WorldWideScience

Sample records for submersed monocot hydrilla

  1. Evidence that inducible C-4-type photosynthesis is a chloroplastic CO2-concentrating mechanism in Hydrilla, a submersed monocot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiskind, JB; Madsen, TV; VanGinkel, LC; Bowes, G

    Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle exhibits an inducible C-4- type photosynthetic cycle, but lacks Kranz anatomy. Leaves in the C-4-type state (but not C-3-type) contained up to 5-fold higher internal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG) concentrations than the medium, indicating that they possessed a

  2. Keystone Functions of Hydrilla verticillata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    His doctoral research was on the Nilgiri Tahr in the. Nilgiris and he has since continued his research into several endangered species both in India and globally. His research interests .... Epizoic Forms: An incredible 2000–3000 species of free- living microbes, like bacteria and diatoms are known to adhere to Hydrilla.

  3. Keystone Functions of Hydrilla verticillata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/02/0156-0162. Keywords. Hydrilla verticillata; keystone species; invasive weeds; carbon sequestration; bioremediation; AVM disease. Author Affiliations. Stephen Sumithran1 P J Sanjeeva Raj. Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Kentucky University Richmond, KY. 40475 ...

  4. Biological Studies of Bagous Hydrillae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Feed- ing was negligible on the 25 species outside the hydrilla family except on four species: Ceratophyllum demersum L., Cabomba caroliniana A. Grey...Nefa and Cabomba carolinias L were eaten much less in these tests than in Australia. This may be because they were exposed for 7 days compared with m...o day, but declined after 3 days. Minor feeding was also obtained on Nymphoides aquatica (S.G. Gmel.) Kuntze and Sagittaria spp. No more than

  5. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  6. Integrated Weed Management Strategies for Control of Hydrilla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Linda S; Shearer, Judy F

    2009-01-01

    ...), and the fungal pathogen Mycoleptodiscus terrestris (Gerd.) Ostazeski, applied alone and in combination with one another, as an integrated weed management strategy against the nuisance aquatic plant, hydrilla...

  7. Exploration for Natural Enemies of Hydrilla verticillata in Eastern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    were for morphological evidence of herbivority ( teeth type, peritoneum color, intestine length) and for actual evidence of hydrilla feeding (stomach...brought to shore for examination for natural enemies and damage. The plants to be examined were normally floated in water-filled white enamel pans. The...sected for evidence of hydrilla feeding and herbivority. All four species were carnivorous. They had silver peritoneums, holding teeth , and short

  8. TIR-NBS-LRR genes are rare in monocots: evidence from diverse monocot orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, D Ellen K; Alexander, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant resistance (R) gene products recognize pathogen effector molecules. Many R genes code for proteins containing nucleotide binding site (NBS) and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. NBS-LRR proteins can be divided into two groups, TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR, based on the structure of the N-terminal domain. Although both classes are clearly present in gymnosperms and eudicots, only non-TIR sequences have been found consistently in monocots. Since most studies in monocots have been limited to agriculturally important grasses, it is difficult to draw conclusions. The purpose of our study was to look for evidence of these sequences in additional monocot orders. Findings Using degenerate PCR, we amplified NBS sequences from four monocot species (C. blanda, D. marginata, S. trifasciata, and Spathiphyllum sp.), a gymnosperm (C. revoluta) and a eudicot (C. canephora). We successfully amplified TIR-NBS-LRR sequences from dicot and gymnosperm DNA, but not from monocot DNA. Using databases, we obtained NBS sequences from additional monocots, magnoliids and basal angiosperms. TIR-type sequences were not present in monocot or magnoliid sequences, but were present in the basal angiosperms. Phylogenetic analysis supported a single TIR clade and multiple non-TIR clades. Conclusion We were unable to find monocot TIR-NBS-LRR sequences by PCR amplification or database searches. In contrast to previous studies, our results represent five monocot orders (Poales, Zingiberales, Arecales, Asparagales, and Alismatales). Our results establish the presence of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences in basal angiosperms and suggest that although these sequences were present in early land plants, they have been reduced significantly in monocots and magnoliids. PMID:19785756

  9. TIR-NBS-LRR genes are rare in monocots: evidence from diverse monocot orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarr D Ellen K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant resistance (R gene products recognize pathogen effector molecules. Many R genes code for proteins containing nucleotide binding site (NBS and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR domains. NBS-LRR proteins can be divided into two groups, TIR-NBS-LRR and non-TIR-NBS-LRR, based on the structure of the N-terminal domain. Although both classes are clearly present in gymnosperms and eudicots, only non-TIR sequences have been found consistently in monocots. Since most studies in monocots have been limited to agriculturally important grasses, it is difficult to draw conclusions. The purpose of our study was to look for evidence of these sequences in additional monocot orders. Findings Using degenerate PCR, we amplified NBS sequences from four monocot species (C. blanda, D. marginata, S. trifasciata, and Spathiphyllum sp., a gymnosperm (C. revoluta and a eudicot (C. canephora. We successfully amplified TIR-NBS-LRR sequences from dicot and gymnosperm DNA, but not from monocot DNA. Using databases, we obtained NBS sequences from additional monocots, magnoliids and basal angiosperms. TIR-type sequences were not present in monocot or magnoliid sequences, but were present in the basal angiosperms. Phylogenetic analysis supported a single TIR clade and multiple non-TIR clades. Conclusion We were unable to find monocot TIR-NBS-LRR sequences by PCR amplification or database searches. In contrast to previous studies, our results represent five monocot orders (Poales, Zingiberales, Arecales, Asparagales, and Alismatales. Our results establish the presence of TIR-NBS-LRR sequences in basal angiosperms and suggest that although these sequences were present in early land plants, they have been reduced significantly in monocots and magnoliids.

  10. Establishing Research and Management Priorities for Monoecious Hydrilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    of several eradication programs. Table 1. An overview of various monoecious eradication projects in northern tier lakes. Lake and State ~ Lake Size...exists regarding competitive traits of dioecious hydrilla (e.g. low light and CO2 compensation points, ability to utilize a C-4-like photosynthesis

  11. Recording Fathometer Techniques for Hydrilla Distribution and Biomass Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    with Panicum, Ceratophyllum, Pontederia, Sagittaria, and Cabomba . Before hydrilla introduction in 1974, the open water pro- fundal zone was approximately...in lakes allows a greater amount of carbon to be available to macrophyte photosynthesis due to the availability of biocarbonate and, depending on

  12. Genetic Relationships among Invasive Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) Biotypes in the US and Their Implications for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    genetic clusters . ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-32 February 2014 3 Benoit (2011) built upon these early studies and conducted a formal cladistic analysis of...Schnell. 1997. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of the phonetic relationships among world-wide accessions of Hydrilla verticillata. Aquatic

  13. Riemannian submersions and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Falcitelli, Maria; Pastore, Anna Maria

    2004-01-01

    This book provides the first-ever systematic introduction to thetheory of Riemannian submersions, which was initiated by BarrettO''Neill and Alfred Gray less than four decades ago. The authorsfocus their attention on classification theorems when the total spaceand the fibres have nice geometric properties.

  14. Extensins in graminaceous monocots and dicots compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieliszewski, M.; Lamport, D.T.A.

    1987-04-01

    Is the cellulose-extensin warp-weft model of primary cell wall organization generally applicable, or restricted to dicots. Although wall-bound hydroxyproline is usually a quantitative measure of extensin content, it is not definitive at low hyp levels typical of graminaceous monocots. Therefore the authors searched for putative soluble extensins ionically-bound to the cell wall of maize cell suspension cultures. Fractionation of AlCl/sub 3/ eluates on cellex-P, Cellex-E, and Superose-6 gave two HRGPs CEV and CE1 which compositionally resembled extensins rather than the arabinogalactan HRGPs. CEV and CE1 did not react with Yariv's antigen, but did cross-react with antibodies raised against tomato extensin. A tryptic peptide map of CEV gave some major peptides enriched in hydroxyproline and proline residues, indicating peptide periodicity. TEM of the low-angle shadowed protein gave flexuous rodlike molecules of 80 nm contour length. This is the best evidence to date for extensin in monocots.

  15. Manned submersible „JAGO“

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hissmann

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The manned submersible „JAGO“ is a human occupied underwater vehicle (HOV designed for personal exploration and research in all types of aquatic systems and habitats. The seafloor along the continental shelf and slopes within the ocean twilight zone is JAGO’s main target area. The DNV-GL classed 2-person submersible has a maximum operating depth of 400 m. The two occupants, the pilot and one observer, are seated at 1 Atmosphere in a steel pressure hull with two large acrylic windows. The submersible’s small size and lightweight construction (3 T allows worldwide operations from on board a wide variety of vessels as well as transport in a single standard 20-foot container together with all support equipment. Typical applications include personal observation of the sea bed and water column, video and photo documentation, selective non-intrusive sampling, placement of sensors and experiments, underwater inspection, as well as location and recovery of objects

  16. Phytofabrication of silver nanoparticles by using aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Sable N, Gaikwad S, Bonde S, Gade A, Rai M. 2012. Phytofabrication of silver nanoparticles by using aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 45-49. In the context of current drive to developed new green technology in nanomaterials, synthesis of nanoparticles is of considerable importance. There has been considerable work done in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology during the last decade due to the introduction of various protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles by using plants and microorganisms. Here we firstly report the extracellular phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs using aquatic plants Hydrilla verticilata. The characterization of the phytosynthesized Ag-NPs was done with the help of UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, Zeta potential and SEM. The SEM micrograph revealed the synthesis of polydispersed spherical nanoparticles, with the average size of 65.55 nm. The phytofabricated Ag-NPs can be used in the field of medicine and agriculture, due to their antimicrobial potential.

  17. Do global diversity patterns of vertebrates reflect those of monocots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Lynsey; Jones, F Andrew; Orme, C David L; Sobkowiak, Benjamin; Barraclough, Timothy G; Chase, Mark W; Govaerts, Rafaël; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Few studies of global diversity gradients in plants exist, largely because the data are not available for all species involved. Instead, most global studies have focussed on vertebrates, as these taxa have historically been associated with the most complete data. Here, we address this shortfall by first investigating global diversity gradients in monocots, a morphologically and functionally diverse clade representing a quarter of flowering plant diversity, and then assessing congruence between monocot and vertebrate diversity patterns. To do this, we create a new dataset that merges biome-level associations for all monocot genera with country-level associations for almost all ∼70,000 species. We then assess the evidence for direct versus indirect effects of this plant diversity on vertebrate diversity using a combination of linear regression and structural equation modelling (SEM). Finally, we also calculate overlap of diversity hotspots for monocots and each vertebrate taxon. Monocots follow a latitudinal gradient although with pockets of extra-tropical diversity, mirroring patterns in vertebrates. Monocot diversity is positively associated with vertebrate diversity, but the strength of correlation varies depending on the clades being compared. Monocot diversity explains marginal amounts of variance (correlations remain among model residuals, and SEMs apparently reveal some direct effects of monocot richness. Our results suggest that collinear responses to environmental gradients are behind much of the congruence observed, but that there is some evidence for direct effects of producer diversity on consumer diversity. Much remains to be done before broad-scale diversity gradients among taxa are fully explained. Our dataset of monocot distributions will aid in this endeavour.

  18. Do global diversity patterns of vertebrates reflect those of monocots?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey McInnes

    Full Text Available Few studies of global diversity gradients in plants exist, largely because the data are not available for all species involved. Instead, most global studies have focussed on vertebrates, as these taxa have historically been associated with the most complete data. Here, we address this shortfall by first investigating global diversity gradients in monocots, a morphologically and functionally diverse clade representing a quarter of flowering plant diversity, and then assessing congruence between monocot and vertebrate diversity patterns. To do this, we create a new dataset that merges biome-level associations for all monocot genera with country-level associations for almost all ∼70,000 species. We then assess the evidence for direct versus indirect effects of this plant diversity on vertebrate diversity using a combination of linear regression and structural equation modelling (SEM. Finally, we also calculate overlap of diversity hotspots for monocots and each vertebrate taxon. Monocots follow a latitudinal gradient although with pockets of extra-tropical diversity, mirroring patterns in vertebrates. Monocot diversity is positively associated with vertebrate diversity, but the strength of correlation varies depending on the clades being compared. Monocot diversity explains marginal amounts of variance (<10% after environmental factors have been accounted for. However, correlations remain among model residuals, and SEMs apparently reveal some direct effects of monocot richness. Our results suggest that collinear responses to environmental gradients are behind much of the congruence observed, but that there is some evidence for direct effects of producer diversity on consumer diversity. Much remains to be done before broad-scale diversity gradients among taxa are fully explained. Our dataset of monocot distributions will aid in this endeavour.

  19. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinq-Mars, Robert S; Burke, Timothy; Irish, James; Gustafson, Brian; Kirtley, James; Alawa, Aiman

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. Completed final reporting and deliverables

  20. Links between early pollen development and aperture pattern in monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadot, S; Forchioni, A; Penet, L; Sannier, J; Ressayre, A

    2006-08-01

    Although the pollen grains produced in monocots are predominantly monosulcate (or monoporate), other aperture types are also found within this taxonomic group, such as the trichotomosulcate, inaperturate, zonaperturate, di-, or triaperturate types. The aperture pattern is determined during the young-tetrad stage of pollen development and it is known that some features of microsporogenesis can constrain the aperture type. For example, trichotomosulcate pollen is always associated with simultaneous cytokinesis, a condition considered as derived in the monocots. Our observations of the microsporogenesis pathway in a range of monocot species show that this pathway is surprisingly variable. Our results, however preliminary, reveal that variation in microsporogenesis concerns not only cytokinesis but also callose deposition among the microspores and shape of the tetrads. The role played by these features in aperture pattern determination is discussed.

  1. Experimental feeding of Hydrilla verticillata colonized by stigonematales cyanobacteria induces vacuolar myelinopathy in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert D Mercurio

    Full Text Available Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter "UCB" for "uncharacterized cyanobacterium". Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata, colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common "host" of UCB. We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, "toxicity" was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the

  2. Molecular basis of development in petaloid monocot flowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Frederiksen, Signe; Skipper, Martin

    2006-01-01

    -class genes and at least two copies of A-class genes: one is expressed in floral meristems, the other in inflorescence meristems. In monocots and non-core eudicots the validity of the ABC model is under discussion. Generally, more than one functional copy is found of at least one of the B-class genes. The A...

  3. Captive bubble and sessile drop surface characterization of a submerged aquatic plant, Hydrilla verticillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface energy parameters of the invasive aquatic weed, Hydrilla verticillata, were determined using contact angle measurements using two different methods. The abaxial and adaxial surfaces of the leaves and stem were characterized for the weed while submerged in water using captive air and octa...

  4. Assessment of Nelumbo nucifera and Hydrilla verticillata in the treatment of pharmaceutical industry effluent from 24 Parganas, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamba Chatterjee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern day technologies employed in industrialization and unhygienic lifestyle of mankind has led to a severe environmental menace resulting in pollution of freshwater bodies. Pharmaceutical industry effluents cause eutrophication and provide adequate nutrients for growth of pathogenic bacteria. This study has been conducted with aquatic plants water lotus (Nelumbo nucifera and hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata with an novel aim to treat pharmaceutical industry effluents showing the outcome of the experiments carried out with the effluents collected from rural areas of 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India. Determination of pH, solid suspend, BOD5, NH3-N, MPN and coliform test were used for this notioned purpose. Pharmaceutical waste effluent water treated with water lotus showed less pH, solid suspend, DO, BOD, NH3-N, MPN and coliform bacteria than hydrilla treatment when compared to the control. In conclusion, water lotus is found to be more efficient in treatment of pharmaceutical industry effluent waste water than hydrilla.

  5. The Submersible Threat to Maritime Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    research would be how the HSE could possibly utilize small submersibles to enhance HS through such activities as using remotely operated subs to conduct...1 C. RESEARCH QUESTION AND METHODOLOGY ...................................4 D. SIGNIFICANCE TO THE FIELD...Technology ...................................................66 C. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH .............................68 D. CONCLUSION

  6. Field Surveys to Identify Biocontrol Agents of Hydrilla verticillata from June - September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-36 July 2015 Progress Report on Field Surveys to Identify Biocontrol ...AND SUBTITLE Progress Report on Field Surveys to Identify Biocontrol Agents of Hydrilla verticillata from June - September 2012 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...1 Invasion Biology and Biocontrol Lab, Wuhan Botanical Institute, CAS ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-36 July 2015 3 named previously as Bagous sp. 3 and

  7. Motif content comparison between monocot and dicot species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserhati, Matyas

    2015-03-01

    While a number of DNA sequence motifs have been functionally characterized, the full repertoire of motifs in an organism (the motifome) is yet to be characterized. The present study wishes to widen the scope of motif content analysis in different monocot and dicot species that include both rice species, Brachypodium, corn, wheat as monocots and Arabidopsis, Lotus japonica, Medicago truncatula, and Populus tremula as dicots. All possible existing motifs were analyzed in different regions of genomes such as were found in different sets of sequences in these species: the whole genome, core proximal and distal promoters, 5' and 3' UTRs, and the 1st introns. Due to the increased number of species involved in this study compared to previous works, species relationships were analyzed based on the similarity of common motif content. Certain secondary structure elements were inferred in the genomes of these species as well as new unknown motifs. The distribution of 20 motifs common to the studied species were found to have a significantly larger occurrence within the promoters and 3' UTRs of genes, both being regulatory regions. Motifs common to the promoter regions of japonica rice, Brachypodium, and corn were also found in a number of orthologous and paralogous genes. Some of our motifs were found to be complementary to miRNA elements in Brachypodium distachyon and japonica rice.

  8. Biomechanics and functional morphology of a climbing monocot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Linnea; Wagner, Sarah T.; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plants with a climbing growth habit possess unique biomechanical properties arising from adaptations to changing loading conditions connected with close attachment to mechanical supports. In monocot climbers, mechanical adaptation is restricted by the absence of a bifacial vascular cambium. Flagellaria indica was used to investigate the mechanical properties and adaptations of a monocot climber that, uniquely, attaches to the surrounding vegetation via leaf tendrils. Biomechanical methods such as three-point bending and torsion tests were used together with anatomical studies on tissue development, modification and distribution. In general, the torsional modulus was lower than the bending modulus; hence, torsional stiffness was less than flexural stiffness. Basal parts of mature stems showed the greatest stiffness while that of more apical stem segments levelled off. Mechanical properties were modulated via tissue maturation processes mainly affecting the peripheral region of the stem. Peripheral vascular bundles showed a reduction in the amount of conducting tissue while the proportion and density of the bundle sheath increased. Furthermore, adjacent bundle sheaths merged resulting in a dense ring of fibrous tissue. Although F. indica lacks secondary cambial growth, the climbing habit is facilitated by a complex interaction of tissue maturation and attachment. PMID:26819259

  9. Codon usage and codon pair patterns in non-grass monocot genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Purabi; Binti Othman, RofinaYasmin; Mebus, Katharina; Ramakrishnan, N; Ann Harikrishna, Jennifer

    2017-11-28

    Studies on codon usage in monocots have focused on grasses, and observed patterns of this taxon were generalized to all monocot species. Here, non-grass monocot species were analysed to investigate the differences between grass and non-grass monocots. First, studies of codon usage in monocots were reviewed. The current information was then extended regarding codon usage, as well as codon-pair context bias, using four completely sequenced non-grass monocot genomes (Musa acuminata, Musa balbisiana, Phoenix dactylifera and Spirodela polyrhiza) for which comparable transcriptome datasets are available. Measurements were taken regarding relative synonymous codon usage, effective number of codons, derived optimal codon and GC content and then the relationships investigated to infer the underlying evolutionary forces. The research identified optimal codons, rare codons and preferred codon-pair context in the non-grass monocot species studied. In contrast to the bimodal distribution of GC3 (GC content in third codon position) in grasses, non-grass monocots showed a unimodal distribution. Disproportionate use of G and C (and of A and T) in two- and four-codon amino acids detected in the analysis rules out the mutational bias hypothesis as an explanation of genomic variation in GC content. There was found to be a positive relationship between CAI (codon adaptation index; predicts the level of expression of a gene) and GC3. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between coding and genomic GC content and negative correlation of GC3 with gene length, indicating a strong impact of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in shaping codon usage and nucleotide composition in non-grass monocots. Optimal codons in these non-grass monocots show a preference for G/C in the third codon position. These results support the concept that codon usage and nucleotide composition in non-grass monocots are mainly driven by gBGC.

  10. Relation of age-0 largemouth bass abundance to hydrilla coverage and water level at Lochloosa and Orange Lakes, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, W.B.; Allen, M.S.; Myers, R.A.; Nagid, E.J.; Estes, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in electrofishing catch per hour (CPH) of age-0 largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides were examined in relation to aquatic macrophytes and seasonal water elevation at Lochloosa and Orange lakes, Florida, during the 1990s. At Lochloosa Lake, stepwise multiple regression revealed a significant positive relationship between the mean CPH of age-0 largemouth bass and the percentage of areal coverage by hydrilla Hydrilla verticallata. At Orange Lake, mean CPH was directly associated with the percentage of areal coverage by hydrilla and inversely related to summer water levels. Thus, the influence of vegetation on age-0 largemouth bass abundance was similar at both lakes, but the effects of water levels were not. Further investigations into the effects of fluctuations in water levels on age-0 largemouth bass in natural lakes are needed.

  11. In silico identification of alternative oxidase 2 (AOX2) in monocots: A new evolutionary scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, José Hélio; Santos, Clesivan Pereira Dos; de Sousa E Lima, Beatriz; Moreira Netto, Anthônio Nunes; Saraiva, Kátia Daniella da Cruz; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2017-03-01

    We identified AOX2 genes in monocot species from Lemnoideae (Spirodela polyrhiza, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata), Pothoideae (Anthurium andraeanum and Anthurium amnicola) and Monsteroideae (Epipremnum aureum) subfamilies within the Araceae, an early-diverging monocot family. These findings highlight the presence of AOX2 in the most ancient monocot ancestor and also that at least partial loss of this gene occurred during speciation events within several monocot orders. The presence of AOX2 in monocot species challenges (1) new understanding of the evolutionary history of the AOX gene family in angiosperms and (2) drives experimental and bioinformatics efforts to explore functional relevance of the two AOX gene family members for plant growth and development. Knowledge gain in this field will impact running strategies on AOX-derived functional marker candidate development for plant breeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Cooling devices and methods for use with electric submersible pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, Todd Andrew; Gamboa, Jose A

    2017-10-25

    Cooling devices for use with electric submersible pump motors include a refrigerator attached to the end of the electric submersible pump motor with the evaporator heat exchanger accepting all or a portion of the heat load from the motor. The cooling device can be a self-contained bolt-on unit, so that minimal design changes to existing motors are required.

  13. Cooling devices and methods for use with electric submersible pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Todd A; Hill, Dallas D

    2014-12-02

    Cooling devices for use with electric submersible pump motors include a refrigerator attached to the end of the electric submersible pump motor with the evaporator heat exchanger accepting all or a portion of the heat load from the motor. The cooling device can be a self-contained bolt-on unit, so that minimal design changes to existing motors are required.

  14. Culture Methodology for Experimental Investigations Involving Rooted Submersed Aquatic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Regrowth of hydrilla from axillary buds . J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 18:27-29. Langeland, K. A., Sutton, D. L. and Canfield, D. E., Jr. 1983. Growth response...Barko, Hardin, and Matthews 1982). Room temperatures (20 -25 C) are adequate for most species; however, some of the more subtropically occurring, exotic...species (e.g. H. verticillata) may benefit from higher temperatures (Van, Hailer, and Garrard 1978; Bowes, Holaday, and Hailer 1979; Barko and Smart

  15. Do the U.S. Dioecious and Monoecious biotypes of Hydrilla verticillata L.F. Royle hybridize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical note reports the results of two studies to address the question of whether the two hydrilla biotypes present in the U.S. can hybridize. These include whether hybridization can occur under controlled conditions and in field populations where the two hybrids coexist in close proximity ...

  16. Surveys for Biological Control Agents of Hydrilla verticillata in the People’s Republic of China in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Matching the origin of an invasive weed for selection of a herbivore haplotype for a biological control programme. Molecular Ecology 15:287-297...performance of two candidate biological control agents of Brazilian peppertree in Florida. Biological Control 47:167-171. Monoecious Hydrilla- A

  17. Submersible purification system for radioactive water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Michael L.; Lewis, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    A portable, submersible water purification system for use in a pool of water containing radioactive contamination includes a prefilter for filtering particulates from the water. A resin bed is then provided for removal of remaining dissolved, particulate, organic, and colloidal impurities from the prefiltered water. A sterilizer then sterilizes the water. The prefilter and resin bed are suitably contained and are submerged in the pool. The sterilizer is water tight and located at the surface of the pool. The water is circulated from the pool through the prefilter, resin bed, and sterilizer by suitable pump or the like. In the preferred embodiment, the resin bed is contained within a tank which stands on the bottom of the pool and to which a base mounting the prefilter and pump is attached. An inlet for the pump is provided adjacent the bottom of the pool, while the sterilizer and outlet for the system is located adjacent the top of the pool.

  18. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Daniel Francis Alan; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D; Jankowski, Todd Andrew

    2014-04-15

    A submersible pumping system for downhole use in extracting fluids containing hydrocarbons from a well. In one embodiment, the pumping system comprises a rotary induction motor, a motor casing, one or more pump stages, and a cooling system. The rotary induction motor rotates a shaft about a longitudinal axis of rotation. The motor casing houses the rotary induction motor such that the rotary induction motor is held in fluid isolation from the fluid being extracted. The pump stages are attached to the shaft outside of the motor casing, and are configured to impart fluid being extracted from the well with an increased pressure. The cooling system is disposed at least partially within the motor casing, and transfers heat generated by operation of the rotary induction motor out of the motor casing.

  19. [Query: distinguish between dicot and monocot according to whether free vein termination exist or not].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baozuo; Lao, Yuekui; Zhu, Yilin; Li, Li; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2011-07-01

    To observe and study the correctness of the proposition dicot have free vein termination but monocot have not. To evaluate the reliability of the identification principle that is based on above proposition. Fourteen species of pharmaceutical monocot come from 9 families and 3 species of pharmaceutical dicot come from 3 families were observed by using the method of microscopic identification. The free vein termination existed in the vein-islets of 10 species of monocot from 8 families, Zingiberaceae, Stemonaceae, Gramineae, Liliaceae, Orchidaceae, Alismataceae, Dioscoreaceae and Araceae ect, and it was not to find the free vein termination in monocot Iris tectorum, Belamcanda chinensis (Fam. Iridaceae) and Imperata cylindrica, Coix lacryma-jobi (Fam. Gramineae). Three species dicot, Cinnamomum burmannii, Castanea mollissima, Mangifera indica, all had the free vein termination. The free vein termination of C. burnmannii was sparse, and C. mollissima's was usually covered by non-glandular hair. The proposition is not universally applicable, monocot have no free vein termination. The identification principle is unreliable, which distinguish between medicinal dicot and monocot leaves according to whether the free vein termination exists or not.

  20. Testing new submersible pumps for proper sizing and reduced costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Toole, W.P.; O' Brien, J.B.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes an ongoing program to improve overall submersible pump performance by Thums Long Beach Co., acting as contractor for the City of Long Beach, operator of the Long Beach Unit. Thums Long Beach Co. currently operates 700 submersible pump installations located on four manmade islands and one landfill pier location. The program began with spot testing of submersible pumps for Thums' use. It has evolved to 100% pump testing and the stipulation that only pumps with newly manufactured parts are acceptable. The primary goals of this program are to increase well production and to lower lifting costs. Critical to these goals is increasing the average length of run by using accurate pump-performance data to design equipment and by rejecting defective pumps before they are run. Increased production is realized from better designs. Lower lifting costs result from using more efficient pumps and a reduced frequency of pulling submersible equipment.

  1. Testing new submersible pumps for proper sizing and reduced costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Toole, W.P.; O' Brien, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing program to improve overall submersible pump performance by Thums Long Beach Company, acting as Contractor of the City of Long Beach, Operator of the Long Beach Unit. Thums Long Beach Company currently operates 700 submersible pump installations located on four man-made islands and one land fill pier location. The program began with spot testing of submersible pumps for Thums' use. It has evolved to 100 percent pump testing and the stipulation that only pumps with newly manufactured parts are acceptable. The primary goals of this program are to increase well production and lower lifting costs. Critical to these goals is increasing the average length of run by using accurate pump performance data to design equipment and by rejecting defective pumps before they are run. Increased production is realized from better designs. Lower lifting costs result from utilizing higher efficiency pumps and a reduced frequency of pulling submersible equipment.

  2. AWWA E102-17 submersible vertical turbine pumps

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This standard describes minimum requirements for submersible vertical turbine pumps utilizing a discharge column pipe assembly, 5 hp or larger, used in water service, including materials, design, manufacture, inspection, and testing.

  3. Expanded Simulation Models Version 3.0 for Growth of the Submerged Aquatic Plants American Wildcelery, Sago Pondweed, Hydrilla, and Eurasian Watermilfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Sago Pondweed, Hydrilla, Eurasian Watermilfoil by Elly P. H. Best and William A. Boyd PURPOSE: This technical note describes modifications of...Wildcelery, Sago Pondweed, Hydrilla, and Eurasian Watermilfoil 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...monoecious Potamogeton pectinatus1 ( sago pondweed)-POTAM (Best and Boyd 1996, 1999a, 1999b, 2001a, 2001b, 2003a, 2003b, Boyd and Best 1996). These models can

  4. DNA barcoding of the Lemnaceae, a family of aquatic monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wenqin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the aquatic monocot family Lemnaceae (commonly called duckweeds represent the smallest and fastest growing flowering plants. Their highly reduced morphology and infrequent flowering result in a dearth of characters for distinguishing between the nearly 38 species that exhibit these tiny, closely-related and often morphologically similar features within the same family of plants. Results We developed a simple and rapid DNA-based molecular identification system for the Lemnaceae based on sequence polymorphisms. We compared the barcoding potential of the seven plastid-markers proposed by the CBOL (Consortium for the Barcode of Life plant-working group to discriminate species within the land plants in 97 accessions representing 31 species from the family of Lemnaceae. A Lemnaceae-specific set of PCR and sequencing primers were designed for four plastid coding genes (rpoB, rpoC1, rbcL and matK and three noncoding spacers (atpF-atpH, psbK-psbI and trnH-psbA based on the Lemna minor chloroplast genome sequence. We assessed the ease of amplification and sequencing for these markers, examined the extent of the barcoding gap between intra- and inter-specific variation by pairwise distances, evaluated successful identifications based on direct sequence comparison of the "best close match" and the construction of a phylogenetic tree. Conclusions Based on its reliable amplification, straightforward sequence alignment, and rates of DNA variation between species and within species, we propose that the atpF-atpH noncoding spacer could serve as a universal DNA barcoding marker for species-level identification of duckweeds.

  5. In tropical lowland rain forests monocots have tougher leaves than dicots, and include a new kind of tough leaf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominy, N.J.; Grubb, P.J.; Jackson, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims: There has been little previous work on the toughness of the laminae of monocots in tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) despite the potential importance of greater toughness in inhibiting herbivory by invertebrates. Of 15 monocot families with >100 species in TLRF, eight have...... and Panama, fracture toughness was determined with an automated scissors apparatus using fully toughened leaves only. Key Results: In Australia punch strength was, on average, 7x greater in shade-tolerant monocots than in neighbouring dicots at the immature stage, and 3x greater at the mature stage....... In Singapore, shade-tolerant monocots had, on average, 13x higher values for fracture toughness than neighbouring dicots. In Panama, both shade-tolerant and gap-demanding monocots were tested; they did not differ in fracture toughness. The monocots had markedly higher values than the dicots whether shade-tolerant...

  6. Use of sediment CO2 by submersed rooted plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Anders; Borum, Jens

    2009-01-01

    freshwater plants with different morphology and growth characteristics (Lobelia dortmanna, Lilaeopsis macloviana, Ludwigia repens, Vallisneria americana and Hydrocotyle verticillata) are able to support photosynthesis supplied by uptake of CO2 from the sediment. Methods: Gross photosynthesis was measured......Background and Aims: Submersed plants have different strategies to overcome inorganic carbon limitation. It is generally assumed that only small rosette species (isoetids) are able to utilize the high sediment CO2 availability. The present study examined to what extent five species of submersed......, the shoot to root ratio on an areal basis was the single factor best explaining variability in the importance of sediment CO2. For Ludwigia, diffusion barriers limited uptake or transport from roots to stems and transport from stems to leaves. Conclusions: Submersed plants other than isoetids can utilize...

  7. Monocot leaves are eaten less than dicot leaves in tropical lowland rain forests: correlations with toughness and leaf presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubb, P.J.; Jackson, R.V.; Barberis, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    . It was hypothesized that (a) losses of leaf area to herbivorous invertebrates are generally greatest during leaf expansion and smaller for monocots than for dicots, and (b) where losses after expansion are appreciable any difference between monocots and dicots then is smaller than that found during expansion. Methods......: At six sites on four continents, estimates were made of lamina area loss from the four most recently mature leaves of focal monocots and of the nearest dicot shoot. Measurements of leaf mass per unit area, and the concentrations of water and nitrogen were made for many of the species. In Panama......, the losses from monocots (palms) and dicots were also measured after placing fully expanded palm leaflets and whole dicot leaves on trails of leaf-cutter ants. Key Results: At five of six sites monocots experienced significantly smaller leaf area loss than dicots. The results were not explicable in terms...

  8. Class B Gene Expression and the Modified ABC Model in Nongrass Monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Kanno

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the MADS-box genes and the study of model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus have greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving the diversity in floral development. The class B genes, which belong to the MADS-box gene family, are important regulators of the development of petals and stamens in flowering plants. Many nongrass monocot flowers have two whorls of petaloid organs, which are called tepals. To explain this floral morphology, the modified ABC model was proposed. This model was exemplified by the tulip, in which expansion and restriction of class B gene expression is linked to the transition of floral morphologies in whorl 1. The expression patterns of class B genes from many monocot species nicely fit this model; however, those from some species, such as asparagus, do not. In this review, we summarize the relationship between class B gene expression and floral morphology in nongrass monocots, such as Liliales (Liliaceae and Asparagales species, and discuss the applicability of the modified ABC model to monocot flowers.

  9. Evaluation of Monocot and Eudicot Divergence Using the Sugarcane Transcriptome1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentz, Michel; Cara, Frank A.A.; Okura, Vagner K.; da Silva, Felipe R.; Pedrosa, Guilherme L.; Hemerly, Adriana S.; Capella, Adriana N.; Marins, Mozart; Ferreira, Paulo C.; França, Suzelei C.; Grivet, Laurent; Vettore, Andre L.; Kemper, Edson L.; Burnquist, Willian L.; Targon, Maria L.P.; Siqueira, Walter J.; Kuramae, Eiko E.; Marino, Celso L.; Camargo, Luis E.A.; Carrer, Helaine; Coutinho, Luis L.; Furlan, Luiz R.; Lemos, Manoel V.F.; Nunes, Luiz R.; Gomes, Suely L.; Santelli, Roberto V.; Goldman, Maria H.; Bacci, Maurício; Giglioti, Eder A.; Thiemann, Otávio H.; Silva, Flávio H.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Nobrega, Francisco G.; Arruda, Paulo; Menck, Carlos F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Over 40,000 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) consensus sequences assembled from 237,954 expressed sequence tags were compared with the protein and DNA sequences from other angiosperms, including the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa). Approximately two-thirds of the sugarcane transcriptome have similar sequences in Arabidopsis. These sequences may represent a core set of proteins or protein domains that are conserved among monocots and eudicots and probably encode for essential angiosperm functions. The remaining sequences represent putative monocot-specific genetic material, one-half of which were found only in sugarcane. These monocot-specific cDNAs represent either novelties or, in many cases, fast-evolving sequences that diverged substantially from their eudicot homologs. The wide comparative genome analysis presented here provides information on the evolutionary changes that underlie the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Our comparative analysis also led to the identification of several not yet annotated putative genes and possible gene loss events in Arabidopsis. PMID:15020759

  10. Long branch attraction, taxon sampling, and the earliest angiosperms: Amborella or monocots?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Danny W

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies, using in aggregate some 28 genes, have achieved a consensus in recognizing three groups of plants, including Amborella, as comprising the basal-most grade of all other angiosperms. A major exception is the recent study by Goremykin et al. (2003; Mol. Biol. Evol. 20:1499–1505, whose analyses of 61 genes from 13 sequenced chloroplast genomes of land plants nearly always found 100% support for monocots as the deepest angiosperms relative to Amborella, Calycanthus, and eudicots. We hypothesized that this conflict reflects a misrooting of angiosperms resulting from inadequate taxon sampling, inappropriate phylogenetic methodology, and rapid evolution in the grass lineage used to represent monocots. Results We used two main approaches to test this hypothesis. First, we sequenced a large number of chloroplast genes from the monocot Acorus and added these plus previously sequenced Acorus genes to the Goremykin et al. (2003 dataset in order to explore the effects of altered monocot sampling under the same analytical conditions used in their study. With Acorus alone representing monocots, strongly supported Amborella-sister trees were obtained in all maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses, and in some distance-based analyses. Trees with both Acorus and grasses gave either a well-supported Amborella-sister topology or else a highly unlikely topology with 100% support for grasses-sister and paraphyly of monocots (i.e., Acorus sister to "dicots" rather than to grasses. Second, we reanalyzed the Goremykin et al. (2003 dataset focusing on methods designed to account for rate heterogeneity. These analyses supported an Amborella-sister hypothesis, with bootstrap support values often conflicting strongly with cognate analyses performed without allowing for rate heterogeneity. In addition, we carried out a limited set of analyses that included the chloroplast genome of Nymphaea, whose position as a basal angiosperm was

  11. Submersible telemetry system downhole unit model for the petroleum industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, O. O.; Trofimova, E. S.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Danilov, V. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses the issue of increasing requirements for the oil industry: the need to develop new wells and control their profitability. The device under consideration (a submersible telemetry system that is capable of measuring well parameters and transferring them via the communication line to the ground based control system) will allow to avoid downtime when it is extracted for indicators check.

  12. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... This study was carried out to determine which pre-treatments should be preferred to overcome dormancy problems of Colutea armena seeds which were collected from three different provenances. Pre-treatments applied to the seeds were submersion in concentrated (98%) sulphuric acid for 30 min,.

  13. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and tap water pretreatments in the greenhouse and open field conditions on germination of bladder-Senna ... This study was carried out to determine which pre-treatments should be preferred to overcome dormancy problems of Colutea armena seeds which were ...

  14. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit

    2010-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treatment of sewage sludge and simultaneous generate electricity. Stable power generation (145±5 mW/m2) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency...

  15. Hydrilla verticillata employs two different ways to affect DNA methylation under excess copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Danlu; Zhuang, Kai; Xia, Yan; Zhu, Changhua; Chen, Chen; Hu, Zhubing; Shen, Zhenguo

    2017-12-01

    Because of the accumulation of heavy metals, Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle, a rooted submerged perennial aquatic herb, is being developed as a potential tool to clean the aquatic ecosystem polluted by heavy metals. However, its physiological responses for heavy metal remain to be elucidated. Here, through employing proteomics approach, we found that excess Cu significantly induced the expressions of four DNA methylation related proteins in H. verticillata, which were the homologues of two domains rearranged methyltransferases (DRM), a methyltransferases chromomethylase (CMT) and a histone H3 lysine-9 specific SUVH6-like (SUVH6). Consistently, a dramatic change in DNA methylation patterns was detected in excess Cu-exposed H. verticillata. Surprisingly, administration of the NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and imidazole (IMZ) that block production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could trigger the remethylation of genomic sites that were demethylated by excess Cu, indicating that Cu-induced ROS might be another way to affect DNA methylation. Further analysis suggested this changed DNA methylation may be owing to the ROS-induced DNA damage. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that two different ways to influence DNA methylation in excess Cu-treated H. verticillata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of ADM1 for modeling of biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Hydrilla verticillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Xun; Huo, Chan; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Mian

    2016-07-01

    The present study focused on the application of anaerobic digestion model no. 1 (ADM1) to simulate biogas production from Hydrilla verticillata. Model simulation was carried out by implementing ADM1 in AQUASIM 2.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to select the most sensitive parameters for estimation using the absolute-relative sensitivity function. Among all the kinetic parameters, disintegration constant (kdis), hydrolysis constant of protein (khyd_pr), Monod maximum specific substrate uptake rate (km_aa, km_ac, km_h2) and half-saturation constants (Ks_aa, Ks_ac) affect biogas production significantly, which were optimized by fitting of the model equations to the data obtained from batch experiments. The ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to well predict the experimental results of daily biogas production and biogas composition. The simulation results of evolution of organic acids, bacteria concentrations and inhibition effects also helped to get insight into the reaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A preliminary study on the adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) using seaweed, Hydrilla verticillata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baral, S.S., E-mail: ss_baral2003@yahoo.co.in [Chemical Engineering Group, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani - Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa-403726 (India); Das, Namrata; Roy Chaudhury, G.; Das, S.N. [Department of Environment and Sustainability, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar-751013 (India)

    2009-11-15

    The Cr(VI) adsorption efficiency of the seaweed, Hydrilla verticillata, was studied in batches. The adsorbent was characterized using SEM, BET surface area analyzer, Malvern particle size analyzer, EDAX and FT-IR. Cr(VI) removal efficiency of the adsorbent was studied as a function of different adsorption parameters such as contact time, stirring speed, pH, adsorbent dose, particle size, adsorbate concentration, and temperature. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin adsorption isotherm equations were used in the equilibrium modeling. The adsorption process followed pseudo second-order kinetics and intra-particle diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step. Experimental data follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of the adsorption process were evaluated to find out the feasibility of the adsorption process. The negative values of Gibb's free energy and positive enthalpy values show the feasibility and endothermic nature of the process. The significance of different adsorption parameters along with their combined effect on the adsorption process has been established through a full 2{sup 4} factorial design. Among the different adsorption parameters, pH has the most influential effect on the adsorption process followed by adsorbate concentration and combined effects of all the four parameters were tested. The correlation among different adsorption parameters were studied using multi-variate analysis.

  18. Acclimation of Hydrilla verticillata to sediment anoxia in vegetation restoration in eutrophic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Dai, Yanran; Rui, Shengyang; Cui, Naxin; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2015-12-01

    Sediment anoxia generally results from intense organic enrichment and is a limiting factor in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. To investigate the effect of sediment anoxia on a typical pollution-tolerant submerged macrophyte species, Hydrilla verticillata, and acclimation mechanisms in the plant, a gradient of sediment anoxia was simulated with additions of sucrose to the sediment, which can stimulate increased concentrations of total nitrogen, NH4(+) and Fe in pore water. H. verticillata growth was significantly affected by highly anoxic conditions, as indicated by reduced total biomass in the 0.5 and 1% sucrose treatments. However, slight anoxia (0.1% sucrose addition) promoted growth, and the shoot biomass was 22.64% higher than in the control. In addition to morphologic alterations, H. verticillata showed physiological acclimations to anoxia, including increased anaerobic respiration and changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in roots. The soluble protein and soluble carbohydrate contents in roots of the 1% treatment were both significantly higher compared with those in the control. The increase in alcohol dehydrogenase activity and pyruvate content in the roots suggested that H. verticillata has a well-developed capacity for anaerobic fermentation. This study suggests that highly anoxic sediments inhibit the growth of H. verticillata and the species has a degree of tolerance to anoxic conditions. Further in situ investigations should be conducted on the interactions between sediment conditions and macrophytes to comprehensively evaluate the roles of sediment in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters.

  19. Bayesian phylogeny of sucrose transporters: Ancient origins, differential expansion and convergent evolution in monocots and dicots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo ePeng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose transporters (SUTs are essential for the export and efficient movement of sucrose from source leaves to sink organs in plants. The angiosperm SUT family was previously classified into three or four distinct groups, Types I, II (subgroup IIB and III, with dicot-specific Type I and monocot-specific Type IIB functioning in phloem loading. To shed light on the underlying drivers of SUT evolution, Bayesian phylogenetic inference was undertaken using 41 sequenced plant genomes, including seven basal lineages at key evolutionary junctures. Our analysis supports four phylogenetically and structurally distinct SUT subfamilies, originating from two ancient groups (AG1 and AG2 that diverged early during terrestrial colonization. In both AG1 and AG2, multiple intron acquisition events in the progenitor vascular plant established the gene structures of modern SUTs. Tonoplastic Type III and plasmalemmal Type II represent evolutionarily conserved descendants of AG1 and AG2, respectively. Type I and Type IIB were previously thought to evolve after the dicot-monocot split. We show, however, that divergence of Type I from Type III SUT predated basal angiosperms, likely associated with evolution of vascular cambium and phloem transport. Type I SUT was subsequently lost in monocots along with vascular cambium, and independent evolution of Type IIB coincided with modified monocot vasculature. Both Type I and Type IIB underwent lineage-specific expansion. In multiple unrelated taxa, the newly-derived SUTs exhibit biased expression in reproductive tissues, suggesting a functional link between phloem loading and reproductive fitness. Convergent evolution of Type I and Type IIB for SUT function in phloem loading and reproductive organs supports the idea that differential vascular development in dicots and monocots is a strong driver for SUT family evolution in angiosperms.

