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Sample records for submerged terraces yellowstone

  1. Geomorphic evidence for Quaternary tectonics on the southern flank of the Yellowstone hotspots from terraces and stream profiles along the Hoback and Snake River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, Aaron; Pederson, Joel; Tuzlak, Daphnee

    2017-04-01

    The greater Yellowstone region offers a type example of Earth surface response to a mantle anomaly. Motion of the North American plate across the Yellowstone plume over the past 17 Ma is predicted to have produced a wave of transient uplift and extension of the upper crust. In the wake of the plume, the Snake River Plain (SRP) has been subsiding 4-8 km due to a combination of crustal loading by basaltic magmatism and cooling. Studying patterns and rates of Quaternary incision of rivers flowing off the Yellowstone plateau can test models about the distribution and timing of active uplift, subsidence, and faulting, improving our understanding of the geodynamics and the hazards in the region. We present results from surveying and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of river terraces along the Hoback and upper Snake rivers (western Wyoming and southeastern Idaho), which provide a study transect from the modern Yellowstone hotspot center, across zones of changing fault activity, into the subsiding SRP. Downstream of Palisades Reservoir, dated fill terraces reveal that the Snake River has seen no apparent net incision since 50-60 ky. Moreover, a paleo-channel bed preserved by a 2 My-old basalt flow and exposed <10 m above the modern river suggests that net incision rates averaged over 2 My were <5 m/My. In contrast, upstream of Alpine, we find that three levels of 10-90 ky-old strath terraces record recent incision at rates of 0.1-0.3 mm/y along the deeply incised Alpine Canyon and the Hoback River. Here, the pattern of incision rates appear to be controlled by local baselevel fall along normal faults and we hypothesize that rates of subsidence of the SRP in the Quaternary have been relatively slow (< 0.1 mm/y).

  2. Terrace Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Heather

    2010-01-01

    The "Terrace Town" program brings architecture and city planning curriculum to elementary schools in Madison, Wisconsin, and surrounding areas. Over eight weeks, classrooms discuss what makes a community livable, sustainable, and kid-friendly. Throughout the process, students gain a better understanding of their own city environments and…

  3. Staking Terraces Online: A Terrace Layout Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrace construction in Missouri exceeded 3 million feet at a cost of over $8 million in 2008. Up to 50 % of the total construction and design time is spent on the terrace layout itself. A web-based computer program, MOTERR, has been developed to design terrace layouts. The program utilizes digital ...

  4. Post-glacial inflation-deflation cycles, tilting, and faulting in the Yellowstone Caldera based on Yellowstone Lake shorelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Cannon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Grant A.; Trebesch, Matthew J.; Watts, Raymond D.

    2002-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera, like many other later Quaternary calderas of the world, exhibits dramatic unrest. Between 1923 and 1985, the center of the Yellowstone caldera rose nearly one meter along an axis between its two resurgent domes (Pelton and Smith, 1979, Dzurisin and Yamashita, 1987). From 1985 until 1995-6, it subsided at about two cm/yr (Dzurisin and others, 1990). More recent radar interferometry studies show renewed inflation of the northeastern resurgent dome between 1995 and 1996; this inflation migrated to the southwestern resurgent dome from 1996 to 1997 (Wicks and others, 1998). We extend this record back in time using dated geomorphic evidence of postglacial Yellowstone Lake shorelines around the northern shore, and Yellowstone River levels in the outlet area. We date these shorelines using carbon isotopic and archeological methods. Following Meyer and Locke (1986) and Locke and Meyer (1994), we identify the modern shoreline as S1 (1.9 ? 0.3 m above the lake gage datum), map paleoshoreline terraces S2 to S6, and infer that the prominent shorelines were cut during intracaldera uplift episodes that produced rising water levels. Doming along the caldera axis reduces the gradient of the Yellowstone River from Le Hardys Rapids to the Yellowstone Lake outlet and ultimately causes an increase in lake level. The 1923-1985 doming is part of a longer uplift episode that has reduced the Yellowstone River gradient to a ?pool? with a drop of only 0.25 m over most of this 5 km reach. We also present new evidence that doming has caused submergence of some Holocene lake and river levels. Shoreline S5 is about 14 m above datum and estimated to be ~12.6 ka, because it post-dates a large hydrothermal explosion deposit from the Mary Bay area (MB-II) that occurred ~13 ka. S4 formed about 8 m above datum ~10.7 ka as dated by archeology and 14C, and was accompanied by offset on the Fishing Bridge fault. About 9.7 ka, the Yellowstone River eroded the ?S-meander?, followed

  5. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  6. Terraces and contour farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraces are earthen embankments constructed across the prevailing field land slope. They have been used in differing forms for thousands of years in an attempt to protect steep land slopes from runoff induced erosion. Contour farming, where tillage and planting create ridges and furrows at nearly...

  7. The cafeteria terrace

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    The large terrace area outside Restaurant 1 at CERN is a hive of activity in the summer. Visitors and staff members meet here for breaks from work. Often the air is filled with discussion in many different accents and languages on topics from theoretical physics to the weekend's activities.

  8. Fossilization of Coniform (Phormidium) Stromatolites In Siliceous Thermal Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jack; Bebout, Brad; Jahnke, Linda; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have studied fossilization processes in well-developed cyanobacterial mats present in mid-terrace ponds of silica-precipitating thermal springs of Yellowstone National Park. These mats occur over temperatures of approx.35-60 C and are dominated by species of Phormidium. Within Bonded systems two end member environments have been distinguished based temperature, depth, and the stability of spring inflows, each differing substantially in the style of stromatolite morphogenesis and fossilization. Type 1 systems include shallow, ephemeral ponds where water flow and temperature fluctuates widely on a seasonal basis; mats typically secrete rapidly up to the air-water interface, forming exposed islands. Silicification occurs primarily by the wicking of water onto the surface of exposed mats, leading to the evaporative concentration of silica near the surface. pH microelectronic measurements in partially-exposed columns show strong gradients in pH with values exceeding 10.5 in the upper am of silicifying mats, decreasing to stromatolites become silicified first, followed by the bases. This typically leads to extensive fragmentation during the initial stages of burial. Case 2 systems include deeper ponds where the water flow, temperature and depth are seasonally more stable, and where mats develop larger-scale tufts and columns. Alkalinity in permanently submerged mats increases into tuft interiors from approx.9.0 near the surface to >10.0 at depth. Moderate silicification is apparent throughout mat frameworks, although there is frequently a densely silicified core near the base. In Type 2 systems, preservation of the coniform and columnar architecture of stromatoilites is much more robust. Sub-fossil examples suggest minimal fragmentation prior to burial. Comparative rapid analysis of the phone zones of submerged and exposed (silicifying) mats demonstrated the recovery of comparable levels of esterified fatty acids in both types of mats. Membrane lipids apparently

  9. Assessing functional equivalency of nekton habitat in enhanced habitats: Comparison of terraced and unterraced marsh ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, M.K.; Gossman, B.; Nyman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    A primary goal of many coastal restoration programs is to increase nekton habitat in terms of both quantity and quality. Using shallow water ponds rehabilitated with a technique called marsh terracing, we examined the quality of nekton habitat created, using and comparing several metrics including nekton density and diversity, functional group composition, and weight-length relationships as indirect measures of habitat quality. We examined three paired terraced and unterraced marsh ponds in southwest Louisiana. Nekton, submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), and soil and water quality variables were sampled bimonthly from April 2004 through April 2005 at four subtidal habitat types: terraced nearshore, terraced open water, unterraced nearshore, and unterraced open water. Results indicate that terraced ponds had increased the habitat value of degrading unterraced ponds over open water areas for estuarine nekton; nekton density and richness were similar between terraced and unterraced nearshore habitat types, but greater at all nearshore as compared to open water sites. Analysis of the distribution of nekton functional groups and weight:length ratios indicates the terraced and unterraced pond habitats were not functioning similarly: distribution of nekton functional groups differed significantly between habitat types with greater percentages of benthic-oriented species at unterraced open water habitats and higher percentage of open water species in terraced ponds as compared to unterraced ponds, and two of the six numerically dominant fish species had greater weight-length relationships in unterraced ponds as compared to terraced ponds. This lack of functional equivalency may be attributed to environmental differences between terraced and unterraced ponds such as water depth or SAV biomass, or the relatively young age of the terraces studied, which may not have allowed for the development of some critical habitat variables, such as soil organic matter that was found to

  10. US State Submerged Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. Section 1301 et seq.) grants coastal states title to natural resources located within their coastal submerged lands and navigable...

  11. Wolverine in Greater Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry Murphy; Jason Wilmot; Jeff Copeland; Dan Tyers; John. Squires

    2011-01-01

    The wolverine is one of the least studied carnivores in North America, particularly in the contiguous United States where it occurs at the southern extent of its range. This project documented the distribution of wolverines in the eastern portion of Yellowstone National Park and adjoining areas of national forest and their population characteristics, habitat...

  12. Galveston Bay Marsh Terracing 2001-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marsh terracing is used to restore coastal wetlands by converting shallow nonvegetated bottom to intertidal marsh. Terraces are constructed from excavated bottom...

  13. CERN gets a new terrace

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    For the last few days, people working on the CERN site have been able to take advantage of the new terrace to relax on and make the most of the nice weather. What more could you ask for in your work place?   New terrace between building 39 and 40 As part of the programme of renewal and improvement of CERN's green areas, the GS Department entrusted Genève Espaces Verts, the company responsible for their upkeep and management, with the creation of a new terrace between Buildings 39 and 40. The terrace, which is made of a wood selected for its ability to withstand variations in temperature, is shady in the mornings and in the full sun from midday onwards. It can seat about a hundred people. Users can now unwind or drink their coffee at leisure in a peaceful and harmonious setting surrounded by flowers. Even here, though, physics is never far away: the flower pots made from the protective end-caps of the LHC magnets serve as a reminder of what we are all here for.     &...

  14. The 1988 Fires in Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, Abby

    2008-01-01

    The 1988 fires at Yellowstone National Park burned 1.4 million acres in the tri-state areas of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho--encompassing the greater Yellowstone area--and burned some 800,000 acres within the park itself (Franke 2000). This article discusses this extraordinary fire event and contains helpful resources for bringing the science of…

  15. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (~51,000 pyrosequencing reads; V1 and V2 regions) and Sanger sequencing of 200 near-full-length polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clones. Automated classifiers (Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and Greengenes) were problematic for the 454-FLX reads (wrong domain or phylum), although BLAST analysis of the 454-FLX reads against the phylogenetically placed full-length Sanger sequenced PCR clones proved reliable. Most of the archaeal diversity was associated with vents, and as expected there were differences between the vents and the near-surface photic zone samples. Thaumarchaeota dominated all samples: vent-associated organisms corresponded to the largely uncharacterized Marine Group I, and in surface waters, ~69-84% of the 454-FLX reads matched archaeal clones representing organisms that are Nitrosopumilus maritimus-like (96-97% identity). Importance of the lake nitrogen cycling was also suggested by >5% of the alkaline vent phylotypes being closely related to the nitrifier Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. The Euryarchaeota were primarily related to the uncharacterized environmental clones that make up the Deep Sea Euryarchaeal Group or Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group-6. The phylogenetic parallels of Yellowstone Lake archaea to marine microorganisms provide opportunities to examine interesting evolutionary tracks between freshwater and marine lineages.

  16. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eClingenpeel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1,349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels. However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (70 pyrosequencing reads was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  17. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  18. Terrace Layout Using a Computer Assisted System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a web-based terrace design tool based on the MOTERR program is presented, along with representative layouts for conventional and parallel terrace systems. Using digital elevation maps and geographic information systems (GIS), this tool utilizes personal computers to rapidly construct ...

  19. Agricultural Terrace Pattern along Climatic Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Oren; Svoay, Tal; Zhevelev, Helena M.

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are a well-distributed agrotechnical method for planting in various places in the world, from ancient time and until today. The aim of the current poster is to demonstrate the spatial distribution of agricultural terraces along a climatic gradient of sub-humid Mediterranean, semi-arid and arid climate zones. In the Judean Mountains (central Israel), a region under sub-humid Mediterranean conditions, agricultural terraces are characterized by terrace coverage on slopes and in valleys. Annual rainfall average in this region is 800 mm, allowing for vast rain-fed agriculture based on direct rain. In the Judean Shephelah (central Israel), a region under semi-arid conditions, agriculture terraces are located in small spots on the slopes, and in terrace fields in the valleys. Annual average rainfall in this region is between 300 and 400 mm. Rain-fed agriculture was sustained by direct rain and additional runoff generated on rock outcrops. In the Negev Highlands, (southern Israel), a region under arid climate conditions with annual rainfall average of 100 mm, runoff farm terraces are located in valleys, and agriculture sustenance was based on water harvesting from the slopes. In conclusion, climate has a dominant effect on agricultural terrace distribution, and ancient farmers knew how to adapt to different climate conditions.

  20. Cyanidiales diversity in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupa, D J; Reeb, V; Castenholz, R W; Bhattacharya, D; McDermott, T R

    2013-11-01

    The Cyanidiales are unicellular red algae that are unique among phototrophs. They thrive in acidic, moderately high-temperature habitats typically associated with geothermally active regions, although much remains to be learned about their distribution and diversity within such extreme environments. We focused on Yellowstone National Park (YNP), using culture-dependent efforts in combination with a park-wide environmental polymerase chain reaction (PCR) survey to examine Cyanidiales diversity and distribution in aqueous (i.e. submerged), soil and endolithic environments. Phylogenetic reconstruction of Cyanidiales biodiversity demonstrated the presence of Cyanidioschyzon and Galdieria lineages exhibiting distinct habitat preferences. Cyanidioschyzon was the only phylotype detected in aqueous environments, but was also prominent in moist soil and endolithic habitats, environments where this genus was thought to be scarce. Galdieria was found in soil and endolithic samples, but absent in aqueous habitats. Interestingly, Cyanidium could not be found in the surveys, suggesting this genus may be absent or rare in YNP. Direct microscopic counts and viable counts from soil samples collected along a moisture gradient were positively correlated with moisture content, providing the first in situ evidence that gravimetric moisture is an important environmental parameter controlling distribution of these algae. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. When is a terrace not a terrace? The importance of understanding landscape evolution in studies of terraced agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Vázquez, C; Lang, C; Kaal, J; Stump, D

    2017-11-01

    Before the invention of modern, large-scale engineering projects, terrace systems were rarely built in single phases of construction, but instead developed gradually, and could even be said to have evolved. Understanding this process of landscape change is therefore important in order to fully appreciate how terrace systems were built and functioned, and is also pivotal to understanding how the communities that farmed these systems responded to changes; whether these are changes to the landscape brought about by the farming practices themselves, or changes to social, economic or climatic conditions. Combining archaeological stratigraphy, soil micromorphology and geochemistry, this paper presents a case-study from the historic and extensive terraced landscape at Konso, southwest Ethiopia, and demonstrates - in one important river valley at least - that the original topsoil and much of the subsoil was lost prior to the construction of hillside terraces. Moreover, the study shows that alluvial sediment traps that were built adjacent to rivers relied on widespread hillside soil erosion for their construction, and strongly suggests that these irrigated riverside fields were formerly a higher economic priority than the hillside terraces themselves; a possibility that was not recognised by numerous observational studies of farming in this landscape. Research that takes into account how terrace systems change through time can thus provide important details of whether the function of the system has changed, and can help assess how the legacies of former practices impact current or future cultivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  3. The Yellowstone hotspot, Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and human geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Despain, D.G.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Good, John M.; Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann

    2007-01-01

    Active geologic processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are fundamental in shaping the landscapes of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE), a high volcanic plateau flanked by a crescent of still higher mountainous terrain. The processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are volcanism, faulting, and uplift and are observed in the geology at the surface. We attribute the driving forces responsible for the northeastward progression of these processes to a thermal plume rising through the Earth’s mantle into the base of the southwest-moving North American plate. This progression began 16 million years ago (Ma) near the Nevada-Oregon border and arrived at Yellowstone about 2 Ma. Before arrival of the hotspot, an older landscape existed, particularly mountains created during the Laramide orogeny about 70–50 Ma and volcanic terrain formed by Absaroka andesitic volcanism mostly between 50–45 Ma. These landscapes were more muted than the present, hotspot-modified landscape because the Laramide-age mountains had worn down and an erosion surface of low relief had developed on the Absaroka volcanic terrain.

  4. Yellowstone and Heise: Supervolcanoes that lighten up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watts, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    .... Here, Watts discusses the new studies of the volcanic rocks from previous eruptions of the Yellowstone Supervolcano and its predecessors that give researchers insight into possible future eruptions...

  5. Ostracoda from Vestfold Hill lake terraces, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Six species of ostracodes are recorded from two transects of terraces of Deep Lake, Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. Two species (@iXesteleberis@@ sp. and @iBradleya dictyon@@) range from Cretaceous to Recent, @iPoseidonamicus aff. P. major@@ ranges from...

  6. Adoption of terraces in the Peruvian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthumus, H.

    2005-01-01

    Soil erosion is a serious constraint for agriculture and rural development in developing countries. Many efforts are made to promote soil and water conservation (SWC) among farm households. However, adoption of SWC practices is often disappointing. This thesis analyses the benefits of terraces and

  7. Expedition: Yellowstone! A Cooperative School Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Golia, Jack; And Others

    Designed to help upper elementary school teachers prepare for a class expedition to Yellowstone National Park, this workbook presents environmental learning activities that are also useful in schools too distant for an actual visit. Either way, the workbook aims to develop student appreciation of Yellowstone, the life in it, and the park's value…

  8. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Submerged vanes are airfoils which are in general placed at certain angle with respect to the flow direction in a channel to induce artificial circulations downstream. By virtue of these artificially generated circulations, submerged vanes were utilized to protect banks of rivers against erosion, to control shifting of rivers, to avoid ...

  9. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Sharma

    velocities simulated from CFD using standard k-x model were very much in accordance with what it was measured by Wang and Odgaard [4]. Thus, model can be used to study the turbulence characteristics around submerged vanes and to predict various parameters downstream of the submerged vanes. After the model ...

  10. Life history migrations of adult Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the upper Yellowstone River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Brian D.; McMahon, Thomas E.; Koel, Todd M.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Burckhardt, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of salmonid life history types at the watershed scale is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for effective management. In this study, we used radiotelemetry to characterize the life history movements of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri in the upper Yellowstone River, an extensive tributary that composes nearly half of the drainage area of Yellowstone Lake. In Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout have precipitously declined over the past 2 decades primarily due to predation from introduced Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. Radio tags were implanted in 152 Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout, and their movements monitored over 3 years. Ninety-six percent of tagged trout exhibited a lacustrine–adfluvial life history, migrating upstream a mean distance of 42.6 km to spawn, spending an average of 24 d in the Yellowstone River before returning to Yellowstone Lake. Once in the lake, complex postspawning movements were observed. Only 4% of radio-tagged trout exhibited a fluvial or fluvial–adfluvial life history. Low prevalence of fluvial and fluvial–adfluvial life histories was unexpected given the large size of the upper river drainage. Study results improve understanding of life history diversity in potamodromous salmonids inhabiting relatively undisturbed watersheds and provide a baseline for monitoring Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout response to management actions in Yellowstone Lake.

  11. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  12. Living terraced landscapes: Exploring the viability of mountain terraced vineyards in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoumides, Christos; Giannakis, Elias; Bruggeman, Adriana; Camera, Corrado

    2017-04-01

    Dry-stone terracing is an intensive cultivation practice that has been implemented for centuries in the Mediterranean region. The Troodos Ophiolite Complex on the island of Cyprus covers an area of 2332 km2 with 31% mean slope gradient, and consists of 140 small communities with a total population of around 50,000 inhabitants. Agriculture is practiced on dry-stone terraces with narrow (1-3 m) to medium-base (3-6 m) bench, constructed by cutting and filling in slopes with gradient between 20 and 40%. The main crop grown on terraces is wine grapes. However, many of the vineyards on terraced hillsides are being gradually abandoned and dry-stone walls remain unmaintained, causing a domino effect of collapsing terraces and leading to soil erosion and sedimentation of downstream infrastructure. The main reasons for the gradual decline of terraced landscapes are the ageing of farming population, the depopulation and marginalization of Troodos communities, the small size of agricultural plots, the high cost of labour and the loss of know-how on dry-stone wall maintenance. Despite these socio-economic issues, policy reforms, especially after the accession of Cyprus to the European Union in 2004, have created new challenges and opportunities, and have focused on improving the viniculture's quality rather than quantity. The new appellation of origin launched in 2007 that define where the wine-grapes are grown, as well as the incentives to create small regional wineries, helped maintain the population of some communities and the vine cultivations on dry-stone terraces. The aim of this study is to analyse the determinants of success or failure in sustaining the terraced vineyards in Cyprus. More precisely, the study explores the characteristics that determine the investment (or not) in terrace maintenance and analyses the interlinkages between farming practices and business strategies. The analysis is based on grape and wine production cost data that is acquired by interviews

  13. Cyanobacterial construction of hot spring siliceous stromatolites in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Berelson, William M; Corsetti, Frank A; Treants, Merika; Spear, John R

    2012-05-01

    Living stromatolites growing in a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park are composed of silica-encrusted cyanobacterial mats. Two cyanobacterial mat types grow on the stromatolite surfaces and are preserved as two distinct lithofacies. One mat is present when the stromatolites are submerged or at the water-atmosphere interface and the other when stromatolites protrude from the hot spring. The lithofacies created by the encrustation of submerged mats constitutes the bulk of the stromatolites, is comprised of silica-encrusted filaments, and is distinctly laminated. To better understand the cyanobacterial membership and community structure differences between the mats, we collected mat samples from each type. Molecular methods revealed that submerged mat cyanobacteria were predominantly one novel phylotype while the exposed mats were predominantly heterocystous phylotypes (Chlorogloeopsis HTF and Fischerella). The cyanobacterium dominating the submerged mat type does not belong in any of the subphylum groups of cyanobacteria recognized by the Ribosomal Database Project and has also been found in association with travertine stromatolites in a Southwest Japan hot spring. Cyanobacterial membership profiles indicate that the heterocystous phylotypes are 'rare biosphere' members of the submerged mats. The heterocystous phylotypes likely emerge when the water level of the hot spring drops. Environmental pressures tied to water level such as sulfide exposure and possibly oxygen tension may inhibit the heterocystous types in submerged mats. These living stromatolites are finely laminated and therefore, in texture, may better represent similarly laminated ancient forms compared with more coarsely laminated living marine examples. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Magma Beneath Yellowstone National park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, G P; Christiansen, R L; Iyer, H M; Pitt, A D; Mabey, D R; Blank, H R; Zietz, I; Gettings, M E

    1975-05-23

    The Yellowstone plateau volcanic field is less than 2 million years old, lies in a region of intense tectonic and hydrothermal activity, and probably has the potential for further volcanic activity. The youngest of three volcanic cycles in the field climaxed 600,000 years ago with a voluminous ashflow eruption and the collapse of two contiguous cauldron blocks. Doming 150,000 years ago, followed by voluminous rhyolitic extrusions as recently as 70,000 years ago, and high convective heat flow at present indicate that the latest phase of volcanism may represent a new magmatic insurgence. These observations, coupled with (i) localized postglacial arcuate faulting beyond the northeast margin of the Yellowstone caldera, (ii) a major gravity low with steep bounding gradients and an amplitude regionally atypical for the elevation of the plateau, (iii) an aeromagnetic low reflecting extensive hydrothermal alteration and possibly indicating the presence of shallow material above its Curie temperature, (iv) only minor shallow seismicity within the caldera (in contrast to a high level of activity in some areas immediately outside), (v) attenuation and change of character of seismic waves crossing the caldera area, and (vi) a strong azimuthal pattern of teleseismic P-wave delays, strongly suggest that a body composed at least partly of magma underlies the region of the rhyolite plateau, including the Tertiary volcanics immediately to its northeast. The Yellowstone field represents the active end of a system of similar volcanic foci that has migrated progressively northeastward for 15 million years along the trace of the eastern Snake River Plain (8). Regional aeromagnetic patterns suggest that this course was guided by the structure of the Precambrian basement. If, as suggested by several investigators (24), the Yellowstone magma body marks a contemporary deep mantle plume, this plume, in its motion relative to the North American plate, would appear to be "navigating" along a

  15. Sr-Isotope record of Quaternary marine terraces on the California coast and off Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Moore, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium-isotopic ratios of dated corals have been obtained from submerged reefs formed during Quaternary glacial periods off the Hawaiian islands. These data, combined with data from deep-sea sediments, tightly constrain the secular variation of marine 87Sr 86Sr for the past 800,000 yr. Although long-term trends are apparent, no significant (>0.02???), rapid (<100,000 yr) excursions in 87Sr 86Sr were resolved nor did we observe any samples with 87Sr 86Sr greater than that of modern seawater. Strontium in mollusks from elevated marine terraces formed during interglacial periods on the southern California coast show resolvable and consistent variations in 87Sr 86Sr which, when compared to the trend of Quaternary marine 87Sr 86Sr, can be used to infer uplift rates and define approximate ages for the higher terraces. The Sr-isotope age estimates indicate that uplift rates vary among crustal blocks and were not necessarily constant with time. No contrast in Sr-isotopic ratios between similar-age Hawaiian and California fossils was observed, confirming that any change in marine 87Sr 86Sr from glacial to interglacial periods must be small. A realistic appraisal of the potential of Sr-isotope stratigraphy for chronometric applications in the Quaternary suggests that the technique will be limited to relatively coarse distinctions in age. ?? 1992.

  16. Cryoplanation Terraces: A Characteristic Upland Periglacial Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, K. E.; Nelson, F. E.; Queen, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    Cryoplanation terraces (CTs) are alternating sequences of rubble-covered scarps and gently sloping treads ascending ridgecrests and hillsides, often culminating in extensive summit flats. CTs are ubiquitous in cold, unglaciated upland environments extending from the Ural Mountains to the Mackenzie Mountains. CTs are large erosional landforms cut in bedrock, but many examples appear to be largely independent of geologic structure. Although process investigations have never been carried out on cryoplanation terraces, the traditional interpretation that they are formed by intensified weathering and transport processes associated with late-lying snow cover, referred to by the shorthand term nivation, has been challenged in recent literature. The new spatial-analytic and field investigations reported here provide strong evidence in support of the "nivation formation hypothesis." The elevation trends of CTs and the glacial snowline are very similar, rising from 200-300 m.a.s.l. on islands in the Bering Sea (central Beringia) to 1200 m.a.s.l. near the Alaska-Yukon border in far-eastern Beringia. This correspondence indicates that, like cirques, CT formation is controlled by the mass balance of localized, late-lying snow. Exploratory data collected during the summer of 2016 at three sites in interior and western Alaska provide additional support for the nivation hypothesis. Four sedimentological lines of investigation were employed to observe relative patterns of weathering intensity and duration across terraces: 1) rock fracture distribution patterns; 2) clast shape indices; 3) Schmidt hammer rebound values; and 4) weathering-rind thickness. Preliminary results from transect-based sampling of these variables indicate that CT treads are time-transgressive surfaces, where progressively more weathered clasts are present with increasing distance downslope from scarp-tread junctures. Results from the preliminary field work support the nivation hypothesis of CT formation, but

  17. Conservation of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in Yellowstone National Park: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael B.; Murphy, Brian R.; Zale, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    The Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT; "Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri") has become a species of special concern for Yellowstone National Park (YNP) fisheries biologists. Although this subspecies formerly occupied a greater area than any other inland cutthroat trout, the current distribution of YCT is now limited to several watersheds within the…

  18. Does Yellowstone need large fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romme, W.H. (Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO (United States)); Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; Hargrove, W.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States))

    1994-06-01

    This paper synthesizes several studies initiated after the 1988 Yellowstone fires, to address the question whether the ecological effects of large fires differ qualitatively as well as quantitatively from small fires. Large burn patches had greater dominance and contagion of burn severity classes, and a higher proportion of crown fire. Burned aspen stands resprouted vigorously over an extensive area, but heavy ungulate browsing prevented establishment of new tree-sized stems. A burst of sexual reproduction occurred in forest herbs that usually reproduce vegetatively, and new aspen clones became established from seed - a rare event in this region. We conclude that the effects of large fires are qualitatively different, but less dramatically so than expected.

  19. Agricultural Terrace Pattern Distribution and Preservation along Climatic Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Oren

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural terraces are a well-distributed agrotechnical method for planting in various places in the world, from ancient time and until today. The aim of the current research is to demonstrate the spatial distribution and conservation of agricultural terraces along a climatic gradient of sub-humid Mediterranean, semi-arid and arid climate zones by presenting the case study of the Land of Israel. In the Judean Mountains (central Israel), a region under sub-humid Mediterranean conditions, agricultural terraces are characterized by terrace coverage on slopes and in valleys. Annual rainfall average in this region is 800 mm, allowing for vast rain-fed agriculture based on direct rain. In the Judean Shephelah (central Israel), a region under semi-arid conditions, agriculture terraces are located in small spots on the slopes, and in terrace fields in the valleys. Annual average rainfall in this region is between 300 and 400 mm. Rain-fed agriculture was sustained by direct rain and additional runoff generated on rock outcrops. In the Negev Highlands, (southern Israel), a region under arid climate conditions with annual rainfall average of 100 mm, runoff farm terraces are located in valleys, and agriculture sustenance was based on water harvesting from the slopes. The terraces pattern distribution is similar to the natural vegetation pattern distribution of the three given areas. During the past ten of years, changes in land use and farming methods have resulted in the abandonment of many agricultural terraces in the given areas. Terrace abandonment leads to the collapse of retaining walls and erosion of soil and sediments from the terrace body with the latter occurring at a high rate in the arid Negev highlands. However, in the Judean Mountains and the Judean Shephelah, areas under sub-humid Mediterranean and semi-arid conditions, the intensity of erosion is lower since the terraces are covered by dense shrubs such as Sarcopoterium spinosum or by trees. This plant cover

  20. 36 CFR 7.13 - Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yellowstone National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.13 Yellowstone National Park. (a) Commercial... Yellowstone National Park; said point being approximately in latitude 44°18′22.8″ N., at longitude 110°20′04.8...

  1. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT AGENCY: Federal... highway project in Yellowstone County, Montana. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Hasselbach, Right... (I-90) and Old Highway 312 in or near the city of Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana. FHWA...

  2. Three Short Videos by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessells, Stephen; Lowenstern, Jake; Venezky, Dina

    2009-01-01

    This is a collection of videos of unscripted interviews with Jake Lowenstern, who is the Scientist in Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). YVO was created as a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and University of Utah to strengthen the long-term monitoring of volcanic and earthquake unrest in the Yellowstone National Park region. Yellowstone is the site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world and the first National Park. YVO is one of the five USGS Volcano Observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety. These video presentations give insights about many topics of interest about this area. Title: Yes! Yellowstone is a Volcano An unscripted interview, January 2009, 7:00 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions to explain volcanic features at Yellowstone: 'How do we know Yellowstone is a volcano?', 'What is a Supervolcano?', 'What is a Caldera?','Why are there geysers at Yellowstone?', and 'What are the other geologic hazards in Yellowstone?' Title: Yellowstone Volcano Observatory An unscripted interview, January 2009, 7:15 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions about the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory: 'What is YVO?', 'How do you monitor volcanic activity at Yellowstone?', 'How are satellites used to study deformation?', 'Do you monitor geysers or any other aspect of the Park?', 'Are earthquakes and ground deformation common at Yellowstone?', 'Why is YVO a relatively small group?', and 'Where can I get more information?' Title: Yellowstone Eruptions An unscripted interview, January 2009, 6.45 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions to explain volcanic

  3. Drought and submergence tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hewei; Zhou, Yufan; Oksenberg, Nir; Ronald, Pamela

    2017-11-14

    The invention provides methods of genetically modified plants to increase tolerance to drought and/or submergence. The invention additionally provides plants having increased drought and/or submergence tolerance engineered using such methods.

