that of V. natans is 3-5 m in the polydominant communities and 2.5-5 m in the monodominant communities. This is the first report that the optimum water depth ranges in the horizontal direction of three

  2. Epidemiology of non-submersion injuries in aquatic sporting and recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, David; Morrison, Luke

    2003-01-01

    Although the issues of drowning and near-drowning in aquatic sporting and recreational activities receive considerable attention in the epidemiological literature, there is not a recognised literature on non-submersion injuries occurring in these activities. This review draws together the epidemiological literature on non-submersion injuries and describes the incidence, nature and causes of these injuries, common risk factors, and strategies for prevention. Activities covered by the review include swimming, diving, boating, surf sports, fishing, water polo and water sliding. For most activities there is a dearth of good quality descriptive studies, with most involving cases-series designs and few providing estimates of incidence. Inconsistencies in inclusion criteria and the reporting of incidence rates makes comparisons within and between activities difficult. Incidence rates were identified for most activities and in general the incidence of injury was low, especially for more serious injury. However, some activities were associated with severely disabling injury, such as spinal cord injury (diving) and amputation (from propeller strikes in water skiing and swimming). Only three studies reporting the significance of postulated risk factors were identified. Lack of knowledge about the water being entered and alcohol consumption are significant risk factors in recreational diving; increased blood alcohol concentrations were reported to increase the risk of death in boating; and obesity and tandem riding were reported to increase the risk of injury on public water slides. Few evaluations of preventive measures were identified. Two studies reported reductions in the incidence of water slide injuries following the introduction of design changes and supervision, but neither had a non-intervention comparison group. Improvements in swimming and diving skills were reported in three studies, but these were not designed to measure changes in the risk of injury.This review

  3. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  4. Early prognostication markers in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetkova, M; Koenig, M A; Jia, X

    2016-03-01

    Established prognostication markers, such as clinical findings, electroencephalography (EEG) and biochemical markers, used by clinicians to predict neurological outcome after cardiac arrest (CA) are altered under therapeutic hypothermia (TH) conditions and their validity remains uncertain. MEDLINE and Embase were searched for evidence on the current standards for neurological outcome prediction for out-of-hospital CA patients treated with TH and the validity of a wide range of prognostication markers. Relevant studies that suggested one or several established biomarkers and multimodal approaches for prognostication are included and reviewed. Whilst the prognostic accuracy of various tests after TH has been questioned, pupillary light reflexes and somatosensory evoked potentials are still strongly associated with negative outcome for early prognostication. Increasingly, EEG background activity has also been identified as a valid predictor for outcome after 72 h after CA and a preferred prognostic method in clinical settings. Neuroimaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, can identify functional and structural brain injury but are not readily available at the patient's bedside because of limited availability and high costs. A multimodal algorithm composed of neurological examination, EEG-based quantitative testing and somatosensory evoked potentials, in conjunction with newer magnetic resonance imaging sequences, if available, holds promise for accurate prognostication in CA patients treated with TH. In order to avoid premature withdrawal of care, prognostication should be performed more than 72 h after CA. © 2015 EAN.

  5. Cardiac hypertrophy in chick embryos induced by hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, C.; Johnson, T.R.; Caston, J.D.; Przybylski, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A decrease in incubation temperature from 38 to 32 0 C elicits a decrease in chicken embryo size and weight with concomitant heart enlargement if done after day 10 of incubation. When assayed at day 18 of incubation with the hypothermia started on day 11 or 14, evidence is presented that the heart enlargement is an hypertrophy with no detectable hyperplasia. Supporting data are presented for various physical parameters showing increases in heart wet and dry weight, volume, area, wall thickness, and cell size. There was little difference in DNA content and nuclear [ 3 H]thymidine labeling index between hearts of control and hypothermic embryos. Hearts of hypothermic embryos showed a slight increase in water content and considerable increases in RNA, protein, and glycogen content per unit DNA. The average size of polysomes isolated from hypothermic hearts was larger than that of polysomes isolated from controls. Microscopic studies showed no obvious increase in amount of capillary beds, connective tissue, and myocardial cells. Annulate lamellae were found only in myocardial cells of hypothermic embryos in sparse amounts and low frequency but always associated with large deposits of glycogen

  6. Hypothermia with Extreme Bradycardia following Spinal Cord Infarction of Septic Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hantson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other autonomic dysfunctions complicating acute spinal cord injury, deep hypothermia is rare but may induce serious cardiovascular complications. There are few pharmacological options to influence hypothermia. A 66-year-old woman was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU for serious cardiac arrhythmias (atrial fibrillation and asystole in the context of a deep hypothermia (axillary temperature below 32°C. She had been admitted to the hospital two months before for an acute L4-L5 infectious spondylodiscitis without any initial neurological deficit. After surgery for epidural abscess drainage, she became paraplegic due to spinal cord infarction (from C7 to T6 levels in the upper territory of the anterior spinal artery. In the ICU, the patient experienced several episodes of asystole and hypotension associated with a core body temperature below 35°C. Common causes of hypothermia (drugs, hypothyroidism, etc. were excluded. A definitive pacemaker had to be inserted, but hypotension persisted. The prescription of oral progesterone (200 mg·d−1 helped to maintain a core temperature higher than 35°C, with a withdrawal of vasopressors. This case report illustrates that patients with incomplete spinal cord injury may present with delayed and deep hypothermia leading to serious cardiovascular complications. Progesterone could be able to influence positively central and peripheral thermal regulation.

  7. Locally induced hypothermia for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: A physical feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slotboom, J.; Kiefer, C.; Brekenfeld, C.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Nedeltchev, K.; Schroth, G.; Arnold, M.; Mattle, H.

    2004-01-01

    During the treatment of stroke by local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) it is frequently possible to pass the blood clot with a micro-catheter, allowing perfusion of brain tissue distally to the occlusion. This possibility allows for new early treatments of ischaemic brain tissue, even before the blood clot has been removed. One potential new approach to preserve brain tissue at risk may be locally induced endovascular hypothermia. Physical parameters such as the required micro-catheter input pressure, output velocity and flow rates, and a heat exchange model, applicable in the case of a micro-catheter placed within a guiding catheter, are presented. Also, a simple cerebral temperature model is derived that models the temperature response of the brain to the perfusion with coolant fluids. Based on this model, an expression has been derived for the time needed to reach a certain cerebral target temperature. Experimental in vitro measurements are presented that confirm the usability of standard commercially available micro-catheters to induce local hypothermia of the brain. If applied in vivo, the model predicts a local cooling rate of ischaemic brain tissue of 300 g of approximately 1 C in 1 min, which is up to a factor 30-times faster than the time-consuming systemic hypothermia via the skin. Systemic body temperature is only minimally affected by application of local hypothermia, thus avoiding many limitations and complications known in systemic hypothermia. (orig.)

  8. Effect of hypothermia on cell kinetics and response to hyperthermia and x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Rijn, J.; van den Berg, J.; Kipp, J.B.A.; Schamhart, D.H.J.; van Wijk, R.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potent radio enhancer. Studies using hypothermia in combination with irradiation have given confusing results due to lack of uniformity in experimental design. This report shows that hypothermia might have potential significance in the treatment of malignant cells with both thermo- and radiotherapy. Reuber H35 hepatoma cells, clone KRC-7 were used to study the effect of hypothermia on cell kinetics and subsequent response to hyperthermia and/or X rays. Cells were incubated at 8.5 0 C or between 25 and 37 0 C for 24 hr prior to hyperthermia or irradiation. Hypothermia caused sensitization to both hyperthermia and X rays. In contrast to the effect of hypothermia on either hyperthermia or X rays alone, thermal radiosensitization was decreased in hypothermically pretreated cells (24 hr at 25 0 C) compared to control cells (37 0 C). The expression of thermotolerance and the rate of development at 37 0 C after an initial heating at 42.5 0 C were not influenced after preincubation at 25 0 C for 24 hr. The expression of thermotolerance for heat or heat plus X rays during incubation at 41 0 C occurred in a significantly smaller number of cells after 24 hr preincubation at 25 0 C. The enhanced thermo- and radiosensitivity in hypothermically treated cells disappeared in approximately 6 hr after return to 37 0 C

  9. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-μm radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 ± 0.23 ml O 2 ·100 g -1 ·min -1 during normothermia (39 degree C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35 degree C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced

  10. Locally induced hypothermia for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: A physical feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slotboom, J.; Kiefer, C.; Brekenfeld, C.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Nedeltchev, K.; Schroth, G. [Inselspital, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Bern, Berne (Switzerland); Arnold, M.; Mattle, H. [University of Bern, Department of Neurology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2004-11-01

    During the treatment of stroke by local intra-arterial thrombolysis (LIT) it is frequently possible to pass the blood clot with a micro-catheter, allowing perfusion of brain tissue distally to the occlusion. This possibility allows for new early treatments of ischaemic brain tissue, even before the blood clot has been removed. One potential new approach to preserve brain tissue at risk may be locally induced endovascular hypothermia. Physical parameters such as the required micro-catheter input pressure, output velocity and flow rates, and a heat exchange model, applicable in the case of a micro-catheter placed within a guiding catheter, are presented. Also, a simple cerebral temperature model is derived that models the temperature response of the brain to the perfusion with coolant fluids. Based on this model, an expression has been derived for the time needed to reach a certain cerebral target temperature. Experimental in vitro measurements are presented that confirm the usability of standard commercially available micro-catheters to induce local hypothermia of the brain. If applied in vivo, the model predicts a local cooling rate of ischaemic brain tissue of 300 g of approximately 1 C in 1 min, which is up to a factor 30-times faster than the time-consuming systemic hypothermia via the skin. Systemic body temperature is only minimally affected by application of local hypothermia, thus avoiding many limitations and complications known in systemic hypothermia. (orig.)

  11. Submersed aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay: Sentinel species in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert J.; Dennison, William C.; Lefcheck, Jonathon S.; Gurbisz, Cassie; Hannam, Michael; Keisman, Jennifer; Landry, J. Brooke; Moore, Kenneth A.; Murphy, Rebecca R.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Testa, Jeremy; Weller, Donald E.; Wilcox, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Chesapeake Bay has undergone profound changes since European settlement. Increases in human and livestock populations, associated changes in land use, increases in nutrient loadings, shoreline armoring, and depletion of fish stocks have altered the important habitats within the Bay. Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) is a critical foundational habitat and provides numerous benefits and services to society. In Chesapeake Bay, SAV species are also indicators of environmental change because of their sensitivity to water quality and shoreline development. As such, SAV has been deeply integrated into regional regulations and annual assessments of management outcomes, restoration efforts, the scientific literature, and popular media coverage. Even so, SAV in Chesapeake Bay faces many historical and emerging challenges. The future of Chesapeake Bay is indicated by and contingent on the success of SAV. Its persistence will require continued action, coupled with new practices, to promote a healthy and sustainable ecosystem.

  12. The Need Of A Phenological Spectral Library Of Submersed Macrophytes For Lake Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Patrick; Robler, Sebastian; Schneider, Thomas; Melzer, Arnulf

    2013-12-01

    Submersed macrophytes are bio-indicators for water quality. For plant monitoring by remote sensing, in-situ reflectance measurements are necessary. Hence, systematic measurements were carried out at Lake Starnberg and Lake Tegernsee (Germany) in the year 2011. Besides two wide-spread species (Chara spp. and Potamogeton perfoliatus), the invasive species Elodea nuttallii and Najas marina were investigated. Remote sensing reflectances were calculated from downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance. Those were collected with RAMSES spectroradiometers (320nm-950nm, 3.3nm step). As data collection took place several times, changes in the spectral responses within the growing season were detected and could be linked to population density, growing height, biomass and pigmentation. Additionally, a stable sampling method and a processing chain for the in-situ reflectance measurements were developed. Part of the processing was a water column correction, including WASI (water colour simulator). Principal component analysis showed separability of sediment from vegetation and species differentiation.

  13. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...... digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m2 /day and current density...... of 4.33 A/m2 were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic...

  14. Sensitivity of submersed freshwater macrophytes and endpoints in laboratory toxicity tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arts, Gertie H.P.; Belgers, J. Dick M.; Hoekzema, Conny H.; Thissen, Jac T.N.M.

    2008-01-01

    The toxicological sensitivity and variability of a range of macrophyte endpoints were statistically tested with data from chronic, non-axenic, macrophyte toxicity tests. Five submersed freshwater macrophytes, four pesticides/biocides and 13 endpoints were included in the statistical analyses. Root endpoints, reflecting root growth, were most sensitive in the toxicity tests, while endpoints relating to biomass, growth and shoot length were less sensitive. The endpoints with the lowest coefficients of variation were not necessarily the endpoints, which were toxicologically most sensitive. Differences in sensitivity were in the range of 10-1000 for different macrophyte-specific endpoints. No macrophyte species was consistently the most sensitive. Criteria to select endpoints in macrophyte toxicity tests should include toxicological sensitivity, variance and ecological relevance. Hence, macrophyte toxicity tests should comprise an array of endpoints, including very sensitive endpoints like those relating to root growth. - A range of endpoints is more representative of macrophyte fitness than biomass and growth only

  15. Algorithm to determine electrical submersible pump performance considering temperature changes for viscous crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderrama, A. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Distrito Socialista Tecnologico (Venezuela); Valencia, F. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Instituto de Tecnologia Venezolana para el Petroleo (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, electrical submersible pumps (ESPs) are used to transfer energy to fluids through stages made up of one impeller and one diffuser. Since liquid temperature increases through the different stages, viscosity might change between the inlet and outlet of the pump, thus affecting performance. The aim of this research was to create an algorithm to determine ESPs' performance curves considering temperature changes through the stages. A computational algorithm was developed and then compared with data collected in a laboratory with a CG2900 ESP. Results confirmed that when the fluid's viscosity is affected by the temperature changes, the stages of multistage pump systems do not have the same performance. Thus the developed algorithm could help production engineers to take viscosity changes into account and optimize the ESP design. This study developed an algorithm to take into account the fluid viscosity changes through pump stages.

  16. Catamaran or semi-submersible for floating platform - selection of a better design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, Idrees; Gao, Liangtian; Peng, Duojin; Liu, Bo

    2018-02-01

    With nonstop advancement in marine engineering, more and more new structures are being designed and explored for tidal current energy. There are three different kinds of support structures for tidal current power station mostly in use, which are sea-bed mounted/gravity based system, pile mounted system and floating moored platform. Comparing all of them, the floating mooring system is most suitable for deep water systems and the application of this arrangement is widely usable. In this paper, a semi-submersible and a catamaran as floating platforms for tidal current power stations are studied are compared on the basis of its economics, efficiency of turbine and stability of the station. Based on basic ship theory and using software MAXSURF, the stability of Catamaran tidal current power station is also calculated. It is found that the catamaran design is optimal choice.

  17. Phytotoxicity of atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron to submersed macrophytes in outdoor mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauert, Stefanie; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Knauer, Katja

    2010-01-01

    The submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton lucens were constantly exposed over a five-week period to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron, and their mixture in outdoor mesocosms. Effects were evaluated investigating photosynthetic efficiency (PE) of the three macrophytes and growth of M. spicatum and E. canadensis. Adverse effects on PE were observed on days 2 and 5 after application. M. spicatum was found to be the more sensitive macrophyte. E. canadensis and P. lucens were less sensitive to atrazine, diuron and the mixture and insensitive to isoproturon. PE of M. spicatum was similarly affected by the single herbicides and the mixture demonstrating concentration addition. Growth of E. canadensis and M. spicatum was not reduced indicating that herbicide exposure did not impair plant development. Although PE measurements turned out to be a sensitive method to monitor PSII herbicides, plant growth remains the more relevant ecological endpoint in risk assessment.

  18. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF KAOLIN/SAND SLURRY USED DURING SUBMERSIBLE MIXER PUMP TESTS AT TNX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANSEN, ERICH

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to characterize the physical properties of the kaolin/sand slurries used during the testing of a new submersible mixer pump (SMP) which had undergone performance testing at the TNX Waste Tank mockup facility from July 2004 through May 2005. During this time period, four identical SMPs were subjected to various water tests and four different tests using different batches of kaolin/sand slurries. The physical properties of the kaolin/sand slurries were measured for three of the four tests. In these tests, three different sample locations were used to pull samples, the SMP cooling water exit (CWE), the SMP fluid flow field (FFF), and SMP effective cleaning radius (ECR). The physical properties measured, though not for each sample, included rheology, weight percent total solids (wt% TS), density, kaolin/sand slurry particle size distribution (PSD), weight percent and particles size distribution of material greater than 45 microns

  19. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conductive heat flow at the TAG Active Hydrothermal Mound: Results from 1993-1995 submersible surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Von Herzen, R.; Kirklin, J.; Evans, R.; Kadko, D.; Kinoshita, M.; Matsubayashi, O.; Mills, R.; Schultz, A.; Rona, P.

    We report 70 measurements of conductive heat flow at the 50-m-high, 200-m-diameter TAG active hydrothermal mound, made during submersible surveys with Alvin in 1993 and 1995 and Shinkai 6500 in 1994. The stations were all measured with 5-thermistor, 0.6- or 1-m-long Alvin heat flow probes, which are capable of determining both gradient and thermal conductivity, and were transponder-navigated to an estimated accuracy of ±5-10 m relative to the 10-m-diameter central complex of black smokers. Within 20 m of this complex, conductive heat flow values are extremely variable (0.1- > 100 W/m²), which can only be due to local spatial and possible temporal variability in the immediate vicinity of the vigorous discharge sites. A similar local variability is suggested in the “Kremlin” area of white smokers to the southeast of the black smoker complex. On the south and southeast side of the mound, there is very high heat flow (3.7- > 25 W/m²) on the sedimented terraces that slope down from the Kremlin area. Heat flow is also high (0.3-3 W/m²) in the pelagic carbonate sediments on the surrounding seafloor within a few tens of meters of the southwest, northwest, and northeast sides of the mound. On the west side of the sulfide rubble plateau that surrounds the central black smoker peak, there is a coherent belt of very low heat flow (smokers, suggestive of local, shallow recharge of bottom water. The three submersible surveys spanned nearly two years, but showed no indication of any temporal variability in conductive heat flow over this time scale, whether natural or induced by ODP drilling in 1994.

  1. Systemic Effects of Hypothermia due to Hypothalamic Dysfunction after Resection of a Craniopharyngioma : Case Report and Review of Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vetten, L.; Bocca, Gianni

    Objective With this case report, we aim to improve recognition of the systemic effects of hypothermia due to hypothalamic dysfunctioning. We present a patient who developed temperature dysregulation after surgery for craniopharyngioma. He suffered from several episodes of hypothermia associated with

  2. The influence of body composition on therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational study of patients after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimmink, Joost J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Paulus, Frederique; Mathus-Vliegen, Lisbeth M. H.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Vroom, Margreeth B.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) benefit from therapeutic hypothermia for 24 hours. The time needed to reach hypothermia (target temperature of 32 degrees C to 34 degrees C) varies widely. In this study, we explore the relation between measures of body composition

  3. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-08-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Paradoxical undressing associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a non-hypothermia case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Emilienne; Ducrot, Kewin; Scarpelli, Maria Pia; Lobrinus, Alexander; Palmiere, Cristian

    2017-09-01

    Paradoxical undressing is a phenomenon characterizing some fatal hypothermia cases. The victims, despite low environmental temperatures, paradoxically remove their clothes due to a sudden feeling of warmth. In this report, we describe a case of suspected paradoxical undressing in a non-hypothermia case. The victim, a 51-year-old Caucasian man, was found dead wearing only sneakers and socks. All other clothing was found in his car. Postmortem investigations allowed the hypothesis of hypothermia to be ruled out and revealed the presence of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm that caused a subarachnoid hemorrhage, the latter responsible for the death. The absence of any elements suggesting a voluntary undressing or any third party's DNA profile or involvement along with the possibility that the subarachnoid hemorrhage might have determined a hypothalamic injury, somehow rendered conceivable the hypothesis of an inappropriate feeling of warmth due to hemorrhage-induced dysregulation of the hypothalamic temperature-regulating centers.