  20. Biosorption of arsenic in drinking water by submerged plant: Hydrilla verticilata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Shubha; Gopal, Krishna; Vankar, Padma S

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the biosorption efficacy of submerged aquatic plant Hydrilla verticilata for arsenic uptake from drinking water. H. verticillata, a submerged aquatic plant was utilized successfully for arsenic uptake from aqueous solution. Batch studies with various parameters viz. pH, sorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature were carried out. Data were utilized to plot Lagergren graph along with pseudo-second-order graphs for kinetic studies to estimate the removal efficacy and to determine the nature of reaction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been performed for characterization of metals on biomass. The study showed 96.35 % maximum absorption of arsenic by H. verticilata at initial concentration of 100 ppb with 0.5 g of biomass/100 ml for 5 h contact time at pH 6.0 with 150 rpm agitation rate. Data followed Langmuir isotherm showing sorption to be monolayer on homogeneous surface of biosorbent. The negative values of ΔG° indicated spontaneous nature; whereas ΔH° indicates exothermic nature of system and negative value of ∆S° entropy change correspond to a decrease in the degree of freedom to the adsorbed species followed by pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetics. FTIR and SEM results showed apparent changes in functional group regions after metal chelation and the changes in surface morphology of biosorbent. This is a comparatively more effective, economic, easily available, and environmentally safe source for arsenic uptake from solution due to its high biosorption efficacy than other biosorbents already used.

  1. Responses of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara to glyphosate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guidi; Wu, Zhonghua; Yin, Jun; Chai, Lulu

    2018-02-01

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide that is frequently detected in water bodies and is harmful to aquatic systems. We conducted an experiment to explore the ecological sensitivity of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara to glyphosate. Our research focused on the physiological responses of H. verticillata and V. natans after exposure to various concentrations of glyphosate (0, 1, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 80 mg/L) in hydroponic culture after one day (1D) and seven days (7D). The results show that after 1D, the soluble protein content of H. verticillata was significantly stimulated under low herbicide concentrations. Other indices for H. verticillata and V. natans had no remarkable changes at 1D. After 7D of treatment, the soluble protein content of H. verticillata showed no significant differences, while the malondialdehyde (MDA), pigment contents and catalase (CAT) activity significantly increased at low glyphosate concentrations. Guaiacol peroxidase (POD) activity in H. verticillata significantly increased with increasing herbicide concentrations. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of H. verticillata sharply decreased above 10 mg/L. For V. natans, soluble protein, chlorophyll a, and carotenoid content; and CAT activity declined significantly after glyphosate application, while other indicators showed no significant changes. Our results indicate that glyphosate concentrations from 0 to 80 mg/L can induce oxidative stress in H. verticillate and may impede metabolism processes for protein and pigments without causing oxidative stress in V. natans. Taken together, our results suggest that the sensitivity of H. verticillata to glyphosate exposure is higher than that of V. natans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  3. Issues in offshore platform research - Part 1: Semi-submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Kim, Tae-Wan; Sha, O. P.; Misra, S. C.

    2010-09-01

    Availability of economic and efficient energy resources is crucial to a nation's development. Because of their low cost and advancement in drilling and exploration technologies, oil and gas based energy systems are the most widely used energy source throughout the world. The inexpensive oil and gas based energy systems are used for everything, i.e., from transportation of goods and people to the harvesting of crops for food. As the energy demand continues to rise, there is strong need for inexpensive energy solutions. An offshore platform is a large structure that is used to house workers and machinery needed to drill wells in the ocean bed, extract oil and/or natural gas, process the produced fluids, and ship or pipe them to shore. Depending on the circumstances, the offshore platform can be fixed (to the ocean floor) or can consist of an artificial island or can float. Semi-submersibles are used for various purposes in offshore and marine engineering, e.g. crane vessels, drilling vessels, tourist vessels, production platforms and accommodation facilities, etc. The challenges of deepwater drilling have further motivated the researchers to design optimum choices for semi-submersibles for a chosen operating depth. In our series of eight papers, we discuss the design and production aspects of all the types of offshore platforms. In the present part I, we present an introduction and critical analysis of semi-submersibles.

  4. Issues in offshore platform research - Part 1: Semi-submersibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sharma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Availability of economic and efficient energy resources is crucial to a nation's development. Because of their low cost and advancement in drilling and exploration technologies, oil and gas based energy systems are the most widely used energy source throughout the world. The inexpensive oil and gas based energy systems are used for everything, i.e., from transportation of goods and people to the harvesting of crops for food. As the energy demand continues to rise, there is strong need for inexpensive energy solutions. An offshore platform is a large structure that is used to house workers and machinery needed to drill wells in the ocean bed, extract oil and/or natural gas, process the produced fluids, and ship or pipe them to shore. Depending on the circumstances, the offshore platform can be fixed (to the ocean floor or can consist of an artificial island or can float. Semi-submersibles are used for various purposes in offshore and marine engineering, e.g. crane vessels, drilling vessels, tourist vessels, production platforms and accommodation facilities, etc. The challenges of deepwater drilling have further motivated the researchers to design optimum choices for semi-submersibles for a chosen operating depth. In our series of eight papers, we discuss the design and production aspects of all the types of offshore platforms. In the present part I, we present an introduction and critical analysis of semi-submersibles.

  5. Evaluation of uranium removal by Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle from low level nuclear waste under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Bhainsa, K C

    2016-02-01

    The present study evaluated uranium (U) removal ability and tolerance to low level nuclear waste (LLNW) of an aquatic weed Hydrilla verticillata. Plants were screened for growth in 10%-50% waste treatments up to 3 d. Treatments of 20% and 50% waste imposed increasing toxicity with duration assessed in terms of change in fresh weight and in the levels of photosynthetic pigments and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. U concentration, however, did not show a progressive increase and was about 42 μg g(-1) dw from 20% to 50% waste at 3 d. This suggested that a saturation stage was reached with respect to U removal due to increasing toxicity. However, in another experiment with 10% waste and 10% waste+10 ppm U treatments, plants showed an increase in U concentration with the maximum level approaching 426 μg g(-1) dw at 3 d without showing any toxicity as compared to that at 20% and 50% waste treatments. Hence, plants possessed significant potential to take up U and toxicity of LLNW limited their U removal ability. This implies that the use of Hydrilla plants for U removal from LLNW is feasible at low concentrations and would require repeated harvesting at short intervals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of sediment CO2 by submersed rooted plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Anders; Borum, Jens

    2009-05-01

    Submersed plants have different strategies to overcome inorganic carbon limitation. It is generally assumed that only small rosette species (isoetids) are able to utilize the high sediment CO(2) availability. The present study examined to what extent five species of submersed freshwater plants with different morphology and growth characteristics (Lobelia dortmanna, Lilaeopsis macloviana, Ludwigia repens, Vallisneria americana and Hydrocotyle verticillata) are able to support photosynthesis supplied by uptake of CO(2) from the sediment. Gross photosynthesis was measured in two-compartment split chambers with low inorganic carbon availability in leaf compartments and variable CO(2) availability (0 to >8 mmol L(-1)) in root compartments. Photosynthetic rates based on root-supplied CO(2) were compared with maximum rates obtained at saturating leaf CO(2) availability, and (14)C experiments were conducted for two species to localize bottlenecks for utilization of sediment CO(2). All species except Hydrocotyle were able to use sediment CO(2), however, with variable efficiency, and with the isoetid, Lobelia, as clearly the most effective and the elodeid, Ludwigia, as the least efficient. At a water column CO(2) concentration in equilibrium with air, Lobelia, Lilaeopsis and Vallisneria covered >75% of their CO(2) requirements by sediment uptake, and sediment CO(2) contributed substantially to photosynthesis at water CO(2) concentrations up to 1000 micromol L(-1). For all species except Ludwigia, the shoot to root ratio on an areal basis was the single factor best explaining variability in the importance of sediment CO(2). For Ludwigia, diffusion barriers limited uptake or transport from roots to stems and transport from stems to leaves. Submersed plants other than isoetids can utilize sediment CO(2), and small and medium sized elodeids with high root to shoot area in particular may benefit substantially from uptake of sediment CO(2) in low alkaline lakes.

  7. Optimization of operating costs in managing electrical submersible pumping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Speranskaya, N. I.

    2017-10-01

    Using the methods of analysis, the task of minimizing the specific operating costs for oil production by submersible ESP units was formalized. The analysis of the multidimensional parameter space of the “ESP-well” system made it possible to isolate the vector of controlled parameters, determine the range of admissible parameters, and also to simplify the problem of finding an extremum up to the three-dimensional case. An application of the method of Lagrange multipliers to the solution of the problem is considered.

  8. Sodium dopants in helium clusters: Structure, equilibrium and submersion kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, F. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, Rue de La Piscine, Campus Saint Martin d’Hères, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-31

    Alkali impurities bind to helium nanodroplets very differently depending on their size and charge state, large neutral or charged dopants being wetted by the droplet whereas small neutral impurities prefer to reside aside. Using various computational modeling tools such as quantum Monte Carlo and path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we have revisited some aspects of the physical chemistry of helium droplets interacting with sodium impurities, including the onset of snowball formation in presence of many-body polarization forces, the transition from non-wetted to wetted behavior in larger sodium clusters, and the kinetics of submersion of small dopants after sudden ionization.

  9. Similar genetic switch systems might integrate the floral inductive pathways in dicots and monocots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.H.; Jensen, C.S.; Petersen, K.

    2004-01-01

    A recent paper by Million Tadege et A shows that a SOC1-like gene from rice, OsSOC1, can complement the Arabidopsis soc1 mutant, and that ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLC in rice delays flowering and up-regulation of OsSOC1 These findings, together with the identificatio...... of the wheat vernalization VRN1 locus as an AP1 homologue, suggest that related genetic switch systems control floral transition in dicots and monocots but that they are based on different MADS-box transcription factors....

  10. Effect of mercury on some aquatic plants. [Hydrilla verticillata Presl. ; Pistia stratiotes L. ; Salvinia molesta D. S. Mitchell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhatre, G.N.; Chaphekar, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Three aquatic plants, Hydrilla verticillata Presl, Pistia stratiotes L. and Salvinia molesta D.S. Mitchell, were treated with different concentrations of mercury ranging from 1 to 1000 ..mu..g liter/sup -1/ at three different exposure durations, i.e. 1, 3 and 5 h. All were found to be severely affected by mercury. Foliar injury, chlorophyll content and phytomass showed perceptible effects with increasing exposure to the metal. In the case of floating plants a positive relationship was obtained between Leaf Injury Index (LII) and doses of the metal. The possible use of aquatic plants in general, and floating plants in particular, as simple bioassay material in biomonitoring and toxicity studies is discussed with special reference to LII as a simple biomonitoring parameter.

  11. Fluid electrodes for submersible robotics based on dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Caleb; Goldberg, Nathaniel; Cai, Shengqiang; Tolley, Michael T.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have gathered interest for soft robotics due to their low cost, light weight, large strain, low power consumption, and high energy density. However, developing reliable, compliant electrodes for DEAs remains an ongoing challenge due to issues with fabrication, uniformity of the conductive layer, and mechanical stiffening of the actuators caused by conductive materials with large Young's moduli. In this work, we present a method for preparing, patterning, and utilizing conductive fluid electrodes. Further, when we submerse the DEAs in a bath containing a conductive fluid connected to ground, the bath serves as a second electrode, obviating the need for depositing a conductive layer to serve as either of the electrodes required of most DEAs. When we apply a positive electrical potential to the conductive fluid in the actuator with respect to ground, the electric field across the dielectric membrane causes charge carriers in the solution to apply an electrostatic force on the membrane, which compresses the membrane and causes the actuator to deform. We have used this process to develop a tethered submersible robot that can swim in a tank of saltwater at a maximum measured speed of 9.2 mm/s. Since saltwater serves as the electrode, we overcome buoyancy issues that may be a challenge for pneumatically actuated soft robots and traditional, rigid robotics. This research opens the door to low-power underwater robots for search and rescue and environmental monitoring applications.

  12. Recent Progress on Submersions: A Survey and New Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Picavet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a survey about recent progress on submersive morphisms of schemes combined with new results that we prove. They concern the class of quasicompact universally subtrusive morphisms that we introduced about 30 years ago. They are revisited in a recent paper by Rydh, with substantial complements and key results. We use them to show Artin-Tate-like results about the 14th problem of Hilbert, for a base scheme either Noetherian or the spectrum of a valuation domain. We look at faithfully flat morphisms and get “almost” Artin-Tate-like results by considering the Goldman (finite type points of a scheme. Bjorn Poonen recently proved that universally closed morphisms are quasicompact. By introducing incomparable morphisms of schemes, we are able to characterize universally closed surjective morphisms that are either integral or finite. Next we consider pure morphisms of schemes introduced by Mesablishvili. In the quasicompact case, they are universally schematically dominant morphisms. This leads us to a characterization of universally subtrusive morphisms by purity. Some results on the schematically dominant property are given. The paper ends with properties of monomorphisms and topological immersions, a dual notion of submersions.

  13. KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Townsley

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I KNOX genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed.

  14. Morphogenic Regulators Baby boom and Wuschel Improve Monocot Transformation[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Keith; Wu, Emily; Cho, Myeong-Je; Lenderts, Brian; Chamberlin, Mark; Cushatt, Josh; Ryan, Larisa; Khan, Tanveer; Chow-Yiu, Julia; Hua, Wei; Banh, Jenny; Bao, Zhongmeng; Brink, Kent; Igo, Elizabeth; Rudrappa, Bhojaraja; Shamseer, PM; Shen, Bo; Zheng, Peizhong; Bidney, Dennis; Falco, Carl; Zhao, Zuo-Yu; Xu, Deping

    2016-01-01

    While transformation of the major monocot crops is currently possible, the process typically remains confined to one or two genotypes per species, often with poor agronomics, and efficiencies that place these methods beyond the reach of most academic laboratories. Here, we report a transformation approach involving overexpression of the maize (Zea mays) Baby boom (Bbm) and maize Wuschel2 (Wus2) genes, which produced high transformation frequencies in numerous previously nontransformable maize inbred lines. For example, the Pioneer inbred PHH5G is recalcitrant to biolistic and Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation. However, when Bbm and Wus2 were expressed, transgenic calli were recovered from over 40% of the starting explants, with most producing healthy, fertile plants. Another limitation for many monocots is the intensive labor and greenhouse space required to supply immature embryos for transformation. This problem could be alleviated using alternative target tissues that could be supplied consistently with automated preparation. As a major step toward this objective, we transformed Bbm and Wus2 directly into either embryo slices from mature seed or leaf segments from seedlings in a variety of Pioneer inbred lines, routinely recovering healthy, fertile T0 plants. Finally, we demonstrated that the maize Bbm and Wus2 genes stimulate transformation in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) immature embryos, sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) callus, and indica rice (Oryza sativa ssp indica) callus. PMID:27600536

  15. Chromosome studies in the aquatic monocots of Myanmar: A brief review with additional records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ito

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Myanmar (Burma constitutes a significant component of the Indo-Myanmar biodiversity hotspot, with elements of the Indian, the Indochina, and the Sino-Japanese floristic regions, yet thus far only a few reliable sources of the country's flora have been available. As a part of a contribution for the floristic inventory of Myanmar, since it is important in a floristic survey to obtain as much information as possible, in addition to previous two reports, here we present three more chromosome counts in the aquatic monocots of Myanmar: Limnocharis flava with 2n = 20, Sagittaria trifolia with 2n = 22 (Alismataceae, and Potamogeton distinctus × P. nodosus with 2n = 52 (Potamogetonaceae; the third one is new to science. A brief review of cytological researches in the floristic regions' 45 non-hybrid aquatic monocots plus well investigated two inter-specific hybrids that are recorded in Myanmar is given, indicating that the further works with a focus on species in Myanmar that has infra-specific chromosome variation in the floristic regions will address the precise evolutionary history of the aquatic flora of Myanmar.

  16. High time for a roll call: gene duplication and phylogenetic relationships of TCP-like genes in monocots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Trontin, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The TCP family is an ancient group of plant developmental transcription factors that regulate cell division in vegetative and reproductive structures and are essential in the establishment of flower zygomorphy. In-depth research on eudicot TCPs has documented their evolutionary and developmental role. This has not happened to the same extent in monocots, although zygomorphy has been critical for the diversification of Orchidaceae and Poaceae, the largest families of this group. Investigating the evolution and function of TCP-like genes in a wider group of monocots requires a detailed phylogenetic analysis of all available sequence information and a system that facilitates comparing genetic and functional information. Methods The phylogenetic relationships of TCP-like genes in monocots were investigated by analysing sequences from the genomes of Zea mays, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa and Sorghum bicolor, as well as EST data from several other monocot species. Key Results All available monocot TCP-like sequences are associated in 20 major groups with an average identity ≥64 % and most correspond to well-supported clades of the phylogeny. Their sequence motifs and relationships of orthology were documented and it was found that 67 % of the TCP-like genes of Sorghum, Oryza, Zea and Brachypodium are in microsyntenic regions. This analysis suggests that two rounds of whole genome duplication drove the expansion of TCP-like genes in these species. Conclusions A system of classification is proposed where putative or recognized monocot TCP-like genes are assigned to a specific clade of PCF-, CIN- or CYC/tb1-like genes. Specific biases in sequence data of this family that must be tackled when studying its molecular evolution and phylogeny are documented. Finally, the significant retention of duplicated TCP genes from Zea mays is considered in the context of balanced gene drive. PMID:21444336

  17. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Growth and Rooting Depth Characteristics of Hydrilla Verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum Spicatum L. on Fertilized and Unfertilized Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Bremner, J. M. (1965). "Inorganic forms of nitrogen." Methods of soil analy- sis, Part 2: Chemical and microbiological properties . C. A. Black, ed... demands of Myriophyllum and Hydrilla were reflected in patterns of N and P removal from low-N sediment (Fig- ures 13 and 14). Depressed concentrations of...Cambridge. Barkham, J. P. (1980). "Population dynamics of the wild daffodil ( Narcissus pseudonarsissus) Il. Oranges in number of shoots and flowers

  18. Positioning of semi-submersibles with roll and pitch damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, A.J. [ABB Industri AS, Oslo (Norway); Strand, J.P. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Engineering Cybernetics

    1999-07-01

    Dynamic positioning and thruster assisted position mooring of ships and floating marine constructions include different control functions for automatic positioning in the horizontal plane. A three degrees of freedom multivariable controller with feedback signals from surge, sway and yaw, either of linear or nonlinear type, can be regarded as adequate for the control objective for most surface vessels. However, for certain marine constructions with discernible coupling characteristics in the dynamics between the horizontal plane (surge, sway and yaw) and vertical plane (heave, roll and pitch), undesirably large roll and pitch oscillations may be induced by the thruster actions. Especially for constructions with natural periods in roll and pitch within the bandwidth of the positioning controller, the thruster induced oscillations in roll and pitch may become limitable on the operation. In this paper a new multivariable control law accounting for both horizontal and vertical motions is proposed. Simulations with a semi-submersible demonstrate the effect of the proposed control strategy. (author)

  19. Performance evaluation of a transformerless multiphase electric submersible pump system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Hakeem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Using of low-voltage variable-frequency drive followed by a step-up transformer is the most preferable way to feed an electrical submersible pump motor. The existence of long feeder between the motor and drive systems usually causes over-voltage problems because of the travelling wave phenomenon, which makes the employment of filter networks on the motor or inverter terminals mandatory. The so-called boost-inverter inherently can solve this problem with filter-less operation as it offers a direct sinusoidal output voltage. As boost inverters have voltage boosting capability, it can provide a transformer-less operation as well. This study investigates the performance of a five-phase modular winding induction machine fed from a boost-inverter through a long feeder. A simulation study using a 1000 Hp system and experimental investigation on a 1 Hp prototype machine are used to support the presented approach.

  20. Submersion Quenching of Undercooled Liquid Metals in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. The laboratory has recently added a new capability, a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals and alloys. This is the first submersion quench system inside an electrostatic levitator. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and silicon-cobalt alloys. This rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development, including studies of metastable phases and transient microstructures. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  1. Extra- and intracellular distribution of cytokinins in the leaves of monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskrová, Eva; Novák, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, Hana; Holubová, Katarína; Karády, Michal; Galuszka, Petr; Robert, Stéphanie; Frébort, Ivo

    2016-09-25

    The plant hormones cytokinins are a convenient target of genetic manipulations that bring benefits in biotechnological applications. The present work demonstrates the importance of the subcellular compartmentalization of cytokinins on the model dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot crop Hordeum vulgare. The method of protoplast and vacuole isolation combined with precise cytokinin analysis and recovery assay of a vacuolar marker protein were used to quantify the contents of individual cytokinin forms in the leaf extracellular space, cell interior and vacuole. The data obtained for wild type plants and in each case a specific mutant line allow comparing the effect of genetic manipulations on the hormone distribution and homeostatic balance of cytokinins in the modified plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Operation Deep Scope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II along its track during nineteen dives of the 2007 "Operation Deep Scope" expedition sponsored...

  3. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during seventeen dives of the 2009 "Bioluminescence" expedition...

  4. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Life on the Edge 2004 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I along its track during twenty-five dives of the 2004 "Life on the Edge" expedition sponsored by...

  5. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Life on the Edge 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link I at waypoints along its track during nineteen dives of the 2005 "Life on the Edge" expedition...

  6. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Investigating the Charleston Bump 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during fourteen dives of the 2003 "Investigating the Charleston...

  7. Vomiting is not associated with poor outcomes in pediatric victims of unintentional submersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Kimberley M; Camp, Elizabeth A; Yusuf, Shabana; Shenoi, Rohit P

    2015-05-01

    The outcome of submersion victims depends on submersion duration and the availability of timely and effective resuscitation. The prognostic implication of vomiting during resuscitation of submersion victims is unclear. The study sought to determine whether vomiting during resuscitation in children treated for unintentional submersion injuries adversely impacts outcome. This was a retrospective study of unintentional submersion victims under age 18 treated at an urban tertiary-care children's hospital from 2003-2009. Submersion and victim details were obtained from hospital, EMS, and fatality records. Outcomes studied were survival at 24 hours and condition (Favorable: good/mild impairment or Poor: death/severe disability) at hospital discharge. Descriptive comparisons between emesis groups (yes/no) and categorical covariates were analyzed. There were 281 victims. The median age was 3 years; 66% were males. Most incidents occurred at swimming pools (77%) and bathtubs (16%). Most were hospitalized (83%). The presence or absence of emesis was documented in 246 (88%). Victims with emesis were significantly less likely to have apnea or be intubated in the ED, have a low ED GCS or die. No patient who had emesis died at 24 hours or had a poor outcome at hospital discharge. Victims who had emesis post-resuscitation were significantly more likely to have received CPR or chest compressions than rescue breaths. Emesis in pediatric submersion victims is inversely associated with death at 24 hours or poor outcome at hospital discharge. The relationship between emesis and the adequacy of resuscitation of pediatric submersion victims needs to be further studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Air-gap effect on life boat arrangement for a semi-submersible FPU

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Mun-Sung; Park, Hong-Shik; Jung, Kwang-Hyo; Chun, Ho-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore project such as semi-submersible FPU and FPSO, the free fall type life boat called TEMPSC (Totally Enclosed Motor Propelled Survival Craft) has been installed for the use of an emergency evacuation of POB (People on Board) from the topside platform. For the design of life boat arrangement for semi-submersible FPU in the initial design stage, the drop height and launch angle are required fulfill with the limitation of classification society rule and Company requirement, includi...

  9. Submersible Unmanned Aerial Vehicle: Configuration Design and Analysis Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qinyang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Submersible aerial vehicle is capable of both flying in the air and submerging in the water. Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA outlined a challenging set of requirements for a submersible aircraft and solicited innovative research proposals on submersible aircraft since 2008. In this paper, a conceptual configuration design scheme of submersible unmanned aerial vehicle is proposed. This submersible UAV lands on the surface of water, then adjusts its own density to entry water. On the contrary, it emerges from water by adjusting its own density and then takes off from the surface of water. Wing of the UAV is whirling wing. It is set along aircraft’s fuselage while submerging for lift reduction. We analysis aerodynamic and hydrodynamic performance of this UAV by CFD method, especially compare the hydrodynamic performance of the whirling wing configuration and normal configuration. It turns out that whirling wing is beneficial for submerging. This result proves that the configuration design scheme proposed in this paper is feasible and suitable for a submersible unmanned aerial vehicle.

  10. Packed-bed column biosorption of chromium(VI) and nickel(II) onto Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, Brahma Dutt; Rai, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The present study represents the first attempt to investigate the biosorption potential of Fenton modified Hydrilla verticillata dried biomass (FMB) in removing chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions from wastewater using up-flow packed-bed column reactor. Effects of different packed-bed column parameters such as bed height, flow rate, influent metal ion concentration and particle size were examined. The outcome of the column experiments illustrated that highest bed height (25cm); lowest flow rate (10mLmin(-1)), lowest influent metal concentration (5mgL(-1)) and smallest particle size range (0.25-0.50mm) are favourable for biosorption. The maximum biosorption capacity of FMB for chromium(VI) and nickel(II) removal were estimated to be 89.32 and 87.18mgg(-1) respectively. The breakthrough curves were analyzed using Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and Thomas models. The experimental results obtained agree to both the models. Column regeneration experiments were also carried out using 0.1M HNO3. Results revealed good reusability of FMB during ten cycles of sorption and desorption. Performance of FMB-packed column in treating secondary effluent was also tested under identical experimental conditions. Results demonstrated significant reduction in chromium(VI) and nickel(II) ions concentration after the biosorption process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The power supply system model of the process submersible device with AC power transmission over the cable-rope

    OpenAIRE

    Rulevskiy, V. M.; Bukreev, Viktor Grigorievich; Kuleshova, Elena Olegovna; Shandarova, Elena Borisovna; Shandarov, S.M.; Vasilyeva, Yu. Z.

    2017-01-01

    A practical problem of power supply system modeling for the process submersible device with AC power transmission over the cable-rope was considered. The problem is highly relevant in developing and operation of submersible centrifugal pumps and submersibles. The results of modeling a symmetrical three-phase power supply system and their compliance with the real data are given at the paper. The obtained results in the mathematical and simulation models were similar.

  12. Induction of Reduced Photorespiratory Activity in Submersed and Amphibious Aquatic Macrophytes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Michael E.; Bowes, George

    1981-01-01

    Incubation under water in a 30 C/14-hour or 12 C/10-hour photoperiod caused the CO2 compensation points of 10 aquatic macrophytes to decrease below 25 or increase above 50 microliters CO2 per liter, respectively. Submerged and aerial leaves of two amphibious angiosperms (Myriophyllum brasiliense and Proserpinaca palustris) maintained high compensation points when incubated in air but, when the submerged or aerial leaves of Proserpinaca were incubated under water, the compensation points dropped as low as 10. This suggests that, in addition to temperature and photoperiod, some factor associated with submergence regulates the compensation point of aquatic plants. In the high-compensation point plants, photorespiration, as a percentage of net photosynthesis, was equivalent to that in terrestrial C3 plants. For Hydrilla verticillata, the decreasing CO2 compensation points (110, 40, and 10) were associated with reduced photorespiration, as indicated by decreased O2 inhibition, decreased rates of CO2 evolution into CO2-free air, and increased net photosynthetic rates. The decrease in the CO2 compensation points of Hydrilla, Egeria densa, and Cabomba caroliniana was accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate, but not of ribulose bisphosphate, carboxylase. In Hydrilla, several C4 enzymes also increased in activity to the following levels (micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour): pyruvate Pi dikinase (35), pyrophosphatase (716), adenylate kinase (525), NAD and NADP malate dehydrogenase (6565 and 30), NAD and NADP malic enzymes (239 and 44), and aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (357 and 85), whereas glycolate oxidase (6) and phosphoglycolate and phosphoglycerate phosphatases (76 and 32) showed no change. Glycolate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were undetectable. The reduced photorespiration in these plants may be due to increased CO2 fixation via a C4 acid pathway. However, for three Myriophyllum species, some other

  13. Induction of reduced photorespiratory activity in submersed and amphibious aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, M E; Bowes, G

    1981-02-01

    Incubation under water in a 30 C/14-hour or 12 C/10-hour photoperiod caused the CO(2) compensation points of 10 aquatic macrophytes to decrease below 25 or increase above 50 microliters CO(2) per liter, respectively. Submerged and aerial leaves of two amphibious angiosperms (Myriophyllum brasiliense and Proserpinaca palustris) maintained high compensation points when incubated in air but, when the submerged or aerial leaves of Proserpinaca were incubated under water, the compensation points dropped as low as 10. This suggests that, in addition to temperature and photoperiod, some factor associated with submergence regulates the compensation point of aquatic plants. In the high-compensation point plants, photorespiration, as a percentage of net photosynthesis, was equivalent to that in terrestrial C(3) plants. For Hydrilla verticillata, the decreasing CO(2) compensation points (110, 40, and 10) were associated with reduced photorespiration, as indicated by decreased O(2) inhibition, decreased rates of CO(2) evolution into CO(2)-free air, and increased net photosynthetic rates.The decrease in the CO(2) compensation points of Hydrilla, Egeria densa, and Cabomba caroliniana was accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate, but not of ribulose bisphosphate, carboxylase. In Hydrilla, several C(4) enzymes also increased in activity to the following levels (micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour): pyruvate Pi dikinase (35), pyrophosphatase (716), adenylate kinase (525), NAD and NADP malate dehydrogenase (6565 and 30), NAD and NADP malic enzymes (239 and 44), and aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (357 and 85), whereas glycolate oxidase (6) and phosphoglycolate and phosphoglycerate phosphatases (76 and 32) showed no change. Glycolate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were undetectable. The reduced photorespiration in these plants may be due to increased CO(2) fixation via a C(4) acid pathway. However, for three Myriophyllum

  14. Life extension of semi-submersible drilling unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, I.; Sinclair, C.I.K. [TWI, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Structural Integrity Dept.; Magne, E. [Schlumberger Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the life extension of a semi-submersible drilling rig built in the early 1970`s. A nominal design life of 20 years was estimated at the time of building; however, in the interim period, numerous improvements have been made in fatigue life estimation ad life improvement techniques, raising the possibility that a further 20 years of operation could be considered. The life extension strategy made use of a number of aspects of offshore technology which were not available at the time of construction of the rig. Finite element studies and results from offshore research programs were used to gauge the effect of fatigue life improvement techniques. The program demonstrated the feasibility of extending the operation of the rig for a further 20 years, with the interval between in-service inspection increased to every five years. It also provided a valuable database of fracture toughness data for the rig materials, which may be used in future work to address reliability issues.

  15. Submersible Spectrofluorometer for Real-Time Sensing of Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Adriana; Fiorani, Luca; Menicucci, Ivano; Pistilli, Marco; Lai, Antonia

    2015-06-18

    In this work, we present a newly developed submersible spectrofluorometer (patent pending) applied to real-time sensing of water quality, suitable for monitoring some important indicators of the ecological status of natural waters such as chlorophyll-a, oil and protein-like material. For the optomechanical realization of the apparatus, a novel conceptual design has been adopted in order to avoid filters and pumps while maintaining a high signal-to-noise ratio. The elimination of filters and pumps has the advantage of greater system simplicity and especially of avoiding the risk of sample degradation. The use of light-emitting diodes as an excitation source instead of Xe lamps or laser diodes helped save on size, weight, power consumption and costs. For sensor calibration we performed measurements on water samples with added chlorophyll prepared in the laboratory. The sensor functionality was tested during field campaigns conducted at Albano Lake in Latium Region of Italy as well as in the Herzliya Harbor, a few kilometers North East of Tel Aviv in Israel. The obtained results are reported in the paper. The sensitivity achieved for chlorophyll-a detection was found to be at least 0.2 µg/L.

  16. The plastid genome of Najas flexilis: adaptation to submersed environments is accompanied by the complete loss of the NDH complex in an aquatic angiosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L Peredo

    Full Text Available The re-colonization of aquatic habitats by angiosperms has presented a difficult challenge to plants whose long evolutionary history primarily reflects adaptations to terrestrial conditions. Many aquatics must complete vital stages of their life cycle on the water surface by means of floating or emergent leaves and flowers. Only a few species, mainly within the order Alismatales, are able to complete all aspects of their life cycle including pollination, entirely underwater. Water-pollinated Alismatales include seagrasses and water nymphs (Najas, the latter being the only freshwater genus in the family Hydrocharitaceae with subsurface water-pollination. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the plastid genome of Najas flexilis. The plastid genome of N. flexilis is a circular AT-rich DNA molecule of 156 kb, which displays a quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (IR separating the large single copy (LSC from the small single copy (SSC regions. In N. flexilis, as in other Alismatales, the rps19 and trnH genes are localized in the LSC region instead of within the IR regions as in other monocots. However, the N. flexilis plastid genome presents some anomalous modifications. The size of the SSC region is only one third of that reported for closely related species. The number of genes in the plastid is considerably less. Both features are due to loss of the eleven ndh genes in the Najas flexilis plastid. In angiosperms, the absence of ndh genes has been related mainly to the loss of photosynthetic function in parasitic plants. The ndh genes encode the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, believed essential in terrestrial environments, where it increases photosynthetic efficiency in variable light intensities. The modified structure of the N. flexilis plastid genome suggests that adaptation to submersed environments, where light is scarce, has involved the loss of the NDH complex in at least some photosynthetic angiosperms.

  17. Lower Miocene plant assemblage with coastal-marsh herbaceous monocots from the Vienna Basin (Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaček, Zlatko; Teodoridis, Vasilis; Kováčová, Marianna; Schlögl, Ján; Sitár, Viliam

    2014-06-01

    A new plant assemblage of Cerová-Lieskové from Lower Miocene (Karpatian) deposits in the Vienna Basin (western Slovakia) is preserved in a relatively deep, upper-slope marine environment. Depositional conditions with high sedimentation rates allowed exceptional preservation of plant remains. The plant assemblage consists of (1) conifers represented by foliage of Pinus hepios and Tetraclinis salicornioides, a seed cone of Pinus cf. ornata, and by pollen of the Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Pinus sp. and Cathaya sp., and (2) angiosperms represented by Cinnamomum polymorphum, Platanus neptuni, Potamogeton sp. and lauroid foliage, by pollen of Liquidambar sp., Engelhardia sp. and Craigia sp., and in particular by infructescences (so far interpreted as belonging to cereal ears). We validate genus and species assignments of the infructescences: they belong to Palaeotriticum Sitár, including P. mockii Sitár and P. carpaticum Sitár, and probably represent herbaceous monocots that inhabited coastal marshes, similar to the living grass Spartina. Similar infructescences occur in the Lower and Middle Miocene deposits of the Carpathian Foredeep (Slup in Moravia), Tunjice Hills (Žale in Slovenia), and probably also in the Swiss Molasse (Lausanne). This plant assemblage demonstrates that the paleovegetation was represented by evergreen woodland with pines and grasses in undergrowth, similar to vegetation inhabiting coastal brackish marshes today. It also indicates subtropical climatic conditions in the Vienna Basin (central Paratethys), similar to those implied by other coeval plant assemblages from Central Europe

  18. Lower Miocene plant assemblage with coastal-marsh herbaceous monocots from the Vienna Basin (Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvaček Zlatko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new plant assemblage of Cerová-Lieskové from Lower Miocene (Karpatian deposits in the Vienna Basin (western Slovakia is preserved in a relatively deep, upper-slope marine environment. Depositional conditions with high sedimentation rates allowed exceptional preservation of plant remains. The plant assemblage consists of (1 conifers represented by foliage of Pinus hepios and Tetraclinis salicornioides, a seed cone of Pinus cf. ornata, and by pollen of the Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Pinus sp. and Cathaya sp., and (2 angiosperms represented by Cinnamomum polymorphum, Platanus neptuni, Potamogeton sp. and lauroid foliage, by pollen of Liquidambar sp., Engelhardia sp. and Craigia sp., and in particular by infructescences (so far interpreted as belonging to cereal ears. We validate genus and species assignments of the infructescences: they belong to Palaeotriticum Sitár, including P. mockii Sitár and P. carpaticum Sitár, and probably represent herbaceous monocots that inhabited coastal marshes, similar to the living grass Spartina. Similar infructescences occur in the Lower and Middle Miocene deposits of the Carpathian Foredeep (Slup in Moravia, Tunjice Hills (Žale in Slovenia, and probably also in the Swiss Molasse (Lausanne. This plant assemblage demonstrates that the paleovegetation was represented by evergreen woodland with pines and grasses in undergrowth, similar to vegetation inhabiting coastal brackish marshes today. It also indicates subtropical climatic conditions in the Vienna Basin (central Paratethys, similar to those implied by other coeval plant assemblages from Central Europe

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the wetland monocot Typha latifolia L. (Broadleaf cattail).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Rangaraj; Chen, Li; Rogers, Suzanne M D

    2005-03-01

    An Agrobacterium-mediated model transformation system was standardized for the wetland monocot Typha latifolia L. to achieve the long-term objective of introducing candidate genes for phytoremediation. Two binary plasmid vectors, pCAMBIA1301/EHA105 and pTOK233/LBA4404, both containing the gus (beta-glucuronidase) and hptII (hygromycin phosphotransferase II) genes, were used for transformation. Fifty-day-old 5 mg/l picloram-derived calli were cocultivated and selected on medium containing 20 mg/l or 40 mg/l hygromycin. Resistant calli were regenerated on medium supplemented with 5 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine, with or without 20 mg/l or 40 mg/l hygromycin and with or without charcoal (10 g/l). Transient GUS activity in explants ranged between 28% and 36%. Hygromycin-resistant calli, selected after 3 months, showed stable GUS expression. A total of 46 plants were regenerated and established in the greenhouse; 13 showed stable GUS expression. Cocultivation of dark culture-derived calli, directly selected on regeneration medium containing 20 mg/l hygromycin and rooted on medium with 20 mg/l hygromycin was the best protocol. The addition of charcoal did not have any effect on regeneration. PCR and Southern analyses of transgenic calli and transgenic plants confirmed the presence of the introduced genes. In conclusion, T. latifolia could be genetically transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

  20. Exploring the bark thickness-stem diameter relationship: clues from lianas, successive cambia, monocots and gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Olson, Mark E; Anfodillo, Tommaso; Martínez-Méndez, Norberto

    2017-07-01

    Bark thickness is ecologically crucial, affecting functions from fire protection to photosynthesis. Bark thickness scales predictably with stem diameter, but there is little consensus on whether this scaling is a passive consequence of growth or an important adaptive phenomenon requiring explanation. With a comparative study across 913 species, we test the expectation that, if bark thickness-stem diameter scaling is adaptive, it should be possible to find ecological situations in which scaling is predictably altered, in this case between species with different types and deployments of phloem. 'Dicots' with successive cambia and monocots, which have phloem-free bark, had predictably thinner inner (mostly living) bark than plants with single cambia. Lianas, which supply large leaf areas with limited stem area, had much thicker inner bark than self-supporting plants. Gymnosperms had thicker outer bark than angiosperms. Inner bark probably scales with plant metabolic demands, for example with leaf area. Outer bark scales with stem diameter less predictably, probably reflecting diverse adaptive factors; for example, it tends to be thicker in fire-prone species and very thin when bark photosynthesis is favored. Predictable bark thickness-stem diameter scaling across plants with different photosynthate translocation demands and modes strongly supports the idea that this relationship is functionally important and adaptively significant. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-Based Multiplex Genome Editing in Monocot and Dicot Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingliang; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome targeting system has been applied to a variety of organisms, including plants. Compared to other genome-targeting technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas9 system is easier to use and has much higher editing efficiency. In addition, multiple "single guide RNAs" (sgRNAs) with different target sequences can be designed to direct the Cas9 protein to multiple genomic sites for simultaneous multiplex editing. Here, we present a procedure for highly efficient multiplex genome targeting in monocot and dicot plants using a versatile and robust CRISPR/Cas9 vector system, emphasizing the construction of binary constructs with multiple sgRNA expression cassettes in one round of cloning using Golden Gate ligation. We also describe the genotyping of targeted mutations in transgenic plants by direct Sanger sequencing followed by decoding of superimposed sequencing chromatograms containing biallelic or heterozygous mutations using the Web-based tool DSDecode. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Phylogenetic comparative analysis of microsporogenesis in angiosperms with a focus on monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadot, Sophie; Furness, Carol A; Sannier, Julie; Penet, Laurent; Triki-Teurtroy, Sarah; Albert, Beatrice; Ressayre, Adrienne

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the first broad overview of three main features of microsporogenesis (male meiosis) in angiosperms: cytokinesis (cell division), intersporal wall formation, and tetrad form. A phylogenetic comparative approach was used to test for correlated evolution among these characters and to make hypotheses about evolutionary trends in microsporogenesis. The link between features of microsporogenesis and pollen aperture type was examined. We show that the pathway associated with successive cytokinesis (cytoplasm is partitioned after each meiotic division) is restricted to wall formation mediated by centrifugally developing cell plates, and tetragonal (or decussate, T-shaped, linear) tetrads. Conversely, much more flexibility is observed when cytokinesis is simultaneous (two meiotic divisions completed before cytoplasmic partitioning). We suggest that the ancestral type of microsporogenesis for angiosperms, and perhaps for all seed plants, associated simultaneous cytokinesis with centripetal wall formation, resulting in a large diversity in tetrad forms, ranging from regular tetrahedral to tetragonal tetrads, including rhomboidal tetrads. From this ancestral pathway, switches toward successive cytokinesis occurred among basal angiosperms and monocots, generally associated with a switch toward centrifugal intersporal wall formation, whereas eudicots evolved toward an almost exclusive production of regular tetrahedral tetrads. No straightforward link is found between the type of microsporogenesis and pollen aperture type.

  3. Genomic analysis of NAC transcription factors in banana (Musa acuminata) and definition of NAC orthologous groups for monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Albero; Guignon, Valentin; Roux, Nicolas; Rouard, Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance to abiotic stresses is important in crop breeding. A comprehensive understanding of the gene families associated with drought tolerance is therefore highly relevant. NAC transcription factors form a large plant-specific gene family involved in the regulation of tissue development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The main goal of this study was to set up a framework of orthologous groups determined by an expert sequence comparison of NAC genes from both monocots and dicots. In order to clarify the orthologous relationships among NAC genes of different species, we performed an in-depth comparative study of four divergent taxa, in dicots and monocots, whose genomes have already been completely sequenced: Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, Musa acuminata and Oryza sativa. Due to independent evolution, NAC copy number is highly variable in these plant genomes. Based on an expert NAC sequence comparison, we propose forty orthologous groups of NAC sequences that were probably derived from an ancestor gene present in the most recent common ancestor of dicots and monocots. These orthologous groups provide a curated resource for large-scale protein sequence annotation of NAC transcription factors. The established orthology relationships also provide a useful reference for NAC function studies in newly sequenced genomes such as M. acuminata and other plant species.

  4. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  5. Impacts of residual aluminum from aluminate flocculant on the morphological and physiological characteristics of Vallisneria natans and Hydrilla verticillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Wei; He, Feng; Ma, Jian-Min; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Bi-Yun; Min, Fen-Li; Dai, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qiao-Hong; Wu, Zhen-Bin

    2017-11-01

    Aluminate is generally used as a flocculant in water and wastewater treatment processes, but the residual aluminum (Al) may have toxic effects on aquatic organisms when the concentration accumulates beyond a threshold level. The in situ and laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the impact of residual Al on submerged macrophytes in West Lake, Hangzhou, China, which receives Al flocculant-purified water diverted from the Qiantang River. The responses of Vallisneria natans and Hydrilla verticillata were investigated based on their morphological and physiological parameters in pot culture and aquarium simulation experiments. In the pot culture experiments, the biomass, seedling number, plant height, stolon number, stolon length, and root weight were significantly higher at a site located 150m from the inlet compared with those at a site located 15m from the inlet (P macrophytes were stressed by residual Al. V. natans and H. verticillata accumulated 0.052-0.227mg of Al per gram of plant biomass (fresh weight, mg/g FW) and 0.045-0.205mg Al/g FW in the in situ experiments, respectively, where the amounts of Al were significantly higher in the plants in the treatment aquaria during the laboratory experiments than those in the controls. These results may have important implications for the restoration of submerged macrophytes and ecological risk assessments in Al-exposed lakes. It is recommended that the Al salt concentration used for the control of lake eutrophication should be reduced to an appropriate level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Mike [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Herbert, James E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scheele, Patrick W. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  7. Carbon-Flow-Based Modeling of Ecophysiological Processes and Biomass Dynamics of Submersed Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Publications. Voss, E. 1972. Michigan Flora. Part I – Gymnosperms and monocots. Bloomfield Hills, Michigan: Cranbrook Institute of Science, 488 pp...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT UNCLASSIFIED b. ABSTRACT

  8. Can biophysical properties of submersed macrophytes be determined by remote sensing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malthus, T.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G. [Univ. of Palermo, Sicily (Italy)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    This paper details the development of a computationally efficient Monte Carlo simulation program to model photon transport through submersed plant canopies, with emphasis on Seagrass communities. The model incorporates three components: the transmission of photons through a water column of varying depth and turbidity; the interaction of photons within a submersed plant canopy of varying biomass; and interactions with the bottom substrate. The three components of the model are discussed. Simulations were performed based on measured parameters for Posidonia oceanica and compared to measured subsurface reflectance spectra made over comparable seagrass communities in Sicilian coastal waters. It is shown that the output is realistic. Further simulations are undertaken to investigate the effect of depth and turbidity of the overlying water column. Both sets of results indicate the rapid loss of canopy signal as depth increases and water column phytoplankton concentrations increase. The implications for the development of algorithms for the estimation of submersed canopy biophysical parameters are briefly discussed.