  4. a sedimentologic analysis of terrace sediments from the pawmpawm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    ABSTRACT. The object of this paper is to analyse the sedimentologic characteristics of old and new terrace sediments from the Pawmpawm River channel. The morphometric characteristics of the terrace materials give credence to the hydrologic dynamics of the river as it performs its core functions of erosion, transportation ...

  5. Submerged membrane distillation for desalination of water

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2016-10-27

    Submerged membrane modules for use for desalination of water are disclosed. In one or more aspects, the membrane modules can be submerged either in a feed solution tank or the feed solution can pass through the lumen side of the membrane submerged within the tank. The feed solution can be a water-based feed stream containing an amount of salt.

  6. [Soft-ridged bench terrace design in hilly loess region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixiong; Chen, Li; Gao, Wangsheng

    2005-08-01

    Reconfiguration of hillside field into terrace is regarded as one of the key techniques for water and soil conservation in mountainous regions. On slopes exceeding 30 degrees, the traditional techniques of terracing are difficult to apply as risers (i.e., backslopes), and if not reinforced, are so abrupt and easy to collapse under gravity alone, thus damaging the terrace. To improve the reconfiguration of hillside field into terrace, holistic techniques of soft-ridged bench terrace engineering, including revegetation, with trees and planting grasses on riser slopes, were tested between 1997 and 2001 in Xiabiangou watershed of Yan' an, Shaanxi Province. A "working with Nature" engineering approach, riser slopes of 45 degrees, similar to the pre-existing slope of 35 degrees, was employed to radically reduce gravity-erosion. Based on the concepts of biodiversity and the principles of landscape ecology, terrace benches, bunds, and risers were planted with trees, shrubs, forage grasses, and crops, serving to generate a diverse array of plants, a semi-forested area, and to stabilize terrace bunds. Soft-ridged bench terrace made it possible to significantly reduce hazards arising from gravity erosion, and reduce the costs of individual bench construction and maintenance by 24.9% and 55.5% of the costs under traditional techniques, respectively. Such a construction allowed an enrichment and concentration of nutrients in the soils of terrace bunds, providing an ideal environment for a range of plants to grow and develop. The terrace riser could be planted with drought-resistant plants ranging from forage grasses to trees, and this riser vegetation would turn the exposed bunds and risers existing under traditional techniques into plant-covered belts, great green ribbons decorating farmland and contributing to the enhancement of the landscape biology.

  7. 76 FR 3569 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone...). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, MT, to... procedures at Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, MT. The FAA is proposing this action to enhance the...

  8. Landsliding, topographic variables and location of cultural terraces in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komac, Blaž; Zorn, Matija

    2015-04-01

    For a large number of people living in hilly regions of Slovenia cultural terraces are important landscape elements. We know from previous studies that as many as half of vineyard terraces are built in areas which are highly susceptible to landslides, and a quarter in low landslide susceptibility areas. The contribution will present links between landslide susceptibility in terraced areas in Slovenia. Landslides are frequent element of cultural terraces-landscape. In Slovenia they are frequent in hilly and mountainous regions. The position of landslide areas is strongly influenced by the topography and thus indirectly by the construction of cultural terraces. They trigger during and after terraces construction when the drainage system is altered. Thus, agricultural activity leads to instability of slopes, and increases the production costs. Links between landsliding (Zorn and Komac 2004; 2008; 2009) and cultural terraces were determined using the geographic information systems. For the territory of Slovenia, we have already created landslide susceptibility map (Zorn and Komac 2004; 2008), while here we determined the correlation between landslides, topographic variables and location of cultural terraces. To achieve this aim, all areas of cultural terraces in Slovenia were digitized at the scale of 1:10,000. References Zorn, M., Komac B. 2004: Deterministic modeling of landslide and rockfall risk. Acta geographica Slovenica 44 (2), pp. 53-10. DOI: 10.3986/AGS44203 Zorn, M., Komac, B. 2008: Zemeljski plazovi v Sloveniji (Landslides in Slovenia). Georitem 8. Ljubljana: ZRC Publishing. Zorn, M., Komac, B. 2009: The importance of landsliding in a flysch geomorphic system: The example of the Gori\\vska brda Hills (W Slovenia). Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie N. F., Suppl. 56 (3), pp. 53-79. DOI: 10.1127/0372-8854/2012/S-00104

  9. Numerical model predictions of autogenic fluvial terraces and comparison to climate change expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ajay B. S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-03-01

    Terraces eroded into sediment (alluvial) and bedrock (strath) preserve an important history of river activity. River terraces are thought to form when a river switches from a period of slow vertical incision and valley widening to fast vertical incision and terrace abandonment. Consequently, terraces are often interpreted to reflect changing external drivers including tectonics, sea level, and climate. In contrast, the intrinsic unsteadiness of lateral migration in rivers may generate terraces even under constant rates of vertical incision without external forcing. To explore this mechanism, we simulate landscape evolution by a vertically incising, meandering river and isolate the age and geometry of autogenic river terraces. Modeled autogenic terraces form for a wide range of lateral and vertical incision rates and are often paired and longitudinally extensive for intermediate ratios of vertical-to-lateral erosion rate. Autogenic terraces have a characteristic reoccurrence time that scales with the time for relief generation. There is a preservation bias against older terraces due to reworking of previously visited parts of the valley. Evolving, spatial differences in bank strength between bedrock and sediment reduce terrace formation frequency and length, favor pairing, and can explain sublinear terrace margins at valley boundaries. Age differences and geometries for modeled autogenic terraces are consistent, in cases, with natural terraces and overlap with metrics commonly attributed to terrace formation due to climate change. We suggest a new phase space of terrace properties that may allow differentiation of autogenic terraces from terraces formed by external drivers.

  10. Amphibian decline in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debra A. Patla; Charles R. Peterson; Paul Stephen Corn

    2009-01-01

    We conduct long-term amphibian monitoring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (1) and read McMenamin et al.'s article (2) with interest. This study documents decline in the extent of seasonal wetlands in the Lamar Valley of YNP during extended drought, but the conclusion, widely reported in the media, of "severe declines in 4 once-common amphibian species,...

  11. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  12. Drilling Into the Track of the Yellowstone Hot Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, John W.; Evans, James P.; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Prokopenko, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The Yellowstone supervolcano erupted roughly 640,000 years ago, covering much of North America in a thick coat of ash. Material ejected from the volcano devastated the surrounding area, and particles injected into the atmosphere changed the Earth's climate. Over the past 18 million years the Yellowstone hot spot has powered a series of similar eruptions. In southern Idaho, the 640-kilometer-long Snake River Plain traces the path of the Yellowstone hot spot over this period.

  13. New challenges for grizzly bear management in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2016-01-01

    A key factor contributing to the success of grizzly bear Ursus arctos conservation in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem has been the existence of a large protected area, Yellowstone National Park. We provide an overview of recovery efforts, how demographic parameters changed as the population increased, and how the bear management program in Yellowstone National Park has evolved to address new management challenges over time. Finally, using the management experiences in Yellowstone National Park, we present comparisons and perspectives regarding brown bear management in Shiretoko National Park.

  14. Investigating Late Cenozoic Mantle Dynamics beneath Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Liu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent tomography models (Sigloch, 2011; Schmandt & Lin, 2014) reveal unprecedented details of the mantle structure beneath the United States (U.S.). Prominent slow seismic anomalies below Yellowstone, traditionally interpreted as due to a mantle plume, are restricted to depths either shallower than 200 km or between 500 and 1000 km, but a continuation to greater depth is missing. Compared to fast seismic anomalies, which are usually interpreted as slabs or delaminated lithosphere, origin of deep slow seismic anomalies, especially those in the vicinity of subduction zones, is more enigmatic. As a consequence, both the dynamics and evolution of these slow anomalies remain poorly understood. To investigate the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone slow anomaly during the past 20 Myr, we construct a 4D inverse mantle convection model with a hybrid data assimilation scheme. On the one hand, we use the adjoint method to recover the past evolution of mantle seismic structures beyond the subduction zones. On the other hand, we use a high-resolution forward model to simulate the subduction of the oceanic (i.e., Farallon) plate. During the adjoint iterations, features from these two approaches are blended together at a depth of ~200 km below the subduction zone. In practice, we convert fast and slow seismic anomalies to effective positive and negative density heterogeneities. Our preliminary results indicate that at 20 Ma, the present-day shallow slow anomalies beneath the western U.S. were located inside the oceanic asthenosphere, which subsequently entered the mantle wedge, through the segmented Farallon slab. The eastward encroachment of the slow anomaly largely followed the Yellowstone hotspot track migration. The present deep mantle Yellowstone slow anomaly originated at shallower depths (i.e. transition zone), and was then translated down to the lower mantle accompanying the sinking fast anomalies. The temporal evolution of the slow anomalies suggests that the deep

  15. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  16. Post-eruptive Submarine Terrace Development of Capelinhos, Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongwei Zhao, Will; Mitchell, Neil; Quartau, Rui; Tempera, Fernando; Bricheno, Lucy

    2017-04-01

    Erosion of the coasts of volcanic islands by waves creates shallow banks, but how erosion proceeds with time to create them and how it relates to wave climate is unclear. In this study, historical and recent marine geophysical data collected around the Capelinhos promontory (western Faial Island, Azores) offer an unusual opportunity to characterize how a submarine terrace developed after the eruption. The promontory was formed in 1957/58 during a Surtseyan eruption that terminated with extensive lava forming new rocky coastal cliffs. Historical measurements of coastline position are supplemented here with coastlines measured from 2004 and 2014 Google Earth images in order to characterize coastline retreat rate and distance for lava- and tephra-dominated cliffs. Swath mapping sonars were used to characterize the submarine geometry of the resulting terrace (terrace edge position, gradient and morphology). Limited photographs are available from a SCUBA dive and drop-down camera deployments to ground truth the submarine geomorphology. The results reveal that coastal retreat rates have decreased rapidly with the time after the eruption, possibly explained by the evolving resistance to erosion of cliff base materials. Surprisingly, coastline retreat rate decreases with terrace width in a simple inverse power law with terrace width. We suspect this is only a fortuitous result as wave attenuation over the terrace will not obviously produce the variation, but nevertheless it shows how rapidly the retreat rate declines. Understanding the relationship between terrace widening shelf and coastal cliff retreat rate may be more widely interesting if they can be used to understand how islands evolve over time into abrasional banks and guyots.

  17. Quaternary Deformation of Sumba, Indonesia: Evidence from Carbonate Terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlquist, M. P.; West, A. J.; Dolan, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Banda Arc of Indonesia remains one of the least understood tectonic domains on the modern Earth. The island of Sumba, located approximately 50 km south of Flores and 120 km north of the Java Trench, northwest of where it transitions into the Timor Trough, lies in a region of tectonic transition and potentially offers insights into regional dynamics. The Banda Arc is volcanically active, but Sumba itself is not volcanic. The northern coast of Sumba is covered in Quaternary coral terraces, with the rest of the island's surface geology composed of Mio-pliocene carbonates and uplifted Late Cretaceous-Oligocene forearc basin and volcanic rocks. The purpose of this study is to remotely map the topographic expression of the coral terraces and use the information gained to better understand deformation on Sumba since their deposition. The ages of the coral terraces, of which many platforms are exposed over significant areas of the island, have been constrained at Cape Luandi in north central Sumba, but uplift rates calculated from those ages may not be representative of the island as a whole. The lateral continuity of these dated terraces can help constrain the extent to which uplift of Sumba is spatially variable. Analysis of the terraces using SRTM digital elevation data with ArcGIS software makes it possible to trace the same terrace platforms over large distances, and shows that the north central part of the island has experienced the most uplift since the deposition of the terraces, forming an anticline with the east limb dipping more steeply than the west. The terraces are not well preserved on the southern half of the island. Exposure of older rocks and lack of terrace preservation, as well as a south-skewed drainage divide suggests the southern half of the island experiences greater exhumation, but this could be driven by climate or other factors and does not necessarily indicate more rapid uplift. Study of Quaternary deformation of Sumba can offer greater

  18. Infectious diseases of wolves in Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, Emily S.; Cross, Paul C.; Hudson, Peter J.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Smith, Douglas W.; Stahler, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The summer of 2005 began with such promise for wolves in Yellowstone.  The population had been at an all-time high the last few years, and the wolves appeared to be in good condition.  Several packs had been particularly busy during the breeding season, and early summer pup counts suggested another healthy crop of new wolves rising through the ranks.

  19. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although past investigations establish the effect of various parameters on scour around vertical submerged structures for live and clear water condition, yet further studies are required to analyze the scour around group of submerged structures for various bed sediments, understand the flow physics around the group and ...

  20. Economic and social activities on ancient Cypriot terraced landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Elizabeth; Galletti, Christopher S; Fall, Patricia L; Falconer, Steven E

    2017-11-01

    We investigate ancient agricultural terraces and their associated social and economic activities across the site complex consisting of the village at Politiko-Troullia and its more extensive associated taskscape. Surface artifact distributions mapped over 12 ha are integrated with evidence excavated from this Bronze Age settlement in central Cyprus. Contrary to expectations, artifact densities do not diminish with distance from the village architecture. In particular, concentrations of Prehistoric Bronze Age ceramics and ground stone artifacts are most pronounced on nearby terraced hillsides. These terraces were not utilized for domestic structures, but for extensive processing of agricultural crops and copper ore. Bronze Age excavated plant remains indicate cultivation of olives, grapes and figs, with wood resources dominated by olive and pine. Larger, non-portable ground stones and gaming stones are associated with communal social and economic activities in open courtyard settings in Politiko-Troullia. This category of ground stone also is particularly common on the terraced hillsides around Troullia, suggesting that similar behaviors occurred beyond village structures. The terraced landscape of Politiko-Troullia exemplifies a multi-faceted taskscape with a range of agricultural, metallurgical and social activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  2. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  3. 79 FR 2688 - Remote Vaccination Program To Reduce the Prevalence of Brucellosis in Yellowstone Bison, Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-15

    ... National Park Service Remote Vaccination Program To Reduce the Prevalence of Brucellosis in Yellowstone Bison, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming AGENCY: National Park... Yellowstone Bison, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. DATES: The National Park Service will execute a Record...

  4. 79 FR 35567 - Remote Vaccination Program To Reduce the Prevalence of Brucellosis in Yellowstone Bison, Record...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-23

    ... National Park Service Remote Vaccination Program To Reduce the Prevalence of Brucellosis in Yellowstone Bison, Record of Decision, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Yellowstone Bison, Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. On March 3, 2014, the...

  5. 76 FR 18040 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT AGENCY... airspace at Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, MT, to accommodate aircraft using Instrument Landing System (ILS) Localizer (LOC) standard instrument approach procedures at Yellowstone Airport. This will...

  6. TerraceM: A Matlab® tool to analyze marine terraces from high-resolution topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Muñoz, Julius; Melnick, Daniel; Strecker, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    To date, Light detection and ranging (LiDAR), high- resolution topographic data sets enable remote identification of submeter-scale geomorphic features bringing valuable information of the landscape and geomorphic markers of tectonic deformation such as fault-scarp offsets, fluvial and marine terraces. Recent studies of marine terraces using LiDAR data have demonstrated that these landforms can be readily isolated from other landforms in the landscape, using slope and roughness parameters that allow for unambiguously mapping regional extents of terrace sequences. Marine terrace elevation has been used since decades as geodetic benchmarks of Quaternary deformation. Uplift rates may be estimated by locating the shoreline angle, a geomorphic feature correlated with the high-stand position of past sea levels. Indeed, precise identification of the shoreline-angle position is an important requirement to obtain reliable tectonic rates and coherent spatial correlation. To improve our ability to rapidly assess and map different shoreline angles at a regional scale we have developed the TerraceM application. TerraceM is a Matlab® tool that allows estimating the shoreline angle and its associated error using high-resolution topography. For convenience, TerraceM includes a graphical user interface (GUI) linked with Google Maps® API. The analysis starts by defining swath profiles from a shapefile created on a GIS platform orientated orthogonally to the terrace riser. TerraceM functions are included to extract and analyze the swath profiles. Two types of coastal landscapes may be analyzed using different methodologies: staircase sequences of multiple terraces and rough, rocky coasts. The former are measured by outlining the paleo-cliffs and paleo-platforms, whereas the latter are assessed by picking the elevation of sea-stack tops. By calculating the intersection between first-order interpolations of the maximum topography of swath profiles we define the shoreline angle in

  7. Steam explosions, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions -- what's in Yellowstone's future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Smith, Robert B.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Heasler, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Yellowstone, one of the world?s largest active volcanic systems, has produced several giant volcanic eruptions in the past few million years, as well as many smaller eruptions and steam explosions. Although no eruptions of lava or volcanic ash have occurred for many thousands of years, future eruptions are likely. In the next few hundred years, hazards will most probably be limited to ongoing geyser and hot-spring activity, occasional steam explosions, and moderate to large earthquakes. To better understand Yellowstone?s volcano and earthquake hazards and to help protect the public, the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Utah, and Yellowstone National Park formed the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, which continuously monitors activity in the region.

  8. The physical model of a terraced plot: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlotto, Chiara; D'Agostino, Vincenzo; Buzzanca, Giacomo

    2017-04-01

    Terrace building have been expanded in the 19th century because of the increased demographic pressure and the need to crop additional areas at steeper slopes. Terraces are also important to regulate the hydrological behavior of the hillslope. Few studies are available in literature on rainfall-runoff processes and flood risk mitigation in terraced areas. Bench terraces, reducing the terrain slope and the length of the overland flow, quantitatively control the runoff flow velocity, facilitating the drainage and thus leading to a reduction of soil erosion. The study of the hydrologic-hydraulic function of terraced slopes is essential in order to evaluate their possible use to cooperate for flood-risk mitigation also preserving the landscape value. This research aims to better focus the times of the hydrological response, which are determined by a hillslope plot bounded by a dry-stone wall, considering both the overland flow and the groundwater. A physical model, characterized by a quasi-real scale, has been built to reproduce the behavior of a 3% outward sloped terrace at bare soil condition. The model consists of a steel metal box (1 m large, 3.3 m long, 2 m high) containing the hillslope terrain. The terrain is equipped with two piezometers, 9 TDR sensors measuring the volumetric water content, a surface spillway at the head releasing the steady discharge under test, a scale at the wall base to measure the outflowing discharge. The experiments deal with different initial moisture condition (non-saturated and saturated), and discharges of 19.5, 12.0 and 5.0 l/min. Each experiment has been replicated, conducting a total number of 12 tests. The volumetric water content analysis produced by the 9 TDR sensors was able to provide a quite satisfactory representation of the soil moisture during the runs. Then, different lag times at the outlet since the inflow initiation were measured both for runoff and groundwater. Moreover, the time of depletion and the piezometer

  9. Capturing sediment and nutrients in irrigated terraced landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaets, Johanna; Schmitter, Petra; Hilger, Thomas; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Dercon, Gerd; Cadisch, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Terraces are often promoted as green filters in landscapes, buffering discharge and constituent peaks. For irrigated rice terraces, however, this mitigating potential has not been assessed at the landscape level. Additionally, sediment and nutrient inputs potentially affect soil fertility in agricultural terraces and therefore yield - the extent of the impact depending on the quality and quantity of the captured material. Quantifying such upland-lowland linkages is particularly important in intensely cultivated landscapes, as declining upland soil fertility could alter beneficial hydrological connectivity between terraces and surrounding landscapes. In this study, we therefore quantified the sediment, sediment-associated organic carbon and nitrogen inputs and losses for a 13 ha paddy rice area, surrounded by upland maize cultivation in Northwest Vietnam in 2010 and 2011. Turbidity sensors were used in combination with a linear mixed model in order to obtain continuous predictions of the constituent concentrations. Sediment texture was determined using mid-infrared spectroscopy. Uncertainty on annual load estimates was quantified by calculating 95% confidence intervals with a bootstrap approach. Sediment inputs from irrigation water to the rice area amounted to 48 Mg ha-1 a-1 and runoff during rainfall events contributed an additional 16 Mg ha-1 a-1. Export from the rice terraces equalled 63 Mg ha-1 a-1 of sediments, resulting in a net balance of 28 Mg ha-1 a-1 or a trapping of almost half of the annual sediment inputs. Runoff contributed one third of the sand inputs, while irrigated sediments were predominantly silty. As paddy outflow contained almost exclusively silt- and clay-sized material, 24 Mg ha-1 a-1 of captured sediments consisted of sand. The sediment-associated organic carbon resulted in a deposit of 1.09 Mg ha-1 a-1. For sediment-associated nitrogen, 0.68 Mg ha-1 a-1 was trapped in the terraces. Combining both sediment-associated and dissolved nitrogen

  10. Iodine Removal Efficiency in Non-Submerged and Submerged Self-Priming Venturi Scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Wang, Junlong; Mehboob; Khurram [Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China)

    2013-04-15

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I{sub 2}) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  11. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID ALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3 in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2 from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  12. Yellowstone Lake: A Large Volcanic Lake Influenced by the Yellowstone Magmatic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W. C.; Morgan, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    Northern, central and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake are within the Yellowstone Caldera, which collapsed due to the cataclysmic eruption of the Lava Creek Tuff at 0.64 Ma. Bathymetric, seismic reflection, and aeromagnetic mapping of Yellowstone Lake shows that the area inside the caldera hosts multiple post-caldera rhyolite lava flows, active faults and fissures, hundreds of sub-lacustrine hot spring vents and associated siliceous hydrothermal deposits, large and small hydrothermal explosion craters, and significant areas of hydrothermally altered sediments. All of these features are driven by hydrothermal upwelling related to an underlying partially molten magma reservoir. Yellowstone hydrothermal fluids originate predominantly from deeply circulating meteoric waters that are probably depth-limited by the brittle-ductile transition at temperatures of 350-400°C above the magmatic system. Brines (generated by phase-separation near the magma chamber) and degassed magmatic volatiles (CO2, H2S, HCl) both mix with circulating meteoric waters, resulting in a 350°C, CO2- and H2S-rich, deep thermal-reservoir fluid with about 310 mg/kg Cl. The deep reservoir fluid boils during ascent due to depressurization and may mix with local fluids. Sub-lacustrine hydrothermal vent fluids sampled by submersible remotely operated vehicle (ROV) show δD-Cl systematics that indicate the ascending fluids boil to ≥220°C with Cl increasing to ≤570 mg/kg and then mix with Yellowstone Lake water at or just below lake-floor hydrothermal vent sites. The geochemical composition of Yellowstone Lake water is strongly influenced by sub-lacustrine hydrothermal activity and magmatic volatiles. The evidence for this conclusion is twofold. First, Yellowstone Lake is strongly enriched in dissolved As, B, Cl, Cs, Ge, Li, Mo, Sb, and W relative to the weighted average of inflowing stream waters. Geochemical reaction modeling indicates that the composition of ascending hydrothermal fluids is

  13. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of a digitized polygon of a constant recharge value for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace...

  14. Effects of terracing on soil and water conservation in China: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Die; Wei, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Terracing has long been considered a powerful strategy for soil and water conservation. However, the efficiency is limited by many factors, such as climate, soil properties, topography, land use, population and socioeconomic status. The aim of this critical review was to discuss the effects of terracing on soil and water conservation in China, using a systematic approach to select peer-reviewed articles published in English and Chinese. 46 individual studies were analyzed, involving six terracing structures (level terraces, slope-separated terraces, slope terraces, reverse-slope terraces, fanya juu terraces and half-moon terraces), a wide geographical range (Northeastern China, Southeastern hilly areas, Southwestern mountain areas and Northwestern-central China), and six land use types (forest, crop trees, cropland, shrub land, grassland and bare land) as well as a series of slope gradients ranging from 3° to 35°. Statistical meta-analysis with runoff for 593 observations and sediment for 636 observations confirmed that terracing had a significant effect on water erosion control. In terms of different terrace structures, runoff and sediment reduction were uppermost on slope-separated terraces. Land use in terraces also played a crucial role in the efficiency of conservation, and tree crops and forest were detected as the most powerful land covers in soil and water conservation due to large aboveground biomass and strong root systems below the ground, which directly reduces the pressure of terraces on rainwater redistribution. In addition, a significant positive correlation between slope gradients (3° 15° and 16° 35°) and terracing efficiency on soil and water conservation was observed. This study revealed the effectiveness and variation of terracing on water erosion control on the national scale, which can serve as a scientific basis to land managers and decision-makers.

  15. The future of volcanism at Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, G.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    Yellowstone caldera has produced three very large Pliocene and Pleistocene ignimbrite eruptions, the 2500 km3 Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, 280 km3 Mesa Falls Tuff, and 1000 km3 Lava Creek Tuff, at 2.05, 1.29 and 0.639 Ma, respectively. Today, Yellowstone caldera is seismically active, and its degassing rate is among the highest of Earth’s volcanoes. Whether, when and how this restless rhyolitic caldera will erupt again is of utmost importance. We analyzed trace elements in whole rock, glass and crystals of intra-caldera and extra-caldera Yellowstone rhyolites erupted during the last 0.5 Ma, in order to decipher their petrogenesis and shed light on future volcanism at Yellowstone. Based on these data, together with published mapping, hydrothermal activity, seismicity, seismic tomography, ground deformation and neotectonic data, we identify six areas within or near the caldera where eruptions may potentially occur in the future. Among these areas are two NNW-trending eruptive vent lineaments, which (1) cut through the caldera between the two resurgent domes, and (2) define the western caldera rim. These eruptive vents are those of the 173-70 ka Central Plateau Member (CPM) rhyolites, the youngest intra-caldera rhyolites, which total ~ 600 km3 in volume. These lineaments, despite being seismically and hydrothermally less active than other regions of the caldera, thus appear the most likely foci of future eruptions related to CPM magmatism. The volume of such effusive rhyolitic eruptions may reach several cubic kilometers. (3) Much of the seismicity, ground deformation, hydrothermal activity and degassing is observed in the northeastern part of the caldera. Despite this current unrest, no volcanism has occurred in this area in the last 0.48 Ma, and the upper crust (composed of older ignimbrite material as elsewhere beneath the caldera) may be more fertile and more likely to melt subsequent to deep heat inputs than the crust beneath the CPM lineaments, where ~ 600 km3 of

  16. Soil slips and debris flows on terraced slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Crosta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Terraces cover large areas along the flanks of many alpine and prealpine valleys. Soil slips and soil slips-debris flows are recurrent phenomena along terraced slopes. These landslides cause damages to people, settlements and cultivations. This study investigates the processes related to the triggering of soil slip-debris flows in these settings, analysing those occurred in Valtellina (Central Alps, Italy on November 2000 after heavy prolonged rainfalls. 260 landslides have been recognised, mostly along the northern valley flank. About 200 soil slips and slumps occurred in terraced areas and a third of them evolved into debris flows. Field work allowed to recognise the settings at soil slip-debris flow source areas. Landslides affected up to 2.5 m of glacial, fluvioglacial and anthropically reworked deposits overlying metamorphic basement. Laboratory and in situ tests allowed to characterise the geotechnical and hydraulic properties of the terrains involved in the initial failure. Several stratigraphic and hydrogeologic factors have been individuated as significant in determining instabilities on terraced slopes. They are the vertical changes of physical soil properties, the presence of buried hollows where groundwater convergence occurs, the rising up of perched groundwater tables, the overflow and lateral infiltration from superficial drainage network, the runoff concentration by means of pathways and the insufficient drainage of retaining walls.

  17. Foraminifera from the deep lake terraces, Vestfold hills, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Williams, R.; Kerry, K.R.

    Fourteen species of planktonic and forty-two species of benthonic foraminifera are identified from two transects of terraces near Deep Lake in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica. All the planktonic and a few of the benthonic species occur on the western...

  18. Monitoring and modelling for dry-stone walls terracement maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Federico; Errico, Alessandro; Giambastiani, Yamuna; Guastini, Enrico; Penna, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of dry-stone walls stability in agricultural areas based on innovative monitoring and modeling is here presented The field test took place in Lamole, a terraced rural area located in the province of Florence, Tuscany, central Italy, where wine production is the most important agricultural activity business. Results show a good capability of the model to predict the time-space distribution and the intensity of stresses on the instrumented dry-stone wall and to describe the bulging of the ancient ones. We obtained significant information on how the terrace failure in Lamole resulted mainly related to the water concentration pathways at specific portions of the walls. An accurate drainage of the terraced slopes, even by means of simple ditches, could reduce the concentration factor at the critical parts of terraces strongly reducing the water pressures on the walls. The analysis of the effects caused by high return time events has been carried out by means of artificially reproduced severe rainfalls on the presented experimental area.

  19. Ancient terraces as environmental archives in the southern Levant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Bernhard; Kouki, Paula

    2017-04-01

    Remains of ancient terraces collecting runoff water are widespread in the southern Levant, and played a pivotal rule for agriculture since rainfall was often not sufficient for growing crops. In this context, it has been debated how large cities of antiquity such as Petra were supplied, since they are situated in an environment apparently hostile to food production. However, a survey of the hinterland of Petra showed that it represents in fact an agricultural landscape full of terrace remains, although these are largely eroded today. But excavations of profiles found surprisingly deep sediment bodies, showing only a limited connection with the respective bedrocks, and indicating that part of the sediments consist of windblown dust. As well, there are carbonate crusts and archaeological materials associated with the terraces, suggesting that they represent so far unexplored environmental archives. Although probably discontinuous and thus rather challenging records are present, the terraces and their sediments could be a key for a better understanding of past landscape changes in the region.

  20. Porosity prediction from seismic inversion, Lavrans Field, Halten Terrace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolberg, David M.

    1998-12-31

    This presentation relates to porosity prediction from seismic inversion. The porosity prediction concerns the Lavrans Field of the Halten Terrace on the Norwegian continental shelf. The main themes discussed here cover seismic inversion, rock physics, statistical analysis - verification of well trends, upscaling/sculpting, and implementation. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Agricultural terraces and slope instability at Cinque Terre (NW Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandolini, Pierluigi; Cevasco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Cinque Terre, located in the eastern Liguria, are one of the most representative examples of terraced coastal landscape within the Mediterranean region. They are the result of a century-old agricultural practice and constitute an outstanding example of human integration with the natural landscape. For this highly unusual man-made coastal landscape, the Cinque Terre have been recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1997 and became National Park in 1999. The complex network of retaining dry stone walls and drainage networks ensured through times the control of shallow water erosion and therefore, indirectly, favoured debris cover stability. The lack of maintenance of terracing due to farmer abandonment since the 1950s led to widespread slope erosion phenomena. The effects of such phenomena culminated during the 25 October 2011 storm rainfall event, when slope debris materials charged by streams gave rise to debris floods affecting both Monterosso and Vernazza villages. As the analysis of the relationships between geo-hydrological processes and land use in the Vernazza catchment highlighted, abandoned and not well maintained terraces were the most susceptible areas to shallow landsliding and erosion triggered by intense rainfall. As a consequence, the thousands of kilometres of dry stone walls retaining millions of cubic metres of debris cover at Cinque Terre currently constitute a potential menace for both villages, that are mainly located at the floor of deep cut valleys, and tourists. Given the increasing human pressure due to tourist activities, geo-hydrological risk mitigation measures are urgently needed. At the same time, restoration policies are necessary to preserve this extraordinary example of terraced coastal landscape. In this framework, the detailed knowledge of the response of terraced areas to intense rainfall in terms of slope instability is a topic issue in order to identify adequate land planning strategies as well as the areas where

  2. Thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.; Hasell, P. G., Jr.; Sellman, A. N.; Smedes, H. W.

    1976-01-01

    An uncontrolled aerial thermographic mosaic of Yellowstone National Park was assembled from the videotape record of 13 individual thermographs obtained with linescan radiometers. Post mission processing of the videotape record rectified the nadir line to a topographic map base, corrected for v/h variations in adjacent flight lanes, corrected for yaw and pitch distortions, and distortions produced by nonlinearity of the side-wise scan. One of the purposes of the thermographic study was to delineate the areas of thermal emission (hot springs, geysers, etc.) throughout the Park, a study which could have great value in reconnaissance surveys of geothermal areas in remote regions or regions of high relief.