  5. Combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia in treating refractory status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-ping REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary choice of treating refractory status epilepticus (RSE is intravenous anesthetics, but the seizures of some patients can not get a good control. Thus, other therapies must be combined. Hypothermia not only can terminate seizures, but also play a part in brain protection. Though combined use of intravenous anesthetics and hypothermia is not a regular clinical scheme, the favorable effect has been proved by a lot of clinical research. This paper mainly focuses on the dose of intravenous anesthetics, the time, temperature and procedure of hypothermia, the indications and contraindications of combined therapy, and so on. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.006

  6. Detection and significance of S-100 protein and NSE during mild hypothermia cardiopulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiuqin; Jin Mu; Tan Jiefang; Huang Wenqi; Chen Bingxue; Huang Weiming; Huang Xiongqing

    2001-01-01

    To observe dynamic changes of S-100 protein and NSE during mild hypothermia cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the venous blood samples of 25 patients with elective cardiac surgery were obtained simultaneously from the left artery and left jugular bulb before CPB(A), hypothermia period (32-35 degree C) (B) and rewarming to 36 degree C (C) during CPB, 30 minutes (D), 4-6 hours (E) and 24 hours (F) after CPB. Plasma S-100 protein concentration was determined by chemiluminescence immunoassay, and NSE level was determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that the levels of S-100 protein and NSE increased significantly during CPB, and NSE peaked at 30 minutes (D) after CPB. It suggested the central nervous system dysfunctions. The S-100 protein and NSE concentrations decreased gradually and retuned to normal nearly (F) after mild hypothermia CPB. It suggested that there were not obvious central nervous system dysfunctions

  7. Intelligent Hypothermia Care System using Ant ‎Colony Optimization for Rules Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Naser Khraibet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent Hypothermia Care System (IHCS is an intelligence system uses set of methodologies, algorithms, architectures and processes to determine where patients in a postoperative recovery area must be sent. Hypothermia is a significant concern after surgery. This paper utilizes the classification task in data mining to propose an intelligent technique to predict where to send a patient after surgery: intensive care unit, general floor or home. To achieve this goal, this paper evaluates the performance of decision tree algorithm, exemplifying the deterministic approach, against the AntMiner algorithm, exemplifying the heuristic approach, to choose the best approach in detecting the patient’s status. Results show the outperformance of the heuristic approach. The implication of this proposal will be twofold: in hypothermia treatment and in the application of ant colony optimization

  8. Involvement of histamine H1 and H2 receptors in hypothermia induced by ionizing radiation in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced hypothermia was examined in guinea pigs. Exposure to the head alone or whole-body irradiation induced hypothermia, whereas exposure of the body alone produced a small insignificant response. Systemic injection of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer) and cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) had no effect on radiation-induced hypothermia, whereas systemic and central administration of mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist) or central administration of disodium cromoglycate or cimetidine attenuated it, indicating the involvement of central histamine through both H1 and H2 receptors in this response. Serotonin is not involved, since the serotonin antagonist methysergide had no effect on radiation-induced hypothermia. These results indicate that central histaminergic systems may be involved in radiation-induced hypothermia. 34 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  9. Localized hypothermia aggravates bleeding in the collagenase model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Roseleen F; Williamson, Michael R; Dietrich, Kristen; Colbourne, Frederick

    2015-03-01

    Animal studies testing whether therapeutic hypothermia is neuroprotective after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have been inconclusive. In rodents, ICH is often produced in the striatum by infusing collagenase, which causes prolonged hemorrhaging from multiple vessels. Our previous data shows that this bleeding (hematoma) is worsened by systemic hypothermia given soon after collagenase infusion. In this study we hypothesized that localized brain hypothermia would also aggravate bleeding in this model (0.2 U of collagenase in 1.2 μL of saline). We also evaluated cooling after intrastriatal thrombin infusion (1 U in 30 μL of saline)-a simplified model of ICH thought to cause bleeding. Focal hypothermia was achieved by flushing cold water through an implanted cooling device attached to the skull underneath the temporalis muscle of adult rats. Previous work and data at this time shows this method cools the striatum to ∼33°C, whereas the body remains normothermic. In comparison to normothermic groups, cooling significantly worsened bleeding when instituted at 6 hours (∼94 vs. 42 μL, p=0.018) and 12 hours (79 vs. 61 μL, p=0.042) post-ICH (24-hour survival), but not after a 24-hour delay (36-hour survival). Rats were cooled until euthanasia when hematoma size was determined by a hemoglobin-based spectrophotometry assay. Cooling did not influence cerebral blood volume after just saline or thrombin infusion. The latter is explained by the fact that thrombin did not cause bleeding beyond that caused by saline infusion. In summary, local hypothermia significantly aggravates bleeding many hours after collagenase infusion suggesting that bleeding may have confounded earlier studies with hypothermia. Furthermore, these findings serve as a cautionary note on using cooling even many hours after cerebral bleeding.

  10. Olanzapine-associated hypothermia: a case report of a rare event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Monti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia, a potentially fatal condition, is defined as a drop of the body temperature below 35°C. The most common cause of severe hypothermia is the environmental exposure to low-temperatures. Other causes include septicemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, trauma, acute spinal cord injury, prolonged cardiac arrest and hypothyroidism. The hypothermia is an infrequent, but previously documented, adverse effect of antipsychotic medications. A 83-year-old Italian woman was transported to the Emergency Room with a reduced level of consciousness, Glasgow coma scale 7. She was bradycardic (heart rate 42 bpm, 80/150 mmHg blood pressure and respiratory rate 26/min. Her physical examination was significant for an anal temperature of 31°C. Blood exam and chest X-ray were unremarkable. In her clinical history, she was suffering from generalized anxiety disorder for the last 2 years and was prescribed olanzapine 7.5 mg daily. In recent days, the patient experienced a cognitive impairment with heat intolerance and had been reduced the dose of olanzapine 5 mg daily. On the basis of the clinical findings, the patient’s body temperature and blood exam, the diagnosis of olanzapine-associated hypothermia was made. The patient was gradually rewarmed with blankets and warm saline infusion and the olanzapine therapy was discontinued. She gradually regained consciousness after 18 h and, after 1 day, the patient’s body temperature increased up to 37.8°C with an improvement of the neurological conditions. We reported about the case of a patient treated with stable doses of olanzapine for a long period of time that developed hypothermia, a potentially fatal complication. This case shows that it is important to consider every change in the patient behavior, e.g., the poor resistance to heat present in our patient, that should exhibit warning sign of hypothermia.

  11. Randomized trial of plastic bags to prevent term neonatal hypothermia in a resource-poor setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsches, Theodore C; Tilly, Alyssa E; Miller, Tonya R; Kambeyanda, Rohan H; Leadford, Alicia; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Ramani, Manimaran; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2013-09-01

    Term infants in resource-poor settings frequently develop hypothermia during the first hours after birth. Plastic bags or wraps are a low-cost intervention for the prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants that may also be effective in term infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that placement of term neonates in plastic bags at birth reduces hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in a resource-poor hospital. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at University Teaching Hospital, the tertiary referral center in Zambia. Inborn neonates with both a gestational age ≥37 weeks and a birth weight ≥2500 g were randomized 1:1 to either a standard thermoregulation protocol or to a standard thermoregulation protocol with placement of the torso and lower extremities inside a plastic bag within 10 minutes after birth. The primary outcome was hypothermia (plastic bag (n = 135) or to standard thermoregulation care (n = 136) had similar baseline characteristics (birth weight, gestational age, gender, and baseline temperature). Neonates in the plastic bag group had a lower rate of hypothermia (60% vs 73%, risk ratio 0.76, confidence interval 0.60-0.96, P = .026) and a higher axillary temperature (36.4 ± 0.5°C vs 36.2 ± 0.7°C, P plastic bag at birth reduced the incidence of hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in term neonates born in a resource-poor setting, but most neonates remained hypothermic.

  12. Comparison of resistive heating and forced-air warming to prevent inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M; Crook, D; Dasari, K; Eljelani, F; El-Haboby, A; Harper, C M

    2016-02-01

    Forced-air warming is a commonly used warming modality, which has been shown to reduce the incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (heating mattresses offer a potentially cheaper alternative, however, and one of the research recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was to evaluate such devices formally. We conducted a randomized single-blinded study comparing perioperative hypothermia in patients receiving resistive heating or forced-air warming. A total of 160 patients undergoing non-emergency surgery were recruited and randomly allocated to receive either forced-air warming (n=78) or resistive heating (n=82) in the perioperative period. Patient core temperatures were monitored after induction of anaesthesia until the end of surgery and in the recovery room. Our primary outcome measures included the final intraoperative temperature and incidence of hypothermia at the end of surgery. There was a significantly higher rate of hypothermia at the end of surgery in the resistive heating group compared with the forced-air warming group (P=0.017). Final intraoperative temperatures were also significantly lower in the resistive heating group (35.9 compared with 36.1°C, P=0.029). Hypothermia at the end of surgery in both warming groups was common (36% forced air warming, 54% resistive heating). Our results suggest that forced-air warming is more effective than resistive heating in preventing postoperative hypothermia. NCT01056991. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Robotic partial nephrectomy with intracorporeal renal hypothermia using ice slush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Samarasekera, Dinesh; Krishnan, Jayram; Autorino, Riccardo; Acka, Oktay; Brando, Luis Felipe; Laydner, Humberto; Zargar, Homayoun

    2014-09-01

    To outline our technique for intracorporeal cooling with ice slush during robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN), with real-time parenchymal temperature monitoring. Eleven consecutive patients with enhancing solid renal masses suitable for treatment with RPN between September 2013 and January 2014 were included in the analysis. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Preoperative patient characteristics, intraoperative surgical parameters including patient body temperature and ipsilateral kidney temperature with real-time monitoring, and short-term functional outcomes were analyzed. Median age was 55 years (range, 39-75 years) and American Society of Anesthesiologists score was 3 (range, 2-4). Median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 2.3-7.1) and RENAL nephrometry score was 9 (range, 5-11). One patient had a solitary kidney. During cooling, the lowest median renal parenchymal temperature was 17.05°C (range, 11°C-26°C) and cold ischemia time was 27.17 minutes (range, 18-49 minutes). Median time to latest postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate was 12 days (range, 2-30 days). Median glomerular filtration rate preservation was 81% (range, 47.9%-126%). There was one positive margin. There were no postoperative complications, and no patients experienced a prolonged ileus. The limitations of this study include a small number of patients and short-term follow-up. RPN with renal hypothermia using intracorporeal ice slush is technically feasible. Our simplified method of introducing the ice slush was free of complications and highly reproducible. The use of a needle temperature probe allowed us to monitor in real time cooling of the renal parenchyma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrén, M; Silfvast, T; Rubertsson, S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Sudden cardiac arrest survivors suffer from ischaemic brain injury that may lead to poor neurological outcome and death. The reperfusion injury that occurs is associated with damaging biochemical reactions, which are suppressed by mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). In several...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI). METHODS: Relevant studies were identified after two consensus meetings of the SSAI Task Force on Therapeutic Hypothermia (SSAITFTH) and via literature search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Medline. Evidence was assessed and consensus...

  15. Kinetic distribution of the radio-sodium among the rabbit in hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, F.; Combrisson, A.

    1955-01-01

    The experimental hypothermia, by the deep modifications of the circulatory hemodynamic, which it drags, and by the huge reduction of the oxidative processes that it characterizes, represent a particular physiological state that must permit to specify physico-chemical mechanisms which order the exchanges of the partition of the blood in capillaries and notably electrolytes exchanges. To do this study we followed the distribution kinetics of the sodium 24 in the blood system of 30 rabbits that was either in hypothermia, either to normal temperature. (M.B.) [fr

  16. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB...... the hypothermia phase of TH had a 17% 180-day mortality rate compared to 38% in no-SB patients (phypothermia was directly associated with lower odds of unfavorable...... neurological outcome (ORunadjusted=0.42 (0.23-0.75, phypothermia is independently associated with a lower 180-day mortality rate and may thus be a novel, early marker of favorable outcome in comatose survivors of OHCA....

  17. Demonstration of the astral post accidental code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmon, P.; Mourlon, C.

    2003-01-01

    . The results proposed by ASTRAL can in turn be saved in its database, on the user's request, in order to be processed by other tools such as Geographical Information Systems, which enable spatial analysis and map production. Such maps are very helpful in crisis situations to decision makers since by answering to questions of a 'where?' type, at a given time, they complete the information delivered by ASTRAL, which answers to questions of a 'when?' type, at a given site. This is why a link to ASTRAL has been constructed in CARTINFO, an IRSN tool dedicated to mapping results for its Crisis Technical Center. Thus the CONRAD, ASTRAL and CARTINFO softwares constitute a chain for IRSN's Crisis Technical Center, calculating transfers through the environment and consequences of an atmospheric accidental radionuclide release. The development of this version started in 1999 and has been subject to a quality assurance program. The identified customers and users have been associated in a control committee expressing needs, validating choices and checking the good progress of the project. The programming is currently being validated by test scenarios that check the equations, parameters, functionalities and navigation through the screens. The technology and architecture chosen for the second version of ASTRAL are different from the previous ones. It now uses an internet technology and is of a three-third type, the software requiring an Oracle database, a Microsoft web server and a consultation station. These choices offer important advantages: the spreading and maintenance of the tool are very easy. In fact, once the server and the database have been installed an a network, the users only need a web browser to run the code. The initial installation and the updating are thus no more to be made an every user station, but only on the server and/or the database; the code may be installed on a portable computer, which hosts the database, the internet server and the web browser. This

  18. Cocoa Beach, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of from fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance...

  19. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  20. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  1. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  2. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  3. Jeff's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  4. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  5. stil113_0401p -- Still frame locations of sediment extracted from video imagery collected by Delta submersible in September 2001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  6. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  7. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Exploration of Outer Shelf and Slope Habitats off the Coast of North Carolina - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during one dive of the 2002 "Islands in the Stream - Outer Shelf...

  8. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard (Massachusetts) Coastal Observatory, May 10 - December 15, 2003 (NODC Accession 0002299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts data were collected using a moored submersible flow cytometer from a Coastal Observatory at the Martha's Vineyard in Masschutsetts from 10...

  9. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard (Massachusetts) Coastal Observatory, May - December 2006 (NODC Accession 0036656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts were collected from using a moored submersible flow cytometer from the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory in the Northwest Atlantic...

  10. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, Massachusetts, May - September 2004 (NODC Accession 0002722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts were collected from using a moored submersible flow cytometer from the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory in the Northwest Atlantic...

  11. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of accidental injection of local anaesthetic into the subdural space during neuraxial blockade is rare. The presentation of unexplainable clinical signs that do not match the clinical picture of subarachnoid or intravascular injection of the local anaesthetic agent should invoke high suspicion of unintentional ...

  12. Coincidence counting corrections for dead time losses and accidental coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    An equation is derived for the calculation of the radioactivity of a source from the results of coincidence counting taking into account the dead-time losses and accidental coincidences. The derivation is an extension of the method of J. Bryant [Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isot., 14:143, 1963]. The improvement on Bryant's formula has been verified by experiment

  13. Brugada syndrome unmasked by accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranjcec, Darko; Bergovec, Mijo; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien

    2007-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the gene SCN5A can cause Brugada syndrome (BrS), which is an inherited form of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient, with no previous medical history, who had ventricular fibrillation after accidental inhalation of gasoline...

  14. The Accidental Transgressor: Morally Relevant Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Richardson, Cameron; Jampol, Noah

    2014-01-01

    To test young children’s false belief theory of mind in a morally relevant context, two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, children (N = 162) at 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 years of age were administered 3 tasks: prototypic moral transgression task, false belief theory of mind task (ToM), and an “accidental transgressor” task, which measured a morally relevant false belief theory of mind (MoToM). Children who did not pass false belief ToM were more likely to attribute negative intentions to an accidental transgressor than children who passed false belief ToM, and to use moral reasons when blaming the accidental transgressor. In Experiment 2, children (N = 46) who did not pass false belief ToM viewed it as more acceptable to punish the accidental transgressor than did participants who passed false belief ToM. Findings are discussed in light of research on the emergence of moral judgment and theory of mind. PMID:21377148

  15. The Accidental Transgressor: Morally-Relevant Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Melanie; Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Richardson, Cameron; Jampol, Noah; Woodward, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    To test young children's false belief theory of mind in a morally relevant context, two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, children (N=162) at 3.5, 5.5, and 7.5 years of age were administered three tasks: prototypic moral transgression task, false belief theory of mind task (ToM), and an "accidental transgressor" task, which measured a…

  16. Accidental Childhood Poisoning in Enugu, South‑East, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accidental childhood poisoning is one of the recognized causes of ... are those undergoing the oral phase of their psychological development. .... Palm oil ingestion and induction of emesis were the most commonly used ... poisoning. Kerosene is found in most homes in Nigeria as it is the ... Ingestion of coconut water. 2. 3.1.

  17. Accidental hand grenade blast injuries in the Transkei region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Study: Accidental hand grenade blast injuries in the Transkei region of South Africa. 348. Vol 51 No 4. SA Fam ... There is some evidence that a substantial number of small arms and hand grenades ... Unfortunately, the safety device was ...

  18. Accidental administration of Syntometrine in adult dosage to the newborn.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitfield, M F; Salfield, S A

    1980-01-01

    The clinical course is described of an infant who accidentally received an adult dose of Syntometrine (synthetic oxytocin + ergometrine) at delivery. The infant soon became ill with convulsions and ventilatory failure, and later with water intoxication. Similar reported cases are reviewed and recommendations are given for the management of future cases.

  19. Non-accidental injury: a review of the radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carty, H.

    1997-01-01

    There have been many descriptions of the radiological features of non-accidental injury since John Caffey introduced the concept of inflicted injury and initially described some of the patterns of injury. Since then, our understanding of the radiologically detectable injuries has increased. This article provides a review of our current understanding of the lesions. (orig.)

  20. Natural convection accidental conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmastro, D.F.; Clausse, A.

    1990-01-01

    Under certain conditions, wether accidental or in nuclear reactor design, a nuclear reactor core may be found to be refrigerated by a fluid in natural circulation. Before the possible density waves phenomenon occurrence, it is essential to have a good knowledge of the flow evolution and thermohydraulic variables under these conditions. (Author) [es

  1. Study of stowage of radioactive materials packagings in accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, G.; Gilles, P.; Phalippou, C.; Pouard, M.; Draulans, J.; Lafontaine, I.

    1987-03-01

    The study of transport conditions shows that few data are available on accidental conditions. Two types of accidents are selected and defined by calculations and tests. Sizing of stowage is determined for a frontal shock (35 g deceleration), maintaining the packaging on the vehicle, and side shock rupture of the stowage system for a determined stress. Mathematical formulations are developed [fr

  2. Accidental Childhood Poisoning in Enugu, South‑East, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accidental childhood poisoning is one of the recognized causes of morbidity and mortality in children under the age of 5 years worldwide. The prevalence and type of substance ingested vary from place to place and over time. Aim: This study was conducted with the aim of ascertaining the frequency and ...

  3. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Observaciones sobre accidentes de trabajo y enfermedades profesionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Sarmiento López

    1948-03-01

    Full Text Available En los tiempos antiguos no existía ley ni disposición alguna de carácter social que favoreciera a los trabajadores incapacitados por enfermedad o por accidente, por tanto, eran tratados como esclavos o considerados como animales. Los accidentes de trabajo y las enfermedades profesionales eran casi desconocidas antes de la introducción de la maquinaria en la industria, por lo cual no existía el derecho a indemnización por concepto de daños que sufriera el trabajador en el desempeño de sus labores. Solamente se conocen los edictos de Rotari (año 645 de la éra cristiana lanzados en Italia con el fin de reparar los accidentes de los obreros de la construcción y después, en la época del Renacimiento, algunas publicaciones que hablan de ciertas enfermedades de los trabajadores (Ellemborg 1473, Paracelso 1493-1541. Ya en la edad media la industria comenzó a tomar cierta importancia y dada la escasez de brazos, se vio obligado el patrón por fuerza de las circunstancias a prestar ayuda económica a los trabajadores incapacitados por una u otra causa. Los accidentes sucedidos en las industrias no se consideraban como de trabajo, por no conocerse el peligro que envolvía el empleo de la maqumana. En el siglo XVII y a principios del XVIII un médico italiano, Ramazzini habla del perjuicio que ocasionan ciertos trabajos en el organismo del individuo, produciendo alteraciones anatómicas y funcionales. Solamente a fines del siglo XVIII y a principios del XIX con la producción en masa, con el aumento del número de obreros y con la falta de protección, empezaron los accidentes de trabajo a hacerse notorios.

  5. Milrinone ameliorates cardiac mechanical dysfunction after hypothermia in an intact rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrichs, Erik Sveberg; Kondratiev, Timofei; Tveita, Torkjel

    2014-12-01

    Rewarming from hypothermia is often complicated by cardiac dysfunction, characterized by substantial reduction in stroke volume. Previously we have reported that inotropic agents, working via cardiac β-receptor agonism may exert serious side effects when applied to treat cardiac contractile dysfunction during rewarming. In this study we tested whether Milrinone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, is able to ameliorate such dysfunction when given during rewarming. A rat model designed for circulatory studies during experimental hypothermia with cooling to a core temperature of 15°C, stable hypothermia at this temperature for 3h and subsequent rewarming was used, with a total of 3 groups: (1) a normothermic group receiving Milrinone, (2) a hypothermic group receiving Milrinone the last hour of hypothermia and during rewarming, and (3) a hypothermic saline control group. Hemodynamic function was monitored using a conductance catheter introduced to the left ventricle. After rewarming from 15°C, stroke volume and cardiac output returned to within baseline values in Milrinone treated animals, while these variables were significantly reduced in saline controls. Milrinone ameliorated cardiac dysfunction during rewarming from 15°C. The present results suggest that at low core temperatures and during rewarming from such temperatures, pharmacologic efforts to support cardiovascular function is better achieved by substances preventing cyclic AMP breakdown rather than increasing its formation via β-receptor stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - where to from here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne O. Davidson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia before or around the time of birth occurs in approximately 2/1000 live births and is associated with a high risk of death or lifelong disability. Therapeutic hypothermia is now well established as standard treatment for infants with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy but is only partially effective. There is compelling preclinical and clinical evidence that hypothermia is most protective when it is started as early as possible after hypoxia-ischemia. Further improvements in outcome from therapeutic hypothermia are very likely to arise from strategies to reduce the delay before starting treatment of affected infants. In this review we examine evidence that current protocols are reasonably close to the optimal depth and duration of cooling, but that the optimal rate of rewarming after hypothermia is unclear. The potential for combination treatments to augment hypothermic neuroprotection has considerable promise, particularly with endogenous targets such as melatonin and erythropoietin and noble gases such as xenon. We dissect the critical importance of preclinical studies using realistic delays in treatment and clinically relevant cooling protocols when examining combination treatment, and that for many strategies overlapping mechanisms of action can substantially attenuate any effects.