  9. Boron-induced amelioration of aluminium toxicity in a monocot and a dicot species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Isabel; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Barceló, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has reported inconsistent results from experiments on the influence of boron (B) on plant sensitivity to potentially toxic aluminium (Al) concentrations. Differences in B requirement and cell wall properties among species, especially between Poaceae and dicots, may account for this. This investigation reports amelioration by B of Al-induced inhibition of root elongation in Al-sensitive cucumber (Cucumis sativus), but not in Al-sensitive maize (Zea mays). Vital staining, however, also revealed a positive influence of B supply on Al tolerance in maize. In both species, adequate B supply decreased Al-induced damage of cell integrity. In cucumber, increasing B supply enhanced Al concentrations and haematoxylin staining in root tips. In maize, no differences for root Al among B treatments were observed. These results indicate that the positive effect of B on Al resistance was not due to less Al accumulation in root tips. Enhanced concentrations of reduced glutathione were found in roots of Al-stressed maize plants growing with adequate B. It is concluded that adequate B supply is essential for prevention of Al toxicity in both the dicot and the monocot species. In dicot cucumber, the B-induced amelioration of root elongation, despite higher Al accumulation in root tips, indicates B-induced change in either or both Al speciation and compartmentation in the tips. The protection by an adequate B supply of roots against Al-induced cell death suggests a role for B in the defence against oxidative stress. This is supported by the observation that Al induced enhanced levels of GSH in roots of maize plants growing with adequate B supply but not in those growing with either deficient or excess B concentrations.

  10. New Navigation Post-Processing Tools for Oceanographic Submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Whitcomb, L. L.; Yoerger, D. R.; Howland, J. C.; Ferrini, V. L.; Hegrenas, O.

    2006-12-01

    We report the development of Navproc, a new set of software tools for post-processing oceanographic submersible navigation data that exploits previously reported improvements in navigation sensing and estimation (e.g. Eos Trans. AGU, 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract OS32A- 0225, 2003). The development of these tools is motivated by the need to have post-processing software that allows users to compensate for errors in vehicle navigation, recompute the vehicle position, and then save the results for use with quantitative science data (e.g. bathymetric sonar data) obtained during the mission. Navproc does not provide real-time navigation or display of data nor is it capable of high-resolution, three dimensional (3D) data display. Navproc supports the ASCII data formats employed by the vehicles of the National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Post-processing of navigation data with Navproc is comprised of three tasks. First, data is converted from the logged ASCII file to a binary Matlab file. When loaded into Matlab, each sensor has a data structure containing the time stamped data sampled at the native update rate of the sensor. An additional structure contains the real-time vehicle navigation data. Second, the data can be displayed using a Graphical User Interface (GUI), allowing users to visually inspect the quality of the data and graphically extract portions of the data. Third, users can compensate for errors in the real-time vehicle navigation. Corrections include: (i) manual filtering and median filtering of long baseline (LBL) ranges; (ii) estimation of the Doppler/gyro alignment using previously reported methodologies; and (iii) sound velocity, tide, and LBL transponder corrections. Using these corrections, the Doppler and LBL positions can be recomputed to provide improved estimates of the vehicle position compared to those computed in real-time. The data can be saved in either binary or ASCII

  11. Geology of mud volcanos in the Eastern Mediterranean from combined sidescan and submersible surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zitter, T.A.C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Submersible observations and seafloor mapping over areas of mud volcanism in the eastern Mediterranean Sea reveal an abundance of methane-rich fluid emissions, as well as specific seep-associated fauna (e.g. tubeworms, bivalves and chemosynthetic bacteria) and diagenetic deposits (i.e. carbonates

  12. Competition between two submersed aquatic macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus and Potamogeton gramineus, across a light gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Submersed aquatic macrophyte communities, are often limited by the availability of light. Thus, they offer a unique opportunity to evaluate competition when light is the limiting resource. Competitive abilities of Potamogeton pectinatus (L.) Börner and Potamogeton gramineus L. were estimated using a...

  13. Management of Half Moon Lake, Wisconsin, for Improved Native Submersed Macrophyte Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    for aesthetic and recreational reasons. Eutrophication can negatively impact submersed macrophyte growth and community diversity by stimulating...sediments in the lake are high (range = 2.3 to 11.7 mg·m-2·d-1) and, thus, represent an important nutritional source to this species. During the July

  14. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  15. 77 FR 2957 - Application for Manufacturing Authority, Liberty Pumps, Inc. (Submersible and Water Pumps...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Application for Manufacturing Authority, Liberty Pumps, Inc. (Submersible and... manufacturing authority on behalf of Liberty Pumps, Inc., located in Bergen, New York. The application was... regulations of the Board (15 CFR part 400). It was formally filed on January 12, 2012. The Liberty Pumps, Inc...

  16. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...

  17. Submersion time, depth, substrate type and sampling method as variation sources of marine periphyton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, M.; Trottier, C.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Hussenot, J.M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Periphyton is an additional food source in African and Asian brackish and freshwater fish ponds. The present study was a preliminary assessment of periphyton development on artificial substrates in temperate marine ponds. The effects of submersion time, substrate type, water depth, and total or

  18. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from prima...

  19. A promoter from sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus drives transgene expression in banana and other monocot and dicot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P M; Sagi, L; Remans, T; Dietzgen, R G; Bernard, M J; Graham, M W; Manners, J M

    1999-04-01

    A 1369 bp DNA fragment (Sc) was isolated from a full-length clone of sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus (ScBV) and was shown to have promoter activity in transient expression assays using monocot (banana, maize, millet and sorghum) and dicot plant species (tobacco, sunflower, canola and Nicotiana benthamiana). This promoter was also tested for stable expression in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. These experiments showed that this promoter could drive high-level expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in most plant cells. The expression level was comparable to the maize ubiquitin promoter in standardised transient assays in maize. In transgenic banana plants the expression levels were variable for different transgenic lines but was generally comparable with the activities of both the maize ubiquitin promoter and the enhanced cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. The Sc promoter appears to express in a near-constitutive manner in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. The promoter from sugarcane bacilliform virus represents a useful tool for the high-level expression of foreign genes in both monocot and dicot transgenic plants that could be used similarly to the CaMV 35S or maize polyubiquitin promoter.

  20. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fen; Wang, Huiqin; Wang, Shanzhi; Jiang, Wendi; Shan, Changlin; Li, Bin; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shiyong; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifically recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cell cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the AtEFR transgenic rice cells and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatically in transgenic rice plant and cell lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 triggered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Collectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  2. Remelting of Aluminium by Continuous Submersion of Rolled Scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farner, Snorre

    2000-12-01

    When remelting aluminium scrap, metal losses due to dross generation is a common problem. Reduction of these losses will give substantial economic and environmental benefits. Dross is generated when aluminium metal oxidizes and films of oxide envelope molten metal. When a cold metal object is immersed in a melt, the heat of the melt around this is transferred so rapidly into the object that a shell of melt often solidifies to the surface of the object. When scrap with low bulk density is charged to a melt, solidification of melt on the cold scrap prevents melt from entering the cavities in the bulk of the scrap, and the bulk density remains low. Thus the scrap tends to float on the melt surface. Submersion of this scrap is important to avoid oxidation and subsequent dross generation. One solution to this is to roll scrap to a strip and feed it into the melt. This system has been examined by studying feeding of a continuous, thin aluminium plate into molten aluminium. Also, the effect of lacquer was considered, as well as feeding the plate into a launder with melt flowing along the surface of the plate. An analytical, one-dimensional, steady-state model has been developed to describe the melting and the melting mechanisms. It is based on a shell solidifying on the plate surface and a gap introducing a thermal resistance 1/h{sub g} between the shell and the plate. The thermal resistance 1/h{sub l} of the boundary layer of the melt is included. Depending on these resistances, the initial temperature of the plate and the melt temperature, a shell will form, and the plate will penetrate a distance P into the melt before it melts away. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to feed aluminium plate from a coil into a melt bath at a specified velocity. The plate could be withdrawn rapidly to ''freeze'' the situation like it was below the melt surface. The penetration depth P of the plate could be measured and shell formation observed

  3. vid119_0601d -- Line coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  4. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Life on the Edge 2003: Exploring Deep Ocean Habitats - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during two of the seventeen dives of the 2003 "Life on the Edge -...

  5. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Pharmaceutical Discovery, Vision, and Bioluminescence - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during one dive of the 2002 "Islands in the Stream -...

  6. vid119_0601c-- Point coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  7. Characterization of clarified medium from submerse and semisolid cultivation of OF Aspergillus awamori NRRL3112 by size-exclusion chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MINAMI N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a preparative size-exclusion chromatography of two different clarified media obtained from submerse and semisolid culture of the mold Aspergillus awamori was carried out. Characterization and comparison of the quantities of glucoamylase and contaminant proteins present in these media were possible. Glucoamylase is the protein with the higher molecular weight in both media analyzed, varying from 72 to 80kDa in the submerse culture and from 68 to 90kDa in the semisolid culture. Also, glucoamylase protein concentration is higher in the submerse culture than in the semisolid culture. The other proteins in the submerse culture presented molecular weights lower than 12kDa and in the semisolid culture their molecular weights varied from 21 to 37kDa and below 10kDa.

  8. vid113_0401p -- Point coverage of sediment types from video collected from the Delta submersible vehicle.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from theR/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  9. A Phylogeny of the Monocots, as Inferred from rbcL and atpA Sequence Variation, and a Comparison of Methods for Calculating Jackknife and Bootstrap Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Jerrold I.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of the monocots was conducted on the basis of nucleotide sequence variation in two genes (atpA, encoded in the mitochondrial genome, and rbcL, encoded in the plastid genome). The taxon sample of 218 angiosperm terminals included 177 monocots and 41 dicots. Among the major ...

  10. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritioff, A. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fritioff@botan.su.se; Kautsky, L. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Greger, M. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants.

  11. Submersible pumping, Long Beach Unit of East Wilmington Field: A 17-year review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allis, D.H.; Capps, W.M.

    1983-10-01

    The electric submersible pump was selected as the primary form of lift when Thums Long Beach Company initiated production operations in August 1965. Deviated wells with ever-increasing volumes resulting from water flooding required a flexibility offered by this method of lift. Numerous problems have been solved in 17 years of these operations to provide a respectable run life and continue on a sound economic operational basis.

  12. Submersible pumping--long beach unit of east wilmington field: A 17-year review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allis, D.H.; Capps, W.M.

    1984-08-01

    The electric submersible pump (ESP) was selected as the primary form of lift when Thums Long Beach Co. initiated production operations in Aug. 1965. Deviated wells with ever increasing volumes resulting from waterflooding required the flexibility offered by this lift method. Many problems have been solved in the 17 years of these operations to provide a respectable run life and a sound economic operational basis.

  13. Submersible pumping, Long Beach unit of East Wilmington field: a 17-year review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allis, D.H.; Capps, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    The electric submersible pump was selected as the primary form of lift when THUMS Long Beach Co. initiated production operations in Aug. 1965. Deviated wells with ever-increasing volumes resulting from waterflooding required a flexibility offered by this method of lift. Numerous problems have been solved in 17 yr of these operations to provide a respectable run life and continue on a sound economic operational basis.

  14. Development of a new submersible test to characterise the erosion of soils and sediments

    OpenAIRE

    NDOYE, Ousseynou; Chevalier, Christophe; Reiffsteck, Philippe; MINATCHY, Carlos; FANELLI, Sonia; Pham Van Bang, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism and behavior of the scour process is a most challenging subject. One part of this challenge is the in situ measurement of soil and sediment sensitivity to erosion (in undisturbed and submersible conditions). To improve this understanding, a new test, the Wheel Erosion Test (WET), was developed. It consists of a wheel rotating upon a layer of sediments located in an aquarium filled in with water. The rotating speed of the wheel and the distance to the sediment bed a...

  15. Parametric pitch instability investigation of Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves

    OpenAIRE

    Huan Mao; Hezhen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Parametric pitch instability of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform (DDS) is investigated in irregular waves. Parametric pitch is a form of parametric instability, which occurs when parameters of a system vary with time and the variation satisfies a certain condition. In previous studies, analyzing of parametric instability is mainly limited to regular waves, whereas the realistic sea conditions are irregular waves. Besides, parametric instability also occurs in irregular waves in some exp...

  16. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of Deep Geothermal Electric Submersible Pumping Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Kullick; Hackl, Christoph M.

    2017-01-01

    Deep geothermal energy systems employ electric submersible pumps (ESPs) in order to lift geothermal fluid from the production well to the surface. However, rough downhole conditions and high flow rates impose heavy strain on the components, leading to frequent failures of the pump system. As downhole sensor data is limited and often unrealible, a detailed and dynamical model system will serve as basis for deeper understanding and analysis of the overall system behavior. Furthermore, it allows...

  17. Energy consumption behavior of submersible pumps using in the Barind area of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M. E.; Islam, M. R.; Masud, M. H.; Ferdous, J.; Haniu, H.

    2017-06-01

    In this work the ground water level and water pumping for irrigation and drinking purposes in Barind area of Bangladesh have been studied. The depth of ground water level remains under 30ft throughout the year that enforcing the use of submersible pumps in most parts of Barind zone. The Barind Multipurpose Development Authority (BMDA) and Rajshahi WASA are the major water supplying authority in the Northern Part of Bangladesh by using 14386 and 87 nos of submersible pumps, respectively. An investigation for the values of life cycle cost elements of submersible pumps has also been carried out. The performance of the pumps running in different sites in Barind area were investigated and compared with the lab test results of new pumps. Energy consumption cost is dominating the life cycle cost of the pumps using in Barind region and improper matching of pump standard running conditions and operation/system requirements are the main causes of lower efficiency. It is found that the efficiency of the running pumps is reduced by 20 - 40% than that of lab test results.

  18. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Teruo [Energis, Co., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Tokunaga, Sango [Japan Deep Sea Technology Association, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  19. Nuevas citas de monocotiledóneas adventicias para la Argentina New records of adventitious monocots for Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Hurrell

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo incluye cinco nuevos registros de monocotiledóneas adventicias para la Argentina: Aloe ciliaris Haw. (Asphodelaceae, Aspidistra elatior Blume (Convallariaceae, Sansevieria trifasciata Prain (Dracaenaceae, Phormium tenax J. R. Forst. & G. Forst. (Hemerocallidaceae y Ornithogalum arabicum L. (Hyacinthaceae, pertenecientes al orden Asparagales. También incluye una evaluación del estado actual de estas especies, en relación al proceso de naturalización: escapadas de cultivo ocasionales, naturalizadas.This paper includes five new records of adventitious monocots for Argentina: Aloe ciliaris Haw. (Asphodelaceae, Aspidistra elatior Blume (Convallariaceae, Sansevieria trifasciata Prain (Dracaenaceae, Phormium tenax J. R. Forst. & G. Forst. (Hemerocallidaceae and Ornithogalum arabicum L. (Hyacinthaceae, belonging to order Asparagales. Also includes an evaluation of its status in the naturalization process: casual alien, naturalized.

  20. Gene duplication and an accelerated evolutionary rate in 11S globulin genes are associated with higher protein synthesis in dicots as compared to monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed storage proteins are a major source of dietary protein, and the content of such proteins determines both the quantity and quality of crop yield. Significantly, examination of the protein content in the seeds of crop plants shows a distinct difference between monocots and dicots. Thus, it is expected that there are different evolutionary patterns in the genes underlying protein synthesis in the seeds of these two groups of plants. Results Gene duplication, evolutionary rate and positive selection of a major gene family of seed storage proteins (the 11S globulin genes, were compared in dicots and monocots. The results, obtained from five species in each group, show more gene duplications, a higher evolutionary rate and positive selections of this gene family in dicots, which are rich in 11S globulins, but not in the monocots. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence to support the suggestion that gene duplication and an accelerated evolutionary rate may be associated with higher protein synthesis in dicots as compared to monocots.

  1. Monocot and dicot MLO powdery mildew susceptibility factors are functionally conserved in spite of the evolution of class-specific molecular features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appiano, M.; Catalano, D.; Santillan Martinez, M.I.; Lotti, C.; Zheng Zheng, Zheng; Visser, R.G.F.; Ricciardi, L.; Bai, Y.; Pavan, S.N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Specific members of the plant Mildew Locus O (MLO) protein family act as susceptibility factors towards powdery mildew (PM), a worldwide-spread fungal disease threatening many cultivated species. Previous studies indicated that monocot and dicot MLO susceptibility proteins are

  2. Promoters for pregenomic RNA of banana streak badnavirus are active for transgene expression in monocot and dicot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P M; Remans, T; Sági, L; Elliott, A R; Dietzgen, R G; Swennen, R; Ebert, P R; Grof, C P; Manners, J M

    2001-10-01

    Two putative promoters from Australian banana streak badnavirus (BSV) isolates were analysed for activity in different plant species. In transient expression systems the My (2105 bp) and Cv (1322 bp) fragments were both shown to have promoter activity in a wide range of plant species including monocots (maize, barley, banana, millet, wheat, sorghum), dicots (tobacco, canola, sunflower, Nicotiana benthamiana, tipu tree), gymnosperm (Pinus radiata) and fern (Nephrolepis cordifolia). Evaluation of the My and Cv promoters in transgenic sugarcane, banana and tobacco plants demonstrated that these promoters could drive high-level expression of either the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene (uidA) in vegetative plant cells. In transgenic sugarcane plants harbouring the Cv promoter, GFP expression levels were comparable or higher (up to 1.06% of total soluble leaf protein as GFP) than those of plants containing the maize ubiquitin promoter (up to 0.34% of total soluble leaf protein). GUS activities in transgenic in vitro-grown banana plants containing the My promoter were up to seven-fold stronger in leaf tissue and up to four-fold stronger in root and corm tissue than in plants harbouring the maize ubiquitin promoter. The Cv promoter showed activities that were similar to the maize ubiquitin promoter in in vitro-grown banana plants, but was significantly reduced in larger glasshouse-grown plants. In transgenic in vitro-grown tobacco plants, the My promoter reached activities close to those of the 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), while the Cv promoter was about half as active as the CaMV 35S promoter. The BSV promoters for pregenomic RNA represent useful tools for the high-level expression of foreign genes in transgenic monocots.

  3. Lumichrome and riboflavin are two novel symbiotic signals eliciting developmental changes in both monocot and dicot plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Dapare Dakora

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lumichrome and riboflavin are novel molecules from rhizobial exudates that stimulate plant growth. Developmental changes elicited by lumichrome at very low nanomolar concentrations (5 nM include early initiation of trifoliate leaves, expansion of unifoliate and trifoliate leaves, increased stem elongation and leaf area, and consequently greater biomass accumulation in monocots and dicots. However, higher lumichrome concentration (50 nM depressed root development and reduced growth of unifoliate and second trifoliate leaves. Applying either 10 nM lumichrome, 10 nM ABA, or 10 ml of infective rhizobial cells (0.2 OD600 to roots of monocots and dicots for 44 h produced identical effects, which included decreased stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration in Bambara groundnut, soybean and maize, increased stomatal conductance and transpiration in cowpea and lupin, and elevated root respiration in maize (19% by rhizobia and 20% by lumichrome. Extracellular exudation of lumichrome, riboflavin and IAA was greater in N2-fixing rhizobia than non-fixing bacteria, indicating their role as symbiotic signals. Xylem concentration of lumichrome in cowpea and soybean was greater in plants inoculated with infective rhizobia and treated with lumichrome (61.2 µmol lumichrome.ml-1 sap, followed by uninoculated plants receiving lumichrome (41.12 µmol lumichrome.ml-1 sap, and lowest in uninoculated, lumichrome-free plants (26.8 µmol lumichrome.ml-1 sap. Overall, soybean showed greater xylem concentration of lumichrome and a correspondingly increased accumulation in leaves relative to cowpea. As a result, soybean exhibited dramatic developmental changes than cowpea. Taken together, lumichrome and riboflavin secreted by soil rhizobia function as environmental cues for sensing stress. The fact that exogenous application of ABA to plant roots caused the same effect as lumichrome on stomatal functioning suggests molecular cross-talk in plant response to environmental

  4. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-21

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2 in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  5. Monocot and dicot MLO powdery mildew susceptibility factors are functionally conserved in spite of the evolution of class-specific molecular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiano, Michela; Catalano, Domenico; Santillán Martínez, Miguel; Lotti, Concetta; Zheng, Zheng; Visser, Richard G F; Ricciardi, Luigi; Bai, Yuling; Pavan, Stefano

    2015-10-26

    Specific members of the plant Mildew Locus O (MLO) protein family act as susceptibility factors towards powdery mildew (PM), a worldwide-spread fungal disease threatening many cultivated species. Previous studies indicated that monocot and dicot MLO susceptibility proteins are phylogenetically divergent. A bioinformatic approach was followed to study the type of evolution of Angiosperm MLO susceptibility proteins. Transgenic complementation tests were performed for functional analysis. Our results show that monocot and dicot MLO susceptibility proteins evolved class-specific conservation patterns. Many of them appear to be the result of negative selection and thus are likely to provide an adaptive value. We also tested whether different molecular features between monocot and dicot MLO proteins are specifically required by PM fungal species to cause pathogenesis. To this aim, we transformed a tomato mutant impaired for the endogenous SlMLO1 gene, and therefore resistant to the tomato PM species Oidium neolycopersici, with heterologous MLO susceptibility genes from the monocot barley and the dicot pea. In both cases, we observed restoration of PM symptoms. Finally, through histological observations, we demonstrate that both monocot and dicot susceptibility alleles of the MLO genes predispose to penetration of a non-adapted PM fungal species in plant epidermal cells. With this study, we provide insights on the evolution and function of MLO genes involved in the interaction with PM fungi. With respect to breeding research, we show that transgenic complementation assays involving phylogenetically distant plant species can be used for the characterization of novel MLO susceptibility genes. Moreover, we provide an overview of MLO protein molecular features predicted to play a major role in PM susceptibility. These represent ideal targets for future approaches of reverse genetics, addressed to the selection of loss-of-function resistant mutants in cultivated species.

  6. Analysis of Electric Propulsion Performance on Submersible with Motor DC, Supply Power 10260AH at Voltage 115VDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Ranu Kusuma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electric propulsion is the ship system using propulsion motor to replace performance of main engine. The application of diesel engine as propulsion system have some problems and weaknesses such as diesel engine unability to operate when submersible vessel is operating under sea. To overcome that problems in submersible vessel, alternative solution of ship propulsion is required. DC Motor can be used as this alternative solution. Submersible vessel use electric propulsion system with DC Motor because DC Motor has advantages of easy rotation setting and does not cause noise when submersible vessel is diving. This bachelor thesis will study the application of DC Motor as an electric propulsion system on submersible vessel with length 59,57 m in series and parallel circuit by simulation using MATLAB software. The simulation data obtained are rotation and torque of DC Motor. From these simulation, it can be concluded that parallel circuit rotation is greater than series circuit rotation. It caused the greater speed and lower power in parallel circuit. 

  7. Donor cornea tissue in cases of drowning or water submersion: eye banks practice patterns and tissue outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Nithya P; Parikh, Purak; Mian, Shahzad I; Tennant, Brad; Grossman, Gregory H; Albrecht, Bob; Niziol, Leslie M; Woodward, Maria A

    2017-10-25

    Surgical use of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion (drowning or submersion secondary to death) remains controversial due to limited evidence about the quality of these tissues. To assess the safety of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion, an investigation of eye banks' practice patterns and tissue outcomes was conducted. All 79 Eye Bank Association of America accredited eye banks were contacted for a phone interview of practices regarding tissue from victims of water submersion. A retrospective review of corneal tissues from 2014 to 2016 from a large eye bank network was performed to identify all donors submerged in water. Corneal epithelial integrity, endothelial cell density (ECD), rim cultures, and adverse events were analyzed for associations with water submersion characteristics. 49 eye banks (62% response) participated in the survey. 55% of these eye banks had specific, written protocol for tissue eligibility from donors submerged in water. With or without specific protocol, eye banks reported considering water type (84%) and length of time submerged (92%) to determine eligibility. 22% of eye banks reported medical director involvement when eligibility determination was unclear. 79 tissues from 40 donors who were submerged were identified in 2014-2016 eye bank data. No donor tissues had pre-processing corneal infiltrates, positive rim cultures, or adverse events post-keratoplasty. Corneal epithelial integrity and ECD were not associated with water type or length of time submerged. In conclusion, data from a large eye bank network showed no adverse events or outcomes, indicating these tissues may be safe.

  8. Anaerobic decomposition of a native and an exotic submersed macrophyte in two tropical reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WA Chiba de Castro

    Full Text Available Some aquatic plants have fast metabolism and growth, even at sub-optimal conditions, and become dominant in lentic environments such as large reservoirs, altering the nutrient cycle and impairing their environmental quality. There is great need in the knowledge impact processes of invasive species in aquatic environments, among the major, those related to the decomposition. This study evaluated the anaerobic decomposition of invasive submerged macrophytes Egeria densa Planch, native, and Hydrilla verticillata (L.f. Royle, exotic in Porto Primavera and Jupiá reservoirs, Paraná basin. We evaluated the decay of organic matter, humification degree of the leached material, electrical conductivity and pH of the decomposition process. Mathematical models were utilised to describe the decomposition patterns over time. Both species showed the same heterogeneous pattern of decay of organic matter and carbon mineralisation. The models of carbon mineralisation, compared with the experimentally obtained data presented were adequate. Both species show no significant differences in the decomposition processes. Incubations of both species presented rapid t ½ for POC mineralisation and low DOC mineralisation.

  9. Arsenic, zinc, and aluminium removal from gold mine wastewater effluents and accumulation by submerged aquatic plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Ahmad Farid; Yusoff, Ismail; Fatt, Ng Tham; Othman, Faridah; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2013-01-01

    The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata) to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2%) and zinc (93.7%) and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8%) compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5%) and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  10. Phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites Australis: leaf-type-dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Uhram; Lee, Sunryung

    2016-05-01

    The phytotoxicity and accumulation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata and Phragmites australis were investigated using mesocosms. The percentage of dissolved Zn in the ZnO NP treatment solutions was measured along with plant shoot growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, and Zn content. The dissolution rate of ZnO NPs in Hoagland solution was inversely related to the concentration. The submerged aquatic plant H. verticillata, growth was reduced during the early stages of the experiment when exposed to the highest ZnO NP concentration (1000 mg/L), whereas the emerged aquatic plant P. australis began to show significantly reduced growth after a few weeks. The measurements of chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme activity, and Zn accumulation showed that P. australis was adversely affected by NPs and absorbed more Zn than H. verticillata. The results indicated that physiological differences among aquatic plants, such as whether they use leaves or roots for nutrient and water uptake, led to differences in nanoparticle toxicity. Overall, High ZnO NP concentrations caused significant phytotoxicity on aquatic plants, and low concentrations caused unpredictable phytotoxicity. Therefore, the use and disposal of zinc oxide nanoparticles should be carefully monitored.

  11. Temperature-dependent development, cold tolerance, and potential distribution of Cricotopus lebetis (Diptera: Chironomidae), a tip miner of Hydrilla verticillata (Hydrocharitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Karen N; Overholt, William A; Cuda, James P; Mukherjee, A; Diaz, R; Netherland, Michael D; Wilson, Patrick C

    2014-10-15

    A chironomid midge, Cricotopus lebetis (Sublette) (Diptera: Chironomidae), was discovered attacking the apical meristems of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f. Royle) in Crystal River, Citrus Co., Florida in 1992. The larvae mine the stems of H. verticillata and cause basal branching and stunting of the plant. Temperature-dependent development, cold tolerance, and the potential distribution of the midge were investigated. The results of the temperature-dependent development study showed that optimal temperatures for larval development were between 20 and 30°C, and these data were used to construct a map of the potential number of generations per year of C. lebetis in Florida. Data from the cold tolerance study, in conjunction with historical weather data, were used to generate a predicted distribution of C. lebetis in the United States. A distribution was also predicted using an ecological niche modeling approach by characterizing the climate at locations where C. lebetis is known to occur and then finding other locations with similar climate. The distributions predicted using the two modeling approaches were not significantly different and suggested that much of the southeastern United States was climatically suitable for C. lebetis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  12. Arsenic, Zinc, and Aluminium Removal from Gold Mine Wastewater Effluents and Accumulation by Submerged Aquatic Plants (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farid Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of three submerged aquatic plant species (Cabomba piauhyensis, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to be used for As, Al, and Zn phytoremediation was tested. The plants were exposed for 14 days under hydroponic conditions to mine waste water effluents in order to assess the suitability of the aquatic plants to remediate elevated multi-metals concentrations in mine waste water. The results show that the E. densa and H. verticillata are able to accumulate high amount of arsenic (95.2% and zinc (93.7% and resulted in a decrease of arsenic and zinc in the ambient water. On the other hand, C. piauhyensis shows remarkable aluminium accumulation in plant biomass (83.8% compared to the other tested plants. The ability of these plants to accumulate the studied metals and survive throughout the experiment demonstrates the potential of these plants to remediate metal enriched water especially for mine drainage effluent. Among the three tested aquatic plants, H. verticillata was found to be the most applicable (84.5% and suitable plant species to phytoremediate elevated metals and metalloid in mine related waste water.

  13. Study on global performances and mooring-induced damping of a semi-submersible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling-zhi; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning; Zhao, Wen-hua; Kou, Yu-feng

    2016-10-01

    The harsh environmental conditions bring strong nonlinearities to the hydrodynamic performances of the offshore floating platforms, which challenge the reliable prediction of the platform coupled with the mooring system. The present study investigates a typical semi-submersible under both the operational and the survival conditions through numerical and experimental methods. The motion responses, the mooring line tensions, and the wave loads on the longitudinal mid-section are investigated by both the fully non-linearly coupled numerical simulation and the physical experiment. Particularly, in the physical model test, the wave loads distributed on the semi-submersible's mid-section were measured by dividing the model into two parts, namely the port and the starboard parts, which were rigidly connected by three six-component force transducers. It is concluded that both the numerical and physical model can have good prediction of the semi-submersible's global responses. In addition, an improved numerical approach is proposed for the estimation of the mooring-induced damping, and is validated by both the experimental and the published results. The characteristics of the mooring-induced damping are further summarized in various sea states, including the operational and the survival environments. In order to obtain the better prediction of the system response in deep water, the mooring-induced damping of the truncated mooring lines applied in the physical experiment are compensated by comparing with those in full length. Furthermore, the upstream taut and the downstream slack mooring lines are classified and investigated to obtain the different mooring line damping performances in the comparative study.

  14. INTENSITY SETTER FOR A DEVICE OF SMOOTH START OF SUBMERSIBLE PUMP ELECTRIC MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Lobov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of an intensity setter, which in a rational law changes the opening thyristor the voltage regulator and effectively to changing power supply voltage stator windings of the electric pump deepening, ensuring a smooth start in a wide range. Methodology. Electric submersible pump belongs to the small inertia electric, since it is not significant total moment of inertia, not exceeding two moments of inertia of the motor and static moment on the shaft does not exceed forty percent of the nominal torque. For technical requirements that electric acceleration time should have no less than twenty seconds or more. Office starting modes of electric submersible pumps economically justified using thyristor voltage regulator by forming the dial changes the intensity of the necessary legislation in time voltage feeding the stator windings. This ensures a smooth start right rotor of the electric submersible pump. Results. A block diagram of the intensity setter that is: with control unit, two units that form the exponential voltage supply emitter follower and regulatory elements. The mathematical expressions for voltage at the stator windings of the motor, changing exponentially, opening the angle of thyristor power unit thyristor the voltage regulator, which is determined through the initial angle of opening. Provided formula for pick-up voltage and minimum voltage, time constants, which are determined from the basic equations of motion and mechanical characteristics of the electric motor. Analytical investigated by the voltage dependence violation by changing the time constant flowing and growing exhibitor supply voltage stator electric circuit deepening pump. Originality. Proposed in the initial time on the stator windings of the electric pick-up voltage is applied. Under the influence of this voltage, motor rotor begins to accelerate. At the same time, pick-up voltage decreases the minimum startup voltage varies exponentially in which

  15. Maintenance of submersible pumps in the septic tanks: ergonomic and biological risks to the worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Suzi; Figueiredo, Alex

    2012-01-01

    In this study was observed the maintenance task of submersible pumps septic tanks installed in industrial bathrooms. This maintenance activity operators are exposed to various biological and ergonomic risks. This type of activity requires its great physical performers who are also subject to contact with human waste in the form of liquids, gases and solids. Besides the problems mentioned, are still exposed to high temperatures that can cause diseases such as hyperthermia or heatstroke. These aspects were observed using the ergonomic assessment methodology in order to suggest improvements that are reflected in productivity and employee satisfaction.

  16. A study among the population of Sevilla of death due to submersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, J; Romero, J L; Arufe, M I; Vizcaya, M A; Balanza, E

    1997-03-01

    Death due to submersion is of great interest from the medical-legal point of view, given the increase in nautical activity among children and adults alike over the past number of years. However, the lack of reliable statistical data concerning the impact of this specific form of death in our country must be emphasized. These are the circumstances that have led us to study the incidence of this form of death in a specific area. The population analyzed lived in the city of Sevilla during the period 1967-1993.

  17. Structural variations among monocot emergent and amphibious species from lakes of the semi-arid region of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRB Leite

    Full Text Available Temporary lakes are common in the semi-arid region of the State of Bahia and form water mirrors in the rainy season. In this period, various vegetal species appear having different life forms adapted to the seasonality conditions of the rainfall regime. This work surveyed the adaptive anatomical structures of some emergent and amphibious monocot species occurring in these lakes. We studied the anatomy of roots, rhizomes, leaves and scapes of Cyperus odoratus, Oxycaryum cubense, Pycreus macrostachyos (Cyperaceae - amphibious species; and of Echinodorus grandiflorus (Alismataceae, Eichhornia paniculata (Pontederiaceae and Habenaria repens (Orchidaceae - emergent species. The anatomical features of the dermal, fundamental and vascular systems confirming the tendency of the adaptive convergence of these plants to temporary lacustrine the environment include: single layered epidermal cells with a thin cuticle layer in the aerial organs; the presence of air canals in all the organs; few or no supporting tissues; and less numerous conducting elements and thinner cell walls in the xylem. The reduction of the supporting tissues, the number of stomata, which can even be absent, and the number of conducting elements and the degree of cell wall lignification in the xylem of the emergent species is more accentuated than that of the amphibious species. The pattern of distribution of aerenchyma in the roots of the studied species was considered important to distinguish between amphibious and emergent life forms.

  18. Effects of monocot and dicot types and species richness in mesocosm constructed wetlands on removal of pollutants from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Bang; Liu, Wen-Li; Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yong; Ge, Ying; Chang, Scott X; Chang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    The effects of planting type and species richness on removal of BOD5, COD, nitrogen and phosphorus were studied in mesocosms with monocot alone (M), dicot alone (D) and mixed planting of M+D, where each planting type had four species richness levels. Above- and below-ground plant biomasses increased with the M and M+D species richness as shown by one-way ANOVA. The M+D type had the highest above-ground biomass, whereas the M type had the highest below-ground biomass among planting types. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the microbial biomass increased with the richness of the M and M+D type. Removals of BOD5, COD, inorganic P and total P did not change with the richness, but removals of NH4-N, NO3-N increased. Planting type impacted only removal of inorganic P, with higher removal of inorganic P in the M type. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Experimental Problems of New Constructions of Portable Submersible Pumps for Mining with Electric Motor Cooled by Water Jacket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej KORCZAK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a new construction of a submersible pumping engine where new original solutions in flowing system and control system where introduced It let obtain high efficiency and fulfill user’s expectations. The article also contains experiments of the new pumping engine and their results. The results of numerical analysis of the movement of liquid in flowing channel is described and the analytical characteristics are compared with ones measured in laboratory. The work also presents the problems with constructing, research and certification of new submersible pumping engine which construction fulfils ATEX requirements for machines working in explosive conditions areas

  20. Evaluation of station keeping systems for deepwater drilling semi-submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, An-Ke; Sun, Li-Ping; Luo, Yong; Wang, Qiang

    2010-09-01

    This paper addresses the need for systematic evaluation of the station keeping systems of deepwater drilling semi-submersibles. Based on the selected drilling semi-submersible configuration, the mooring systems were analyzed and designed for a range of water depths using different mooring line materials. These were steel wire rope, polyester rope and HMPE (high modulus poly ethylene). The mooring analysis was carried out using the advanced fully coupled time domain analysis method in the computer software package HARP. Diffraction analysis was first applied to solve the hydrodynamic properties of the vessel and then the motion equations of the complete dynamic system including the drilling rig, the mooring lines and risers were developed and solved in the time domain. Applying the advanced analysis method, a matrix of mooring systems was developed for operating in water depths of 1 000 m, 1 500 m, and 2 000 m using various mooring materials. The development of mooring systems was conducted in accordance with the commonly adopted mooring design code, API RP 2SK and API RP 2SM. Fresh attempts were then made to comparatively evaluate the mooring system’s characteristics and global performance. Useful results have been obtained in terms of mooring materials, water depths, and key parameters of mooring configurations. The results provide in-depth insight for the design and operation of deepwater mooring systems in the South China Sea environment.

  1. Submersible pumps: Energetic efficiency norm; Bombas sumergibles: norma de eficiencia energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Torres, R. A.; Buendia Dominguez, E. H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), supporting the Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), has prepared a preliminary project of the norm of energy efficiency for submersible pumps. This document has complied with the necessary formalities for the emission of the norm. This paper presents the results of the analysis of the submersible pumps, the energy savings, as well as the economic evaluation that sustains the norm project, additionally pointing out the environmental impact that will bring along the implantation of the same. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), apoyando a la Comision Nacional para el Ahorro de Energia (CONAE), ha elaborado el anteproyecto de norma de eficiencia energetica para bombas sumergibles. Dicho documento ha cumplido con los tramites necesarios para la emision de una norma. En el presente articulo se mencionan los resultados del analisis de las bombas sumergibles, los ahorros energeticos, asi como la evaluacion economica que sustenta el proyecto de norma, indicandose ademas el impacto ambiental que tendra la implantacion de la misma.

  2. Study Of Calculation Of Degaussing System For Reducing Magnetic Field From Submersible Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardono Sarwito

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of maritime technology in the world to make Indonesia are also increasingly taking the development of maritime technology, such as in a Submersible Vehicle one is degaussing system, this technology should be owned by the vessel so that the vessel can avoid dangerous explosive equipment contained in the sea. Degaussing system is a system that is in use on the metal parts or electronic devices that are at risk of a magnetic field. This system is used to prevent the vessel from dangerous equipment in the sea which can trigger an explosion and the damage that utilize magnetic fields as a metal-detection sensor when the boat was doing dives. To the authors will plan the design degaussing system, and calculating the system in order to reduce the magnetic properties of the Submersible Vehicle which were obtained by the use of Coil Degaussing along 214,5 meters, a diameter of 0,2, with 500.000 coil that will generate a current of 0,0157 Ampere's 0.0787 Tesla generates a magnetic field.

  3. A Hydraulic Motor-Alternator System for Ocean-Submersible Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aintablian, Harry O.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Jones, Jack A.

    2012-01-01

    An ocean-submersible vehicle has been developed at JPL that moves back and forth between sea level and a depth of a few hundred meters. A liquid volumetric change at a pressure of 70 bars is created by means of thermal phase change. During vehicle ascent, the phase-change material (PCM) is melted by the circulation of warm water and thus pressure is increased. During vehicle descent, the PCM is cooled resulting in reduced pressure. This pressure change is used to generate electric power by means of a hydraulic pump that drives a permanent magnet (PM) alternator. The output energy of the alternator is stored in a rechargeable battery that powers an on-board computer, instrumentation and other peripherals.The focus of this paper is the performance evaluation of a specific hydraulic motor-alternator system. Experimental and theoretical efficiency data of the hydraulic motor and the alternator are presented. The results are used to evaluate the optimization of the hydraulic motor-alternator system. The integrated submersible vehicle was successfully operated in the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. A brief overview of the actual test results is presented.

  4. Electric power generation by a submersible microbial fuel cell equipped with a membrane electrode assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Thygesen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were incorporated into the cathode chamber of a submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC). A close contact of the electrodes could produce high power output from SMFC in which anode and cathode electrodes were connected in parallel. In polarization test, the maxi......Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were incorporated into the cathode chamber of a submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC). A close contact of the electrodes could produce high power output from SMFC in which anode and cathode electrodes were connected in parallel. In polarization test......, the maximum power density was 631mW/m2 at current density of 1772mA/m2 at 82Ω. With 180-Ω external resistance, one set of the electrodes on the same side could generate more power density of 832±4mW/m2 with current generation of 1923±4mA/m2. The anode, inclusive a biofilm behaved ohmic, whereas a Tafel type...... behavior was observed for the oxygen reduction. The various impedance contributions from electrodes, electrolyte and membrane were analyzed and identified by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Air flow rate to the cathode chamber affected microbial voltage generation, and higher power generation...

  5. Microbial Biofilm Community Variation in Flowing Habitats: Potential Utility as Bioindicators of Postmortem Submersion Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous formation of microbial communities found on surfaces in aqueous environments. These structures have been investigated as biomonitoring indicators for stream heath, and here were used for the potential use in forensic sciences. Biofilm successional development has been proposed as a method to determine the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI of remains because there are no standard methods for estimating the PMSI and biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. We sought to compare the development of epinecrotic (biofilms on Sus scrofa domesticus carcasses and epilithic (biofilms on unglazed ceramic tiles communities in two small streams using bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Epinecrotic communities were significantly different from epilithic communities even though environmental factors associated with each stream location also had a significant influence on biofilm structure. All communities at both locations exhibited significant succession suggesting that changing communities throughout time is a general characteristic of stream biofilm communities. The implications resulting from this work are that epinecrotic communities have distinctive shifts at the first and second weeks, and therefore the potential to be used in forensic applications by associating successional changes with submersion time to estimate a PMSI. The influence of environmental factors, however, indicates the lack of a successional pattern with the same organisms and a focus on functional diversity may be more applicable in a forensic context.

  6. Parametric pitch instability investigation of Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parametric pitch instability of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform (DDS is investigated in irregular waves. Parametric pitch is a form of parametric instability, which occurs when parameters of a system vary with time and the variation satisfies a certain condition. In previous studies, analyzing of parametric instability is mainly limited to regular waves, whereas the realistic sea conditions are irregular waves. Besides, parametric instability also occurs in irregular waves in some experiments. This study predicts parametric pitch of a Deep Draft Semi-submersible platform in irregular waves. Heave motion of DDS is simulated by wave spectrum and response amplitude operator (RAO. Then Hill equation for DDS pitch motion in irregular waves is derived based on linear-wave theory. By using Bubnov-Galerkin approach to solve Hill equation, the corresponding stability chart is obtained. The differences between regular-waves stability chart and irregular-waves stability chart are compared. Then the sensitivity of wave parameters on DDS parametric pitch in irregular waves is discussed. Based on the discussion, some suggestions for the DDS design are proposed to avoid parametric pitch by choosing appropriate parameters. The results indicate that it's important and necessary to predict DDS parametric pitch in irregular waves during design process.

  7. The evaluation of a rake method to quantify submersed vegetation in the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yao; Kreiling, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    A long-handled, double-headed garden rake was used to collect submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) and compared to in-boat visual inspection to record species presence at 67 individual sites. Six rake subsamples were taken at each site and a rake density rating was given to each species collected in the subsamples. Presence at the site, frequency of occurrence in the six rake samples, and additive density rating (the sum of the six rake density ratings) were quantified for each species at each site. The validity of the indices was tested against biomass data collected by clipping all remaining vegetation from the 67 sites. In the turbid water of the Mississippi River, visual inspection of SAV from boats was ineffective with only 27% of the species detected, while raking retrieved on average 70% of the total number of submersed species in the 67 sites. Presence of species at individual sites was correlated with biomass from Stuckenia pectinata, while frequency of occurrence and additive density rating were correlated with biomass for species with greater than 21 g of total biomass from all sites. The efficiency of the rake to collect biomass varied among species; only 18% of total biomass was captured via raking the site six times. Additive density rating as an index of abundance can be used to detect temporal changes in the same water body; however, cross-species comparison is not encouraged unless the efficiency of the rake has been determined for each species being compared.

  8. Numerical simulation and performance prediction in multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. J.; Li, G. D.; Wang, Y.; Cui, Y. R.; Yin, G.; Peng, S.

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the inner flow field of multi-stage submersible centrifugal pump, the model named QD3-60/4-1.1 was selected. Steady turbulence characteristics of impellers, diffusers and return channel were calculated by Fluent software, the SIMPLEC algorithm and RNG κ-ε turbulence model with sliding mesh technology. Then, the distributions of pressure, velocity and Turbulence kinetic energy was obtained and the distributions of velocity field of a channel were analysed. The results show that the static pressure in impeller is increasing with the increasing of radius. The circumferential component of relative velocity is in the opposite direction of impeller rotating. At the same radius, the component value of pressure surface is larger than suction surface. With the increasing of flow rate, absolute velocity and relative velocity flow angle are becoming small, in opposite of the relative velocity and absolute velocity flow angle. The high turbulent zone of impeller is located in the gap of impellers and diffusers. Flow similarity and structure similarity of the multi-stage submersible pump are confirmed.