  3. Population dynamics of Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Richard R.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the population of grizzly bears in the environs of Yellowstone National Park suggest that the population has not recovered from the reductions following closure of garbage dumps in 1970 and 1971, and may continue to decline. A computer simulation model indicates that the risk of extirpation over the next 30 yr is small, if the present population parameters continue to prevail. A review and further analysis of the available data brings out the importance of enhancing adult female survival if the population is to recover, and assesses various research needs. In particular, a reliable index of population trend is needed to augment available data on the population.

  4. Modeling runoff and sediment yield from a terraced watershed using WEPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Carla McCullough; Dean E. Eisenhauer; Michael G. Dosskey

    2008-01-01

    The watershed version of WEPP (Water Erosion Prediction Project) was used to estimate 50-year runoff and sediment yields for a 291 ha watershed in eastern Nebraska that is 90% terraced and which has no historical gage data. The watershed has a complex matrix of elements, including terraced and non-terraced subwatersheds, multiple combinations of soils and land...

  5. Cost-benefit of bench terraces, a case study in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthumus, H.; Graaff, de J.

    2005-01-01

    Soil and water conservation measures like bench terraces can reduce erosion in highland crop production. A cost-benefit analysis for 11 cases of bench terraces was undertaken on the basis of both measured data and data obtained from farmers. It showed that the profitability of bench terraces was

  6. Wildlife health initiatives in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Plumb, G.

    2007-01-01

    Yellowstone Science 15(2) • 2007 and conservation organizations ( see inset page 7, The Yellowstone Wildlife Health Program ). Wildlife and Human Health are Linked Much of the interest in disease ecology and wildlife health has been prompted by the emergence, or resurgence, of many parasites that move between livestock, wildlife, and/or humans. Wildlife diseases are important because of their impact on both the natural ecosystem and human health. Many human dis - eases arise from animal reservoirs (WHO 2002). Hantaviruses, West Nile virus, avian influenza, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are examples of disease issues that have arisen over the last decade. Indeed, nearly 75% of all emerg - ing human infectious diseases are zoonotic (a disease that has spread to humans from another animal species). Many of these diseases have spilled over from natural wildlife reservoirs either directly into humans or via domestic animals (WHO/FAO/ OIE 2004). Unprecedented human population abundance and distribution, combined with anthropogenic environmental change, has resulted in dramatic increases in human–animal contact, thus increasing the intimate linkages between animal and human health (Figure 1). Linkage of human and animal health is not a new phenomenon, but the scope, scale, and worldwide impacts of contemporary zoonoses have no historical precedent (OIE 2004a). Zoonotic infectious diseases can have major impacts on wild and domestic animals and human health, resulting in

  7. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  8. Demography of the Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, C.M.; Mattson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a demographic analysis of the Yellowstone grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) to identify critical environmental factors controlling grizzly bear vital rates, and thereby to help evaluate the effectiveness of past management and to identify future conservation issues. We concluded that, within the limits of uncertainty implied by the available data and our methods of data analysis, the size of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population changed little from 1975 to 1995. We found that grizzly bear mortality rates are about double in years when the whitebark pine crop fails than in mast years, and that the population probably declines when the crop fails and increases in mast years. Our model suggests that natural variation in whitebark pine crop size over the last two decades explains more of the perceived fluctuations in Yellowstone grizzly population size than do other variables. Our analysis used demographic data from 202 radio-telemetered bears followed between 1975 and 1992 and accounted for whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) crop failures during 1993-1995. We used a maximum likelihood method to estimate demographic parameters and used the Akaike Information Criteria to judge the significance of various independent variables. We identified no independent variables correlated with grizzly bear fecundity. In order of importance, we found that grizzly bear mortality rates are correlated with season, whitebark pine crop size (mast vs. nonmast year), sex, management-trapping status (never management-trapped vs. management-trapped once or more), and age. The mortality rate of bears that were management-trapped at least once was almost double that of bears that were never management-trapped, implying a source/sink (i.e., never management-trapped/management-trapped) structure. The rate at which bears move between the source and sink, estimated as the management-trapping rate (h), is critical to estimating the finite rate of increase, I>I?. We quantified h by

  9. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for YELLOWSTONE CUTTHROAT TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based...

  10. Yellowstone Lake trout creel censuses, 1950-51

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, H.L; Cope, O.B; Beckwith, R.E

    1952-01-01

    Because of the problem of increased fishing pressure on Yellowstone Lake, the Fish and Wildlife Service, at the request of the National Park Service, initiated an extensive study to learn the effects...

  11. Exterior sound level measurements of snowcoaches at Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Sounds associated with oversnow vehicles, such as snowmobiles and snowcoaches, are an important management concern at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. The John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Centers Environmental Measurement a...

  12. The Yellowstone magma reservoir is 50% larger than previously imaged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J.; Smith, R. B.; Husen, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier tomographic studies of the Yellowstone crustal magma system have revealed a low P-wave crustal anomaly beneath the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera that has been interpreted to be the magma reservoir of partial melt that provides the thermal energy for Yellowstone's youthful volcanic and hydrothermal systems. The Yellowstone seismic network has evolved over the last decade into a modern real-time volcano monitoring system that consists of 36 short-period, broadband, and borehole seismometers that cover the entire Yellowstone volcanic field and surrounding tectonic areas. Until recently, limited seismograph coverage did not provide for adequate resolution of the velocity structure northeast of the caldera, an area of the largest negative Bouguer gravity field of -60 mGal whose 3D density model reveals a shallow, low density body that extends ~20 km northeast of the caldera. Recent upgrades to the Yellowstone Seismic Network (YSN), including the addition of nine 3-component and broadband seismic stations providing much better ray coverage of the entire Yellowstone area with greater bandwidth data. This allows much-expanded and improved resolution coverage of the Yellowstone crustal velocity structure. We have compiled waveforms for the Yellowstone earthquake catalog from 1984-2011 with 45,643 earthquakes and 1,159,724 waveforms to analyze P-wave arrival times with an automatic picker based on an adaptive high-fidelity human mimicking algorithm. Our analysis reduced the data to the 4,520 best-located earthquakes with 48,622 P-wave arrival times to invert for the velocity structure. The resulting 3D P-wave model reveals a low Vp body (up to -7% ΔVp) that is interpreted to be the Yellowstone crustal magma reservoir and is ~50% larger than previously imaged. It extends as an oblong shaped anomalous body ~90 km NE-SW, ~20 km NE of the 0.64 Ma caldera, and up to 30 km wide and markedly shallowing from 15 km depth beneath the caldera to less than ~2 km deep northeast of

  13. Refurbishment and extension of the terrace of Restaurant No.1

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Work to refurbish and extend part of the terrace of Restaurant No.1 started in the first week of October and should last about two months. This is just a small part of the wide-ranging site infrastructure consolidation programme that began in April 2009. The new terrace, covering a surface area of 1770 m2 (compared with 1650 m2 today), is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010 and will run all the way around the Restaurant No.1 extension. Work on the latter will affect part of Building 501 during the period from April to October 2010. The new dining room will seat some 275 additional customers (see picture). Part of the Cedars car-park will remain closed until some time in December to provide site access for trucks transporting construction materials, plant, etc. CERN Bulletin

  14. Thallium in fractions of soil formed on floodplain terraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Monika; Pasieczna, Anna; Zembrzuski, Wlodzimierz; Swit, Zbigniew; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2007-01-01

    Two soils formed on the floodplain terrace of a rivulet flowing through the zinc-lead ore exploration area polluted with thallium and one soil from a floodplain terrace of the reference area were investigated in terms of thallium distribution between soil fractions. Such type of soil is formed on river floodplain terraces next to the main river channel and its composition records the history of river pollution. A sequential extraction of soil according to the BCR protocol was performed with an additional initial stage of extraction with water. Apart from labile thallium, thallium entrapped in the residual parent matter was also determined. Thallium was determined by flow-injection differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. In all three cases, the major fraction is thallium entrapped in parent matter. Top soil from the polluted area contains 49.3% thallium entrapped in the residual parent matter, the bottom soil contains 41% while the reference soil contains 80% in this fraction. The major part of labile thallium is located in the reducible fraction (27.7% of total thallium in the top soil, 27% in the bottom soil and 12.4% of the reference soil). Second in terms of significance is the fraction of oxidizable thallium. The top soil contains 12% of total thallium concentration, the bottom soil contains 19% of total concentration, while the reference soil contains 4.1% of total concentration. The acid soluble/exchangeable fraction of thallium has almost the same significance as the oxidizable fraction. The top soil contains 10.4% of the total concentration, while the bottom soil contains 12% of the total concentration. Water soluble thallium concentration is very small. Comparison of the top and the bottom soil show that thallium has not been transported from the river channel onto the floodplain terrace over a long period.

  15. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  16. Relationships between soil parameters and vegetation in abandoned terrace fields vs. non-terraced fields in arid lands (Lanzarote, Spain): An opportunity for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, José Ramón; Fernández-Lugo, Silvia; Reyes-Betancort, J. Alfredo; Tejedor, Marisa; Jiménez, Concepción; Díaz, Francisco J.

    2017-11-01

    Over 90% of terraced fields have been abandoned on the island of Lanzarote in the last 40 years. The present work analyses the effects of abandonment on the soil and vegetation recovery of terraced field agroecosystems by comparing them with adjacent non-terraced fields in Lanzarote, Canary Islands (Spain). This information is necessary to take the appropriate management actions to achieve goals such as soil protection and biodiversity conservation. Results indicate that terraced fields display better soil quality than non-terraced ones, as shown by the significant differences found in parameters such as SAR, exchangeable Na, CaCO3, B content, moisture content or soil depth. Moreover, the terraced fields' plant community has more species similarities with the native plant community when compared with non-terraced areas. Owing to characteristics such as deeper soils, more water capacity, lower salinity and less sodic soils, terraced soils provide better conditions for passive restoration of both soil and vegetation. Therefore, the recovery and maintenance of wall structures and revegetation with native/endemic species are proposed to promote the restoration of native systems and preserve a landscape with cultural and aesthetic value.

  17. Trend of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Eberhardt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone's grizzlies (Ursus arctos have been studied for more than 40 years. Radiotelemetry has been used to obtain estimates of the rate of increase of the population, with results reported by Schwartz et al. (2006. Counts of females with cubs-of-the-year “unduplicated” also provide an index of abundance and are the primary subject of this report. An exponential model was fitted to n=24 such counts, using nonlinear leastsquares. Estimates of the rate of increase, r, were about 0.053. 95% confidence intervals, were obtained by several different methods, and all had lower limits substantially above zero, indicating that the population has been increasing steadily, in contrast to the results of Schwartz et al. (2006, which could not exclude a decreasing population. The grizzly data have been repeatedly mis-used in current literature for reasons explained here.

  18. Use of naturally occurring mercury to determine the importance of cutthroat trout to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Felicetti L.A; Schwartz C.C; Rye R.O; Gunther K.A; Crock J.G; Haroldson M.A; Waits L; Robbins C.T

    2004-01-01

    ... (Ursus arctos horribilis Ord, 1815) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We developed a method to estimate the amount of cutthroat trout ingested by grizzly bears living in the Yellowstone Lake area...

  19. Pregnancy rates in central Yellowstone bison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, Peter J.; Russell, Robin E.; Olexa, Edward M.; Podruzny, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Plains bison (Bison b. bison) centered on Yellowstone National Park are chronically infected with brucellosis (Brucella abortus) and culled along the park boundaries to reduce the probability of disease transmission to domestic livestock. We evaluated the relationship between pregnancy rates and age, dressed carcass weight, and serological status for brucellosis among bison culled from the central Yellowstone subpopulation during the winters of 1996–1997, 2001–2002, and 2002–2003. A model with only dressed carcass weight was the best predictor of pregnancy status for all ages with the odds of pregnancy increasing by 1.03 (95% CI = 1.02–1.04) for every 1-kg increase in weight. We found no effect of age or the serological status for brucellosis on pregnancy rates across age classes; however, we did find a positive association between age and pregnancy rates for bison ≥2 years old. Bison ≥2 years old had an overall pregnancy rate of 65% with markedly different rates in alternate ages for animals between 3 and 7 years old. Pregnancy rates were 0.50 (95% CI = 0.31–0.69) for brucellosis positive and 0.57 (95% CI = 0.34–0.78) for brucellosis negative 2- and 3-year-olds and 0.74 (95% CI = 0.60–0.85) in brucellosis positive and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.49–0.85) in brucellosis negative bison ≥4 years old. Only 1 of 21 bison pregnancy rates.

  20. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  1. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    .... We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements...

  2. 77 FR 53908 - Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone... (Draft SEIS) for a Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National Park, located in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming... 2012 Supplemental Winter Use Plan EIS), and at Yellowstone National Park headquarters, Mammoth Hot...

  3. 76 FR 68503 - Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho, Montana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park... the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY... National Park, P.O. Box 168, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming 82190. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  4. 78 FR 12353 - Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National... for Yellowstone National Park, located in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. DATES: The National Park Service.../YELL (click on the link to the 2012 Supplemental Winter Use Plan EIS), and at Yellowstone National Park...

  5. 77 FR 38824 - Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone... Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY...) for a Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National Park, located in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. DATES: The...

  6. 75 FR 4842 - Winter Use Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park AGENCY... Impact Statement for a Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone ] National Park, located in Idaho...

  7. 77 FR 6581 - Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement, Yellowstone National... prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park... 168, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190, (307) 344-2035. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In January 2010...

  8. 72 FR 73043 - Draft Site Progress Report to the World Heritage Committee for Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-26

    ... National Park Service Draft Site Progress Report to the World Heritage Committee for Yellowstone National... Report to the World Heritage Committee, Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Decision... a Draft Site Progress Report to the World Heritage Committee for Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming...

  9. 76 FR 31009 - BNSF Railway Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Surface Transportation Board BNSF Railway Company--Trackage Rights Exemption--Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc. Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc. (YVRR) has agreed to grant, pursuant to a prospective written..., Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc.--Discontinuance Exemption--in Richland and Dawson Counties, Montana, in...

  10. 82 FR 38928 - Closure on Public Lands of Yellowstone Bridge in Linn County, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    ...-0096] Closure on Public Lands of Yellowstone Bridge in Linn County, OR AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Yellowstone Bridge to motorized vehicles is in effect on public lands administered by the Cascades Field... hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This closure affects public lands at Yellowstone Creek, Linn County...

  11. 80 FR 13603 - Environmental Impact Statement for a Management Plan for Yellowstone-Area Bison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    ..., PMP00EI05.YP0000, 15XP103905] Environmental Impact Statement for a Management Plan for Yellowstone-Area... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a plan to manage a wild and migratory population of Yellowstone-area... the park's Administration Building in Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, WY and by...

  12. 74 FR 67836 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-21

    ... Yellowstone, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, MT, to accommodate aircraft using a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS...

  13. 75 FR 30295 - Modification of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; West Yellowstone, MT... Class E airspace at West Yellowstone, MT, to accommodate aircraft using a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP) at West Yellowstone Airport...

  14. 77 FR 74027 - Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Amended Record of Decision, Yellowstone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ..., Yellowstone National Park, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Sec. 102(2)(C) of the National... availability of the Amended Record of Decision for the Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National Park, located...

  15. 76 FR 77249 - Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, Yellowstone National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, Yellowstone..., Yellowstone National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Sec. 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of... announces the availability of the Record of Decision for the Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National Park...

  16. 77 FR 73310 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Belgrade, MT AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Bozeman Yellowstone... approving the designation of user fee status for Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport was signed on...

  17. Oxygen dynamics in submerged rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy D.; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Complete submergence of plants prevents direct O2 and CO2 exchange with air. Underwater photosynthesis can result in marked diurnal changes in O2 supply to submerged plants. Dynamics in pO2 had not been measured directly for submerged rice (Oryza sativa), but in an earlier study, radial O2 loss...

  18. 79 FR 14570 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request to Release Deed Restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    ... Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, Montana AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice requesting comment on request to release deed restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport; re-opening... notice of intent to rule on the request to release deed restrictions at Yellowstone Airport under the...

  19. 79 FR 36860 - Notice of Intent to Rule on Request To Release Deed Restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    ... Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, Montana AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent to Rule on Request to Release Deed Restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, Montana. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration is issuing this notice to...

  20. 79 FR 4529 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Deed Restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport, West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-28

    ... Yellowstone Airport, West Yellowstone, Montana AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... comment on the release of deed restrictions at Yellowstone Airport under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C... restrictions at the Yellowstone Airport under the provisions of the Title 49, U.S.C. 47125. The FAA...

  1. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  2. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    29(1): 1-6. Fraile ER, Bernardinelli SE, Handel M, Jauregui AM (1978). Selección de cepas de Mucor sp productoras de enzimas coagulantes de leche. Rev. Arg. Microbiol. 10(2): 65-69. Ghareib M, Hamdy HS, Khalil AA (2001). Production of intracellular milk clotting enzyme in submerged cultures of Fusarium subglutinans.

  3. Topology optimization for submerged buoyant structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary structural topology optimization method for the design of completely submerged buoyant modules with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structure is used to support offshore rig installation and pipeline transportation at all water depths. The

  4. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal milk-clotting enzymes have gained value as bovine Chymosin substitutes in the cheese industry. In this work, the effects of culture conditions on the production of extracellular milk clotting enzymes from Mucor mucedo DSM 809 in submerged fermentation were studied. The maximum activity was observed after 48 h ...

  5. Shading Performance on Terraced House Facades in Putrajaya, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmad Sanusi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates shading performance on house facades of selected three terraced houses in Putrajaya, Malaysia as the case studies. Terraced house type is selected for the case study because it is the most popular house type built in this country to house an increase of the urban population. Its total number built in urban area increases from 27% of the total dwellings in 1980 to 40% in 1990, and to slightly more than 60 per cent in 2000. The Case Study A, B, and C are atypical style of terraced house facade designs built in Putrajaya. These postmodern designs exhibit a range of complex geometric elements blending of colonial and traditional elements with colorful styles on the house facade. In this study, the time at which the sun path perpendicular to the house facade will be used to gain the results of shading performances when the house facades have their maximum exposure to the direct sunlight. The house facade was divided into two main parts which are opaque and glazing surface elements. The amount of shading area on the opaque and glazing surface was simulated using the SunTool program. In conclusion, the Case Study C had the highest average percentage of the shading area, which is 64.43%, followed by the Case Study A 60.41% and Case Study B 56.29%. These results showed that the facade designs had excellent horizontal shading elements with roof overhangs for high angle sunlight but they had weak vertical shading elements due to a lack of considerations of louvered elements to block low angle sunlight.

  6. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles W; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-02

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed approximately 640,000 years ago when an explosive eruption ejected approximately 1,000 km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began approximately 16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from approximately 150,000 to approximately 70,000 years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of approximately 70 cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system.

  7. Uplift, thermal unrest and magma intrusion at Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Charles W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Dzurisin, Daniel; Svarc, Jerry

    2006-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera, in the western United States, formed ~640,000years ago when an explosive eruption ejected ~1,000km3 of material. It is the youngest of a series of large calderas that formed during sequential cataclysmic eruptions that began ~16 million years ago in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. The Yellowstone caldera was largely buried by rhyolite lava flows during eruptions that occurred from ~150,000 to ~70,000years ago. Since the last eruption, Yellowstone has remained restless, with high seismicity, continuing uplift/subsidence episodes with movements of ~70cm historically to several metres since the Pleistocene epoch, and intense hydrothermal activity. Here we present observations of a new mode of surface deformation in Yellowstone, based on radar interferometry observations from the European Space Agency ERS-2 satellite. We infer that the observed pattern of uplift and subsidence results from variations in the movement of molten basalt into and out of the Yellowstone volcanic system.

  8. Chronostratigraphical investigations on Pleistocene fluvioglacial terraces of NW-Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, B.

    2009-04-01

    Investigations on paleopedology and Quaternary stratigraphy were carried out in the area of fluvioglacial terraces of the rivers Inn and Traun/Enns. Research projects have been financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the ICSU Grant Programme. Detailed studies were carried out on paleosols and loess sequences of different ages. The investigations of the research group were focused on loess/paleosol sequences located on top of Riss terraces (OIS 6 and older) as well as in areas with Mindel and Günz terraces. Loess records of the last glacial/interglacial cycle can be well observed in the study areas. Generally, the Eemian soil (O/S 5e) is developed as a reddish Bt-horizon in fluvioglacial gravels. U/Th-datings of calcites in the fluvioglacial sediments are indicating that soil formation took place in the catchment area about 113.000 ± 4.400 ka (Terhorst et al., 2002). The interglacial paleosol was truncated and a redeposited colluvial layer was deposited on top of the Bt-horizons containing charcaol with characteristic relicts of coniferous trees. After this land surface destabilisation phase, sedimentation of loess became the predominant process. Pedogenesis in form of a brown paleosol occurred, which partly has been redeposited. The pedocomplex is characterized by intense bioturbation of steppe animals. OSL-datings show that this part of the sequence belong to the Middle Würmian stage. The pedocomplex is overlain by a Cambisol corresponding to the youngest Middle Würmian interstadial. The paleosol is covered by thick loess deposits of the Upper Pleniglacial. Well-developed Tundragleysols subdivide the loess deposits. The uppermost soil corresponds to the Holocene Luvisol that includes hydromorphic properties. Older fluvioglacial terraces of Mindel and Günz age (in the classical stratigraphy) show a completely different structure of the covering layers (c.f. Kohl, 1999). In this case, several thick interglacial paleosols are embedded within records

  9. Tomography from 26 years of seismicity revealing that the spatial extent of the Yellowstone crustal magma reservoir extends well beyond the Yellowstone caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Jamie; Smith, Robert B.; Husen, Stephan; Diehl, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    The Yellowstone volcanic field has experienced three of Earth's most explosive volcanic eruptions in the last 2.1 Ma. The most recent eruption occurred 0.64 Ma forming the 60 km long Yellowstone caldera. We have compiled earthquake data from the Yellowstone Seismic Network from 1984 to 2011 and tomographically imaged the three-dimensional P wave velocity (Vp) structure of the Yellowstone volcanic system. The resulting model reveals a large, low Vp body, interpreted to be the crustal magma reservoir that has fueled Yellowstone's youthful volcanism. Our imaged magma body is 90 km long, 5-17 km deep, and 2.5 times larger than previously imaged. The magma body extends ~15 km NE of the caldera and correlates with the location of the largest negative gravity anomaly, a -80 mGal gravity low. This new seismic image provides important constraints on the dynamics of the Yellowstone magma system and its potential for future volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

  10. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Feeding ecology of native and nonnative salmonids during the expansion of a nonnative apex predator in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syslo, John M.; Guy, Christopher S.; Koel, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    The illegal introduction of Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush into Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, preceded the collapse of the native population of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri, producing a four-level trophic cascade. The Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout population’s collapse and the coinciding increase in Lake Trout abundance provided a rare opportunity to evaluate the feeding ecology of a native prey species and a nonnative piscivore species after the restructuring of a large lentic ecosystem. We assessed diets, stable isotope signatures, and depth-related CPUE patterns for Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Lake Trout during 2011–2013 to evaluate trophic overlap. To evaluate diet shifts related to density, we also compared 2011–2013 diets to those from studies conducted during previous periods with contrasting Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Lake Trout CPUEs. We illustrate the complex interactions between predator and prey in a simple assemblage and demonstrate how a nonnative apex predator can alter competitive interactions. The diets of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout were dominated by zooplankton during a period when the Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout CPUE was high and were dominated by amphipods when the CPUE was reduced. Lake Trout shifted from a diet that was dominated by Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout during the early stages of the invasion to a diet that was dominated by amphipods after Lake Trout abundance had increased and after Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout prey had declined. The shifts in Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Lake Trout diets resulted in increased trophic similarity of these species through time due to their shared reliance on benthic amphipods. Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout not only face the threat posed by Lake Trout predation but also face the potential threat of competition with Lake Trout if amphipods are limiting. Our results demonstrate the importance of studying the long-term feeding ecology of fishes in

  12. Broadband Seismic Observations of Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, A.; Hurwitz, S.; Johnson, H. E., III; Manga, M.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are natural phenomena that episodically erupt water and steam. Geophysical observations at geysers are analyzed to shed light on subsurface multi-phase mass and heat exchange processes and geometries controlling geyser eruptions, which are still are not completely understood. Lone Star Geyser (LSG) in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA erupts every ~3 hours, with brief episodes (~5-10 min) of water and steam fountaining (preplays) leading up to the main eruption (~28 min), and the discharge evolves from a water-dominated phase to a steam-dominated phase as the main eruption proceeds in time. We describe observations from multiple seismometers deployed around LSG as part of a comprehensive geophysical survey conducted in April 2014. 3-component seismograms were continuously recorded at 250 samples per second by 6 Nanometrics Trillium 120 P/PA broadband seismometers (lower corner frequency at 120 seconds) and Taurus dataloggers at distances ~10 to 25 m from the geyser cone for a period of 3 days. We identify distinct episodes of hydrothermal tremor associated with preplay events and main eruptions. We find that the dominant tremor frequencies during main eruptions are consistently higher (> 10.0 Hz) than those during preplays (> 1.0 Hz) indicating slightly different source locations or processes controlling the two phenomena. Unlike seismic observations at the Old Faithful Geyser, we also observe subtle harmonic tremor and spectral gliding in the frequency range ~1.0-8.0 Hz towards the end of both main eruption and preplay tremor episodes. We interpret long-period pulses on horizontal components of the seismometers located close to the geyser and synchronous with preplays, as pseudo-tilts resulting from deformation of the sinter terrace. We also compare the evolution of hydrothermal tremor in time with synchronous changes in temperature, acoustic emission and discharge for interpretation of the possible tremor source processes.

  13. Time scale for degradation and erosion of archaeological terraces in the Judea Mountains, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Naomi; Elinson, Rotem; Ben Dor, Eyal; Avni, Yoav; Gadot, Yuval

    2017-04-01

    The fate of mountain bench terraces which have been abandoned in ancient times is puzzling. On the one hand recently abandoned terraces undergo rapid degradation by walls crumbling, leading to soil being washed by rain water out of breaches in the walls, suggesting that within a short time all soil would be washed down-slope. On the other hand slopes with degraded terraces appear to still retain much soil even though only faint remains of the terraces exist. Moreover, if soil is rapidly eroded down-slope when terraces are no longer maintained, where do subsequent terrace builders find the soil to fill behind the stone walls? These questions were addressed as part of a larger study on the chronology of terraces in the Judea Mountains, Israel. Previous OSL dating of terrace soils in the region showed that the majority of the maintained terraces were constructed during the past 700 years, and only occasionally older ages were obtained for the soil at the very base of these terraces. Concerns were raised that soil erosion caused earlier events of terrace construction to disappear. To check if terraces and soils indeed erode entirely and how long this might take, we selected a relatively smooth hill slope showing small patches of limestone bedrock as well as remains of highly degraded sets of terraces. Three pits were excavated in soils within three different terrace remains down to bedrock, some to a depth of 2 m, and samples for OSL dating were collected from the exposed soil sections. In all three pits the lowermost samples gave ages of 3000-4500 years before the present, possibly the natural soils before any human intervention. However samples from a depth of 35-45 cm gave ages of 350-200 years, providing the last time the soil at that depth was exposed to sunlight. This suggests that the terraces were abandoned in the past 200 years or so and since then degraded. However the thick soil present on most of the slope suggests that after the first stage of rapid

  14. Dating of river terraces along Lefthand Creek, western High Plains, Colorado, reveals punctuated incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Melissa A.; Anderson, Robert S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon A.

    2017-10-01

    The response of erosional landscapes to Quaternary climate oscillations is recorded in fluvial terraces whose quantitative interpretation requires numerical ages. We investigate gravel-capped strath terraces along the western edge of Colorado's High Plains to constrain the incision history of this shale-dominated landscape. We use 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and thermally transferred OSL (TT-OSL) to date three strath terraces, all beveled in shale bedrock and then deposited upon by Lefthand Creek, which drains the crystalline core of the Front Range. Our study reveals: (i) a long history (hundreds of thousands of years) of fluvial occupation of the second highest terrace, T2 (Table Mountain), with fluvial abandonment at 92 ± 3 ka; (ii) a brief occupation of a narrow and spatially confined terrace, T3, at 98 ± 7 ka; and (iii) a 10-25 thousand year period of cutting and fluvial occupation of a lower terrace, T4, marked by the deposition of a lower alluvial unit between 59 and 68 ka, followed by deposition of an upper alluvial package at 40 ± 3 ka. In conjunction with other recent CRN studies of strath terraces along the Colorado Front Range (Riihimaki et al., 2006; Dühnforth et al., 2012), our data reveal that long periods of lateral planation and fluvial occupation of strath terraces, sometimes lasting several glacial-interglacial cycles, are punctuated by brief episodes of rapid vertical bedrock incision. These data call into question what a singular terrace age represents, as the strath may be cut at one time (its cutting-age) and the terrace surface may be abandoned at a much later time (its abandonment age), and challenge models of strath terraces that appeal to simple pacing by the glacial-interglacial cycles.

  15. Research on Remote Sensing recognition features of Yuan Yang Terraces in Yunnan Province (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jie; Chen, Jianping; Lai, ZiLi; Yang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Yuan Yang terraces is one of the most famous terraces in China, and it was successfully listed in the world heritage list at the 37th world heritage convention. On the one hand, Yuan Yang terraces retain more soil and water, to reduce both hydrological connectivity and erosion, and to support irrigation. On the other hand, It has the important tourism value, bring the huge revenue to local residents. In order to protect and make use of Yuan Yang terraces better, This study analyzed the spatial distribution and spectral characteristics of terraces:(1) Through visual interpretation, the study recognized the terraces based on the spatial adjusted remote sensing image (2010 Geoeye-1 with resolution of 1m/pix), and extracted topographic feature (elevation, slope, aspect, etc.) based on the digital elevation model with resolution of 20m/pix. The terraces cover a total area of about 11.58Km2, accounted for 24.4% of the whole study area. The terraces appear at range from 1400m to 1800m in elevation, 10°to 20°in slope, northwest to northeast in aspect; (2) Using the method of weight of evidence, this study assessed the importance of different topographic feature. The results show that the sort of importance: elevation>slope>aspect; (3) The study counted the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) changes of terraces throughout the year, based on the landsat-5 image with resolution of 30m/pix. The results show that the changes of terraces' NDVI are bigger than other stuff (e.g. forest, road, house, etc.). Those work made a good preparations for establishing the dynamic remote sensing monitoring system of Yuan Yang terraces.

  16. Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow

  17. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Forgacs

    Full Text Available Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06. Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76. However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae. Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  18. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  19. Protocols for geologic hazards response by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau hosts an active volcanic system, with subterranean magma (molten rock), boiling, pressurized waters, and a variety of active faults with significant earthquake hazards. Within the next few decades, light-to-moderate earthquakes and steam explosions are certain to occur. Volcanic eruptions are less likely, but are ultimately inevitable in this active volcanic region. This document summarizes protocols, policies, and tools to be used by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) during earthquakes, hydrothermal explosions, or any geologic activity that could lead to a volcanic eruption.

  20. Pump Coastdown with the Submerged Flywheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Seo, KyoungWoo; Kim, Seong Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many research reactors are generally designed as open pool types in consideration of the heat removal of the nuclear fuels, reactor operation and accessibility. Reactor structure assembly is generally placed at the pool bottom as shown in Fig. 1. Primary cooling system pump circulates the coolant from the reactor structure to the heat exchanger in order to continuously remove the heat generated from the reactor core in the research reactor as shown in Fig. 1. The secondary cooling system releases the transferred heat to the atmosphere by the cooling tower. Coastdown flow rate of the primary cooling system pump with the submerged flywheel are calculated analytically in case of the accident situation. Coastdown flow rate is maintained until almost 80 sec when the pump stops normally. But, coastdown flow rate is rapidly decreased when the flywheel is submerged because of the friction load on the flywheel surface.