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegel, Andreas; Gamper, Gunnar; Mayr, Harald

    2011-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria. A questionnaire was sent to intensive care units (ICUs) in Lower Austria. Methods of inducing and maintaining hypothermia, the practise of rewarming, concomitant therapies and reasons not to cool were documented. Of the 23 ICUs 10 (43%) used TH. Nine (39%) cooled their patients to 32-34°C and one to 34-35°C. Duration of cooling was 24 h (n=8, 35%), 24-48 h (n=1) or 48 h (n=1). For induction of hypothermia, ICUs used cold infusions (n=5, 22%), surface (n=7, 30%) or endovascular cooling (n=6, 26%). The same methods were used during the maintenance period. Reasons not to cool were insufficient staff resources (n=4, 17%), technical complexity of cooling (n=4, 17%) and too little information (n=3, 13%). In conclusion, TH has been poorly implemented in Lower Austria. The reasons for not using hypothermia could possibly be dispelled by education.

  8. Unexpected fatal neurological deterioration after successful cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and therapeutic hypothermia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, R.; Tjan, D.H.; Adriaanse, M.W.; Vugt, R. van; Zanten, A.R. van

    2008-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to pulseless electrical activity. She was treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia to minimise secondary anoxic brain damage. After a 24 h period of

  9. Changes in blood flow by local hypothermia and its application to cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong-Su; Higano, Shuichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Mamoru; Hoshino, Humihiko

    1984-01-01

    Protective effects of local hypothermia on radiation dermatitis and mucositis were shown. It was considered that the main factor influencing radioprotection was decrease of local blood flow. Our examinations showed that blood flow of the skin and oral mucosa decreased while that of the tumors did not so change. Adequate results were obtained in the combined treatment of radiation and chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Admission Hypothermia in Very Preterm Infants and Neonatal Mortality and Morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Emilija; Maier, Rolf F; Norman, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    -28 days (risk ratio 1.79; 1.15-2.78) but not after 28 days of age. We found no associations between admission temperature and neonatal morbidity. CONCLUSION: Admission hypothermia after very preterm birth is a significant problem in Europe, associated with an increased risk of early and late neonatal...

  11. Numerical Investigation of a Tuned Heave Plate Energy-Harvesting System of a Semi-Submersible Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel tuned heave plate energy-harvesting system (THPEH is presented for the motion suppressing and energy harvesting of a semi-submersible platform. This THPEH system is designed based on the principle of a tuned mass damper (TMD and is composed of spring supports, a power take-off system (PTO and four movable heave plates. The permanent magnet linear generators (PMLG are used as the PTO system in this design. A semi-submersible platform operating in the South China Sea is selected as the research subject for investigating the effects of the THPEH system on motion reduction and harvesting energy through numerical simulations. The numerical model of the platform and the THPEH system, which was established based on hydrodynamic analysis, is modified and validated by the results of the flume test of a 1:70 scale model. The effects of the parameters, including the size, the frequency ratio and the damping ratio of the THPEH system, are systematically investigated. The results show that this THPEH system, with proper parameters, could significantly reduce the motions of the semi-submersible platform and generate considerable power under different wave conditions.

  12. Linking carbon and nitrogen metabolism to depth distribution of submersed macrophytes using high ammonium dosing tests and a lake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guixiang; Cao, Te; Fu, Hui; Ni, Leyi; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Wei; Song, Xin; Xie, Ping; Jeppesen, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Strategies of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilisation are among the factors determining plant distribution. It has been argued that submersed macrophytes adapted to lower light environments are more efficient in maintaining C metabolic homeostasis due to their conservative C strategy and ability to balance C shortage. We studied how depth distributions of 12 submersed macrophytes in Lake Erhai, China, were linked to their C-N metabolic strategies when facing acute [Formula: see text] dosing.[Formula: see text] dosing changed C-N metabolism significantly by decreasing the soluble carbohydrate (SC) content and increasing the [Formula: see text]-N and free amino acid (FAA) content of plant tissues.The proportional changes in SC contents in the leaves and FAA contents in the stems induced by [Formula: see text] dosing were closely correlated (positive for SC and negative for FAA) with the colonising water depths of the plants in Lake Erhai, the plants adapted to lower light regimes being more efficient in maintaining SC and FAA homeostasis.These results indicate that conservative carbohydrate metabolism of submersed macrophytes allowed the plants to colonise greater water depths in eutrophic lakes, where low light availability in the water column diminishes carbohydrate production by the plants.

  13. Studi Pengaruh Gerak Semi-submersible Drilling Rig dengan Variasi Pre-tension Mooring Line terhadap Keamanan Drilling Riser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Arda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Analisis terhadap sistem tambat pada anjungan pengeboran semi-submersible drilling rig perlu dilakukan sebelum dilakukannya operasi di lapangan untuk mengetahui perencanaan sistem tambat yang tepat dan aman. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan analisa perilaku gerak semi-submersible dengan variasi pre-tension mooring line untuk mengetahui berapa besar pre-tension minimal yang harus digunakan agar operasi pengeboran di lingkungan laut Natuna dapat berjalan dengan aman. Variasi pre-tension yang digunakan adalah sebesar 400kN-2000kN dengan penambahan sebesar 400kN. Karakteristik gerakan semi-submersible diprediksi dengan menghitung RAO free floating dengan pemodelan numerik dalam domain frekuensi. Kemudian dilakukan analisa simulasi sistem lengkap (platform, mooring dan drilling riser dengan pemodelan numerik dalam domain waktu. Hasil yang didapat yakni nilai maksimum tegangan mooring line memenuhi batas kriteria API-RP2SK untuk semua variasi pre-tension dengan safety factor terkecil 2.44. Sudut flex joint drilling riser yang terjadi melewati batas kriteria API-RP16Q pada pre-tension 400kN-800kN yang mencapai 6.20 untuk sudut maksimum dan 4.80 untuk sudut rata-rata. Tegangan von Mises yang terjadi pada drilling riser melebihi kriteria API-RP16Q pada pre-tension 400kN-1200kN karena nilainya mencapai 369 MPa (0.82 yield stress.

  14. EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL PLUS HYPOTHERMIA ON SHORT-TERM NEWBORN PIG BRAIN DAMAGE AFTER ACUTE HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Lafuente

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothermia is standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but near 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms to hypothermia and would improve neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate.Objective: To test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets.Methods: Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomized to receive 30 min after the insult: 1 normothermia- and vehicle-treated group; 2 normothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group; 3 hypothermia- and vehicle-treated group; and 4 hypothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to qualify the number of neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate. Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress and expression of caspase-3 (apoptosis and TNFα (inflammation.Results: Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on histological damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone.Conclusion: Cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  15. Whole-body hypothermia has central and peripheral influences on elbow flexor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Farrell; Kalmar, Jayne M; Pretorius, Thea; Gardiner, Phillip F; Giesbrecht, Gordon G

    2011-05-01

    The superimposed twitch technique was used to study the effect of whole-body hypothermia on maximal voluntary activation of elbow flexors. Seven subjects [26.4 ± 4 years old (mean ± SD)] were exposed to 60 min of either immersion in 8°C water (hypothermia) or sitting in 22°C air (control). Voluntary activation was assessed during brief (3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and then during a 2 min fatiguing sustained MVC. Hypothermia (core temperature 34.8 ± 0.9°C) decreased maximal voluntary torque from 98.2 ± 1.0 to 82.8 ± 5.8% MVC (P < 0.001) and increased central conduction time from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 9.1 ± 0.7 ms (P < 0.05). Hypothermia also decreased maximal resting twitch amplitude from 17.6 ± 4.0 to 10.0 ± 1.7% MVC (P < 0.005) and increased the time-to-peak twitch tension from 55.4 ± 4.0 to 79.0 ± 11.7 ms (P < 0.001). During the 2 min contraction, hypothermia decreased initial torque (P < 0.01) but attenuated the subsequent rate of torque decline (control from 95.5 ± 4 to 29.4 ± 8% MVC; and hypothermia from 85.3 ± 8 to 37.3 ± 5% MVC; P < 0.01). Cortical superimposed twitches increased as fatigue developed but were always lower in the hypothermic conditions. Cortical superimposed twitches increased from a value of 0.4 ± 0.3% MVC prefatigue to 3.9 ± 1.4% MVC postfatigue (P < 0.001) in the hypothermic conditions and from 1.7 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 2.3% MVC in control conditions. Our results suggest that hypothermia decreases MVCs primarily via peripheral mechanisms and attenuates the rate of fatigue development by reducing central fatigue.

  16. Post-stroke gaseous hypothermia increases vascular density but not neurogenesis in the ischemic penumbra of aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Uzoni, Adriana; Ciobanu, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    of several genes involved in protein degradation, thereby leading to better preservation of infarcted tissue. Further, hypothermia increased the density of newly formed blood vessels in the peri-lesional cortex did not enhance neurogenesis in the infarcted area of aged rats. Likewise, there was improved......-PCR and immunofluorescence, we assessed infarct size, vascular density, neurogenesis and as well as the expression of genes coding for proteasomal proteins as well as in post-stroke aged Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to H2S- induced hypothermia. Results: Two days exposure to mild hypothermia diminishes the expression...

  17. BIOMARKERS S100B AND NSE PREDICT OUTCOME IN HYPOTHERMIA-TREATED ENCEPHALOPATHIC NEWBORNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, An N.; Chang, Taeun; Baumgart, Stephen; McCarter, Robert; Nelson, Karin B.; Glass, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if serum S100B protein and neuron specific enolase (NSE) measured during therapeutic hypothermia are predictive of neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months in children with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study Setting A level IV neonatal intensive care unit in a free-standing children’s hospital. Patients Term newborns with moderate to severe NE referred for therapeutic hypothermia during the study period. Interventions Serum NSE and S100B were measured at 0, 12, 24 and 72 hrs of hypothermia. Measurements and Main Reseults Of the 83 infants were enrolled, fifteen (18%) died in the newborn period. Survivors were evaluated by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II) at 15 months of age. Outcomes were assessed in 49/68 (72%) survivors at a mean age of 15.2±2.7 months. Neurodevelopmental outcome was classified by BSID-II Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor (PDI) Developmental Index scores, reflecting cognitive and motor outcomes respectively. Four-level outcome classifications were defined a priori: normal= MDI/PDI within 1SD (>85), mild= MDI/PDI <1SD (70–85), moderate/severe= MDI/PDI <2SD (<70), or died. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with increasing outcome severity after controlling for baseline and soceioeconomic characteristics in ordinal regression models. Adjusted odds ratios for cognitive outcome were: S100B 2.5 (95% CI 1.3–4.8) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6); for motor outcome: S100B 2.6 (1.2–5.6) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6). Conclusions Serum S100B and NSE levels in babies with NE are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months. These putative biomarkers of brain injury may help direct care during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24777302

  18. Therapeutic mild hypothermia improves early outcomes in rats subjected to severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wu; Shen, Yuehong; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Shouyin; Shen, Huahao

    2018-04-15

    Therapeutic hypothermia has shown beneficial effects in sepsis. This study focused on its mechanism. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent cecal ligation and perforation and subsequently were treated with either hypothermia (HT; body temperature cooled and maintained at 34 °C by ice pad for 10 h; n = 8) or normothermia (NT; n = 8). Three additional rats underwent sham surgery. The body temperatures of the sham-operated and NT groups were maintained at 38 °C with a thermal pad. After the hypothermia treatment, the HT rats were rewarmed for 2 h. The groups were compared for circulating cytokines (IL-6, IL-10), lactate, high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1), and lung and intestinal lesions. Animals were observed for 24 h. Compared with the sham-operated group, the 2 sepsis group rats had significantly higher circulating IL-6, HMGB1, and lactate levels, and tissue injury. In the HT rats, the levels of IL-6, HMGB1, and lactate, the lung wet-to-dry ratio, and lung and intestinal damage were significantly lower than that of the NT group. Circulating IL-10 levels increased significantly after 12 h in the sepsis groups compared with sham animals, while that of the NT and HT groups were comparable. The survival rates of the NT and HT rats were also comparable. Therapeutic hypothermia in a rat model of sepsis was associated with lower levels of circulating IL-6 and HMGB1, and less capillary leakage and tissue edema. These results suggest that mild hypothermia has potential as a therapy in sepsis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Management Of Patients With Stroke In Critical Care Units, Considering Osmotic Therapy And Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic brain edema is an early complication of stroke which increases the possibility of secondary ischemia. Hypertonic solutions, mannitol and recently hypertonic saline (HS has been considered for treatment of increased ICP. HS could decrease ICP especially in hypotensive patients with different mechanisms, direct effect on edema, decreasing inflammation which is mediated by attenuation of TNFa and IL-1b stimulation on Na-K-Cl cotransporter 1 and improvement of microcirculation. Improvement of microcirculation is so important for hypertonic solutions to be effective in ischemia especially focal ischemia. Based on the literature, hypertonic saline is more effective in decreasing cerebral edema than the equal volume of mannitol. The optimal dose and duration of therapy needs more trials. Caution should be performed with patients with moderate size hemispheric infarcts on presentation, race and genetic factors regarding osmotic therapy. Hypothermia has been rated as one of the most active modes of neuroprotection based on the results of different trials. Hypothermia in both ways, surface and intravascular, decreases cerebral metabolic rate of O2 and glucose and reduces brain oxygen consumption, inflammation and oxidative stress. Recent data continue to support consideration of therapeutic hypothermia for cerebral ischemia in larger clinical trials of acute ischemic stroke. By increasing the time window to therapy initiation and decreasing the treatment duration, selective intracarotid cold saline administration brings increased feasibility, potentially better outcomes and perhaps fewer complications compared with the whole body cooling. Hypothermia is now recommended as a targeted temperature management with defined protocol which should be started early; it may be performed pharmacologically in combination with other therapies. Applying hypothermia should be considered regarding its cost, using in awaked patients, re-warming protocol

  20. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m(2) /day and current density of 4.33 A/m(2) were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic benefits of biogas enhancement and possible wastewater treatment, the SMDC may represent a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for waste resources recovery and biomethanation of ammonia-rich residues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of Deep Geothermal Electric Submersible Pumping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Kullick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep geothermal energy systems employ electric submersible pumps (ESPs in order to lift geothermal fluid from the production well to the surface. However, rough downhole conditions and high flow rates impose heavy strain on the components, leading to frequent failures of the pump system. As downhole sensor data is limited and often unrealible, a detailed and dynamical model system will serve as basis for deeper understanding and analysis of the overall system behavior. Furthermore, it allows to design model-based condition monitoring and fault detection systems, and to improve controls leading to a more robust and efficient operation. In this paper, a detailed state-space model of the complete ESP system is derived, covering the electrical, mechanical and hydraulic subsystems. Based on the derived model, the start-up phase of an exemplary yet realistic ESP system in the Megawatt range—located at a setting depth of 950 m and producing geothermal fluid of 140 ∘ C temperature at a rate of 0.145 m 3 s − 1 —is simulated in MATLAB/Simulink. The simulation results show that the system reaches a stable operating point with realistic values. Furthermore, the effect of self-excitation between the filter capacitor and the motor inductor can clearly be observed. A full set of parameters is provided, allowing for direct model implementation and reproduction of the presented results.

  2. Classification of submersed aquatic vegetation of the Venice lagoon using MIVIS airborne data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pignatti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In July 2001 an aerial survey with MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Spectrometer hyperspectral sensor and an in situ survey campaign were performed on Venice lagoon to map benthic macro-algae and sea phanerogams distribution. On MIVIS VIS spectral range images, training areas for benthic macro-algae and sea phanerogams have been selected by using sea truth data collected by CNR-ISMAR from in situ campaign and periodic area surveys used in the lagoon by the local authorities. The derived spectral signature has been used to classify the area in order to produce the maps of the pure and mixture submersed vegetation population. The algorithm applied to the data is based on the Subpixel Spectral Analytical Process (SSAP method. The method assumes that the spectrum of a single pixel is composed of a fraction of the material of interest while the remainder of the observed spectra contains background materials. In terms of recognition processes the produced maps present a very good agreement with the sea truth data even though the fraction material expressed in the maps does not represent a quantitative estimation of the material of interest.

  3. Carbon dioxide and submersed macrophytes in lakes: linking functional ecology to community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, John E; Pagano, Angela M

    2017-12-01

    Evaluating plant community response to atmospheric CO 2 rise is critical to predicting ecosystem level change. Freshwater lakes offer a model system for examining CO 2 effects as submersed macrophyte species differ greatly in their growth responses to CO 2 enrichment, and free CO 2 concentrations among these habitats show a wide range of natural, spatial variation. We determined free CO 2 concentrations in the water column and sediment porewater in littoral zones with pH macrophyte communities coupled with greenhouse-derived growth responses to CO 2 enrichment of constituent species to test two hypotheses: (1) CCRI, which is higher for communities dominated by species with greater growth responses to CO 2 enrichment, is positively correlated to free [CO 2 ] in the water column, and (2) in natural communities, the percent of sediment CO 2 -using species, which are relatively unresponsive to CO 2 enrichment, is negatively correlated to free [CO 2 ]. A significant positive correlation (P = 0.003) between our physiologically based CCRI and the concentration of free CO 2 in the water column supported our primary hypothesis that sites with higher levels of free CO 2 are dominated by species with greater growth responses to CO 2 enrichment. Our CCRI is also highly significantly correlated (P macrophyte community composition. Further, we demonstrate the utility of a physiologically-based index of community composition, our CCRI, as an ecologically valid measure of community response to CO 2 . © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Development for LMR coolant technology - Development of a submersible-in-pool electromagnetic pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Hee; Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Sang Don; Seo, Chun Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Su Won [Kyungki University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    The conceptual and detailed designs of an annular linear induction electromagnetic pump of small scale submersible-in-pool type are performed for the purpose of domestic development of the pumps used for the high-temperature natrium coolant transportation in liquid metal reactors. The pump drawings for and input power of 1,100 VA, an input frequency of 17 Hz, a maximum flowrate of 60 l/min and a maximum operation temperature of 600 deg C are obtained from the optimum design analyses by solving MHD and equivalent circuit equations. The characteristics of pump materials in the high temperature and neutron irradiation environment are reflected in designing the pump, and theoretical analyses for improving the pump performance and efficiency are tried through calculations of magnetic flux and temperature distributions inside the pump. The present project contributes to the further design of engineering proto-type electromagnetic pump with higher capacity and the development of liquid metal reactor with innovative simplicity. 44 refs., 4 tabs., 33 figs. (author)

  5. Ocean Economy and Fault Diagnosis of Electric Submersible Pump applied in Floating platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panlong Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocean economy plays a crucial role in the strengthening maritime safety industry and in the welfare of human beings. Electric Submersible Pumps (ESP have been widely used in floating platforms on the sea to provide oil for machines. However, the ESP fault may lead to ocean environment pollution, on the other hand, a timely fault diagnosis of ESP can improve the ocean economy. In order to meet the strict regulations of the ocean economy and environmental protection, the fault diagnosis of ESP system has become more and more popular in many countries. The vibration mechanical models of typical faults have been able to successfully diagnose the faults of ESP. And different types of sensors are used to monitor the vibration signal for the signal analysis and fault diagnosis in the ESP system. Meanwhile, physical sensors would increase the fault diagnosis challenge. Nowadays, the method of neural network for the fault diagnosis of ESP has been applied widely, which can diagnose the fault of an electric pump accurately based on the large database. To reduce the number of sensors and to avoid the large database, in this paper, algorithms are designed based on feature extraction to diagnose the fault of the ESP system. Simulation results show that the algorithms can achieve the prospective objectives superbly.

  6. Development of LMR Coolant Technology - Development of a submersible-in-pool electromagnetic pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Hi; Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Sang Don; Seo, Joon Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Su Won [Kyoungki University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    A submersible-in-pool type annular linear induction pumps of 60 l/min and 200 l/min, and 600 deg C has been designed with optimum geometrical and operating values found from MHD and circuit analyses reflecting the high-temperature characteristics of pump materials. Through the characteristics analyses inside the narrow flow channel of electromagnetic pump, the distribution of the time-varying flow field is calculated, and magnetic flux and force density are evaluated by end effects of linear induction electromagnetic pump and the instability analyses are carried out introducing one-dimensional linear perturbation. Testing the pump with the flow rate of 60 l/min in the suitably manufactured loop system shows a flow rate of 58 l/min at an input power of 1,377 VA with 60Hz. The design of a scaled-up pump is further taken into account LMR coolant system requiring increased capacity, and a basic analysis is carried out on the pump of 40,000 l/min for KALIMER. The present project contributes to the further design of engineering prototype electromagnetic pumps with higher capacity and to the development of liquid metal reactor with innovative simplicity. 89 refs., 8 tabs., 45 figs. (author)

  7. FUZZY LOGIC BASED OPTIMIZATION OF CAPACITOR VALUE FOR SINGLE PHASE OPEN WELL SUBMERSIBLE INDUCTION MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The aim of this paper is to optimize the capacitor value of a single phase open well submersible motor operating under extreme voltage conditions using fuzzy logic optimization technique and compared with no-load volt-ampere method. This is done by keeping the displacement angle (a between main winding and auxiliary winding near 90o, phase angle (f between the supply voltage and line current near 0o. The optimization work is carried out by using Fuzzy Logic Toolbox software built on the MATLAB technical computing environment with Simulink software. Findings – The optimum capacitor value obtained is used with a motor and tested for different supply voltage conditions. The vector diagrams obtained from the experimental test results indicates that the performance is improved from the existing value. Originality/value – This method will be highly useful for the practicing design engineers in selecting the optimum capacitance value for single phase induction motors to achieve the best performance for operating at extreme supply voltage conditions.

  8. Leading global projects for professional and accidental project leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    This book is a must-read for anyone responsible for projects and initiatives that span functional and geographical divides. Authors Moran and Youngdahl bring extensive experience and learning from industry practice to present a clear and straightforward treatment of the leadership skills and knowledge required to lead projects that are global in nature. They have written the first book of its kind to address the three essential skills of global project leaders - strategic project management, project leadership, and cross-cultural leadership. The authors argue that global project leadership is an essential skill in our project-based world and that we are all either intentional or accidental project leaders. Intentional project leaders pursue formal project management education and even certification whereas accidental project leaders find themselves leading global projects and initiatives as a result of a special assignment or promotion. Moran and Youndahl have found that the vast majority of global projects ...