  9. Phytotoxicity of atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron to submersed macrophytes in outdoor mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauert, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.knauert@basf.co [University of Basel, Department of Environmental Sciences, Hebelstrasse 1, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Uberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Knauer, Katja [University of Basel, Program Sustainability Research, Klingelbergstr. 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    The submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum and Potamogeton lucens were constantly exposed over a five-week period to environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron, and their mixture in outdoor mesocosms. Effects were evaluated investigating photosynthetic efficiency (PE) of the three macrophytes and growth of M. spicatum and E. canadensis. Adverse effects on PE were observed on days 2 and 5 after application. M. spicatum was found to be the more sensitive macrophyte. E. canadensis and P. lucens were less sensitive to atrazine, diuron and the mixture and insensitive to isoproturon. PE of M. spicatum was similarly affected by the single herbicides and the mixture demonstrating concentration addition. Growth of E. canadensis and M. spicatum was not reduced indicating that herbicide exposure did not impair plant development. Although PE measurements turned out to be a sensitive method to monitor PSII herbicides, plant growth remains the more relevant ecological endpoint in risk assessment. - Short-term effects on photosynthesis did not result in growth reduction of submerse macrophytes exposed to PSII inhibitors.

  10. Passive Vibration Control of a Semi-Submersible Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Floating offshore wind turbines have the potential to commercially convert the vast wind resource in deep-water area. Compared with fixed-bottom wind turbines, motions of the floating foundation complicate vibrations and loads of the wind turbine in offshore environment. To alleviate the responses of the wind turbine, this study investigates the use of fore–aft tuned mass damper (TMD in nacelle/tower for passive control of a semi-submersible offshore wind turbine. A simplified structural model, considering the degree-of-freedom of platform pitch and surge, tower tilt and TMD translation, is proposed in the light of motion features of semi-submersible platform. After identifying ten unknown parameters, the correctness of the deterministic model is validated by pitch free decay responses. The mass, stiffness and damping of TMD are optimized using both method of exhaustion and genetic algorithm to avoid local minimum. Six optimized TMD devices are evaluated under three kinds of realistic environment conditions. The control effectiveness is assessed by the extreme and fatigue response reduction ratios. It is found that the high stiffness TMDs that directly dissipate the energy of tower oscillation exhibit an overall stable performance. Similar to the spar-type foundation, the TMDs in the nacelle/tower are capable of extending the service life of floating wind turbines.

  11. Integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in leaves of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arkajo; Kar, Rup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Directional chloroplast photorelocation is a major physio-biochemical mechanism that allows these organelles to realign themselves intracellularly in response to the intensity of the incident light as an adaptive response. Signaling processes involved in blue light (BL)-dependent chloroplast movements were investigated in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle leaves. Treatments with antagonists of actin filaments [2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA)] and microtubules (oryzalin) revealed that actin filaments, but not microtubules, play a pivotal role in chloroplast movement. Involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in controlling chloroplast avoidance movement has been demonstrated, as exogenous H2O2 not only accelerated chloroplast avoidance but also could induce chloroplast avoidance even in weak blue light (WBL). Further support came from experiments with different ROS scavengers, i.e., dimethylthiourea (DMTU), KI, and CuCl2, which inhibited chloroplast avoidance, and from ROS localization using specific stains. Such avoidance was also partially inhibited by ZnCl2, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX) as well as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), a photosynthetic electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitor at PS II. However, methyl viologen (MV), a PS I ETC inhibitor, rather accelerated avoidance response. Exogenous calcium (Ca(+2)) induced avoidance even in WBL while inhibited chloroplast accumulation partially. On the other hand, chloroplast movements (both accumulation and avoidance) were blocked by Ca(+2) antagonists, La(3+) (inhibitor of plasma membrane Ca(+2) channel) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca(+2) chelator) while LiCl that affects Ca(+2) release from endosomal compartments did not show any effect. A model on integrated role of ROS and Ca(+2) (influx from apolastic space) in actin-mediated chloroplast avoidance has been proposed.

  12. Deepwater marine litter densities and compsoition from submersible video-gransects around the ABC-islands, Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Vinke, E.; Wende, van der G.; Hylkema, A.; Reed, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Baseline data on anthropogenic seafloor debris contamination in the year 2000 is provided for 24 submersible video transects at depths of 80–900 m, off the Dutch ABC-islands (Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao), in the southeastern Caribbean Sea. In total, 202 objects were documented from a combined 21,184 m

  13. Towards improved management of coastal submersion crises – CRISMA-WAVE solution as an example of CRISMA Framework application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlich Marc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coping with various types of natural or man-made hazards the FP7 SECURITY CRISMA project (http://www.crismaproject.eu has designed and developed an experimental software framework allowing building crisis management simulation application. One of the five pilot applications of CRISMA dealing with preparedness to the coastal submersions was developed and implemented using return of experience of the reference Xynthia storm surge event in the Charente Maritime County in France. The paper addresses the generic CRISMA Framework applicability to simulate mitigation effects of a coastal submersion through CRISMA-Wave implementation of a full modelling cycle. The CRISMA-Wave paradigm reflects user needs for simulation of “what-if” scenarios for short and long-term actions and the paper describes in particular its different components : *Simulation of submersion effects at a range of temporal and spatial scales, *Preparedness Planning, *Assessment of impacts depending on scenarios based on options for managing the inundation risks, *Cascading effects and *Evaluation of damages with comparison of submersion defence scenarios based on cost-benefit and multi criteria analysis.

  14. The Metabolite Pathway between Bundle Sheath and Mesophyll: Quantification of Plasmodesmata in Leaves of C3 and C4 Monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danila, Florence R; Quick, William Paul; White, Rosemary G; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    C4 photosynthesis is characterized by a CO2-concentrating mechanism between mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves. This generates high metabolic fluxes between these cells, through interconnecting plasmodesmata (PD). Quantification of these symplastic fluxes for modeling studies requires accurate quantification of PD, which has proven difficult using transmission electron microscopy. Our new quantitative technique combines scanning electron microscopy and 3D immunolocalization in intact leaf tissues to compare PD density on cell interfaces in leaves of C3 (rice [Oryza sativa] and wheat [Triticum aestivum]) and C4 (maize [Zea mays] and Setaria viridis) monocot species. Scanning electron microscopy quantification of PD density revealed that C4 species had approximately twice the number of PD per pitfield area compared with their C3 counterparts. 3D immunolocalization of callose at pitfields using confocal microscopy showed that pitfield area per M-BS interface area was 5 times greater in C4 species. Thus, the two C4 species had up to nine times more PD per M-BS interface area (S. viridis, 9.3 PD µm(-2); maize, 7.5 PD µm(-2); rice 1.0 PD µm(-2); wheat, 2.6 PD µm(-2)). Using these anatomical data and measured photosynthetic rates in these C4 species, we have now calculated symplastic C4 acid flux per PD across the M-BS interface. These quantitative data are essential for modeling studies and gene discovery strategies needed to introduce aspects of C4 photosynthesis to C3 crops. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  16. A Robust CRISPR/Cas9 System for Convenient, High-Efficiency Multiplex Genome Editing in Monocot and Dicot Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingliang; Zhang, Qunyu; Zhu, Qinlong; Liu, Wei; Chen, Yan; Qiu, Rong; Wang, Bin; Yang, Zhongfang; Li, Heying; Lin, Yuru; Xie, Yongyao; Shen, Rongxin; Chen, Shuifu; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Yuanling; Guo, Jingxin; Chen, Letian; Zhao, Xiucai; Dong, Zhicheng; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2015-08-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome targeting systems have been applied to a variety of species. However, most CRISPR/Cas9 systems reported for plants can only modify one or a few target sites. Here, we report a robust CRISPR/Cas9 vector system, utilizing a plant codon optimized Cas9 gene, for convenient and high-efficiency multiplex genome editing in monocot and dicot plants. We designed PCR-based procedures to rapidly generate multiple sgRNA expression cassettes, which can be assembled into the binary CRISPR/Cas9 vectors in one round of cloning by Golden Gate ligation or Gibson Assembly. With this system, we edited 46 target sites in rice with an average 85.4% rate of mutation, mostly in biallelic and homozygous status. We reasoned that about 16% of the homozygous mutations in rice were generated through the non-homologous end-joining mechanism followed by homologous recombination-based repair. We also obtained uniform biallelic, heterozygous, homozygous, and chimeric mutations in Arabidopsis T1 plants. The targeted mutations in both rice and Arabidopsis were heritable. We provide examples of loss-of-function gene mutations in T0 rice and T1 Arabidopsis plants by simultaneous targeting of multiple (up to eight) members of a gene family, multiple genes in a biosynthetic pathway, or multiple sites in a single gene. This system has provided a versatile toolbox for studying functions of multiple genes and gene families in plants for basic research and genetic improvement. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An efficient method for transient gene expression in monocots applied to modify the Brachypodium distachyon cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursova, Oksana; Pogorelko, Gennady; Zabotina, Olga A

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is widely used to produce insertions into plant genomes. There are a number of well-developed Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods for dicotyledonous plants, but there are few for monocotyledonous plants. Three hydrolase genes were transiently expressed in Brachypodium distachyon plants using specially designed vectors that express the gene product of interest and target it to the plant cell wall. Expression of functional hydrolases in genotyped plants was confirmed using western blotting, activity assays, cell wall compositional analysis and digestibility tests. An efficient, new, Agrobacterium-mediated approach was developed for transient gene expression in the grass B. distachyon, using co-cultivation of mature seeds with bacterial cells. This method allows transformed tissues to be obtained rapidly, within 3-4 weeks after co-cultivation. Also, the plants carried transgenic tissue and maintained transgenic protein expression throughout plant maturation. The efficiency of transformation was estimated at around 5 % of initially co-cultivated seeds. Application of this approach to express three Aspergillus nidulans hydrolases in the Brachypodium cell wall successfully confirmed its utility and resulted in the expected expression of active microbial proteins and alterations of cell wall composition. Cell wall modifications caused by expression of A. nidulans α-arabinofuranosidase and α-galactosidase increased the biodegradability of plant biomass. This newly developed approach is a quick and efficient technique for expressing genes of interest in Brachypodium plants, which express the gene product throughout development. In the future, this could be used for broad functional genomics studies of monocots and for biotechnological applications, such as plant biomass modification for biofuel production.

  18. High resolution numerical wave propagation in coastal area : benefits in assessment of the marine submersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorville, Jean-François; Cayol, Claude; Palany, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Many numerical models based on equation of action conservation (N = E/σ) enables the simulation of sea states (WAM, WW3,...). They allow through parametric equations to define sources and sinks of wave energy (E(f,σ)) in spectral form. Statistics of the sea states can be predicted at medium or long term as the significant wave height, the wave pic direction, mean wave period, etc. Those predictions are better if initials and boundaries conditions together with 10m wind field are well defined. Basically the more homogeneous the marine area bathymetry is the more accurate the prediction will be. Météo-France for French West Indies and French Guiana (MF-DIRAG) is in charge of the safety of persons and goods tries to improve knowledge and capacity to evaluate the sea state at the coast and the marine submersion height using among other statistical methods (as return periods) and numerical simulations. The area of responsibility is large and includes different territory, type of coast and sea wave climate. Up today most part of the daily simulations were done for large areas and with large meshes (10km). The needs of more accurate values in the assessment of the marine submersion pushed to develop new strategies to estimate the level of the sea water on the coast line and therefore characterize the marine submersion hazard. Since 2013 new data are available to enhance the capacity to simulate the mechanical process at the coast. High resolution DEM Litto 3D for Guadeloupe and Martinique coasts with grid-spacing of 5m up to 5km of the coast are free of use. The study presents the methodology applied at MF-DIRAG in study mode to evaluate effects of wave breaking on coastline. The method is based on wave simulation downscaling form the Atlantic basin to the coastal area using MF-WAM to an sub kilometric unstructured WW3 or SWAN depending to the domain studied. At the final step a non-hydrostatic wave flow as SWASH is used on the coast completed by an analytical method

  19. Research on water-exit and take-off process for Morphing Unmanned Submersible Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun-hua; Xu, Bao-wei; Feng, Jin-fu; Qi, Duo; Yang, Jian; Wang, Cong

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretic implementation method of Morphing Unmanned Submersible Aerial Vehicle (MUSAV), which can both submerge in the water and fly in the air. Two different shapes are put forward so that the vehicle can suit both submergence and flight, considering the tremendous differences between hydrodynamic configuration and aerodynamic configuration of a vehicle. The transition of the two shapes can be achieved by using morphing technology. The water-to-air process, including water-exit, morphing, take-off and steady flight, is analyzed. The hydrodynamic and aerodynamic model of the vehicle exiting the water surface obliquely and then taking off into the air has been founded. The control strategy after morphing is analyzed and the control method is given. Numerical method is used to validate the motion model of the water-exit process. Results of simulations show the validity of the proposed model and the feasibility of MUSAV in theory.

  20. Algorithm to determine electrical submersible pump performance considering temperature changes for viscous crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderrama, A. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Distrito Socialista Tecnologico (Venezuela); Valencia, F. [Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., Instituto de Tecnologia Venezolana para el Petroleo (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, electrical submersible pumps (ESPs) are used to transfer energy to fluids through stages made up of one impeller and one diffuser. Since liquid temperature increases through the different stages, viscosity might change between the inlet and outlet of the pump, thus affecting performance. The aim of this research was to create an algorithm to determine ESPs' performance curves considering temperature changes through the stages. A computational algorithm was developed and then compared with data collected in a laboratory with a CG2900 ESP. Results confirmed that when the fluid's viscosity is affected by the temperature changes, the stages of multistage pump systems do not have the same performance. Thus the developed algorithm could help production engineers to take viscosity changes into account and optimize the ESP design. This study developed an algorithm to take into account the fluid viscosity changes through pump stages.

  1. Predicting the postmortem submersion interval for human remains recovered from U.K. waterways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Vivienne; Lagden, Abigail; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2010-03-01

    This article aims to increase accuracy in estimating the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI) for bodies recovered from rivers in the United Kingdom. Data were collected from closed case files, crime scene reports, and autopsy files concerning bodies recovered over a 15-year period from the River Clyde, Scotland, and the River Mersey and canals in northwest England. One hundred and eighty-seven cases met the study criteria and were scored by quantifying the overall amount of decomposition observed in each case. Statistical analysis showed that the duration of a body's submergence in water and the temperatures to which it was exposed, as measured in accumulated degree days (ADD), had a significant effect on the decay process. Further analysis indicated that there were no significant differences in decomposition between the waterways. By combining the data from all study samples, it was possible to produce a single linear regression model for predicting ADD from observed decomposition.

  2. Examination of histological samples from submerged carrion to aid in the determination of postmortem submersion interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Michael Keith; Panacek, Edward; Green, William; Albers, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    The use of histology in the as a tool for estimating postmortem intervals has rarely been explored but it has the potential for offering medical examiners an additional means for estimating the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI) during a death investigation. This study used perinatal piglets as human analogs which were submerged in freshwater for various time intervals. Each piglet was extracted from the water and underwent a necropsy examination during which histological samples were collected. The samples revealed that the necrotic tissue decomposed relatively predictably over time and that this decompositional progression may have the potential to be used via a scoring system to determine or aid in determining the PMSI. This method for calculating PMSI allows for normalization between piglets of various mass and body types. It also prevents any contamination of the remains via algae growth and animal activity that may exacerbate and possibly exaggerate PMSI calculation.

  3. Submersed aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay: Sentinel species in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert J.; Dennison, William C.; Lefcheck, Jonathon S.; Gurbisz, Cassie; Hannam, Michael; Keisman, Jennifer; Landry, J. Brooke; Moore, Kenneth A.; Murphy, Rebecca R.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Testa, Jeremy; Weller, Donald E.; Wilcox, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Chesapeake Bay has undergone profound changes since European settlement. Increases in human and livestock populations, associated changes in land use, increases in nutrient loadings, shoreline armoring, and depletion of fish stocks have altered the important habitats within the Bay. Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) is a critical foundational habitat and provides numerous benefits and services to society. In Chesapeake Bay, SAV species are also indicators of environmental change because of their sensitivity to water quality and shoreline development. As such, SAV has been deeply integrated into regional regulations and annual assessments of management outcomes, restoration efforts, the scientific literature, and popular media coverage. Even so, SAV in Chesapeake Bay faces many historical and emerging challenges. The future of Chesapeake Bay is indicated by and contingent on the success of SAV. Its persistence will require continued action, coupled with new practices, to promote a healthy and sustainable ecosystem.

  4. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Cell Wall and NAC Domain Transcription Factor Genes during Elaeis guineensis Fruit Ripening: Evidence for Widespread Conservation within Monocot and Eudicot Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranbarger, Timothy J; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Roongsattham, Peerapat; Pizot, Maxime; Collin, Myriam; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Suraninpong, Potjamarn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Dussert, Stéphane; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), a monocotyledonous species in the family Arecaceae, has an extraordinarily oil rich fleshy mesocarp, and presents an original model to examine the ripening processes and regulation in this particular monocot fruit. Histochemical analysis and cell parameter measurements revealed cell wall and middle lamella expansion and degradation during ripening and in response to ethylene. Cell wall related transcript profiles suggest a transition from synthesis to degradation is under transcriptional control during ripening, in particular a switch from cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin synthesis to hydrolysis and degradation. The data provide evidence for the transcriptional activation of expansin, polygalacturonase, mannosidase, beta-galactosidase, and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase proteins in the ripening oil palm mesocarp, suggesting widespread conservation of these activities during ripening for monocotyledonous and eudicotyledonous fruit types. Profiling of the most abundant oil palm polygalacturonase (EgPG4) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) transcripts during development and in response to ethylene demonstrated both are sensitive markers of ethylene production and inducible gene expression during mesocarp ripening, and provide evidence for a conserved regulatory module between ethylene and cell wall pectin degradation. A comprehensive analysis of NAC transcription factors confirmed at least 10 transcripts from diverse NAC domain clades are expressed in the mesocarp during ripening, four of which are induced by ethylene treatment, with the two most inducible (EgNAC6 and EgNAC7) phylogenetically similar to the tomato NAC-NOR master-ripening regulator. Overall, the results provide evidence that despite the phylogenetic distance of the oil palm within the family Arecaceae from the most extensively studied monocot banana fruit, it appears ripening of divergent monocot and eudicot fruit lineages are

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Cell Wall and NAC Domain Transcription Factor Genes during Elaeis guineensis Fruit Ripening: Evidence for Widespread Conservation within Monocot and Eudicot Lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Tranbarger

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis, a monocotyledonous species in the family Arecaceae, has an extraordinarily oil rich fleshy mesocarp, and presents an original model to examine the ripening processes and regulation in this particular monocot fruit. Histochemical analysis and cell parameter measurements revealed cell wall and middle lamella expansion and degradation during ripening and in response to ethylene. Cell wall related transcript profiles suggest a transition from synthesis to degradation is under transcriptional control during ripening, in particular a switch from cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin synthesis to hydrolysis and degradation. The data provide evidence for the transcriptional activation of expansin, polygalacturonase, mannosidase, beta-galactosidase, and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase proteins in the ripening oil palm mesocarp, suggesting widespread conservation of these activities during ripening for monocotyledonous and eudicotyledonous fruit types. Profiling of the most abundant oil palm polygalacturonase (EgPG4 and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO transcripts during development and in response to ethylene demonstrated both are sensitive markers of ethylene production and inducible gene expression during mesocarp ripening, and provide evidence for a conserved regulatory module between ethylene and cell wall pectin degradation. A comprehensive analysis of NAC transcription factors confirmed at least 10 transcripts from diverse NAC domain clades are expressed in the mesocarp during ripening, four of which are induced by ethylene treatment, with the two most inducible (EgNAC6 and EgNAC7 phylogenetically similar to the tomato NAC-NOR master-ripening regulator. Overall, the results provide evidence that despite the phylogenetic distance of the oil palm within the family Arecaceae from the most extensively studied monocot banana fruit, it appears ripening of divergent monocot and eudicot fruit

  7. Temporal and spatial expression of polygalacturonase gene family members reveals divergent regulation during fleshy fruit ripening and abscission in the monocot species oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roongsattham Peerapat

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell separation that occurs during fleshy fruit abscission and dry fruit dehiscence facilitates seed dispersal, the final stage of plant reproductive development. While our understanding of the evolutionary context of cell separation is limited mainly to the eudicot model systems tomato and Arabidopsis, less is known about the mechanisms underlying fruit abscission in crop species, monocots in particular. The polygalacturonase (PG multigene family encodes enzymes involved in the depolymerisation of pectin homogalacturonan within the primary cell wall and middle lamella. PG activity is commonly found in the separation layers during organ abscission and dehiscence, however, little is known about how this gene family has diverged since the separation of monocot and eudicots and the consequence of this divergence on the abscission process. Results The objective of the current study was to identify PGs responsible for the high activity previously observed in the abscission zone (AZ during fruit shedding of the tropical monocot oil palm, and to analyze PG gene expression during oil palm fruit ripening and abscission. We identified 14 transcripts that encode PGs, all of which are expressed in the base of the oil palm fruit. The accumulation of five PG transcripts increase, four decrease and five do not change during ethylene treatments that induce cell separation. One PG transcript (EgPG4 is the most highly induced in the fruit base, with a 700–5000 fold increase during the ethylene treatment. In situ hybridization experiments indicate that the EgPG4 transcript increases preferentially in the AZ cell layers in the base of the fruit in response to ethylene prior to cell separation. Conclusions The expression pattern of EgPG4 is consistent with the temporal and spatial requirements for cell separation to occur during oil palm fruit shedding. The sequence diversity of PGs and the complexity of their expression in the oil palm fruit

  8. stil113_0401p -- Still frame locations of sediment extracted from video imagery collected by Delta submersible in September 2001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Delta submersible vehicle, outfitted with video equipment (and other devices), was deployed from the R/V Auriga during September 2001 to monitor seafloor...

  9. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Exploration of Outer Shelf and Slope Habitats off the Coast of North Carolina - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during one dive of the 2002 "Islands in the Stream - Outer Shelf...

  10. Functionality of the plastron in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae): aspects of the integument coating and submersion laboratory experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wesley Oliveira de Sousa; Germano Henrique Rosado-Neto; Marinêz Isaac Marques

    2012-01-01

    The plastron theory was tested in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, through the analysis of the structure that coats these insects' integument and also through submersion laboratorial experiments...

  11. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, Massachusetts, May - September 2004 (NODC Accession 0002722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts were collected from using a moored submersible flow cytometer from the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory in the Northwest Atlantic...

  12. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Estuary to the Abyss 2004: Exploring Along the Latitude 31-30 Transect - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during thirteen of the fourteen dives of the 2004 "Estuary to the...

  13. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  14. Jeff's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  15. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  16. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  17. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  18. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  19. Cocoa Beach, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of from fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance...

  20. Cape Canaveral, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  1. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 608 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  2. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  3. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  4. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  5. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard (Massachusetts) Coastal Observatory, May 10 - December 15, 2003 (NODC Accession 0002299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts data were collected using a moored submersible flow cytometer from a Coastal Observatory at the Martha's Vineyard in Masschutsetts from 10...

  6. Phytoplankton cell counts from a moored submersible flow cytometer at Martha's Vineyard (Massachusetts) Coastal Observatory, May - December 2006 (NODC Accession 0036656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton cell counts were collected from using a moored submersible flow cytometer from the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory in the Northwest Atlantic...

  7. Development of a Semi-submersible Barge for the installation of a TLP floating substructure. TLPWIND® case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, Juan; Sánchez, Gustavo D.; González, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    One of the biggest challenges to introduce Tension Leg Platform (TLP) technology into the Offshore Wind market are the Transport & Installation (T&I) stages, since most of TLPs are not self-stable as semisubmersible or SPAR platforms, and consequently requires additional means to perform these operations. This paper addresses this problem that has been overcome through the development of a Semi-submersible “Transport & Installation” Barge (SSB) for Iberdrola's TLPWIND® floating support structure. The Semi-submersible Barge has been designed both through the use of numerical models and an extensive basin testing campaign carried out at the University of Strathclyde facilities. This paper also includes an estimation of the duration in time to carry out the installation process of a Floating Offshore Wind Farm, comprising 100x5MW TLPWIND® units in different scenarios.

  8. Characterization of a 65 kDa NIF in the nuclear matrix of the monocot Allium cepa that interacts with nuclear spectrin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Munive, Clara; Blumenthal, Sonal S D; de la Espina, Susana Moreno Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells have a well organized nucleus and nuclear matrix, but lack orthologues of the main structural components of the metazoan nuclear matrix. Although data is limited, most plant nuclear structural proteins are coiled-coil proteins, such as the NIFs (nuclear intermediate filaments) in Pisum sativum that cross-react with anti-intermediate filament and anti-lamin antibodies, form filaments 6-12 nm in diameter in vitro, and may play the role of lamins. We have investigated the conservation and features of NIFs in a monocot species, Allium cepa, and compared them with onion lamin-like proteins. Polyclonal antisera against the pea 65 kDa NIF were used in 1D and 2D Western blots, ICM (imunofluorescence confocal microscopy) and IEM (immunoelectron microscopy). Their presence in the nuclear matrix was analysed by differential extraction of nuclei, and their association with structural spectrin-like proteins by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization in ICM. NIF is a conserved structural component of the nucleus and its matrix in monocots with Mr and pI values similar to those of pea 65 kDa NIF, which localized to the nuclear envelope, perichromatin domains and foci, and to the nuclear matrix, interacting directly with structural nuclear spectrin-like proteins. Its similarities with some of the proteins described as onion lamin-like proteins suggest that they are highly related or perhaps the same proteins.

  9. Roothairless5, which functions in maize (Zea mays L.) root hair initiation and elongation encodes a monocot-specific NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Josefine; Liu, Sanzhen; Wen, Tsui-Jung; Paschold, Anja; Marcon, Caroline; Tang, Ho Man; Li, Delin; Li, Li; Meeley, Robert B; Sakai, Hajime; Bruce, Wesley; Schnable, Patrick S; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Root hairs are instrumental for nutrient uptake in monocot cereals. The maize (Zea mays L.) roothairless5 (rth5) mutant displays defects in root hair initiation and elongation manifested by a reduced density and length of root hairs. Map-based cloning revealed that the rth5 gene encodes a monocot-specific NADPH oxidase. RNA-Seq, in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR experiments demonstrated that the rth5 gene displays preferential expression in root hairs but also accumulates to low levels in other tissues. Immunolocalization detected RTH5 proteins in the epidermis of the elongation and differentiation zone of primary roots. Because superoxide and hydrogen peroxide levels are reduced in the tips of growing rth5 mutant root hairs as compared with wild-type, and Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to be involved in tip growth, we hypothesize that the RTH5 protein is responsible for establishing the high levels of ROS in the tips of growing root hairs required for elongation. Consistent with this hypothesis, a comparative RNA-Seq analysis of 6-day-old rth5 versus wild-type primary roots revealed significant over-representation of only two gene ontology (GO) classes related to the biological functions (i.e. oxidation/reduction and carbohydrate metabolism) among 893 differentially expressed genes (FDR <5%). Within these two classes the subgroups 'response to oxidative stress' and 'cellulose biosynthesis' were most prominently represented. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Studi Pengaruh Gerak Semi-submersible Drilling Rig dengan Variasi Pre-tension Mooring Line terhadap Keamanan Drilling Riser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Arda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Analisis terhadap sistem tambat pada anjungan pengeboran semi-submersible drilling rig perlu dilakukan sebelum dilakukannya operasi di lapangan untuk mengetahui perencanaan sistem tambat yang tepat dan aman. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan analisa perilaku gerak semi-submersible dengan variasi pre-tension mooring line untuk mengetahui berapa besar pre-tension minimal yang harus digunakan agar operasi pengeboran di lingkungan laut Natuna dapat berjalan dengan aman. Variasi pre-tension yang digunakan adalah sebesar 400kN-2000kN dengan penambahan sebesar 400kN. Karakteristik gerakan semi-submersible diprediksi dengan menghitung RAO free floating dengan pemodelan numerik dalam domain frekuensi. Kemudian dilakukan analisa simulasi sistem lengkap (platform, mooring dan drilling riser dengan pemodelan numerik dalam domain waktu. Hasil yang didapat yakni nilai maksimum tegangan mooring line memenuhi batas kriteria API-RP2SK untuk semua variasi pre-tension dengan safety factor terkecil 2.44. Sudut flex joint drilling riser yang terjadi melewati batas kriteria API-RP16Q pada pre-tension 400kN-800kN yang mencapai 6.20 untuk sudut maksimum dan 4.80 untuk sudut rata-rata. Tegangan von Mises yang terjadi pada drilling riser melebihi kriteria API-RP16Q pada pre-tension 400kN-1200kN karena nilainya mencapai 369 MPa (0.82 yield stress.

  11. Numerical Investigation of a Tuned Heave Plate Energy-Harvesting System of a Semi-Submersible Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel tuned heave plate energy-harvesting system (THPEH is presented for the motion suppressing and energy harvesting of a semi-submersible platform. This THPEH system is designed based on the principle of a tuned mass damper (TMD and is composed of spring supports, a power take-off system (PTO and four movable heave plates. The permanent magnet linear generators (PMLG are used as the PTO system in this design. A semi-submersible platform operating in the South China Sea is selected as the research subject for investigating the effects of the THPEH system on motion reduction and harvesting energy through numerical simulations. The numerical model of the platform and the THPEH system, which was established based on hydrodynamic analysis, is modified and validated by the results of the flume test of a 1:70 scale model. The effects of the parameters, including the size, the frequency ratio and the damping ratio of the THPEH system, are systematically investigated. The results show that this THPEH system, with proper parameters, could significantly reduce the motions of the semi-submersible platform and generate considerable power under different wave conditions.

  12. Linking carbon and nitrogen metabolism to depth distribution of submersed macrophytes using high ammonium dosing tests and a lake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guixiang; Cao, Te; Fu, Hui; Ni, Leyi; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Wei; Song, Xin; Xie, Ping; Jeppesen, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Strategies of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilisation are among the factors determining plant distribution. It has been argued that submersed macrophytes adapted to lower light environments are more efficient in maintaining C metabolic homeostasis due to their conservative C strategy and ability to balance C shortage. We studied how depth distributions of 12 submersed macrophytes in Lake Erhai, China, were linked to their C-N metabolic strategies when facing acute [Formula: see text] dosing.[Formula: see text] dosing changed C-N metabolism significantly by decreasing the soluble carbohydrate (SC) content and increasing the [Formula: see text]-N and free amino acid (FAA) content of plant tissues.The proportional changes in SC contents in the leaves and FAA contents in the stems induced by [Formula: see text] dosing were closely correlated (positive for SC and negative for FAA) with the colonising water depths of the plants in Lake Erhai, the plants adapted to lower light regimes being more efficient in maintaining SC and FAA homeostasis.These results indicate that conservative carbohydrate metabolism of submersed macrophytes allowed the plants to colonise greater water depths in eutrophic lakes, where low light availability in the water column diminishes carbohydrate production by the plants.

  13. Ocean Economy and Fault Diagnosis of Electric Submersible Pump applied in Floating platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panlong Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocean economy plays a crucial role in the strengthening maritime safety industry and in the welfare of human beings. Electric Submersible Pumps (ESP have been widely used in floating platforms on the sea to provide oil for machines. However, the ESP fault may lead to ocean environment pollution, on the other hand, a timely fault diagnosis of ESP can improve the ocean economy. In order to meet the strict regulations of the ocean economy and environmental protection, the fault diagnosis of ESP system has become more and more popular in many countries. The vibration mechanical models of typical faults have been able to successfully diagnose the faults of ESP. And different types of sensors are used to monitor the vibration signal for the signal analysis and fault diagnosis in the ESP system. Meanwhile, physical sensors would increase the fault diagnosis challenge. Nowadays, the method of neural network for the fault diagnosis of ESP has been applied widely, which can diagnose the fault of an electric pump accurately based on the large database. To reduce the number of sensors and to avoid the large database, in this paper, algorithms are designed based on feature extraction to diagnose the fault of the ESP system. Simulation results show that the algorithms can achieve the prospective objectives superbly.

  14. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m(2) /day and current density of 4.33 A/m(2) were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic benefits of biogas enhancement and possible wastewater treatment, the SMDC may represent a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for waste resources recovery and biomethanation of ammonia-rich residues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Review of Experiments and Modeling of Gas-Liquid Flow in Electrical Submersible Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As the second most widely used artificial lift method in petroleum production (and first in produced amount, electrical submersible pump (ESP maintains or increases flow rate by converting kinetic energy to hydraulic pressure of hydrocarbon fluids. To facilitate its optimal working conditions, an ESP has to be operated within a narrow application window. Issues like gas involvement, changing production rate and high oil viscosity, greatly impede ESP boosting pressure. Previous experimental studies showed that the presence of gas would cause ESP hydraulic head degradation. The flow behaviors inside ESPs under gassy conditions, such as pressure surging and gas pockets, further deteriorate ESP pressure boosting ability. Therefore, it is important to know what parameters govern the gas-liquid flow structure inside a rotating ESP and how it can be modeled. This paper presents a comprehensive review on the key factors that affect ESP performance under gassy flow conditions. Furthermore, the empirical and mechanistic models for predicting ESP pressure increment are discussed. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD-based modeling approach for studying the multiphase flow in a rotating ESP is explained as well. The closure relationships that are critical to both mechanistic and numerical models are reviewed, which are helpful for further development of more accurate models for predicting ESP gas-liquid flow behaviors.

  16. Classification of submersed aquatic vegetation of the Venice lagoon using MIVIS airborne data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pignatti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In July 2001 an aerial survey with MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Spectrometer hyperspectral sensor and an in situ survey campaign were performed on Venice lagoon to map benthic macro-algae and sea phanerogams distribution. On MIVIS VIS spectral range images, training areas for benthic macro-algae and sea phanerogams have been selected by using sea truth data collected by CNR-ISMAR from in situ campaign and periodic area surveys used in the lagoon by the local authorities. The derived spectral signature has been used to classify the area in order to produce the maps of the pure and mixture submersed vegetation population. The algorithm applied to the data is based on the Subpixel Spectral Analytical Process (SSAP method. The method assumes that the spectrum of a single pixel is composed of a fraction of the material of interest while the remainder of the observed spectra contains background materials. In terms of recognition processes the produced maps present a very good agreement with the sea truth data even though the fraction material expressed in the maps does not represent a quantitative estimation of the material of interest.

  17. Critical surface roughness for wall bounded flow of viscous fluids in an electric submersible pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Dhairyasheel; Siddique, Md Hamid; Kenyery, Frank; Samad, Abdus

    2017-11-01

    Surface roughness plays a vital role in the performance of an electric submersible pump (ESP). A 3-D numerical analysis has been carried out to find the roughness effect on ESP. The performance of pump for steady wall bounded turbulent flows is evaluated at different roughness values and compared with smooth surface considering a non-dimensional roughness factor K. The k- ω SST turbulence model with fine mesh at near wall region captures the rough wall effects accurately. Computational results are validated with experimental results of water (1 cP), at a design speed (3000 RPM). Maximum head is observed for a hydraulically smooth surface (K=0). When roughness factor is increased, the head decreases till critical roughness factor (K=0.1) due to frictional loss. Further increase in roughness factor (K>0.1) increases the head due to near wall turbulence. The performance of ESP is analyzed for turbulent kinetic energy and eddy viscosity at different roughness values. The wall disturbance over the rough surface affects the pressure distribution and velocity field. The roughness effect is predominant for high viscosity oil (43cP) as compared to water. Moreover, the study at off-design conditions showed that Reynolds number influences the overall roughness effect.

  18. Development of LMR Coolant Technology - Development of a submersible-in-pool electromagnetic pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sang Hi; Kim, Hee Reyoung; Lee, Sang Don; Seo, Joon Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Su Won [Kyoungki University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    A submersible-in-pool type annular linear induction pumps of 60 l/min and 200 l/min, and 600 deg C has been designed with optimum geometrical and operating values found from MHD and circuit analyses reflecting the high-temperature characteristics of pump materials. Through the characteristics analyses inside the narrow flow channel of electromagnetic pump, the distribution of the time-varying flow field is calculated, and magnetic flux and force density are evaluated by end effects of linear induction electromagnetic pump and the instability analyses are carried out introducing one-dimensional linear perturbation. Testing the pump with the flow rate of 60 l/min in the suitably manufactured loop system shows a flow rate of 58 l/min at an input power of 1,377 VA with 60Hz. The design of a scaled-up pump is further taken into account LMR coolant system requiring increased capacity, and a basic analysis is carried out on the pump of 40,000 l/min for KALIMER. The present project contributes to the further design of engineering prototype electromagnetic pumps with higher capacity and to the development of liquid metal reactor with innovative simplicity. 89 refs., 8 tabs., 45 figs. (author)

  19. Electrically heated pipe in pipe combined with electrical submersible pumps for deepwater development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei Guerreiro da; Euphemio, Mauro Luiz Lopes [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The general trend of deep water and ultra deep water field development is the requirement of highly insulated flow lines, as flow assurance has become one of the major considerations in designing and operating the sub sea system. If not adequately considered in the design phase, it can have significant and unexpected effects to the operational costs, increasing production lost time, decreasing efficiency. In this scenario, the use of pipe in pipe flow lines, with high passive insulation and/ or active heating (called the Electrically Heated Pipe in Pipe - EHPIP), emerges as an attractive method to prevent deposition, especially of waxes and hydrates, by actively maintaining or leading the temperature of the flow line above a critical limit. Besides, the recent heavy oil discoveries in Brazil have encouraged PETROBRAS to move a step forward in the artificial lift design and operation, by the use of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESP) installed in deep water wells. The combination of EHPIP and ESP are particularly suitable for deep water, high viscosity and long tie back systems, but also can improve oil recovery and production efficiency by allowing the operator to drop down production losses associated Flow Assurance problems. (author)

  20. Innovative self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC) for biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC), in which a specially designed anode chamber and external electricity supply were not needed, was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. In batch experiments, the hydrogen production rate reached 17.8 m......L/L/d at the initial acetate concentration of 410 mg/L (5 mM), while the cathodic hydrogen recovery (RH2) and overall systemic coulombic efficiency (CEos) were 93% and 28%, respectively, and the systemic hydrogen yield (YH2) peaked at 1.27 mol-H2/mol-acetate. The hydrogen production increased along with acetate...... and buffer concentration. The highest hydrogen production rate of 32.2 mL/L/d and YH2 of 1.43 mol-H2/mol-acetate were achieved at 1640 mg/L (20 mM) acetate and 100 mM phosphate buffer. Further evaluation of the reactor under single electricity-generating or hydrogen-producing mode indicated that further...

  1. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of Deep Geothermal Electric Submersible Pumping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Kullick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep geothermal energy systems employ electric submersible pumps (ESPs in order to lift geothermal fluid from the production well to the surface. However, rough downhole conditions and high flow rates impose heavy strain on the components, leading to frequent failures of the pump system. As downhole sensor data is limited and often unrealible, a detailed and dynamical model system will serve as basis for deeper understanding and analysis of the overall system behavior. Furthermore, it allows to design model-based condition monitoring and fault detection systems, and to improve controls leading to a more robust and efficient operation. In this paper, a detailed state-space model of the complete ESP system is derived, covering the electrical, mechanical and hydraulic subsystems. Based on the derived model, the start-up phase of an exemplary yet realistic ESP system in the Megawatt range—located at a setting depth of 950 m and producing geothermal fluid of 140 ∘ C temperature at a rate of 0.145 m 3 s − 1 —is simulated in MATLAB/Simulink. The simulation results show that the system reaches a stable operating point with realistic values. Furthermore, the effect of self-excitation between the filter capacitor and the motor inductor can clearly be observed. A full set of parameters is provided, allowing for direct model implementation and reproduction of the presented results.

  2. ESP [electric submersible pump] performance in sand-laden fluids in the Bellshill Lake field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowhaniuk, W. (Petro-Canada Resources, Killam, AB (Canada))

    1992-06-01

    Electric submersible pumps (ESPs) used by Petro-Canada in the Bellshill Lake basal quartz pool, were first used as a means of high volume lift in 1976. Traditionally used in areas of the reservoir with limited sand production, ESPs were run in the more permeable and porous areas of the reservoir consisting mainly of unconsolidated sandstones in 1987. Reservoir inflow and sand production was prolific, and ESPs in these wells typically ran for 2-3 days before catastrophic failure occurred, due to the high concentration of abrasives in the produced fluids. As a result of the failures a study was carried out to identify the problems associated with ESPs and abrasives and to determine economic solutions. As a result of the study, the following measures were implemented to improve the service lives of ESPs in the field. All wells that are converted to ESPs are reperforated at 39 shots/m to reduce the pressure drop across the perforations and thus reduce the inflow of sand. New and rebuilt ESPs are assembled without the conventional brass sleeves, instead using Ni-resist parts to avoid hydrogen sulfide attack and degradation. Rubber bearing radially stabilized design counteracts the effect of sand-laden fluid, and drawdown is limited for the first 2-4 weeks of production. Current ESP run-times range up to 2.5 years, and no rubber bearing ESPs have failed due to sand production. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Towards Chip-Based Salinity Measurements for Small Submersibles and Biologgers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jonsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water’s salinity plays an important role in the environment. It can be determined by measuring conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD. The corresponding sensor systems are commonly large and cumbersome. Here, a 7.5 × 3.5 mm chip, containing microstructured CTD sensor elements, has been developed. On this, 1.5 mm2 gold finger electrodes are used to measure the impedance, and thereby the conductivity of water, in the MHz frequency range. Operation at these frequencies resulted in higher sensitivities than those at sub-MHz frequencies. Up to 14 kΩ per parts per thousand salt concentration was obtained repeatedly for freshwater concentrations. This was three orders of magnitude higher than that obtained for concentrations in and above the brackish range. A platinum electrode is used to determine a set ambient temperature with an accuracy of 0.005°C. Membranes with Nichrome strain gauges responded to a pressure change of 1 bar with a change in resistance of up to 0.21 Ω. A linear fit to data over 7 bars gave a sensitivity of 0.1185 Ω/bar with an R2 of 0.9964. This indicates that the described device can be used in size-limited applications, like miniaturized submersibles, or as a bio-logger on marine animals.

  4. Lack of S-RNase-Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Orchids Suggests That This System Evolved after the Monocot-Eudicot Split

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ce Niu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is found in approximately 40% of flowering plant species and at least 100 families. Although orchids belong to the largest angiosperm family, only 10% of orchid species present SI and have gametophytic SI (GSI. Furthermore, a majority (72% of Dendrobium species, which constitute one of the largest Orchidaceae genera, show SI and have GSI. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanism of GSI. The S-determinants of GSI have been well characterized at the molecular level in Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Plantaginaceae, which use an S-ribonuclease (S-RNase-based system. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Orchidaceae uses a similar S-RNase to those described in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae SI species. In this study, two SI species (Dendrobium longicornu and D. chrysanthum were identified using fluorescence microscopy. Then, the S-RNase- and SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 (SSK1-like genes present in their transcriptomes and the genomes of Phalaenopsis equestris, D. catenatum, Vanilla shenzhenica, and Apostasia shenzhenica were investigated. Sequence, phylogenetic, and tissue-specific expression analyses revealed that none of the genes identified was an S-determinant, suggesting that Orchidaceae might have a novel SI mechanism. The results also suggested that RNase-based GSI might have evolved after the split of monocotyledons (monocots and dicotyledons (dicots but before the split of Asteridae and Rosidae. This is also the first study to investigate S-RNase-based GSI in monocots. However, studies on gene identification, differential expression, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed to further evaluate the genes with high expression levels in GSI tissues.

  5. Lack of S-RNase-Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Orchids Suggests That This System Evolved after the Monocot-Eudicot Split.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Pei-Xing; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Chen, Li-Jun; Wang, Jie-Yu; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is found in approximately 40% of flowering plant species and at least 100 families. Although orchids belong to the largest angiosperm family, only 10% of orchid species present SI and have gametophytic SI (GSI). Furthermore, a majority (72%) of Dendrobium species, which constitute one of the largest Orchidaceae genera, show SI and have GSI. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanism of GSI. The S-determinants of GSI have been well characterized at the molecular level in Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Plantaginaceae, which use an S-ribonuclease (S-RNase)-based system. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Orchidaceae uses a similar S-RNase to those described in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae SI species. In this study, two SI species ( Dendrobium longicornu and D. chrysanthum ) were identified using fluorescence microscopy. Then, the S-RNase- and SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 (SSK1)-like genes present in their transcriptomes and the genomes of Phalaenopsis equestris, D. catenatum, Vanilla shenzhenica , and Apostasia shenzhenica were investigated. Sequence, phylogenetic, and tissue-specific expression analyses revealed that none of the genes identified was an S-determinant, suggesting that Orchidaceae might have a novel SI mechanism. The results also suggested that RNase-based GSI might have evolved after the split of monocotyledons (monocots) and dicotyledons (dicots) but before the split of Asteridae and Rosidae. This is also the first study to investigate S-RNase-based GSI in monocots. However, studies on gene identification, differential expression, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed to further evaluate the genes with high expression levels in GSI tissues.