  1. A change in landscape: Lessons learned from abandonment of ancient Wari agricultural terraces in Southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londoño, Ana C; Williams, Patrick Ryan; Hart, Megan L

    2017-11-01

    Ancient agricultural terrace practices have survived for millennia, sustaining populations through extreme climatic shifts and political regime changes. In arid regions with abrupt relief such as Southern Peru, agricultural terracing is undergoing a resurgence, as has seen revitalization of once abandoned terrace and hydraulic systems. Wari terraces at Cerro Baul provide clues to past cultural practices. They also document sustainable farming practices by using resilient land management techniques which can help combat desertification and degradation of arable lands. Three abandoned Wari terrace systems were mapped using microtopographic methods, the erosion patterns examined, the states of preservation compared, and then the design contrasted with modern terracing practices in the Moquegua Valley. In order to negate the harmful effects of desertification, rehabilitation and reconstruction of these terraces using ancient knowledge and techniques may be necessary. Rehabilitation must be conducted with consideration for preservation of cultural patrimony that may be encountered within the terrace treads or riser structures. With future climatic shifts impacting vulnerable dryland areas more than others, the ability to resiliently respond to these changes may be found in the lessons learned from ancient farming techniques such as the Wari. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon stocks of the terraces of the Lower Tana River floodplain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Few studies have addressed the terraces adjacent to the Tana River and delta. In May 2012 a survey assessed the woody vegetation of the terraces in anticipation of their conversion to a biofuel farm. The 64 000 hectares targeted by Bedford Biofuels for clearing for Jatropha curcas would have released over 1 million Mg of ...

  3. Nutrient Losses by Runoff and Sediment from the Taluses of Orchard Terraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran Zuazo, V.H.; Martinez Ray, A.; Aguilar Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nutrient fluxes of nitrate, ammonium, phosphorus and potassium in runoff and sediments were evaluated over a two-year period (1999¿2000) on the taluses of terraces, in a zone of intense subtropical orchard cultivation (SE Spain). The erosion plots were located on a terrace of 214% (65°) slope,

  4. Designing terraces for the rainfed farming region in Iraq using the RUSLE and hydraulic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Hussein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The rainfed region in Iraq comprises an area of more than 5 million ha of forest, grazing and farmland areas. Except the plains, the region suffers from moderate to severe water erosion due mainly to overgrazing and land mismanagement. Due to population growth and the shortage in water resources, an expansion in land used for agriculture in the region is expected. Terracing is an option when utilizing sloping land for agricultural production. A terrace design criterion was developed for the region in which terrace spacing was determined using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE; terrace channel specifications were determined using conventional hydraulic computations. Analyses showed that terracing is feasible on rolling and hilly sloping land in the high rainfall zone (seasonal rainfall >600 mm where economic crops are grown to offset the high cost of terrace construction and maintenance. In the medium and low rainfall zones (seasonal rainfall 400–600 mm and 300–400 mm, terracing for water erosion control is generally not needed on cultivated land less than 10% in slope where wheat and barley crops are normally grown; however, pioneer research projects are needed to assess the feasibility of terraces of the level (detention type to conserve rain water in these two zones for a more successful rainfed farming venture.

  5. Terrace effects on soil erosion processes in a watershed of the loess plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraces in crop fields are one of the most important soil and water conservation measures that affect runoff and erosion processes in a watershed. In this paper, terrace effects on soil erosion and sediment transport in the upstream and middle sections of the Weihe River basin in the Loess Plateau ...

  6. Separating Catalytic Activity at Edges and Terraces on Platinum: Hydrogen Dissociation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.M.N.; Kleyn, A.W.; Juurlink, L.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies to a large extent on the reactivity of metal nanoparticles. The surface of these particles consists of atomically smooth terraces and edges. As local environments of atoms in edges and terraces are different, their catalytic ability varies. This severely complicates

  7. Post-200-ka Pyroclastic Eruptions of the Yellowstone Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Pyroclastic deposits intercalated in post-Yellowstone-caldera rhyolitic lava flows form a minor component of the total volume of high-silica rhyolites erupted between 200 and 70 ka. Such events produced significant volumes of ash, fast-moving pyroclastic flows, and volcanic gases during young eruptions on the Plateau. Thus, while these were less common events, it is important to know the details of these deposits, including the number and frequency of eruptions, their sources, and possible associations or relations to other volcanic or tectonic events. The tuff of Bluff Point is the largest of these Yellowstone Caldera. Eruption of the tuff of Bluff Point, around 170-200 ka, is estimated from current maps to be ~50 km3 and resulted in collapse of the 10-km-wide West Thumb caldera, centered in the western-most basin of Yellowstone Lake. Large amounts of water derived from an ancestral Yellowstone Lake may have been involved in the eruption, suggested by large blocks of glass and abundant smaller fragments of obsidian incorporated into the ignimbrite. The oval-shaped West Thumb caldera occurs within the much larger and older Yellowstone Caldera and has dimensions comparable to Crater Lake (Oregon). New mapping, variable 40Ar/39Ar ages, and differences in mineralogy, grain size, and component data between key exposures all suggest that the tuff of Bluff Point, as mapped, represents as many as three pyroclastic eruptions. These eruptions may have occurred over a 20- to 40-k.y. interval, which may explain enigmatic age discrepancies. Stratigraphic, mineralogical, geochemical, radiometric, granulometric, and component analyses are being employed to unravel the details and origins of these pyroclastic deposits, which are rich in glass, pumice, ash, crystal, and lithic fragments. Several pumice morphologies are present in each deposit. Pyroclastic fallout, sinter, and volcaniclastic-rich alluvial deposits are intercalated between individual ignimbrite deposits; these

  8. Coastline Protection by a Submerged Breakwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B. D.; Hayatdavoodi, M.; Ertekin, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal communities are in danger of the impact caused by storm surge and waves. Storm surge brings the water level to a higher elevation and farther inland. This rise in water level increases the chance of a higher number and larger set of waves approaching shorelines, and it can potentially devastate the coastal infrastructure. In this study, we evaluate the performance of a submerged, horizontal breakwater located near shore. Unlike other types of breakwaters, such as the ones that extend to the surface, either fixed or floating, a submerged horizontal breakwater does not create any visual distraction or limit most of the recreational and commercial activities in the nearshore areas. The Level I Green-Naghdi (GN) nonlinear water wave equations are utilized here to study the wave transformation over a submerged breakwater that is located in shallow water. The GN theory is based on the theory of directed fluid sheets and assumes an incompressible and inviscid fluid; no assumption on the rotationality of the flow is required. In this approach, the nonlinear boundary conditions and the averaged conservation laws are satisfied exactly. The reflection and transmission coefficients due to nonlinear shallow water waves are determined implementing two approaches which use Goda's (1976) and Grue's (1992) methods. The results are compared with the existing laboratory experiments, and close agreement is observed overall. Preliminary results of the performance of the breakwater on dissipating storm waves during Hurricane Ike (2008), approaching the shore of Galveston, Texas, are presented.

  9. The Species Composition on Agricultural Terraces in NW Part of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machová Iva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contributes to a deeper understanding of agricultural terraces in NW Slovakia. The agricultural terraces found in 12 mountain ranges were characterised in detail on 32 localities. The slope parts of the studied terraces are on average only 2.3 m wide and current and former agricultural areas between them are on average 11 m wide. Furthermore, seventy phytosociological relevés were made on the terraces. Overall, 360 species of vascular plants were found in the relevés, 66 of which appeared regularly The localities were evaluated by DCA analysis. The main factor infuencing the species composition appears to be the geological composition of the bedrock and, probably the altitude as well. High coverage of the herb layer (median value 95%, low coverage of the shrub layer (median value 5% and the absence or a very low coverage of the tree layer is typical for these terraces.

  10. Source and fate of inorganic solutes in the Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. II. Trace element chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Susong, David D.; Ball, James W.; Taylor, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park receives inflows from several geothermal areas, and consequently the concentrations of many trace elements are elevated compared to rivers in non-geothermal watersheds. Water samples and discharge measurements were obtained from the Gibbon River and its major tributaries near Norris Geyser Basin under the low-flow conditions of September 2006 allowing for the identification of solute sources and their downstream fate. Norris Geyser Basin, and in particular Tantalus Creek, is the largest source of many trace elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Br, Cs, Hg, Li, Sb, Tl, W, and REEs) to the Gibbon River. The Chocolate Pots area is a major source of Fe and Mn, and the lower Gibbon River near Terrace Spring is the major source of Be and Mo. Some of the elevated trace elements are aquatic health concerns (As, Sb, and Hg) and knowing their fate is important. Most solutes in the Gibbon River, including As and Sb, behave conservatively or are minimally attenuated over 29 km of fluvial transport. Some small attenuation of Al, Fe, Hg, and REEs occurs but primarily there is a transformation from the dissolved state to suspended particles, with most of these elements still being transported to the Madison River. Dissolved Hg and REEs loads decrease where the particulate Fe increases, suggesting sorption onto suspended particulate material. Attenuation from the water column is substantial for Mn, with little formation of Mn as suspended particulates.

  11. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital aquifer boundaries for the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma. The Tillman terrace aquifer encompasses...

  12. Infrasound characterization of some Yellowstone geysers' eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada-Reyes, A.; Johnson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Geysers are springs that intermittently erupt hot water and steam. As with volcanoes, infrasonic airwaves produced by different geysers provide information about the processes that occur near the nozzle, such as the amount of fluid released during eruptive episodes. The aim of this study was to investigate acoustic sources from different geyser behaviors observed at Lone Star, Sawmill and Great Fountain geysers, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Acoustic signal were measured by arrays of microphones deployed around Lone Star and Great Fountain geysers between August 9th to 14th, 2011, and during one hour on August 16th, 2011 at Sawmill Geyser. Infrasound was analyzed with coincident video recordings to quantify and compare the pressure fields generated during explosive phases at the three geysers. We propose that the periodic infrasound recorded at Sawmill, and dominated by energy at 1 to 40 Hz, is generated by: 1) steam-filled bubble oscillations, and 2) subsequent bursting at the free surface resulting in a violent steam and water discharge. At Lone Star geyser, where ~18 m/s eruption jets endure for about 30 minutes, sound is dominated by higher frequency infrasound and audio-band signal evolving from 20 - 60 Hz to 40 - 85 Hz. We suggest that the infrasound tremor amplitudes are related to the transition of the erupted two-phase mixture from mostly water (low acoustic radiation) to steam (high acoustic radiation). At Great Fountain we observed three explosive bursts of water and steam during the last stage on the August 11 eruption with bi-modal infrasound pulses of up to 0.7 Pa-m. We model these pulses as volumetric sound sources and infer up to 32 m3 of fluid ejection. The variety of recordings reflect the variety of eruption mechanisms at the different geyser systems. Better understanding of the mechanisms of geyser infrasound radiation may help us to understand infrasound analogues at erupting silicic volcanoes, which are considerably more difficult to

  13. Geologic field-trip guide to the volcanic and hydrothermal landscape of the Yellowstone Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann; Shanks, W. C. Pat; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Farrell, Jamie M.; Robinson, Joel E.

    2017-11-20

    Yellowstone National Park, a nearly 9,000 km2 (~3,468 mi2) area, was preserved in 1872 as the world’s first national park for its unique, extraordinary, and magnificent natural features. Rimmed by a crescent of older mountainous terrain, Yellowstone National Park has at its core the Quaternary Yellowstone Plateau, an undulating landscape shaped by forces of late Cenozoic explosive and effusive volcanism, on-going tectonism, glaciation, and hydrothermal activity. The Yellowstone Caldera is the centerpiece of the Yellowstone Plateau. The Yellowstone Plateau lies at the most northeastern front of the 17-Ma Yellowstone hot spot track, one of the few places on Earth where time-transgressive processes on continental crust can be observed in the volcanic and tectonic (faulting and uplift) record at the rate and direction predicted by plate motion. Over six days, this field trip presents an intensive overview into volcanism, tectonism, and hydrothermal activity on the Yellowstone Plateau (fig. 1). Field stops are linked directly to conceptual models related to monitoring of the various volcanic, geochemical, hydrothermal, and tectonic aspects of the greater Yellowstone system. Recent interest in young and possible future volcanism at Yellowstone as well as new discoveries and synthesis of previous studies, (for example, tomographic, deformation, gas, aeromagnetic, bathymetric, and seismic surveys), provide a framework in which to discuss volcanic, hydrothermal, and seismic activity in this dynamic region.

  14. A geothermal-linked biological oasis in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovalvo, D; Clingenpeel, S R; McGinnis, S; Macur, R E; Varley, J D; Inskeep, W P; Glime, J; Nealson, K; McDermott, T R

    2010-09-01

    Hundreds of active and dormant geothermal vents have been located on the floor of Yellowstone Lake, although characterization of the associated biology (macro or micro) has been extremely limited. Herein, we describe an aquatic moss (Fontinalis) colony closely associated with vent emissions that considerably exceeded known temperature maxima for this plant. Vent waters were supersaturated with CO(2), likely accommodating a CO(2) compensation point that would be expected to be quite elevated under these conditions. The moss was colonized by metazoa, including the crustaceans Hyalella and Gammarus, a segmented worm in the Lumbriculidae family, and a flatworm specimen tentatively identified as Polycelis. The presence of these invertebrates suggest a highly localized food chain that derives from the presence of geothermal inputs and thus is analogous to the deep marine vents that support significant biodiversity.

  15. Characteristic of composite pine forests on Volga terraces of Tatarstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Prokhorenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pine forests in various natural areas of European Russia depends on environmental conditions, specifics of soil and underlying parent rock. Types of pine forests are distinguished by such features as their species composition of the lower layers, structure of grass-shrub layer and the nature of its mosaic. The purpose of the study are regional features of the composite pine forests, distributed on ancient terraces of left bank of the Volga River in north-western Tatarstan, considering specifics of their position in the contact zone of coniferous-deciduous forests with steppes. The structure of the communities of the pine forests on such indicators as species richness, quantitative participation of species, their occurrence and horizontal structure of grass cover were analyzed, and detailed description of the stand and of its renewal was given. In addition, ecological and coenotic structure of communities of pine forests was investigated. It was found that group of types of composite pine forests on the slopes and flat sections of high Volga terraces in northwest of Tatarstan are distinguished by age and completeness of the stand, but is characterized by similar composition of dominant species of lower layer and microgroups in grass layer composition. These communities are characterized by high participation of meadow-steppe plants. This feature distinguishes them from composite pine forests that are found in the central part of the European Russia. This is due to the fact that the area of our study takes position of a buffer, with broad invasion of meadow and meadow-steppe species in the communities of pine forests, especially when anthropogenic disturbances take place. The probability of further transformation of pine stands in the direction of their xerophytization has been identified.

  16. Burning questions and false alarms about wildfires at Yellowstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyne, S.J. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    The fires of 1988 have inspired a barrage of editorials, conferences, review panels, public forums, and just plain second-guessing. While consensus grows that the fires reflected a breakdown in how America copes with fire, it is not clear what exactly broke down - whether there was a failure in policy, in programs, in field operations, or in all three. Any review, moreover, is complicated by the stature of Yellowstone National Park - the epicenter of the 1988 fire season - and its capacity to monopolize public and media attention. It is not clear whether the real issue is national fire policy or the administration of Yellowstone. There is good reason to contend the problem is Yellowstone, that what appears a flaw in fire policy is only a weakness that Yellowstone's colossal size and celebrity status have amplified into grotesque dimensions. Regardless, the fires have brought national wildland fire policy into public debate. The paper discusses why fires exist, how fire behaves, how nations respond, historical aspects of US fire policy, how the system operates, and what needs reform and what doesn't.

  17. Coefficients of productivity for Yellowstone's grizzly bear habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, David John; Barber, Kim; Maw, Ralene; Renkin, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This report describes methods for calculating coefficients used to depict habitat productivity for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem. Calculations based on these coefficients are used in the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Cumulative Effects Model to map the distribution of habitat productivity and account for the impacts of human facilities. The coefficients of habitat productivity incorporate detailed information that was collected over a 20-year period (1977-96) on the foraging behavior of Yellowstone's bears and include records of what bears were feeding on, when and where they fed, the extent of that feeding activity, and relative measures of the quantity consumed. The coefficients also incorporate information, collected primarily from 1986 to 1992, on the nutrient content of foods that were consumed, their digestibility, characteristic bite sizes, and the energy required to extract and handle each food. Coefficients were calculated for different time periods and different habitat types, specific to different parts of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Stratifications included four seasons of bear activity (spring, estrus, early hyperphagia, late hyperphagia), years when ungulate carrion and whitebark pine seed crops were abundant versus not, areas adjacent to (bear activity in each region, habitat type, and time period were incorporated into calculations, controlling for the effects of proximity to human facilities. The coefficients described in this report and associated estimates of grizzly bear habitat productivity are unique among many efforts to model the conditions of bear habitat because calculations include information on energetics derived from the observed behavior of radio-marked bears.

  18. Examining winter visitor use in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae A. Davenport; Wayne A. Freimund; William T. Borrie; Robert E. Manning; William A. Valliere; Benjamin Wang

    2000-01-01

    This research was designed to assist the managers of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) in their decision making about winter visitation. The focus of this report is on winter use patterns and winter visitor preferences. It is the author’s hope that this information will benefit both the quality of winter experiences and the stewardship of the park resources. This report...

  19. Genetic population substructure in bison at Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Natalie D; Gogan, Peter J P; Hedrick, Philip W; Wahl, Jacquelyn M; Derr, James N

    2012-01-01

    The Yellowstone National Park bison herd is 1 of only 2 populations known to have continually persisted on their current landscape since pre-Columbian times. Over the last century, the census size of this herd has fluctuated from around 100 individuals to over 3000 animals. Previous studies involving radiotelemetry, tooth wear, and parturition timing provide evidence of at least 2 distinct groups of bison within Yellowstone National Park. To better understand the biology of Yellowstone bison, we investigated the potential for limited gene flow across this population using multilocus Bayesian clustering analysis. Two genetically distinct and clearly defined subpopulations were identified based on both genotypic diversity and allelic distributions. Genetic cluster assignments were highly correlated with sampling locations for a subgroup of live capture individuals. Furthermore, a comparison of the cluster assignments to the 2 principle winter cull sites revealed critical differences in migration patterns across years. The 2 Yellowstone subpopulations display levels of differentiation that are only slightly less than that between populations which have been geographically and reproductively isolated for over 40 years. The identification of cryptic population subdivision and genetic differentiation of this magnitude highlights the importance of this biological phenomenon in the management of wildlife species.

  20. Grizzly bear management in Yellowstone National Park: The heart of recovery in the Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C.C.; Gunther, K.; McCullough, Dale R.; Kaji, Koichi; Yamanaka, Masami

    2006-01-01

    Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) management in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) in the past quarter century has resulted in more than doubling of the population from around 200 to more than 500, expansion of range back into habitats where the bear has extirpated more than a century ago, and a move toward removal from the U.S. Endangered Species list. At the center of this success story are the management programs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Regulations that restrict human activity, camping, and food storage, elimination of human food and garbage as attractants, and ranger attendance of roadside bears have all resulted in the population of grizzlies in YNP approaching carrying capacity. Recent studies suggest, however, that YNP alone is too small to support the current population, making management beyond the park boundary important and necessary to the demographics of the population as a whole. Demographic analyses suggest a source-sink dynamic exists within the GYE, with YNP and lands outside the park within the Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone (RZ) representing source habitats, whereas lands beyond the RZ constitute sinks. The source-sink demography in the GYE is indicative of carnivore conservation issues worldwide where many national parks or preserves designed to protect out natural resources are inadequate in size or shape to provide all necessary life history requirements for these wide-ranging species. Additionally, wide-ranging behavior and long-distance dispersal seem inherent to large carnivores, so mortality around the edges is virtually inevitable, and conservation in the GYE is inextricably linked to management regimes not only within YNP, but within the GYE as a whole. We discuss those needs here.

  1. Three novel virophage genomes discovered from Yellowstone Lake metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinglie; Sun, Dawei; Childers, Alyson; McDermott, Timothy R; Wang, Yongjie; Liles, Mark R

    2015-01-15

    Virophages are a unique group of circular double-stranded DNA viruses that are considered parasites of giant DNA viruses, which in turn are known to infect eukaryotic hosts. In this study, the genomes of three novel Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs)--YSLV5, YSLV6, and YSLV7--were identified from Yellowstone Lake through metagenomic analyses. The relative abundance of these three novel virophages and previously identified Yellowstone Lake virophages YSLV1 to -4 were determined in different locations of the lake, revealing that most of the sampled locations in the lake, including both mesophilic and thermophilic habitats, had multiple virophage genotypes. This likely reflects the diverse habitats or diversity of the eukaryotic hosts and their associated giant viruses that serve as putative hosts for these virophages. YSLV5 has a 29,767-bp genome with 32 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), YSLV6 has a 24,837-bp genome with 29 predicted ORFs, and YSLV7 has a 23,193-bp genome with 26 predicted ORFs. Based on multilocus phylogenetic analysis, YSLV6 shows a close evolutionary relationship with YSLV1 to -4, whereas YSLV5 and YSLV7 are distantly related to the others, and YSLV7 represents the fourth novel virophage lineage. In addition, the genome of YSLV5 has a G+C content of 51.1% that is much higher than all other known virophages, indicating a unique host range for YSLV5. These results suggest that virophages are abundant and have diverse genotypes that likely mirror diverse giant viral and eukaryotic hosts within the Yellowstone Lake ecosystem. This study discovered novel virophages present within the Yellowstone Lake ecosystem using a conserved major capsid protein as a phylogenetic anchor for assembly of sequence reads from Yellowstone Lake metagenomic samples. The three novel virophage genomes (YSLV5 to -7) were completed by identifying specific environmental samples containing these respective virophages, and closing gaps by targeted PCR and sequencing. Most of

  2. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Majid; CHANGQI, YAN; ZHONGNING, SUN; HAIFENG, GU; JUNLONG, WANG; MEHBOOB, KHURRAM

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine...

  3. Submergence tolerance in Hordeum marinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Malik, Al I.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Floodwaters differ markedly in dissolved CO(2), yet the effects of CO(2) on submergence responses of terrestrial plants have rarely been examined. The influence of dissolved CO(2) on underwater photosynthesis and growth was evaluated for three accessions of the wetland plant Hordeum marinum Huds......) movement, would all contribute to submergence tolerance in H. marinum. The present study demonstrates that dissolved CO(2) levels can determine submergence tolerance of terrestrial plants. So, submergence experiments should be conducted with defined CO(2) concentrations and enrichment might be needed...

  4. The Uranium-trend dating method: Principles and application for southern California marine terrace deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Rosholt, J.N.; Bush, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium-trend dating is an open-system method for age estimation of Quaternary sediments, using disequilibrium in the 238U234U230Th decay series. The technique has been applied to alluvium, colluvium, loess, till, and marine sediments. In this study we tested the U-trend dating method on calcareous marine terrace deposits from the Palos Verdes Hills and San Nicolas Island, California. Independent age estimates indicate that terraces in these areas range from ???80 ka to greater than 1.0 Ma. Two low terraces on San Nicolas Island yielded U-trend plots that have a clustered array of points and the ages of these deposits are indeterminate or highly suspect. Middle Pleistocene terraces and one early Pleistocene terrace on San Nicolas Island and all terraces on the Palos Verdes Hills gave reasonably linear U-trend plots and estimated ages that are stratigraphically consistent and in agreement with independent age estimates. We conclude that many marine terrace deposits are suitable for U-trend dating, but U-trend plots must be carefully evaluated and U-trend ages should be consistent with independent geologic control. ?? 1989.

  5. Soil-plant mercury concentrations in the Idrijca river terraces (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Gosar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of research are mercury contents in plants and soils on river terraces in the lower reaches of the Idrijca River. Samples of averaged meadow forage and plaintain (Plantago lanceolata contain from 0.055 to 0.220 mg Hg/kg in dry matter. In comparison to samples from Idrija in the 1970's these contents are relatively low with respect to mercury in soil. They are similar to those established in the surroundings of the abandoned Podljubelj mercury mine. However, with respect to contents in non-polluted soils the contents on Idrijca river terraces are considerably above the background.Total mercury in plants is influenced only to some degree by its contents in soils. Comparison of samples on terraces at the Temnikar farm shows that the contents in soil increase discontinuously from the third towards the first terrace. But in plants these differences are small, probably owing to the large part of mercury being contained in cinnabar that is inaccessible to plants. On the first river terrace (TEM3 locality where soil contains about 55 times more Hg than on the second terrace, the average forage sample contains only 1.6 times and plantain sample 1.8 times higher Hg than the corresponding samples on the third terrace.

  6. A preliminary study of older hot spring alteration in Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter B.; Phillips, Allison; John, David; Cosca, Michael; Pritchard, Chad; Andersen, Allen; Manion, Jennifer

    2009-11-01

    Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300 m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal) + kaolinite ± alunite ± dickite, and an argillic or potassic alteration association with quartz + illite ± adularia. Disseminated fine-grained pyrite or marcasite is ubiquitous in both alteration types. These alteration associations are characteristic products of shallow volcanic epithermal environments. The contact between the two alteration types is about 100 m beneath the rim. By analogy to other active geothermal systems including active hydrothermal springs in the Yellowstone Caldera, the transition from kaolinite to illite occurred at temperatures in the range 150 to 170 °C. An 40Ar/ 39Ar age on alunite of 154,000 ± 16,000 years suggests that hydrothermal activity has been ongoing since at least that time. A northwest-trending linear array of extinct and active hot spring centers in the Sevenmile Hole area implies a deeper structural control for the upflowing hydrothermal fluids. We interpret this deeper structure to be the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault that is covered by the younger tuff of Sulphur Creek. The Sevenmile Hole altered area lies at the eastern end of a band of hydrothermal centers that may mark the buried extension of the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault across the northern part of the Caldera.

  7. Calibration of submerged multi-sluice gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to study experimentally and verify empirically the different parameters affecting the discharge through submerged multiple sluice gates (i.e., the expansion ratios, gates operational management, etc.. Using multiple regression analysis of the experimental results, a general equation for discharge coefficient is developed. The results show, that the increase in the expansion ratio and the asymmetric operation of gates, give higher values for the discharge coefficient. The obtained predictions of the discharge coefficient using the developed equations are compared to the experimental data. The present developed equations showed good consistency and high accuracy.

  8. Comparison of a Riverine Waterborne Transport and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone River Dye Releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone River Dye Releases N. Platt, Project Leader J. L. Palguta January 2015...F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5330 Comparison of a Riverine Waterborne Transport and Dispersion Model and Yellowstone ...conducted in the Yellowstone River. We selected this study because it provided all the necessary information for setting up ICWater simulations and

  9. Yellowstone and Long Valley - A Comparison of Two Restless Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. P.; Smith, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Three large, silicic calderas in the conterminous United States have explosively erupted volumes > 300 km3 within in the last 2 million years -- Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming) Long Valley caldera (California) and the Vallez caldera (New Mexico) all located in extensional tectonic environments. All have shown varying levels of historic unrest. Pronounced unrest episodes at Yellowstone and Long Valley calderas over the past three decades stimulated extensive research on these two closely monitored calderas, and we explore some emerging similarities and differences. Yellowstone caldera is underlain by a long-lived (> 17 my) upper-mantle hot-spot that has fed a series of caldera-forming, extending to the southwest across southern Idaho to central Oregon including three caldera-forming eruptions from the Yellowstone caldera system in the last 2 my, the most recent at 600,000 ybp. It is marked by relatively low density and low seismic velocities extending to depths of at least 400 km and a regional topographic swell with elevations exceeding 2000 m. The extensive Yellowstone hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 5 GW. The most recent magmatic eruption dated at 70,000 ybp. By comparison, Long Valley caldera is underlain by a relatively modest "hot-spot", the locus of which appears to be influenced by a dilatational jog between the dextral Eastern California Shear Zone and the Walker Lane and westward delamination of the dense lithospheric root of the adjacent Sierra Nevada. The Long Valley system has fed multiple eruptions of over the past 4 my and a single caldera-forming eruption at 760,000 ybp. It is marked by a limited topographic swell but with the elevation of the caldera floor and adjacent basins comparable to the 2000-plus m elevation of the Yellowstone swell. Long Valley caldera hydrothermal system has a thermal output of 0.3 GW (including a 40 MW geothermal power plant). The most recent eruptions from the Long Valley Caldera- Mono Domes volcanic field

  10. Seismic Energy From Waterfalls in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, E. J.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Lin, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    We surveyed continuous seismic data recorded at two seismic stations in Yellowstone National Park that are located near to Yellowstone National Park's Upper and Lower Falls. Lower Falls is the largest waterfall in Yellowstone, with an estimated flow rate of 70 cubic meters per second, falling an estimated 94 meters, while the Upper Falls has a flow of 70 cubic meters per second, jetting over a 21 meter gap downward 33 meters. A study based on a deployment of seismometers in Yellowstone in September and October of 1972 had found a predominant 2 Hz signal associated with the Lower Falls, with the signal remaining above background noise within 6 km of the falls in every direction but the south. Station YUF is a three-component, broadband seismometer operated by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations that is located approximately 1.5 km southwest of the Lower Falls, while station B206 is a three-component, short-period, borehole seismometer operated by the Plate Boundary Observatory, located roughly 1.2 km west of the Lower Falls. We computed power spectral densities (PSD) for all available hour-long segments of continuous data from the vertical components of YUF and B206 beginning September 22, 2006 and July 10, 2008, respectively. Yearly spectrograms were used to visualize the PSDs. Both stations showed spectral peaks in the double-frequency microseismic band, with stronger amplitudes in winter than in summer, presumably generated mainly by storms in the North Pacific. Both also showed strong peaks near a period of 1 s, but with the opposite seasonal dependence. This 1 s peak signal broadens in frequency during the summer, from 1 to 5 Hz, as well as uniformly increasing in power across this band. This short-period noise was compared to discharge measurements of the Yellowstone River made at the Yellowstone Lake outlet, about 18.5 km upstream from the Upper Falls. For periods of 0.5-2.0 s the correlation coefficient between the seismic energy and the river

  11. Olivine Crystallization and Mantle Potential Temperatures Beneath Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonderly, A.; Putirka, K. D.; Atosa, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2007-12-01

    New basalt samples from the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field provide evidence for some of the most primitive liquids yet recovered for the region, and yield clues regarding mantle processes. The sample distribution covers a large area and an extended period, and one sample in particular (basalt of Warm River) contains 11% MgO, with olivines that are in equilibrium with the host whole rock. Using olivine thermometry, we calculate both olivine crystallization and mantle potential temperatures (Tp, the temperature a parcel of mantle would have if it rose adiabatically to Earth's surface without melting) to test whether the alleged Yellowstone hot spot is truly hot. These tests make use of thermometers from (1) and (2), and we compare temperatures at Yellowstone with estimates from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project, HSDP-2 (2, 3) and the Siqueiros Transform, near the East Pacific Rise (4). Assessment of olivine-liquid equilibrium is based on the Fe-Mg exchange coefficient between olivine and liquid, which is assumed to be 0.30+/-0.03 (5). In total, the Yellowstone lavas have mean crystallization temperatures of 1251+/-41°C (n=79) with a maximum of 1327°C. The mean temperature is similar to crystallization temperatures of basalts from Siqueiros (1264+/-21°C), but lower than the mean temperature for HDSP samples (1343+/-50°C). Mantle potential temperatures appear to approach an olivine-control line, which if valid, yields a mantle potential temperature of 1610°C, slightly higher than most Snake River Plain (SRP) lavas (Tp =1540°C). Applying the same model to lavas from the Siqueiros Transform yields a Tp of 1400°C, and so excess temperatures (relative to MORB) along the SRP are in the range of 140-209°C, consistent with a mantle plume interpretation for the Yellowstone hot spot track. These calculations presume that primitive melts have equilibrated with mantle olivine of Fo90 in composition; given the FeO contents of SRP lavas, parental liquids should

  12. Older Hydrothermal Activity along the Northern Yellowstone Caldera Margin at Sulphur Creek, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, J. L.; Larson, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) is well exposed in the Seven Mile Hole area of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The rhyolitic tuff erupted after the collapse of the Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka) and hosts more than 350 vertical meters of hydrothermal alteration. Two epithermal alteration assemblages with different mineral associations have been identified in the area: an illite-silica-pyrite phase and a kaolinite-alunite-silica-pyrite phase. Kaolinite and opal occur along the canyon rim, montmorillonite and other smectites are found at intermediate depths, and illite and sulfides (pyrite) are found deepest in the section. Our work on the north side of the Sevenmile Hole altered area has found a complex system of veining. The veins are concentrated in the eastern portion of the canyon and are less frequent to the west. Brecciated cross-cutting veins ranging from 2 to 30cm wide are found at the base of the canyon. Moving vertically up the canyons walls, the veining style becomes less complex. These veins are about 1 to 1.5cm wide and are not brecciated, occurring less frequently than the brecciated veins. The canyon walls and the canyon rim mainly contain millimeter-scale cross-cutting silica veinlets. These stockwork-like veinlets are the most abundant fracture filling that we find throughout the canyon walls. Veins at the base of the system, found in the stream bed, contain abundant sulfides (mainly pyrite). Sulfides are present in three forms: disseminated in a silica matrix, as massive pyrite in healed fractures, and encrusting clays and silica. The latter is the least common. Disseminated and massive sulfides are typically associated with the matrix in the brecciated veins. Breccias include angular clasts of altered tuff with argillized feldspar phenocrysts and fragments of earlier vein-filling opal. Sulfides are most abundant in the bottom of the canyon and in the western part of the field area. Hydrothermal

  13. Damage detection in submerged plates using ultrasonic guided waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suitable ultrasonic guided wave modes with optimum scanning capabilities have been generated and identified in submerged plate system. Finally, the propagation of selected modes through submerged notched plates is investigated. Sensitivity of leaky waves to the notches has been studied. The methodology would help ...