  9. Food allergy: practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, I; Moreira, A; Moreira, P; Barros, R

    2016-09-01

    Food allergies are a growing problem and currently the primary treatment of food allergy is avoidance of culprit foods. However, given the lack of information and education and also the ubiquitous nature of allergens, accidental exposures to food allergens are not uncommon. The fear of potential fatal reactions and the need of a proper avoidance leads in most of the cases to the limitation of leisure and social activities. This review aims to be a practical approach on education and accidental exposure prevention regarding activities like shopping, eating out, and travelling. The recommendations are focused especially on proper reading of food labels and the management of the disease, namely in restaurants and airplanes, concerning cross-contact and communication with other stakeholders. The implementation of effective tools is essential to manage food allergy outside home, avoid serious allergic reactions and minimize the disease's impact on individuals' quality of life.

  10. Accidental degeneracy of double Dirac cones in a phononic crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ze-Guo; Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; He, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Zheng, Li-Yang; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial honeycomb lattices with Dirac cone dispersion provide a macroscopic platform to study the massless Dirac quasiparticles and their novel geometric phases. In this paper, a quadruple-degenerate state is achieved at the center of the Brillouin zone in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice phononic crystal, which is a result of accidental degeneracy of two double-degenerate states. In the vicinity of the quadruple-degenerate state, the dispersion relation is linear. Such quadruple degeneracy is analyzed by rigorous representation theory of groups. Using method, a reduced Hamiltonian is obtained to describe the linear Dirac dispersion relations of this quadruple-degenerate state, which is well consistent with the simulation results. Near such accidental degeneracy, we observe some unique properties in wave propagating, such as defect-insensitive propagating character and the Talbot effect.

  11. Accidental degeneracy of double Dirac cones in a phononic crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ze-Guo

    2014-04-09

    Artificial honeycomb lattices with Dirac cone dispersion provide a macroscopic platform to study the massless Dirac quasiparticles and their novel geometric phases. In this paper, a quadruple-degenerate state is achieved at the center of the Brillouin zone in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice phononic crystal, which is a result of accidental degeneracy of two double-degenerate states. In the vicinity of the quadruple-degenerate state, the dispersion relation is linear. Such quadruple degeneracy is analyzed by rigorous representation theory of groups. Using method, a reduced Hamiltonian is obtained to describe the linear Dirac dispersion relations of this quadruple-degenerate state, which is well consistent with the simulation results. Near such accidental degeneracy, we observe some unique properties in wave propagating, such as defect-insensitive propagating character and the Talbot effect.

  12. Reversible Hypothermia-Induced Inhibition of Human Platelet Activation in Whole Blood in Vitro and in Vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, A

    1992-01-01

    Platelets and other blood components are often transfused in clinical settings associated with hypothermia and a bleeding diathesis, such as cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, other major surgery, and multiple trauma...

  13. Induced hypothermia is protective in a rat model of pneumococcal pneumonia associated with increased adenosine triphosphate availability and turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; Aslami, Hamid; Kuipers, Maria T.; Horn, Janneke; Vroom, Margreeth B.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of induced hypothermia on bacterial growth, lung injury, and mitochondrial function in a rat model of pneumococcal pneumosepsis. Design: Animal study. Setting: University research laboratory. Subjects: Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Subjects were

  14. TherapeuTic hypoThermia afTer peri-inTervenTional in-hospiTal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... percutaneous dilation tracheostomy on the icu under analgosedation. during the .... ice-water gastric lavage could have been used for further facilitating .... cerebral hypothermia after cardiac arrest in dogs: a prospective ...

  15. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF ACCIDENTAL FLOOD WAVES PROPAGATION

    OpenAIRE

    Lorand Catalin STOENESCU

    2011-01-01

    The study presented in this article describes a modern modeling methodology of the propagation of accidental flood waves in case a dam break; this methodology is applied in Romania for the first time for the pilot project „Breaking scenarios of Poiana Uzului dam”. The calculation programs used help us obtain a bidimensional calculation (2D) of the propagation of flood waves, taking into consideration the diminishing of the flood wave on a normal direction to the main direction; this diminishi...

  16. A 'Puff' dispersion model for routine and accidental releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grsic, Z.; Rajkovic, B.; Milutinovic, P.

    1999-01-01

    A Puff dispersion model for accidental or routine releases is presented. This model was used as a constitutive part of an automatic meteorological station.All measured quantities are continuously displayed on PC monitor in a digital and graphical form, they are averaging every 10 minutes and sending to the civil information center of Belgrade. In the paper simulation of a pollutant plume dispersion from The oil refinery 'Pancevo', on April 18 th 1999 is presented. (author)

  17. La prevención de accidentes (3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchilla, M.

    1966-04-01

    Full Text Available The financial loss due to working accidents is very substantial, quite apart from the actual loss of human lives. Hence avoiding these accidents is a most important matter. The accident index in the various industries shows a rate of increase that is larger than should be the case in proportion to the development of the industries concerned, and the larger number of employees. The fact that these indexes are smaller in many countries, however, shows that these accidents can be considerably reduced if suitable measures are taken to avoid them. In chapter 2 of our magazine, issue no. 178, a variety of reasons were discussed that may originate accidents, although these causes are not directly linked to the accident itself. In this article mention is made of some of the measures that can be taken in the handling of cutting and welding equipment, and also of inflammable liquids, to prevent possible accidents.El peso de los accidentes de trabajo sobre la economía supone cantidades muy grandes que, independientemente del inestimable valor de una vida humana, realzan la importancia de la prevención de accidentes. Los índices de accidentes muestran en diferentes industrias un crecimiento mayor de lo que debería corresponder proporcionalmente, habida cuenta del crecimiento laboral. El hecho de que en distintos países los índices sean inferiores, demuestra que se pueden conseguir buenos frutos si se concede primordial importancia a que los trabajos se realicen con las debidas medidas de seguridad. En el Capítulo 2, número 178 de esta Revista, se detallaron diversas causas que pueden originar un accidente sin estar ligadas en forma directa con una tarea determinada. En el presente trabajo se indican algunas de las medidas que deben observarse en el manejo de los equipos de soldadura y corte, así como en el transvase de líquidos inflamables.

  18. Compact fluorescent lamp phosphors in accidental radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, K. V. R.; Pallavi, S. P.; Ghildiyal, R.; Parmar, M. C.; Patel, Y. S.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Sai Prasad, A. S.; Natarajan, V.; Page, A. G.

    2006-01-01

    The application of lamp phosphors for accidental dosimetry is a new concept. Since the materials used in fluorescent lamps are good photo luminescent materials, if one can either use the inherent defects present in the phosphor or add suitable modifiers to induce thermoluminescence (TL) in these phosphors, then the device (fluorescent lamp) can be used as an accidental dosemeter. In continuation of our search for a suitable phosphor material, which can serve both as an efficient lamp phosphor and as a good radiation monitoring device, detailed examination has been carried out on cerium and terbium-doped lanthanum phosphate material. A 90 Sr beta source with 50 mCi strength (1.85 GBq) was used as the irradiation source for TL studies. The TL response as a function of dose received was examined for all phosphors used and it was observed that the intensity of the TL peak vs. dose received was a linear function in the dose range 0.1-200 Gy in each case. Incidentally LaPO 4 :Ce,Tb is a component of the compact fluorescent lamp marketed recently as an energy bright light source. Besides having very good luminescence efficiency, good dosimetric properties of these phosphors render them useful for their use in accidental dosimetry also. (authors)

  19. Development of miniaturized submersible fluorometers for the detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in marine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedetti, Marc; Bachet, Caroline; Joffre, Pascal; Ferretto, Nicolas; Guigue, Catherine; Goutx, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most widespread organic contaminants in aquatic environments. Due to their physico-chemical properties, PAHs are persistent and mobile, can strongly bioaccumulate in food chains and are harmful to living organisms. They are thus recognized by various international organizations as priority contaminants and are included in the list of 45 priority regulated substances by the European Union. Because of their aromatic structure, PAHs are "optically active" and have inherent fluorescence properties in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral domain (200-400 nm). Therefore, UV fluorescence spectroscopy has been successfully used to develop PAH sensors (i.e. UV fluorometers). Currently, five UV submersible fluorometers are commercially available for in situ measurements of PAHs: EnviroFlu-HC (TriOS Optical Sensors, Germany), Hydrocarbon Fluorometer (Sea & Sun Technology, Germany), HydroC ™ / PAH (CONTROS, Germany), UviLux AquaTracka (Chelsea Technology Group, UK) and Cyclops-7 (Turner Designs, US). These UV fluorometers are all dedicated to the measurement of phenanthrene (λEx /λEm: 255/360 nm), one of the most abundant and fluorescent PAHs found in the aquatic environment. In this study, we developed original, miniaturized submersible fluorometers based on deep UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for simultaneous measurements of two PAHs of interest: the MiniFluo-UV 1 for the detection of phenanthrene (PHE, at λEx /λEm: 255/360 nm) and naphthalene (NAP, at λEx /λEm: 270/340 nm), and the MiniFluo-UV 2 for the detection of fluorene (FLU, at λEx /λEm: 255/315 nm) and pyrene (PYR, at λEx /λEm: 270/380 nm). The MiniFluo-UV sensors have several features: measurements of two PAHs at the same time, small size (puck format, 80 x 60 mm), very low energy consumption (500 mW at 12V), LED monitoring, analog and numerical communication modes. The two MiniFluo-UV sensors were first tested in the laboratory: 1) on standard solutions of

  20. Expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70 and vacuolization in the pituitary glands in cases of fatal hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doberentz, Elke; Markwerth, Philipp; Wagner, Rebecca; Madea, Burkhard

    2017-09-01

    Hypothermia causes systemic cellular stress. The pituitary gland is an endocrine gland and plays an important role in thermoregulation. When the core body temperature drops, the pituitary gland is activated by stimulation of hypothalamic hormones. In this study, we investigated morphological alterations of the pituitary gland in cases of fatal hypothermia. Several morphological alterations of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, such as hemorrhage, vacuolization, and hyperemia, have been previously described in fatal hypothermia. However, the diagnostic value of these findings is controversial. We compared 11 cases of fatal hypothermia with 10 cases lacking antemortem hypothermic influences. In the presence of thermal cellular stress, the expression of heat shock proteins increases to protect cellular structures. Therefore, we immunohistochemically analyzed Hsp27 and Hsp70. Hsp27 expression was detected in 27.3% of the cases of fatal hypothermia and in 10.0% of the control cases, whereas Hsp70 expression was not detected in any case. Additionally, Sudan staining was performed to quantify fatty degeneration. A positive reaction was found in 45.5% of the study group and in 10.0% of the control group. This indicates that fatty degeneration might be a valuable marker when other macroscopic signs of hypothermia are absent.

  1. Use of plastic bags to prevent hypothermia at birth in preterm infants--do they work at lower gestations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, C P H; Yoxall, C W

    2009-02-01

    Hypothermia at birth is strongly associated with mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Occlusive wrapping of preterm infants during resuscitation, including polythene bags have been shown to prevent hypothermia. To evaluate the effectiveness of the introduction of polythene bags at resuscitation of infants born below 30 weeks gestation in a large tertiary neonatal centre. Retrospective audit of admission temperatures of all infants born below 30 weeks gestation for two years before and two years after the introduction of polythene bags. Hypothermia was defined as admission axillary temperature bags. The main reduction in hypothermia was seen in infants born above 28 weeks gestation (19.4% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.017). There was no significant effect in infants born between 28 weeks and 30 weeks (29.3% vs. 24.8%, p = 0.58). Polythene bags are effective in reducing the incidence of hypothermia at admission in infants born below 30 weeks gestation. The benefit in infants born below 28 weeks gestation was only marginal. This is in contrast to previously published studies. This may be related to the comparatively low incidence of hypothermia at the study centre even prior to introduction of polythene bags.

  2. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy-Associated Liver Fatty Degeneration and the Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia in Newborn Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroyuki; Shimono, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Shinji; Koyano, Kosuke; Jinnai, Wataru; Yamato, Satoshi; Yasuda, Saneyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Tanaka, Aya; Fujii, Takayuki; Kanenishi, Kenji; Chiba, Yoichi; Miki, Takanori; Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Although liver can be injured under the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) condition, there is currently no histopathological evidence. Therapeutic hypothermia is used to protect the brain; however, the therapeutic potential for concomitant liver injury is unknown. This study aimed to histopathologically prove HIE-associated liver injury and to investigate the influence of therapeutic hypothermia in a newborn piglet HIE model. Eighteen newborn piglets were divided into 3 groups: control (n = 4), HIE (n = 8), and therapeutic hypothermia (n = 6) groups. The hypoxic insult was induced by decreasing the fraction of inspiratory oxygen from 21 to 2-4% over 40 min while monitoring cerebral blood volume and cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation. For therapeutic hypothermia, whole-body cooling at 33-34°C was administered for 24 h after the hypoxic insult. We hematologically and histopathologically investigated the liver injury in all groups. Alanine transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase levels in the HIE group were significantly elevated compared with those in the control group. Micro-lipid droplet accumulation in the periportal zone, but not in the perivenous zone, was significantly greater in the HIE group than in the control group and significantly smaller in the therapeutic hypothermia group than in the HIE group. We demonstrated that micro-lipid droplet accumulation in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in the periportal zone occurs under the HIE condition and that this accumulation is suppressed by therapeutic hypothermia. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. [Neuroprotection with hypothermia in the newborn with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Standard guidelines for its clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Valverde, E; Tenorio, V; Vento, M; Cabañas, F

    2011-11-01

    Standardisation of hypothermia as a treatment for perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is supported by current scientific evidence. The following document was prepared by the authors on request of the Spanish Society of Neonatology and is intended to be a guide for the proper implementation of this therapy. We discuss the difficulties that may arise when moving from the strict framework of clinical trials to clinical daily care: early recognition of clinical encephalopathy, inclusion and exclusion criteria, hypothermia during transport, type of hypothermia (selective head or systemic cooling) and side effects of therapy. The availability of hypothermia therapy has changed the prognosis of children with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and our choices of therapeutic support. In this sense, it is especially important to be aware of the changes in the predictive value of the neurological examination and the electroencephalographic recording in cooled infants. In order to improve neuroprotection with hypothermia we need earlier recognition of to recognise earlier the infants that may benefit from cooling. Biomarkers of brain injury could help us in the selection of these patients. Every single infant treated with hypothermia must be included in a follow up program in order to assess neurodevelopmental outcome. Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Preferential cephalic redistribution of left ventricular cardiac output during therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwald, Ori; Jabr, Mohammad; Osiovich, Horacio; Miller, Steven P; McNamara, Patrick J; Lavoie, Pascal M

    2014-05-01

    To determine the relationship between left ventricular cardiac output (LVCO), superior vena cava (SVC) flow, and brain injury during whole-body therapeutic hypothermia. Sixteen newborns with moderate or severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were studied using echocardiography during and immediately after therapeutic hypothermia. Measures were also compared with 12 healthy newborns of similar postnatal age. Newborns undergoing therapeutic hypothermia also had cerebral magnetic resonance imaging as part of routine clinical care on postnatal day 3-4. LVCO was markedly reduced (mean ± SD 126 ± 38 mL/kg/min) during therapeutic hypothermia, whereas SVC flow was maintained within expected normal values (88 ± 27 mL/kg/min) such that SVC flow represented 70% of the LVCO. The reduction in LVCO during therapeutic hypothermia was mainly accounted by a reduction in heart rate (99 ± 13 vs 123 ± 17 beats/min; P newborns without brain injury (P = .013). Newborns with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy showed a preferential systemic-to-cerebral redistribution of cardiac blood flow during whole-body therapeutic hypothermia, which may reflect a lack of cerebral vascular adaptation in newborns with more severe brain injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DORADO/DOLPHIN: A Unique Semi-submersible Autonomous Vehicle for Ocean Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D.

    2016-02-01

    The Ocean Science and Technology research group (CERC.OCEAN) at Dalhousie University focuses on new approaches to the design and development of autonomous platforms to study biogeochemical and ecological changes in the world's oceans. Mesoscale "patch" experiments involving tracers are used to test hypotheses (e.g. iron fertilization) and examine near-surface processes and air-sea exchange. Such experiments typically require mapping of rapidly-evolving properties on scales of 10's to 100's of kilometers. These experiments typically employ a research vessel to monitor patch movement and to support process studies: however allocation of expensive vessel time between these uses can be problematic. We present a class of autonomous vehicle with unique potential for mesoscale mapping and experimental science at sea. The Dorado/Dolphin semi-submersibles, manufactured by International Submarine Engineering Ltd., travel just below the sea surface. A surface-piercing, "snorkel" mast allows use of a diesel engine allowing speeds of up to 16 knots and sufficient power for support of complex payloads. A tow-body can profile to 200m. The mast allows air sampling with near-zero atmospheric disturbance as well as remote sensing of the sea surface. The characteristics of this type of vehicle will be compared with those of other available platforms. We will report on our adaptation of the vehicle for measurement of gases and purposeful tracers (e.g. SF5CF3) as well as properties such as T, S, pCO2, O2, fluorescence, etc. and present and solicit ideas for the vehicles' further application/use for ocean science.

  6. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction

  7. Lightweight submersed 'Walking' NDE manipulators for PWR and BWR vessel weld inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saernmark, Ivan; Lenz, Herbert [WesDyne TRC AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    Three new manipulators developed by WesDyne TRC in Sweden have under the year 2007 performed three very successful inspections in the PWR reactor Ringhals 3 and the BWR reactors Ringhals 1 and Oskarshamn 1. The manipulator systems can be used to perform inspection of circumferential and vertical welds on the reactor pressure vessel, the core shroud, core shroud support in BWR reactors or vessel and core barrel welds in PWR reactors. Most other flat or curved surfaces can be inspected using the new concept through relatively simple mechanical reconfigurations of system modules. The first inspection was performed on the R3 PWR core barrel in June 2007 with a very good result. This Manipulator is designed for access in very narrow gaps and for the type of core barrels with a shield covering the whole area of the perimeter. The manipulator is attached to the inspection area by means of a new unique suction cup system. The current manipulators consist of a curved horizontal beam, with radius similar to the reactor vessel, and a straight vertical beam, forming a T-shaped structure. By alternating the application of suction cup pairs on the horizontal beam and the vertical beam and by driving the scanning motors, the manipulator performs an incremental translational movement upwards/downwards or from side to side. The principles of this system give a well defined and stable platform for global and local positioning accuracy. A combination of advanced sensor solutions provides accurate position information in the absence of other physical reference objects. The system is controlled by the new WesDyne TRC Motor Control Panel and software, the MCP is specifically designed for remote control of submersed manipulators using techniques for cable reduction.

  8. Application of a newly built semi-submersible vessel for transportation of a tension leg platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dagang; Sun, Weiying; Fan, Zhixia

    2012-09-01

    Transportation of tension leg platform (TLP) structures for a long distance has always been associated with the use of a heavy semi-transport vessel. The requirements of this type of vessel are always special, and their availability is limited. To prepare for the future development of South China Sea deepwater projects, the China Offshore Oil Engineering Corporation has recently built a heavy lift transport vessel-Hai Yang Shi You 278. This semi-submersible vessel has a displacement capacity of 50k DWT, and a breath of 42 meters. Understanding the vessel's applicability and preparing it for use in future deepwater projects are becoming imminent needs. This paper reviews the current critical issues associated with TLP transportation and performs detailed analysis of the designed TLP during load-out and transportation. The newly built COOEC transportation vessel HYSY 278 was applied to dry transport of the TLP structure from the COOEC fabrication yard in Qingdao to an oil field in South China Sea. The entire process included the load-out of the TLP structure from the landsite of the fabrication yard, the offloading and float-on of the platform from the vessel, the dry transport of the TLP over a long distance, and the final offloading of the platform. Both hydrodynamic and structure analysis were performed to evaluate the behavior of the transport vessel and TLP structure. Special attention was paid to critical areas associated with the use of this new vessel, along with any potential limitations. The results demonstrate that HYSY 278 can effectively be used for transporting the structure with proper arrangement and well-prepared operation. The procedure and details were presented on the basis of the study results. Special attention was also given to discussion on future use based on the results from the analysis.

  9. CubeSub - A CubeSat Based Submersible Testbed for Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettebo, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This report is a Master's Thesis in Aerospace Engineering, performed at the NASA Ames Research Center. It describes the development of the CubeSub, a submersible testbed compatible with the CubeSat form factor. The CubeSub will be used to mature technology and operational procedures to be used in space exploration, and possibly also as a tool for exploration of Earthly environments. CubeSats are carried as payloads, either containing technology to be tested or experiments and sensors for scientific use. The CubeSub is designed to be built up by modules, which can be assembled in different configurations to fulfill different needs. Each module is powered individually and intermodular communication is wireless, reducing the need for wiring. The inside of the hull is flooded with ambient water to simplify the interaction between payloads and surrounding environment. The overall shape is similar to that of a conventional AUV, slender and smooth. This is to make for a low drag, reduce the risk of snagging on surrounding objects and make it possible to deploy through an ice sheet via a narrow borehole. Rapid prototyping is utilized to a large extent, with full-scale prototypes being constructed through 3D-printing and with COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) components. Arduino boards are used for control and internal communication. Modules required for basic operation have been designed, manufactured and tested. Each module is described with regards to its function, design and manufacturability. By performing tests in a pool it was found that the basic concept is sound and that future improvements include better controllability, course stability and waterproofing of electrical components. Further development is needed to make the CubeSub usable for its intended purposes. The largest gains are expected to be found by developing the software and improving controllability.