  6. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare) WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions between monocots and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Kolukisaoglu, Uner H; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-04-28

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far as regulators in sucrose signaling, pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features, the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in monocot and dicot species.

  7. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions between monocots and dicots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Christer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare, three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far as regulators in sucrose signaling, pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. Results In this study, we used available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY genes. According to their structural features, the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. Conclusion HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in monocot and dicot species.

  8. Structural mechanism governing the quaternary organization of monocot mannose-binding lectin revealed by the novel monomeric structure of an orchid lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Na; Ding, Jingjin; Huang, Ren-huai; Hu, Zhong; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2005-04-15

    Two isoforms of an antifungal protein, gastrodianin, were isolated from two subspecies of the orchid Gastrodia elata, belonging to the protein superfamily of monocot mannose-specific lectins. In the context that all available structures in this superfamily are oligomers so far, the crystal structures of the orchid lectins, both at 2.0 A, revealed a novel monomeric structure. It resulted from the rearrangement of the C-terminal peptide inclusive of the 12th beta-strand, which changes from the "C-terminal exchange" into a "C-terminal self-assembly" mode. Thus, the overall tertiary scaffold is stabilized with an intramolecular beta-sheet instead of the hybrid observed on subunit/subunit interface in all known homologous dimeric or tetrameric lectins. In contrast to the constrained extended conformation with a cis peptide bond between residues 98 and 99 commonly occurring in oligomers, a beta-hairpin forms from position 97 to 101 with a normal trans peptide bond at the corresponding site in gastrodianin, which determines the topology of the C-terminal peptide and thereby its unique fold pattern. Sequence and structure comparison shows that residue replacement and insertion at the position where the beta-hairpin occurs in association with cis-trans inter-conversion of the specific peptide bond (97-98) are possibly responsible for such a radical structure switch between monomers and oligomers. Moreover, this seems to be a common melody controlling the quaternary states among bulb lectins through studies on sequence alignment. The observations revealed a structural mechanism by which the quaternary organization of monocot mannose binding lectins could be governed. The mutation experiment performed on maltose-binding protein-gastrodianin fusion protein followed by a few biochemical detections provides direct evidence to support this conclusion. Potential carbohydrate recognition sites and biological implications of the orchid lectin based on its monomeric state are also

  9. Contrasting sediment records of marine submersion events related to wave exposure, Southwest France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, J.; Chaumillon, E.; Schneider, J.-L.; Jorissen, F.; Sauriau, P.-G.; Richard, P.; Bonnin, J.; Schmidt, S.

    2017-05-01

    Sediment records of two contrasting backshore coastal marshes, extremely vulnerable to recent and historical marine flooding events, located on the SW coast of France, have been investigated using a multiproxy approach. The studied marshes are 30 km apart and have been flooded by similar storm events (7 marine floods in the last 250 years). One is located in a wave-exposed coast but isolated from the sea by a sediment barrier, whereas the other is located in a sheltered estuarine environment and isolated from the sea by a dike. One core was collected in each marsh and information on grain-size, foraminifera, shell contents and stable carbon isotopes was obtained along with an age model using 210Pb, 137Cs and 14C. Core data combined with historical maps give evidence of a typical estuarine backfilling, part of the Holocene regressive parasequence, including an intertidal mudflat at the base and a backshore environment at the top. Despite the absence of grain size anomalies, marine flood-related sedimentation in the backshore area of both marshes is identified by a mixture of marine and terrestrial features, including marine fauna, vegetation debris and variation in the δ13C signature of the organic fraction. Very low sedimentation rates between flood events and/or bioturbation prevents the identification of individual episodic marine floods in the sediment succession. Comparison of the two sedimentary successions shows that the foraminifera deposited by marine submersions are of two different types. Foraminifera are monospecific and originate from the upper tidal mudflat in the sheltered marsh; whereas in the backshore marsh located in a wave-exposed environment, they show higher diversity and originate from both shallow and deeper water marine environments. This study shows that wave exposure can control the faunal content of marine flood sediment records in coastal marshes.

  10. Integrated System Design for a Large Wind Turbine Supported on a Moored Semi-Submersible Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, wind energy has emerged as an alternative to conventional power generation that is economical, environmentally friendly and, importantly, renewable. Specifically, offshore wind energy is being considered by a number of countries to harness the stronger and more consistent wind resource compared to that over land. To meet the projected “20% energy from wind by 2030” scenario that was announced in 2006, 54 GW of added wind energy capacity need to come from offshore according to a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL study. In this study, we discuss the development of a semi-submersible floating offshore platform with a catenary mooring system to support a very large 13.2-MW wind turbine with 100-m blades. An iterative design process is applied to baseline models with Froude scaling in order to achieve preliminary static stability. Structural dynamic analyses are performed to investigate the performance of the new model using a finite element method approach for the tower and a boundary integral equation (panel method for the platform. The steady-state response of the system under uniform wind and regular waves is first studied to evaluate the performance of the integrated system. Response amplitude operators (RAOs are computed in the time domain using white-noise wave excitation; this serves to highlight nonlinear, as well as dynamic characteristics of the system. Finally, selected design load cases (DLCs and the stochastic dynamic response of the system are studied to assess the global performance for sea states defined by wind fields with turbulence and long-crested irregular waves.

  11. DORADO/DOLPHIN: A Unique Semi-submersible Autonomous Vehicle for Ocean Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D.

    2016-02-01

    The Ocean Science and Technology research group (CERC.OCEAN) at Dalhousie University focuses on new approaches to the design and development of autonomous platforms to study biogeochemical and ecological changes in the world's oceans. Mesoscale "patch" experiments involving tracers are used to test hypotheses (e.g. iron fertilization) and examine near-surface processes and air-sea exchange. Such experiments typically require mapping of rapidly-evolving properties on scales of 10's to 100's of kilometers. These experiments typically employ a research vessel to monitor patch movement and to support process studies: however allocation of expensive vessel time between these uses can be problematic. We present a class of autonomous vehicle with unique potential for mesoscale mapping and experimental science at sea. The Dorado/Dolphin semi-submersibles, manufactured by International Submarine Engineering Ltd., travel just below the sea surface. A surface-piercing, "snorkel" mast allows use of a diesel engine allowing speeds of up to 16 knots and sufficient power for support of complex payloads. A tow-body can profile to 200m. The mast allows air sampling with near-zero atmospheric disturbance as well as remote sensing of the sea surface. The characteristics of this type of vehicle will be compared with those of other available platforms. We will report on our adaptation of the vehicle for measurement of gases and purposeful tracers (e.g. SF5CF3) as well as properties such as T, S, pCO2, O2, fluorescence, etc. and present and solicit ideas for the vehicles' further application/use for ocean science.

  12. Innovative self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC) for biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-05-15

    A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell (SMEC), in which a specially designed anode chamber and external electricity supply were not needed, was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. In batch experiments, the hydrogen production rate reached 17.8 mL/L/d at the initial acetate concentration of 410 mg/L (5 mM), while the cathodic hydrogen recovery ( [Formula: see text] ) and overall systemic coulombic efficiency (CE(os)) were 93% and 28%, respectively, and the systemic hydrogen yield ( [Formula: see text] ) peaked at 1.27 mol-H(2)/mol-acetate. The hydrogen production increased along with acetate and buffer concentration. The highest hydrogen production rate of 32.2 mL/L/d and [Formula: see text] of 1.43 mol-H(2)/mol-acetate were achieved at 1640 mg/L (20 mM) acetate and 100 mM phosphate buffer. Further evaluation of the reactor under single electricity-generating or hydrogen-producing mode indicated that further improvement of voltage output and reduction of electron losses were essential for efficient hydrogen generation. In addition, alternate exchanging the electricity-assisting and hydrogen-producing function between the two cell units of the SMEC was found to be an effective approach to inhibit methanogens. Furthermore, 16S rRNA genes analysis showed that this special operation strategy resulted same microbial community structures in the anodic biofilms of the two cell units. The simple, compact and in situ applicable SMEC offers new opportunities for reactor design for a microbial electricity-assisted biohydrogen production system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia...... and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMDC performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative...

  14. Structural analyses of very large semi-submersibles in waves; Choogata hansensuishiki futai no harochu kozo oto kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, K.; Yoshida, K.; Suzuki, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    An analysis method in which the technique of a vehicle obtained when a three-dimensional singular point distribution method and Kagemoto`s mutual interaction theory are combined was expanded for the fluid area was proposed as the structural analysis of very large semi-submersibles in waves. A partial structure method is used for the structure. In a fluid area, the number of unknown quantities appearing in a final expression could be largely reduced by introducing the new concept of a group body. In this process, both hydro-elasticity and hydrodynamic mutual interaction are considered. As a result, floating bodies that could not be previously calculated can be modeled as a three-dimensional frame structure and the response analysis in waves can be carried out without damaging the accuracy. The calculation result is used as the input data required for analyzing the structural fatigue locally during structural design of very large semi-submersibles in the 3,000 (m) class. This study can present a series of procedures between the response analysis of very large floating bodies in waves and the structural design. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Hydrodynamic comparison of a semi-submersible, TLP, and Spar: Numerical study in the South China Sea environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Liu, Kun; Yan, Gongwei; Ou, Jinping

    2011-09-01

    The South China Sea contains tremendous oil and gas resources in deepwater areas. However, one of the keys for deepwater exploration, the investigation of deepwater floating platforms, is very inadequate. In this paper, the authors studied and compared the hydrodynamics and global motion behaviors of typical deepwater platforms in the South China Sea environment. The hydrodynamic models of three main types of floating platforms, e.g. the Semi-submersible, tension leg platform (TLP), and Truss Spar, which could potentially be utilized in the South China Sea, were established by using the 3-D potential theory. Additionally, some important considerations which significantly influence the hydrodynamics were given. The RAOs in frequency domains as well as global motions in time domains under time-varying wind, random waves, and current in 100-y, 10-y, and 1-y return period environment conditions were predicted, compared, and analyzed. The results indicate that the heave and especially the pitch motion of the TLP are favorable. The heave response of the Truss Spar is perfect and comparable with that of the TLP when the peak period of random waves is low. However, the pitch motion of Truss Spar is extraordinarily larger than that of Semi-submersible and TLP.

  16. WHTSubmersible: a simulator for estimating transient circulation temperature in offshore wells with the semi-submersible platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xun-cheng; Liu, Yong-wang; Guan, Zhi-chuan

    2015-10-01

    Offshore wellbore temperature field is significant to drilling fluids program, equipment selection, evaluations on potential risks caused by casing thermal stress, etc. This paper mainly describes the theoretical basis, module structure and field verification of the simulator WHTSubmersible. This computer program is a useful tool for estimating transient temperature distribution of circulating drilling fluid on semi-submersible platform. WHTSubmersible is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider radial and axial two-dimensional heat exchange of the inner drill pipe, the annulus, the drill pipe wall, the sea water and the formation in the process of drilling fluid circulation. The solution of the discrete equations is based on finite volume method with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Besides, the simulator also considers the heating generated by drilling fluid circulation friction, drill bit penetrating rocks, friction between the drill column and the borehole wall, and the temperature effect on thermal physical properties and rheology of the drilling fluid. These measures ensure more accurate results. The simulator has been programmed as a dynamic link library using Visual C++, the routine interface is simple, which can be connected with other computer programs conveniently. The simulator is validated with an actual well temperature filed developed on a semi-submersible platform in South China, and the error is less than 5 %.

  17. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: Focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was req...

  18. Dynamics modeling of a semi-submersible autonomous underwater vehicle with a towfish towed by a cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmo Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we employ a dynamics modeling method for investigating a multi-body dynamics system of semi-submersible autonomous underwater vehicles consisting of a towing vehicle operated near the water surface, a tow cable, and a towfish. The towfish, which is towed by a marine cable for the purposes of exploration or mine hunting, is modeled with a Six-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DOF equation of motion that reflects its hydrodynamics characteristics. The towing cable, which can experience large displacements and deformations, is modeled using an absolute nodal coordinate formulation. To reflect the hydrodynamic characteristics of the cable during motion, the hydrodynamic force due to added mass and the drag force are imposed. To verify the completeness of the modeling, a few simple numerical simulations were conducted, and the results confirm the physical plausibility of the model.

  19. Stochastic dynamic response analysis of a floating vertical-axis wind turbine with a semi-submersible floater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Moan, Torgeir; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2016-01-01

    Floating vertical-axis wind turbines (FVAWTs) provide the potential for utilizing offshore wind resources in moderate and deep water because of their economical installation and maintenance. Therefore, it is important to assess the performance of the FVAWT concept. This paper presents a stochastic...... dynamic response analysis of a 5MW FVAWT based on fully coupled nonlinear time domain simulations. The studied FVAWT, which is composed of a Darrieus rotor and a semi-submersible floater, is subjected to various wind and wave conditions. The global motion, structural response and mooring line tension...... on the response is demonstrated by comparing the floating wind turbine with the equivalent land-based wind turbine. Additionally, by comparing the behaviour of FVAWTs with flexible and rigid rotors, the effect of rotor flexibility is evaluated. Furthermore, the FVAWT is also investigated in the parked condition...

  20. Generic phylogeny, historical biogeography and character evolution of the cosmopolitan aquatic plant family Hydrocharitaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Yun; Chen, Jin-Ming; Gituru, Robert Wahiti; Wang, Qing-Feng

    2012-03-10

    Hydrocharitaceae is a fully aquatic monocot family, consists of 18 genera with approximately 120 species. The family includes both fresh and marine aquatics and exhibits great diversity in form and habit including annual and perennial life histories; submersed, partially submersed and floating leaf habits and linear to orbicular leaf shapes. The family has a cosmopolitan distribution and is well represented in the Tertiary fossil record in Europe. At present, the historical biogeography of the family is not well understood and the generic relationships remain controversial. In this study we investigated the phylogeny and biogeography of Hydrocharitaceae by integrating fossils and DNA sequences from eight genes. We also conducted ancestral state reconstruction for three morphological characters. Phylogenetic analyses produced a phylogeny with most branches strongly supported by bootstrap values greater than 95 and Bayesian posterior probability values of 1.0. Stratiotes is the first diverging lineage with the remaining genera in two clades, one clade consists of Lagarosiphon, Ottelia, Blyxa, Apalanthe, Elodea and Egeria; and the other consists of Hydrocharis-Limnobium, Thalassia, Enhalus, Halophila, Najas, Hydrilla, Vallisneria, Nechamandra and Maidenia. Biogeographic analyses (DIVA, Mesquite) and divergence time estimates (BEAST) resolved the most recent common ancestor of Hydrocharitaceae as being in Asia during the Late Cretaceous and Palaeocene (54.7-72.6 Ma). Dispersals (including long-distance dispersal and migrations through Tethys seaway and land bridges) probably played major roles in the intercontinental distribution of this family. Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that in Hydrocharitaceae evolution of dioecy is bidirectional, viz., from dioecy to hermaphroditism, and from hermaphroditism to dioecy, and that the aerial-submerged leaf habit and short-linear leaf shape are the ancestral states. Our study has shed light on the previously controversial

  1. Zea mays Fe deficiency-related 4 (ZmFDR4) functions as an iron transporter in the plastids of monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qi; Pan, Xiao-Xi; Yan, Luo-Chen; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Wei-Zhong; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2017-04-01

    Iron (Fe)-homeostasis in the plastids is closely associated with Fe transport proteins that prevent Fe from occurring in its toxic free ionic forms. However, the number of known protein families related to Fe transport in the plastids (about five) and the function of iron in non-green plastids is limited. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of Zea mays Fe deficiency-related 4 (ZmFDR4), which was isolated from a differentially expressed clone of a cDNA library of Fe deficiency-induced maize roots. ZmFDR4 is homologous to the bacterial FliP superfamily, coexisted in both algae and terrestrial plants, and capable of restoring the normal growth of the yeast mutant fet3fet4, which possesses defective Fe uptake systems. ZmFDR4 mRNA is ubiquitous in maize and is inducible by iron deficiency in wheat. Transient expression of the 35S:ZmFDR4-eGFP fusion protein in rice protoplasts indicated that ZmFDR4 maybe localizes to the plastids envelope and thylakoid. In 35S:c-Myc-ZmFDR4 transgenic tobacco, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting confirmed that ZmFDR4 is targeted to both the chloroplast envelope and thylakoid. Meanwhile, ultrastructure analysis indicates that ZmFDR4 promotes the density of plastids and accumulation of starch grains. Moreover, Bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPDS) colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) indicate that ZmFDR4 is related to Fe uptake by plastids and increases seed Fe content. Finally, 35S:c-Myc-ZmFDR4 transgenic tobacco show enhanced photosynthetic efficiency. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrate that ZmFDR4 functions as an iron transporter in monocot plastids and provide insight into the process of Fe uptake by plastids. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 612 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  3. Construction of high quality Gateway™ entry libraries and their application to yeast two-hybrid for the monocot model plant Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumimoto Roderick W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocots, especially the temperate grasses, represent some of the most agriculturally important crops for both current food needs and future biofuel development. Because most of the agriculturally important grass species are difficult to study (e.g., they often have large, repetitive genomes and can be difficult to grow in laboratory settings, developing genetically tractable model systems is essential. Brachypodium distachyon (hereafter Brachypodium is an emerging model system for the temperate grasses. To fully realize the potential of this model system, publicly accessible discovery tools are essential. High quality cDNA libraries that can be readily adapted for multiple downstream purposes are a needed resource. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H libraries are an important discovery tool for protein-protein interactions and are not currently available for Brachypodium. Results We describe the creation of two high quality, publicly available Gateway™ cDNA entry libraries and their derived Y2H libraries for Brachypodium. The first entry library represents cloned cDNA populations from both short day (SD, 8/16-h light/dark and long day (LD, 20/4-h light/dark grown plants, while the second library was generated from hormone treated tissues. Both libraries have extensive genome coverage (~5 × 107 primary clones each and average clone lengths of ~1.5 Kb. These entry libraries were then used to create two recombination-derived Y2H libraries. Initial proof-of-concept screens demonstrated that a protein with known interaction partners could readily re-isolate those partners, as well as novel interactors. Conclusions Accessible community resources are a hallmark of successful biological model systems. Brachypodium has the potential to be a broadly useful model system for the grasses, but still requires many of these resources. The Gateway™ compatible entry libraries created here will facilitate studies for multiple user

  4. A Submersible, Off-Axis Holographic Microscope for Detection of Microbial Motility and Morphology in Aqueous and Icy Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Lindensmith

    Full Text Available Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology's near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples taken directly from sea ice at several locations near Nuuk, Greenland. In all samples, the appearance and motility of eukaryotes were conclusive signs of life. The appearance of prokaryotic cells alone was not sufficient to confirm life, but when prokaryotic motility occurred, it was rapid and conclusive. Warming the samples to above-freezing temperatures or supplementing with serine increased the number of motile cells and the speed of motility; supplementing with serine also stimulated chemotaxis. These results show that DHM is a useful technique for detection of active organisms in extreme environments, and that motility may be used as a biosignature in the liquid brines that persist in ice. These findings have important implications for the design of missions to icy environments and suggest ways in which DHM imaging may be integrated with chemical life-detection suites in order to create more conclusive life detection packages.

  5. Effects of herbicides on two submersed aquatic macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus L. and Myriophyllum sibiricum Komarov, in a prairie wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D J; Martin, P A; Shaw, G G

    1997-01-01

    Clopyralid, picloram, 2,4-D and a mixture of 2,4-D plus picloram, (Tordon 202C) were added to the water of 1 m square enclosures in a prairie wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada to produce concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 mg active ingredient litre(-1). Effects on the submersed macrophytes, Potamogeton pectinatus and Myriophyllum sibiricum, were monitored by taking repeated measurements of plant weight, flower and tuber production and inspecting for injuries at 30 and 60 days after application. Clopyralid did not inhibit weight gain (growth) in either species, but stimulated growth and flowering by M. sibiricum at 0.01 mg litre(-1) and tuber production by P. pectinatus at both rates. The low rate of 2,4-D stimulated flowering by M. sibiricum and tuber production by P. pectinatus, whereas the high rate inhibited growth of M. sibiricum and injured both species. Picloram did not affect growth of either species, but injured M. sibiricum at both concentrations and inhibited flowering at 0.1 mg litre(-1). Tordon 202C at 0.1 mg litre(-1) caused reduced growth and flowering in M. sibiricum and injured both species; 0.01 mg litre(-1) also injured M. sibiricum. Mortality resulted only from Tordon 202C and 2,4-D. Field data are lacking to assess the extent to which submerged macrophytes in prairie ponds are exposed to harmful concentrations of herbicide from aerial spraying, drift from ground application, runoff or wind erosion of soil.

  6. Taxonomic research on deep-sea macrofauna in the South China Sea using the Chinese deep-sea submersible Jiaolong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinzheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper reviews the taxonomic and biodiversity studies of deep-sea invertebrates in the South China Sea based on the samples collected by the Chinese manned deep-sea submersible Jiaolong. To date, 6 new species have been described, including the sponges Lophophysema eversa, Saccocalyx microhexactin and Semperella jiaolongae as well as the crustaceans Uroptychus jiaolongae, Uroptychus spinulosus and Globospongicola jiaolongi; some newly recorded species from the South China Sea have also been reported. The Bathymodiolus platifrons-Shinkaia crosnieri deep-sea cold seep community has been reported by Li (2015), as has the mitochondrial genome of the glass sponge L. eversa by Zhang et al. (2016). The population structures of two dominant species, the shrimp Shinkaia crosnieri and the mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons, from the cold seep Bathymodiolus platifrons-Shinkaia crosnieri community in the South China Sea and the hydrothermal vents in the Okinawa Trough, were compared using molecular analysis. The systematic position of the shrimp genus Globospongicola was discussed based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. © 2017 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Creating Student Engagement Through Immersion: Exploring the MT6 Shipwreck in Puget Sound via Submersible, Using a Team Challenge Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarason, C. P.; Hartzler, R.; Anderson, A.

    2016-02-01

    Educational literature has many stories describing the "aha" moment that teachers are privileged to observe: a student who suddenly grasps a concept (ding!), dives into an activity (whee!) or works tirelessly to complete a complicated project (wow!). Designing moments like these for students can be one of the great joys of teaching. Experiencing such a moment can have a lasting impact on student engagement and motivation, and is the underlying rationale for the importance of creating a wide array of outreach efforts, from field work to telepresence activities.During the spring of 2015, OceanGate Foundation and Seattle Central College partnered on a pilot program to design a program that had this kind of impact and created the Open The Oceans Challenge. Student teams responded to our Request for Proposal (RFP), which was centered around the exploration of a shipwreck in 150 meters of water just off the Seattle waterfront, the MT-6. Students spent a significant amount of time crafting their proposals and reported that they enjoyed the process of writing the proposal as a team. The two winning teams accompanied us on a series of submersible dives performed by OceanGate, Inc. and worked up the results afterward. In addition to researching the MT-6 wreck and documenting what they found, students were able to do basic observational research on the wreck, providing sonar and photographic data that will help form the basis of future expeditions to this site.We report on lessons learned from this pilot — the impact for the small set of students involved in this project was profound, but how can we expand the reach of such activities? Results from this experience suggest that providing a highly engaging topic and expedition may not be enough to inspire an "aha" moment that creates lasting engagement; the scaffolding and mentorship that surrounds a rich experience is also critical.

  8. A simple and rapid method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in water with a submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC) was developed as a biosensor for in situ and real time monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) in environmental waters. Domestic wastewater was utilized as a sole fuel for powering the sensor. The sensor performance was firstly examined with tap water at varying DO levels. With an external resistance of 1000Ω, the current density produced by the sensor (5.6 ± 0.5-462.2 ± 0.5 mA/m(2)) increased linearly with DO level up to 8.8 ± 0.3mg/L (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.9912), while the maximum response time for each measurement was less than 4 min. The current density showed different response to DO levels when different external resistances were applied, but a linear relationship was always observed. Investigation of the sensor performance at different substrate concentrations indicates that the organic matter contained in the domestic wastewater was sufficient to power the sensing activities. The sensor ability was further explored under different environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity, and alternative electron acceptor), and the results indicated that a calibration would be required before field application. Lastly, the sensor was tested with different environmental waters and the results showed no significant difference (p>0.05) with that measured by DO meter. The simple, compact SBMFC sensor showed promising potential for direct, inexpensive and rapid DO monitoring in various environmental waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial and temporal relationships between the invasive snail Bithynia tentaculata and submersed aquatic vegetation in Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Alicia M.; DeJager, Nathan R.; Haro, Roger J.; Sandland, Greg J.

    2017-01-01

    Bithynia tentaculata is an invasive snail that was first reported in Lake Michigan in 1871 and has since spread throughout a number of freshwater systems of the USA. This invasion has been extremely problematic in the Upper Mississippi River as the snails serve as intermediate hosts for several trematode parasites that have been associated with waterfowl mortality in the region. This study was designed to assess the abundance and distribution of B. tentaculata relative to submersed aquatic vegetation as macrophytes provide important nesting and food resources for migrating waterfowl. Temporal changes in both vegetation and snail densities were compared between 2007 and 2015. Between these years, B. tentaculata densities have nearly quadrupled despite minor changes in vegetation abundance, distribution and composition. Understanding the spatial distribution of B. tentaculata in relation to other habitat features, including submersed vegetation, and quantifying any further changes in the abundance and distribution of B. tentaculata over time will be important for better identifying areas of risk for disease transmission to waterfowl.

  10. Functionality of the plastron in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: aspects of the integument coating and submersion laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Oliveira de Sousa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The plastron theory was tested in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, through the analysis of the structure that coats these insects' integument and also through submersion laboratorial experiments. The tegument processes were recognized in three types: agglutinated scales with large perforations, plumose scales of varied sizes and shapes, and hairs. The experiments were carried out on 264 adult individuals which were kept submerged at different time intervals (n = 11 and in two types of treatment, natural non-aerated water and previously boiled water, with four repetitions for each treatment. The tests showed a maximum mortality after 24 hours of immersion in the previously boiled water treatment. The survival of the adults was negative and significantly correlated with the types of treatment employed and within the different time intervals. The values of oxygen dissolved in water (mg/l differed significantly within the types of treatment employed. They were positively correlated with the survival of the adults in the two types of treatment, although more markedly in the treatment with previously boiled water. The mortality of adults after 24 hours of submersion in the treatment with previously boiled water may be associated with the physical-chemical conditions of the non-tested water in this study, such as low surface tension and concentration of solutes. These results suggest plastron functionality in the adults of this species.

  11. Software-In-the-Loop based Modeling and Simulation of Unmanned Semi-submersible Vehicle for Performance Verification of Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Jeong, Mijin; Kim, Dong Hun

    2017-12-01

    Since an unmanned semi-submersible is mainly used for the purpose of carrying out dangerous missions in the sea, it is possible to work in a region where it is difficult to access due to safety reasons. In this study, an USV hull design was determined using Myring hull profile, and reinforcement work was performed by designing and implementing inner stiffener member for 3D printing. In order to simulate a sea state 5.0 or more at sea, which is difficult to implement in practice, a regular and irregular wave equation was implemented in Matlab / Simulink. We performed modeling and simulation of semi - submersible simulation based on DMWorks considering the rolling motion in wave. To verify and improve unpredicted errors, we implemented a numeric and physical simulation model of the USV based on software-in-the-loop (SIL) method. This simulation allows shipbuilders to participate in new value-added markets such as engineering, procurement, construction, installation, commissioning, operation, and maintenance for the USV.

  12. Submersible Packaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    E Acetylene E,B Barium Sulfide B,E Acetylene Tetrabromide V,E Beer B Aerozine 50 E Benzaldehyde E Air (below 3000F) E,B Benzene V,F,K Air (above...per square inch per minute. 4.7.3.3 Test criterio . During the test, boots shall be observed for evidence of water leakage into the test enclosure or for

  13. Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) Collected from Hydrilla Verticillata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alpha- and ß-diversity values indicated that the chironomid communities on aquatic plants from Lake Bisina and Lake Tanganyika (Burundi) were markedly different. Studies of chironomids and other invertebrates associated with macrophytes in other African lakes will add significantly to knowledge of the natural history of ...

  14. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    plates and transferred to potato dextrose agar (PDA; Difco Inc., Detroit, Michigan) slants (test tubes placed at an angle during cooling to give a...species” was plated onto potato carrot agar (PCA; Dinghra and Sinclair 1985) and PDA and incubated at 25 °C under a grow light for 1 to 3 weeks to...are leaf, stem, and fruit pathogens of a variety of plants (Farr et al. 1989). Venturia inaequalis, for example, causes a serious disease of apples

  15. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Woolfolk. 2007. Microfungi from bark of healthy and damaged American beech, Fraser fir, and Eastern hemlock trees during an all taxa biodiversity ...Biocontrol Science and Technology 12:75-82. Charudattan, R. 2010. Microbial control of weeds. Symposium: Microbial biocontrol of arthropods, weeds and

  16. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ura, Tamaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takamasa, Tomoji [Tokyo Univ. of Mercantile Marine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  17. Internal Structure of the West Submarine Flanks of Mauna Loa and Hualalai, Hawaii Island: investigation of ROV KAIKO and Manned Submersible SHINKAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokose, H.

    2003-12-01

    Submersible-based exploration of basaltic rocks west flank of the Hawaii Island, mostly at 2000 to 5000 m depths, was a focus of Japan USA joint research during two cruises by the JAMSTEC in 2001-02. The observations from submersibles and samples recovered are summarized, based on the twelve recent submersible dives and numerous newly obtained samples from deep submarine flanks of Hualalai and Mauna Loa Topographic nature of the studied area are categorized using high-resolution bathymetric data obtained during the cruses and are very effective for deciphering the sequence of landslides. Because the west of Hawaii Island is lee side having a little rain, topographic characteristics of landslide deposits are preserved without buried by material of the later subaerial erosion process. Submarine geological map of the west flank of Hawaii Island has been revised on the basis of these investigations. Major difference between maps proposed previously and this work is twofold. The first is the submarine flank of this area consists mainly of pillow lavas. This is contrastive to the Nuuanu landslide and Hilina slump regions in which hyaloclastite and fragmental debris are dominated. The debris avalanche deposits are prevailing only in the lower submarine slope. The second is the sequence of landslide events. Base on the topographic and geologic investigations major landslide events can be redefined in the sequence from early to late: South Kona Slide 1(South Kona slump and Ka Lae west debris-avalanche), South Kona Slide 2 (South Kona slide), North Kona Slump (North Kona slide + Alika 1 debris-avalanche), Ka Lae slump (newly defined), Ka Lae debris-avalanche (Ka Lae East debris-avalanche), Alika debris-avalanche (Alika 2 debris-avalanche). It is concluded that these slope failures were probably result in the rift propagation rather than instability of the slope itself which made of unstable fragmental lavas. Therefore, the pillow lava model is more suitable for present case

  18. Effect of Difference-frequency Forces on the Dynamics of a Semi-submersible Type FVAWT in Misaligned Wave-wind Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Cheng, Zhengshun; Moan, Torgeir

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interests in the development of offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines (FVAWTs), a large amount of studies on the FVAWTs have been conducted. This paper focuses on evaluating the effect of second-order difference-frequency force on the dynamics of a 5 MW FVAWT in misaligned......-induced. And the second order differencefrequency force can contribute to a slightly larger mean value. The standard deviations and maximum values of the global responses are slightly more sensitive to the wave-wind misalignment and the second order difference-frequency force, especially at high significant wave height...... wave-wind condition. The studied FVAWT is composed of a 5 MW Darrieus rotor, a semi-submersible floater and a catenary mooring system. Fully coupled nonlinear time domain simulations were conducted using the state-of-art code Simo- Riflex-DMS. Several misaligned wave-wind conditions were selected...

  19. The characterization of axenic culture systems suitable for plant propagation and experimental studies of the submersed aquatic angiosperm Potamogeton pectinatus (Sago pondweed)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailstock, M.S.; Fleming, W.J.; Cooke, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    Clonal lines of the submersed aquatic angiosperm Potamogeton pectinatus were grown in three culture systems. The first, which used sucrose as a carbon source in a liquid medium, supported vigorous vegetative growth and can be used to propagate large numbers of plants in axenic conditions. In this culture system, plants were responsive to increasing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) photon flux density (PFD) and were photosynthetically competent. However, their growth was heterotrophic and root development was poor. When these plants were transferred to a second nonaxenic culture system, which used 16-l buckets containing artificial sediments and tap water, growth was autotrophic and plants were morphologically identical to field-harvested P. pectinatus. The last culture system which consisted of a sand substrate and inorganic nutrient bathing solution aerated with 135 ml min-1 ambient air enhanced to 3.0% CO2 was axenic and supported autotrophic growth by plants that were also morphologically normal.

  20. Electricity generation and microbial community in response to short-term changes in stack connection of self-stacked submersible microbial fuel cell powered by glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Stack connection (i.e., in series or parallel) of microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an efficient way to boost the power output for practical application. However, there is little information available on short-term changes in stack connection and its effect on the electricity generation and microbial...... community. In this study, a self-stacked submersible microbial fuel cell (SSMFC) powered by glycerol was tested to elucidate this important issue. In series connection, the maximum voltage output reached to 1.15 V, while maximum current density was 5.73 mA in parallel. In both connections, the maximum power...... density increased with the initial glycerol concentration. However, the glycerol degradation was even faster in parallel connection. When the SSMFC was shifted from series to parallel connection, the reactor reached to a stable power output without any lag phase. Meanwhile, the anodic microbial community...

  1. Effect of Difference-frequency Forces on the Dynamics of a Semi-submersible Type FVAWT in Misaligned Wave-wind Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Cheng, Zhengshun; Moan, Torgeir

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interests in the development of offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines (FVAWTs), a large amount of studies on the FVAWTs have been conducted. This paper focuses on evaluating the effect of second-order difference-frequency force on the dynamics of a 5 MW FVAWT in misaligned...... wave-wind condition. The studied FVAWT is composed of a 5 MW Darrieus rotor, a semi-submersible floater and a catenary mooring system. Fully coupled nonlinear time domain simulations were conducted using the state-of-art code Simo- Riflex-DMS. Several misaligned wave-wind conditions were selected...... to investigate the global dynamic responses of the FVAWT, such as the platform motions, structural responses and mooring line tensions. It has been found that the wave-wind misalignment does not significantly affect the mean values of the global responses since the global responses are primarily wind...

  2. Functionality of the plastron in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae): aspects of the integument coating and submersion laboratory experiments Funcionalidade do plastrão em adultos de Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae): aspectos do revestimento tegumentar e experimentos laboratoriais de submersão

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wesley Oliveira de Sousa; Germano Henrique Rosado-Neto; Marinêz Isaac Marques

    2012-01-01

    The plastron theory was tested in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, through the analysis of the structure that coats these insects' integument and also through submersion laboratorial experiments...

  3. Editorial: Rich geo- and bio-diversities exist in the South West Atlantic deep-sea: The first human-occupied submersible Shinkai 6500 dive cruise (Iatá-piúna)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazato, Hiroshi; Fujikura, Katsunori; Sumida, Paulo G. Y.; Pellizari, Vivian H.; Perez, Jose Angel

    2017-12-01

    The deep sea comprises a series of extreme environments, characterized by low temperatures, high hydraulic pressure, the virtual absence of sunlight, and the scarcity of organic nutrients. High hydraulic pressure prevents human access to these environments without using human-occupied submersibles (HOVs), landers or other instruments. Unlike the extreme outer space environments, visited by hundreds of astronauts, only three humans have accessed to the deepest point of the planet.

  4. Journal of East African Natural History - Vol 101, No 1 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from Hydrilla Verticillata (Hydrocharitaceae) and other submersed aquatic Macrophytes in Lake Bisina and other Ugandan Lakes · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Robert S Copeland, Brian Gidudu, Fred Wanda, John H Epler, James P Cuda, William A Overholt.

  5. Generic phylogeny, historical biogeography and character evolution of the cosmopolitan aquatic plant family Hydrocharitaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocharitaceae is a fully aquatic monocot family, consists of 18 genera with approximately 120 species. The family includes both fresh and marine aquatics and exhibits great diversity in form and habit including annual and perennial life histories; submersed, partially submersed and floating leaf habits and linear to orbicular leaf shapes. The family has a cosmopolitan distribution and is well represented in the Tertiary fossil record in Europe. At present, the historical biogeography of the family is not well understood and the generic relationships remain controversial. In this study we investigated the phylogeny and biogeography of Hydrocharitaceae by integrating fossils and DNA sequences from eight genes. We also conducted ancestral state reconstruction for three morphological characters. Results Phylogenetic analyses produced a phylogeny with most branches strongly supported by bootstrap values greater than 95 and Bayesian posterior probability values of 1.0. Stratiotes is the first diverging lineage with the remaining genera in two clades, one clade consists of Lagarosiphon, Ottelia, Blyxa, Apalanthe, Elodea and Egeria; and the other consists of Hydrocharis-Limnobium, Thalassia, Enhalus, Halophila, Najas, Hydrilla, Vallisneria, Nechamandra and Maidenia. Biogeographic analyses (DIVA, Mesquite) and divergence time estimates (BEAST) resolved the most recent common ancestor of Hydrocharitaceae as being in Asia during the Late Cretaceous and Palaeocene (54.7-72.6 Ma). Dispersals (including long-distance dispersal and migrations through Tethys seaway and land bridges) probably played major roles in the intercontinental distribution of this family. Ancestral state reconstruction suggested that in Hydrocharitaceae evolution of dioecy is bidirectional, viz., from dioecy to hermaphroditism, and from hermaphroditism to dioecy, and that the aerial-submerged leaf habit and short-linear leaf shape are the ancestral states. Conclusions Our study has shed light

  6. Optimation Pressure Loss to Oil Production System with Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) at the Well A SW Field Bojonegoro, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmah, A. M.; Hendrajaya, L.

    2017-07-01

    Study about oil and gas well A and SW fields have been conducted in Bojonegoro area, East Java Province. From the research, it is known that one of the constrain in oil and gas production process is a pressure drop, so that is necessary to set Electrical Submersible Pump (ESP) as an artificial lift pump at low pressure wells. It is needed to analyze the production well pressure as an effort to optimize the fluid production. It is in describe to relations between IPR (Inflow Performance Relationship ) curve with TPR (Tubing Performance Relationship), are getting down point cut TPR curve with IPR curve, fluid rate its optimal, so need tubing’s diameter variation and the number of stage pump ESP variation to can the most optimal fluid rate. Produced that to tubing variation are 2,441 ID is 876,729 bpd, 2,991 is 961,197 bpd, 3,476 id is 996, 26 Bpd, while on the number of stage pump esp variation The most high is stage 400 with fluid rate 961,197 by comparison stage 338 it has value fluid rate 921,165 bpd, stage 200 it has fluid rate 827,889 bpd, and stage 169 has fluid rate 774,646 bpd. Of some variation tubing and stage pumps that has the most influence to fluid rate optimalize is the change number of stage pump.

  7. Limiting values of radionuclide intake and air concentration and dose conversion factors for inhalation, submersion, and ingestion: Federal guidance report No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Wolbarst, A.B.; Richardson, A.C.B.

    1988-09-01

    Radiation protection programs for workers are based, in the United States, on a hierarchy of limitations stemming from Federal guidance approved by the President. This guidance, which consists of principles, policies, and numerical primary guides, is used by Federal agencies as the basis for developing and implementing their own regulatory standards. The primary guides are usually expressed in terms of limiting doses to workers. The protection of workers against taking radioactive materials into the body, however, is accomplished largely through the use of regulations based on derived guides expressed in terms of quantities or concentrations of radionuclides. The values of these derived guides are chosen so as to assure that workers in work environments that conform to them are unlikely to receive radiation doses that exceed the primary guides. The purpose of the present report is to set forth derived guides that are consistent with current Federal radiation protection guidance. They are intended to serve as the basis for regulations setting upper bounds on the inhalation and ingestion of, and submersion in, radioactive materials in the workplace. The report also includes tables of exposure-to-dose conversion factors, for general use in assessing average individual committed doses in any population that is adequately characterized by Reference Man. 38 refs.

  8. Electricity generation and microbial community in response to short-term changes in stack connection of self-stacked submersible microbial fuel cell powered by glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-02-01

    Stack connection (i.e., in series or parallel) of microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an efficient way to boost the power output for practical application. However, there is little information available on short-term changes in stack connection and its effect on the electricity generation and microbial community. In this study, a self-stacked submersible microbial fuel cell (SSMFC) powered by glycerol was tested to elucidate this important issue. In series connection, the maximum voltage output reached to 1.15 V, while maximum current density was 5.73 mA in parallel. In both connections, the maximum power density increased with the initial glycerol concentration. However, the glycerol degradation was even faster in parallel connection. When the SSMFC was shifted from series to parallel connection, the reactor reached to a stable power output without any lag phase. Meanwhile, the anodic microbial community compositions were nearly stable. Comparatively, after changing parallel to series connection, there was a lag period for the system to get stable again and the microbial community compositions became greatly different. This study is the first attempt to elucidate the influence of short-term changes in connection on the performance of MFC stack, and could provide insight to the practical utilization of MFC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In situ particle characterization and evidence of ubiquitous particle orientation in the ocean using a submersible holographic imaging system (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Aditya R.; McFarland, Malcolm N.; Stockley, Nicole D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Sullivan, James M.

    2017-05-01

    Field experiments with the goal of characterizing aquatic particle properties, including size distributions and orientations in their natural environment, were conducted using a submersible holographic imaging system (HOLOCAM). Digital holography is a non-intrusive technique that allows particle fields to be mapped within a 3-D sampling volume at high resolution. The HOLOCAM was deployed at East Sound, a fjord in the US Pacific Northwest, and Lake Erie over three separate deployments from 2013 to 2015. A database of more than a million particles in the 100-10000 µm size range of varying shape and orientation was created after processing holograms. Furthermore, simultaneous, co-located acoustic Doppler velocimeter measurements of small-scale shear and turbulence structure were used to study the effects of the ambient flow field on particle orientation. Several interesting features presented themselves, with a Microcystis bloom dominating the surface layer of Lake Erie, while `thin layers' of high particle concentrations dominated by colonial diatoms were seen in East Sound. Particle size distribution (PSD) slopes in the 50-250 µm size range were 1.7-1.9, while for particles optics as random particle orientation is inherently assumed in theory and models. Preferential alignment can increase/decrease optical properties such as backscattering and attenuation relative to random distributions.

  10. Pilot-scale submersed cultivation of R. microsporus var. oligosporus in thin stillage, a dry-grind corn-to-ethanol co-product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Daniel Thomas

    An innovative process to add value to a corn-to-ethanol co-product, Thin stillage, was studied for pilot-scale viability. A 1500L bioreactor was designed, operated, and optimized to cultivate Rhizopus microsporus var. oligosporus via submersed fermentation in Thin Stillage. The biomass was harvested and processed into a feed suitable for storage and ultimately for animal feeding trials. Characterization of the biomass and feed trials revealed that there is substantial potential as a nutrient dense feed supplement with 41.1% protein, 26.3% fat, and metabolizable energy on s dried basis. The amino acid profile is superior to that of DDGS, with most notably 1.7% Lys on dried basis. This process produces a significantly more nutrient dense product than DDGS, and could increase water-reclaimation in a dry-grind corn to ethanol plant. Industrially it would replace the energy intensive process of converting thin stillage into syrup that adds only $10-25/ton to DDG, while maintaining production of DDG. Using thin stillage as used a growth media for R. microsporus var. oligosporus, should not only lead to saving in energy costs, but also generate a high-value co-product which could lead to economic gains. Also there is still unexplored potential of enzymes, chitin, and co-culturing to further add value.

  11. Directionality Effects of Aligned Wind and Wave Loads on a Y-Shape Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine under Rated Operational Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtao Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Y-shape (triangular semi-submersible foundation has been adopted by most of the built full-scale floating wind turbines, such as Windfloat, Fukushima Mirai and Shimpuu. Considering the non-fully-symmetrical shape and met-ocean condition, the foundation laying angle relative to wind/wave directions will not only influence the downtime and power efficiency of the floating turbine, but also the strength and fatigue safety of the whole structure. However, the dynamic responses induced by various aligned wind and wave load directions have scarcely been investigated comparatively before. In our study, the directionality effects are investigated by means of combined wind and wave tests and coupled multi-body simulations. By comparing the measured data in three load directions, it is found that the differences of platform motions are mainly derived from the wave loads and larger pitch motion can always be observed in one of the directions. To make certain the mechanism underlying the observed phenomena, a coupled multi-body dynamic model of the floating wind turbine is established and validated. The numerical results demonstrate that the second-order hydrodynamic forces contribute greatly to the directionality distinctions for surge and pitch, and the first-order hydrodynamic forces determine the variations of tower base bending moments and nacelle accelerations. These findings indicate the directionality effects should be predetermined comprehensively before installation at sea, which is important for the operation and maintenance of the Y-shape floating wind turbines.

  12. Vertical zonality of septal nectaries of Monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аnastasiya Odintsova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the septal nectary as a system of exogenous cavities inside the ovary and taking account of possibilities of various ways of the formation of nectary walls we propose to apply the concept of vertical zonality to the analysis of the septal nectary structure. The comparative analysis of the gynoecium with septal nectaries must include data about the nectary vertical zones and its location in the structural zones of the gynoecium.