  14. Automating a submerged pump method for operating oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, I.

    1984-01-01

    The basic parameters of wells which operate in a mode of submerged operation are presented. The basic systems for measuring and testing the parameters of submerged operation are described. Worldwide experience in solving this particular problem is analyzed. Romanian (SRR) use of systems for automation, remote signaling and remote management is examined.

  15. Impacts of climate change on submerged and emergent wetland plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick T. Short; Sarian Kosten; Pamela A. Morgan; Sparkle L Malone; Gregg E. Moore

    2016-01-01

    Submerged and emergent wetland plant communities are evaluated for their response to global climate change (GCC), focusing on seagrasses, submerged freshwater plants, tidal marsh plants, freshwater marsh plants and mangroves. Similarities and differences are assessed in plant community responses to temperature increase, CO2increase, greater UV-B exposure, sea...

  16. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... 3Engineering Research Center of Ecology and Agricultural Use of Wetland, Ministry of Education, Yangzte University,. Jingzhou 434025, P.R. .... intolerance to submergence) and M202(Sub1A) by qRT-. PCR. We identified a novel gene responsive to submergence, called RS1. The expression patterns of.

  17. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our results also show that RS1 is highly expressed under submergence, drought, and NaCl stresses, but not under cold or dehydration stress. Hormone ABA treatment induces, whereas GA treatment decreases, RS1 expression. The RS1 and Sub1A genes are co-regulated under submergence. Overexpression of RS1 in ...

  18. Main Terrace vertical offset data for the Lower Rhine Graben, central Europe – Data Release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release includes vertical offset information for the regionally extensive Main Terrace in the Lower Rhine Graben in the border region between Germany,...

  19. Effectiveness of the GAEC standard of cross compliance retain terraces on soil erosion control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The GAEC standard retain terraces of cross compliance prohibits farmers the elimination of existing terraces, with the aim to ensure the protection of soil from erosion. In the Italian literature there are not field studies to quantify the effects of the elimination or degradation of terraces on soil erosion. Therefore, the modeling approach was chosen and applied in a scenario analysis to evaluate increasing levels of degradation of stone wall terraces. The study was conducted on two sample areas: Lamole (700.8 ha, Tuscany and Costaviola (764.73 ha, Calabria with contrasting landscapes. The Universal Soil Loss Equation model (USLE was applied in the comparative assessment of the soil erosion risk (Mg . ha-1 . yr-1, by simulating five increasing intensity of terrace degradation, respectively: conserved partially damaged, very damaged, partially removed, removed, each of which corresponding to different values of the indexes of verification in case of infringement to GAEC standard provided for by the AGEA rules which have come into force since December 2009 (Agency for Agricultural Payments. To growing intensity of degradation, a progressive loss of efficacy of terraces was attributed by increasing the values of the LS factor (length and slope of USLE in relation with the local modification of the length and steepness of the slope between adjacent terraces. Basically, it was simulated the gradual return to the natural morphology of the slope. The results of the analysis showed a significant increase in erosion in relationship with increasing degradation of terraces. Furthermore, it is possible to conclude that the GAEC standard retain terraces is very effective with regard to the primary objective of reducing erosion. A further statistical analysis was performed to test the protective value of terraces against soil erosion in areas where agriculture was abandoned. The analysis was carried out by comparing the specific risk of erosion (Mg . ha-1

  20. Territorial Analysis of the Agricultural Terraced Landscapes of Tuscany (Italy): Preliminary Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agnoletti, Mauro; Conti, Leonardo; Frezza, Lorenza; Santoro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ... of the country. The progressive abandonment of rural areas and farmland that began in the 1960s has led to the disintegration and disappearance of many terraces, representing one of the problems con...

  1. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid...

  2. Holocene submarine terraces on the western continental shelf of India; implications for sea-level changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wagle, B.G.; Vora, K.H.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Veerayya, M.; Almeida, F.

    -beach/barrier terraces are discernible in the terrigenous regime, which is located north and south of these latitudes. Despite their genetic differences, their evolution is ascribed to reef growth, progaradation and wave activity during the lowstands of sea level...

  3. Groundwater flood of a river terrace in southwest Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotkowitz, Madeline B.; Attig, John W.; McDermott, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Intense rainstorms in 2008 resulted in wide-spread flooding across the Midwestern United States. In Wisconsin, floodwater inundated a 17.7-km2 area on an outwash terrace, 7.5 m above the mapped floodplain of the Wisconsin River. Surface-water runoff initiated the flooding, but results of field investigation and modeling indicate that rapid water-table rise and groundwater inundation caused the long-lasting flood far from the riparian floodplain. Local geologic and geomorphic features of the landscape lead to spatial variability in runoff and recharge to the unconfined sand and gravel aquifer, and regional hydrogeologic conditions increased groundwater discharge from the deep bedrock aquifer to the river valley. Although reports of extreme cases of groundwater flooding are uncommon, this occurrence had significant economic and social costs. Local, state and federal officials required hydrologic analysis to support emergency management and long-term flood mitigation strategies. Rapid, sustained water-table rise and the resultant flooding of this high-permeability aquifer illustrate a significant aspect of groundwater system response to an extreme precipitation event. Comprehensive land-use planning should encompass the potential for water-table rise and groundwater flooding in a variety of hydrogeologic settings, as future changes in climate may impact recharge and the water-table elevation.

  4. Adaptive restoration of river terrace vegetation through iterative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Michelle P.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Decker, Cheryl E.; O’Neil, Aviva

    2014-01-01

    Restoration projects can involve a high degree of uncertainty and risk, which can ultimately result in failure. An adaptive restoration approach can reduce uncertainty through controlled, replicated experiments designed to test specific hypotheses and alternative management approaches. Key components of adaptive restoration include willingness of project managers to accept the risk inherent in experimentation, interest of researchers, availability of funding for experimentation and monitoring, and ability to restore sites as iterative experiments where results from early efforts can inform the design of later phases. This paper highlights an ongoing adaptive restoration project at Zion National Park (ZNP), aimed at reducing the cover of exotic annual Bromus on riparian terraces, and revegetating these areas with native plant species. Rather than using a trial-and-error approach, ZNP staff partnered with academic, government, and private-sector collaborators to conduct small-scale experiments to explicitly address uncertainties concerning biomass removal of annual bromes, herbicide application rates and timing, and effective seeding methods for native species. Adaptive restoration has succeeded at ZNP because managers accept the risk inherent in experimentation and ZNP personnel are committed to continue these projects over a several-year period. Techniques that result in exotic annual Bromus removal and restoration of native plant species at ZNP can be used as a starting point for adaptive restoration projects elsewhere in the region.

  5. Ancient Agricultural Terraces and the Soil Erosion Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony

    2015-04-01

    Geoarchaeology lies at the heart of debates about societal stability and change. Geomorphological research has been used as a foundation for simplistic models of resource depletion based almost entirely on the comparison of soil erosion rates with long-term so- called 'geological' rates. However, the neo-catastrophic collapse of complex agricultural societies is rare, and where it is convincing demonstrated it is even more rarely monocausal. Indeed many societies appear to have continued agricultural exploitation of climatically marginal lands for far longer than soil depletion estimates would forecast. One reason may be that this soil depletion approach has grossly simplified soil creation through weathering, and neglected how past agriculture also affected the soil creation rate (especially on some lithologies) and how soil was conserved (terraces) and utilised even after transport. However, we now have we know have some potentially valuable new tools, including mineral magnetics and cosmogenic nuclides, which can be used to estimate changing soil weathering rates. This approach will be discussed with examples from both the temperate and Mediterranean climatic zones and in relation to causative models of change in complex agricultural societies.

  6. Using OSL to decipher past soil history in archaeological terraces, Judea Highlands, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat, Naomi; Gadot, Yuval; Davidovich, Uri; Avni, Yoav; Avni, Gideon; Golan, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Archaeological terraces are the most prominent feature of the agricultural sphere in the hilly landscape throughout the Mediterranean. Using terrace walls for the artificial creation of arable plots of land was a major technological innovation that has completely altered the natural terrain. As such, the dating of these simply built features is of upmost importance. Archaeological excavations and OSL dating of the soil infill of terraces were carried out in three excavation areas at Mt. Eitan in the Judea Highlands, Israel. Previous survey showed that Mt. Eitan was settled continuously at least from the Middle Bronze Age (ca 3800 years ago) and until modern times. The OSL ages shows that all extant terraces were constructed in the past 550-200 years, in the Ottoman period. Older ages are limited only to the base of a few terraces, and they range from the Roman Period (ca 1800 years ago) to Mamluk times (ca 700 years ago). Many of the soil samples contain quartz grains with older ages, indicating incomplete bleaching of the sediment at the time of terrace construction. We used the finite mixture model to find out if there are distinct age clusters to these poorly bleached grains. Analyses were carried out on a compilation of all measured De values (small aliquots) from the entire study area, and for each area separately. Results show that the unbleached grains cluster into only a few periods and highlight four synchronous episodes of terrace building in the past 800 years. The Roman and Early Islamic periods are also represented, even in area where soils with such ages were not found. The unbleached grains preserve older episodes of terrace building no longer represented in the landscape.

  7. Geophysical imaging of hydrothermal shallow degassing in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is the world's largest active hydrothermal system, with over 10,000 thermal features. Yet very little is known about the shallow "plumbing" system connecting hydrothermal reservoirs with the surface features. Here we present the results of geophysical investigations of shallow hydrothermal degassing in Yellowstone. In addition to electrical methods, we combined seismic refraction and surface-wave profiling to estimate pressure and shear wave velocities together with the Poisson's ratio. We find that resistivity data helps identifying hydrothermal areas and fluids flowpaths. Poisson's ratio shows a good sensitivity to saturation variations, highlighting gas saturated areas. Porosity and saturation predicted from rock physics modeling provide critical insight to estimate the depth of fluid phase separation and understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems. Finally, the consistency between Poisson's ratio and predicted saturation illustrates its ability to map shallow "plumbing" systems in hydrothermal areas and constrain gas saturation in depth.

  8. Yellowstone wolves and the forces that structure natural systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy P Dobson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1995 and 1996, wolves have had effects on Yellowstone that ripple across the entire structure of the food web that defines biodiversity in the Northern Rockies ecosystem. Ecological interpretations of the wolves have generated a significant amount of debate about the relative strength of top-down versus bottom-up forces in determining herbivore and vegetation abundance in Yellowstone. Debates such as this are central to the resolution of broader debates about the role of natural enemies and climate as forces that structure food webs and modify ecosystem function. Ecologists need to significantly raise the profile of these discussions; understanding the forces that structure food webs and determine species abundance and the supply of ecosystem services is one of the central scientific questions for this century; its complexity will require new minds, new mathematics, and significant, consistent funding.

  9. Yellowstone wolves and the forces that structure natural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andy P

    2014-12-01

    Since their introduction in 1995 and 1996, wolves have had effects on Yellowstone that ripple across the entire structure of the food web that defines biodiversity in the Northern Rockies ecosystem. Ecological interpretations of the wolves have generated a significant amount of debate about the relative strength of top-down versus bottom-up forces in determining herbivore and vegetation abundance in Yellowstone. Debates such as this are central to the resolution of broader debates about the role of natural enemies and climate as forces that structure food webs and modify ecosystem function. Ecologists need to significantly raise the profile of these discussions; understanding the forces that structure food webs and determine species abundance and the supply of ecosystem services is one of the central scientific questions for this century; its complexity will require new minds, new mathematics, and significant, consistent funding.

  10. Research Poster: Minimizing Native Trout Mortality, Yellowstone National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Research poster presented at the 2016 College of Liberal Arts Honors Day at the University of Texas at Austin. This poster is the final product of the B.S. Environmental Science program's capstone senior research experience. The research investigated the effect of an invasive species suppression effort on a native species in Yellowstone National Park, and made suggestions to the program in order to minimize impact on native biodiversity.

  11. Bark Beetle-Fire Associations in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    OpenAIRE

    Amman, Gene D

    1991-01-01

    The large forest fires in and around Yellowstone National Park in 1988 bring up many ecological questions, including the role of bark beetles. Bark beetles may contribute to fuel buildup over the years preceding a fire, resulting in stand replacement fires. Fire is important to the survival of seral tree species and bark beetles that reproduce in them. Without fire, seral species are ultimately replaced by climax species. Following fire, bark- and wood-boring beetles respond to fire-injured t...

  12. Biology, status, and management of the yellowstone cutthroat trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri were historically distributed in the Yellowstone River drainage (Montana and Wyoming) and the Snake River drainage (Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, and probably Washington). Individual populations evolved distinct life history characteristics in response to the diverse environments in which they were isolated after the last glaciation. Anthropogenic activities have resulted in a substantial decline (42% of the historical range is currently occupied; 28% is occupied by core [genetically unaltered] populations), but the number of extant populations, especially in headwater streams, has precluded listing of this taxon under the Endangered Species Act. Primary threats to persistence of Yellowstone cutthroat trout include (1) invasive species, resulting in hybridization, predation, disease, and interspecific competition; (2) habitat degradation from human activities such as agricultural practices, water diversions, grazing, dam construction, mineral extraction, grazing, timber harvest, and road construction; and (3) climate change, including an escalating risk of drought, wildfire, winter flooding, and rising temperatures. Extirpation of individual populations or assemblages has led to increasing isolation and fragmentation of remaining groups, which in turn raises susceptibility to the demographic influences of disturbance (both human and stochastic) and genetic factors. Primary conservation strategies include (1) preventing risks associated with invasive species by isolating populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and (2) connecting occupied habitats (where possible) to preserve metapopulation function and the expression of multiple life histories. Because persistence of isolated populations may be greater in the short term, current management is focused on isolating individual populations and restoring habitats; however, this approach implies that humans will act as dispersal agents if a population is

  13. Terrace Agriculture of the Hani People – Cultural Heritage of the South-West China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kladovshchikova Mariya Evgenyevna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the features of terrace agriculture of Hani and Yi indigenous minorities, living in the Yunnan province in the South-West China, just a step away from the Laos and Vietnam boundaries. The cultural landscape of the Hani rice terraces, included into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2013 (Cultural Landscape of Honghe Hani Rice Terraces, expresses the conservation of the minorities’ course of life during the last 1 300 years. The geological framework, climate patterns and conform type of vegetation predefine the specific character of natural conditions necessary for terrace agriculture and red rice growth – the most important crop within the region. At that, the landscape picture which fully reflects the season fluctuations of regional subtropical climate, also facilitates to aesthetic and romantic perception forming, symbolizing man-made environment integral and interlaced into natural landscape. The special focus is made on the description of terraced slopes unique morphology and ancient land cultivation technologies for the essential regional culture – red rice. Preservation of centuries-old traditions of efficient agriculture makes it possible to achieve integration of cultural and natural landscapes, that seamlessly comprises the ethnic minorities’ life, as well as to prevent development of erosion and landslide slope processes. The elements of the traditional Hani people way of life, including ritual customs associated with terrace agriculture, are particularly described.

  14. Periglacial cirque analogs: Elevation trends of cryoplanation terraces in eastern Beringia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Frederick E.; Nyland, Kelsey E.

    2017-09-01

    Cryoplanation terraces are large erosional landforms common in cold, unglaciated mountainous environments. Terrace sequences are composed of alternating slope segments with gently sloping treads and steep rubble-covered risers, and culminate in extensive summit flats. Many unglaciated upland landscapes in eastern Beringia are dominated by these landforms. Indirect evidence indicates that they evolve through locally intensified weathering and mass-movement processes associated with late-lying snowcover. Geospatial analysis involving nearly 700 cryoplanation terraces in eastern Beringia demonstrates that their elevation rises from 175 to 350 masl on Bering Sea islands to median values > 1200 m near the Alaska-Canada border. The regional trends of cryoplanation terrace elevation are nearly identical to those of Wisconsinan cirques on several transects across Alaska. The consistency in the elevation trends of glacial cirques and cryoplanation terraces indicates close genetic links between the two classes of feature, involving topographic position, continentality gradients, and the mass balance of localized snow accumulations. Cryoplanation terraces can be considered the periglacial analogs of glacial cirques, and have greater potential as sources of paleoclimatic information than smaller periglacial features more sensitive to short-term climate variations. Process-oriented studies, age determinations, and high-resolution mapping are needed before the paleoenvironmental potential of these landforms can be realized fully.

  15. 78 FR 13932 - Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.-Discontinuance of Lease and Trackage Rights Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Surface Transportation Board Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.--Discontinuance of Lease and Trackage... County, ND On February 11, 2013, Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C. (YVRR) \\1\\ filed with the Surface... 59270. \\1\\ According to YVRR, its name was formerly Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc. See Watco Holdings...

  16. 76 FR 37888 - Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Dawson and Richland...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Surface Transportation Board Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Dawson and Richland Counties, Mont. Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C. (YVRR) \\1\\ has filed a verified... Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc. See Watco Holdings, Watco Companies, and Watco Transp. Services--Corporate...

  17. Terrace styles and timing of terrace formation in the Weser and Leine valleys, northern Germany: Response of a fluvial system to climate change and glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsemann, Jutta; Lang, Jörg; Roskosch, Julia; Polom, Ulrich; Böhner, Utz; Brandes, Christian; Glotzbach, Christoph; Frechen, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    In glaciated continental basins accommodation space is not only controlled by tectonics and sea-level but also by the position of ice-sheets, which may act as a regional base-level for fluvial systems. Although the Pleistocene terrace record of major river systems in northwestern Europe has been investigated by many authors, relatively little attention has been paid to base-level changes related to glacier advance-retreat cycles and how these regional changes in base-level interacted with river catchment processes. This study provides a synthesis of the stratigraphic architecture of Middle Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terraces in the upper Weser and middle Leine valley in northern Germany and links it to glaciation, climate and base-level change. The depositional architecture of the fluvial terrace deposits has been reconstructed from outcrops and high-resolution shear wave seismic profiles. The chronology is based on luminescence ages, 230Th/U ages, 14C ages and Middle Palaeolithic archaeological assemblages. The drainage system of the study area developed during the Early Miocene. During the Pleistocene up to 170 m of fluvial incision took place. A major change in terrace style from strath terraces to cut-and-fill terraces occurred during the early Middle Pleistocene before Marine Isotope Stage MIS 12, which may correlate with climate deterioration and the onset of glaciation in northern central Europe. During this time a stable buffer zone was established within which channels avulsed and cut and filled freely without leaving these vertical confines. Climate was the dominant driver for river incision and aggradation, whereas the terrace style was controlled by base-level changes during ice-sheet growth and decay. A major effect of glacio-isostatic processes was the post-Elsterian re-direction of the River Weser and River Leine. The Middle Pleistocene fluvial terraces are vertically stacked, indicating a high aggradation to degradation ratio, corresponding

  18. Spatio-temporal relation between landslide occurrence and abandoned or not maintained agricultural terraces in the Moldavian Plateau, NE Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprian Margarint, Mihai; Santangelo, Michele; Niculita, Mihai; Bucci, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Terraced landscapes are one of the most obvious human-shaped landscapes, mainly used to reduce the negative impact of soil erosion due to uncontrolled runoff and shallow landslides occurrence. Nevertheless, as the recent literature emphasizes, these old best practices can transform into a potential hazard for soil degradation, if not appropriately maintained. In Moldavian Plateau (NE Romania), agricultural terraces were built after the 1960s for landslide, soil erosion and runoff control, mainly in connection with construction of reservoirs, for increasing their operation time. Usually, the slope reduction was obtained by construction of cut-off ditches, hillside ditches, intermittent terraces, bench terraces, broad-based terraces, vineyardand orchard terraces. Due to the dry climatic setting, to the lack of hard rocks for construction, and to the generally light earth moving machinery available for construction, terraces are generally characterized by a small escarpment (0.5m to 1m), and a relatively short lateral extension (5 to 40 m). When the terraces were maintained, the backslope was typically covered with grass. When, after the 1990s, the lands were returned to the initial owners, the vegetation cover of the terraces was no more maintained, and the terraces themselves were progressively abandoned, due to lack of funds. Accurate landslide mapping on high resolution LiDAR DEM derived images, allowed to produce geomorphological inventories in 5 test cases, representative of the whole study area. In each inventory, landslides were classified based on type and relative age based on published classification schemes. We investigate the spatial and temporal relation between landslides occurrence and terraces, based on the spatial interactions of landslides of different ages and terraces. Results reveal that terraces were built, both on landslide-free and landslide-bearing slopes, and that frequently landslides and gullies develop on terraced slopes. Reactivations of

  19. Four novel algal virus genomes discovered from Yellowstone Lake metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Jinglie; Liu, Taigang; Yu, Yongxin; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-10-13

    Phycodnaviruses are algae-infecting large dsDNA viruses that are widely distributed in aquatic environments. Here, partial genomic sequences of four novel algal viruses were assembled from a Yellowstone Lake metagenomic data set. Genomic analyses revealed that three Yellowstone Lake phycodnaviruses (YSLPVs) had genome lengths of 178,262 bp, 171,045 bp, and 171,454 bp, respectively, and were phylogenetically closely related to prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae). The fourth (YSLGV), with a genome length of 73,689 bp, was related to group III in the extended family Mimiviridae comprising Organic Lake phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus 16 T (OLPG). A pair of inverted terminal repeats was detected in YSLPV1, suggesting that its genome is nearly complete. Interestingly, these four putative YSL giant viruses also bear some genetic similarities to Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs). For example, they share nine non-redundant homologous genes, including ribonucleotide reductase small subunit (a gene conserved in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses) and Organic Lake virophage OLV2 (conserved in the majority of YSLVs). Additionally, putative multidrug resistance genes (emrE) were found in YSLPV1 and YSLPV2 but not in other viruses. Phylogenetic trees of emrE grouped YSLPVs with algae, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer occurred between giant viruses and their potential algal hosts.

  20. The 1978 Yellowstone-Eastern Snake River Plain Seismic Profiling Experiment: Crustal structure of the Yellowstone Region and experiment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. B.; Schilly, M. M.; Braile, L. W.; Ansorge, J.; Lehman, J. L.; Baker, M. R.; Prodehl, C.; Healy, J. H.; Mueller, S.; Greensfelder, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    In 1978 a major seismic profiling experiment was conducted in the Yellowstone-eastern Snake River Plain region of Idaho and Wyoming. Fifteen shots were recorded that provided coverage to distances of 300 km. In this paper, travel time and synthetic seismogram modeling was used to evaluate an average P wave velocity and apparent Q structure of the crust from two seismic profiles (reversed) across the Yellowstone National Park region. This area includes the well-known hydrothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (geysers, fumeroles, etc.), a large collapse caldera, and extensive silicic volcanism of Quaternary age—features attributed to shallow crustal sources of magma. The averaged crustal structure for this region as interpreted from the seismic data consists of (1) a highly variable, near-surface layer approximately 2 km thick with variable velocities of 3.0 to 4.8 km/s and a low apparent Q of 30 that is interpreted to be composed of weathered rhyolites and sedimentary infill, (2) an upper crustal layer 3 to 4 km thick with variable velocities of 4.9 to 5.5 km/s and apparent Q of 50 to 200 that is thought to represent the accumulation of the Pleistocene-Quaternary rhyolite flows, ash flow tuffs, and possible Paleozoic and Precambrian metamorphic equivalents, (3) the crystalline, upper crust that is characterized by a laterally inhomogeneous layer that varies in velocity from 4.0 to 6.1 km/s, averaging 5 km thick with a Q of 300. This layer appears to be a cooling but still hot body of granitic composition beneath the Yellowstone caldera. It is thought to be a remnant of the magma chambers that produced the Quaternary silicic volcanic rocks of the Yellowstone Plateau and may still be a major contributor to the high heat flow, (4) a laterally homogeneous intermediate crustal layer 8 to 10 km thick with a velocity of 6.5 km/s and apparent Q of 100 to 300, (5) a homogeneous 25-km-thick lower crust with a velocity of 6.7 to 6.8 km/s and an apparent Q of 300

  1. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  2. Submerged arc welding of heavy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The submerged arc process is particularly suitable for heavy plate welding because of its ability to combine very high deposit rates along with excellent quality. It does these things without the smoke and spatter often accompanying other processes. It is available today in several forms that are pointed to the fabricators of heavy sections with long, short or round about welds. Tandem arc full automatic equipment is particularly suitable for those long heavy welds where speed and deposit rate are of the first order. An attachment called long stick-out which makes use of the IR drop on long electrode extensions can be included on this equipment to increase deposition rates 50% or more.

  3. Modeling tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A. A.; Adcroft, A.; Sergienko, O.; Marques, G.

    2017-08-01

    Large tabular icebergs calved from Antarctic ice shelves have long lifetimes (due to their large size), during which they drift across large distances, altering ambient ocean circulation, bottom-water formation, sea-ice formation, and biological primary productivity in the icebergs' vicinity. However, despite their importance, the current generation of ocean circulation models usually do not represent large tabular icebergs. In this study, we develop a novel framework to model large tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean. In this framework, tabular icebergs are represented by pressure-exerting Lagrangian elements that drift in the ocean. The elements are held together and interact with each other via bonds. A breaking of these bonds allows the model to emulate calving events (i.e., detachment of a tabular iceberg from an ice shelf) and tabular icebergs breaking up into smaller pieces. Idealized simulations of a calving tabular iceberg, its drift, and its breakup demonstrate capabilities of the developed framework.

  4. Crassulacean acid metabolism in submerged aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Sybesme, C.

    1984-01-01

    CO2-fixation in the dark is known to occur in various organs of many plants. However, only in species possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) does dark CO2-fixation contribute substantially to the carbon economy of the plant. Until very recently CAM was known only from terrestrial species, largely drought adapted succulents. The discovery of CAM in the submerged aquatic fern ally Isoetes howellii (Isoetaceae)(Keeley 1981) adds a new dimension to our understanding of crassulacean acid metabolism. In this paper I will summarize 1) the evidence of CAM in Isoetes howellii, 2) the data on the distribution of CAM in aquatic species, and 3) the work to date on the functional significance of CAM in aquatic species.

  5. Workshop on ROVs and deep submergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deep-submergence community has an opportunity on March 6 to participate in a unique teleconferencing demonstration of a state-of-the-art, remotely operated underwater research vehicle known as the Jason-Medea System. Jason-Medea has been developed over the past decade by scientists, engineers, and technicians at the Deep Submergence Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The U.S. Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Research, and the National Science Foundation are sponsoring the workshop to explore the roles that modern computational, communications, and robotics technologies can play in deep-sea oceanographic research.Through the cooperation of Electronic Data Systems, Inc., the Jason Foundation, and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., 2-1/2 hours of air time will be available from 3:00 to 5:30 PM EST on March 6. Twenty-seven satellite downlink sites will link one operating research vessel and the land-based operation with workshop participants in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Bermuda. The research ship Laney Chouest will be in the midst of a 3-week educational/research program in the Sea of Cortez, between Baja California and mainland Mexico. This effort is focused on active hydrothermal vents driven by heat flow from the volcanically active East Pacific Rise, which underlies the sediment-covered Guaymas Basin. The project combines into a single-operation, newly-developed robotic systems, state-of-the-art mapping and sampling tools, fiber-optic data transmission from the seafloor, instantaneous satellite communication from ship to shore, and a sophisticated array of computational and telecommunications networks. During the workshop, land-based scientists will observe and participate directly with their seagoing colleagues as they conduct seafloor research.

  6. Submerged membrane distillation for seawater desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2014-08-11

    A submerged membrane distillation (SMD) process for fresh water production from Red Sea water using commercially available hollow fiber membranes has been successfully employed and compared with the conventional direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. The hollow fiber membranes have been characterized for its morphology using field effect scanning electron microscope. In SMD process, a bunch of hollow fiber membranes are glued together at both ends to get a simplified open membrane module assembly submerged into the coolant tank equipped with a mechanical stirrer. Hot feed stream is allowed to pass through the lumen side of the membrane using a feed pump. Continuous stirring at the coolant side will reduce the temperature and concentration polarization. During the conventional DCMD process, using feed-coolant streams with co-current and counter-current flows has been tested and the results are compared in this study. In SMD process, a water vapor flux of 10.2 kg m-2 h-1 is achieved when using a feed inlet temperature of 80°C and coolant temperature of 20°C. Under the same conditions, during conventional DCMD process, a water vapor flux of 11.6 and 10.1 kg m-2 h-1 were observed during counter-current and co-current flow streams, respectively. Results show that the water production in the SMD process is comparable with the conventional DCMD process, while the feed-coolant flow streams are in the co-current direction. During conventional DCMD operation, a 15% increase in the water production is observed when feed-coolant streams are in the counter-current direction compared to the co-current direction. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal wildlife management in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem: A spatiotemporal model of disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    South of Yellowstone National Park there are twenty-three sites where elk herds are provided supplementary feeding during the winter and spring months. Supplementary feeding of elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) has been practiced since the early twentieth century, but the practice has b...

  8. 77 FR 30321 - Proposed Concession Contract for Yellowstone National Park-Alternative Formula for Calculating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... lodging, food and beverage, retail sales, transportation and other services at the park. DATES: Public... of the lodging, food and beverage, retail sales, transportation and other services at Yellowstone... National Park Service Proposed Concession Contract for Yellowstone National Park-- Alternative Formula for...