  10. New Submersed Chamber for Calibration of Relative Humidity Instruments at HMI/FSB-LPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestan, D.; Zvizdic, D.; Sariri, K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of a new chamber designed for calibration of relative humidity (RH) instruments at Laboratory for Process Measurement (HMI/FSB-LPM). To the present time, the calibrations of RH instruments at the HMI/FSB-LPM were done by comparison method using a climatic chamber of large volume and calibrated dew point hygrometer with an additional thermometer. Since 2010, HMI/FSB-LPM in cooperation with Centre for Metrology and Accreditation in Finland (MIKES) developed the two primary dew point generators which cover the dew point temperature range between - 70 {°}C and 60 {°}C. In order to utilize these facilities for calibrations of the RH instruments, the new chamber was designed, manufactured and installed in the existing system, aiming to extend its range and reduce the related calibration uncertainties. The chamber construction allows its use in a thermostatic bath of larger volume as well as in the climatic chambers. In the scope of this paper, performances of the new chamber were tested while it was submersed in a thermostated bath. The chamber can simultaneously accommodate up to three RH sensors. In order to keep the design of the chamber simple, only cylindrical RH sensors detachable from display units can be calibrated. Possible optimizations are also discussed, and improvements in the design proposed. By using the new chamber, HMI/FSB-LPM reduced the expanded calibration uncertainties (level of confidence 95 %, coverage factor k=2) from 0.6 %rh to 0.25 %rh at 30 %rh (23 {°}C), and from 0.8 %rh to 0.53 %rh at 70 %rh (23 {°}C).

  11. Integrated System Design for a Large Wind Turbine Supported on a Moored Semi-Submersible Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, wind energy has emerged as an alternative to conventional power generation that is economical, environmentally friendly and, importantly, renewable. Specifically, offshore wind energy is being considered by a number of countries to harness the stronger and more consistent wind resource compared to that over land. To meet the projected “20% energy from wind by 2030” scenario that was announced in 2006, 54 GW of added wind energy capacity need to come from offshore according to a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL study. In this study, we discuss the development of a semi-submersible floating offshore platform with a catenary mooring system to support a very large 13.2-MW wind turbine with 100-m blades. An iterative design process is applied to baseline models with Froude scaling in order to achieve preliminary static stability. Structural dynamic analyses are performed to investigate the performance of the new model using a finite element method approach for the tower and a boundary integral equation (panel method for the platform. The steady-state response of the system under uniform wind and regular waves is first studied to evaluate the performance of the integrated system. Response amplitude operators (RAOs are computed in the time domain using white-noise wave excitation; this serves to highlight nonlinear, as well as dynamic characteristics of the system. Finally, selected design load cases (DLCs and the stochastic dynamic response of the system are studied to assess the global performance for sea states defined by wind fields with turbulence and long-crested irregular waves.

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia brings favorable neurologic outcomes in children with near drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chun; Chu, Chia-Hsiang; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jun-Song; Chen, Jui-Hsia; Chang, Yu-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    A 1-year-10-month-old boy was admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit due to near drowning with pulmonary edema. A conventional ventilator with 100% oxygen supplementation was used initially, but was shifted to high frequency oscillatory ventilation as his oxygen saturation was around 84-88%. Therapeutic hypothermia was applied due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with severe acidosis. His respiratory condition improved and he was extubated successfully on the 6 th hospital day. The patient had no obvious neurological defects and he was discharged in a stable condition after 17 days of hospitalization. Our case report demonstrates the advantages of therapeutic hypothermia on survival and neurological outcomes in treating pediatric near drowning patients.

  13. Photoplethysmographic signals and blood oxygen saturation values during artificial hypothermia in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, M; Kyriacou, P A

    2012-01-01

    Pulse oximetry utilizes the technique of photoplethysmography to estimate arterial oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) values. During hypothermia, the amplitude of the photoplethysmograph (PPG) is compromised which can lead to inaccurate estimation of SpO 2 . A new mutlimode PPG/pulse oximeter sensor was developed to investigate the behaviour of PPGs during conditions of induced hypothermia (hand immersed in an ice bath). PPG measurements from 20 volunteers were conducted and SpO 2 values were estimated at all stages of the experiment. Good quality PPG signals were observed from the majority of the volunteers at almost all hand temperatures. At low temperature ranges, from 13 to 21 °C, the failure rate to estimate SpO 2 values from the multimode transreflectance PPG sensor was 2.4% as compared to the commercial pulse oximeter with a failure rate of 70%. (paper)

  14. Single-dose relative biological effectiveness and toxicity studies under conditions of hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, E.R.; Blekkenhorst, G.; Harrison, G.G.; Morrell, D.; Korrubel, J.; Gregory, A.; Phillips, J.; Manca, V.; Sealy, R.; Cape Town Univ.

    1986-01-01

    An approach to using hyperbaric oxygen with radiation in a clinical situation has been described in the preceding paper in this issue. To ascertain whether there might be a change in the relative biological effectiveness of radiation on normal mammalian tissue treated under conditions of hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen, the acute reaction to radiation of pig skin was studied. A single dose enhancement ratio at the erythema reaction level of 1.4+-0.08 was obtained when compared with irradiation at normal body temperature in air. The authors studied also a series of antioxidant enzymes in rat liver and lung after exposure to hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen. Enzyme changes were such as to combat oxygen toxicity which might develop as a result of the pre-treatment. (author)

  15. Modification of postradiation developments in Guerin's tumour by means of hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakulov, R.K.; Balmukhanov, S.B.

    1979-01-01

    Albino noninbred mice weighing 100-110 g were used to study the growth rate of the entire mass of Guerin's tumour and changes is cytokinetic parameters during irradiation and under the conditions of hypothermia. The animals were cooled according to the Giaja method down to the rectal temperature of 20-21 deg C, the tumour was exposed to single irradiation, locally in a dose of 2500 R. It was shown that irradiation against the background of hypothermia enhanced inhibition of the tumour growth that points to a greater tumour damage. The radiomodifying effect of the low temperature manifests itself cytokinetically as a decrease in the proliferative pool and prolongation of intermitotic time, mainly at the expense of the DNA synthesis phase

  16. Septicemia in a Neonate following Therapeutic Hypothermia: The Literature Review of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a term neonate with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who underwent a 72-hour therapeutic hypothermia. He developed unstable body temperature associated with coagulase negative staphylococcus septicemia 2 weeks later which was promptly treated with intravenous antibiotics and made a good recovery. PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched for the terms “therapeutic hypothermia” and “septicemia,” with limits activated (humans, English, age 0–18 years. There were only 6 randomized controlled trials, 1 non-randomized controlled trial, 1 retrospective cohort, and 1 case-control trial, which showed no definite evidence of increased risk of septicemia or neutrophil dysfunction in infants following hypothermia therapy.

  17. A retrospective analysis on the relationship between intraoperative hypothermia and postoperative ileus after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ji-Won; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Eun-Jee; Kim, Jea-Youn

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is an important factor prolonging the length of hospital stay following colorectal surgery. We retrospectively explored whether there is a clinically relevant association between intraoperative hypothermia and POI in patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy within the setting of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program between April 2016 and January 2017 at our institution. In total, 637 patients were analyzed, of whom 122 (19.2%...

  18. Induction, maintenance, and reversal of therapeutic hypothermia with an esophageal heat transfer device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulstad, Erik; Metzger, Anja K; Courtney, D Mark; Rees, Jennifer; Shanley, Patrick; Matsuura, Timothy; McKnite, Scott; Lurie, Keith

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate a novel esophageal heat transfer device for use in inducing, maintaining, and reversing hypothermia. We hypothesized that this device could successfully induce, maintain (within a 1 °C range of goal temperature), and reverse, mild therapeutic hypothermia in a large animal model over a 30-h treatment protocol. Five female Yorkshire swine, weighing a mean of 65 kg (range 61-70) kg each, were anesthetized with inhalational isoflurane via endotracheal intubation and instrumented. The esophageal device was connected to an external chiller and then placed into the esophagus and connected to wall suction. Reduction to goal temperature was achieved by setting the chiller to cooling mode, and a 24h cooling protocol was completed before rewarming and recovering the animals. Histopathologic analysis was scheduled for 3-14 days after protocol completion. Average baseline temperature for the 5 animals was 38.6 °C (range 38.1-39.2 °C). All swine were cooled successfully, with average rate of temperature decrease of 1.3 °C/h (range 1.1-1.9) °C/h. Standard deviation from goal temperature averaged 0.2 °C throughout the steady-state maintenance phase, and no treatment for shivering was necessary during the protocol. Histopathology of esophageal tissue showed no adverse effects from the device. A new esophageal heat transfer device successfully and safely induced, maintained, and reversed therapeutic hypothermia in large swine. Goal temperature was maintained within a narrow range, and thermogenic shivering did not occur. These findings suggest a useful new modality to induce therapeutic hypothermia. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Brugada sign in a patient with hyperkalemia due to rhabdomyolysis in hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcsányi, Kristóf; Tomcsányi, János

    The Brugada sign may appear as an indication of severe hyperkalemia. This phenomena has recently been called as the "Brugada phenocopy". Hyperthermia and hypothermia may lead to rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis and the release of intracellular muscle constituents into the circulation. We present a case where rhabdomyolysis-related delayed hyperkalemia showed Brugada sign on the ECG mimicking ventricular tachycardia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of two polyethylene covers in prevention of hypothermia among premature neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Talakoub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: After the umbilical cord is cut, premature neonates face numerous problems including hypothermia. With regard to serious complications of hypothermia and incapability of conventional methods in preservation of neonates′ temperature after admission, the researcher decided to conduct a study on the effects of two polyethylene covers in prevention of hypothermia among premature neonates. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 96 neonates aged 28-32 weeks that randomly allocated, by drawing of lots, to three 32-subject groups as follows: Intervention group 1 (a plastic bag cover and a cotton hat, intervention group 2 (a plastic bag cover and a plastic hat, and a control group receiving routine care. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS V.14. Results: Mean axillary temperatures in intervention groups 1 and 2 were different after admission and 1 and 2 h later, but this difference was not significant and the mean axillary temperature increased with time. Mean axillary temperature in the control group showed no significant difference at these time points and it did not increase with time. The mean temperatures in preterm infants were significantly higher in the intervention groups after admission and 1 and 2 h after birth, compared to the control group. Mean axillary temperature in intervention group 2 was significantly higher than in intervention group 1. Conclusions: Usage of a plastic bag cover and a plastic hat (with no risk of hyperthermia is more effective in preventing hypothermia among neonates aged 28-32 weeks, compared to usage of a plastic bag cover and a cotton hat.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of phenobarbital in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia: a thermopharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M P H; Groenendaal, F; Toet, M C; van Straaten, H L M; van Hasselt, J G C; Huitema, A D R; de Vries, L S; Egberts, A C G; Rademaker, C M A

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the discipline which is called thermopharmacology. We studied the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in asphyxiated neonates, and the clinical efficacy and the effect of phenobarbital on the continuous amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in a prospective study. Data were obtained from the prospective SHIVER study, performed in two of the ten Dutch level III neonatal intensive care units. Phenobarbital data were collected between 2008 and 2010. Newborns were eligible for inclusion if they had a gestational age of at least 36 weeks and presented with perinatal asphyxia and encephalopathy. According to protocol in both hospitals an intravenous (repeated) loading dose of phenobarbital 20 mg/kg divided in 1-2 doses was administered if seizures occurred or were suspected before or during the hypothermic phase. Phenobarbital plasma concentrations were measured in plasma using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. aEEG was monitored continuously. A one-compartmental population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed using a multi-level Markov transition model. No (clinically relevant) effect of moderate therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics could be identified. The observed responsiveness was 66%. While we still advise an initial loading dose of 20 mg/kg, clinicians should not be reluctant to administer an additional dose of 10-20 mg/kg. An additional dose should be given before switching to a second-line anticonvulsant drug. Based on our pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, administration of phenobarbital under hypothermia seems to reduce the transition rate from a continuous normal voltage (CNV) to discontinuous normal voltage aEEG background level in hypothermic asphyxiated newborns, which may be attributed to the additional neuroprotection of phenobarbital in infants with a CNV pattern.

  2. Gravitational and submersible offshore platform, and construction method. Nedsenkbar fralandsplattform av gravitasjonstypen og fremgangsmaate for fremstilling av samme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, T.; Olsen, O.

    1985-06-17

    The invention concerns a submersible offshore platform of the gravitational type designed for great depths. The platform is made of concrete or the like comprising a sea-bed foundation, and a number of at least 3 cantilevered pillars connected to the prop section carrying the load-bearing structure and the platform deck. In addition, the platform consists of a cellular floating section, and the central part of it is lengthened upwards. The central column supports the prop section. There is a considerable space between the floating section and the bed foundation. The various steps of the construction methods are presented. 11 drawings.

  3. Optimization of induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia with cold saline infusion: A laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Fluher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cold fluid infusions can be used to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Fluid temperature higher than 4°C can increase the volume of fluid needed, prolong the induction phase of hypothermia and thus contribute to complications. We performed a laboratory experiment with two objectives. The first objective was to analyze the effect of wrapping fluid bags in ice packs on the increase of fluid temperature with time in bags exposed to ambient conditions. The second objective was to quantify the effect of insulating venous tubing and adjusting flow rate on fluid temperature increase from bag to the level of an intravenous cannula during a simulated infusion. The temperature of fluid in bags wrapped in ice packs was significantly lower compared to controls at all time points during the 120 minutes observation. The temperature increase from the bag to the level of intravenous cannula was significantly lower for insulated tubing at all infusion rates (median temperature differences between bag and intravenous cannula were: 8.9, 4.8, 4.0, and 3.1°C, for non-insulated and 5.9, 3.05, 1.1, and 0.3°C, for insulated tubing, at infusion rates 10, 30, 60, and 100 mL/minute, respectively. The results from this study could potentially be used to decrease the volume of fluid infused when inducing mild hypothermia with an infusion of cold fluids.

  4. A retrospective analysis on the relationship between intraoperative hypothermia and postoperative ileus after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Won; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Eun-Jee; Kim, Jea-Youn

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is an important factor prolonging the length of hospital stay following colorectal surgery. We retrospectively explored whether there is a clinically relevant association between intraoperative hypothermia and POI in patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy within the setting of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program between April 2016 and January 2017 at our institution. In total, 637 patients were analyzed, of whom 122 (19.2%) developed clinically and radiologically diagnosed POI. Overall, 530 (83.2%) patients experienced intraoperative hypothermia. Although the mean lowest core temperature was lower in patients with POI than those without POI (35.3 ± 0.5°C vs. 35.5 ± 0.5°C, P = 0.004), the independence of intraoperative hypothermia was not confirmed based on multivariate logistic regression analysis. In addition to three variables (high age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, long duration of surgery, high maximum pain score during the first 3 days postoperatively), cumulative dose of rescue opioids used during the first 3 days postoperatively was identified as an independent risk factor of POI (odds ratio = 1.027 for each 1-morphine equivalent [mg] increase, 95% confidence interval = 1.014-1.040, P POI within an ERAS pathway, in which items other than thermal measures might offset its negative impact on POI. However, as it was associated with delayed discharge from the hospital, intraoperative maintenance of normothermia is still needed.

  5. Lactate as an early predictor of psychomotor development in neonates with asphyxia receiving therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackova, Renata; Salounova, Dana; Kantor, Lumir

    2017-12-04

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the relationship between persistently elevated lactate values in the arterial blood of newborns with grade II and III hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (treated with therapeutic hypothermia) and psychomotor development at 24 months. 51 neonates of gestational age from 36 to 41 weeks receiving therapeutic hypothermia for moderate to severe hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy had arterial blood lactate levels regularly analysed. At 24 months the infants' psychomotor development was evaluated and they were divided into two groups - those where the outcome was favourable (i.e. normal psychomotor development) and adverse (severe motor or sensory impairment or death). The lactate dynamics over time were retrospectively evaluated from the data collected, with the normal upper limit set at 4 mmol/L. Of the 51 affected neonates, 7 died over the course of the study. 34 of the remaining 44 infants demonstrated normal psychomotor findings at 2 years old, with adverse findings in 10 cases. Although both groups experienced significant reductions in lactate over time, there were statistically significant differences between them regarding currently measured lactate levels. Absolute lactate values and their development over time can be a used as an auxiliary factor in making early estimates of the long-term outcome for newborns with neonatal asphyxia being treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  6. Neonatal therapeutic hypothermia outside of standard guidelines: a survey of U.S. neonatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnsed, Jennifer; Zanelli, Santina A

    2017-11-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is standard of care in term infants with moderate-to-severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). The goal of this survey was to explore the attitudes of U.S. neonatologists caring for infants with HIE who fall outside of current guidelines. Case-based survey administered to members of the Section on Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine of the American Academy of Pediatrics. A total of 447 responses were analysed, a response rate of 19%. We found significant variability amongst U.S. neonatologists with regard to the use of therapeutic hypothermia for infants with HIE who fall outside standard inclusion criteria. Scenarios with the most variability included HIE in a late preterm infant and HIE following a postnatal code. Provision of therapeutic hypothermia outside of standard guidelines was not influenced by number of years in practice, neonatal intensive care type (NICU) or NICU size. Significant variability in practice exists when caring for infants with HIE who do not meet standard inclusion criteria, emphasizing the need for continued and rigorous research in this area. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Cerebral vasoreactivity to carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary perfusion at normothermia and hypothermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, P.; Messeter, K.; Ryding, E.; Kugelberg, J.; Stahl, E.

    1989-01-01

    With the pH-stat acid-base regulation strategy during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is generally administered to maintain the partial pressure of arterial CO 2 at a higher level than with the alpha-stat method. With preserved CO 2 vasoreactivity during CPB, this induction of respiratory acidosis can lead to a much higher cerebral blood flow level than is motivated metabolically. To evaluate CO 2 vasoreactivity, cerebral blood flow was measured using a xenon 133 washout technique before, during, and after CPB at different CO 2 levels in patients who were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with perfusion at either hypothermia or normothermia. The overall CO 2 reactivity was 1.2 mL/100 g/min/mm Hg. There was no difference between the groups. The CO 2 reactivity was not affected by temperature or CPB. The induced hemodilution resulted in higher cerebral blood flow levels during CPB, although this was counteracted by the temperature-dependent decrease in the hypothermia group. After CPB, a transient increase in cerebral blood flow was noted in the hypothermia group, the reason for which remains unclear. The study shows that manipulation of the CO 2 level at different temperatures results in similar changes in cerebral blood flow irrespective of the estimated metabolic demand. This finding further elucidates the question of whether alpha-stat or pH-stat is the most physiological way to regulate the acid-base balance during hypothermic CPB

  8. Bumetanide augments the neuroprotective efficacy of phenobarbital plus hypothermia in a neonatal hypoxia-ischemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YiQing; Shangguan, Yu; Barks, John D.E.; Silverstein, Faye S.

    2014-01-01

    The NaKCl cotransporter NKCC1 facilitates intraneuronal chloride accumulation in the developing brain. Bumetanide, a clinically available diuretic, inhibits this chloride transporter, and augments the antiepileptic effects of phenobarbital in neonatal rodents. In a neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) model, elicited by right carotid ligation, followed by 90 min 8% O2 exposure in 7-day-old(P7) rats, phenobarbital(PB) increases the neuroprotective efficacy of hypothermia. We evaluated whether bumetanide influenced the neuroprotective efficacy of combination treatment with PB and hypothermia(HT). P7 rats underwent HI lesioning; 15 min later, all received PB (30 mg/kg). 10 min later, half received bumetanide (10 mg/kg, PB-HT+BUM) and half received saline (PB-HT+SAL). One hour after HI, all were cooled (30°C, 3h). Contralateral forepaw sensorimotor function and brain damage were evaluated 1 to 4 weeks later. Forepaw functional measures were close to normal in the PB-HT+BUM group, while deficits persisted in PB-HT+SAL controls; there were corresponding reductions in right cerebral hemisphere damage (at P35, % damage: PB-HT+BUM, 21±16 versus 38±20 in controls). These results provide evidence that NKCC1 inhibition amplifies phenobarbital bioactivity in the immature brain, and suggest that co-administration of phenobarbital and bumetanide may represent a clinically feasible therapy to augment the neuroprotective efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in asphyxiated neonates. PMID:22398701

  9. Accidental outcomes guide punishment in a "trembling hand" game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiery Cushman

    Full Text Available How do people respond to others' accidental behaviors? Reward and punishment for an accident might depend on the actor's intentions, or instead on the unintended outcomes she brings about. Yet, existing paradigms in experimental economics do not include the possibility of accidental monetary allocations. We explore the balance of outcomes and intentions in a two-player economic game where monetary allocations are made with a "trembling hand": that is, intentions and outcomes are sometimes mismatched. Player 1 allocates $10 between herself and Player 2 by rolling one of three dice. One die has a high probability of a selfish outcome, another has a high probability of a fair outcome, and the third has a high probability of a generous outcome. Based on Player 1's choice of die, Player 2 can infer her intentions. However, any of the three die can yield any of the three possible outcomes. Player 2 is given the opportunity to respond to Player 1's allocation by adding to or subtracting from Player 1's payoff. We find that Player 2's responses are influenced substantially by the accidental outcome of Player 1's roll of the die. Comparison to control conditions suggests that in contexts where the allocation is at least partially under the control of Player 1, Player 2 will punish Player 1 accountable for unintentional negative outcomes. In addition, Player 2's responses are influenced by Player 1's intention. However, Player 2 tends to modulate his responses substantially more for selfish intentions than for generous intentions. This novel economic game provides new insight into the psychological mechanisms underlying social preferences for fairness and retribution.