  13. Submersible UV-Vis spectroscopy for quantifying streamwater organic carbon dynamics: implementation and challenges before and after forest harvest in a headwater stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollymore, Ashlee; Johnson, Mark S; Hawthorne, Iain

    2012-01-01

    Organic material, including total and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), is ubiquitous within aquatic ecosystems, playing a variety of important and diverse biogeochemical and ecological roles. Determining how land-use changes affect DOC concentrations and bioavailability within aquatic ecosystems is an important means of evaluating the effects on ecological productivity and biogeochemical cycling. This paper presents a methodology case study looking at the deployment of a submersible UV-Vis absorbance spectrophotometer (UV-Vis spectro::lyzer model, s::can, Vienna, Austria) to determine stream organic carbon dynamics within a headwater catchment located near Campbell River (British Columbia, Canada). Field-based absorbance measurements of DOC were made before and after forest harvest, highlighting the advantages of high temporal resolution compared to traditional grab sampling and laboratory measurements. Details of remote deployment are described. High-frequency DOC data is explored by resampling the 30 min time series with a range of resampling time intervals (from daily to weekly time steps). DOC export was calculated for three months from the post-harvest data and resampled time series, showing that sampling frequency has a profound effect on total DOC export. DOC exports derived from weekly measurements were found to underestimate export by as much as 30% compared to DOC export calculated from high-frequency data. Additionally, the importance of the ability to remotely monitor the system through a recently deployed wireless connection is emphasized by examining causes of prior data losses, and how such losses may be prevented through the ability to react when environmental or power disturbances cause system interruption and data loss.

  14. Submersible UV-Vis Spectroscopy for Quantifying Streamwater Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implementation and Challenges before and after Forest Harvest in a Headwater Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Hawthorne

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic material, including total and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, is ubiquitous within aquatic ecosystems, playing a variety of important and diverse biogeochemical and ecological roles. Determining how land-use changes affect DOC concentrations and bioavailability within aquatic ecosystems is an important means of evaluating the effects on ecological productivity and biogeochemical cycling. This paper presents a methodology case study looking at the deployment of a submersible UV-Vis absorbance spectrophotometer (UV-Vis spectro::lyzer model, s::can, Vienna, Austria to determine stream organic carbon dynamics within a headwater catchment located near Campbell River (British Columbia, Canada. Field-based absorbance measurements of DOC were made before and after forest harvest, highlighting the advantages of high temporal resolution compared to traditional grab sampling and laboratory measurements. Details of remote deployment are described. High-frequency DOC data is explored by resampling the 30 min time series with a range of resampling time intervals (from daily to weekly time steps. DOC export was calculated for three months from the post-harvest data and resampled time series, showing that sampling frequency has a profound effect on total DOC export. DOC exports derived from weekly measurements were found to underestimate export by as much as 30% compared to DOC export calculated from high-frequency data. Additionally, the importance of the ability to remotely monitor the system through a recently deployed wireless connection is emphasized by examining causes of prior data losses, and how such losses may be prevented through the ability to react when environmental or power disturbances cause system interruption and data loss.

  15. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Ammonium, microcystins, and hypoxia of blooms in eutrophic water cause oxidative stress and C-N imbalance in submersed and floating-leaved aquatic plants in Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Zhengqi; Xu, Jun; Liu, Yaqin; Ni, Leyi; Cao, Te; Xie, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The heavy bloom of cyanobacteria is a disastrous consequence of freshwater eutrophication, and the bloom is highly toxic due to its secondary metabolites called microcystins (MCs). The release of organic substances from dense blooms causes an increase in NH4+ and decrease in oxygen in lake water. In the present study, the dynamics of physio-biochemical responses of five aquatic macrophytes to MCs and NH4+ stresses in Meiliang Bay were evaluated. The bay is one of the most seriously eutrophized areas dominated by the toxic cyanobacteria of Lake Taihu, China. The results demonstrate that aquatic macrophytes in Meiliang Bay are subjected to successive external stresses. From January to May, they are subjected to high NH4+ stress (>0.56 mg L(-1)), whereas from June to September or during dense blooms, the macrophytes experience both MC proliferation and moderate NH4+ toxicity (>0.3 mg L(-1)). In August, high NH4+ stress occurs along with hypoxia stress, whereas from September to December, the macrophytes experience moderate NH4+ stress, causing a serious imbalance in C-N metabolism and oxidative stress. Between the two aquatic plant life forms, floating-leaved plants are more resistant to the stresses of eutrophication than are submersed plants. Elevated MCs in the water column can aggravate oxidative stress and suppress the soluble protein contents of aquatic plants. High NH4+ in the water causes severe C and N imbalance in submersed macrophytes because of considerable carbon consumption for free amino acid synthesis. The superoxide dismutase activities of submersed macrophytes are suppressed by low light penetrating the eutrophic water, which might impair the antioxidative function of the plants. The findings of this study provide mainly field evidence that reveals the physical, chemical, and biological stresses on aquatic plants in bloom-prevailed eutrophic lakes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological and Physical Forcing of Picophytoplankton on the New England Shelf: New Insights From Submersible Flow Cytometry at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosik, H. M.; Lentz, S. J.; Olson, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Phytoplankton communities of temperate continental shelf systems typically exhibit dramatic seasonal variations. We are taking advantage of the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), a cabled facility on the New England inner shelf, to better understand the physical and biological processes that interact to produce this variability. Our approach depends on high resolution (~hourly) multi-year time series of taxonomically resolved phytoplankton acquired with FlowCytobot and Imaging FlowCytobot, custom-built automated submersible flow cytometers optimized for measurement of picophytoplankton and microphytoplankton, respectively. These observational capabilities enable new approaches to understanding classical problems in plankton ecology. Our time series document a seasonal shift from microphytoplankton (especially large, often chain-forming diatoms) in fall and winter to pico- and small nanophytoplankton in spring and summer. The shift is associated not only with a decline in large cell abundance but also with a dramatic increase (100- to 1000- fold) in small cells. This seasonal pattern reflects a regional-scale phenomenon that emerges despite affects of advection and spatial patchiness. To begin quantifying the factors that produce these seasonal patterns, we have focused first on the cyanobacterial genus, Synechococcus, the numerically dominant picoplankter in this coastal system. In contrast to prevailing views in picoplankton ecology, the annual Synechococcus bloom in this system suggests a persistent decoupling from grazer control in spring. Synechococcus population growth rates, determined from diel changes in cell size distributions, show strong seasonal variability associated with physiological consequences of environmental conditions. Low growth rates are linked to temperature limitation in winter/early spring and a combination of temperature and light limitation in fall associated with decreasing solar angles, seasonal cooling, and breakdown in

  18. Mechanical Harvesting of Aquatic Plants. Report 2. Evaluation of Selected Handling Functions of Mechanical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Test site locations 12 0 a ’-4 0 C𔃾 13 rI a. Topped out hydrilla north of Bonnet Lake (August 1977) b. Topped out hydrilla north of Highway 48 bridge...Towing test in submersed aquatics 25 cut in Bonnet Lake (see Figure 9). The pushing rake mounted on a flat-bottom boat was used in the tests (Figure 11...Laboratory Technical Publications, a facsimile catalog card in Library of Congress MARC format is reproduced below. Smith, Perry A Mechanical harvesting of

  19. The Semi-Submersible Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No . 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information...LA VIOLENCIA ” AND GUERRILLAS ...................................................16 D. THE BEGINNING OF THE FARC...How to Win,” Air and Space Power Journal XXIV, no . 2 AFRP 10-1 (Summer 2010) http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj10/sum10

  20. Eficácia do diquat no controle de Hydrilla verticillata, Egeria densa e Egeria najas e toxicidade aguda para o Guaru (Phallocerus caudimaculatus, em condições de laboratório Efficacy of diquat in the control of Hydrylla verticillata, Egeria densa and Egeria najas and its acute toxicity to Phallocerus caudimaculatus, under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.P. Henares

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, as macrófitas aquáticas submersas, Egeria densa e Egeria najas, têm causado prejuízos aos usos múltiplos da água. Hydrilla verticillata foi recentemente introduzida, mas tem histórico como planta problemática nos EUA, no México e na Austrália. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as suscetibilidades relativas dessas três macrófitas aquáticas ao diquat e os riscos da utilização desse herbicida para o guaru (Phallocerus caudimaculatus. Para isso, foram instalados ensaios em condições de laboratório, a fim de avaliar a suscetibilidade relativa das três macrófitas por meio da manutenção de ponteiros dessas plantas em soluções contendo 0,0; 0,2; 0,4; 0,8; e 1,6 mg L-1 de diquat (Reward® por 14 dias. A avaliação foi realizada pela variação do acúmulo de matéria fresca e do comprimento dos ponteiros no período de exposição ao herbicida. H. verticillata mostrou maior sensibilidade ao diquat em comparação com as duas macrófitas do gênero Egeria, mesmo em baixas concentrações do herbicida. Nas maiores concentrações, E. densa mostrou maior sensibilidade que E. najas. O risco da aplicação do diquat para P. caudimaculatus foi estimado pela toxicidade aguda. Alevinos de P. caudimaculatus de 0,4 ± 0,2 mg foram expostos a soluções de 0,0; 1,0; 5,0; 10,0; 15,0; 20,0; 25,0; e 30,0 mg L-1 de diquat. A concentração letal de 50% (CL(I (50;96h do diquat estimada para P. caudimaculatus foi de 7,17 mg L-1. Para P. caudimaculatus, a toxicidade aguda foi superior à concentração recomendada para o controle de macrófitas aquáticas submersas, indicando risco muito baixo para esse peixe.In Brazil, the submerged plants Egeria densa and Egeria najas have caused damage to multiple uses of water. Hydrilla verticillata has been recently introduced, but it has a history as a problem plant in the U.S., Mexico and Australia. The objectives of this work were to assess the relative susceptibilities of these three

  1. Long-term Simulation Study about the Impact of submerse Macrophytes on thermal Stratification Dynamics and Transport Processes in an extreme shallow water lake - Lake Federsee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Thomas; Pöschke, Franziska; Pflugbeil, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    temperature profiles shows that the lake nevertheless very shallow undergoes periods of distinct and stable thermal stratification which can last up to 10 days giving the right meteorological conditions (calm and warm). The overall vertical temperature gradients are in general stronger in "warm" years than in "cold" years. Furthermore we find most pronounced vertical temperature gradients during summer time whereas during months with smaller positive heat exchange temperature gradients are not as strong. Additionally the influence of the submerse macrophyte population on both - general circulation processes and the vertical mixing processes in the lake - are discussed. It is shown by numerical simulation studies that both - circulation pattern and mixing processes - are influenced severely by macrophytes in the lake slowing down the 3-dim flow field and decreasing vertical mixing processes leading to more and more pronounced stable stratified conditions in the lake.

  2. Surveys for Pathogens of Monoecious Hydrilla in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    were Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Trichoderma harzianum, Pestalotiopsis guepinii, Microsphaeropsis olivacea , Phoma nebulosa, and Phoma leveillei. All...Alternaria alternata x x x Gliocladium sp. x Curvularia lunata x Aposphaeria pulviscula x Microsphaeropsis olivacea x x x... olivacea , Plectosphaerella cucumerina, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, C. cladosporoides, Trichoderma harzianum, Phoma nebulosa, and Emericellopsis

  3. Eficiência de fluridone no controle de plantas aquáticas submersas no reservatório de Jupiá Fluridone efficacy for control of submersed aquatic weeds in the Jupiá reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.S. Marcondes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eficiência do herbicida fluridone no controle de plantas aquáticas submersas (Egeria densa, Egeria najas e Ceratophyllum demersum que ocorrem no reservatório da Usina Hidrelétrica Eng. Souza Dias (Jupiá, região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo. A pesquisa, que consistiu de aplicações de fluridone, foi conduzida em lagoas marginais do rio Tietê, denominadas Flórida e Barrenta. As lagoas foram divididas em faixas, cada uma delas representando um tratamento. As faixas das lagoas receberam uma aplicação inicial de fluridone, procurando-se atingir a concentração de 20 ppb. As aplicações subseqüentes foram dimensionadas para recompor e/ou manter esta concentração, sendo realizadas sempre com o auxílio de uma barra de aplicação munida de três mangueiras, com pontas injetoras submersas na água, em três profundidades (0,2, 0,6 e 1,2 m. O volume de aplicação foi mantido próximo a 54 l ha-1 de calda. Foram feitas avaliações visuais dos sintomas de fitointoxicação nas três espécies estudadas, assim como avaliação da biomassa. Nas condições da pesquisa, o fluridone controlou as macrófitas submersas Egeria najas e Egeria densa; quando cessou o efeito do fluridone, aconteceu a reinfestação de Egeria densa e Egeria najas; e não houve controle de Ceratophyllum demersum nem das espécies não-alvo, como Salvinia auriculata, Ipomoea spp., Merremia sp., Typha latifolia e Cyperus spp.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the herbicide fluridone on the control of submersed aquatic weeds (Egeria densa Planch., Egeria najas Planch. and Ceratophyllum demersum, the major aquatic weeds in the reservoir of Engº Souza Dias (Jupiá Hydroelecric Power Plant, Itapura, São Paulo. The experiment, consisted of fluridone applications and was carried out in bays of the Tietê River, called Flórida and Barrenta. The lakes were divided into zones, each considered a treatment. All

  4. How Efficient are Agitators in Biogas Digesters? Determination of the Efficiency of Submersible Motor Mixers and Incline Agitators by Measuring Nutrient Distribution in Full-Scale Agricultural Biogas Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lemmer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of two different agitation systems by measuring the nutrient distribution in a digester fed with renewable energy crops and animal manure. The study was carried out at the practical research biogas plant of Hohenheim University. A unique probe sampling system has been developed that allows probe sampling from the top of the concrete roof into different parts and heights of the digester. The samples were then analyzed in the laboratory for natural fatty acids concentrations. Three different agitation setups were chosen for evaluation at continuous stirring and feeding procedures. The results showed that the analysis approach for agitator optimization through direct measurement of the nutrients distribution in the digester is promising. The type of the agitators and the agitation regime showed significant differences on local concentrations of organic acids, which are not correlated to the dry matter content. Simultaneous measurements on electric energy consumption of the different agitator types verify that by using the slow-moving incline agitator with large propeller diameters in favor of the fast-moving submersible mixer with smaller propeller diameters, the savings potential rises up to 70% by maintaining the mixing quality.

  5. Utilization of computational simulator for comparison of correlations in multiphase flow in ESP (Electrical Submersible Pumping) systems; Utilizacao de simulador computacional para a comparacao das correlacoes de escoamento multifasico em sistemas BCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, Roselaine M. dos; Maitelli, Carla Wilza S.P.; Maitelli, Andre L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Costa, Rutacio O. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Electrical Submersible Pumping (ESP) is an artificial lifting method which can be used both onshore and offshore for the production of high flow rates of liquid. By using the computational simulator for systems ESP developed by the AUTOPOC/LAUT - UFRN, this work aimed to evaluate empirical correlations for calculation of multiphase flow in tubing typical of artificial lifting systems operating by ESP. The parameters used for evaluating the correlations are some of the dynamic variables of the system such as head that indicates the lifting capacity of the system, the flow rate of fluid in the pump and the discharge pressure at the pump. Five (5) correlations were evaluated, from which only one considered slipping between phases, but does not take into account flow patterns and, four others considering slipping between the phases as well the flow patterns. The simulation results obtained for all these correlations were compared to results from a commercial computational simulator, extensively used in the oil industry. For both simulators, input values and simulation time, were virtually the same. The results showed that the simulator used in this work showed satisfactory performance, since no significant differences from those obtained with the commercial simulator. (author)

  6. Long-term global response analysis of a vertical axis wind turbine supported on a semi-submersible floating platform: Comparison between operating and non-operating wind turbine load cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collu, Maurizio; Manuel, Lance; Borg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study continues [1] the examination of the long-term global response of a floating vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) situated off the Portuguese coast in the Atlantic Ocean. The VAWT, which consists of a 5-MW 3-bladed H-type rotor developed as part of the EU-FP7 H2OCEAN project, is assumed...... to be mounted on the OC4 semi-submersible floating platform. Adding a non-operational load case (wind speed 35m/s), the sea states identified are used to carry out coupled dynamics simulations using the FloVAWT design tool, for which an improved wave elevation and relative force/moment time signals approach...... is adopted, as well as also taking into account the drag generated by the wind turbine tower. Short-term turbine load and platform motion statistics are established for individual sea states that are analysed. The long-term reliability yields estimates of 50-year loads and platform motions that takes...

  7. Relationship of weed shiner and young-of-year bluegill and largemouth bass abundance to submersed aquatic vegetation in Navigation Pools 4, 8, and 13 of the Upper Mississippi River, 1998-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLain, Steven A.; Popp, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation provides food resources and shelter for many species of fish. This study found a significant relationship between increases in submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) in four study reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) and increases in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) of weed shiners (Notropis texanus) and age-0 bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) when all of the study reaches were treated collectively using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) vegetation and fish data for 1998–2012. The selected fishes were more abundant in study reaches with higher SAV frequencies (Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4) and less abundant in reaches with lower SAV frequencies (Pool 13 and Upper Pool 4). When each study reach was examined independently, the relationship between SAV frequency and CPUE of the three species was not significant in most cases, the primary exception being weed shiners in Lower Pool 4. Results of this study indicate that the prevalence of SAV does affect relative abundance of these vegetation-associated fish species. However, the poor annual relationship between SAV frequency and age-0 relative abundance in individual study reaches indicates that several other factors also govern age-0 abundance. The data indicate that there may be a SAV frequency threshold in backwaters above which there is not a strong relationship with abundance of these fish species. This is indicated by the high annual CPUE variability of the three selected fishes in backwaters of Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4 when SAV exceeded certain frequencies.

  8. Eficiência de fluridone no controle de plantas aquáticas submersas e efeitos sobre algumas características ambientais Fluridone efficacy in controling submersed aquatic weeds and its effects on some environmental characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.S. Marcondes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a eficiência do herbicida fluridone no controle de plantas aquáticas submersas (Egeria densa, Egeria najas e Ceratophyllum demersum, assim como seus efeitos sobre algumas características ambientais. A pesquisa foi conduzida no reservatório da Usina Hidrelétrica Eng. Souza Dias (Jupiá, região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, em uma reentrância denominada lagoa Vírgula. A lagoa foi dividida em nove faixas e seis delas receberam uma aplicação inicial de fluridone para se obter uma concentração de 20 ppb. As aplicações subseqüentes foram dimensionadas para recompor esta concentração. Para o estudo do carreamento do herbicida pelo fluxo de água, foi efetuado o monitoramento das suas concentrações nas nove faixas da lagoa (com e sem aplicação e em áreas a jusante e a montante. Foram analisados os efeitos do fluridone sobre características ambientais como: turbidez, temperatura da água, condutividade elétrica, concentração de oxigênio, pH e resíduos de fluridone. A eficácia do controle foi avaliada visualmente (pelos sintomas de fitointoxicação nas três espécies estudadas e pela amostragem de biomassa. Observou-se que o fluridone controlou de forma satisfatória E. najas e E. densa. Quando cessou o efeito do fluridone, aconteceu a reinfestação de E. densa e E. najas. Não houve controle de C. demersum. O fluridone não produziu efeitos adversos sobre as características de qualidade ambiental estudadas.This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the herbicide fluridone to control submersed aquatic weeds (Egeria densa, Egeria najas and Ceratophyllum demersum, as well as its effects on some environmental characteristics. The research was carried out in the reservoir of Eng. Souza Dias (Jupiá Hydro-elecric plant power, Station in northwestern São Paulo, Brazil, in Lagoa Vírgula bay. The bay was divided in nine zones and six of them received an initial application of fluridone

  9. Influência da imersão em água na resistência mecânica de misturas solo-grits compactadas e curadas com vistas a aplicações em estradas florestais Influence of water submersion on the mechanical strength of compacted and cured soil-grits mixtures for forest roads applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Sérgio Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova sobre a resistência mecânica de misturas solo-grits. Trabalhou-se com dois solos da cidade de Viçosa, localizada na Zona da Mata Norte de Minas Gerais, Brasil, respectivamente de texturas predominantemente argilosa e arenosa e com o resíduo sólido industrial grits, um subproduto da indústria de celulose. Determinaram-se os parâmetros de resistência mecânica California Bearing Ratio (CBR e Resistência à Compressão Não-Confinada (RCNC de corpos-de-prova compactados nas energias de compactação referentes aos ensaios Proctor intermediário e Proctor modificado, com teores de grits na faixa de 4 a 28% e períodos de cura de 0, 7 e 28 dias. Com relação ao parâmetro CBR, os ensaios foram realizados segundo a metodologia tradicional (imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova por 96 horas e sem a imersão em água, visando determinar possíveis perdas na capacidade-suporte das misturas. No que tange ao parâmetro compressão não-confinada, os ensaios foram realizados em obediência à norma brasileira para misturas solo-cimento (imersão em água durante quatro horas antes da ruptura dos corpos-de-prova e sem a fase de imersão em água. Os resultados indicaram que a imersão em água dos corpos-de-prova influenciou significativamente a resistência mecânica das misturas solo-grits, que foram dependentes do tipo de ensaio empregado, tipo de solo, teor de grits, energia de compactação e período de cura.This paper address the influence of water submersion on mechanical strength parameters of soil-grits specimens. Two residual soils, predominantly clayey and sandy soils from the city of Viçosa, located in the State of Minas Gerais, "Zona da Mata Norte", Brazil, and waste from cellulose industry were used in the study. The laboratory testing program consisted of CBR (California Bearing Ratio and UCS (Unconfined Compression Strength of specimens prepared with waste contents

  10. Biosynthesis, elicitation and roles of monocot terpenoid phytoalexins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A long standing goal in plant defense research is to optimize the protective function of biochemicals that impede pathogen and pest attack. Nearly 40 years ago pathogen-inducible non-volatile diterpenoids were described in rice and demonstrated to function as potent antimicrobial phytoalexins. Using...

  11. Ocean Engineering Studies. Volume 2. Acrylic Submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    support of H. R. Talkington, Head of the Ocean Technology Department at the Naval Undersea Center, and Dr . W. B. McLean, retired tech- nical director of the...co00 4h 29 A 0 Mftba -40 to 4 a .PeDqUh.74DRD SeUSS "P% o 11313 SSSSBS S mwa . 4 o i S* 0 .4 s- IV ov -cUoocc. c c aw c U MVV 0 9L am ^ DQwmaMVjaw ,ft...administrative and moral support of H. R. Talkington, Head, NUC Ocean Technology Department, and Dr . Wm. B. McLean, retired NUC Technical Director

  12. Small, submersible, centrifugal pump for liquid nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rustad, B.M.; Nielsen, A.; Passell, L.

    1965-01-01

    Full details are given of a pump designed to circulate several liters/min. It can be evacuated before use to exclude oxygen and may be used at pressures of several atmospheres.......Full details are given of a pump designed to circulate several liters/min. It can be evacuated before use to exclude oxygen and may be used at pressures of several atmospheres....

  13. Volcanic eruption of the mid-ocean ridge along the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45-52'N: Direct submersible observations of seafloor phenomena associated with an eruption event in April, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, R. M.; Fornari, D. J.; Von Damm, K. L.; Lilley, M. D.; Perfit, M. R.; Edmond, J. M.; Shanks, W. C.; Lutz, R. A.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Carbotte, S.; Wright, D.; McLaughlin, E.; Smith, M.; Beedle, N.; Olson, E.

    1993-08-01

    In April, 1991, we witnessed from the submersible Alvin a suite of previously undocumented seafloor phenomena accompanying an in-progress eruption of the mid-ocean ridge on the East Pacific Rise crest at 9°45'N-52'N. The volume of the eruption could not be precisely determined, although comparison of pre- and post-eruption SeaBeam bathymetry indicate that any changes in ridge crest morphology resulting from the eruption were site known as 'Tubeworm Barbecue' in the axial summit caldera (ASC) at 9°50.6'N; (4) near-critical temperatures of hydrothermal vent fluids, ranging up to 403°C; (5) temporal variations over a 2 week interval in both temperatures and chemical/isotopic compositions of hydrothermal fluids; (6) unusual compositions of end-member vent fluids, with pH values ranging to a record low of 2.5, salinities ranging as low as 0.3 wt% NaCl (one-twelfth that of seawater), and dissolved gases reaching high concentrations (> 65 mmol/l for both CO 2 and H 2S); (7) venting at temperatures above 380°C of visually detectable white vapor that transformed to plumes of gray smoke a few centimeters above vent orifices; (8) disorganized venting of both high-temperature fluids (black and gray smoke) and large volumes of cooler, diffuse hydrothermal fluids directly from the basaltic seafloor, rather than from hydrothermal mineral constructions; (9) rapid and extensive growth of flocculent white bacterial mats (species unknown) on and under the seafloor in areas experiencing widespread venting of diffuse hydrothermal fluid; and (10) subseafloor downslope migration of magma normal to the ridge axis in a network of small-scale (1-5 m diameter) lava tubes and channels to distances at least 100-200 m outside the ASC. We suggest that, in April, 1991, intrusion of dikes in the eruption area to phase separation of fluids near the tops of the dikes and a large flux of vapor-rich hydrothermal fluids through the overlying rubbly, cavernous lavas. Low salinities and gas

  14. Recording Fathometer Techniques for Determining Distribution and Biomass of Hydrilla verticillata Royle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    cover, and distance from the top of vegetation to the water surface, were calculated from the graph paper utilizing a 25-cm ruler, planim- eter, and... Hyacinth Contr. J. 13:48-50. Hestand, R. S., and C. C. Carter. 1974. The effects of a winter draw- down on aquatic vegetation in a shallow water ...reservoir. Hyacinth Contr. J. 12:9-12. 44 Hestand, R. S., B. E. May, D. P. Schultz, and C. R. Walker. 1973. Eco- logical implications of water levels on

  15. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Moneoecious hydrilla in the Potomac River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    2-4 -D 0 wN 0 00 0 04 ,- % r > 0% (7.I$40%% 0 a0 00%07% ON 0., m 4. - 002 -4 -4 -4 -4 O 0 $4a0 4 0 rAf 00% 00 0c0% ON 0% 0 0 f 0 a4 N 00 0 0 IaAI0 0...and sulfide (Singh et al. 1967, Opuszynski 1979, Custer et al. 1978). These fish cease feeding when dissolved oxygen levels reach about 2.5 mg/k. At...Engineer Water- ways Experiment Station, pp 298-304. Custer , P. E., and F. D. Halverson, J. Malone, and C. Von Chong. 1978. The white amur as a

  16. Biological Control Agents of Hydrilla Verticillata; Final Report on Surveys in East Africa, 1981-1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    unstable and difficult to work from. A weed drag was used in most cases to collect samples. Diving was a much more effective means of collecting plants...a considerable dele- terious effect on African aquatic systems, with increased runoff and erosion leading to heavier sediment loads in rivers and to...outbreaks of Salvinia molesta, limited * . stands of Najas peotinata and Potamogeton spp., especially on eastern and southern shores; L;tricularia

  17. Functionality of the plastron in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: aspects of the integument coating and submersion laboratory experiments Funcionalidade do plastrão em adultos de Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: aspectos do revestimento tegumentar e experimentos laboratoriais de submersão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Oliveira de Sousa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The plastron theory was tested in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, through the analysis of the structure that coats these insects' integument and also through submersion laboratorial experiments. The tegument processes were recognized in three types: agglutinated scales with large perforations, plumose scales of varied sizes and shapes, and hairs. The experiments were carried out on 264 adult individuals which were kept submerged at different time intervals (n = 11 and in two types of treatment, natural non-aerated water and previously boiled water, with four repetitions for each treatment. The tests showed a maximum mortality after 24 hours of immersion in the previously boiled water treatment. The survival of the adults was negative and significantly correlated with the types of treatment employed and within the different time intervals. The values of oxygen dissolved in water (mg/l differed significantly within the types of treatment employed. They were positively correlated with the survival of the adults in the two types of treatment, although more markedly in the treatment with previously boiled water. The mortality of adults after 24 hours of submersion in the treatment with previously boiled water may be associated with the physical-chemical conditions of the non-tested water in this study, such as low surface tension and concentration of solutes. These results suggest plastron functionality in the adults of this species.A teoria plastrão foi testada em adultos de Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, por meio da análise da estrutura que reveste o tegumento destes insetos e em experimentos laboratoriais de submersão. Os processos tegumentares foram reconhecidos em três tipos: escamas aglutinadas e com perfurações largas; escamas plumosas de tamanhos e formas variadas; e pêlos. Os experimentos realizados com 264 indivíduos adultos os quais permaneciam submersos por diferentes intervalos de tempo (n = 11 e em dois

  18. Effects of cold stratification, sulphuric acid, submersion in hot and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Tratamientos en la Produccion Germinacion de Las Semillas de. Colutea arborescens L. (Morphology, Types, Attributes, Difficulties and Treatments in Production and Germination of Seeds of Colutea arborescens L.). Anales Del Instituto Nacional De Investigaciones. Agrarias Seria Forestal, 7: 129-154.

  19. Effects of eutrophication and temperature on submersed rooted plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl

    , especially at high temperatures. Results also showed that growth of Z. marina plants at higher temperatures will be reduced at gradually lower oxygen concentrations. The tropical seagrasses were surprisingly tolerant to oxygen depletion in the water column and none of them showed reduced growth within the 72......Aquatic macrophytes have during the last decades faced a massive decline of coverage and repeated die‐off events have been detected for freshwater (Sand‐Jensen et al., 2000) and marine plants (Waycott et al., 2009). Increased nutrient loading has been suggested to play a central role, because high...... and degradation of dying alga blooms accelerate the microbial activity and thereby intensify oxygen consumption in sediment and water column. This oxygen consumption may accelerate further by increasing temperature caused by warmer climate. This thesis examines how low sediment and water column oxygen levels...

  20. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit

    2011-01-01

    chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency was 78.1±0.2% with initial TCOD of 49.7 g/L. The power generation of SMFC was depended on the sludge concentration, while dilution of the raw sludge resulted in higher power density. The maximum power density was saturated at sludge concentration of 17 g...

  1. North Carolina Seagrass Submersed Rooted Vasculars 1990 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A GIS data set of polygon data interpreted from aerial photography taken by NOAA/NOS Photogrammetry Branch depicting areas of Aquatic Beds of Rooted Vascular Plants...

  2. North Carolina Seagrass Submersed Rooted Vasculars 1990 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A GIS data set of polygon data interpreted from aerial photography taken by NOAA/NOS Photogrammetry Branch depicting areas of Aquatic Beds of Rooted Vascular Plants...

  3. North Carolina Seagrass Submersed Rooted Vasculars 1990 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A GIS data set of polygon data interpreted from aerial photography taken by NOAA/NOS Photogrammetry Branch depicting areas of Aquatic Beds of Rooted Vascular Plants...

  4. North Carolina Seagrass Submersed Rooted Vasculars 1990 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A GIS data set of polygon data interpreted from aerial photography taken by NOAA/NOS Photogrammetry Branch depicting areas of Aquatic Beds of Rooted Vascular Plants...

  5. Deployable Waterfront Transportability Study Using Heavy Lift Submersible Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    City. MO MARITECII ENGRG Donoghue’, Austin, TX j MOFFATIT & NICHO )L ENGRS R Palnmer. Long Beach. CA PACIFIC MARINE TECH (M. Wagtte- Duvall. WA WOODWARD-CLYDE CONSULTANTS R Cross, Walnut Creek. CA; RZ Donminguez, Houston, TX 1

  6. Fuel-Cell Propulsion for Small Manned Submersibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-12

    Conversion Engineering Conference Proceedings (1976), pp. 447-451. 18. Heath, C. E., Verger , B., Hespel, C., and Farrel, P., "High Powered Fuel Cells for...Engineers Paper 760569, 1976. 39. Warszawski, Bernard, Dumas, J., and Verger , B., "The Alsthom Hydrazine-Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cell System", Marine

  7. Parametric Studies of the Dynamic Stability of Submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    34,o Fiqu ::oe 46: w vs Scern ? l ane . .lng!.e; X;a = - 5% 0.05 ,.- -------------------~ 0.035 - .. O.D3- 0.025 . .:. ··---.......... __ :0...zo -•5 -to -s o s 10 u 20 Fiqu : e SS; q II’S St e rn Pl a r.e Ar.g l e ; X ;a= - 1 0 % r...10 ~ 0 5 10 15 W Fiqu ::-e 59: :: vs Ste:::1 ?lane Angle ; X..::a"-!. . 0% 69 5 ~. --------------------------------------------~ I 1

  8. Three Dimensional Pursuit Guidance and Control of Submersible Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    4.17) XdH is the lookahead distance determined according to the stability analysis of Chapter II, and kI, k2, k3 are the horizontal plane control...The existence of two distinct distances XdH , Xdv is for maximum flexibility in the design and to allow for the possibly different stability...DO 1 I=1,IPTS READ (1O,*) XD,YD,ZD, XDH ,XDV,UO XDES( I)=XD*L YDES( I)=YD*L ZDES( I)=ZD*L UDES( I)=U0 DISH( I)= XDH *L DISV( I)=XDV*L 1 CONTINUE C C MASS

  9. Inorganic carbon shortage may limit the development of submersed macrophytes in habitats of the Paraná River basin Baixas concentrações de carbono inorgânico podem limitar o desenvolvimento de macrófitas submersas em habitats do alto rio Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline de Freitas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: In this investigation we carried out an experiment to assess whether the growth of Egeria najas and E. densa (two rooted submersed Hydrocharitacea, native to South America are limited by inorganic carbon or not; METHODS: We measured the early plant growth in 3 L microcosms with alkalinities of 100 µM.L-1 and 500 µM.L-1. These alkalinites represent extremes which are typical of most waters in the Upper Paraná River basin and they represent low and high inorganic carbon (mainly bicarbonate availabilities, respectively; RESULTS: The elongation of E. densa, and the relative growth rates and root development of both species were significantly higher when they grew in the high alkalinity treatment; CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that in several habitats and during certain periods of the year, inorganic carbon shortage may limit the growth of both species. In this sense, phosphorus and nitrogen may assume a secondary role as controlling factors of these plants, because they assimilate these nutrients from sediment, where they are usually found in high concentrations. Thus, controlling eutrofication as a strategy to reduce their biomass may not be successful.OBJETIVOS: Nesse trabalho nós realizamos um experimento para avaliar se o crescimento de Egeria najas e E. densa (duas espécies de macrófitas aquáticas submersas da família Hydrocharitaceae, nativas da América do Sul é limitado por carbono inorgânico; MÉTODOS: Nós medimos os estágios iniciais de crescimento de fragmentos em microcosmos de 3 L com alcalinidade de 100 µM.L-1 e 500 µM.L-1. Esses valores de alcalinidade foram escolhidos por representarem extremos típicos da maioria dos ecossistemas aquáticos da bacia do Alto rio Paraná e representaram baixa e alta disponibilidade de carbono (principalmente bicarbonato, respectivamente; RESULTADOS: O alongamento de E. densa e o crescimento relativo e desenvolvimento de raízes de ambas as espécies foram

  10. Molecular phylogeny, divergence time estimates and historical biogeography within one of the world's largest monocot genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; Huang, De-Qing; He, Xing-Jin; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A primary aim of historical biogeography is to identify the causal factors or processes that have shaped the composition and distribution of biotas over time. Another is to infer the evolution of geographic ranges of species and clades in a phylogenetic context. To this end, historical biogeography addresses important questions such as: Where were ancestors distributed? Where did lineages originate? Which processes cause geographic ranges to evolve through time? Allium subgenus Anguinum comprises approximately twelve taxa with a disjunct distribution in the high mountains from south-western Europe to eastern Asia and in northeastern North America. Although both the systematic position and the geographical limits of Anguinum have been identified, to date no molecular systematic study has been performed utilizing a comprehensive sampling of these species. With an emphasis on the Anguinum eastern Asian geographical group, the goals of the present study were: (i) to infer species-level phylogenetic relationships within Anguinum, (ii) to assess molecular divergence and estimated the times of the major splits in Anguinum and (iii) to trace the biogeographic history of the subgenus. Four DNA sequences (ITS, matK, trnH-psbA, rps16) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Allium subgen. Anguinum RbcL sequences were used to estimate divergences time for Allium, and sequences of ITS were used to estimate the divergence times for Anguinum and its main lineages and to provide implications for the evolutionary history of the subgenus. Phylogenetic analyses for all Allium corroborate that Anguinum is monophyletic and indicate that Anguinum is composed of two sister groups: one with a Eurasian-American distribution, and the other restricted to eastern Asia. In the eastern Asian geographical group, incongruence between gene trees and morphology-based taxonomies was recovered as was incongruence between data from plastid and nuclear sequences. This incongruence is likely due to the combined effects of a recent radiation, incomplete lineage sorting, and hybridization/introgression. Divergence time estimates suggest that the crown group of Anguinum originated during the late Miocene (ca. 7.16 Mya) and then diverged and dispersed. Biogeographic analyses using statistical dispersal-vicariance analysis (S-DIVA) and a likelihood method support an eastern Asia origin of Anguinum It is inferred that in the late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene, with cooling climates and the uplift of the Himalayas and Hengduan Mountains, the ancestor of the eastern Asian alliance clade underwent a very recent radiation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  11. Extra- and intracellular distribution of cytokinins in the leaves of monocots and dicots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiskrová, E.; Novák, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, H.; Holubová, K.; Karády, M.; Galuszka, P.; Robert, S.; Frébort, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 5 (2016), s. 735-742 ISSN 1871-6784 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION * MAIZE BETA-GLUCOSIDASE * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.813, year: 2016

  12. Perianth development in the basal monocot Triglochin maritima (Juncaginaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buzgo, Matyas; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.

    2006-01-01

    .'' Therefore, in some basal angiosperms with abbreviated development of lateral flowers the demarcation of the flower vs. the inflorescence is ontogenetically ambiguous. In situ hybridization experiments show that a putative ortholog of the B-class gene APETALA3/DEFICIENS is expressed in developing stamens...

  13. Analysis of ABCB phosphoglycoproteins (PGPs) and their contribution to monocot biomass, structural stability, and productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Angus Stuart [Purdue University

    2014-09-23

    Efforts to manipulate production of plant secondary cell walls to improve the quality of biofuel feedstocks are currently limited by an inability to regulate the transport of small molecule components out of the cell. Plant ABCB p-glycoproteins are a small family of plasma membrane organic molecule transporters that have become primary targets for this effort, as they can potentially be harnessed to control the export of aromatic compounds and organic acids. However, unlike promiscuous mammalian ABCBs that function in multidrug resistance, all plant ABCB proteins characterized to date exhibit relatively narrow substrate specificity. Although ABCBs exhibit a highly conserved architecture, efforts to modify ABCB activity have been hampered by a lack of structural information largely because an eukaryotic ABCB protein crystal structure has yet to be obtained. Structure/ function analyses have been further impeded by the lack of a common heterologous expression system that can be used to characterize recombinant ABCB proteins, as many cannot be functionally expressed in S. cereviseae or other systems where proteins with analogous function can be readily knocked out. Using experimentally-determined plant ABCB substrate affinities and the crystal structure of the bacterial Sav1866 “half” ABC transporter, we have developed sequence/structure models for ABCBs that provide a testable context for mutational analysis of plant ABCB transporters. We have also developed a flexible heterologous expression system in Schizosaccharomyces pombe in which all endogenous ABC transporters have been knocked out. The effectiveness of this system for transport studies has been demonstrated by the successful functional expression all of the known PIN, AUX/LAX and ABCB auxin transporters. Our central hypothesis is that the domains of the ABCB proteins that we have identified as substrate docking sites and regulators of transport directionality can be altered or swapped to alter the transport characteristics of the proteins. We propose to combine computer modelling, mutational analyses, and complementation of well characterized Arabidopsis abcb4,14,and 19 mutants to elucidate ABCB function. The long term objective of this project is to enhance ABCB transport of cell wall components, to manipulate the direction of ABCB substrate transport, and, ultimately, to produce “designer” ABC transporters that can be used to modify plant feedstock quality.

  14. Rice is the seed of the monocot plants Oryza sativa (Asian rice) or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIOTECH

    2013-10-16

    tests. Biometrics 11:1-. 42. FAOSTAT (2001). FAO Statistical Databases. Available online at http://apps.fao.org/. Accessed 2 May 2001. Ghanti SK, Sujata KG, Rao S, Udayakumar M, Kavi Kishore PB (2009). Role of enzymes and ...

  15. Characterizing the effects of brassinosteroids on root development in monocot plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Louise

    resulted in a one year stay in Professor Elison B. Blancaflors lab. During this period, basic studies of BR effects on plant root development were carried out. As a central finding, it was shown that BR affects the anti-gravity growth response of roots, the autotropic straightening, through stabilization...

  16. Biological and Host Range Studies with Bagous affinis, An Indian Weevil that Destroys Hydrilla Tubers. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    measurements of laboratory-reared and field-collected adults were made to determine if colo- nized individuals were smaller and thus perhaps less vigorous ...L. (Griseb.) (Alismataceae); cel- ery, Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Mill.) Pers. (Apiaceae); cabbage, Brassica oleracea L. Capitata Group

  17. AP2/ERF Transcription Factor in Rice: Genome-Wide Canvas and Syntenic Relationships between Monocots and Eudicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad; Guangyuan, He; Guangxiao, Yang; Hussain, Javeed; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor family intimately regulates gene expression in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic factors, symbiotic interactions, cell differentiation, and stress signalling pathways in plants. In this study, 170 AP2/ERF family genes are identified by phylogenetic analysis of the rice genome (Oryza sativa l. japonica) and they are divided into a total of 11 groups, including four major groups (AP2, ERF, DREB, and RAV), 10 subgroups, and two soloists. Gene structure analysis revealed that, at position-6, the amino acid threonine (Thr-6) is conserved in the double domain AP2 proteins compared to the amino acid arginine (Arg-6), which is preserved in the single domain of ERF proteins. In addition, the histidine (His) amino acid is found in both domains of the double domain AP2 protein, which is missing in single domain ERF proteins. Motif analysis indicates that most of the conserved motifs, apart from the AP2/ERF domain, are exclusively distributed among the specific clades in the phylogenetic tree and regulate plausible functions. Expression analysis reveals a widespread distribution of the rice AP2/ERF family genes within plant tissues. In the vegetative organs, the transcripts of these genes are found most abundant in the roots followed by the leaf and stem; whereas, in reproductive tissues, the gene expression of this family is observed high in the embryo and lemma. From chromosomal localization, it appears that repetition and tandem-duplication may contribute to the evolution of new genes in the rice genome. In this study, interspecies comparisons between rice and wheat reveal 34 rice loci and unveil the extent of collinearity between the two genomes. It was subsequently ascertained that chromosome-9 has more orthologous loci for CRT/DRE genes whereas chromosome-2 exhibits orthologs for ERF subfamily members. Maximum conserved synteny is found in chromosome-3 for AP2 double domain subfamily genes. Macrosynteny between rice and Arabidopsis, a distant, related genome, uncovered 11 homologs/orthologs loci in both genomes. The distribution of AP2/ERF family gene paralogs in Arabidopsis was most frequent in chromosome-1 followed by chromosome-5. In Arabidopsis, ERF subfamily gene orthologs are found on chromosome-1, chromosome-3, and chromosome-5, whereas DRE subfamily genes are found on chromosome-2 and chromosome-5. Orthologs for RAV and AP2 with double domains in Arabidopsis are located on chromosome-1 and chromosome-3, respectively. In conclusion, the data generated in this survey will be useful for conducting genomic research to determine the precise role of the AP2/ERF gene during stress responses with the ultimate goal of improving crops.

  18. Ovule-specific MADS box proteins have conserved protein-protein interactions in monocots and dicot plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favaro, R.; Immink, R.G.H.; Ferioli, V.; Bernasconi, B.; Byzova, M.; Angenent, G.C.; Kater, M.; Colombo, L.

    2002-01-01

    OsMADS13 is a rice MADS-box gene that is specifically expressed in developing ovules. The amino acid sequence of OsMADS13 shows 74␜imilarity to those of FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 7 (FBP7) and FBP11, the products of two MADS-box genes that are necessary and sufficient to determine ovule identity in

  19. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the Johnson Sea Link II during sixteen dives of the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and...

  20. Self-Propelled Semi-Submersibles: The Next Great Threat to Regional Security and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    blue tarp totally hidden from maritime patrol aircraft and surface vessels. Sometimes only traveling at night, the SPSS produce very little wake in...capture SPSSs that are departing and entering coastal waterways. For example, a group of researchers is working on developing a network of solar

  1. Self-stacked submersible microbial fuel cell (SSMFC) for improved remote power generation from lake sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    external resistance (≤400 Ω in this study) was applied. In addition, the internal resistance and OCV were the most important parameters for predicting which cell unit had the highest probability to undergo voltage reversal. Use of a capacitor was found to be an effective way to prevent voltage reversal...

  2. Agonistic attacks on divers and submersibles by gray reef sharks, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos: antipredatory or competitive?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Donald R; Johnson, Robert R; McKibben, James N; Pittenger, Gregory G

    1986-01-01

    .... melanopterus; or reef whitetip sharks, Triaenodon obesus. Gray reef sharks attacked in both baited and unbaited situations, but apparently more readily in the latter. Lone individuals (unbaited...

  3. A Simulation Model for Growth of the Submersed Aquatic Macrophyte Sago Pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus L.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    2003-01-01

    .... The characteristics of community and site can be easily modified by the user. POTAM incorporates insight into the processes affecting the dynamics of a sago pondweed community in relatively shallow, hard water (0.1-to 6-m depth...