  9. Terrace Geochemistry at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site - WM2017-17232 Initial Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Mark [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Ranalli, Tony [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dander, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The objective of this investigation was to identify and differentiate potential non- mill-related water inputs to a shallow terrace groundwater system through the use of aqueous chemical and isotopic tracers at a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility. Terrace groundwater in the vicinity of the Shiprock, New Mexico, site is hypothesized to be largely anthropogenic because natural rates of recharge in the terrace are likely insufficient to sustain a continuous water table in the terrace alluvial system, as observed in several analogue terrace locations east of the site and in response to post-mill dewatering efforts across the site. The terrace is composed of alluvial sand and gravel and weathered and unweathered Mancos Shale. Terrace groundwater exists and flows in the alluvium and to a much less extent in the Mancos Shale. Historical data established that in both the terrace and floodplain below the terrace, mill-derived uranium and sulfate is found primarily in the alluvium and the upper portion of the weathered Mancos Shale. Groundwater extraction is being conducted in the vicinity of former mill operations and in washes and seeps to dewater the formation and remove contamination, thus eliminating these exposure pathways and minimizing movement to the floodplain. However, past and present contribution of non-mill anthropogenic water sources may be hindering the dewatering effort, resulting in reduced remedy effectiveness. Groundwater source signatures can be determined based on chemical and isotopic ratios and are used to help identify and delineate both mill and non-mill water contributions. Aqueous chemical and isotopic tracers, such as 234U/238U activity ratios and uranium concentrations, δ34S sulfate and sulfate concentrations, tritium concentrations, and δ2Hwater and δ18O water are being used in this Phase I study. The aqueous chemical and isotopic analysis has identified areas on the terrace where groundwater is derived from mill

  10. The impact of the streamflow hydrograph on sediment supply from terrace erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higson, John Lee; Singer, Michael Bliss

    2015-11-01

    Sediment supply from banks and terraces has important implications for grain-size distributions in alluvial rivers (and by extension for aquatic habitat), as well as for the delivery of floodplain-stored nutrients and contaminants to the aquatic environment. The interactions between streamflow hydrographs and lateral channel boundary failure control the sediment supply from banks and terraces. However, the relationships between variable flow and discrete sediment supply from catastrophic erosion of lateral boundaries and subsequent mass sediment flux in rivers are not well characterised by existing methods and models that focus only on one of several relevant interrelated processes. In order to improve predictive capability of catastrophic sediment supply from lateral boundaries, we adopt a new approach to modelling the process interactions between stream hydrology, erosion of banks/terraces, and the corresponding discrete supply of sediment to channels. We develop a modelling framework for terrace - channel coupling that combines existing theories of flow through porous media, bank stability, and fractional sediment flux. We demonstrate the utility of this modelling approach by assessing hydrologically driven erosion, evolution of grain size in the channel, and fine sediment flux from a study site along the Yuba River in California over individual flood hydrographs and over decadal historical flow series. We quantify the supply of sediment eroded from a contaminated nineteenth century fan terrace of hydraulic gold mining tailings intersecting the Yuba, and find that a threshold for erosion exists at a stage in the channel in excess of 8 m producing episodic sediment concentrations in excess of 300 mg L-1. The modelling produced erosion and fine sediment pulses from each of three major floods in the past several decades until the flow drops below 500 m3 s-1 and a bed armor layer forms, while no sediment was generated from the terrace during smaller floods. We

  11. Mass movements and infiltration on abandoned terraces in the Iberian Range, Northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnáez, José; Lana-Renault, Noemí; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificación; Pascual, Nuria; Lasanta, Teodoro

    2017-04-01

    Terraced slopes were one of the most common agricultural landscapes in mountain areas of the Mediterranean region. Built to ensure agricultural production, terraces have acted as an effective soil conservation system at both slope and catchment scale. Demographic and socioeconomic changes in the last 60 years in the Mediterranean mountains have led to the abandonment of terraces. The consequent lack of maintenance of such agricultural structures has triggered diverse erosion processes. At the beginning of the 20th century, the upper valleys of the Leza, Jubera and Cidacos rivers, in the Iberian range (northern Spain), held more than 10,000 inhabitants and a cultivated area of 21,021 ha, of which 13,274 ha were farming terraces (63% of the agricultural space). At present, these terraces are abandoned. The most common erosion processes on the walls of abandoned terraces are stone collapses, which leave the riser completely unprotected, and small mass movements. A total amount of 240 terrace failures with mass movement were identified in the 53 studied plots, which means an average number of 4.5 per plot and 10.6 per 100 m of wall. At plot scale, the average volume of debris was 15.1 m3 (33.1 m3 for every 100 m of wall). Soil infiltration capacity and the way the water flows downslope may be the main triggers for mass movements. Rainfall simulations carried out in the study area showed an average infiltration coefficient above 75%. Infiltration coefficients were higher on concave hillslopes (above 85%), probably because the plots in these sectors were intensively tilled in the past, with plowed and permeable anthropogenic soils. The infiltrated water becomes a destabilizing factor for the terrace wall. The lack of deep percolation due to a more impermeable substrate (e.g., the original soil of the slope) favours the accumulation of water within the artificial soil, behind the stone wall. The increasing weight of the material can cause the activation of mass movements

  12. Evolution of Eastern Upper Basin Member Rhyolites, Yellowstone Caldera, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C. J.; Larson, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    Cyclic recharging of the large magmatic system underneath Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, is key to understanding source contributions to these rhyolitic magmas. To better understand recharging of the Caldera magmatic system we focus on the eastern Upper Basin Member Rhyolites (EUBM), which erupted at 480 ka following the collapse of the Yellowstone Caldera at 640 ka. The EUBM outcrops in the northeast corner of the Caldera ring fracture. Genesis of the high silica EUBM could have feasibly included assimilation of an array of bedrock lithologies: Precambrian gneiss, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments, Eocene Absaroka Volcanics, and Pliocene and Quaternary volcanics of the Yellowstone Caldera. The most reasonable heat source for assimilation is from basaltic injections. Preliminary geochemical data agree well with previous studies and show that although the intercaldera rhyolites are geochemically homogeneous (e.g., silica in the range 72.1-78.2 weight percent), the EUBM exhibits distinctive signatures. EUBM major and trace element concentrations generally show higher weight percents of TiO2 as well as higher ppms of Ba, Sc, and Sr when compared to other intercaldera rhyolites. EUBM are also generally depleted in O isotope ratios and enriched in 87/86Sr, 207/204Pb, and 208/204Pb when compared to other intercaldera rhyolites. The variation in geochemistry in the EUBM is not easily explained if their magma supply was entirely remelted shallow instrusives. Although the significant decrease in EUBM O istotope ratios strongly suggests hydrothermal alteration of the magma's source rock, major and trace element data and isotope ratios suggest contributions from a less evolved source. Our preliminary data show that, of the possible magma sources, the Precambrian gneiss and Pliocene/Quaternary Caldera volcanics exhibit a geochemical signature closest to that of the EUBM. Therefore, we propose that the EUBM is a product of partial melting of

  13. Castle Geyser and Bobby Sox Trees: Pulses and Pauses in the Development of Hydrothermal Features in the Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, D.

    2007-12-01

    Preliminary 14-C dating of Castle Geyser, combined with observations of living and dead trees in hydrothermal areas, suggests that hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone have pulses of activity interspersed with pauses of little or no activity. Between the time scale of volcanic activity, with pulses and pauses over thousands to hundreds of thousands of years, and geyser eruptions, with pulses and pauses over minutes to decades, lies the time scale for pulses and pauses in the development of individual hydrothermal systems and large thermal basins. Castle Geyser has long been noted as being among the largest, and therefore probably oldest, geysers in Yellowstone. Watson (1961) proposed an age of 8000 years for the geyser cone, and Bryan (2001) suggested that it is 5000 to 15000 years old. Recent dating, accompanied by 3-D laser mapping, suggests a complex, multi- stage development of the geyser. AMS 14C dating of microbial and pollen carbon trapped in siliceous sinter that forms a broad, gently-sloping shield at the base of the geyser cone yields ages of 8787 +/- 60 years BP and 10472 +/- 70 years BP. Carbon from sinter on the cone of the geyser yields ages equal to or younger than 1038 +/- 35 years BP. No samples dated so far have ages between 8787 and 1038 years BP. The morphology of the geyser suggests that the pause after shield formation was followed at least one stage of terrace formation (from either hot spring or pool-type geyser activity), which in turn has been followed by the construction and partial destruction of a massive cone. Where thermal waters are high in silica, thermally killed trees may develop white lower trunks, informally known as "bobby sox." Forest growth implies a time of no thermal activity; forest death, where clear evidence of thermal activity exists, implies inception or rejuvenation of hydrothermal activity. Many thermal features, such as Castle and Old Faithful geysers, have evidence of trees that are now encrusted by silica. The

  14. The importance of understanding landscape evolution in studies of terraced agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Vazquez, Cruz; Lang, Carol; Kaal, Joeri; Stump, Daryl

    2017-04-01

    Before the invention of modern, large-scale engineering projects, terrace systems were rarely built in single phases of construction, but instead developed gradually, and could even be said to have evolved. Understanding this process of landscape change is therefore important in order to fully appreciate how terrace systems were built and functioned, and is also pivotal to understand how the communities that farmed these systems responded to changes; whether these are changes to the landscape brought about by the farming practices themselves, or changes to social, economic or climatic conditions. With this aim, we studied the historic and extensive terraced landscape at Konso, southwest Ethiopia, combining archaeological stratigraphy, soil micromorphology and geochemistry. Our results demonstrated that erosion has not only been the trigger for the inception of the Konso terraced system but also the foundation of its productivity: it was engineered for taking advantage of erosion by controlling it, first by harvesting soils that had washed into watercourses within irrigable riverside sediment traps, and then by effectively 'repopulating' the denuded hillsides with new soils through the construction of hillside terraces. From this new perspective, soil erosion has been a necessary enemy which, while managed, has constituted an agronomic resource, the system having initially relied on soil erosion to be productive, and the community having apparently only begun constructing terraces in order to protect the productive alluvial fields that were the legacy of that first phase of erosion. Research that takes into account how terrace systems change through time can thus provide important details of whether the function of the system has changed, and can help assess how the legacies of former practices impact current or future cultivation.

  15. Agronomic Challenges and Opportunities for Smallholder Terrace Agriculture in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Tejendra; Raizada, Manish N

    2017-01-01

    Improving land productivity is essential to meet increasing food and forage demands in hillside and mountain communities. Tens of millions of smallholder terrace farmers in Asia, Africa, and Latin America who earn $1-2 per day do not have access to peer-reviewed knowledge of best agronomic practices, though they have considerable traditional ecological knowledge. Terrace farmers also lack access to affordable farm tools and inputs required to increase crop yields. The objectives of this review are to highlight the agronomic challenges of terrace farming, and offer innovative, low-cost solutions to intensify terrace agriculture while improving local livelihoods. The article focuses on smallholder farmers in developing nations, with particular reference to Nepal. The challenges of terrace agriculture in these regions include lack of quality land area for agriculture, erosion and loss of soil fertility, low yield, poor access to agricultural inputs and services, lack of mechanization, labor shortages, poverty, and illiteracy. Agronomic strategies that could help address these concerns include intensification of terraces using agro-ecological approaches along with introduction of light-weight, low-cost, and purchasable tools and affordable inputs that enhance productivity and reduce female drudgery. To package, deliver, and share these technologies with remote hillside communities, effective scaling up models are required. One opportunity to enable distribution of these products could be to "piggy-back" onto pre-existing snackfood/cigarette/alcohol distribution networks that are prevalent even in the most remote mountainous regions of the world. Such strategies, practices, and tools could be supported by formalized government policies dedicated to the well-being of terrace farmers and ecosystems, to maintain resiliency at a time of alarming climate change. We hope this review will inform governments, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to draw

  16. Agronomic Challenges and Opportunities for Smallholder Terrace Agriculture in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Tejendra; Raizada, Manish N.

    2017-01-01

    Improving land productivity is essential to meet increasing food and forage demands in hillside and mountain communities. Tens of millions of smallholder terrace farmers in Asia, Africa, and Latin America who earn $1–2 per day do not have access to peer-reviewed knowledge of best agronomic practices, though they have considerable traditional ecological knowledge. Terrace farmers also lack access to affordable farm tools and inputs required to increase crop yields. The objectives of this review are to highlight the agronomic challenges of terrace farming, and offer innovative, low-cost solutions to intensify terrace agriculture while improving local livelihoods. The article focuses on smallholder farmers in developing nations, with particular reference to Nepal. The challenges of terrace agriculture in these regions include lack of quality land area for agriculture, erosion and loss of soil fertility, low yield, poor access to agricultural inputs and services, lack of mechanization, labor shortages, poverty, and illiteracy. Agronomic strategies that could help address these concerns include intensification of terraces using agro-ecological approaches along with introduction of light-weight, low-cost, and purchasable tools and affordable inputs that enhance productivity and reduce female drudgery. To package, deliver, and share these technologies with remote hillside communities, effective scaling up models are required. One opportunity to enable distribution of these products could be to “piggy-back” onto pre-existing snackfood/cigarette/alcohol distribution networks that are prevalent even in the most remote mountainous regions of the world. Such strategies, practices, and tools could be supported by formalized government policies dedicated to the well-being of terrace farmers and ecosystems, to maintain resiliency at a time of alarming climate change. We hope this review will inform governments, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to draw

  17. The role of mantle-derived magmas in the isotopic evolution of Yellowstone's magmatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelten, Mark E.; Cooper, Kari M.; Wimpenny, Josh B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Injection of mantle-derived magmas into the Earth's crust provides the heat necessary to develop and maintain large silicic magmatic systems. However, the role of mantle-derived magmas in controlling the compositional evolution of large silicic systems remains poorly understood. Here we examine the role of mantle-derived magmas in the postcaldera magmatic system at Yellowstone Plateau, the youngest magmatism associated with the Yellowstone hotspot. Using microbeam techniques, we characterize the age and Hf isotope composition of single zircon crystals hosted in rhyolites from the most recent eruptive episode at Yellowstone Plateau, which produced the Central Plateau Member rhyolites. We place these zircon data into context by comparing them to new solution Hf isotope data for the Central Plateau Member glasses, Yellowstone basalts, and potential local crustal sources. Zircons in the Central Plateau Member rhyolites record a wide range of Hf isotope compositions relative to their host melts and extend from values similar to previously erupted Yellowstone rhyolites to values similar to Yellowstone basalts. Most zircons (˜90%) are in isotopic equilibrium with their host melt, but a significant proportion show ɛHf values higher than their host melt, thus providing the direct evidence that silicic derivatives of mantle-derived basalts have recharged Yellowstone's magmatic system. Mixing models confirm that the isotopic characteristics of the youngest Yellowstone rhyolites can be explained by recharge of Yellowstone's magma reservoir with silicic derivatives of underplating, mantle-derived basalts (˜5-10% material added by mass). This process helps drive the long-term isotopic evolution of Yellowstone's magmatic system.

  18. Methods for automatic identification and extraction of terraces from high spatial resolution satellite data (China-GF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Terraces are effective measures to control soil and water loss on hillslopes and play significant roles in water storage, soil conservation and increasing of crop yield. With the launch of comprehensive management engineering of transforming slopes into terraces in China, the area of terraces is continuously expanding. To plan for soil and water conservation in a scientific way and ensure rational soil and water conservation measures, it is important to determine a timely and accurate inventory of the spatial distribution of the existing terraces. High-resolution satellite data (China GF-1 was used in this study to automatically identify and extract terraces. The edge characteristics statistics algorithm, template-matching algorithm and the Fourier transformation algorithm were used. The results suggest that the template-matching algorithm, based on high gray features of terraces, has higher identification accuracy and lower extraction miss rate, and is able to determines the complete map spots, which works well for identification and extraction of typical terraces. The Fourier transformation algorithm, based on the texture of the terraces, is easily affected by gray changes on the terrace field surfaces and field ridges and is hardly reliable as a stand-alone technique for terrace identification. In this study, we focused on an area near Hengshan County, Yulin of Shanxi Province, and performed field validation of the terrace automatic identification and extraction algorithms. The results suggest that the accuracy of automatic identification and extraction of the terraces is greater than 80%. The method proposed is helpful to meet the requirements for planning and monitoring soil and water conservation projects.

  19. Spatial analysis of fluvial terraces in GRASS GIS accessing R functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsa, Edina

    2017-04-01

    Terrace research along the Danube is a major topic of Hungarian traditional geomorphology because of the socio-economic role of terrace surfaces and their importance in paleo-environmental reconstructions. Semi-automated mapping of fluvial landforms from a coherent digital elevation dataset allow objective analysis of hydrogeomorphic characteristics with low time and cost requirements. New results obtained with unified GIS-based algorithms can be integrated with previous findings regarding landscape evolution. The complementary functionality of GRASS GIS and R provides the possibility to develop a flexible terrain analysing tool for the delineation and quantifiable analysis of terrace remnants. Using R as an intermediate analytical environment and visualisation tool gives great added value to the algorithm, while GRASS GIS is capable of handling the large digital elevation datasets and perform the demanding computations to prepare necessary raster derivatives (Bivand, R.S. et al. 2008). The proposed terrace mapping algorithm is based on the work of Demoulin, A. et al. (2007), but it is further improved in the form of GRASS GIS script tool accessing R functionality. In the first step the hydrogeomorphic signatures of the given study site are explored and the area is divided along clearly recognizable structural-morphological boundaries.The algorithm then cuts up the subregions into parallel sections in the flow direction and determines cells potentially belonging to terrace surfaces based on local slope characteristics and a minimum area size threshold. As a result an output report is created that contains a histogram of altitudes, a swath-profile of the landscape, scatter plots to represent the relation of the relative elevations and slope values in the analysed sections and a final plot showing the longitudinal profile of the river with the determined height ranges of terrace levels. The algorithm also produces a raster map of extracted terrace remnants. From this

  20. Quaternary Uplift of Coral Terraces from Active Folding and Thrusting Along the Northern Coast of Timor-Leste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N. L.; Harris, R.; Merritts, D.

    2006-12-01

    Emergent coral terraces along the northern coast of Timor-Leste, reveal differential vertical strain along the strike of the active Banda arc-continent collision complex. The number of major coral terraces in surveyed profiles increases from 2 to 25 along a coastal distance of 150 km from central to eastern Timor-Leste. Comparison of 8 separate terrace profiles with sea level curves predicts vertical displacement rates that increase eastward from <0.3 to 1.0-1.5 mm/year. This pattern is corroborated by U-series age analyses that document non-linear increases in vertical strain eastward with the uplift rates ranging from <.04 to 2.0 mm/year. U-series ages also indicates the occurrence of both erosional (regressional) and depositional terraces. Two profiles, dominated by erosional terraces, have associated local lower depositional terraces. The erosional terraces are more abundant, but yield apparent lower uplift rates in comparison with the depositional terraces. This occurrence questions the validity of uplift rates obtained by age analysis for the errosional terraces and/or aids in the conclusion that differential vertical strain not only exists with distance between profiles but with time for each profile. We associate active uplift with northward movement along retro- wedge thrust faults that are well documented in seismic reflection profiles adjacent to the north coast of Timor- Leste.

  1. Landsat evaluation of trumpeter swan historical nesting sites in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Laura Elizabeth

    The trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) has historically nested in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Declines in habitat quality may be limiting the growth of the Tri-State Flock. The purpose of this study was to map historical nesting areas for trumpeter swans in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and evaluate Landsat images for changes to habitat. Historical nesting sites were evaluated through image classification and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and compared to field conditions. Swan nesting records were analyzed in comparison to drought index and human visitation rates to determine if these factors may contribute to the decline of trumpeter swans nesting in YNP. Vegetation type and water quality were evaluated at 36 wetlands identified as historical nesting locations. Potamogetonaceae was the largest family represented in plant samples and had the highest frequency of occurrence in samples. There was no significant difference in whether swans were present or absent in wetlands with regards to water quality parameters tested or physical parameters identified. There was an association between certain drought index values and the number of cygnets fledged and the number of territories occupied by swan pairs. I was unsuccessful in using image classification to define pixel characteristics common among historical nesting territories of swans in YNP based on 5 Landsat images from 1975, 1979, 1990, 1999, and 2005. I was also unable to distinguish aquatic plant species composition, emergent and submergent plants, open water versus aquatic vegetation, wetland classification, or swan preference using image classification. No relationship was found in a regression model of NDVI values and swan pair occupancy or number of swans fledged, with the exception of a weak, positive relationship between pair occupancy and positive NDVI values, and a strong, positive relationship between swan fledge rates and positive NDVI values

  2. Determining the spacing of ridge terraces on arable land in central and south-western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baryła Anna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The practice of many countries has shown that terraces can significantly prevent land degradation processes such as excessive soil erosion, landslides. Condition is good layout, proper construction, and then proper maintenance. Practical application in many countries showed that terraces can significantly prevent processes leading to the degradation of land, such as the excessive erosion of soils and landslides. The requirement for this is well-planned, adequate construction, and later – proper conservation. In Poland this is a little popular method. In the article, the dorsal spacing terraces were calculated for two catchments – in the central and south-western parts of Poland. Meteorological and soil data were used for Puczniew station (Ner catchment and Boleścin station (Mielnica catchment. Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was performed to assess the compatibility of a given feature with a normal distribution, then the distribution of the probability distribution was developed. For probability 1, 50 and 90% the spacing of terraces was calculated using Ramser and Morgan method. The results obtained were combined with the results from the USLE model. Hydraulic methods have shown greater spacing for the Mielnica catchment (loess soils compared to the Ner basin (clay loam. For the USLE model, the larger spacing was calculated for the Ner basin. From the practical application to the acceptance of land user will be the maximum distance calculated by different methods. The highest terrace spacing values were obtained using the Morgan method for the Mielnica catchment, for the Ner catchment model USLE.

  3. A Small UAV Based Multi-Temporal Image Registration for Dynamic Agricultural Terrace Monitoring

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    Ziquan Wei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Terraces are the major land-use type of agriculture and support the main agricultural production in southeast and southwest China. However, due to smallholder farming, complex terrains, natural disasters and illegal land occupations, a light-weight and low cost dynamic monitoring of agricultural terraces has become a serious concern for smallholder production systems in the above area. In this work, we propose a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV based multi-temporal image registration method that plays an important role in transforming multi-temporal images into one coordinate system and determines the effectiveness of the subsequent change detection for dynamic agricultural terrace monitoring. The proposed method consists of four steps: (i guided image filtering based agricultural terrace image preprocessing, (ii texture and geometric structure features extraction and combination, (iii multi-feature guided point set registration, and (iv feature points based image registration. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method by 20 pairs of aerial images captured from Longji and Yunhe terraces, China using a small UAV (the DJI Phantom 4 Pro, and also compared against four state-of-the-art methods where our method shows the best alignments in most cases.

  4. Phenotype diversity analysis of red-grained rice landraces from Yuanyang Hani's terraced fields, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianjie; Cheng, Long

    2017-10-01

    There are many areas in the world have terraced fields, Yuanyang Rani's terraced fields are examples in the world, and their unique ecological diversity is beyond other terraced fields, rice landraces are very rich. In order to provide useful information for protection and utilization of red-grained rice landraces from Rani's terraced fields, 61 red-grained rice landraces were assessed based 20 quantitative traits. Principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that 20 quantitative characters could be simplified to seven principal components, and their accumulative contribution ration amounted to 78.699%. The first principal component (PC1) explained 18.375% of the total variance, which was contributed by filled grain number, 1000-grain weight, spikelets per panicle, secondary branch number, grain length, and grain thickness. PC2 accounted for 16.548% of the variance and featured flag leaf width, flag leaf area, panicle neck length and primary branch number. These traits were the most effective parameters to discriminate individuals. At the request of the proceedings editor and with the approval of all authors, article 040111 titled, "Phenotype diversity analysis of red-grained rice landraces from Yuanyang Hani's terraced fields, China," is being retracted from the public record due to the fact that it is a duplication of article 040110 published in the same volume.

  5. Physical data of soil profiles formed on late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munster, Jennie; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    The marine terraces in and around Santa Cruz, California, represent a set of well-preserved terraces formed as a product of geology, sea level, and climate. A marine terrace begins as a wave cut platform. Eustatic sea level changes, seacliff erosion, and tectonic uplift work together to generate marine terraces. "When a wave-cut platform is raised (due to tectonic activity) above sea level and cliffed by wave action it becomes a marine terrace" (Bradley, 1957, p. 424). During glacial periods, eustatic sea level is estimated to have dropped by 150 meters (Fairbanks, 1989). Cliff retreat measured from aerial photographs between 1930 and 1980 vary from 0.0 to 0.2 m yr–1 (Best and Griggs, 1991). Estimates of uplift rates along the Santa Cruz coastline vary from 0.10 to 0.48 m kyr–1 (Bradley and Griggs, 1976; Weber and others, 1999). Uplift mechanisms include coseismic uplift associated both with a reverse component of slip on the steeply SW dipping Loma Prieta fault in the restraining bend of the San Andreas Fault and a small component of reverse slip on the steeply SE dipping San Gregorio fault (Anderson and Menking 1994). Previous work studying physical properties on these terraces include Pinney and others (in press) and Aniku (1986) and Bowman and Estrada (1980). Sedimentary deposits of the marine terraces are a mixture of terrestrial and marine sediments but generally consist of a sheet of marine deposits overlying the old platform and a wedge of nonmarine deposits banked against the old sea cliff (Bradley, 1957). Bedrock underlying the terraces in the Santa Cruz area is generally either Santa Margarita Sandstone or Santa Cruz Mudstone. The Santa Margarita Sandstone represents an upper Miocene, transgressive, tidally dominated marine-shelf deposit with crossbedded sets of sand and gravel and horizontally stratified and bioturbated invertebrate-fossils beds (Phillips, 1990). The siliceous Santa Cruz Mudstone, of late Miocene age, conformably overlies the Santa

  6. Vertical slip rates of active faults of southern Albania inferred from river terraces

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    Oswaldo Guzmán

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluvial terraces of Shkumbin, Devoll, Osum and Vjosa rivers (southern Albania and northwestern Greece are studied in order to quantify the vertical slip rates of the large active faults of the Dinaric-Albanic-Hellenic Alpine fold belt. The spatial and temporal variations of the incision rates along these rivers were estimated from the geomorphological mapping of the Quaternary sediments, the geometry and the dating of the terraces. Eleven terraces levels were identified in Albania from 68 geochronological ages already published or acquired for this work. The five lower terraces of the four studied rivers are well dated (10 new and 23 already published ages. These terraces are younger than 30 ka and their remnants are numerous. Their restoration allows estimating the regional trend of incision rate and the identification of local shifts. We argue that these shifts are linked to the active tectonics when they coincide with the faults already mapped by previous authors. Vertical slip rates for eight active faults in southern Albania are thus estimated for the last 19 ka and vary from ~0.1 to ~2 mm/a. The Lushnje Tepelene Thrust, that extends more than 120 kilometers, has a throw rate that varies from 0.2 to 0.8 mm/a, whereas the active faults of the extensional domain are segmented but are very active, with throw rates reaching locally 2 mm/a.

  7. Sustainability of terraced paddy fields in traditional satoyama landscapes of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Katsue

    2017-11-01

    Terraced paddy fields are essential components of the traditional cultural landscape of Japan, the satoyama landscape. They have been sustainably cultivated in a variety of ecological and social environments through time, and are highly valued as local resources with multiple functions. This paper reviews the recent nationwide movement for conservation of satoyama landscapes and shows that over the last decades, the government has increasingly created policies based on national regulation or international frameworks that concern the culture and environment in rural areas. Recent measures for the sustainability of terraced paddy fields do not only focus on rice terraces, but are directed at each satoyama landscape as a whole under careful consideration of how landscape elements are connected while taking into account the unique features of each area. Nevertheless, it has become difficult to ensure the continued use and maintenance of terraced rice paddies both in depopulated and suburban satoyama landscapes. The motivation for conserving satoyama landscapes, including those with terraced rice paddies, can be found in the awareness and appreciation of the unique characteristics of each locality that offer opportunities that can only be experienced in that particular area. A satoyama landscape that offers such opportunities allows continuity of traditional practices while integrating necessary changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Autogenic entrenchment patterns and terraces due to coupling with lateral erosion in incising alluvial channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Luca C.; Prancevic, Jeffrey P.; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The abandonment of terraces in incising alluvial rivers can be used to infer tectonic and climatic histories. A river incising into alluvium erodes both vertically and laterally as it abandons fill-cut terraces. We argue that the input of sediment from the valley walls during entrenchment can alter the incision dynamics of a stream by promoting vertical incision over lateral erosion. Using a numerical model, we investigate how valley wall feedbacks may affect incision rates and terrace abandonment as the channel becomes progressively more entrenched in its valley. We postulate that erosion of taller valley walls delivers large pulses of sediment to the incising channel, potentially overwhelming the local sediment transport capacity. Based on field observations, we propose that these pulses of sediment can form talus piles that shield the valley wall from subsequent erosion and potentially force progressive channel narrowing. Our model shows that this positive feedback mechanism can enhance vertical incision relative to 1-D predictions that ignore lateral erosion. We find that incision is most significantly enhanced when sediment transport rates are low relative to the typical volume of material collapsed from the valley walls. The model also shows a systematic erosion of the youngest terraces when river incision slows down. The autogenic entrenchment due to lateral feedbacks with valley walls should be taken into account in the interpretation of complex-response terraces.

  9. Physical parameters of Fluvisols on flooded and non-flooded terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercheva, Milena; Sokołowska, Zofia; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Skic, Kamil; Shishkov, Toma

    2017-01-01

    The heterogeneity of soil physical properties of Fluvisols, lack of large pristine areas, and different moisture regimes on non-flooded and flooded terraces impede the possibility to find a soil profile which can serve as a baseline for estimating the impact of natural or anthropogenic factors on soil evolution. The aim of this study is to compare the pore size distribution of pristine Fluvisols on flooded and non-flooded terraces using the method of the soil water retention curve, mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, and water vapour sorption. The pore size distribution of humic horizons of pristine Fluvisols on the non-flooded terrace differs from pore size distribution of Fluvisols on the flooded terrace. The peaks of textural and structural pores are higher in the humic horizons under more humid conditions. The structural characteristics of subsoil horizons depend on soil texture and evolution stage. The peaks of textural pores at about 1 mm diminish with lowering of the soil organic content. Structureless horizons are characterized by uni-modal pore size distribution. Although the content of structural pores of the subsoil horizons of Fluvisols on the non-flooded terrace is low, these pores are represented by biopores, as the coefficient of filtration is moderately high. The difference between non-flooded and flooded profiles is well expressed by the available water storage, volume and mean radius of pores, obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry and water desorption, which are higher in the surface horizons of frequently flooded Fluvisols.

  10. Assessing the Reliability of Land-Use Data in Slovenia: A Case Study of Terraced Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ažman Momirski, Lucija

    2017-10-01

    Land use relates to the exploitation of land through human activity in the landscape. Land use is also one of the best indicators of a landscape’s structure and processes. Land cover comprises manmade surfaces, agricultural areas, forest and semi-natural areas, wetlands, and bodies of water. In Slovenia more than half of the land (63%) is forested. Manmade surfaces represent less than 5%. A large proportion of relatively inaccessible forest is the main reason why society had a less critical impact on forests in the past in Slovenia in comparison to the majority of central European countries. Regarding the high-quality landscape in the country, Slovenia’s natural features are characterized by a mix of forest and farmland. These land categories (i.e., complex cultivation patterns and land principally used for agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation) cover 23% of Slovenia. Land-use data for farmland are gathered and provided to the relevant institutions by landowners, who are not specialists in land-use data. In addition, land use is only a two-dimensional tool, which does not recognize elevation differences and terraced slopes. Terraced areas are either omitted from the inventory of land-use data because landowners do not report them, or they are included in the inventory because landowners do not realize that their land is not terraced. Consequently, the differences between the official data on vineyards, orchards, and olive groves on terraces and actual terraced slopes with such land use may differ significantly.

  11. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This project determined that severe corrosion of steel can occur in the submerged : portions of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments. Field studies of decommissioned : pilings from Florida bridges revealed multiple instances of stron...

  12. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  13. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  14. Marine algal flora of submerged Angria Bank (Arabian Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Reddy, C.R.K.; Ambiye, V.

    Submerged Angria Bank was surveyed for the deep water marine algal flora. About 57 species were reported from this bank for the first time. Rhodophyta dominated (30 species) followed by Chlorophyta (18 species) and Phaeophyta (9 species). A few...

  15. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  16. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  17. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  18. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  19. Incipient motion of sediment in presence of submerged flexible vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Tang, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Han-Qing; Xuan-yu ZHAO; Lü, Sheng-qi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of submerged vegetation on river beds can change the water flow structure and alter the state of sediment motion. In this study, the incipient motion of sediment in the presence of submerged flexible vegetation in open channels was investigated in a laboratory experiment. The vegetation was simulated with flexible rubber cylinders arranged in parallel arrays. The effect of the vegetation density, water depth, and sediment grain size on the incipient motion was investigated. The e...