  10. Numerical simulation of industrial and accidental release formation and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskunov, V.N.; Aloyan, A.A.; Gerasimov, V.M.; Pinaev, V.S.; Golubev, A.I.; Yanilkin, Yu.V.; Ivanov, N.V.; Nikonov, S.N.; Kharchenko, A.I. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Statement of work for contract 006 {open_quotes}Mathematical simulation of industrial and accidental release formation and transport{close_quotes} implies that the final result of the activity within this task will be VNIIEF developed techniques which will provide for the prediction of the post-accidental environment. Report [1] presents the description of physical models and calculation techniques which were chosen by VNIIEF to accomplish this task. These techniques were analysed for their capabilities, the areas of their application were defined, modifications within contract 006 were described, the results of test and methodical calculations were presented. Moreover, the experimental data were analysed over the source parameters and contamination measurements which can be used in the comparison with the calculation results. Based an these data this report compares the calculation results obtained with VNIIEF calculation techniques with the LANL-presented experimental results. The calculations which statements and results are given in section 1, included the following processes: explosion cloud ascent dynamics and jet release origin; aerosols kinetics in the release source including composite particle origin in the explosion cloud caused by radioactive substance sorption an the soil particles; contaminant transport in atmosphere and their in-site fallout due to the accidental explosions and fires; atmospheric flow dynamics and industrial contamination transfer over the complicated terrain. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data. Section 2 presents the parameters for a typical source in the explosion accidents based an the experimental results and calculated data from Section 1, as well as contamination patterns were calculated with basic technique {open_quotes}Prognosis{close_quotes}.

  11. ECMO for Cardiac Rescue after Accidental Intravenous Mepivacaine Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Froehle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepivacaine is a potent local anaesthetic and used for infiltration and regional anaesthesia in adults and pediatric patients. Intoxications with mepivacaine affect mainly the CNS and the cardiovascular system. We present a case of accidental intravenous mepivacaine application and intoxication of an infant resulting in seizure, broad complex bradyarrhythmia, arterial hypotension and finally cardiac arrest. The patient could be rescued by prolonged resuscitations and a rapid initiation of ECMO and survived without neurological damage. The management strategies of this rare complication including promising other treatment options with lipid emulsions are discussed.

  12. Radioactive releases into the environment under accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1976-01-01

    Although accidents involving the release of radioactive materials and the unplanned exposure of people can occur at any stage of the nuclear fuel cycle, most attention has been focused on reactor accidents. Although no power reactor accidents involving exposure of the public have yet occured, it should be recognized that the probability of such accidental releases cannot be reduced to zero. Since the inventory of radioactive materials in power reactors is very large, it is usual to postulate, for safety assessments, that a release of fission products takes place in spite of all protective measures. This postulated release is of importance for reactor siting and for preparing emergency plans. (HP) [de

  13. Biokinetics of radionuclides and treatment of accidental intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.; Stradling, G.N.; Menetrier, F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and reviews the progress of EULEP Working Party 5, convened under the auspices of the European Union's Fifth Framework Programme, to 'cluster' two EU-supported contracts, Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Internal Contamination (BIODOS (EU Contract FIS5-1999-00214)) and Radionuclide Biokinetics Database (EULEP) ( RBDATA-EULEP (Concerted Action Contract FIS5-1999-00218), and two non-EU funded projects, Biokinetics of Radionuclides in Human Volunteers (RNHV (non-EU Funded Project) and Treatment of Accidental Intakes of Radionuclides (TAIR (part-funded by EULEP)). (author)

  14. Accidentes de trabajo en un hospital de agudos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Bermúdez B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: El mejor conocimiento de los determinantes y circunstancias de producción de los accidentes laborales, favorecerá la implantación de medidas correctoras. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir la evolución temporal de los accidentes de trabajo (AT y determinar los factores de riesgo de baja médica en el Hospital Dr. Peset de Valencia. MÉTODOS: Descripción y análisis retrospectivo de los accidentes de trabajo producidos en el Hospital Dr. Peset de Valencia durante los años 1992 a 1995. Se estimó por métodos deterministas la tendencia y estacionalidad de las series (índices estacionales, IE. Se aplicó un modelo de regresión logística para identificar los factores pronósticos de baja médica y determinar su probabilidad de ocurrencia . RESULTADOS: Las tasas más elevadas de AT se produjeron entre los trabajadores de cocina y lavandería (10,00 AT por 100 trabajadores-año. Los AT con baja médica mantienen una tendencia cercana a cero siendo febrero el mes con I.E más elevado (IE=139,8. Los que cursan sin baja médica tienen una tendencia positiva (r²=0,23, p<0,0001, siendo mayo el mes de mayor siniestralidad (IE=134,2. La probabilidad de que el accidente curse con baja médica aumenta significativamente con la edad, cuando se produce por la tarde, si ha tenido lugar en cocina/lavandería, y si se trata de un esguince o tendinitis. CONCLUSIONES: la actuación sobre la siniestralidad en los AT que cursen con IT, debería centrarse sobre los trabajos menos cualificados y en las áreas de cocina y lavandería.

  15. Clinical perspectives on osteogenesis imperfecta versus non-accidental injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Elaine Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although non-accidental injuries (NAI) are more common in cases of unexplained fractures than rare disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), ruling out OI and other medical causes of fracture is always indicated. The majority of OI patients can be diagnosed with the help of family history, physical examination, and radiographic findings. In particular, there are a few radiological findings which are seen more commonly in NAI than in OI which may help guide clinician considerations regarding the probability of either of these diagnoses. At the same time, molecular testing still merits careful consideration in cases with unexplained fractures without obvious additional signs of abuse. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Accidental exposure with X-ray diffraction equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.

    1991-01-01

    The shutter on one of the windows of an X-ray diffraction apparatus was accidentally left open, exposing the worker to the radiation. The worker was wearing a dosimeter film, which was processed immediately to evaluate the potential risk. It was determined that the exposure rate was 350 Roentgen/minute on the skin surface, with corrections being made for the worker's thin clothing. It was concluded that in spite of the worker receiving a relative high dose, it did not reach the threshold value for producing deterministic effects such as cataracts, erythema, and skin damage

  17. Early diagnosis and monitoring of whole-body accidental exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury-Herard, A.; Jullien, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with the handling of accidental, acute or protracted, whole-body overexposures. It is complementary to the report DPS 86/07 SEAPS previously published. The criteria for initial classification, as a function of the mean absorbed dose, the clinical and paraclinical evaluation, the monitoring methods and the treatments to undertake are described successively. The basic components of the therapy are the intensive care of the hematological syndrome with blood products transfusions and anti-infection prophylaxy. The indications and conditions for bone-marrow grafts are also discussed [fr

  18. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor is provided wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release

  19. Evaluation and mitigation of accidental releases of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruessermann, K.

    1982-12-01

    One result of the workshop was, that even in the case of severe accident sequences in modern nuclear power plants (other facilities were not discussed), there will be enough time to take active measures in order to lower the emissions and to diminish the consequences inside and outside of the plant. On the whole, new evidence from Harrisburg show that previously estimated accidental emissions, especially of radiologically relevant nuclides, have been rather conservative and that much lower emissions are possible, if the above measures are considered. Under accident conditions, models to predict radiation exposure must be applied under the event of a short-term release. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Terry R. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release.

  1. Self-Administered Ethanol Enema Causing Accidental Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive ethanol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Much of the harm from ethanol comes from those who engage in excessive or hazardous drinking. Rectal absorption of ethanol bypasses the first pass metabolic effect, allowing for a higher concentration of blood ethanol to occur for a given volume of solution and, consequently, greater potential for central nervous system depression. However, accidental death is extremely rare with rectal administration. This case report describes an individual with klismaphilia whose death resulted from acute ethanol intoxication by rectal absorption of a wine enema.

  2. Simulation of pulsed accidental energy release in a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshanskii, V.A.; Ivanov, A.G.; Uskov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    At the present time the strength of the load-bearing members of VVER and fast reactors during a hypothetical accident is ordinarily investigated in model experiments [1]. A power burst during an accident is simulated by a nonnuclear exothermal reaction in water, which simulates the coolant and fills the model. The problem is to make the correct choice of the simulator of the accidental energy burst as an effective (i.e., sufficiently high working capacity) source of dangerous loads, corresponding to the conditions of an accident. What factors and parameters determine the energy release? The answers to these questions are contradictory

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medication in asphyxiated newborns during controlled hypothermia. The PharmaCool multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan Timo R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, perinatal asphyxia (severe perinatal oxygen shortage necessitating newborn resuscitation occurs in at least 200 of the 180–185.000 newly born infants per year. International randomized controlled trials have demonstrated an improved neurological outcome with therapeutic hypothermia. During hypothermia neonates receive sedative, analgesic, anti-epileptic and antibiotic drugs. So far little information is available how the pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD of these drugs are influenced by post resuscitation multi organ failure and the metabolic effects of the cooling treatment itself. As a result, evidence based dosing guidelines are lacking. This multicenter observational cohort study was designed to answer the question how hypothermia influences the distribution, metabolism and elimination of commonly used drugs in neonatal intensive care. Methods/Design Multicenter cohort study. All term neonates treated with hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE resulting from perinatal asphyxia in all ten Dutch Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs will be eligible for this study. During hypothermia and rewarming blood samples will be taken from indwelling catheters to investigate blood concentrations of several antibiotics, analgesics, sedatives and anti-epileptic drugs. For each individual drug the population PK will be characterized using Nonlinear Mixed Effects Modelling (NONMEM. It will be investigated how clearance and volume of distribution are influenced by hypothermia also taking maturation of neonate into account. Similarly, integrated PK-PD models will be developed relating the time course of drug concentration to pharmacodynamic parameters such as successful seizure treatment; pain assessment and infection clearance. Discussion On basis of the derived population PK-PD models dosing guidelines will be developed for the application of drugs during neonatal hypothermia treatment. The

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Amy E; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Newth, Christopher J L; Bennett, Kimberly S; Berger, John T; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A; Koch, Joshua D; Schleien, Charles L; Dalton, Heidi J; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Thomas, Neal J; van der Jagt, Elise W; Porter, Melissa B; Meyer, Michael T; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S; Bhalala, Utpal S; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A; Sanders, Ronald C; Dean, J Michael

    2015-05-14

    Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children's hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P=0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P=0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P=0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by

  5. Structural analyses of very large semi-submersibles in waves; Choogata hansensuishiki futai no harochu kozo oto kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, K.; Yoshida, K.; Suzuki, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    An analysis method in which the technique of a vehicle obtained when a three-dimensional singular point distribution method and Kagemoto`s mutual interaction theory are combined was expanded for the fluid area was proposed as the structural analysis of very large semi-submersibles in waves. A partial structure method is used for the structure. In a fluid area, the number of unknown quantities appearing in a final expression could be largely reduced by introducing the new concept of a group body. In this process, both hydro-elasticity and hydrodynamic mutual interaction are considered. As a result, floating bodies that could not be previously calculated can be modeled as a three-dimensional frame structure and the response analysis in waves can be carried out without damaging the accuracy. The calculation result is used as the input data required for analyzing the structural fatigue locally during structural design of very large semi-submersibles in the 3,000 (m) class. This study can present a series of procedures between the response analysis of very large floating bodies in waves and the structural design. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Differential photosynthetic and morphological adaptations to low light affect depth distribution of two submersed macrophytes in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianfeng; Cao, Te; Zhang, Xiaolin; Xi, Yilong; Ni, Leyi; Jeppesen, Erik

    2016-10-03

    To evaluate the relative importance of photosynthetic versus morphological adaptations of submersed macrophytes to low light intensity in lakes, rapid light curves (RLCs), morphological parameters, relative growth rate (RGR), clonal reproduction and abundance of two submersed macrophytes (Potamogeton maackianus and Vallisneria natans) were examined under 2.8%, 7.1%, 17.1% and 39.5% ambient light in a field and outdoor experimental study. The plants increased their initial slope of RLCs (α) and decreased their minimum saturating irradiance (E k ) and maximum relative electron transport rate (ETRm) of RLCs under low light stress, but V. natans was more sensitive in RLCs than P. maackianus. Accordingly, the RGR, plant height and abundance of P. maackianus were higher in the high light regimes (shallow water) but lower in the low light regimes than those of V. natans. At the 2.8% ambient light, V. natans produced ramets and thus fulfilled its population expansion, in contrast to P. maackianus. The results revealed that P. maackianus as a canopy-former mainly elongated its shoot length towards the water surface to compensate for the low light conditions, however, it became limited in severe low light stress conditions. V. natans as a rosette adapted to low light stress mainly through photosynthetic adjustments and superior to severely low light than shoot elongation.

  7. Double twist : Can-K's electric submersible twin screw pump is designed to handle the nastiest crudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-12-15

    This article described the Can-K Group of Companies' electric submersible twin screw pump (ESTSP) designed for pumping heavy crudes with high levels of asphaltenes, hydrogen sulphide, wax, and methane. The technology was awarded the 2010 winner of best production technology for a company with fewer than 100 employees. The ESTSP can pump at a greater depth than other lift technologies. The design challenges included making the pump small enough to fit inside the well casing while also able to generate the high pressures necessary for pumping heavy oil. The ESTSP can compete directly against other lift technologies, including electric submersible pumps (ESPs). In the design, two shafts are separated by a timing gear. Each shaft has short sections of interlocking screws that do not touch, which lessens tension and the need for torque, lowering electricity consumption. The ESTSP is more efficient than ESP systems, particularly in more viscous mediums with high gas-to-oil ratios. The positive displacement pump interprets only volume and does not distinguish between gas and oil, functioning with gas content up to 97 percent. ESTSP can also handle more sand than ESP because it does not rely on centrifugal force. A patented screw design also helps prevent pump seizure resulting from sand and other solids. The pump uses downhole electric motors from other manufacturers. The inherent efficiencies of twin screw pumps give the technology the potential to replace conventional ESPs. 2 figs.

  8. Involvement of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and endothelin-A receptors in the effect of agmatine on morphine and oxycodone-induced hypothermia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Andurkar, Shridhar V; Gulati, Anil

    2013-10-01

    Potentiation of opioid analgesia by endothelin-A (ET(A)) receptor antagonist, BMS182874, and imidazoline receptor/α₂-adrenoceptor agonists such as clonidine and agmatine are well known. It is also known that agmatine blocks morphine hyperthermia in rats. However, the effect of agmatine on morphine or oxycodone hypothermia in mice is unknown. The present study was carried out to study the role of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and ET(A) receptors in morphine and oxycodone hypothermia in mice. Body temperature was determined over 6 h in male Swiss Webster mice treated with morphine, oxycodone, agmatine, and combination of agmatine with morphine or oxycodone. Yohimbine, idazoxan, and BMS182874 were used to determine involvement of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and ET(A) receptors, respectively. Morphine and oxycodone produced significant hypothermia that was not affected by α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, imidazoline receptor/α₂ adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, or ET(A) receptor antagonist, BMS182874. Agmatine did not produce hypothermia; however, it blocked oxycodone but not morphine-induced hypothermia. Agmatine-induced blockade of oxycodone hypothermia was inhibited by idazoxan and yohimbine. The blockade by idazoxan was more pronounced compared with yohimbine. Combined administration of BMS182874 and agmatine did not produce changes in body temperature in mice. However, when BMS182874 was administered along with agmatine and oxycodone, it blocked agmatine-induced reversal of oxycodone hypothermia. This is the first report demonstrating that agmatine does not affect morphine hypothermia in mice, but reverses oxycodone hypothermia. Imidazoline receptors and α₂-adrenoceptors are involved in agmatine-induced reversal of oxycodone hypothermia. Our findings also suggest that ET(A) receptors may be involved in blockade of oxycodone hypothermia by agmatine. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de

  9. Accidental fatal lung injury by compressed air: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayamane, Anand Parashuram; Pradeepkumar, M V

    2015-03-01

    Compressed air is being used extensively as a source of energy at industries and in daily life. A variety of fatal injuries are caused by improper and ignorant use of compressed air equipments. Many types of injuries due to compressed air are reported in the literature such as colorectal injury, orbital injury, surgical emphysema, and so on. Most of these injuries are accidental in nature. It is documented that 40 pounds per square inch pressure causes fatal injuries to the ear, eyes, lungs, stomach, and intestine. Openings of body are vulnerable to injuries by compressed air. Death due to compressed air injuries is rarely reported. Many cases are treated successfully by conservative or surgical management. Extensive survey of literature revealed no reports of fatal injury to the upper respiratory tract and lungs caused by compressed air. Here, we are reporting a fatal event of accidental death after insertion of compressed air pipe into the mouth. The postmortem findings are corroborated with the history and discussed in detail.

  10. Accidental Beam Losses and Protection in the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Wenninger, J.

    2005-01-01

    At top energy (proton momentum 7 TeV/c) with nominal beam parameters, each of the two LHC proton beams has a stored energy of 350 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment in case of accidental beam loss. It is essential that the beams are properly extracted onto the dump blocks in case of failure since these are the only elements that can withstand full beam impact. Although the energy stored in the beams at injection (450 GeV/c) is about 15 times smaller compared to top energy, the beams must still be properly extracted in case of large accidental beam losses. Failures must be detected at a sufficiently early stage and initiate a beam dump. Quenches and power converter failures will be detected by monitoring the correct functioning of the hardware systems. In addition, safe operation throughout the cycle requires the use of beam loss monitors, collimators and absorbers. Ideas of detection of fast beam current decay, monitoring of fast beam position changes and monitoring of fast magnet current changes are discussed, to provide the required redundancy for machine protection

  11. Pathological Findings in Accidental Electrocution in a Horse (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Florin Gal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the veterinarians are dealing with a number of cases that require forensic expertise. Such a circumstance could be the accidental electrocution in animals, one of the causes of unnatural death. There is a scarcity with reference to the pathological findings in veterinary forensic medicine. In this paper, we present the main lesions that occurred in a horse with accidental electrocution that was presented for complete necropsy survey. A horse corpse was sent to the Pathology Department (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania for a full medical survey. Preliminary results and external examination: the body was in rigor mortis; from the nasal cavities drained out reddish foam and in the mouth was observed the presence of ingested feed (straw that was not chewed, suggesting a quick death. The findings detected after internal examination of the carcass were poor blood coagulability, haemorrhagic diathesis throughout the body, with haemorrhages of various sizes in different body regions (e.g., muscles of the withers, in the gluteal muscle, the mucosa of epiglottis, larynx, trachea, in the interstitium of the lung, and ecchymosis in the left kidney. Some other lesions detected were infarcts and haemorrhages in the fundic region of the stomach’s mucosa. In electrocution, haemorrhages are most often located in the respiratory tract, aspect observed in our case too. However, the diagnosis of electrocution has to corroborate the necropsy findings (which are not specific, with some other data such as the fulminant death and inspection of power source.

  12. Accidental Beam Losses and Protection in the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R.; Working Group On Machine Protection

    2005-06-01

    At top energy (proton momentum 7 TeV/c) with nominal beam parameters, each of the two LHC proton beams has a stored energy of 350 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment in case of accidental beam loss. It is essential that the beams are properly extracted onto the dump blocks in case of failure since these are the only elements that can withstand full beam impact. Although the energy stored in the beams at injection (450 GeV/c) is about 15 times smaller compared to top energy, the beams must still be properly extracted in case of large accidental beam losses. Failures must be detected at a sufficiently early stage and initiate a beam dump. Quenches and power converter failures will be detected by monitoring the correct functioning of the hardware systems. In addition, safe operation throughout the cycle requires the use of beam loss monitors, collimators and absorbers. Ideas of detection of fast beam current decay, monitoring of fast beam position changes and monitoring of fast magnet current changes are discussed, to provide the required redundancy for machine protection.

  13. Letalidad por accidentes de trabajo en Villa Clara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gómez Vital

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se valora la problemática de la letalidad por accidentes laborales en la provincia de Villa Clara, en el período comprendido entre 1987 y 1997. Se determinan las principales causas, y fue la conducta negligente del individuo la que más incidió. En los últimos años de la década del 80 se registraron más cantidad de muertes por accidentes de trabajo, los que ocurrieron fundamentalmente en el puesto laboral. Queda puntualizado el importante rol del equipo médico en instituciones laborales.The problem of letality from working accidents in the province of Villa Clara from 1987 to 1997 was evaluated. The main causes were also determined. Individual negligent behaviour proved to be the first cause. More deaths from working accidents were registered late in the 1980s. Most of these accidents occurred at the working place. It was stressed the important role played by the medical team at the working institutions

  14. Últimos perfiles del accidente de trabajo en misión

    OpenAIRE

    Poquet Catalá, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    En este trabajo se analiza desde un punto de vista de la doctrina judicial y jurisprudencial la construcción doctrinal del accidente de trabajo en misión como derivación del accidente de trabajo in itinere y como configuración propia del accidente de trabajo en sí. Así, se procede a la delimitación respecto del accidente in itinere, se realiza un análisis de los requisitos configuradores del mismo, tanto genéricos como específicos, así como la aplicabilidad de la presunción iuris tantum de la...

  15. 13C NMR metabolomic evaluation of immediate and delayed mild hypothermia in cerebrocortical slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Segal, Mark R; Kelly, Mark J S; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Kim, Myungwon; James, Thomas L; Litt, Lawrence

    2013-11-01

    Mild brain hypothermia (32°-34°C) after human neonatal asphyxia improves neurodevelopmental outcomes. Astrocytes but not neurons have pyruvate carboxylase and an acetate uptake transporter. C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of rodent brain extracts after administering [1-C]glucose and [1,2-C]acetate can distinguish metabolic differences between glia and neurons, and tricarboxylic acid cycle entry via pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase. Neonatal rat cerebrocortical slices receiving a C-acetate/glucose mixture underwent a 45-min asphyxia simulation via oxygen-glucose-deprivation followed by 6 h of recovery. Protocols in three groups of N=3 experiments were identical except for temperature management. The three temperature groups were: normothermia (37°C), hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h beginning at oxygen--glucose deprivation start), and delayed hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h, beginning 15 min after oxygen-glucose deprivation start). Multivariate analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite quantifications included principal component analyses and the L1-penalized regularized regression algorithm known as the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator. The most significant metabolite difference (Pglucose deprivation, compared with delayed starting or no hypothermia, has higher pyruvate carboxylase throughput, suggesting that better glial integrity is one important neuroprotection mechanism of earlier hypothermia.