  4. Air-gap effect on life boat arrangement for a semi-submersible FPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun-Sung Kim

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have been performed the numerical studies to find proper arrangement for the life boats consider drop height in various environmental conditions such as wave, wind and current. In the calculations, the contributions from static and low frequency (LF motions are considered from the hydrodynamic and mooring analysis as well as damage angle from the intact and damage stability analysis. Also, Air-gap calculation at the life boat positions has been carried out to check the effect on the life boat arrangement. The air-gap assessment is based on the extreme air-gap method includes the effect of 1st order wave frequency (WF motions, 2nd order low frequency roll/pitch motion, static trim/heel and set down.

  5. 76 FR 80291 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Submersible Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... applications, possess parameters or characteristics that provide a critical military or intelligence advantage... U.S.- origin ITAR-controlled content, particularly with respect to generic, unspecified parts and... USML provide a critical military and intelligence advantage to the United States with many technologies...

  6. First-language skills of bilingual Turkish immigrant children growing up in a Dutch submersion context

    OpenAIRE

    Akoglu, Gözde; Yagmur, Kutlay

    2016-01-01

    The interdependence between the first and second language of bilingual immigrant children has not received sufficient attention in research. Most studies concentrate on mainstream language skills of immigrant pupils. In some studies, the gaps in the language development of immigrant children are documented by comparing mainstream pupils with immigrant children. The competence in the first language receives very little attention. In order to show the role of first language competence in second...

  7. Applicability of a submersible microbial fuel cell for Cr(VI) detection in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyeonyong; Ju, Won Jung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2016-11-01

    Two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to study the applicability of MFCs for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) detection in water. The microbial acetate oxidation in the anode and the Cr(VI) reduction in the cathode together generated voltages, which were used to indicate the change in Cr(VI) concentrations of the cathode under varying conditions of pH, ionic strength, co-existing Fe(II) concentration, and organic matter concentration. The MFC-based Cr(VI) detector showed a significant change in voltage with increasing Cr(VI) concentration at pH 1 and 2, but not at higher pH conditions. The detector also successfully measured the changes in Cr(VI) concentration at a range of ionic strength (i.e., 10-300 mM), and in the presence of different concentrations of fulvic acid (0-50 mg/L), which was used as a surrogate of organic matters, without interference. The Cr(VI) detection was not interfered by the presence of Fe(II) at the Cr(VI)/Fe(II) ratio of 1:1 and 1:15, but it was interfered at higher ratios (i.e., 1:164 and 1:848). The detector could measure the Cr(VI) concentration from 0.1 to 15 mg/L at pH 2. Overall, the MFC-based Cr(VI) detector may be applied to meet the growing need of real-time Cr(VI) monitoring in water.

  8. Sediment bioassay with sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submersed aquatic macrophyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, W.J. [NBS, Raleigh, NC (United States); Siesko, M.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ailstock, M.S. [Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sago pondweed explants produced in tissue culture were grown for 6 weeks in sediments from Baltimore Harbor, MD. Although sediments contained up to 9,800 ppm Al, 7.5 ppm Cd, 3,090 ppm Cr, 397 ppm Pb, 530 Cu, 1,320 Sn, 2,040 ppm Zn, and 82,900 ppm oil and grease (all expressed as dry wt.) stepwise linear regression of log transformed contaminant data showed no linkage of reduced plant growth to the contaminants measured. Plant growth was negatively correlated with particle size and particle size was negatively correlated with most contaminant concentrations. In a second study, 17 estuarine sediments, representing a range of low to very high toxicity in Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays, were selected for study. Selected sediments contained up to 10 ppm Cd, 135 ppm Cr, 21 ppm Cu, 105 ppm Pb, 15 ppm Ni, and 190 ppm Zn (all expressed as dry wt.). Sago pondweed explants were planted into these sediments and grown for 4 weeks. Biomass production differed significantly among sediments tested. Phytotoxicity of sediments did not correlate well with the toxicity results of the Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays nor the metal content of sediments.

  9. Stress protein synthesis and peroxidase activity in a submersed aquatic macrophyte exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siesko, M.M.; Grossfeld, R.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Fleming, W.J. [National Biological Service, Raleigh, NC (United States). North Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    1997-08-01

    Sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus L.) was exposed to CdCl{sub 2} to evaluate peroxidase (POD) activity and stress protein (SP) synthesis as potential biomarkers of contaminant stress in an aquatic plant. Peroxidase activity did not increase in sago pondweed incubated for 24 h in a liquid culture medium containing 0.5, 0.75, or 1 mM CdCl{sub 2}. By contrast, at each of these CdCl{sub 2} concentrations, SPs of 162, 142, 1122, 82, and 61 kDa were preferentially synthesized, and synthesis of a 66-kDa protein was reduced relative to controls. Peroxidase activity also did not change in sago pondweed rooted for 21 d in agar containing 1 mM CdCl{sub 2}, despite the lower growth rate, lower protein content, and brown discoloration of the plants. Only when the plants were grown 7 or 21 d on agar containing 10 mM CdCl{sub 2} were the growth retardation and phenotypic deterioration accompanied by significantly increased POD activity. In contrast, plants rooted for 7 d in agar containing 1 mM CdCl{sub 2} were not significantly discolored or retarded in growth, yet they preferentially synthesized SPs of 122, 82, and 50 kDa and synthesized proteins of 59 and 52 kDa at reduced rates relative to controls. Similar changes in protein synthesis were accompanied by signs of depressed growth after 21 d of incubation with 1 mM CdCl{sub 2} and with 7 or 21 d of exposure to 10 mM CdCl{sub 2}. These data indicate that changes in SP synthesis may precede detectable alterations in growth of aquatic plants and, therefore, may be a potentially useful early biomarker of contaminant stress. However, further studies will be required to determine whether the SP response is measurable during exposure to environmentally relevant contaminant levels.

  10. Experimental Applications of the Modular Acoustic System for the Submersible ALVIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    the ocean bottom infauna is highly variable; Hyalinoecia populations range from very small to im- mense (Fauchald, 1975). Fortunately, investigators...aurolaternatum ). On p. 1014, he notes observations of 273 mychtophids in one dive. Between Costa Rica and Acapulco, Mexico he observed dense swarms of

  11. First-Language Skills of Bilingual Turkish Immigrant Children Growing up in a Dutch Submersion Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, Gözde; Yagmur, Kutlay

    2016-01-01

    The interdependence between the first and second language of bilingual immigrant children has not received sufficient attention in research. Most studies concentrate on mainstream language skills of immigrant pupils. In some studies, the gaps in the language development of immigrant children are documented by comparing mainstream pupils with…

  12. Small Submersible Robust Microflow Cytometer for Quantitative Detection of Phytoplankton Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Translume will develop an extremely robust, inexpensive micro flow cytometer (mFCM) for quantitative detection of phytoplankton. This device will be designed to be...

  13. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations from Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  14. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations From Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  15. First-language skills of bilingual Turkish immigrant children growing up in a Dutch submersion context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoglu, Gözde; Yagmur, Kutlay

    2016-01-01

    The interdependence between the first and second language of bilingual immigrant children has not received sufficient attention in research. Most studies concentrate on mainstream language skills of immigrant pupils. In some studies, the gaps in the language development of immigrant children are

  16. Submersible Research in Extreme Environments Using a Novel Light-Tethered Hybrid ROV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, A. D.; Fryer, P.; Shank, T.; Edwards, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle (HROV) will provide the U.S. oceanographic community with capable and cost-effective technology for routine access to the world's oceans to 11,000 meters. The hybrid vehicle design permits operation as an untethered, fully autonomous vehicle, and also as a self-powered ROV employing a 3mm diameter optical fiber tether for real-time telemetry of data and video to operators on a surface ship. Several environments that are currently inaccessible for detailed research have sufficiently mature and testable scientific problems that could be addressed using the HROV. The greatest depths on the surface of Earth are found in oceanic trenches. The complex effects of subduction of oceanic lithosphere beneath both continental and oceanic lithospheric plates are subjects of intense interest in the marine geological and geophysical community because they are prime areas where oceanic lithosphere is recycled back into the mantle. Recent studies of the Challenger Deep (CD) in the Mariana Trench show potential fluid conduits on the subducting plate that occur at depths greater than 10,000 m. The inner trench slope in the vicinity of the CD is a site where fluids derived from the down-going plate and talus from the overriding plate may be interacting. The processes of talus accumulation at this locality and the ultimate fate of the material may be critical to understanding the processes of tectonic erosion and of arc recycling in convergent plate margins. Also, the biology and microbiology of these sites is virtually unknown. The HROV will be ideally suited to conduct pioneering mapping and sampling of these seafloor environments. Over the past few decades, mid-ocean ridge studies have been enabled by deep submergence vehicle access and capabilities, and likewise, this branch of science has provided compelling need for the current family of synergistic deep submergence systems. With the recent identification and first-order mapping and dredging studies of ultra-slow spreading ridges in the Arctic, for instance, scientists are poised to make breakthroughs in our understanding of this important end-member of seafloor spreading environment. The ability to sample and observe detailed geological, biological and chemical processes occurring at these slowest spreading MORs will undoubtedly revolutionize our understanding of how seafloor spreading is manifested in these settings. In addition, we expect to find a host of novel biological communities and chemical-biochemical processes associated with recently discovered hydrothermal venting on Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean as a consequence of tectonic isolation starting in the late Mesozoic. It was not until the middle Miocene that deep water communication was reestablished with the north Atlantic and not until 3Ma with the north Pacific . Currently, Iceland essentially blocks potential migrations from the mid-Atlantic ridge to the Gakkel ridge. The HROV will be highly applicable to operations under-ice, such as those that will be required for survey, close-up inspection, and sampling of sites on the ultra slow spreading Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Basin.

  17. Comparison of Three Biomass Sampling Techniques on Submersed Aquatic Plants in a Northern Tier Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    milfoil (M. sibiricum Komarov, p= 0.8393), najas ( Najas spp.,p=0.1068), broadleaf pondweed (Potamogeton amplifolius Tuck, p=0.8779), curlyleaf pondweed...0.6490), Eurasian milfoil (p=0.1462), northern milfoil (p= 0.6053), najas (p=0.4793), broadleaf pondweed (p=0.6053), curlyleaf pondweed (p=0.0732...collected by the PVC-core sampler. These included coontail (p=0.000), chara (p=0.0219), American elodea (p=0.0061), forked duckweed (p=0.0000), najas (p

  18. Small Submersible Robust Microflow Cytometer for Quantitative Detection of Phytoplankton Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Marine phytoplankton are critical in sustaining life on Earth. They are key drivers of the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and other nutrients, and account...

  19. Chemical Fouling Reduction of a Submersible Steel Spectrophotometer in Estuarine Environments Using a Sacrificial Zinc Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Zachary S; Thompson, Megan; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-07-01

    The availability of in situ spectrophotometers, such as the S::CAN spectro::lyser, has expanded the possibilities for high-frequency water quality data collection. However, biological and chemical fouling can degrade the performance of in situ spectrophotometers, especially in saline environments with rapid flow rates. A complex freshwater washing system has been previously designed to reduce chemical fouling for the S::CAN spectro::lyser spectrophotometer. In the current study, we present a simpler, cheaper alternative: the attachment of a sacrificial zinc anode. Results are presented detailing the S::CAN spectro::lyser performance with and without the addition of the sacrificial anode. Attachment of the zinc anode provided efficient corrosion protection during 2-wk deployments in a highly dynamic (average tidal range, 2.5 m) saline tidal saltmarsh creek at Groves Creek, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Organ and effective dose rate coefficients for submersion exposure in occupational settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dewji, S.A.; Hiller, M.M. [Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-11-15

    External dose coefficients for environmental exposure scenarios are often computed using assumption on infinite or semi-infinite radiation sources. For example, in the case of a person standing on contaminated ground, the source is assumed to be distributed at a given depth (or between various depths) and extending outwards to an essentially infinite distance. In the case of exposure to contaminated air, the person is modeled as standing within a cloud of infinite, or semi-infinite, source distribution. However, these scenarios do not mimic common workplace environments where scatter off walls and ceilings may significantly alter the energy spectrum and dose coefficients. In this paper, dose rate coefficients were calculated using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms positioned in rooms of three sizes representing an office, laboratory, and warehouse. For each room size calculations using the reference phantoms were performed for photons, electrons, and positrons as the source particles to derive mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Since the voxel phantoms lack the resolution to perform dose calculations at the sensitive depth for the skin, a mathematical phantom was developed and calculations were performed in each room size with the three source particle types. Coefficients for the noble gas radionuclides of ICRP Publication 107 (e.g., Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) were generated by folding the corresponding photon, electron, and positron emissions over the mono-energetic dose rate coefficients. Results indicate that the smaller room sizes have a significant impact on the dose rate per unit air concentration compared to the semi-infinite cloud case. For example, for Kr-85 the warehouse dose rate coefficient is 7% higher than the office dose rate coefficient while it is 71% higher for Xe-133. (orig.)

  1. AFSC/ABL: Delta Submersible Dive Video Archive in Alaska, 1988-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seafloor habitat and fish data collected from videos obtained from Delta submarine dives conducted by Auke Bay Laboratories.

  2. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Lophelia II 2008 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the Remotely Operated Vehicle SeaEye Falcon along its track during four dives of the "Lophelia II 2008" expedition sponsored by the...

  3. A Submersed Macrophyte Index of Condition for the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portions of the Upper Mississippi River are listed as impaired for aquatic life use under section 303(d) of the United States Clean Water Act by the State of Minnesota’s Pollution Control Agency and Wisconsin’s Department of Natural Resources for exceeding turbidity and eutrophic...

  4. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Bonaire 2008 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by Gavia AUVs along tracks during dives of the "Bonaire 2008" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  5. Structural Dynamic Analysis of Semi-Submersible Floating Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Ishie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The strong and stable wind at offshore locations and the increasing demand for energy have made the application of wind turbines in deeper water surge. A novel concept of a 5 MW baseline Floating Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (FVAWT and a 5 MW optimised FVAWT with the DeepWind Darrieus rotor and the optimised DeepWind Darrieus rotor, respectively, were studied extensively. The structural responses, fatigue damages, platform global motions and mooring line dynamics of the FVAWTs were investigated comprehensively during normal operating conditions under steady wind and turbulent wind conditions, using a coupled non-linear aero-hydro-servo-elastic code (the Simo-Riflex-DMS code which was developed by Wang et al. for modeling FVAWTs. This coupled code incorporates the models for the turbulent wind field, aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics, and generator controller. The simulation is performed in a fully coupled manner in time domain. The comparison of responses under different wind conditions were used to demonstrate the effect of turbulence on both FVAWTs dynamic responses. The turbulent wind condition has the advantage of reducing the 2P effects. Furthermore, comparative studies of the FVAWTs responses were undertaken to explore the advantages of adopting the optimised 5 MW DeepWind Darrieus rotor over the baseline model. The results identified the 5 MW optimised FVAWT to having: lower Fore-Aft (FA but higher lower Side-Side (SS bending moments of structural components; lower motions amplitude; lower short-term fatigue equivalent loads and a further reduced 2P effects.

  6. A Survey of the Invasive Aquatic and Riparian Plants of the Lower Rio Grande, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    surveys were conducted starting below Amistad Reservoir to immediately below Falcon Reservoir to assess the distribution and expansion of hydrilla... Amistad Reservoir. No hydrilla was discovered immediately south of Laredo; however, hydrilla infestations had dramatically increased below Falcon...Salt cedar encroaching into riparian regions below Amistad Reservoir......................................................................12 Figure

  7. Calibrating Dissimilar Payment Vehicles in Contingent Valuation Studies: An Example of Reducing Hydrilla in Two North Florida Spring-Fed River Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Victoria; Thomas, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Choice of payment vehicle (PV) is important to contingent-valuation practitioners. They are often left using scenarios that may elicit bias responses; for example hypothetical gate fees in open access areas. Utility bills may avoid bias, but introduce a scaling problem. A survey of north-Florida spring-based recreation calibrates these two dissimilar PVs.

  8. Improvements in the use of aquatic herbicides and establishment of future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getsinger, K.D.; Netherland, M.D.; Grue, C.E.; Koschnick, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years identifies significant changes and improvements in chemical control strategies used to manage nuisance submersed vegetation. The invasive exotic plants hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) and Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum L.) continue to spread and remain the plant species of greatest concern for aquatic resource managers at the national scale. Emerging exotic weeds of regional concern such as egeria (Egeria densa Planch.), curlyleaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus L.), and hygrophila (Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb.) T. Anders), as well as native plants such as variable watermilfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx), and cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana Gray) are invasive outside their home ranges. In addition, there is always the threat of new plant introductions such as African elodea (Lagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss) or narrow-leaf anacharis (Egeria najas Planchon). The registration of the bleaching herbicide fluridone in the mid 1980s for whole-lake and large-scale management stimulated numerous lines of research involving reduction of use rates, plant selectivity, residue monitoring, and impacts on fisheries. In addition to numerous advances, the specificity of fluridone for a single plant enzyme led to the first documented case of herbicide resistance in aquatic plant management. The resistance of hydrilla to fluridone has stimulated a renewed interest by industry and others in the registration of alternative modes of action for aquatic use. These newer chemistries tend to be enzyme-specific compounds with favorable non-target toxicity profiles. Registration efforts have been facilitated by increased cooperation between key federal government agencies that have aquatic weed control and research responsibilities, and regulators within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). We reviewed past and current research efforts to identify areas in need of further investigation and to establish

  9. Dark/light modulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in plants from different photosynthetic categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, J.C.V.; Allen, L.H. Jr.; Bowes, G.

    1984-11-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from light-exposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C/sub 3/); P. maximum (C/sub 4/ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C/sub 3//C/sub 4/); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C/sub 3/); P. miliaceum (C/sub 4/ NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C/sub 4/ NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C/sub 3//C/sub 4/); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C/sub 3/ species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light. 16 references, 2 tables.

  10. Mesohaline submerged aquatic vegetation survey along the U.S. gulf of Mexico coast, 2001 and 2002: A salinity gradient approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J.H.; Carter, J.; Merino, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Distribution of marine submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; i.e., seagrass) in the northern Gulf of Mexico coast has been documented, but there are nonmarine submersed or SAV species occurring in estuarine salinities that have not been extensively reported. We sampled 276 SAV beds along the gulf coast in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas in 2001 and 2002 in oligohaline to polyhaline (0 to 36 parts per thousand) waters to determine estuarine SAV species distribution and identify mesohaline SAV communities. A total of 20 SAV and algal species was identified and habitat characteristics such as salinity, water depth, pH, conductivity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and sediment composition were collected. Fourteen SAV species occurred two or more times in our samples. The most frequently occurring species was Ruppia maritima L. (n = 148), occurring in over half of SAV beds sampled. Eleocharis sp. (n = 47), characterized with an emergent rather than submerged growth form, was a common genus in the SAV beds sampled. A common marine species was Halodule wrightii Asch. (n = 36). Nonindigenous species Myriophyllum spicatum L. (n = 31) and Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle (n = 6) were present only in oligohaline water. Analyzing species occurrence and environmental characteristics using canonical correspondence and two-way indicator species analysis, we identify five species assemblages distinguished primarily by salinity and depth. Our survey increases awareness of nonmarine SAV as a natural resource in the gulf, and provides baseline data for future research. ?? 2009 by the Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium of Alabama.

  11. Phytotoxical effect of Lepidium draba L. extracts on the germination and growth of monocot (Zea mays L.) and dicot (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yusuf; Aksakal, Ozkan; Sunar, Serap; Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Bozari, Sedat; Agar, Guleray; Erez, Mehmet Emre; Battal, Peyami

    2015-03-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to determine phytotoxic potentials of white top (Lepidium draba) methanol extracts (root, stem and leaf) on germination and early growth of corn (Zea mays) and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Furthermore, the effects of different methanol extracts of L. draba on the phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellic acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin) levels of corn and redroot pigweed were investigated. It was observed that all concentrations of methanol extracts of root, stem and leaf of L. draba inhibited germination, radicle and plumule elongation when compared with the respective controls. Besides this, the degree of inhibition was increased in concert with increasing concentrations of extracts used. On the other hand, phytohormone levels changed with the application of different extract concentrations. Comparing with the control, the GA levels significantly decreased while the ABA levels increased in all the application groups. Zeatin and IAA levels showed changes depending upon the applied extracts and concentrations. © The Author(s) 2012.

  12. Global history of the ancient monocot family Araceae inferred with models accounting for past continental positions and previous ranges based on fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauheimer, Lars; Metzler, Dirk; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-09-01

    The family Araceae (3790 species, 117 genera) has one of the oldest fossil records among angiosperms. Ecologically, members of this family range from free-floating aquatics (Pistia and Lemna) to tropical epiphytes. Here, we infer some of the macroevolutionary processes that have led to the worldwide range of this family and test how the inclusion of fossil (formerly occupied) geographical ranges affects biogeographical reconstructions. Using a complete genus-level phylogeny from plastid sequences and outgroups representing the 13 other Alismatales families, we estimate divergence times by applying different clock models and reconstruct range shifts under different models of past continental connectivity, with or without the incorporation of fossil locations. Araceae began to diversify in the Early Cretaceous (when the breakup of Pangea was in its final stages), and all eight subfamilies existed before the K/T boundary. Early lineages persist in Laurasia, with several relatively recent entries into Africa, South America, South-East Asia and Australia. Water-associated habitats appear to be ancestral in the family, and DNA substitution rates are especially high in free-floating Araceae. Past distributions inferred when fossils are included differ in nontrivial ways from those without fossils. Our complete genus-level time-scale for the Araceae may prove to be useful for ecological and physiological studies. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Terrestrial 3D laser scanning to track the increase in canopy height of both monocot and dicot crop species under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedli, Michael; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Grieder, Christoph; Liebisch, Frank; Mannale, Michael; Walter, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth is a good indicator of crop performance and can be measured by different methods and on different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we measured the canopy height growth of maize (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) under field conditions by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). We tested the hypotheses whether such measurements are capable to elucidate (1) differences in architecture that exist between genotypes; (2) genotypic differences between canopy height growth during the season and (3) short-term growth fluctuations (within 24 h), which could e.g. indicate responses to rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The canopies were scanned with a commercially available 3D laser scanner and canopy height growth over time was analyzed with a novel and simple approach using spherical targets with fixed positions during the whole season. This way, a high precision of the measurement was obtained allowing for comparison of canopy parameters (e.g. canopy height growth) at subsequent time points. Three filtering approaches for canopy height calculation from TLS were evaluated and the most suitable approach was used for the subsequent analyses. For wheat, high coefficients of determination (R(2)) of the linear regression between manually measured and TLS-derived canopy height were achieved. The temporal resolution that can be achieved with our approach depends on the scanned crop. For maize, a temporal resolution of several hours can be achieved, whereas soybean is ideally scanned only once per day, after leaves have reached their most horizontal orientation. Additionally, we could show for maize that plant architectural traits are potentially detectable with our method. The TLS approach presented here allows for measuring canopy height growth of different crops under field conditions with a high temporal resolution, depending on crop species. This method will enable advances in automated phenotyping for breeding and precision agriculture applications. In future studies, the TLS method can be readily applied to detect the effects of plant stresses such as drought, limited nutrient availability or compacted soil on different genotypes or on spatial variance in fields.

  14. Active Sites of Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence1 (REF1 Isoforms Contain Amino Acid Substitutions That Are Different between Monocots and Dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagnon D Missihoun

    Full Text Available Plant aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs play important roles in cell wall biosynthesis, growth, development, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The Reduced Epidermal Fluorescence1 is encoded by the subfamily 2C of ALDHs and was shown to oxidise coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde to ferulic acid and sinapic acid in the phenylpropanoid pathway, respectively. This knowledge has been gained from works in the dicotyledon model species Arabidopsis thaliana then used to functionally annotate ALDH2C isoforms in other species, based on the orthology principle. However, the extent to which the ALDH isoforms differ between monocotyledons and dicotyledons has rarely been accessed side-by-side. In this study, we used a phylogenetic approach to address this question. We have analysed the ALDH genes in Brachypodium distachyon, alongside those of other sequenced monocotyledon and dicotyledon species to examine traits supporting either a convergent or divergent evolution of the ALDH2C/REF1-type proteins. We found that B. distachyon, like other grasses, contains more ALDH2C/REF1 isoforms than A. thaliana and other dicotyledon species. Some amino acid residues in ALDH2C/REF1 isoforms were found as being conserved in dicotyledons but substituted by non-equivalent residues in monocotyledons. One example of those substitutions concerns a conserved phenylalanine and a conserved tyrosine in monocotyledons and dicotyledons, respectively. Protein structure modelling suggests that the presence of tyrosine would widen the substrate-binding pocket in the dicotyledons, and thereby influence substrate specificity. We discussed the importance of these findings as new hints to investigate why ferulic acid contents and cell wall digestibility differ between the dicotyledon and monocotyledon species.

  15. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics in Eudicots and Monocots Reveals a Role for Gibberellin in Growth Inhibition and Recovery1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonyup; Wilson, Rebecca L.; Case, J. Brett; Binder, Brad M.

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging of dark-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls has revealed new aspects about ethylene signaling. This study expands upon these results by examining ethylene growth response kinetics of seedlings of several plant species. Although the response kinetics varied between the eudicots studied, all had prolonged growth inhibition for as long as ethylene was present. In contrast, with continued application of ethylene, white millet (Panicum miliaceum) seedlings had a rapid and transient growth inhibition response, rice (Oryza sativa ‘Nipponbare’) seedlings had a slow onset of growth stimulation, and barley (Hordeum vulgare) had a transient growth inhibition response followed, after a delay, by a prolonged inhibition response. Growth stimulation in rice correlated with a decrease in the levels of rice ETHYLENE INSENSTIVE3-LIKE2 (OsEIL2) and an increase in rice F-BOX DOMAIN AND LRR CONTAINING PROTEIN7 transcripts. The gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol caused millet seedlings to have a prolonged growth inhibition response when ethylene was applied. A transient ethylene growth inhibition response has previously been reported for Arabidopsis ethylene insensitive3-1 (ein3-1) eil1-1 double mutants. Paclobutrazol caused these mutants to have a prolonged response to ethylene, whereas constitutive GA signaling in this background eliminated ethylene responses. Sensitivity to paclobutrazol inversely correlated with the levels of EIN3 in Arabidopsis. Wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings treated with paclobutrazol and mutants deficient in GA levels or signaling had a delayed growth recovery after ethylene removal. It is interesting to note that ethylene caused alterations in gene expression that are predicted to increase GA levels in the ein3-1 eil1-1 seedlings. These results indicate that ethylene affects GA levels leading to modulation of ethylene growth inhibition kinetics. PMID:22977279

  16. Anoxia tolerance in the aquatic monocot Potamogeton pectinatus absence of oxygen stimulates elongation in association with an unusually large pasteur effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, J E; Ratcliffe, R G; Jackson, M B

    2000-08-01

    Elongation by stems of overwintered tubers of Potamogeton pectinatus (L.) is strongly promoted over several days by oxygen-free conditions. Characteristics of the respiration underpinning this unusual response were examined. Anaerobic plants produced ethanol and CO(2) in approximately equimolar amounts, indicating that glycolysis coupled to alcoholic fermentation was the principal CO(2)-producing respiratory pathway. Rates of CO(2) evolution by aerobic and anaerobic whole plants (shoot and tuber) were similar, suggesting a rate of glycolysis three times that of aerobic plants, i.e. a strong Pasteur effect. In the shoot alone, anaerobic CO(2) production was twice the aerobic rate indicating a 6-fold increase in the rate of glycolysis in this tissue. Anoxic stems contained more sucrose at a stronger concentration than slower-growing aerobic stems or anaerobic leaves, demonstrating that sugar supply to the site of most rapid growth exceeded demand in the absence of oxygen. Concentrations of potentially toxic acetaldehyde in the external medium were small (approximately 0.2 mol m(-3)) during anoxia and on return to aerated conditions. Lactic acid was undetectable under anaerobic conditions and in vivo (31)P-NMR analysis of shoots revealed a cytoplasmic acidification of only

  17. Plant growth-promoting bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 increases the chlorophyll content of the monocot Lemna minor (duckweed) and the dicot Lactuca sativa (lettuce).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wakako; Sugawara, Masayuki; Miwa, Kyoko; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium that was isolated from the surface of duckweed (Lemna aoukikusa). The bacterium was observed to colonize on the plant surfaces and increase the chlorophyll content of not only the monocotyledon Lemna minor but also the dicotyledon Lactuca sativa in a hydroponic culture. This effect on the Lactuca sativa was significant in nutrient-poor (×1/100 dilution of H2 medium) and not nutrient-rich (×1 or ×1/10 dilutions of H2 medium) conditions. Strain P23 has the potential to play a part in the future development of fertilizers and energy-saving hydroponic agricultural technologies. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptomic and histological responses of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) to Meloidogyne graminicola provide new insights into root-knot nematode resistance in monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitot, Anne-Sophie; Kyndt, Tina; Haidar, Rana; Dereeper, Alexis; Collin, Myriam; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Gheysen, Godelieve; Fernandez, Diana

    2017-03-01

    The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola is responsible for production losses in rice ( Oryza sativa ) in Asia and Latin America. The accession TOG5681 of African rice, O. glaberrima , presents improved resistance to several biotic and abiotic factors, including nematodes. The aim of this study was to assess the cytological and molecular mechanisms underlying nematode resistance in this accession. Penetration and development in M. graminicola in TOG5681 and the susceptible O. sativa genotype 'Nipponbare' were compared by microscopic observation of infected roots and histological analysis of galls. In parallel, host molecular responses to M. graminicola were assessed by root transcriptome profiling at 2, 4 and 8 d post-infection (dpi). Specific treatments with hormone inhibitors were conducted in TOG5681 to assess the impact of the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid pathways on nematode penetration and reproduction. Penetration and development of M. graminicola juveniles were reduced in the resistant TOG5681 in comparison with the susceptible accession, with degeneration of giant cells observed in the resistant genotype from 15 dpi onwards. Transcriptome changes were observed as early as 2 dpi, with genes predicted to be involved in defence responses, phenylpropanoid and hormone pathways strongly induced in TOG5681, in contrast to 'Nipponbare'. No specific hormonal pathway could be identified as the major determinant of resistance in the rice-nematode incompatible interaction. Candidate genes proposed as involved in resistance to M. graminicola in TOG5681 were identified based on their expression pattern and quantitative trait locus (QTL) position, including chalcone synthase, isoflavone reductase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, WRKY62 transcription factor, thionin, stripe rust resistance protein, thaumatins and ATPase3. This study provides a novel set of candidate genes for O. glaberrima resistance to nematodes and highlights the rice- M. graminicola pathosystem as a model to study plant-nematode incompatible interactions.

  19. A Comprehensive Inventory of Alabama Coastal Zone Wetland Habitats (Swamps, Marshes, Submersed Grassbeds) from 1980 to 1982 (NCEI Accession 0161311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized maps of Mobile Bay and other coastal areas of Alabama, showing habitat types and species compositions of the vegetation in three broad categories of...

  20. Effects of invasive species on plant communities: an example using submersed aquatic plants at the regional level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Submerged aquatic plants have a key role in maintaining functioning aquatic ecosystems through their effects in the hydrological regime, sedimentation, nutrient cycling and habitats of associated fauna. Modifications of aquatic plant communities, as for example through the introduction of invasive s...

  1. A simple and rapid method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in water with a submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    levels. With an external resistance of 1000 Ω, the current density produced by the sensor (5.6±0.5~462.2±0.5 mA/m2) increased linearly with DO level up to 8.8±0.3 mg/L (regression coefficient, R2=0.9912), while the maximum response time for each measurement was less than 4 min. The current density showed...... different response to DO levels when different external resistances were applied, but a linear relationship was always observed. Investigation of the sensor performance at different substrate concentrations indicates that the organic matter contained in the domestic wastewater was sufficient to power...

  2. Utilization of Herbicide Concentration/Exposure Time Relationships for Controlling Submersed Invasive Plants on Lake Gaston, Virginia/North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    significant decreases in biomass, suggests the potential of imazamox as a plant growth regulator (PGR). Studies that focus on how imazamox could be used as...that target plant. Additional studies might focus on how imazamox could be used as a plant growth regulator in some situations. Imazamox rates of up

  3. Mud Volcanism and Fluid Venting In The Eastern Mediterranean Sea: Observations From Sidescan Sonar and Submersible Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.; Scientific Party, Medineth/Medinaut

    Mud volcanoes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea have been identified by their distinctive acoustic signature as well as their morphology and sedimentology. They appear as circular regions of high backscatter believed to be caused principally by the clast content of the mud flows forming the mud volcano. Both the MEDINAUT and MEDINETH expeditions, conducted in 1998 and 1999 over two mud fields, the Olimpi field and the Anaximander Mountains area, in Eastern Mediterranean Sea, studied mud volcanism using a multidisciplinary approach in order to determine the relationships between the activity of the mud volcanoes (importance of degassing, associated fauna) and their geophysical signature. Mud volcanoes in Eastern Mediterranean Sea vary from conical and dome-shaped reliefs from 500m to 2km wide and 100 to 200m high to large "mud pie" types up to 6km wide. Sidescan sonar records give a very high resolution of the acoustic response, enabling to distinguish several mud flows, often flowing along tectonic lineations. A clear relationship between the occurrence of mud volcanism and cold seeps and both thrust and transcurrent faulting has been observed in both mud fields, although the tectonic settings vary from purely compressional to a more transpressional stress field. The faults are inferred to provide pathways for over- pressured fluids, and secondary faulting (transcurrent and extensional faults) may facilitate mud ascension. On the basis of sidescan sonar interpretation, other typical features have been inferred such as main feeder channels, eruptive cone centers, or brine pools. The in situ observations have been used to characterize the seafloor over numerous mud volcanoes and ground-truth the sonar data. They reveal an abundance of fluid seeps, mainly methane and methane-rich brines, as well as associated specific fauna such as tube worms, clams and chemosynthetic bacteria, and specific diagenetic phenomenon i.e. carbonate crusts. Video observations proved that there may exist several other factors (crusts covering the seafloor, gas bubbles and near bottom gas hydrates) affecting the acoustic backscatter response of the mud volcano

  4. Assessment of the dye removal capability of submersed aquatic plants in a laboratory-scale wetland system using anova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Keskinkan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The textile dye (Basic Blue 41(BB41 removal capability of a laboratory-scale wetland system was presented in this study. Twenty glass aquaria were used to establish the wetland. Myriophyllum spicatum and Ceratophyllum demersum were planted in the aquaria and acclimated. After establishing flow conditions, the aquaria were fed with synthetic wastewaters containing BB41. The concentration of the dye was adjusted to 11.0 mg/L in the synthetic wastewater. Hydraulic retention times (HRTs ranged between 3 and 18 days. Effective HRTs were 9 and 18 days. The highest dye removal rates were 94.8 and 94.1% for M. spicatum and C. demersum aquaria respectively. The statistical ANOVA method was used to assess the dye removal capability of the wetland system. In all cases the ANOVA method revealed that plants in the wetland system and HRT were important factors and the wetland system was able to remove the dye from influent wastewater.

  5. State of South Carolina Cooperative Aquatic Plant Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    of a diquat and copper sulfate pentahydrate herbicide combination for hydrilla control was carried out by Yeo et. al. (1974). The copper was applied at...effective combination to control egeria and hydrilla (Gangstad, 1976). A diquat- copper sulfate combination is more effective in controlling hydrilla than the... copper resulting from the use of algacides or herbicides basic copper carbonate (malachite), copper sulfate , and copper tri- ethanolamine to control

  6. Water Quality Management Studies Lake Seminole, April-November 1978. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    srrulata; speckled alder x Bgetula nigra; river birch x Brasenia schreberi; watershield x Cabomba caroliniana; fanwort x Sphencclea zeylandica; chicken spike...crassipes; water hyacinth P Game Management Area Myipyllum spicatur; Eurasian waterrnilfoil 75 aribras iuiensis; parrotfeather 5 Cbma caroliniana; fanwort 5...splitleaf pennywort P Lemna perpusilla; commion duckweed P Fish Pond Drain Area Hydrilla verticillata; Hydrilla 75 Cabomba caroiniia; fanwort P ajps spp

  7. Ecological Effects of Exotic and Native Aquatic Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    ponds (α=0.05). ..............................................72 Figure 58. Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) counts were highest in hydrilla ponds...Anax Odonata Dragonflies & damselflies Baetidae Callibaetis Ephemeroptera Mayflies Caenidae Caenis Notonectidae Buenoa Belastomatidae...nificantly smaller and in poorer condition in the latter. Numbers of ERDC/EL TR-09-10 74 bluegills were low in hydrilla ponds. Odonata November Pond

  8. Inventory and Assessment of Aquatic Plant Management Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Paper A-81-3, U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, CE, Vicksburg, Miss. Smith, G. K. 1950. The Freshwater Macrophytes of the United...spicatumi L.) Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata SAM (L.f.) Royle) Glyphosate Giant reed (Phragmites communis SACS (Roundup) (Trin.) Rud.) No chemical -- NCS

  9. Effect of paclobutrazol on three different aquatic macrophytes under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three aquatic plants, coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum L.), hydrilla [Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle] and giant duckweed [Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden], were successfully surface sterilized and cultured on liquid basal MS (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) medium under aseptic conditions. Shoot explants obtained from ...

  10. Effect of paclobutrazol on three different aquatic macrophytes under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... Three aquatic plants, coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum L.), hydrilla [Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle] and giant duckweed [Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden], were successfully surface sterilized and cultured on liquid basal MS (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) medium under aseptic conditions. Shoot.

  11. Fish but Not Macroinvertebrates Promote Trophic Cascading Effects in High Density Submersed Plant Experimental Lake Food Webs in Two Contrasting Climate Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iglesias

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Predators play a key role in the functioning of shallow lakes. Differences between the response of temperate and subtropical systems to fish predation have been proposed, but experimental evidence is scarce. To elucidate cascading effects produced by predators in contrasting climatic zones, we conducted a mesocosm experiment in three pairs of lakes in Uruguay and Denmark. We used two typical planktivorous-omnivorous fish species (Jenynsia multidentata + Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and Gasterosteus aculeatus + Perca fluviatilis and one littoral omnivorous-predatory macroinvertebrate (Palaemonetes argentinus and Gammarus lacustris, alone and combined, in numbers resembling natural densities. Fish predation on zooplankton increased phytoplankton biomass in both climate zones, whereas the effects of predatory macroinvertebrates on zooplankton and phytoplankton were not significant in either climate zone. Macroinvertebrates (that freely colonized the sampling devices were diminished by fish in both climate areas; however, periphyton biomass did not vary among treatments. Our experiments demonstrated that fish affected the structure of both planktonic and littoral herbivorous communities in both climate regions, with a visible positive cascading effect on phytoplankton biomass, but no effects on periphyton. Altogether, fish impacts appeared to be a strong driver of turbid water conditions in shallow lakes regardless of climatic zone by indirectly contributing to increasing phytoplankton biomass.

  12. Fish but Not Macroinvertebrates Promote Trophic Cascading Effects in High Density Submersed Plant Experimental Lake Food Webs in Two Contrasting Climate Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Iglesias; Erik Jeppesen; Néstor Mazzeo; Juan Pablo Pacheco; Franco Teixeira-de Mello; Frank Landkildehus; Claudia Fosalba; Clemente, Juan M.; Mariana Meerhoff

    2017-01-01

    Predators play a key role in the functioning of shallow lakes. Differences between the response of temperate and subtropical systems to fish predation have been proposed, but experimental evidence is scarce. To elucidate cascading effects produced by predators in contrasting climatic zones, we conducted a mesocosm experiment in three pairs of lakes in Uruguay and Denmark. We used two typical planktivorous-omnivorous fish species (Jenynsia multidentata + Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and Gasteros...

  13. 1998 Annual Status Report: Submersed and Floating-Leaf Vegetation in Pools 4, 8, 13, and 26 and La Grange Pool of the Upper Mississippi River System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Yao

    2001-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation was investigated in five navigation pools in the Upper Mississippi River System using a new protocol named 'stratified random sampling' or SRS protocol for the first time in 1998...

  14. Plankton Analysis by Automated Submersible Imaging Flow Cytometry: Transforming a Specialized Research Instrument into a Broadly Accessible Tool and Extending its Target Size Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    distribution of the phytoplankton community, for example, help determine the flow of carbon and nutrients through an ecosystem and can be important...researchers with instruments to continuously monitor phytoplankton community structure and investigate questions about the world’s ocean ecosystems...version of Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), reproducing its functions via a series of modular components whose integration would result in a simple and

  15. Importance of Second-Order Difference-Frequency Wave-Diffraction Forces in the Validation of a Fast Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couling, A. J.; Goupee, A. J.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    To better access the abundant offshore wind resource, efforts across the world are being undertaken to develop and improve floating offshore wind turbine technologies. A critical aspect of creating reliable, mature floating wind turbine technology is the development, verification, and validation of efficient computer-aided-engineering (CAE) tools that can be relied upon in the design process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created a comprehensive, coupled analysis CAE tool for floating wind turbines, FAST, which has been verified and utilized in numerous floating wind turbine studies. Several efforts are currently underway that leverage the extensive 1/50th-scale DeepCwind wind/wave basin model test dataset, obtained at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) in 2011, to validate the floating platform functionality of FAST to complement its already validated aerodynamic and structural simulation capabilities. In this paper, further work is undertaken to continue this validation. In particular, the ability of FAST to replicate global response behaviors associated with dynamic wind forces, second-order difference-frequency wave-diffraction forces and their interaction with one another are investigated.

  16. A new anglerfish from eastern Australia and New Caledonia (Lophiiformes: Chaunacidae: Chaunacops), with new data and submersible observation of Chaunacops melanostomus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, H-C; McGrouther, M

    2015-03-01

    A new deep-sea anglerfish of the genus Chaunacops is described based on three specimens collected from eastern Australia and New Caledonia. It differs from its congeners in having fine dermal spinules, mixed with simple and bifurcate ones, densely covering the body, four neuromasts on the pectoral series of the lateral line and a combination of other characteristics. Data for Chaunacops melanostomus based on 31 specimens newly collected from Western Australia are provided. An underwater observation of C. melanostomus made by a remotely operated vehicle is also provided. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Computer simulating for oil fields with artificial elevation method by electrical submersible pump; Simulacao computacional para pocos de petroleo com metodo de elevacao artificial por bombeio centrifugo submerso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Evellyne da Silva; Maitelli, Andre Laurindo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Costa, Rutacio de Oliveira [PETROBRAS S.A., Natal, RN (Brazil). Unidade de Negocio RN/CE; Barbosa, Tiago de Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Computacao

    2008-07-01

    The architecture heterogeneities and petrophysical properties of carbonate reservoirs result from a combination of platform morphology, related depositional environments, relative sea level changes and diagenetic events. The reservoir layering built for static and dynamic modelling purposes should reflect the key heterogeneities (depositional or diagenetic) which govern the fluid flow patterns. The layering needs to be adapted to the goal of the modelling, ranging from full field computations of hydrocarbon volumes, to sector-based fine-scale simulations to test the recovery improvement. This paper illustrates various reservoir layering types, including schemes dominated by depositional architecture, and those more driven by the diagenetic overprint. The examples include carbonate platform reservoirs from different stratigraphic settings (Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic and Permian) and different regions (Europe, Africa and Middle East areas). This review shows how significant stratigraphic surfaces (such as sequence boundaries or maximum flooding) with their associated facies shifts, can be often considered as key markers to constrain the reservoir layering. Conversely, how diagenesis (dolomitization and karst development), resulting in units with particular poroperm characteristics, may significantly overprint the primary reservoir architecture by generating flow units which cross-cut depositional sequences. To demonstrate how diagenetic processes can create reservoir bodies with geometries that cross-cut the depositional fabric, different types of dolomitization and karst development are illustrated. (author)

  18. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice acc...

  19. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice accumulation on vessels contributes to an ext...

  20. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  1. Eau Gallie, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 608 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  2. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  3. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  4. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  5. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  6. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  8. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  9. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  10. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  11. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  12. Effects of water turbulence on variations in cell ultrastructure and metabolism of amino acids in the submersed macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) H. St. John.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapaththu, K S S; Miyagi, A; Atsuzawa, K; Kaneko, Y; Kawai-Yamada, M; Asaeda, T

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between macrophytes and water movement are not yet fully understood, and the causes responsible for the metabolic and ultrastructural variations in plant cells as a consequence of turbulence are largely unknown. In the present study, growth, metabolism and ultrastructural changes were evaluated in the aquatic macrophyte Elodea nuttallii, after exposure to turbulence for 30 days. The turbulence was generated with a vertically oscillating horizontal grid. The turbulence reduced plant growth, plasmolysed leaf cells and strengthened cell walls, and plants exposed to turbulence accumulated starch granules in stem chloroplasts. The size of the starch granules increased with the magnitude of the turbulence. Using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS), analysis of the metabolome found metabolite accumulation in response to the turbulence. Asparagine was the dominant amino acid that was concentrated in stressed plants, and organic acids such as citrate, ascorbate, oxalate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) also accumulated in response to turbulence. These results indicate that turbulence caused severe stress that affected plant growth, cell ultrastructure and some metabolic functions of E. nuttallii. Our findings offer insights to explain the effects of water movement on the functions of aquatic plants. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Application of cylindrical covers from glass-metal composite made by spin casting method for strong cases of deep-sea submersibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, V. K.; Bocharova, A. A.; Ratnikov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this work the manufacturing techniques of layered constructional material metal-glass-metal are considered by method of centrifugal casting; a similar approach to formation of a glass layer without superficial microcracks has no analogues in the world practice. The scheme of installation for production of cylindrical covers from a glass-metal composite is provided. The research of the main technological modes providing reliable connection of aluminium coverings with the glass which is in a plastic state is conducted. Optimum values of temperature parameters are defined. Methods of electronic microscopy have investigated the diffusive layer which is formed on the glass-aluminium border.