  20. Gray wolves as climate change buffers in Yellowstone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C Wilmers

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  1. Gray wolves as climate change buffers in Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmers, Christopher C; Getz, Wayne M

    2005-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus) together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  2. Gray Wolves as Climate Change Buffers in Yellowstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmers Christopher C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms by which climate and predation patterns by top predators co-vary to affect community structure accrues added importance as humans exert growing influence over both climate and regional predator assemblages. In Yellowstone National Park, winter conditions and reintroduced gray wolves (Canis lupus together determine the availability of winter carrion on which numerous scavenger species depend for survival and reproduction. As climate changes in Yellowstone, therefore, scavenger species may experience a dramatic reshuffling of food resources. As such, we analyzed 55 y of weather data from Yellowstone in order to determine trends in winter conditions. We found that winters are getting shorter, as measured by the number of days with snow on the ground, due to decreased snowfall and increased number of days with temperatures above freezing. To investigate synergistic effects of human and climatic alterations of species interactions, we used an empirically derived model to show that in the absence of wolves, early snow thaw leads to a substantial reduction in late-winter carrion, causing potential food bottlenecks for scavengers. In addition, by narrowing the window of time over which carrion is available and thereby creating a resource pulse, climate change likely favors scavengers that can quickly track food sources over great distances. Wolves, however, largely mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion due to earlier snow thaws. By buffering the effects of climate change on carrion availability, wolves allow scavengers to adapt to a changing environment over a longer time scale more commensurate with natural processes. This study illustrates the importance of restoring and maintaining intact food chains in the face of large-scale environmental perturbations such as climate change.

  3. Heat transfer model for quenching by submerging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarella, D N; Varas, F [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada II, E.T.S. de Ing. de Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); MartIn, E B, E-mail: diego@dma.uvigo.es, E-mail: fvaras@uvigo.es, E-mail: emortega@uvigo.es [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, E.T.S. de Ing. Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In quenching by submerging the workpiece is cooled due to vaporization, convective flow and interaction of both mechanisms. The dynamics of these phenomena is very complex and the corresponding heat fluxes are strongly dependent on local flow variables such as velocity of fluid and vapor fraction. This local dependence may produce very different cooling rates along the piece, responsible for inappropriate metallurgical transformations, variability of material properties and residual stresses. In order to obtain an accurate description of cooling during quenching, a mathematical model of heat transfer is presented here. The model is based on the drift-flux mixture-model for multiphase flows, including an equation of conservation of energy for the liquid phase and specific boundary conditions that account for evaporation and presence of vapor phase on the surface of the piece. The model was implemented on Comsol Multiphysics software. Generation of appropriate initial and boundary conditions, as well as numerical resolution details, is briefly discussed. To test the model, a simple flow condition was analyzed. The effect of vapor fraction on heat transfer is assessed. The presence of the typical vapor blanket and its collapse can be recovered by the model, and its effect on the cooling rates on different parts of the piece is analyzed. Comparisons between numerical results and data from literature are made.

  4. The genealogy and genetic viability of reintroduced Yellowstone grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonholdt, Bridgett M; Stahler, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Earl, Dent A; Pollinger, John P; Wayne, Robert K

    2008-01-01

    The recovery of the grey wolf in Yellowstone National Park is an outstanding example of a successful reintroduction. A general question concerning reintroduction is the degree to which genetic variation has been preserved and the specific behavioural mechanisms that enhance the preservation of genetic diversity and reduce inbreeding. We have analysed 200 Yellowstone wolves, including all 31 founders, for variation in 26 microsatellite loci over the 10-year reintroduction period (1995-2004). The population maintained high levels of variation (1995 H(0) = 0.69; 2004 H(0) = 0.73) with low levels of inbreeding (1995 F(IS) = -0.063; 2004 F(IS) = -0.051) and throughout, the population expanded rapidly (N(1995) = 21; N(2004) = 169). Pedigree-based effective population size ratios did not vary appreciably over the duration of population expansion (1995 N(e)/N(g) = 0.29; 2000 N(e)/N(g) = 0.26; 2004 N(e)/N(g) = 0.33). We estimated kinship and found only two of 30 natural breeding pairs showed evidence of being related (average r = -0.026, SE = 0.03). We reconstructed the genealogy of 200 wolves based on genetic and field data and discovered that they avoid inbreeding through a wide variety of behavioural mechanisms including absolute avoidance of breeding with related pack members, male-biased dispersal to packs where they breed with nonrelatives, and female-biased subordinate breeding. We documented a greater diversity of such population assembly patterns in Yellowstone than previously observed in any other natural wolf population. Inbreeding avoidance is nearly absolute despite the high probability of within-pack inbreeding opportunities and extensive interpack kinship ties between adjacent packs. Simulations showed that the Yellowstone population has levels of genetic variation similar to that of a population managed for high variation and low inbreeding, and greater than that expected for random breeding within packs or across the entire breeding pool. Although short

  5. Episodic Aggradation and Asynchronous Incision of River Terraces in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgette, R. J.; Weldon, R. J.; Abdkrakhmatov, K. Y.; Ormukov, C.

    2006-12-01

    Sequences of terraces and alluvial fans with characteristic geomorphic expression lie above or at the mouth of rivers in all of the major basins in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan. The similarity of terraces and fans in different drainage basins, despite being bounded by faults of varying activity and style, has been used to argue for synchronous regional climatic variations controlling the timing of aggradation and incision. Our emerging set of radiocarbon dates (currently 24) from terrace deposits and overlying sediments suggest that despite the general regional synchroneity of a late Pleistocene terrace-forming event, deep incision below broad aggradational surfaces may be locally controlled and occurred over time spans up to 30 k.y. The most prominent intra-canyon terrace is known as QIII(2) in the characteristic sequence of Tien Shan terraces. QIII(2) is a fill terrace everywhere except for the hanging walls of the most active thrust faults in the Tien Shan, where it has a strath terrace morphology. In many places the base of the QIII(2) fill is not visible even at the level of the modern river. Five dates in the fill from the Ak-Terek and Tong Rivers in the Issyk-Kul basin and Kajerty River in the Naryn basin are all >40 Ka, and may be beyond the limit of radiocarbon. The Issyk-Kul basin is occupied by a large lake, which provides additional dating possibilities, while potentially complicating the geomorphic system. In Issyk-Kul dates from sediment overlying the QIII(2) gravel in thick colluvial wedges far from the edge of the riser to lower terraces along the Ak-Terek and Tamga rivers show that at least the highest level of the fill was abandoned by 33-30 Ka. However, the downstream reaches of Issyk- Kul rivers' QIII(2) surfaces clearly remained active through a high stand of the lake that persisted from 38 to 20 Ka. Remnants of terraces with steeper gradients that merge upstream with surfaces inset only a few m into the main QIII(2) post-date the high

  6. Analysis of the Terraced Construction Effect on Ecological  Economic Coordinated Development in the Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper through the correlation analysis and efficiency analysis, studied the differences between slope croplands and terraces on soil, water and fertilizer conservation in Southwest China. Meanwhile, it carried out a quantum chemical calculation of the ecological, economic and social benefits brought to the local Hani residents by terrace construction and concluded that terraced fields can promote the mutual coordination effect of water and fertilizer. Thus, it is beneficial for crop growth and development and increase grain output, to achieve the purpose of efficient water use and stable high yield. The results show that with the improvement of Hani ecological environment and the increase of land utilization, local ecological, economic and social benefits are significantly increased, which has laid a solid foundation for the agricultural industrialization development and implementation of sustainable agricultural development strategy in Hani. And also, it provides guarantee for the ecological, economic and social coordinated development of the county.

  7. Morphotectonic analysis and 10Be dating of the Kyngarga river terraces (southwestern flank of the Baikal rift system, South Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikova, A.; Arzhannikov, S.; Braucher, R.; Jolivet, M.; Aumaître, G.; Bourlès, D.; Keddadouche, K.

    2018-02-01

    The formation of the Baikal rift system basins is controlled by active faults separating each basin from the adjacent horsts. The kinematics of these faults is mainly explored through investigation of complex sequences of the fault-intersecting river terraces that record both tectonic and climatic events. This study focuses on the northern margin of the major Tunka basin that develops south-west of Lake Baikal. The development of the basin is controlled by the segmented Tunka fault. We performed a detailed mapping of the Kyngarga river terraces, the best preserved terraces staircase in Baikal rift system, at their intersection with the Tunka fault. In order to decipher the chronology of seismic events and the slip rates along that segment of the fault, key terraces were dated using in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be. We demonstrate that the formation of the terrace staircase occurred entirely during MIS1-MIS2. The obtained data allowed us to estimate the rate of incision at different stages of the terrace staircase formation and the relationship between the vertical and horizontal slip rates along this sub-latitudinal segment of the Tunka fault making respectively 0.8 and 1.12 mm yr- 1 over the past 12.5 ka. Analysis of the paleoseismology and paleoclimate data together with terrace dating provided the possibility to estimate the influence of tectonic and climatic factors on the terrace formation. Our proposed model of the Kyngarga river terrace development shows that the incisions into terraces T3 and T6 were induced by the abrupt climatic warming episodes GI-1 and GI-2, respectively, whereas terraces T5, T4 and T2 were abandoned due to the vertical tectonic displacement along the Tunka fault caused by coseismic ruptures.

  8. Geomorphometric delineation of floodplains and terraces from objectively defined topographic thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clubb, Fiona J.; Mudd, Simon M.; Milodowski, David T.; Valters, Declan A.; Slater, Louise J.; Hurst, Martin D.; Limaye, Ajay B.

    2017-07-01

    Floodplain and terrace features can provide information about current and past fluvial processes, including channel response to varying discharge and sediment flux, sediment storage, and the climatic or tectonic history of a catchment. Previous methods of identifying floodplain and terraces from digital elevation models (DEMs) tend to be semi-automated, requiring the input of independent datasets or manual editing by the user. In this study we present a new method of identifying floodplain and terrace features based on two thresholds: local gradient, and elevation compared to the nearest channel. These thresholds are calculated statistically from the DEM using quantile-quantile plots and do not need to be set manually for each landscape in question. We test our method against field-mapped floodplain initiation points, published flood hazard maps, and digitised terrace surfaces from seven field sites from the US and one field site from the UK. For each site, we use high-resolution DEMs derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) where available, as well as coarser resolution national datasets to test the sensitivity of our method to grid resolution. We find that our method is successful in extracting floodplain and terrace features compared to the field-mapped data from the range of landscapes and grid resolutions tested. The method is most accurate in areas where there is a contrast in slope and elevation between the feature of interest and the surrounding landscape, such as confined valley settings. Our method provides a new tool for rapidly and objectively identifying floodplain and terrace features on a landscape scale, with applications including flood risk mapping, reconstruction of landscape evolution, and quantification of sediment storage and routing.

  9. Distribution of Hydrothermal Mineral Assemblages in the Sevenmile Hole Area, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A.; Larson, P.; John, D.; Cosca, M.; Pauley, B.; Manion, J.; Pritchard, C.; Andersen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Incision of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park has exposed approximately 350 vertical meters of hydrothermally altered rhyolites. This older alteration formed in the shallow portion of a hydrothermal system that was most likely similar to the modern Yellowstone hydrothermal environment. Hydrothermal fluid circulation is related to the ongoing rhyolitic magmatism that produced the Yellowstone caldera at 640 ka. The rhyolitic magmatism and hydrothermal system are shallow expressions of deeper mantle- derived basalts. The older alteration is well exposed in the Sevenmile Hole area, near the northeastern margin of the caldera. Here, the alteration protolith is the high silica, low-18O, rhyolitic Tuff of Sulfur Creek. The tuff erupted at about 480 ka after resurgent doming associated with the third cycle collapse of the Yellowstone caldera. The tuff is a rheomorphically deformed densely welded agglutinate fallout ash that was deposited along the caldera wall. It contains phenocrysts of quartz, sodic plagioclase, and potassium feldspar. The tuff is exposed from the rim of the canyon, which is very close to the pre-alteration paleosurface, to the river bottom where it is covered by detrital sediments and actively forming hot spring deposits. Rocks exposed within the field area are pervasively hydrothermally altered. Mineral phases in approximately 90 samples were determined in the field using a Portable Infrared Mineral Analyser (PIMA). Subsequently, more precise mineral determinations were made using standard petrographic and powder XRD techniques. The alteration mineralogy consists of variable assemblages that include zones of kaolinite + opal; kaolinite + alunite with local dickite and typically high opal and/or quartz concentrations; highly silicified zones containing illite with or without smectite; and weakly silicified zones containing mostly illite. Minor (less than 1 percent) fine-grained disseminated pyrite is ubiquitous. The

  10. 3-Dimensional Terraced NAND (3D TNAND) Flash Memory-Stacked Version of Folded NAND Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Gil Sung; Park, Il Han; Lee, Jong Duk; Shin, Hyungcheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    We propose a 3-dimensional terraced NAND flash memory. It has a vertical channel so it is possible to make a long enough channel in 1F2 size. And it has 3-dimensional structure whose channel is connected vertically along with two stairs. So we can obtain high density as in the stacked array structure, without silicon stacking process. We can make NAND flash memory with 3F2 cell size. Using SILVACO ATLAS simulation, we study terraced NAND flash memory characteristics such as program, erase, and read. Also, its fabrication method is proposed.

  11. Butagaz: a domestic terrace-heater; Butagaz: un parasol chauffant domestique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Butagaz innovates by enlarging to the domestic sector the use of terrace-heaters, until now used only by cafes, hotels and restaurants. An appliance was engineered by Butagaz's R and D team at Rognac, in the South of France. A special attention was made on aesthetics and on some technical innovations: an MFB Acotech burner with metallic fibers, shape of the parabolic reflector, quick coupling system. This appliance is now manufactured by the Belgian company Barbecook. This innovative terrace heater was presented at the poster-communication session, during the last French Gas Congress, by Jean-Philippe Hecq and Stephanie Metairie. We publish this communication below. (authors)

  12. Autogenic terraces and non-linear river incision rates under steady external forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Luca C.; Prancevic, Jeffrey P.; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Fluvial terraces are among the most commonly cited records of hydraulic changes and tectonic events, and researchers often use the timing of their abandonment to constrain regional climatic and tectonic forcings. However, it can be challenging to identify the cause of terrace abandonment, as the same first order signature results from multiple drivers: external forcings of tectonics and climate, and internal autogenic feedbacks. Misinterpretation of the origin of fluvial terraces carries important consequences, as they often are key evidences for geomorphological and tectonic studies. Using a numerical model we identify an autogenic mechanism in transport-limited rivers that produces accelerated incision rates and the abandonment of significant terraces under steady forcing conditions. We show that a 'bank-feedback' process controls the cross-sectional geometry of channel entrenchment through the rising cost of eroding higher banks. During a phase of incision under the forcing of regular discharges (e.g. bankfull floods), an incising alluvial river migrates in a floodplain bound by progressively higher banks. Consequently, the volume of sediment produced by a unit of lateral migration grows larger and eventually forms a talus that may persist for multiple flood events. The talus shields the toe of the bank and prevents lateral erosion while vertical erosion can continue unhindered. This bank-shielding mechanism becomes more effective as vertical erosion creates even higher banks, initiating a feedback that promotes dramatic vertical entrenchment and abandonment of wide terraces. We propose that such a 'bank-feedback' process also plays a large role in determining the source of bedload material by forcing the river to tap into deeper and older sedimentary strata. We compare the 'bank-feedback' mechanism with a well-studied case of the northern piedmont of the East Tian Shan. There, terrace ages documenting >200 m of Holocene river incision, record a fourfold

  13. Changes in hydrological connectivity due to vegetation recovery and wall collapse in abandoned terraced fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana-Renault, Noemí; López-Vicente, Manuel; Oranjuren, Rafael; Ángel Llorente, José; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificación; Arnáez, José

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural terraces have been built in mountain regions worldwide in order to provide a larger surface for cultivation, improve water availability and reduce soil erosion, as they favour infiltration and reduce runoff and sediment connectivity from hillslopes to streams. In many Mediterranean countries, farmland abandonment has led to progressive natural revegetation and, in terraced slopes, due to a lack of maintenance, to a collapse of the water conservation structures, often followed by small mass movements and gullying. Little is known about the effect of such failures on the hydrological system, especially at catchment scale. The aim of this study is to contributing to fill in this gap by exploring the effect of vegetation recovery and terrace failure on hydrological connectivity in a small catchment (192 ha) in northern Spain mostly occupied by abandoned terraced fields. For this purpose, we applied a modified version of the Borselli's index of runoff and sediment connectivity (IC). Besides using the C-RUSLE factor, as used by many authors, we tested the inclusion of an infiltration component (Kf) to assess the landscape-weighting factor. The Kf factor accounted for the high infiltration rates observed in the terraced soils and was estimated using the permeability classes of the K-RUSLE factor. A 2x2 m resolution DEM was used to capture the terraced fields and run the IC model. Following the recommendation of Cavalli et al. (2015), we used the D-infinity flow accumulation algorithm (Tarboton, 1997) to represent the real flow paths, especially on hillslopes, where divergent flow predominates, and on stream channels. To ensure the continuity of the flow path lines, local sinks were filled in with the algorithm of Planchon & Darboux (2001) that preserved a minimum slope gradient of 0.01 degrees. Finally, linear landscape elements such as stonewalls, rock outcrops, and trails and forest roads were also considered. The IC was calculated for the current scenario

  14. Ground-water and drainage problems in the Whitney terrace area, Boise, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, S.W.

    1955-01-01

    Ground-water levels in the Whitney terrace area, after many years of rise owing to downward percolation of water from irrigated land, became nearly stabilized by 1935.  Strong seasonal water-level fluctuations of 8 to 10 feet, however, are common in the Boise Valley.  In recent years, the Whitney terrace has been changing rapidly from a farming to an urban community.  The 3,200-acre area now has about 15,000 inhabitants and the land area is about 35-percent occupied by urban developments.  Population trends indicate that urban expansion will continue.  

  15. River terraces as a response to climatic forcing: formation processes, sedimentary characteristics and sites for human occupation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberghe, J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate impact on the fluvial processes led to morphological and sedimentological differentiation of a terrace. This diversity in the fluvial environment determined how people could adapt to the river. Although the climatic impact on development and initiation of river terraces seems to be well

  16. Submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms: bioprocesses and products (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms belonging to higher Basidiomycetes are an immensely rich yet largely untapped resource of useful, easily accessible, natural compounds with various biological activities that may promote human well-being. The medicinal properties are found in various cellular components and secondary metabolites (polysaccharides, proteins and their complexes, phenolic compounds, polyketides, triterpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, nucleotides, etc.), which have been isolated and identified from the fruiting bodies, culture mycelium, and culture broth of mushrooms. Some of these compounds have cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, antitumor, immunomodulating, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities ready for industrial trials and further commercialization, while others are in various stages of development. Recently, the submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms has received a great deal of attention as a promising and reproducible alternative for the efficient production of mushroom mycelium and metabolites. Submerged cultivation of mushrooms has significant industrial potential, but its success on a commercial scale depends on increasing product yields and development of novel production systems that address the problems associated with this technique of mushroom cultivation. In spite of many researchers' efforts for the production of bioactive metabolites by mushrooms, the physiological and engineering aspects of submerged cultures are still far from being thoroughly studied. The vast majority of studies have focused on polysaccharide and ganoderic acid production in submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms, and very little has been written so far on the antioxidant and hemagglutinating activity of submerged mushroom cultures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the present state of the art and future prospects of submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms to produce mycelium and bioactive metabolites, and to make a

  17. What is "natural"?: Yellowstone elk population? A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigley, R.B.; Wagner, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ecology analyzes the structure and function of ecosystems at all points along the continuum of human disturbance, from so-called pristine forests to urban backyards. Undisturbed systems provide reference points at one end of the spectrum, and nature reserves and parks are highly valued because they can provide unique examples of such ecosystems. Unfortunately the concept of “natural” or pristine is not that easy to define. Indeed, although ecologists have considered pre-Columbian, western-hemisphere ecosystems to have been largely unaltered by human action, and have termed their state “natural” or “pristine,” evidence from archaeology challenges this view. U.S. and Canadian national parks are charged with preserving the “natural,” and thus need to be able to understand and manage for the “natural.” A pivotal “natural” question in Yellowstone National Park management is the size of the northern-range, wintering elk population at Park establishment in 1872, argued both to have been small and large. Integrating and quantifying several sources of evidence provides a consistent picture of a low population (ca. 5,000–6,000), largely migrating out of the northern range in winter, with little vegetation impact. If we accept this conclusion about what is natural for the Yellowstone ecosystem, then it dramatically alters how we view management alternatives for the Park, which currently supports a northern wintering herd of up to ˜ 25,000 elk.

  18. Distribution of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C.C.; Haroldson, M.A.; Gunther, K.; Moody, D.

    2006-01-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) proposed delisting the Yellowstone grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) in November 2005. Part of that process required knowledge of the most current distribution of the species. Here, we update an earlier estimate of occupied range (1990–2000) with data through 2004. We used kernel estimators to develop distribution maps of occupied habitats based on initial sightings of unduplicated females (n = 481) with cubs of the year, locations of radiomarked bears (n = 170), and spatially unique locations of conflicts, confrontations, and mortalities (n = 1,075). Although each data set was constrained by potential sampling bias, together they provided insight into areas in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) currently occupied by grizzly bears. The current distribution of 37,258 km2 (1990–2004) extends beyond the distribution map generated with data from 1990–2000 (34,416 km2 ). Range expansion is particularly evident in parts of the Caribou–Targhee National Forest in Idaho and north of Spanish Peaks on the Gallatin National Forest in Montana.

  19. Modeling ash fall distribution from a Yellowstone supereruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-08-01

    We used the volcanic ash transport and dispersion model Ash3d to estimate the distribution of ashfall that would result from a modern-day Plinian supereruption at Yellowstone volcano. The simulations required modifying Ash3d to consider growth of a continent-scale umbrella cloud and its interaction with ambient wind fields. We simulated eruptions lasting 3 days, 1 week, and 1 month, each producing 330 km3 of volcanic ash, dense-rock equivalent (DRE). Results demonstrate that radial expansion of the umbrella cloud is capable of driving ash upwind (westward) and crosswind (N-S) in excess of 1500 km, producing more-or-less radially symmetric isopachs that are only secondarily modified by ambient wind. Deposit thicknesses are decimeters to meters in the northern Rocky Mountains, centimeters to decimeters in the northern Midwest, and millimeters to centimeters on the East, West, and Gulf Coasts. Umbrella cloud growth may explain the extremely widespread dispersal of the ˜640 ka and 2.1 Ma Yellowstone tephra deposits in the eastern Pacific, northeastern California, southern California, and South Texas.

  20. Invasion of American bullfrogs along the Yellowstone River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.; Stagliano, Dave; Chaffin, Jake; Begley, Allison; Maxell, Bryce A.

    2015-01-01

    The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is a globally distributed invasive species that was introduced to the Yellowstone River floodplain of Montana. Knowledge about floodplain habitat features that allow for bullfrog persistence and spread will help identify effective control strategies. We used field surveys in 2010, 2012 and 2013 to describe bullfrog spread in the Yellowstone River floodplain and the habitat features that are associated with bullfrog occupancy and colonization. Bullfrogs in our study area expanded from ~ 60 km in 2010 to 106 km in 2013, and are spreading to up- and downstream habitats. The number of breeding sites (i.e., presence of bullfrog eggs or larvae) increased from 12 sites in 2010 to 45 sites in 2013. We found that bullfrogs were associated with deeper waters, emergent vegetation and public-access sites, which are habitat features that characterize permanent waters and describe human-mediated introductions. Control strategies that reduce the hydroperiod of breeding sites may help to limit bullfrog persistence and spread, while an increase in public outreach and education may help prevent further bullfrog introductions at public-access sites.

  1. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  2. Modeling ash fall distribution from a Yellowstone supereruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    We used the volcanic ash transport and dispersion model Ash3d to estimate the distribution of ashfall that would result from a modern-day Plinian supereruption at Yellowstone volcano. The simulations required modifying Ash3d to consider growth of a continent-scale umbrella cloud and its interaction with ambient wind fields. We simulated eruptions lasting 3 days, 1 week, and 1 month, each producing 330 km3 of volcanic ash, dense-rock equivalent (DRE). Results demonstrate that radial expansion of the umbrella cloud is capable of driving ash upwind (westward) and crosswind (N-S) in excess of 1500 km, producing more-or-less radially symmetric isopachs that are only secondarily modified by ambient wind. Deposit thicknesses are decimeters to meters in the northern Rocky Mountains, centimeters to decimeters in the northern Midwest, and millimeters to centimeters on the East, West, and Gulf Coasts. Umbrella cloud growth may explain the extremely widespread dispersal of the ∼640 ka and 2.1 Ma Yellowstone tephra deposits in the eastern Pacific, northeastern California, southern California, and South Texas.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in Yellowstone National Park, USA; Beikoku Yellowstone kokuritsu koen ni okeru genchi jikaritsu sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuma, S. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    For the purpose of interpreting data of the aeromagnetic anomalies in Yellowstone National Park in the U.S.A., in-situ magnetization intensity measurements have been carried out in 1994 and 1995 on geological outcrops of rocks in that area. Comparisons and discussions were given on the measurement results, and existing rock magnetic data and aeromagnetic anomaly data available for the area. Outside the Yellowstone caldera, part of granitic gneisses among the Precambrian granitic gneisses and crystalline schists distributed to the north has an abnormally high magnetization intensity of 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI. This could be a powerful anomaly source for the high magnetic anomaly in this area. Paleogene volcanic rocks distributed widely in the eastern part of the park also have magnetization intensity as high as 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher, which are also thought a powerful anomaly source in this area. Part of Pleistocene basalts which are exposed partially in the western part of the park has also very high magnetization intensity at 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher. This suggests correlation with the magnetic anomaly in the east-west direction distributed in this area. Quaternary rhyolites are more magnetic than Quaternary welded tuffs, which should give greater effects to the magnetic anomaly. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Eruptions at Lone Star geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA: 2. Constraints on subsurface dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Sohn, Robert A; Rudolph, Maxwell L; Hurwitz, Shaul; Manga, Michael; Johnston, Malcolm J. S; Soule, S. Adam; McPhee, Darcy; Glen, Jonathan M. G; Karlstrom, Leif; Murphy, Fred

    2014-01-01

    We use seismic, tilt, lidar, thermal, and gravity data from 32 consecutive eruption cycles of Lone Star geyser in Yellowstone National Park to identify key subsurface processes throughout the geyser's eruption cycle...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus altitudinis YNP4-TSU, Isolated from Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHair, Joshua A; Li, Hui; Thapa, Santosh; Scholz, Matthew; Zhou, Suping

    2017-07-13

    Undisturbed hot springs inside Yellowstone National Park remain a dynamic biome for novel cellulolytic thermophiles. We report here the draft genome sequence of one of these isolates, Bacillus altitudinis YNP4-TSU. Copyright © 2017 OHair et al.

  6. Fuel Moisture as Measured and Predicted During the 1988 Fires in Yellowstone Park

    OpenAIRE

    U.S. Forest Service

    1991-01-01

    Fine fuel moisture content, relative humidity, air temperature, and fire behavior were observed hourly for 48 hours on the North Fork fire in Yellowstone National Park from August 25 to August 27, 1988.

  7. 76 FR 27087 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... Internet: We encourage you to comment via the Internet at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/YELL (click on the... a detailed history of winter use in Yellowstone, is available at http://www.nps.gov/yell/planvisit...

  8. Exterior sound level measurements of over-snow vehicles at Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Sounds associated with oversnow vehicles, such as snowmobiles and snowcoaches, are an : important management concern at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. The John A. : Volpe National Transportation Systems Centers Environmental Measureme...

  9. Environmental factors influencing the distribution of agricultural terraces: Case study of Horny Tisovnik, Slovakia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slámová, M.; Krčmářová, Jana; Hrončiek, P.; Kaštierová, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2017), s. 34-45 ISSN 1210-8812 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-15716S Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : agricultural terraces * traditional landscapes * environmental history * multivariate analysis * Slovakia Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2016

  10. Development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems. Technical progress report, October 1- October 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, D. G.

    1979-11-19

    A bibliography on various aspects of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems is included. Relevant federal and state legislation and regulations have been identified. Mines of interest to the project have been identified and listed for field visits. Seven regions of different climates, hydrology, geology, etc., are being studied individually. (LTN)

  11. Late Quaternary fluvial terrace development and changing landscape connectivity in the Great Karoo, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet

    2017-04-01

    Dendritic channel networks in the Wilgerbosch River catchment draining the south side of the Sneeuberg, South Africa are deeply incised exposing terrace fills of varying thickness and extent. Channel long sections exhibit 'stepped' profiles where resistant rock strata cross valley floors, but are now partially or completely breached. Using a combination of aerial image analyses, geomorphological mapping, sedimentological investigations (field logging, grain size and mineral magnetic analysis) and geochronology (OSL, radiocarbon), this presentation demonstrates the patterns and controls on erosion and sedimentation and to a lesser extent, the age structure of fills in two low-order tributaries (Africanders Kloof and Wilgerbosch Kloof) and several reaches of the higher-order Wilgerbosch River. A conceptual model of terrace development in relation to changing conditions of connectivity was tested. Valley headwaters are dominated by discontinuous palaeochannel and floodout sediments, whilst in 2nd-4th order tributaries, five sedimentologically and stratigraphically distinct terrace fills that exceed the scale and complexity of deposits to the north of the Sneeuberg, were identified and analysed. The early part of this regional terrace succession highlights the importance of interactions between periglacial and fluvial activity on cut, fill and pedogenesis in the deglacial period. Terrace development is shown to have been a complex response to re-connection of the channel network with upland colluvial stores resulting in the valleys becoming choked with sediment. This caused a rise in groundwater and formation of extensive calcretised rootmats on valley floors and slopes acting to 'blanket' terraces 1 and 2. The thickness and longevity of this blanket is shown to restrict depth of incision in subsequent phases (T3, T4). As a result, the stratigraphic record is spatially and temporally biased toward the late Pleistocene and Holocene terraces (1, 2 and 4 respectively

  12. Paleo-Erosion Rates From in Situ 10Be in Middle European River Terrace Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Hovius, N.; Kubik, P. W.

    2001-12-01

    Exploiting cosmogenic nuclides in sand of dated river terrace can be used to quantify catchment-wide rates of paleo-erosion. The measured cosmogenic 10Be concentration in quartz is corrected for post-depositional irradiation using the known terrace age. The remaining nuclide inventory is attributed to irradiation in the source area of the sediment. This inventory reflects the catchment-wide erosion rate at the time of terrace deposition. This approach has been used to assess the influence of climate change on erosion in the waning stages of the last cold period. Late Pleistocene to Holocene terraces of the Allier and Dore Rivers, France, yield paleo-erosion rates that range from 30 to 55 mm/kyr. These rates are very similar to recent ones measured with 10Be in sands from the active Allier channel (31 to 59 mm/kyr, Schaller et al., 2001). Rates derived independently from the sedimentary fill of a lake in the upstream area of the Allier catchment show strong fluctuations with an erosion maximum of 120 mm/kyr during the Younger Dryas (Macaire et al., 1997). However, these real variations in erosion rates are strongly dampened in the cosmogenic nuclide record due to the method's slow response time. As a result, the Late Pleistocene erosion signal in the terrace sequence is virtually invariant and is propagated into the Holocene terrace and modern bedload erosion rates. The resulting memory of elevated past erosion rates might explain the difference between modern cosmogenic nuclide-derived and much lower river load gauging-derived erosion rates that was observed in Middle European rivers (Schaller et al., 2001). The analysis of Late Pleistocene to Holocene terrace sediments of the Meuse River, the Netherlands, suggest that cosmogenic nuclide-derived paleo-erosion rates have decreased from 60 mm/kyr in the Late Pleistocene to 23 mm/kyr in Holocene times. The results from these 30 kyr of erosion rate records suggest that individual samples from a given terrace interval

  13. The Yellowstone magmatic system from the mantle plume to the upper crust

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schmandt, Brandon; Farrell, Jamie; Smith, Robert B.; Tsai, Victor C.