  16. Hypothermia broadens the therapeutic time window of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for severe neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Sung, Dong Kyung; Sung, Se In; Park, Won Soon

    2018-05-16

    Recently, we have demonstrated that concurrent hypothermia and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation synergistically improved severe neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The current study was designed to determine whether hypothermia could extend the therapeutic time window of MSC transplantation for severe neonatal HIE. To induce HIE, newborn rat pups were exposed to 8% oxygen for 2 h following unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal day (P) 7. After approving severe HIE involving >50% of the ipsilateral hemisphere volume, hypothermia (32 °C) for 2 days was started. MSCs were transplanted 2 days after HIE modeling. Follow-up brain MRI, sensorimotor function tests, assessment of inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and histological evaluation of peri-infarction area were performed. HIE induced progressively increasing brain infarction area over time, increased cell death, reactive gliosis and brain inflammation, and impaired sensorimotor function. All these damages observed in severe HIE showed better, robust improvement with a combination treatment of hypothermia and delayed MSC transplantation than with either stand-alone therapy. Hypothermia itself did not significantly reduce brain injury, but broadened the therapeutic time window of MSC transplantation for severe newborn HIE.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF HYPOTHERMIA (SURFACE COOLING) ON THE TIME-COURSE OF ACTION AND ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF ROCURONIUM IN HUMANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEAUFORT, AM; WIERDA, JMKH; BELOPAVLOVIC, M; NEDERVEEN, PJ; KLEEF, UW; AGOSTON, S

    Hypothermia prolongs the time-course of action of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. The mechanism, however, is unknown. We studied the influence of hypothermia (by surface cooling, nasopharyngeal temperature less than or equal to 31 degrees C) on the time-course of action and on the

  18. Benefits of starting hypothermia treatment within 6 h vs. 6-12 h in newborns with moderate neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wen; Lei, Xiaoping; Dong, Wenbin; Li, Qingping

    2018-02-12

    It has been suggested that mild hypothermia treatment of hypoxia-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) should start within 6 h after HIE, but many children are admitted to the hospital > 6 h, particularly in developing areas. We aimed to determine whether hypothermia treatment could remain effective within 12 h after birth. According to their admission, 152 newborns were enrolled in the newborns received conventional treatment combined with mild head hypothermia therapy, according to our routine clinical practice. Some newborns only received conventional treatment (lacking informed consent). All newborns received amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) monitoring for 4 h and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) measurement before and after 3 days of therapy. Compared to the conventional treatment, hypothermia significantly improved the aEEG scores and NSE values in all newborns of the newborns with moderate HIE. Hypothermia treatment seems to have no effect in newborns with severe HIE after 6 h (P > 0.05). Hypothermia improved the rates of neonatal death and 18-month disability (all P newborns with moderate HIE, starting hypothermia therapy < 6 h and 6-12 h after HIE showed curative effects. In those with severe HIE, only starting hypothermia therapy within 6 h showed curative effects.

  19. Accidental head injuries in children under 5 years of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.; Fischer, T.; Chapman, S.; Wilson, B.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the type and nature of head injuries sustained by children under the age of 5 years who present to a busy accident and emergency (A and E) department following an accidental fall. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included all children under the age of 5 years, who over an 8-month period were referred to our A and E Department with head injury following an accidental fall. Data were collected regarding the height of the fall, whether or not stairs were involved, the type of surface that the child landed on and the height of the child. This was correlated with any soft-tissue injury or skull fracture. RESULTS: A total of 72 children (aged 4 months to 4.75 years) fulfilled all the criteria for an accidental fall. The heights of the falls ranged from less than 50 cm to over 3 m, with the majority below 1 m. Of the falls, 49 were onto a hard surface and 23 were onto a soft surface. Of the 72 children, 52 had visible evidence of head injury, 35 (71%) of 49 being the result of falls onto hard surfaces and 17 (74%) of 23 onto soft (carpeted) surfaces. There was no significant difference in the type of surface that resulted in a visible head injury. A visible head injury was seen in all children who fell from a height of over 1.5 m and in 95% of children who fell over 1 m. Of the 72 children, 32 (44%) had skull radiographs performed in accordance with established guidelines and 4 (12.5%) were identified as having a fracture. Of the 3 linear parietal fractures 2 were inflicted by falls of just over 1 m (from a work surface) and 1 by a fall of 80 to 90 cm onto the hard-edged surface of a stone fire surround. The 4th was a fracture of the base of skull following a fall from more than 3 m (from a first-storey window). CONCLUSIONS: In the vast majority of domestic accidents children do not suffer significant harm. Skull fractures are rare and probably occur in less than 5% of cases. To cause a skull fracture the fall needs to be from over 1 m or, if from a

  20. Opposite effects of WR-2721 and WR-1065 on radiation-induced hypothermia: possible correlation with oxygen uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Kumar, K.S.; Hunt, W.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces hypothermia in guinea pigs. While systemic injection of the radioprotectant S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) did not block hyperthermia induced by exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, central administration did attenuate it. The dephosphorylated metabolite of WR-2721, N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065), accentuated radiation-induced hypothermia by both routes of administration. In brain homogenates, oxygen uptake was inhibited by WR-2721 but elevated by WR-1065. These results suggest that the antagonism of radiation-induced hypothermia found only after central administration of WR-2721 is due to its direct actions and not to its dephosphorylated metabolite and that this effect may be correlated with the inhibition by WR-2721 of oxygen uptake

  1. The anti-influenza drug oseltamivir evokes hypothermia in mice through dopamine D2 receptor activation via central actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Fukushima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir has a hypothermic effect in mice when injected intraperitoneally (i.p. and intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.. Here we show that the hypothermia evoked by i.c.v.-oseltamivir is inhibited by non-selective dopamine receptor antagonists (sulpiride and haloperidol and the D2-selective antagonist L-741,626, but not by D1/D5-selective and D3-selective antagonists (SCH-23390 and SB-277011-A, respectively. The hypothermic effect of i.p.-administered oseltamivir was not inhibited by sulpiride, haloperidol, L-741,626 and SCH-23390. In addition, neither sulpiride, haloperidol nor SCH-23390 blocked hypothermia evoked by i.c.v.-administered oseltamivir carboxylate (a hydrolyzed metabolite of oseltamivir. These results suggest that oseltamivir in the brain induces hypothermia through activation of dopamine D2 receptors.

  2. Controle ácido-básico na hipotermia The acid-base management in hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter José Gomes

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available O emprego da hipotermia profunda tem se constituído, atualmente, numa Importante estratégia para melhoria da qualidade técnica e resultados em cirurgia cardiovascular. A hipotermia reduz os danos teciduais induzidos pela isquemia por diminuir o metabolismo e preservar os fosfatos energéticos. A regulação do pH tecidual durante a hipotermia é fundamental para a manutenção da homeostasia celular, já que a hipotermia induz alterações desse pH pela mudança provocada na constante de dissociação da água. A questão do melhor manuseio dos gases sangüíneos durante a hipotermia induzida tem sido objeto de controvérsia. Duas abordagens têm sido preconizadas para o manejo das alterações iónicas durante a hipotermia. A regulção pH-stat envolve a manutenção do pH constante de 7,40 em todas as temperaturas com ajustes da PaCO2 e a regulação α-stat permite a variação do pH sangüíneo, que aumenta conforme a diminuição da temperatura e o conteúdo total corpóreo de CO2 é mantido constante. Nesta presente revisão a relação entre pH sangüíneo e intracelular e as alterações iónicas induzidas pela hipotermia são discutidas.Deep hypothermia is a usefull tool to improve technical results in cardiovascular surgery and is nowadays the major strategy used to reduce ischemic injury. Hypothermia reduces metabolism and preserves cellular stores of high-energy phosphates. The regulation of tissue pH during hypothermia is important for cellular homeostasis. Furthermore, hypothermia has important effects on pH by altering the dissociation constant of water and various metabolics intermediates and the question of optimal blood gas management during deliberate hypothermia has been subject of much controversy. Two approaches have been advocated for pH management during hypothermia, the first termed pH strategy, where blood pH is maintained constant at 7,40 at all temperatures with PaCO2 adjustment, and in the second type of

  3. Evolution of the Therapeutic Effects of Induced Local Hypothermia in Neonates with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Basiri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is one of the most important causes of permanent damage to brain tissue that redound to mortality and/or late sequelae such as cerebral palsy or delayed neural development. 15-20 percent of Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE cases die during neonatal period and 25-30 percent of those who survive suffer from neural development problems such as cerebral palsy and mental retardation. Hypothermia or lowering temperature of brain or total body is a new and promising treatment. The present study was done to assess therapeutic effects of induced local hypothermia in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE among neonates admitted to Fatemieh and Beset hospitals of Hamadan city.Materials & Method: The present study was performed as a randomized clinical trial upon 36 neonates who had inclusion criteria to be imported into the study. In the first 6 hours after birth, the neonates were randomly classified into two 18 person groups. In the control group the neonates were managed with routine treatments consisted of preservative measures and anti-convulsive treatments, if necessary. In the case group the neonates received induced local hypothermia for 6 hours in addition to routine therapeutic managements. The data were analyzed using SPSS Version 13.Results: 72.7% of the neonates of the case and control groups were male. There was no significant difference between the case and control groups in sex, birth weight, gestational age and perinatal obstetric complications. The mean duration of admission was 7.72±4.23 days in the case group and 10.06±5.99 days in the control group with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.199. The mean time of starting oral feeding was 3.44±3.11 days and 4.53±2.74 days in the control and case groups respectively and this difference was not statistically significant either (P=0.737.The mean time of regaining consciousness was 3.72±3.19 days in the case

  4. Plastic bags for prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadford, Alicia E; Warren, Jamie B; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Salas, Ariel A; Schelonka, Robert; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2013-07-01

    Hypothermia contributes to neonatal mortality and morbidity, especially in preterm and low birth weight infants in developing countries. Plastic bags covering the trunk and extremities of very low birth weight infants reduces hypothermia. This technique has not been studied in larger infants or in many resource-limited settings. The objective was to determine if placing preterm and low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth maintains normothermia. Infants at 26 to 36 weeks' gestational age and/or with a birth weight of 1000 to 2500 g born at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized by using a 1:1 allocation and parallel design to standard thermoregulation (blanket or radiant warmer) care or to standard thermoregulation care plus placement inside a plastic bag at birth. The primary outcome measure was axillary temperature in the World Health Organization-defined normal range (36.5-37.5°C) at 1 hour after birth. A total of 104 infants were randomized. At 1 hour after birth, infants randomized to plastic bag (n = 49) were more likely to have a temperature in the normal range as compared with infants in the standard thermoregulation care group (n = 55; 59.2% vs 32.7%; relative risk 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.81; P = .007). The temperature at 1 hour after birth in the infants randomized to plastic bag was 36.5 ± 0.5°C compared with 36.1 ± 0.6°C in standard care infants (P 38.0°C) did not occur in any infant. Placement of preterm/low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth compared with standard thermoregulation care reduced hypothermia without resulting in hyperthermia, and is a low-cost, low-technology tool for resource-limited settings.

  5. Hypoxia-induced hypothermia mediated by GABA in the rostral parapyramidal area of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, T

    2014-05-16

    Hypoxia evokes a regulated decrease in the body core temperature (Tc) in a variety of animals. The neuronal mechanisms of this response include, at least in part, glutamatergic activation in the lateral preoptic area (LPO) of the hypothalamus. As the sympathetic premotor neurons in the medulla oblongata constitute a cardinal relay station in the descending neuronal pathway from the hypothalamus for thermoregulation, their inhibition can also be critically involved in the mechanisms of the hypoxia-induced hypothermia. Here, I examined the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced hypothermia is mediated by glutamate-responsive neurons in the LPO that activate GABAergic transmission in the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) and neighboring parapyramidal region (PPy) of the medulla oblongata in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. Unilateral microinjection of GABA (15nmol) into the rRPa and PPy regions elicited a prompt increase in tail skin temperature (Ts) and decreases in Tc, oxygen consumption rate (VO2), and heart rate. Next, when the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide (bicuculline methiodide (BMI), 10pmol) alone was microinjected into the rRPa, it elicited unexpected contradictory responses: simultaneous increases in Ts, VO2 and heart rate and a decrease in Tc. Then, when BMI was microinjected bilaterally into the PPy, no direct effect on Ts was seen; and thermogenic and tachycardic responses were slight. However, pretreatment of the PPy with BMI, but not vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the hypothermic responses evoked by hypoxic (10%O2-90%N2, 5min) ventilation or bilateral microinjections of glutamate (5nmol, each side) into the LPO. The results suggest that hypoxia-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by the activation of GABAA receptors in the PPy. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy efficiency comparison of forced-air versus resistance heating devices for perioperative hypothermia management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayazit, Yilmaz; Sparrow, Ephraim M.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia is a state in which the temperature of a human body is below the normal temperature, with the onset of the hypothermic state commonly regarded as 36 o C. This state may be encountered due to exposure to a very cold environment in the outdoors or, surprisingly, in a hospital operating room. In the latter situation, the diminution of metabolic heat generation, coupled with moderate temperatures in the surroundings and absence of a covering over the afflicted parts of the body, creates the possibility of hypothermia. There are several available devices that are designed to ward off the onset of hypothermia. These currently most frequently used devices can be placed in two categories: (a) convective air warming and (b) direct-contact heat conduction. The warming principles that underlie these two approaches are distinctly different. Furthermore, the energy efficiencies of the two approaches differ significantly. The energy penalty which results from these different efficiencies may be compounded by the fact that the portion of the input energies to these devices which escapes into the operating room ambient must be extracted to maintain a comfortable temperature for the surgical staff. Since energy-extracting equipments such as air-conditioning machines are far from being perfectly efficient, the heat-extraction process also introduces wasted energy. Experiments were performed to determine the energy-utilization efficiencies of the representative devices in the two categories cited above. This information, taken together with the known efficiencies of air-conditioning machines, enabled an overall efficiency encompassing both the therapeutic device and the heat-extraction device to be calculated. The experimental data revealed that the specifics of individual devices within a category played a larger role with regard to energy efficiency than did the category itself.

  7. Hypothermia postpones DNA damage repair in irradiated cells and protects against cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Brandon J.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Parekh, Palak; Griko, Yuri V.; Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation is an established strategy used by some homeothermic organisms to survive cold environments. In true hibernation, the core body temperature of an animal may drop to below 0 o C and metabolic activity almost cease. The phenomenon of hibernation in humans is receiving renewed interest since several cases of victims exhibiting core body temperatures as low as 13.7 o C have been revived with minimal lasting deficits. In addition, local cooling during radiotherapy has resulted in normal tissue protection. The experiments described in this paper were prompted by the results of a very limited pilot study, which showed a suppressed DNA repair response of mouse lymphocytes collected from animals subjected to 7-Gy total body irradiation under hypothermic (13 o C) conditions, compared to normothermic controls. Here we report that human BJ-hTERT cells exhibited a pronounced radioprotective effect on clonogenic survival when cooled to 13 o C during and 12 h after irradiation. Mild hypothermia at 20 and 30 o C also resulted in some radioprotection. The neutral comet assay revealed an apparent lack on double strand break (DSB) rejoining at 13 o C. Extension of the mouse lymphocyte study to ex vivo-irradiated human lymphocytes confirmed lower levels of induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) and persistence of the lesions at hypothermia compared to the normal temperature. Parallel studies of radiation-induced oxidatively clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) revealed partial repair at 13 o C compared to the rapid repair at 37 o C. For both γ-H2AX foci and OCDLs, the return of lymphocytes to 37 o C resulted in the resumption of normal repair kinetics. These results, as well as observations made by others and reviewed in this study, have implications for understanding the radiobiology and protective mechanisms underlying hypothermia and potential opportunities for exploitation in terms of protecting normal tissues against radiation.

  8. Energy efficiency comparison of forced-air versus resistance heating devices for perioperative hypothermia management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayazit, Yilmaz; Sparrow, Ephraim M. [Laboratory for Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Practice, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0111 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Hypothermia is a state in which the temperature of a human body is below the normal temperature, with the onset of the hypothermic state commonly regarded as 36 C. This state may be encountered due to exposure to a very cold environment in the outdoors or, surprisingly, in a hospital operating room. In the latter situation, the diminution of metabolic heat generation, coupled with moderate temperatures in the surroundings and absence of a covering over the afflicted parts of the body, creates the possibility of hypothermia. There are several available devices that are designed to ward off the onset of hypothermia. These currently most frequently used devices can be placed in two categories: (a) convective air warming and (b) direct-contact heat conduction. The warming principles that underlie these two approaches are distinctly different. Furthermore, the energy efficiencies of the two approaches differ significantly. The energy penalty which results from these different efficiencies may be compounded by the fact that the portion of the input energies to these devices which escapes into the operating room ambient must be extracted to maintain a comfortable temperature for the surgical staff. Since energy-extracting equipments such as air-conditioning machines are far from being perfectly efficient, the heat-extraction process also introduces wasted energy. Experiments were performed to determine the energy-utilization efficiencies of the representative devices in the two categories cited above. This information, taken together with the known efficiencies of air-conditioning machines, enabled an overall efficiency encompassing both the therapeutic device and the heat-extraction device to be calculated. The experimental data revealed that the specifics of individual devices within a category played a larger role with regard to energy efficiency than did the category itself. (author)

  9. Model-based investigation of intracellular processes determining antibody Fc-glycosylation under mild hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Si Nga; Jedrzejewski, Philip M; Lee, Ken; Sellick, Christopher; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2017-07-01

    Despite the positive effects of mild hypothermic conditions on monoclonal antibody (mAb) productivity (q mAb ) during mammalian cell culture, the impact of reduced culture temperature on mAb Fc-glycosylation and the mechanism behind changes in the glycan composition are not fully established. The lack of knowledge about the regulation of dynamic intracellular processes under mild hypothermia restricts bioprocess optimization. To address this issue, a mathematical model that quantitatively describes Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell behavior and metabolism, mAb synthesis and mAb N-linked glycosylation profile before and after the induction of mild hypothermia is constructed. Results from this study show that the model is capable of representing experimental results well in all of the aspects mentioned above, including the N-linked glycosylation profile of mAb produced under mild hypothermia. Most importantly, comparison between model simulation results for different culture temperatures suggests the reduced rates of nucleotide sugar donor production and galactosyltransferase (GalT) expression to be critical contributing factors that determine the variation in Fc-glycan profiles between physiological and mild hypothermic conditions in stable CHO transfectants. This is then confirmed using experimental measurements of GalT expression levels, thereby closing the loop between the experimental and the computational system. The identification of bottlenecks within CHO cell metabolism under mild hypothermic conditions will aid bioprocess optimization, for example, by tailoring feeding strategies to improve NSD production, or manipulating the expression of specific glycosyltransferases through cell line engineering. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1570-1582. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  10. Revisited: A Systematic Review of Therapeutic Hypothermia for Adult Patients Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hannah I; Shepherd, Andrew A; Rhodes, Jonathan K J; Andrews, Peter J D

    2018-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been of topical interest for many years and with the publication of two international, multicenter randomized controlled trials, the evidence base now needs updating. The aim of this systematic review of randomized controlled trials is to assess the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in adult traumatic brain injury focusing on mortality, poor outcomes, and new pneumonia. The following databases were searched from January 1, 2011, to January 26, 2018: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial, MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE. Only foreign articles published in the English language were included. Only articles that were randomized controlled trials investigating adult traumatic brain injury sustained following an acute, closed head injury were included. Two authors independently assessed at each stage. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing the risk of bias. All extracted data were combined using the Mantel-Haenszel estimator for pooled risk ratio with 95% CIs. p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. All statistical analyses were conducted using RevMan 5 (Cochrane Collaboration, Version 5.3, Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2014). Twenty-two studies with 2,346 patients are included. Randomized controlled trials with a low risk of bias show significantly more mortality in the therapeutic hypothermia group (risk ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.04-1.79; p = 0.02), whereas randomized controlled trials with a high risk of bias show the opposite with a higher mortality in the control group (risk ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60-0.82; p < 0.00001). Overall, this review is in-keeping with the conclusions published by the most recent randomized controlled trials. High-quality studies show no significant difference in mortality, poor outcomes, or new pneumonia. In addition, this review shows a place for fever control in the management of traumatic brain injury.

  11. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 Hours after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Anne Murtha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental Middle Cerebral Artery occlusion (MCAo - 3 hour occlusion was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19-20 months. At one hour after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 hours hypothermia-treatment (32.5 °C or normothermia (37 °C. ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 hours post-occlusion, and at 24 hours post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03. Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 hours post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients.