  14. A comparison of extreme structural responses and fatigue damage of semi-submersible type floating horizontal and vertical axis wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Zhengshun; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Chai, Wei

    2017-01-01

    •A comprehensive comparison of floating HAWTs and VAWTs with different blade number.•Extreme structural responses and fatigue damage are studied.•Both operational and parked conditions are considered.•The merits and disadvantages of floating HAWTs and VAWTs are revealed and highlighted.......•A comprehensive comparison of floating HAWTs and VAWTs with different blade number.•Extreme structural responses and fatigue damage are studied.•Both operational and parked conditions are considered.•The merits and disadvantages of floating HAWTs and VAWTs are revealed and highlighted....

  15. Plankton Analysis by Automated Submersible Imaging Flow Cytometry: Transforming a Specialized Research Instrument into a Broadly Accessible Tool and Extending its Target Size Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    marine applications of flow cytometry, and had sold several slightly-modified instruments (called Influx Marina ) to oceanographic institutions for...and we have begun the transfer of technology by having McLane engineers observing Olson during the construction of the next redesigned IFCB beta unit...3 WORK COMPLETED We have essentially achieved our design goals (the new instrument has already been deployed from the WHOI pier for

  16. Sinopsis sobre las Hydrocharitaceae de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Mumm Udo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic family Hydrocharitaceae is actually represented in Colombia by seven genera and seven species (Egeria densa, Apalanthe granatensis, Halophila decipiens, Hydrilla verticillata, Limnobium laevigatum, Thalassia testudinum, Vallisneria americana. A first record of Hydrilla verticillata growing spontaneously in outside conditions is made for this geographical area. A key to genera is presented, with each species briefly commented and illustrated.En Colombia la familia de plantas acuáticas Hydrocharitaceae se encuentra representada por siete géneros y siete especies (Egeria densa, Apalanthe granatensis, Halophila decipiens, Hydrilla verticillata, Limnabium laevigatum, Thalassia testudinum, Vallisneria americana. Para el país se registra por primera vez a Hydrilla verticillata. Adicionalmente se presenta una clave para los géneros, con las especies brevemente comentadas e ilustradas.

  17. Plant structure in crop production: considerations on application of FSPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Evers, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Cereals, potato and glasshouse cut rose, representing monocot annuals, vegetative propagated dicot annual and woody perennials, have different structural development. ‘Bud break’, initiating tillering (monocots) and branching (dicots) is a key process determining plant structure. Plant population

  18. AcEST: BP917248 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available KSQTVDLVLTAHPTQS+ Sbjct: 153 AEVFDALKSQTVDLVLTAHPTQSV 176 >tr|Q93XG8|Q93XG8_HYDVE Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase OS=Hydrill... Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase OS=Hydrilla verticillata PE=2 SV=2 Length = 970 Score = 134 bits (337), Exp... 182 >tr|Q93XG7|Q93XG7_HYDVE Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase OS=Hydrilla verticillata PE=2 SV=1 Length = 970

  19. ATTACHMENT STUDY OF AGROBACTERIUM TuMEPACIrNs TO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dicot plant cells, but also monocots notably corn and brome grass (Bromus inermis) bind as many bacterial cells as does D. innoxia (Lippincott and. Lippincott, 1975). Monocot cell walls were thought to have fewer bacterial attachment sites than dicots, which would account for the lack of tumour formation in some monocots.

  20. Okeanos Explorer (EX1404L2): Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring the Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — High resolution mapping data from vessel multibeam and submersible sonar systems; singlebeam and sub-bottom profile data; periodic CTD casts; submersible CTD data;...

  1. Covert Underwater Communication with Marine Mammal Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.; Quesson, B.A.J.; Benders, F.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic underwater communication is essential for the participation of friendly submersible vehicles in netcentric operations. To prevent interception of exchanged information and, not less important, detection of the submersibles in a hostile environment, the communication should be sufficiently

  2. Okeanos Explorer (EX1404L3): Northeast Seamounts and Canyons

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — High resolution mapping data from vessel multibeam and submersible sonar systems; singlebeam and sub-botoom profile data; periodic CTD casts; submersible CTD data;...

  3. Slant Riemannian maps from almost hermitian manifolds | Sahin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a generalization of holomorphic submersions, anti-invariant submersions and slant submersions, we introduce slant Riemannian maps from almost Hermitian manifolds to Riemannian manifolds. We give examples, obtain the existence conditions of slant Riemannian maps and investigate harmonicity of such maps.

  4. Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (20th) Held at Atlanta, Georgia on 18-21 November 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    glyphosate , and fenatrol have been conducted in cooperation with industry to evaluate efficacy, environmental fate, and/or toxicology of these...interact with essentially equal importance in influencing the growth and morphology of submersed freshwater macrophytes. Differences in the morphological...supply in relation to the growth of submersed macrophytes. Significantly, the photosynthetic potential of a variety of submersed freshwater

  5. Estimativa da chuva efetiva para o cultivo de arroz irrigado por submersão com lâmina contínua Estimative of the effective rainfall for rice crop irrigated by continuous submersion water depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Moreira Rota

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho consistiu na simulação da chuva efetiva da lavoura de arroz, irrigado com lâmina contínua de submersão, através da utilização de planilha eletrônica para computador. O modelo considerou condições específicas do cultivo de arroz, irrigado, na região sul do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, em planossolo de textura argilosa (albaqualf. Foram considerados dois manejos de irrigação. Um deles retratando a situação existente na região mencionada, o qual considera a aplicação da lâmina de inundação de modo uniforme, através de um incremento constante e diário de altura, até atingir o valor máximo de 100mm; e o segundo, preconizado pelas entidades de pesquisa locais, no qual a lâmina tem o mesmo incremento, porém apenas até a altura de 35mm, permanecendo fixa nesse valor, até o período de maior necessidade de altura, quando é elevada para 75mm e assim mantida até a supressão da irrigação. Os resultados obtidos demostraram valores de chuva efetiva mais elevados, quando considerada a metodologia que utiliza lâmina máxima de inundação de 75mm, do que aqueles obtidos quando o modelo considerou a lâmina máxima de 100mm. A utilização dessa lâmina de inundação pode gerar uma economia no volume líquido de água de irrigação, da ordem de 20%.A computer model was developed based on computerized spreed sheet to estimate the effective rainfall for irrigated rice by innundation. The model has considered the specific conditions of irrigated rice in the Rio Grande do Sul State in albaqualf soil. Two different irrigation water managements were considered: (i using the actual situation used by farmers and; (ii the management recommended by local research centers. In the first one, a water depth of 25mm was used since the beginning of irrigation and a progressive increase in the water table wafs used until a value of 100mm was reached. However, in the second one, the initial water depth of 25mm was increased only until reached 35mm, then was kept at this value, and when a higher water depth is recommended, it was elevated to 75mm. It was observed higher values of effective rainfall in the water depth management recommended by the research centers compared to water managementes mainly used by farmer. The implementation of this water depth managements can reduce water application up to 20%.

  6. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4910 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 08, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  7. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4912 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 09, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0037102)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  8. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4921 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 18, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  9. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4913 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 10, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0037065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  10. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4918 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 16, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036895)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  11. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4920 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 17, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  12. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4919 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 17, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036826)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  13. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4909 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 08, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036667)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  14. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4914 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 10, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0037043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  15. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4917 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 16, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036972)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  16. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4915 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 11, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0037022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  17. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4911 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 09, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036985)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This video data was recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. The data gathered during this expedition provided a strong foundation of...

  18. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4922 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 18, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036658)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These video data were recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. Data gathered during this expedition provide a strong foundation of information...

  19. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 608 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, August 30, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0039353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Islands in the Stream is a three-month scientific expedition to marine protected areas and other habitats being considered for protection from offshore of Belize in...

  20. Digital Video taken during Johnson-Sea-Link submersible dive 4916 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Florida Coast Deep Corals 2005 cruise, November 11, 2005 (NCEI Accession 0036986)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These video data were recorded during the Florida Coast Deep Corals mission of 2005. Data gathered during this expedition provide a strong foundation of information...

  1. Digital video collected during Pisces II submersible dive 880018 by Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) in the Gulf of Mexico on 1988-07-28 (NCEI Accession 0164789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Archival Information Package (AIP) contains videographic data of ocean floor biology and geology at a suspected hydrocarbon seep site in the Gulf of Mexico,...

  2. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 617 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, September 03, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0041593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Islands in the Stream is a three-month scientific expedition to marine protected areas and other habitats being considered for protection from offshore of Belize in...

  3. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 615 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, September 02, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0041370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Islands in the Stream is a three-month scientific expedition to marine protected areas and other habitats being considered for protection from offshore of Belize in...

  4. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 613 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, September 01, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0037126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The video data in this accession was captured during the Islands in the Stream mission of 2001. Islands in the Stream was a three-month scientific expedition to...

  5. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 607 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, August 29, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0039467)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Islands in the Stream is a three-month scientific expedition to marine protected areas and other habitats being considered for protection from offshore of Belize in...

  6. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  7. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  8. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 610 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data presented in the Oculina Banks Geographic Information System (OGIS) were collected as part of a cooperative project between: the National Oceanographic and...

  9. Digital video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 606 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, August 29, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0039739)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The video data in this accession was captured during the Islands in the Stream mission of 2001. Islands in the Stream was a three-month scientific expedition to...

  10. Proceedings of the Undersea Medical Society Workshop (7th) on Medical Aspects of Small Submersible Operations Held at Submarine Development Group 1, San Diego, California on 19-20 November 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    breathing gases will be avail- able for use, depending on depth--air to 40-60 m and heliox or trimix with 5% oxygen for greater depth. The gas supply...bypass line will maintain 0.25 liters/min flow if the controller IV-26 Fig. IVE-1. Overall view of JIM suit. fails closed. The oxygen is injected into... injection point).I The duration of the life support system can be worked out very simply by assuming any oxygen consumption. The life of the C02

  11. Digital Video taken during the 3-person submersible Clelia dive 609 of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration's Islands in the Stream 2001 cruise, August 30, 2001 (NCEI Accession 0037122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The video data in this accession was captured during the Islands in the Stream mission of 2001. Islands in the Stream was a three-month scientific expedition to...

  12. SEACAT CTD data of the Hawaii Undersea Research Program from 593 dives of the remotely operated vehicle and the submersibles Pisces IV and V during 1995-2012 in the North and South Pacific (NODC Accession 0116373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) was established by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Hawaii. Its...

  13. MEMPELAJARI FISIOLOGI PENCEMARAN LINGKUNGAN DENGAN TEHNIK RADIOISOTOP (Study in the Physiology of Environment Pollution Using Radiotracer Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razak Achmad Hamzah

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui: 1. Perbedaan kemampuan daya serap tumbuhan air Hydrilla verticillata, Enceng gondok (Eichhomia crassipes dan Kangkung terhadap residu Malathion, menggunakan akuarium (diisi dengan air + Hydrilla Verticillata + Enceng Gondok + Kangkung + Malathion radioisotope 14C. 2. Perbandingan kadar malathion dalam jaringan ikan yang mendapat makanan Hydrilla verticilata dengan yang mendapat makanan kangkung, menggunakan: (akuarium pertama diisi air + Hydrilla Vericillata + ikan mas + Malathion radioisotope 14C; akuarium ke dua diisi air + kangkung + ikan mas + malathion radiisotop 14C. 3. Perbandingan ukuran penyerapan pada jaringan mammalia (tikus yang diberi makan jaringan ikan mas dengan yang diberi makan tumbuhan air (kangkung yang terkontaminasi. Jaringan ikan mas dan kangkung dilakukan pengabuan basah, lalu diberikan masing-masing kepada 30 ekor tikus. Kadar Malathion dari semua percobaan satu, dua dan tiga, diketahui dengan menggunakan alat pencacah Sintilator cair (Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer, LSC- 753 (ALOKA”. Hasil yang didapat dibandingkan dengan menggunakan uji-t Student. Hasil penelitian memperlihatkan bahwa: 1. Hydrilla Verticillata lebih efisien dari pada Enceng Gondok dan Kangkung dalam menyerap residu insektisida malathion dalam air. 2. Ikan yang diberi makan Hydrilla verticillata mengkonsentrasikan malathion lebih tinggi dari pada ikan yang diberi makan kangkung. 3. Mammalia (tikus yang mengkonsumsi daging ikan yang terkontaminasi akan mengkonsentrasikan malathion dalam tubuhnya lebih banyak dari pada tikus yang memakan sayuran (kangkung yang terkontaminasi. ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to determine: 1.The comparison of absorption by aquatic plants Hydrilla verticillata, water hyacinth and water spinach of Malathion insecticide residues in water, (aquarium filled with water + Hydrilla verticillata + water hyacinth + water spinach + 20 mci 14C malathion radioisotope; 2

  14. Evaluation of butachlor for control of some submerged macrophytes along with its impact on biotic components of freshwater system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chattopadhyay, S. Adhikari, S. P. Adhikary, S. Ayyappan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the efficacy of the herbicide butachlor, (N-butoxymethyl-2 chloro-21, 61 diethyl acetanilide was tested against few common submerged macrophytes namely Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata (L. Royale, Najas (Najas minor All., Nechamandra (Nechamandra alternifolia (Roxb. Thwaites and Ottelia (Ottelia alismoides (L. Pers. of freshwater fish ponds. Almost complete decay of Hydrilla, Nechamandra and Ottelia was achieved at 7.5 L of active ingredient/ha/m butachlor within 15 days while the herbicide showed no negative effect on Najas. However at the same concentration of butachlor, total mortality of zooplankton and water fern Azolla (Azolla caroliniana Lamarck occurred within seven days. In case of few freshwater fish species like Rohu (Labeo rohita, Channa (Channa punctatus, Anabas (Anabas testitudineus and Heteropneustes (Heteropneustes fossilis, total mortality occurred upto 90 days after application of the same dose of butachlor but fish survived beyond 120 days of herbicide application indicating degradation of the herbicides.

  15. Journal of East African Natural History - Vol 100, No 1&2 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herbivory OF hydrilla verticillata by Cichlid fish in Lake Bisina, Uganda · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Fred Wanda, Brian Gidudu, Silvester Wandera, Robert S Copeland, James P Cuda, William A Overholt. http://dx.doi.org/10.2982/028.100.0107 ...

  16. Effect of paclobutrazol on three different aquatic macrophytes under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... var. tuberosus (Orchidaceae) seedlings from distant populations: implications for assessing ecotopic differentiation. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 136: 433-444. Lembi CA, Chand T (1992). Response of hydrilla and Eurasian watermilfoil to flurprimidol concentrations and exposure time. J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 30: 6-9.

  17. Hydrothermal processing of biomass from invasive aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. James Catallo; Todd F. Shupe; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hydrothermal (HT) treatment of three invasive aquatic plants (i.e., Lemna sp., Hydrilla sp., and Eichhornia sp.) with respect to the generation of semi-volatile hydrocarbon product mixtures and biomass volume reduction. Identical HT treatments yielded similar semi-...

  18. Introduced aquatic plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-native aquatic plants such as waterhyacinth and hydrilla severely impair the uses of aquatic resources including recreational faculties (lakes, reservoirs, rivers) as well as timely delivery of irrigation water for agriculture. Costs associated with impacts and management of all types of aquatic...

  19. Effects of nitric oxide on the growth and antioxidant response of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results provided the evidence that 25 - 100 μM SNP increased the growth of H. verticillata by alleviating the oxidative stress and 200 - 400 μM SNP might enhance the oxidative stress in plant cell. The results suggested that NO has dual role on the growth and ROS metabolism of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.

  20. Changes in photosynthesis and activities of enzymes involved in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... (OAA) into malic acid (MA), which exists compre- hensively in the nature. Therefore was considered that. NADP-MDH in C3 carbon metabolism had similar role compared to the C4 metabolism. In recent years, it was reported that angiosperms such as Hydrilla verticilata. (Magnin et al., 1997) and Egeria ...

  1. Decomposition characteristics of three different kinds of aquatic macrophytes and their potential application as carbon resource in constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqing; He, Shengbing; Zhou, Weili; Gu, Jianya; Huang, Jungchen; Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Decomposition of aquatic macrophytes usually generates significant influence on aquatic environment. Study on the aquatic macrophytes decomposition may help reusing the aquatic macrophytes litters, as well as controlling the water pollution caused by the decomposition process. This study verified that the decomposition processes of three different kinds of aquatic macrophytes (water hyacinth, hydrilla and cattail) could exert significant influences on water quality of the receiving water, including the change extent of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), the contents of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, etc. The influence of decomposition on water quality and the concentrations of the released chemical materials both followed the order of water hyacinth > hydrilla > cattail. Greater influence was obtained with higher dosage of plant litter addition. The influence also varied with sediment addition. Moreover, nitrogen released from the decomposition of water hyacinth and hydrilla were mainly NH3-N and organic nitrogen while those from cattail litter included organic nitrogen and NO3(-)-N. After the decomposition, the average carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) in the receiving water was about 2.6 (water hyacinth), 5.3 (hydrilla) and 20.3 (cattail). Therefore, cattail litter might be a potential plant carbon source for denitrification in ecological system of a constructed wetland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Chanchal Kumar shows how Legendre polynomials can be obtained by the Gram–Schmidt orthogonalization process. The article on the freshwater weed Hydrilla verticillata points out that its scientific management can be very beneficial to the ecosystem. V V Raman continues his Darsana Jolts, and discusses the nature of ...

  3. Genome size in Anthurium evaluated in the context of karyotypes and phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthurium is an important horticultural flower crop from family Araceae in order Alismatales, a monocot lineage considered to have diverged from other monocots prior to the divergence of the cereals lineage. Currently there is a virtual lack of molecular-genetic resources that would greatly augment...

  4. 76 FR 66685 - Foreign-Trade Zone 37-Orange County, NY, Application for Subzone, ITT Water Technology, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... special purpose subzone status for the centrifugal and submersible pump manufacturing and warehousing... above. FTZ designation would further allow ITTWT to realize logistical benefits through the use of...

  5. Investigation of Processes and Factors Regulating the Generation, Maintenance and Breakdown of Bioluminescent Thin Layers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Widder, Edith

    2001-01-01

    .... Katz's submersible holographic camera mounted on the upper work platform. Thin layers were located using real-time sensor feedback from intensified video recordings of stimulated bioluminescence...

  6. Operator-Adjustable Frame Rate, Resolution, and Gray Scale Tradeoff in Fixed-Bandwidth Remote Manipulator Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    easier. During the Campeche blowout, both a manned and an unmanned submersible were sent for. The remotely controlled TREAC submersible was loaded...hose into a socket would be easiest with high resolution and * relatively low gray scale and frame rate, while selecting the blue valve from a bank of

  7. Management of Eurasian Watermilfoil in the Columbia River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Metabolism of Selected Submersed Freshwater Macrophytes," Ecolog- ical Monographs, Vol 51, No. 2, pp 219-235. 1982. "Ecology of Submersed Macrophytes...11X Fenac X Fluridone X X X Glyphosate X X x Simazine x Xylene X 2,4-D X x X Chemical-Adjuvants (Trade Names) Asgrow 403 inverting oil X X X Big Sur

  8. Comparison of electrofishing and rotenone for sampling largemouth bass in vegetated areas of two Florida lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, W.B.; Allen, M.S.; Myers, R.A.; Estes, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the sampling precision and efficiency of electrofishing and rotenone for assessing populations of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides in vegetated portions of two Florida lakes. Sampling was conducted at Lochloosa and Orange lakes in north-central Florida from 1990 to 1999. Significant differences in length frequencies were determined between the two methods in 5 of 9 years for each lake. In years where differences existed, electrofishing collected larger fish than did rotenone. The maximum deviation between cumulative relative length frequencies for the two methods was not related to total vegetation, native emergent vegetation, or hydrilla Hydrilla verticallata coverage at either lake. Sampling precision was greater for electrofishing than for rotenone; electrofishing also required less sampling effort to detect changes in the abundance of juvenile and adult largemouth bass. Electrofishing was a more precise and cost-effective method than rotenone for estimating largemouth bass abundance.

  9. Synergistic effects of heavy metal pollutants on senescence in submerged aquatic plants. [Potamogeton pectinatus L. , Vallisneria spiralis L. , Hydrialla Verticillata (L. f. ) Royle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, S.; Choudhuri, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of many combinations of toxic concentrations of heavy metal pollutants, viz., mercuric chloride, lead acetate, cadmium chloride and cupric sulphate, on the senescence of isolated mature leaves of submerged aquatic plants, Potamogeton pectinatus L., Vallisneria spiralis L., and Hydrilla Verticillata (L.f.) Royle were studied. All of the combinations of heavy metal pollutants caused senescence in all three species by decreasing chlorophyll, DNA, RNA, protein and dry wt, and increasing free amino acid, tissue permeability, the activities of protease and RNase, and the ratio of acid to alkaline pyrophosphatase activity over control values. The effects were highest in Potamogeton and lowest in Hydrilla. The degree of senescence in the three submerged plants by combinations of toxic concentrations of heavy metal pollutants is much higher due to synergism than that by individual heavy metal pollutants.

  10. Monitoring Invasive Aquatic Vegetation in Lake Okeechobee, Florida, Using NDVI Derived from Modis Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kate; Brozen, Madeline; Malik, Sadaf; Maki, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Lake Okeechobee, located in southern Florida, encompasses approximately 1,700 sq km and is a vital part of the Lake Okeechobee and Everglades ecosystem. Major cyanobacterial blooms have been documented in Lake Okeechobee since the 1970s and have continued to plague the ecosystem. Similarly, hydrilla, water hyacinth, and water lettuce have been documented in the lake and continue to threaten the ecosystem by their rapid growth. This study examines invasive aquatic vegetation occurrence through the use of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated on MOD09 surface reflectance imagery. Occurrence during 2008 was analyzed using the Time Series Product Tool (TSPT), a MATLAB-based program developed at John C. Stennis Space Center. This project tracked spatial and temporal variability of cyanobacterial blooms, and overgrowth of water lettuce, water hyacinth, and hydrilla. In addition, this study presents an application of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to assist in water quality management.

  11. On the Basket Stinkhorn Mushroom Phallus merulinus (Phallaceae in Mangalore, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Sridhar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Basket Stinkhorm Mushroom Phallus merulinus is reported from the monocot debris of Mangalore University Arbortum. Its occurrence, growth and characteristics are compared with other Phallus spp.

  12. Main: IBOXCORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IBOXCORE S000199 2-May-1998 (last modified) kehi I box; I-box; Conserved sequence u...pstream of light-regulated genes; Conserved sequence upstream of light-regulated genes of both monocots and dico

  13. Environ: E00614 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00614 Dioscorea nipponica root Crude drug Dioscorea nipponica [TAX:64700] Dioscore...aceae (yam family) Dioscorea nipponica root Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Dioscoreaceae (yam family) E00614 Dioscorea nipponica root ...

  14. Environ: E00739 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [TAX:100532], Dracaena [TAX:39502] Asparagaceae (asparagus family) Dracaena ombet, Dracaena cinnabari, Drac...aena draco resin Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Asparagaceae (asparagus family) E00739 Dracaena resin ...

  15. Environ: E00751 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00751 Dendrobium chrysanthum stem Crude drug Dendrobium chrysanthum [TAX:154291] Orchidaceae... (orchid family) Dendrobium chrysanthum stem Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Orchidaceae (orchid family) E00751 Dendrobium chrysanthum stem ...

  16. Environ: E00654 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00654 Curcuma tuberous root Crude drug Curcuma [TAX:99568] Zingiberaceae (ginger family) Curcuma tuber...ous root Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Zingiberaceae (ginger family) E00654 Curcuma tuberous root ...

  17. Environ: E00409 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00409 Pleione pseudobulb Crude drug Pleione [TAX:141751] Orchidaceae (orchid family) Pleione pseudobulb... (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Orchidaceae (orchid family) E00409 Pleione pseudobulb ...

  18. Environ: E00615 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00615 Scilla scilloides bulb Crude drug Scilla scilloides [TAX:49652] Liliaceae (l...ily family) Scilla scilloides bulb (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Liliaceae (lily family) E00615 Scilla scilloides bulb ...

  19. Environ: E00596 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00596 Tulipa edulis bulb Crude drug Tulipa edulis, Tulipa [TAX:13305] Liliaceae (l...ily family) Tulipa edulis bulb (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Liliaceae (lily family) E00596 Tulipa edulis bulb ...

  20. Environ: E00616 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00616 Allium macrostemon bulb Crude drug Allium macrostemon [TAX:91198] Liliaceae ...(lily family) Allium macrostemon bulb (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Liliaceae (lily family) E00616 Allium macrostemon bulb ...

  1. Environ: E00352 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odoratum [TAX:82207], Polygonatum macropodium, Polygonatum prattii, Polygonatum [TAX:16195] Liliaceae (lily...ried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Liliaceae (lily family) E00352 Polygonatum rhizome ...

  2. Environ: E00284 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fficinale [TAX:142615], Dendrobium nobile [TAX:94219] Ruscaceae (lily-of-the-valley family) Dendrobium stem ...Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Ruscaceae (lily-of-the-valley family) E00284 Dendrobium ...

  3. Environ: E00292 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00292 Dayflower Crude drug Commelina communis [TAX:4744] Commelinaceae (spiderwort... family) Commelina communis whole herb Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Commelinaceae (spiderwort family) E00292 Dayflower ...

  4. Environ: E00674 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00674 Bolboschoenus fluviatilis tuber Crude drug Bolboschoenus fluviatilis [TAX:38...8563] Cyperaceae (sedge family) Bolboschoenus fluviatilis tuber (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Cyperaceae (sedge family) E00674 Bolboschoenus fluviatilis tuber ...

  5. Environ: E00344 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hor [CPD:C00808] Amomum kravanh [TAX:649195], Amomum compactum [TAX:252847] Zingiberaceae (ginger family) Am...omum mature fruit Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Zingiberaceae (ginger family) E00344 Amomum kravanh seed ...

  6. Environ: E00439 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Alpinetin, Cardamomin Alpinia katsumadai, Alpinia [TAX:94326] Zingiberaceae (ginger family) Alpinia katsuma...dai mature seed (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Zingiberaceae (ginger family) E00439 Alpinia katsumadai seed ...

  7. Environ: E00353 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00353 Kaempferia galanga rhizome Crude drug Kaempferia galanga [TAX:97750] Zingibe...raceae (ginger family) Kaempferia galanga rhizome Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Zingiberaceae (ginger family) E00353 Kaempferia galanga rhizome ...

  8. Environ: E00437 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00437 Alpinia galanga fruit Alpiniae galangae fructus Crude drug Alpinia galanga [...TAX:94327] Zingiberaceae (ginger family) Alpinia galanga fruit (dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Zingiberaceae (ginger family) E00437 Alpinia galanga fruit ...

  9. Environ: E00347 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00347 Allium leaf sheath Crude drug Allyl sulfide Allium fistulosum [TAX:35875] Liliaceae (lily family) All...ium leaf sheath Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Monocot plants Liliaceae (lily family) E00347 Allium leaf sheath ...

  10. Field and laboratory evaluation of the influence of copper-diquat on apple snails in southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Imlay, M.J.; McMillan, W.E.; Martin, T.W.; Takekawa, Jean E.; Johnson, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The recent decline of apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) populations in canals surrounding Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Florida coincided with the use of copper-diquat for the control of the aquatic weed hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata). Field and laboratory studies were designed to assess the effects of copper-diquat on apple snails, which are the primary food of the endangered snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis (formerly known as the Everglade kite). Acute toxicities (96-h LC50 values) of Cutrine-Plus and Komeen (chelated formulations of copper) to immature apple snails were 22 and 24 μg/L, respectively. Diquat was toxic at a concentration of 1,800 μg/L and did not increase the toxicity of copper when the chemicals were used in combination. Evaluation of field samples indicated that copper concentrations were higher in detritus than in water, plants and mud, and that there was a gradient of copper concentration from the canal to the interior, the highest residues being in samples from the canal. Copper associated with detritus (up to 150 μg/g) had no effect on growth or survival of apple snails in field cage and tank studies. Also, field applications of copper-diquat to hydrilla had no effect on survival of caged adult and immature snails. Copper from field applications was rapidly taken out of solution by plants and organic material in the water and subsequently incorporated into the bottom detritus. Although the effects of repeated applications of copper-diquat and high body burdens of copper (accumulated during exposure to herbicidal treatment) on survival and reproduction of apple snails are not known, the information available indicates that treatment of hydrilla with copper-diquat was probably not responsible for the decline in the apple snail population. Application at recommended rates should pose no threat to these snails in the organically rich waters of southern Florida.

  11. Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    I COPY AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM .q TECHNICAL REPORT A-90-7 >AD-A226 125 BIOASSAY OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATOR ACTIVITY ON AQUATIC PLANTS... Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lembi, Carole A.; Netherland, Michael D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...OF THIS PAGE 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continued). Aquatic plants Hydrilla Bensulfuron methyl Paclobutrazol Bioassay Plant growth regulator Eurasian

  12. Point Intercept and Surface Observation GPS (SOG): A Comparison of Survey Methods - Lake Gaston, NC/VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    and exhibited low diversity, domi- nated by coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum L.) and muskgrass (Chara spp.), but included traces of a naiad ( Najas ...giant lyngbya N 0.2 0.6 Myriophyllum spicatum Eurasian watermilfoil E 0.3 0.8 Najas guadalupensis southern naiad N 0.5 1.5 Nelumbo lutea American...were observed mixed with hydrilla. Naiads (either southern naiad and/or the exotic brittle naiad, Najas minor All.) were also found in mixed

  13. Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants. Selected Life History Information of Animal Species on Lake Conway, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    of the problem aquatic plant hydrilla. Information developed in this report will1i(Continued) DD FOR W~S13 Enon r mOF N Vs is NossLeftUfn’n ASECURITY...and commercial d. Unknown management potential e. Not sensitive f. Omnivorous , including terres- trial and aquatic insects, macrocrustaceans, fish...threat- ened or endangered lists c. Not recreational or commercial d. Unknown management potential e. Not sensitive f. Largely vegetarian in diet h. i

  14. US Department of Agriculture/Corps of Engineers Cooperative Aquatic Plant Control Research. Annual Report for FY 1982. Biological and Chemical Control Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    collections from Lake Jackson, Florida, and Lewis Pond, Georgia (collections (Fla.) 79305; (Ga.) 79390). 16. Tetragoneuria sepia Gloyd 1 nymph from Lake...Munroe 1972). While the larva of 0. callista is unknown, Dr. Habeck believes that these specimens are this species based on unique characteristics which...locations provided an indication of the geographic variability of the fauna associated with hydrilla. Characteristics Inspection of the values listed

  15. Stormwater Discussion Session - Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Jon

    2006-01-01

    The Stormwater panel addressed water quality impacts on the Wakulla springshed stemming from stormwater discharge into the basin; correlation of discharge with precipitation; relationship between land use and the quantity and quality of runoff and use of Florida's stormwater program and BMP's to address these impacts; nutrient loading; local efforts to reduce stormwater pollution; and, the role of phosphorus vs. nitrate concentrations as triggers to eutrophication and Hydrilla and algal growt...

  16. ALTERNATE FOOD-CHAIN TRANSFER OF THE TOXIN LINKED TO AVIAN VACUOLAR MYELINOPATHY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ENDANGERED FLORIDA SNAIL KITE (ROSTRHAMUS SOCIABILIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Shelley R; Haynie, Rebecca S; Williams, Susan M; Wilde, Susan B

    2016-04-28

    Avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) is a neurologic disease causing recurrent mortality of Bald Eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) and American Coots ( Fulica americana ) at reservoirs and small impoundments in the southern US. Since 1994, AVM is considered the cause of death for over 170 Bald Eagles and thousands of American Coots and other species of wild birds. Previous studies link the disease to an uncharacterized toxin produced by a recently described cyanobacterium, Aetokthonos hydrillicola gen. et sp. nov. that grows epiphytically on submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). The toxin accumulates, likely in the gastrointestinal tract of waterbirds that consume SAV, and birds of prey are exposed when feeding on the moribund waterbirds. Aetokthonos hydrillicola has been identified in all reservoirs where AVM deaths have occurred and was identified growing abundantly on an exotic SAV hydrilla ( Hydrilla verticillata ) in Lake Tohopekaliga (Toho) in central Florida. Toho supports a breeding population of a federally endangered raptor, the Florida Snail Kite ( Rostrhamus sociabilis ) and a dense infestation of an exotic herbivorous aquatic snail, the island applesnail ( Pomacea maculata ), a primary source of food for resident Snail Kites. We investigated the potential for transmission in a new food chain and, in laboratory feeding trials, confirmed that the AVM toxin was present in the hydrilla/A. hydrillicola matrix collected from Toho. Additionally, laboratory birds that were fed apple snails feeding on hydrilla/A. hydrillicola material from a confirmed AVM site displayed clinical signs (3/5), and all five developed brain lesions unique to AVM. This documentation of AVM toxin in central Florida and the demonstration of AVM toxin transfer through invertebrates indicate a significant risk to the already diminished population of endangered Snail Kites.

  17. Hostplant change and paleoclimatic events explain diversification shifts in skipper butterflies (Family: Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Warren, Andrew D; Collins, Steve C; Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa

    2017-08-02

    Skippers (Family: Hesperiidae) are a large group of butterflies with ca. 4000 species under 567 genera. The lack of a time-calibrated higher-level phylogeny of the group has precluded understanding of its evolutionary past. We here use a 10-gene dataset to reconstruct the most comprehensive time-calibrated phylogeny of the group, and explore factors that affected the diversification of these butterflies. Ancestral state reconstructions show that the early hesperiid lineages utilized dicots as larval hostplants. The ability to feed on monocots evolved once at the K-Pg boundary (ca. 65 million years ago (Mya)), and allowed monocot-feeders to diversify much faster on average than dicot-feeders. The increased diversification rate of the monocot-feeding clade is specifically attributed to rate shifts in two of its descendant lineages. The first rate shift, a four-fold increase compared to background rates, happened ca. 50 Mya, soon after the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum, in a lineage of the subfamily Hesperiinae that mostly fed on forest monocots. The second rate shift happened ca. 40 Mya in a grass-feeding lineage of Hesperiinae when open-habitat grasslands appeared in the Neotropics owing to gradual cooling of the atmospheric temperature. The evolution of monocot feeding strongly influenced diversification of skippers. We hypothesize that although monocot feeding was an intrinsic trait that allowed exploration of novel niches, the lack of extensive availability of monocots comprised an extrinsic limitation for niche exploration. The shifts in diversification rate coincided with paleoclimatic events during which grasses and forest monocots were diversified.

  18. Species and biogeochemical cycles of organic phosphorus in sediments from a river with different aquatic plants located in Huaihe River Watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, He Zhong; Pan, Wei; Ren, Li Jun; Liu, Eeng Feng; Shen, Ji; Geng, Qi Fang; An, Shu Qing

    2015-01-01

    The results of phosphorus fractionation in the sediments from a contaminated river containing different aquatic plants, analyzed by solution 31P-NMR for Organic Phosphorus, showed that the concentration of Inorganic Phosphorus dominated in all species and Organic Phosphorus accounted for over 20% of Total Phosphorus. In general, orthophosphate was dominant in all the sampling sites. The proportion of Organic Phosphorus accounting for the Total Phosphorus in the sediments with different plant decreased in the following order: Paspalum distichum>Typha orientalis>Hydrilla verticillata. Phosphorus-accumulation ability of Paspalum distichum was obviously stronger than Typha orientalis and Hydrilla verticillata. The Organic Phosphorus was in aquatic plants dominated by humic-associated P (Hu-P), which converted to Inorganic Ohosphorus more significantly in submerged plants than in emerged plants. The sediment dominated by Paspalum distichum abundantly accumulated Organic Phosphorus in the orthophosphate monoester fraction. The degradation and mineralization of orthophosphate monoester was the important source of high Inorganic Phosphorus concentration and net primary productivity in Suoxu River. The Organic Phosphorus derived from Typha orientalis and Hydrilla verticillata was dramatically converted to Inorganic Phosphorus when the environmental factors varied.

  19. Is there evidence of optimisation for carbon efficiency in plant proteomes?

    KAUST Repository

    Jankovic, Boris R.

    2011-07-25

    Flowering plants, angiosperms, can be divided into two major clades, monocots and dicots, and while differences in amino acid composition in different species from the two clades have been reported, a systematic analysis of amino acid content and distribution remains outstanding. Here, we show that monocot and dicot proteins have developed distinct amino acid content. In Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar, as in the ancestral moss Physcomitrella patens, the average mass per amino acid appears to be independent of protein length, while in the monocots rice, maize and sorghum, shorter proteins tend to be made of lighter amino acids. An examination of the elemental content of these proteomes reveals that the difference between monocot and dicot proteins can be largely attributed to their different carbon signatures. In monocots, the shorter proteins, which comprise the majority of all proteins, are made of amino acids with less carbon, while the nitrogen content is unchanged in both monocots and dicots. We hypothesise that this signature could be the result of carbon use and energy optimisation in fast-growing annual Poaceae (grasses). © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Efficacy of commercial earplugs in preventing water intrusion during swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Hossein; Lee, Austin; Kiumehr, Saman; Zardouz, Shawn; Shahriari, Shawhin; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficacy of commercially available earplugs in preventing water intrusion in healthy individuals. Experimental study. Tertiary care medical center. Ten subjects (20 ears) were assessed. After insertion of the earplugs, subjects underwent 3 standardized head-wetting protocols, including (1) surface swimming for 10 minutes, which entailed no head submersion and moderate splashing; (2) head submersion at a 90-cm depth for 20 seconds with their head upright; and (3) head submersion at a 90-cm depth with head tilted 90 degrees left and then tilted 90 degrees right for 10 seconds on each side to apply vertical pressure. Color change of a wetness indicator was used to determine water intrusion after each protocol. The same protocol was repeated for all 9 earplugs. Water intrusion was observed in 44%, 67%, and 88% of ears after surface swimming, horizontal submersion, and vertical submersion, respectively. The results revealed a significant difference in the waterproofing qualities of the various types of earplugs. The soft silicone type (Pillow Soft) earplug had the lowest rate of water penetration during all 3 protocols (P earplugs, Pillow Soft and Aquaseal, were only significant during the horizontal submersion protocol (P = .008). Water intrusion occurred even with the use of earplugs. The intrusion was more significant with horizontal or vertical head submersion. The soft silicone Pillow Soft earplug was the most effective earplug for preventing water intrusion in surface swimming.

  1. Behaviour and time allocation of the mud shrimp, Corophium volutator, during the tidal cycle: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Backer, Annelies; van Ael, Evy; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Despite the numerous ecological and behavioural studies, relatively little is known about the behavioural dynamics of Corophium volutator during the tidal cycle. In the present study, the behaviour of C. volutator was observed in the laboratory in a tide-simulated aquarium, and time allocation of the different activities was quantified. Overall, the surface activity was low and showed a steep decline after submersion. A clear tide-based cyclic pattern was found, with a boost of activity immediately after first submersion, continuing during submersion, and shifting over a period with decreasing activity towards almost total inactivity at the end of emersion.

  2. LEGACY - EOP Gold Coral (Gerardia sp.) Growth Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gold coral (Gerardia sp.) trees that were inspected years earlier on Pisces submersible dives were revisited and their change in size measured. The fishery for...

  3. 78 FR 40891 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations: Military Vehicles; Vessels of War...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ..., et al. Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations: Military Vehicles; Vessels of War... the Export Administration Regulations: Military Vehicles; Vessels of War; Submersible Vessels..., Department of Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule adds to the Export Administration Regulations...

  4. Experimental Performance Study of a High Speed Oil Lubricated Polymer Thrust Bearing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Jie; Blair, Barry; Argires, John; Pitsch, Donald

    2015-01-01

    .... Polymer based materials are alternative materials that can operate at high temperatures and with thin films and have been in use for many decades in high load applications, such as electric submersible pumps (ESP...

  5. Lithium Battery Fire Tests and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-25

    hydrogen explosion) Potable Water Flooding Suppression, cooling, exposure protection Shorting, collateral damage, electrolysis (hydrogen......this objective is to rapidly submerse the battery pack in water . The severity of the initial reaction, the proximity of the adjacent cells, and the

  6. A Multi-Depth Underwater Spectroradiometer for Validation of Remotely-Sensed Ocean Color and Estimation of Seawater Biogeochemical Properties Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A mobile-deployable, submersible multi-depth, simultaneous, spectro-radiometer system (AquaTree) was designed under phase-I, and key elements were tested in the...

  7. Superconducting Electric Boost Pump for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A submersible, superconducting electric boost pump sized to meet the needs of future Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems in the 25,000 lbf thrust range is proposed....

  8. Exploring Alaska's Seamounts on RV Atlantis in North Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Alaska between 20040730 and 20040823

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Five seamounts (Denson, Dickins, Pratt, Welker and Giacomini) in the Gulf of Alaska that had not previously been observed by manned submersible or ROV were...

  9. Nymphaeaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, A.L.

    1966-01-01

    Aquatic, annual or commonly perennial herbs, generally with submersed rhizomes. Leaves alternate, floating or emersed, long-petiolate; blade peltate or falsely peltate. Stipules present or wanting. Flowers solitary, hermaphrodite, actinomorphic, often fragrant; peduncle long. Sepals 4—15, free,

  10. Investigation of the influence of Ceratophyllum demersum to refine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Gandomkar et al., 2002). Conventional methods ... submersed plant and commonly seen in ponds, lakes, ditches, and quiet streams with moderate to high ... is growing near the lake bottom, it will form modified leaves, which it uses to anchor to the.

  11. Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants. Report 2. First Year Poststocking Results. Volume VII. A Model for Evaluation of the Response of the Lake Conway, Florida, Ecosystem to Introduction of the White Amur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    mentation in submersed macrophyte beds provides detritus for coloniza- tion by microbes and consumption by benthic invertebrates. Thus, both benthic and...gyrinus Zooplankton, benthic invertebrates ( tadpole madtom) Heterandria formosa Benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, (least killifish) filamentous algae

  12. NANAHAB -- Habitat polygons for the nearshore North Anacapa Island, Channel Islands NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Benthic habitat polygon coverages have been created for marine reserve locations surrounding the Santa Barbara Basin. Diver, ROV and submersible video transects,...

  13. On the operational aspects of subsea systems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    The scientific and commercial underwater activities in the next decades primarily in 'undersea vehicles' and 'manned submersibles' will be taking place in the oceans and ocean related technology. The paper underlines some of the operational aspects...

  14. 75 FR 61479 - Western Passage OCGenTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... consist of: (1) 2 OCGen\\TM\\ hydrokinetic tidal devices each consisting of four 150-kilowatt turbine... mooring system; (4) a 1,500-foot-long submersible cable connecting the turbine-generating units of each...

  15. Oceanographic data collected during the Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 aboard NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown in Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope from 2007-06-03 to 2007-07-06 (NCEI Accession 0053265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Expedition produced 600 DVDs of video recorded from a Science Camera, a Brow Camera and a Pilot's Camera from the JASON submersible; a video annotations log...

  16. Oceanographic data collected during the Mountains in the Sea: Exploring the New England Seamount Chain 2003 on RV Atlantis in North Atlantic Ocean from July 11, 2003 - July 19, 2003 (NODC Accession 0072308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This summer, with the help of the Alvin submersible, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and educators visited several little known seamounts in the North...

  17. Impact of offshore placer mining experiments (PLAMEX) on the sediment size and heavy minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Fernandes, D.

    Two offshore placer mining experiments (PLAMEX) were conducted using submersible pumps specially designed by Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI), Durgapur (India) at 8 m water depth in Kalbadevi Bay (PLAMEX-I), Ratnagiri...

  18. A Simulation Model on the Competition for Light of Meadow-forming and Canopy-forming Aquatic Macrophytes at High and Low Nutrient Availability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    2004-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed that focuses on the ability of two competing submersed macrophytes, meadow-forming and canopy-forming, to maintain their biomass under different environmental conditions...

  19. International Symposium on Mine Warfare Vessels and Systems Held at London, England on 12-15 June 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-19

    PINGUIN Al vehicle (no. 15a). In this 10 and 15) described wire guided, re- system the submersible carries a mine- motely controlled, small...described the PINGUIN B3 system, which face catamaran which contains a diesel- will be used on the new German minehunt- electric generator. Communication...DSQS-11H sonar. The PINGUIN presentation was a set of photographs of Al submersible has dimensions of the sonar display showing high-resolu

  20. The JASON Remotely Operated Vehicle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Project FAMOUS were the French bathyscaph ARCHIMEDE and the submersible CYANA as well as the American submersible ALVIN (ref. 6). In all, forty-two dives...their thrust characteristics and improved their low-level control over the thrusters broad dynamic range (ref. 31). During the JASON vehicle design a...his console is the JASON control box (figure 12). On the left is a grip control for thrusting JASON up or down. Next to it is a push button for