  12. Impact of hypothermia on implementation of CPAP for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in a low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carns, Jennifer; Kawaza, Kondwani; Quinn, M K; Miao, Yinsen; Guerra, Rudy; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Oden, Maria; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is widely associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, but remains a pervasive global problem. No studies have examined the impact of hypothermia on outcomes for preterm infants treated with CPAP for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This retrospective analysis assessed the impact of hypothermia on outcomes of 65 neonates diagnosed with RDS and treated with either nasal oxygen (N = 17) or CPAP (N = 48) in a low-resource setting. A classification tree approach was used to develop a model predicting survival for subjects diagnosed with RDS. Survival to discharge was accurately predicted based on three variables: mean temperature, treatment modality, and mean respiratory rate. None of the 23 neonates with a mean temperature during treatment below 35.8°C survived to discharge, regardless of treatment modality. Among neonates with a mean temperature exceeding 35.8°C, the survival rate was 100% for the 31 neonates treated with CPAP and 36.4% for the 11 neonates treated with nasal oxygen (pCPAP, outcomes were poor if more than 50% of measured temperatures indicated hypothermia (5.6% survival). In contrast, all 30 neonates treated with CPAP and with more than 50% of temperature measurements above 35.8°C survived to discharge, regardless of initial temperature. The results of our study suggest that successful implementation of CPAP to treat RDS in low-resource settings will require aggressive action to prevent persistent hypothermia. However, our results show that even babies who are initially cold can do well on CPAP with proper management of hypothermia.

  13. Transfer of accidentally released radionuclides in agricultural systems (TARRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Maubert, Colle; Rauret, G.; Grandison, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project is to contribute to the reliability of radiological assessment methods and establish a scientific base for the design of post-accident countermeasures. Three main aspects are considered in this project: A simulated accidental source term is used and the behaviour of aerosol deposits containing Sr, Cs and Ag isotopes are followed in some European soil-crop systems; the modification of radionuclide transfer rates through the food chain by well established food processing techniques is studied for Sr, Cs, Co and Ru; the project includes a study on the specific mediterranean diet and transfer data that are compared with currently used generic parameters. Seven contributions of the project for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 11 figs., 12 tabs

  14. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF ACCIDENTAL FLOOD WAVES PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorand Catalin STOENESCU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this article describes a modern modeling methodology of the propagation of accidental flood waves in case a dam break; this methodology is applied in Romania for the first time for the pilot project „Breaking scenarios of Poiana Uzului dam”. The calculation programs used help us obtain a bidimensional calculation (2D of the propagation of flood waves, taking into consideration the diminishing of the flood wave on a normal direction to the main direction; this diminishing of the flood wave is important in the case of sinuous courses of water or with urban settlements very close to the minor river bed. In the case of Poiana Uzului dam, 2 scenarios were simulated with the help of Ph.D. Eng. Dan Stematiu, plausible scenarios but with very little chances of actually producing. The results were presented as animations with flooded surfaces at certain time steps successively.

  15. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at IPNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose rates ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2,850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem

  16. Nuclear power: Accidental releases - principles of public health action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is based on the collective knowledge and experience of the members of a Working Group, convened by WHO in collaboration with the Government of Belgium in Brussels on 23-27 November 1981, to discuss and appraise the different actions that might be taken following accidental radioactive releases from nuclear plants. It does not provide detailed technical data, but broadly surveys the rational basis for decision-making, indicating the present position as assessed by members of the Working Group. Four major disciplines (radiological protection, health physics, environmental science and technology, and human biology) and three main professional categories (physicians, engineers and physicists) were represented, providing a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the topic. The purpose of this report is to give guidance to national authorities on how to develop the capacity to take action in a nuclear emergency

  17. Dose mortality relationships: implications for hypothetical accidental releases from FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the findings detailed in the most recent of a series of radiological studies of a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (Kelly, G.N. Simmonds, J.R. Smith, H. and Stather, J.W., The radiological consequences of notional accidental releases of radioactivity from fast breeder reactors: sensitivity to the dose-effect relationships adopted for early biological effects, Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R87. London, HMSO (1979)). The results have indicated those areas where effort might be most profitably directed to improve the reliability of the predicted consequences. The composition of the released activity has been shown to have a marked influence on the sensitivity of the predicted consequences, and application of simple supportive medical treatment has a potential for reducing the predicted consequences by factors of up to an order of magnitude, depending on the composition of the release. (UK)

  18. Medicina legal: concepto pericial en un accidente de trabajo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Uribe Cualla

    1935-03-01

    Full Text Available En la comunicación número 2249 de fecha 24 de noviembre de 1935, de la Oficina General del Trabajo, se dice lo siguiente: "Con carácter devolutivo y constante de 20 fojas útiles, me permito enviar a Ud. el expediente relacionado con la reclamación del señor S. G., por un accidente de trabajo, con el objeto de que esa ilustrada Oficina se sirva emitir su concepto sobre el caso del señor G. El Ministerio de Guerra niega la indemnización porque según dictamen de los Oficiales de Sanidad del Ejército, la lesión de G. no ha dejado incapacidad permanente, sino que es una incapacidad simulada.

  19. Brugada syndrome unmasked by accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjcec, Darko; Bergovec, Mijo; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Raguz, Miroslav; Pavlovic, Sonja; Jespersen, Thomas; Castella, Vincent; Keller, Dagmar I; Abriel, Hugues

    2007-10-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the gene SCN5A can cause Brugada syndrome (BrS), which is an inherited form of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient, with no previous medical history, who had ventricular fibrillation after accidental inhalation of gasoline vapors. His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a typical type-1 BrS pattern that persisted after the acute event. Genetic investigations allowed the identification of a novel SCN5A mutation leading to a frame-shift and early termination of the channel protein. Biochemical and cellular electrophysiology experiments confirmed the loss-of-function of the mutant allele. The patient was implanted with a cardioverter/defibrillator.

  20. MULTIORGAN INJURY AFTER ACCIDENTAL POISONING WITH AUTUMN CROCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazd Lešničar

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. A case of accidental poisoning with autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale that was misinterpreted for wild garlic (Allium ursinum is presented. Both plants grow on damp meadows and can be easily wrongly identified especially before blooming period as they have similar, pointed leaves.Results. Considering anamnestic data, clinical picture and laboratory findings in 43-yr-old female, a poisoning with the colchicine plant alkaloid was suspected. Later, it was confirmed by toxicology analyses (chromatography and spectrometry of the collected serum and urine samples. Severe initial gastrointestinal disorders progressed into ileus, bone-marrow suppression and multi-organ failure.Conclusions. After the patient had received a symptomatic treatment with granulocyte-directed growth factor and a suitable antibiotic therapy for secondary infection, she recovered within three weeks from the onset of condition. The most persistent problem was alopecia. The disease did not entailed any permanent sequellae which was confirmed 3 years after the patient was considered cured.

  1. Accidental intrathecal injection of magnesium sulfate for cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehryar Taghavi Gilani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium sulfate is used frequently in the operation room and risks of wrong injection should be considered. A woman with history of pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency in the previous surgery was referred for cesarean operation. Magnesium sulfate of 700 mg (3.5 ml of 20% solution was accidentally administered in the subarachnoid space. First, the patient had warm sensation and cutaneous anesthesia, but due to deep tissue pain, general anesthesia was induced by thiopental and atracurium. After the surgery, muscle relaxation and lethargy remained. At 8-10 h later, muscle strength improved and train of four (TOF reached over 0.85, and then the endotracheal tube was removed. The patient was evaluated during the hospital stay and on the anesthesia clinic. No neurological symptoms, headache or backache were reported. Due to availability of magnesium sulfate, we should be careful for inadvertent intravenous, spinal and epidural injection; therefore before injection must be double checked.

  2. Accidental intrathecal injection of magnesium sulfate for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Mehryar Taghavi; Zirak, Nahid; Razavi, Majid

    2014-10-01

    Magnesium sulfate is used frequently in the operation room and risks of wrong injection should be considered. A woman with history of pseudocholinesterase enzyme deficiency in the previous surgery was referred for cesarean operation. Magnesium sulfate of 700 mg (3.5 ml of 20% solution) was accidentally administered in the subarachnoid space. First, the patient had warm sensation and cutaneous anesthesia, but due to deep tissue pain, general anesthesia was induced by thiopental and atracurium. After the surgery, muscle relaxation and lethargy remained. At 8-10 h later, muscle strength improved and train of four (TOF) reached over 0.85, and then the endotracheal tube was removed. The patient was evaluated during the hospital stay and on the anesthesia clinic. No neurological symptoms, headache or backache were reported. Due to availability of magnesium sulfate, we should be careful for inadvertent intravenous, spinal and epidural injection; therefore before injection must be double checked.

  3. Accidental intraoral formalin injection: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dandriyal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Formalin is a hazardous chemical that needs cautious handling and special storage. Owing to its disinfectant and fixative (i.e. for preserving pathologic tissue specimens in histopathology properties, it is widely used in dentistry. Although, the terms formaldehyde and formalin are often confused as being identical, these are different as to the concentrations of the primary component i.e. formaldehyde. In fact, the common fixative available as 10% neutral buffered formalin is actually a 4% solution of formaldehyde (i.e., a 10% solution made from a 37-40% commercially pure formaldehyde solution. This case report describes an unfortunate case of accidental injection instead of local anesthetic, of formalin into the pterygomandibular space in a 35-year old woman during inferior alveolar nerve block for surgical removal of impacted lower right third molar and its successful management by cautious debridement (under both local and general anesthesia and empirical drug therapy (utilizing analgesics and antibiotics.

  4. Nodular goiter after occupational accidental exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, M.A. [Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Human Biochemistry, Uninversity of Buenos Aires, School of Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schnitman, M. [Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, French Hospital C.Milstein, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    In the present paper we present the consequences of an accidental occupational radiation exposure at a local hospital in Buenos Aires. Control at a local radiology service showed the lack of correct shielding in the X-ray equipment. The physicians and technicians (14 persons) exposed to radiation during 12 months were examined. The survey shows that: a) In 11 out of 14 radiation-exposed patients nodular goiter developed and an additional patient had diffuse goiter which means a goiter incidence of 85.7%; b) In 5 of the nodular goiter patients an increase in the size or the appearance of new nodules was observed along the follow-up period. No cancer was detected by FNA; c) Hypothyroidism was observed in 3/14 patients, and an additional patient had an abnormal TRH-TSH test, suggesting subclinical hypothyroidism; and d) Increased circulating antithyroid antibodies were found in one of the hypothyroid patients

  5. Control of radiation sources and general regulations for accidental situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slimani, A.

    1998-01-01

    In order to prevent accidents caused by application of radiation sources the Tunisian O.N.P.C. established straightforward strategy made up of 3 phases: prevention, planning and intervention. Civil Protection conducts prevention studies of all radiation sources by examining normal application conditions as well as possible accidental situations. It keeps up with scientific, technical and statistical aspects of radiation risks, elaborates specific plans and programs for intervention operations and cooperates with administrative and security services as well as international organisations. The O.N.P.C. established a model intervention plan based on observation (according to preliminary information), evaluation of the situation (according to the head of operation) intervention (specialized units) and post intervention (testing of personnel)

  6. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem

  7. Reporting a sudden death due to accidental gasoline inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Antonia; Ballesteros, Salomé; Alcaraz, Rafael

    2012-02-10

    The investigation of uncertain fatalities requires accurate determination of the cause of death, with assessment of all factors that may have contributed to it. Gasoline is a complex and highly variable mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons that can lead to cardiac arrhythmias due to sensitization of the myocardium to catecholamines or acts as a simple asphyxiant if the vapors displace sufficient oxygen from the breathing atmosphere. This work describes a sudden occupational fatality involving gasoline. The importance of this petroleum distillate detection and its quantitative toxicological significance is discussed using a validated analytical method. A 51 year-old Caucasian healthy man without significant medical history was supervising the repairs of the telephone lines in a manhole near to a gas station. He died suddenly after inhaling gasoline vapors from an accidental leak. Extensive blistering and peeling of skin were observed on the skin of the face, neck, anterior chest, upper and lower extremities, and back. The internal examination showed a strong odor of gasoline, specially detected in the respiratory tract. The toxicological screening and quantitation of gasoline was performed by means of gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and confirmation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Disposition of gasoline in different tissues was as follows: heart blood, 35.7 mg/L; urine, not detected; vitreous humor, 1.9 mg/L; liver, 194.7 mg/kg; lung, 147.6 mg/kg; and gastric content, 116,6 mg/L (2.7 mg total). Based upon the toxicological data along with the autopsy findings, the cause of death was determined to be gasoline poisoning and the manner of death was accidental. We would like to alert on the importance of testing for gasoline, and in general for volatile hydrocarbons, in work-related sudden deaths involving inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors and/or exhaust fumes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  8. Performance test of a portable TLD system for accidental doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihelic, M.; Stuhec, M.; Mitic, D.; Vekic, B.; Miljanic, S.; Ban, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: A portable TLD measuring system was constructed at the J. Stefan Institute many years ago, motivated by the thread of a catastrophic nuclear event. It was designed for fast measurements in accidental dosimetry mainly for military and civil protection use. The system consists of a robust portable measuring unit built for measurements in field conditions, sized about 40 cm in diameter and weighting 5 kg. Dosimeters are based on CaF 2 :Mn ceramic tablets closed in water resistant plastic housings. In original design producer assured measuring range from cGy to kGy. Specially designed energy compensating filters are used to satisfy requirements for energy response from 0,1 to 3 MeV. Stability of readings is maintained with the temperature stabilized light source. Measuring time for manually driven heating-reading cycle of one dosimeter is about 30 sec. Many systems of the type with sets of dosimeters were stored unused for some years in depositories of different institutions. Modernization of equipment in last years raised questions of applicability of such measurement systems for contemporary needs. The system was thus tested in a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory for compliance with up to date requirements for accidental individual monitoring. Dosimeter characteristics as repeatability, linearity and directional response were of particular interest. As a result of the tests, technical improvements are suggested to extent systems measuring capabilities in order to meet new standards. Possibilities of its use in different fields of dosimetry are discussed, where quick in field measurements of high doses is required as for example in medicine or in civil protection motivated by the new threads of terrorist attacks. (author)

  9. Temporal changes in spatial patterns of submersed macrophytes in two impounded reaches of the Upper Mississippi River, USA, 1998-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, Nathan R.; Yin, Yao

    2011-01-01

    We examined temporal changes in spatial patterns of submersed aquatic macrophytes during a recent three-fold increase in macrophyte abundance and in response to the cumulative effects of management actions (island construction and water level management) and changes in regional environmental conditions (turbidity) in two navigation pools of the Upper Mississippi River, Pool 8 (managed) and Pool 13 (unmanaged). We used cross-correlograms to quantify changes in the degree and range of spatial correlation between submersed macrophytes and depth across the impounded portions of the two pools from 1998-2009. Along with increases in abundance, we observed gradual expansion of submersed macrophytes into deeper water in both pools. However, we detected no temporal change in spatial patterns in Pool 13, where the range of spatial correlation was ~ 1500-2500 m in length in the downriver direction and ~ 500-1000 m in length in the crossriver direction. We initially detected similar ranges of spatial correlation in Pool 8, but over time the range of correlation in the cross river direction increased from ~ 500 m in 1998 to ~ 2000 m by 2009. Thus, the expansion of submersed macrophytes into deeper water areas in Pool 8 appears to have occurred in the cross-river direction and led to increases in patch size and a more symmetrical patch configuration. Hence, very similar temporal changes in submersed macrophyte abundance corresponded with different diffusion dynamics and spatial patterns in the two pools. We hypothesize that management actions altered spatial patterns of depth, water flow and/or wind fetch and led to the differences in spatial patterns reported here.

  10. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of moderate hypothermia to prevent intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Murphy, Nicholas; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Animal models and human case series of acute liver failure (ALF) suggest moderate hypothermia (MH) to have protective effects against cerebral oedema (CO) development and intracranial hypertension (ICH). However, the optimum temperature for patient management is unknown...... by sealed envelope to targeted temperature management (TTM) groups of 34°C (MH) or 36°C (control) for a period of 72h. Investigators were not blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was a sustained elevation in ICP >25mmHg, with secondary outcomes the occurrence of predefined serious adverse...

  11. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    2016-07-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score was developed before the use of therapeutic hypothermia, its value was reassessed. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of the Thompson encephalopathy score with adverse short-term outcomes, defined as death before discharge, development of severe epilepsy, or the presence of multiple organ failure in asphyxiated newborns undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. The study period ranged from November 2010 to October 2014. A total of 12 tertiary neonatal intensive care units participated. Demographic and clinical data were collected from the "PharmaCool" multicenter study, an observational cohort study analyzing pharmacokinetics of medication during therapeutic hypothermia. With multiple logistic regression analyses the association of the Thompson encephalopathy scores with outcomes was studied. Data of 142 newborns were analyzed (male: 86; female: 56). Median Thompson score was 9 (interquartile range: 8 to 12). Median gestational age was 40 weeks (interquartile range 38 to 41), mean birth weight was 3362 grams (standard deviation: 605). All newborns manifested perinatal asphyxia and underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Death before discharge occurred in 23.9% and severe epilepsy in 21.1% of the cases. In total, 59.2% of the patients had multiple organ failure. The Thompson encephalopathy score was not associated with multiple organ failure, but a Thompson encephalopathy score ≥12 was associated with death before discharge (odds ratio: 3.9; confidence interval: 1.3 to 11.2) and with development of severe epilepsy (odds ratio: 8.4; confidence interval: 2.5 to 27.8). The Thompson encephalopathy score is a useful clinical tool, even in cooled asphyxiated

  12. Management options in the food chain for accidental radionuclide deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.

    2005-12-01

    Finland with four other countries participated in the European Union's network project FARMING in 2000 - 2004. The aim of the project was to invite participants from each country representing the food supply chain in a stakeholder group and advance with the groups the networking in building preparedness for accidental contamination of the food production systems. The task of the groups was to evaluate the practicability of management options suggested for reduction of radiation exposure through foodstuffs, and for disposal of waste generated in implementation of these options. The criteria for practicability were effectiveness in reduction of radiation exposure through foodstuffs, technical feasibility, capacity, costs for implementation, secondary costs for waste disposal, socio-economic impact, and acceptability concerning ecology and protection of environment and landscape. Practicable management options aimed at sustainable restoration of food production systems after accidental contamination. The Finnish stakeholder group represented farm production, processing industry, food marketing, catering, advisor organisations for households and agriculture, consumers, nature conservation, the media, experts on environmental impact and authorities responsible for production, safety and security of foodstuffs, food supply and feedstuffs. The group was expected to examine the effect of the Finnish, and, also more generally, northern production conditions on the practicability of the suggested management options. The stakeholder group members first familiarized themselves with intervention after accidental contamination of a large milk production area and thereafter with practicability of individual management options. The evaluation was based on the group members' complementary expertise that very well covered the chain 'from field to fork' whether the issue was related to legislation, production methods, logistics, environmental impacts, or the issues of consumers and

  13. On the accuracy, uniqueness and implication of dimensionless accidental relations between fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahran, M.; Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman-OK,

    2002-01-01

    Ibrahim et al(1) found an accidental formula relating the gravitational coupling constant, the electromagnetic fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio. This work comments on such relation, in particular it studies the accuracy, uniqueness and unification implication of such accidental relation.(author)

  14. Involving Parents in Indicated Early Intervention for Childhood PTSD Following Accidental Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobham, Vanessa E.; March, Sonja; De Young, Alexandra; Leeson, Fiona; Nixon, Reginald; McDermott, Brett; Kenardy, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Accidental injuries represent the most common type of traumatic event to which a youth is likely to be exposed. While the majority of youth who experience an accidental injury will recover spontaneously, a significant proportion will go on to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). And yet, there is little published treatment outcome…

  15. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF. Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%. Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2; P=0.0493. Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P=0.0657. Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135.

  16. An accidental death due to electric grinder: Dupatta as a strangulation hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Herald D′Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidents could occur at home in any age group. Accidental ligature strangulation in adults could be prevented. We are reporting a case of a woman who died in her kitchen due to accidental strangulation by her dupatta while working with the electric grinder. This case highlights the need to educate the people about the safety and potential hazards of these machines.

  17. An accidental death due to electric grinder: Dupatta as a strangulation hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Herald D′Souza; Vina R Vaswani; Kishor Kumar Badiadka; Venkat Krishna Shenoy; Boban Babu

    2013-01-01

    Accidents could occur at home in any age group. Accidental ligature strangulation in adults could be prevented. We are reporting a case of a woman who died in her kitchen due to accidental strangulation by her dupatta while working with the electric grinder. This case highlights the need to educate the people about the safety and potential hazards of these machines.

  18. Accidental childhood poisoning in Calabar at the turn of the 20 th ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accidental poisoning is a preventable cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. Therefore, knowledge of the common causative agents is necessary in order to create awareness among caregivers towards its prevention. Objectives: To document the pattern of accidental childhood poisoning in Calabar from ...

  19. Full recovery two months after therapeutic hypothermia following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J.; Cha, K.S.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic impairments are very common among patients who get a recovery of spontaneous circulation after suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia is established as a standardized therapeutic strategy for those patients in whom it decreases mortality rate and improves neurologic outcome. Herein, we report a case of patient who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ischaemic heart disease and ventricular arrhythmia and got a full recovery without any neurologic impediments 2 months after being managed with therapeutic hypothermia. (author)

  20. Stochastic dynamic response analysis of a floating vertical-axis wind turbine with a semi-submersible floater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Moan, Torgeir; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2016-01-01

    Floating vertical-axis wind turbines (FVAWTs) provide the potential for utilizing offshore wind resources in moderate and deep water because of their economical installation and maintenance. Therefore, it is important to assess the performance of the FVAWT concept. This paper presents a stochastic...... on the response is demonstrated by comparing the floating wind turbine with the equivalent land-based wind turbine. Additionally, by comparing the behaviour of FVAWTs with flexible and rigid rotors, the effect of rotor flexibility is evaluated. Furthermore, the FVAWT is also investigated in the parked condition...... dynamic response analysis of a 5MW FVAWT based on fully coupled nonlinear time domain simulations. The studied FVAWT, which is composed of a Darrieus rotor and a semi-submersible floater, is subjected to various wind and wave conditions. The global motion, structural response and mooring line tension...