    2015-01-01

    The Yellowstone supervolcano is one of the largest active continental silicic volcanic fields in the world. An understanding of its properties is key to enhancing our knowledge of volcanic mechanisms and corresponding risk. Using a joint local and teleseismic earthquake P-wave seismic inversion, we unveil a basaltic lower-crustal magma body that provides a magmatic link between the Yellowstone mantle plume and the previously imaged upper-crustal magma reservoir. This lower-crustal magma body ...

  14. Volcanic Stratigraphy of the Quaternary Rhyolite Plateau in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Robert L.; Blank, H. Richard

    1972-01-01

    The volcanic sequence of the Quaternary Yellowstone plateau consists of rhyolites and basalts representing three volcanic cycles. The major events of each cycle were eruption of a voluminous ash-flow sheet and formation of a large collapse caldera. Lesser events of each cycle were eruption of precaldera and postcaldera rhyolitic lava flows and marginal basaltic lavas. The three major ash-flow sheets are named and designated in this report as formations within the Yellowstone Group. The lavas are assigned to newly named formations organized around the three ash-flow sheets of the Yellowstone Group to represent the volcanic cycles. Rocks of the first volcanic cycle comprise the precaldera Junction Butte Basalt and rhyolite of Broad Creek; the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff of the Yellowstone Group; and the postcaldera Lewis Canyon Rhyolite and basalt of The Narrows. Rocks of the second volcanic cycle do not crop out within Yellowstone National Park, and only the major unit, the Mesa Falls Tuff of the Yellowstone Group, is named here. The third volcanic cycle is represented by the precaldera Mount Jackson Rhyolite and Undine Falls Basalt; the Lava Creek Tuff of the Yellowstone Group; and the postcaldera Plateau Rhyolite and five post-Lava Creek basaltic sequences. Collapse to form the compound and resurgent Yellowstone caldera was related to eruption of the Lava Creek Tuff. The Plateau Rhyolite is divided into six members - the Mallard Lake, Upper Basin, Obsidian Creek, Central Plateau, Shoshone Lake Tuff, and Roaring Mountain Members; all but the Mallard Lake postdate resurgent doming of the caldera. The basalts are divided into the Swan Lake Flat Basalt, Falls River Basalt, basalt of Mariposa Lake, Madison River Basalt, and Osprey Basalt. Sediments are intercalated in the volcanic section below the Huckleberry Ridge and Mesa Falls Tuffs and within the Junction Butte Basalt, sediments and basalts of The Narrows, Undine Falls Basalt, Plateau Rhyolite, and Osprey Basalt.

  15. Geologic and geochemical results from boreholes drilled in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 2007 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Cheryl; Susong, David; Heasler, Henry; Mencin, David; Johnson, Wade; Conrey, Rick; Von Stauffenberg, Jennipher

    2016-06-01

    Between 2007 and 2008, seven Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) boreholes ranging in depth from about 200 to 800 feet deep were drilled in and adjacent to the Yellowstone caldera in Yellowstone National Park, for the purpose of installing volcano monitoring instrumentation. Five of the seven boreholes were equipped with strainmeters, downhole seismometers, and tiltmeters. Data collected during drilling included field observations of drill cuttings, stratigraphy within the boreholes, water temperature, and water and drill cuttings samples from selected depths.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-08-28

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons. Copyright © 2014 Thiel et al.

  17. A landscape character assessment of three terraced areas in Campania region, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravagnuolo, Antonia; Ronza, Maria; Di Martino, Ferdinando; De Rosa, Fortuna

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural terraces represent the territorial structure of many cultural landscapes in the Campania region, Italy. Historic urban/rural settlements and hydraulic-agrarian systems have been developed on mountains and hills, producing diverse cultural landscapes depending on the specific geological, pedological and geomorphological characteristics, which influenced the character and functions of terraces. These unique landscapes are multi-functional and provide many ecosystem services: provisioning (food, water retention, building materials); regulating and maintenance (hydrogeological stability, soil fertility, protection from soil erosion, maintenance of genetic diversity, habitat); cultural services (heritage and traditional knowledge conservation, tourism and recreation, spiritual experience, education, aesthetic quality). Three terraced landscapes in Campania are analysed, which present a rich diversity in the geological structure and formal/functional characteristics: the Roccamonfina vulcanic area, a highly fertile and lapillous soil; the Monte di Bulgheria, a clay-rich area; and finally the well-known UNESCO World Heritage site of the Amalfi Coast, a calcareous, steep rock faced area. A landscape character assessment of the three sites is processed, identifying the biophysical structure of the sites, natural systems and land use, and cultural and anthropic elements. Terraced landscapes in Campania can be regenerated, taking again an active social and economic role for the society, enhancing their multifunctionality as a key source of wellbeing. Ecosystem services are mapped and evaluated to assess benefits and costs in a multidimensional framework. Spatial analysis in GIS environment supports this process, providing a decision-support tool for mapping and assessment of terraced landscapes, to convert their actual and potential value into a resource of economic sustainable development.

  18. Insights for the melt migration, the volcanic activity and the ultrafast lithosphere delamination related to the Yellowstone plume (Western USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Rigo, A.; Adam, C.; Grégoire, M.; Gerbault, Muriel; Meyer, R.; Rabinowicz, M.; Fontaine, F.; Bonvalot, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The Yellowstone-East Snake River Plain hotspot track has been intensely studied since several decades and is widely considered to result from the interaction of a mantle plume with the North American plate. An integrated conclusive geodynamic interpretation of this extensive data set is however presently still lacking, and our knowledge of the dynamical processes beneath Yellowstone is patchy. It has been argued that the Yellowstone plume has delaminated the lower part of the thick Wyoming cr...

  19. Rice SUB1A constrains remodelling of the transcriptome and metabolome during submergence to facilitate post-submergence recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Anna M; Barding, Gregory A; Sathnur, Sumukh; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2017-11-02

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) ethylene-responsive transcription factor gene SUB1A-1 confers tolerance to prolonged, complete submergence by limiting underwater elongation growth. Upon desubmergence, SUB1A-1 genotypes rapidly recover photosynthetic function and recommence development towards flowering. The underpinnings of the transition from stress amelioration to the return to homeostasis are not well known. Here, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were conducted to identify mechanisms by which SUB1A improves physiological function over the 24 hr following a sublethal submergence event. Evaluation of near-isogenic genotypes after submergence and over a day of reaeration demonstrated that SUB1A transiently constrains the remodelling of cellular activities associated with growth. SUB1A influenced the abundance of ca. 1,400 transcripts and had a continued impact on metabolite content, particularly free amino acids, glucose, and sucrose, throughout the recovery period. SUB1A promoted recovery of metabolic homeostasis but had limited influence on mRNAs associated with growth processes and photosynthesis. The involvement of low energy sensing during submergence and recovery was supported by dynamics in trehalose-6-phosphate and mRNAs encoding key enzymes and signalling proteins, which were modulated by SUB1A. This study provides new evidence of convergent signalling pathways critical to the rapidly reversible management of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in submergence resilient rice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Field Trip Guide to the Petrology of Quaternary Volcanism on the Yellowstone Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Stelten, Mark; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Cooper, Kari M

    2017-12-19

    The Yellowstone Plateau is one of the largest manifestations of silicic volcanism on Earth, and marks the youngest focus of magmatism associated with the Yellowstone Hot Spot. The earliest products of Yellowstone Hot Spot volcanism are from ~17 million years ago, but may be as old as ~32 Ma, and include contemporaneous eruption of voluminous mafic and silicic magmas, which are mostly located in the region of northwestern Nevada and southeastern Oregon. Since 17 Ma, the main locus of Yellowstone Hot Spot volcanism has migrated northeastward producing numerous silicic caldera complexes that generally remain active for ~2–4 million years, with the present-day focus being the Yellowstone Plateau. Northeastward migration of volcanism associated with the Yellowstone Hot Spot resulted in the formation of the Snake River Plain, a low relief physiographic feature extending ~750 kilometers from northern Nevada to eastern Idaho. Most of the silicic volcanic centers along the Snake River Plain have been inundated by younger basalt volcanism, but many of their ignimbrites and lava flows are exposed in the extended regions at the margins of the Snake River Plain. 

  1. Geomorphic influences on the distribution of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, C.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Influences of large-scale abiotic, geomorphic characteristics on distributions of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri are poorly understood. We sampled 151 sites on 56 perennial streams in the Greybull-Wood river drainage in northwestern Wyoming to determine the effects of geomorphic variables on Yellowstone cutthroat trout distributions. Channel slope, elevation, stream size, and barriers to upstream movement significantly influenced the presence and absence of Yellowstone cutthroat trout. Wild populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout were not found upstream of barriers to fish migration, at sites with channel slopes of 10% or greater, or at elevations above 3, 182 m. Based on channel slope alone, logistic regression models correctly classified presence or absence of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in 83% of study sites. The addition of elevation and stream size in the models increased classification to 87%. Logistic models tested on an independent data set had agreement rates as high as 91% between actual and predicted fish presence. Large-scale geomorphic variables influence Yellowstone cutthroat trout distributions, and logistic functions can predict these distributions with a high degree of accuracy.

  2. A field trip guide to the petrology of Quaternary volcanism on the Yellowstone Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Stelten, Mark; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Cooper, Kari

    2017-12-19

    The Yellowstone Plateau is one of the largest manifestations of silicic volcanism on Earth, and marks the youngest focus of magmatism associated with the Yellowstone Hot Spot. The earliest products of Yellowstone Hot Spot volcanism are from ~17 million years ago, but may be as old as ~32 Ma, and include contemporaneous eruption of voluminous mafic and silicic magmas, which are mostly located in the region of northwestern Nevada and southeastern Oregon. Since 17 Ma, the main locus of Yellowstone Hot Spot volcanism has migrated northeastward producing numerous silicic caldera complexes that generally remain active for ~2–4 million years, with the present-day focus being the Yellowstone Plateau. Northeastward migration of volcanism associated with the Yellowstone Hot Spot resulted in the formation of the Snake River Plain, a low relief physiographic feature extending ~750 kilometers from northern Nevada to eastern Idaho. Most of the silicic volcanic centers along the Snake River Plain have been inundated by younger basalt volcanism, but many of their ignimbrites and lava flows are exposed in the extended regions at the margins of the Snake River Plain. 

  3. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing of the Yellowstone Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Yellowstone National Park (YNP) geothermal system is one of the largest in the world, with thousands of individual thermal features ranging in size from a few centimeters to tens of meters across, (e.g., fumaroles, geysers, mud pots and hot spring pools). Together, large concentrations of these thermal features make up dozens of distinct thermal areas, characterized by sparse vegetation, hydrothermally altered rocks, and usually either sinter, travertine, or acid sulfate alteration. The temperature of these thermal features generally ranges from ~30 to ~93 oC, which is the boiling temperature of water at the elevation of Yellowstone. In-situ temperature measurements of various thermal features are sparse in both space and time, but they show a dynamic time-temperature relationship. For example, as geysers erupt and send pulses of warm water down slope, the warm water cools rapidly and is then followed by another pulse of warm water, on time scales of minutes. The total heat flux from the Park’s thermal features has been indirectly estimated from chemical analysis of Cl- flux in water flowing from Yellowstone’s rivers. We are working to provide a more direct measurement, as well as estimates of time variability, of the total heat flux using satellite multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data. Over the last 10 years, NASA’s orbiting ASTER and MODIS instruments have acquired hundreds and thousands of multispectral TIR images, respectively, over the YNP area. Compared with some volcanoes, Yellowstone is a relatively low-temperature geothermal system, with low thermal contrast to the non-geothermal surrounding areas; therefore we are refining existing techniques to extract surface temperature and thermal flux information. This task is complicated by issues such as, during the day, solar heated surfaces may be warmer than nearby geothermal features; and there is some topographic (elevation) influence on surface temperatures, even at night. Still

  4. Track of the Yellowstone hotspot: young and ongoing geologic processes from the Snake River Plain to the Yellowstone Plateau and Tetons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lisa A.; Pierce, Kenneth L.; Shanks, Pat; Raynolds, Robert G.H.

    2008-01-01

    This field trip highlights various stages in the evolution of the Snake River Plain–Yellowstone Plateau bimodal volcanic province, and associated faulting and uplift, also known as the track of the Yellowstone hotspot. The 16 Ma Yellowstone hotspot track is one of the few places on Earth where time-transgressive processes on continental crust can be observed in the volcanic and tectonic (faulting and uplift) record at the rate and direction predicted by plate motion. Recent interest in young and possible renewed volcanism at Yellowstone along with new discoveries and synthesis of previous studies, i.e., tomographic, deformation, bathymetric, and seismic surveys, provide a framework of evidence of plate motion over a mantle plume. This 3-day trip is organized to present an overview into volcanism and tectonism in this dynamically active region. Field trip stops will include the young basaltic Craters of the Moon, exposures of 12–4 Ma rhyolites and edges of their associated collapsed calderas on the Snake River Plain, and exposures of faults which show an age progression similar to the volcanic fields. An essential stop is Yellowstone National Park, where the last major caldera-forming event occurred 640,000 years ago and now is host to the world's largest concentration of hydrothermal features (>10,000 hot springs and geysers). This trip presents a quick, intensive overview into volcanism and tectonism in this dynamically active region. Field stops are directly linked to conceptual models related to hotspot passage through this volcano-tectonic province. Features that may reflect a tilted thermal mantle plume suggested in recent tomographic studies will be examined. The drive home will pass through Grand Teton National Park, where the Teton Range is currently rising in response to the passage of the North American plate over the Yellowstone hotspot.

  5. Peculiarities of thermal dissociation of oxides during submerged arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Zhdanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of settlement of the process of thermal dissociation of oxides in reaction zone during the submerged arc welding and welding deposition is presented. Combined non-linear equations for definition of gas-vapour mixture composition were developed. They describe the dissociation of MeO, MeO2 and Me2O3 types of oxides. Calculations of the processes of oxide dissociation were performed for the oxides that are commonly included into welding fluxes. Their results and analysis are presented. The method proposed appeared to be adequate and applicable for analysis of processes during submerged arc operation that run in the gas phase.

  6. EAARL-B Submerged Topography—Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  7. EAARL-B Submerged Topography--Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  8. Long-term allelopathic control of phytoplankton by the submerged macrophyte Elodea nuttallii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderstukken, M.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Decaestecker, E.; Muylaert, K.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: allelochemicals; chemical ecology; competition; nutrient limitation; shallow lakes Summary 1.It is well known that submerged macrophytes can suppress phytoplankton blooms in lakes and thus promote water quality and biodiversity. One of the possible mechanisms through which submerged

  9. Invasive Crayfish Threaten the Development of Submerged Macrophytes in Lake Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.K.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts Van Kessel, J.M.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  10. Invasive crayfish threaten the development of submerged macrophytes in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wal, J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts, J.J.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  11. Through-flow of water in leaves of a submerged plant is influenced by the apical opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity......Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity...

  12. Photonics in nature: Yellowstone National Park in IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Shaw, Joseph A.; Nugent, Paul W.; Harris, Wilson; Gillis, Kendra; Weiss, William; Carpenter, Logan; Carpenter, Amy; Scherrer, Bryan

    2017-08-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool not only in science but also in optics and photonics education and outreach activities. Observing natural optical phenomena in a different spectral region like the thermal infrared often offers new insights. The commonly used false color images not only allow extraction of useful information about thermal properties of objects, but they can also provide aesthetic sights and are thus an excellent tool for public outreach activities. Recently we have pursued this kind of study using IR imaging within Yellowstone National Park, complementing earlier work on thermal pool colors and spectroscopy. We will discuss and compare images of a variety of VIS and IR cameras of hot springs, geysers, mud pools and other natural phenomena recorded in the park during 2012 and 2016.

  13. Molecular identification of Pilobolus species from Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, K Michael; Sheehan, Kathy B

    2011-01-01

    Pilobolus, a widely distributed coprophilous fungus, grows on herbivore dung. Species of Pilobolus traditionally are described with imprecise morphological characteristics potentially leading to misidentification. In this study we used PCR analysis of taxonomically informative sequences to provide more consistent species identification from isolates obtained in Yellowstone National Park. We collected Pilobolus park-wide from six taxa of herbivores over 9 y. Multiple transfers of single sporangium isolates provided pure cultures from which DNA was extracted. Sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of DNA that code for rRNA genes were used to distinguish among similar species. We describe several species of Pilobolus associated with herbivores in various habitats, including two species not previously reported, P. heterosporus and P. sphaerosporus. Our results show that phylogenetic species identification of Pilobolus based on sequence analysis of pure culture isolates provides a more reliable means of identifying species than traditional methods.

  14. Fungi from Geothermal Soils in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Regina S.; Litvintseva, Anastassia; Sheehan, Kathy B.; Henson, Joan M.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    1999-01-01

    Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70°C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils we cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. We cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22°C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature. PMID:10583964

  15. New constraints on the Yellowstone hotspot's dynamical agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, K. G.; Schutt, D.; Yuan, H.

    2006-12-01

    Recent teleseismic results from the 2000-2001 PASSCAL Yellowstone and Billings arrays reveal the following. The P-wave velocity tomogram requires a 100 km diameter pipe extending from beneath Yellowstone Park to 400-500 km depth. This pipe is tilted at about 15° from vertical towards the NW. We show that the image of the low velocity pipe in the 200-400 km depth range is robust (our array apature and teleseismic earthquake distribution is better than Iceland arrays). Ignoring the possibility of a wet non-thermal upwelling pipe, a mantle plume is the only process capable of producing the >200 km extension of the low velocity pipe. Independent confirmation that a warm pipe exists is provided by a 14 km depression of the 410 km discontinuity where the tomographic image of the pipe crosses the 410. Noteworthy is that the 660 km discontinuity does not show evidence for a plume: consistent with our tomographic image. Less visually stimulating, but equally compelling evidence for the occurrence of a plume beneath Yellowstone is provided by Rayleigh wave phase velocity modeling. The most remarkable aspect of this modeling is that a shear-wave velocity minimum of 3.8-3.9 km/s is required below the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) at 70-80 km depth (normal sub-solidus adiabatic mantle is 4.1-4.2 km/s). Simple parametric modeling of the phase velocity data is performed in which the independent parameters are: temperature, grain size, attenuation, and melt-velocity scaling. Equilibrium melt porosities of 0.1-0.4% were constrained by a 1-D Darcy flow suggesting that most of the velocity reduction is not controlled by melt porosity (using Kreutzmann et al., (2004) melt- velocity scaling of 2.1% dVs per 1% melt). This modeling requires a minimum excess temperature of 90° with respect to a 1320° potential temperature mantle. A plume flux rate estimate is provided by integrating the volume of low velocity plume layer beneath the last 8 Ma of the hotspot track; this finds a very

  16. Risks of Brucella abortus spillover in the Greater Yellowstone area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, B

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent spillover of Brucella abortus from wildlife reservoirs to domestic cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) has prevented the United States from completely eradicating bovine brucellosis. Risks to cattle are a function of the size and location of wildlife and livestock populations, the degree and nature of spatio-temporal interactions between the various hosts, the level of disease in wildlife, and the susceptibility of livestock herds. While the brucellosis prevalence in wild, free-ranging GYA bison (Bison bison) is high, current management actions have successfully limited contact between bison and cattle. Under current management practices, the risks to cattle in the GYA are predominantly from wild elk (Cervus elaphus). Intra- and inter-species transmission events, while uncommon, are nevertheless crucial for the maintenance of brucellosis in the GYA. Future management actions should focus on decreasing elk herd densities and group sizes and on understanding the behavioural and environmental drivers that result in co-mingling that makes transmission possible.

  17. Yellowstone Lake: high-energy geochemistry and rich bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Kan, Jinjun; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Mathur, Eric; Nealson, Kenneth; Gorby, Yuri; Jiang, Hongchen; LaFracois, Toben; McDermott, Timothy R

    2011-08-01

    Yellowstone Lake is central to the balanced functioning of the Yellowstone ecosystem, yet little is known about the microbial component of its food chain. A remotely operated vehicle provided video documentation (http://www.tbi.montana.edu/media/videos/) and allowed sampling of dilute surface zone waters and enriched lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids. Vent emissions contained substantial H(2)S, CH(4), CO(2) and H(2), although CH(4) and H(2) levels were also significant throughout the lake. Pyrosequencing and near full-length sequencing of Bacteria 16S rRNA gene diversity associated with two vents and two surface water environments demonstrated that this lake contains significant bacterial diversity. Biomass was size-fractionated by sequentially filtering through 20-µm-, 3.0-µm-, 0.8-µm- and 0.1-µm-pore-size filters, with the >0.1 to <0.8 µm size class being the focus of this study. Major phyla included Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, α- and β-Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, with 21 other phyla represented at varying levels. Surface waters were dominated by two phylotypes: the Actinobacteria freshwater acI group and an α-Proteobacteria clade tightly linked with freshwater SAR11-like organisms. We also obtained evidence of novel thermophiles and recovered Prochlorococcus phylotypes (97-100% identity) in one near surface photic zone region of the lake. The combined geochemical and microbial analyses suggest that the foundation of this lake's food chain is not simple. Phototrophy presumably is an important driver of primary productivity in photic zone waters; however, chemosynthetic hydrogenotrophy and methanotrophy are likely important components of the lake's food chain. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Vaccination strategies for managing brucellosis in Yellowstone bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, John J; Johnson, Joseph S; Wallen, Rick L; Cilles, Sara; Crowley, Philip H; Cox, John J; Maehr, David S; White, P J; Plumb, Glenn E

    2010-10-01

    Concerns over migratory bison (Bison bison) at Yellowstone National Park transmitting brucellosis (Brucella abortus) to cattle herds on adjacent lands led to proposals for bison vaccination. We developed an individual-based model to evaluate how brucellosis infection might respond under alternate vaccination strategies, including: (1) vaccination of female calves and yearlings captured at the park boundary when bison move outside the primary conservation area; (2) combining boundary vaccination with the remote delivery of vaccine to female calves and yearlings distributed throughout the park; and (3) vaccinating all female bison (including adults) during boundary capture and throughout the park using remote delivery of vaccine. Simulations suggested Alternative 3 would be most effective, with brucellosis seroprevalence decreasing by 66% (from 0.47 to 0.16) over a 30-year period resulting from 29% of the population receiving protection through vaccination. Under this alternative, bison would receive multiple vaccinations that extend the duration of vaccine protection and defend against recurring infection in latently infected animals. The initial decrease in population seroprevalence will likely be slow due to high initial seroprevalence (40-60%), long-lived antibodies, and the culling of some vaccinated bison that were subsequently exposed to field strain Brucella and reacted positively on serologic tests. Vaccination is unlikely to eradicate B. abortus from Yellowstone bison, but could be an effective tool for reducing the level of infection. Our approach and findings have applicability world-wide for managers dealing with intractable wildlife diseases that cross wildlife-livestock and wildlife-human interfaces and affect public health or economic well-being. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  20. Quantification of the effect of terrace maintenance on soil erosion: two seasons of monitoring experiments in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Corrado; Djuma, Hakan; Zoumides, Christos; Eliades, Marinos; Charalambous, Katerina; Bruggeman, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    In the Mediterranean region, rural communities in topographically challenging sites have converted large areas into dry-stone terraces, as the only way to develop sustainable agriculture. Terraces allow softening the steep mountainous slopes, favoring water infiltration and reducing water runoff and soil erosion. However, population decrease over the past 30 years has led to a lack of maintenance of the terraces and the onset of a process of land degradation. The objective of this study is the quantification of the effect of terrace maintenance on soil erosion. We selected two terraces - A and B, 11 and 14 m long, respectively - for monitoring purposes. They are located in a small catchment (10,000 m2) in the Troodos Mountains of Cyprus, at an elevation of 1,300 m a.s.l., and cultivated with vineyards, which is the main agricultural land use of the region. We monitored soil erosion by means of sediment traps, which are installed along 1-m long sections of terrace. We monitored four sections on terrace A and seven on terrace B. During the first monitoring season (winter 2015/16), on terrace A the traps caught sediment of two collapsed and two standing sections of dry-stone wall. The catchment areas of one set of traps (degraded and non-degraded) were closed by a 1x4-m2 plot, to relate erosion rates to a known draining area. On terrace B the traps were all open and caught four collapsed and three standing sections. Also, we installed a weather station (5-minute rainfall, temperature, and relative humidity) and 15 soil moisture sensors, to relate soil erosion processes with climate and (sub)surface hydrology. From the open traps, we observed that soil loss is on average 8 times higher from degraded terrace sections than from standing, well maintained sections, which in our case study corresponds to an 87% reduction of soil loss due to terrace maintenance. If we compare data from the two closed plots, we obtain a much higher soil loss ratio (degraded/standing) of 56

  1. Proposed gas generation assembly would recover deeply submerged objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, C. W.

    1968-01-01

    Gas generation system, used for recovery of submerged objects, generates hydrogen gas by the reaction of sodium with sea water. The assembly consists of flooded flotation tanks cabled together, equipped with relief valves to equalize pressure as the array ascends and hydrostatic pressure diminishes, and carrying remotely activated welding units.

  2. Implementation of Submerged Arc Welding Training. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Earl; Todd, John

    A unit on submerged arc welding (SAW) was developed and integrated into the welding program at Seattle Central Community College (Washington) during the period December 1983 through May 1984. During this time, 10 major users of SAW in the area were contacted and mailed questionnaires. Follow up consisted of telephone calls and personal contact as…

  3. Benthic Bacterial Diversity in Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystems▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C.; Pangborn, Joseph B.; Zajack, Heidi A.; Kendall, Scott T.; Rediske, Richard R.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities. PMID:19880643

  4. Effects of submerged and anaerobic fermentations on cassava flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oke Oluwatoyin Victoria

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... Cassava tubers for processing into cassava flour, Lafun a Nigerian locally fermented product was subjected to two different types of fermentations: submerged and anaerobic fermentation for 72 h. Physicochemical changes that occurred during fermentation and their influence on the functional, rheological ...

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka eSteffens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism and nonenzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS.

  6. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically and...

  7. Effects of prolonged elevated water salinity on submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental change, global warming. * To whom all correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: ian.russell@sanparks.org. Received 9 March 2017; accepted in revised form 10 October 2017. INTRODUCTION. Estuarine submerged macrophyte communities can be highly variable at both spatial and temporal scales, ...

  8. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... Key words: Cassava peel, Trichoderma viride, enzyme, submerged fermentation, protein, amino acids. INTRODUCTION. Protein-energy malnutrition remains a major public health problem in many developing countries and there is the need to increase daily intake of protein, especially animal protein, using ...

  9. Relationships between the biomass of waterfowl and submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Wilderness Lakes system, comprising three estuarine lakes (Eilandvlei, Langvlei and Rondevlei), supports a diverse waterbird community, which includes 12 duck species and the abundant Red-knobbed Coot Fulica cristata. Biannual counts of waterfowl (ducks and Red-knobbed Coot) and assessments of submerged ...

  10. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with Trichoderma viride (ATCC 36316). OO Ezekiel, OC Aworh, HP Blaschek, TC Ezeji. Abstract. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peel is one of the solid wastes produced as a consequence of cassava processing. It is low in protein but contains a large ...

  11. Nitrification in a submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory-scale submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa cylindrica as support material for the immobilization of nitrifying bacteria was applied for polishing the effluent of an UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater under the tropical conditions of northeast Brazil, in the City of Campina Grande (7o 13' 11” ...

  12. Effects of submerged vegetation on water clarity across climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, S.; Lacerot, G.; Jeppesen, E.; Motta Marques, D.M.L.; Nes, van E.H.; Mazzeo, N.; Scheffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    A positive feedback between submerged vegetation and water clarity forms the backbone of the alternative state theory in shallow lakes. The water clearing effect of aquatic vegetation may be caused by different physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms and has been studied mainly in temperate

  13. The River Mondego terraces at the Figueira da Foz coastal area (western central Portugal): Geomorphological and sedimentological characterization of a terrace staircase affected by differential uplift and glacio-eustasy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Anabela M.; Cunha, Pedro P.; Cunha, Lúcio. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mondego has incised into the Pliocene relief and its long drainage evolution is recorded within a series of inset river terrace landforms. These river terraces are better preserved on the right-hand (northern) bank, where they form a staircase developed against the uplifted Serra da Boa Viagem structure...... of active faults during the Quaternary. The main tectonic structure is the WNW–ESE trending Quiaios fault, responsible for the regional tilting towards SW. Other probably active faults and tectonic lineaments trend NNW–SSE to N–S, NNE–SSW to NE–SW and WNW–ESE. This study reports a long-term uplift rate of 0......-gravels and silts, but also some colluvium at the top of each terrace. The younger terraces (T3, T4 and T5) show better developed sedimentary structures and less sedimentary matrix; the sedimentary features are indicative of both fluvial and coastal environments (estuary and beach, as nowadays). Under conditions...

  14. Evidence for gas and magmatic sources beneath the Yellowstone volcanic field from seismic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Stephan; Smith, Robert B.; Waite, Gregory P.

    2004-03-01

    The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity ( Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio ( Vp/ Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15×15 km) are reliably imaged in the northwestern part of the model outside the Yellowstone caldera; inside the caldera only Vp anomalies of large size extending over several grid nodes are reliably imaged. The Vp/ Vs solution is generally poorer due to the low number of S-P arrival times. Only the northwestern part of the model is resolved with confidence; the Vp/ Vs solution also suffers from strong vertical and horizontal velocity smearing. The tomographic images confirm the existence of a low Vp-body beneath the Yellowstone caldera at depths greater than 8 km, possibly representing hot, crystallizing magma. The most striking result of our study is a volume of anomalously low Vp and Vp/ Vs in the northwestern part of the Yellowstone volcanic field at shallow depths of <2.0 km. Theoretical calculations of changes in P- to S-wave velocity ratios indicate that these anomalies can be interpreted as porous, gas-filled rock. The close spatial correlation of the observed anomalies and the occurrence of the largest earthquake swarm in historic time in Yellowstone, 1985, suggest that the gas may have originated as part of magmatic fluids released by crystallization of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera.

  15. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  16. The Yellowstone sage belts 1958 to 2008: 50 years of change in the big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) communities of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela G. Sikkink

    2011-01-01

    In 1958, 13 belt transects were established within the ungulate winter range in the northern portion of Yellowstone National Park to study how shrub communities were affected by grazing from ungulate populations. Between 1958 and 2008, the belts have been measured and photographed by different researchers at least once per decade, which has resulted in a comprehensive...

  17. Methane dissociation on the steps and terraces of Pt(211) resolved by quantum state and impact site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Guo, Han; Gutiérrez-González, Ana; Menzel, Jan Paul; Jackson, Bret; Beck, Rainer D

    2018-01-07

    Methane dissociation on the step and terrace sites of a Pt(211) single crystal was studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) at a surface temperature of 120 K. The C-H stretch RAIRS signal of the chemisorbed methyl product species was used to distinguish between adsorption on step and terrace sites allowing methyl uptake to be monitored as a function of incident kinetic energy for both sites. Our results indicate a direct dissociation mechanism on both sites with higher reactivity on steps than on terraces consistent with a difference in an activation barrier height of at least 30 kJ/mol. State-specific preparation of incident CH4 with one quantum of antisymmetric (ν3) stretch vibration further increases the CH4 reactivity enabling comparison between translational and vibrational activation on both steps and terraces. The reaction is modeled with first principles quantum theory that accurately describes dissociative chemisorption at different sites on the surface.

  18. Terrace Farming on Agricultural Land in the Conterminous United States, 1992: National Resource Inventory Conservation Practice 600

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the estimated percentage of the 1-km grid cell that is covered by or subject to the agricultural conservation practice (CP600), Terrace...

  19. Methane dissociation on the steps and terraces of Pt(211) resolved by quantum state and impact site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Guo, Han; Gutiérrez-González, Ana; Menzel, Jan Paul; Jackson, Bret; Beck, Rainer D.

    2018-01-01

    Methane dissociation on the step and terrace sites of a Pt(211) single crystal was studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) at a surface temperature of 120 K. The C—H stretch RAIRS signal of the chemisorbed methyl product species was used to distinguish between adsorption on step and terrace sites allowing methyl uptake to be monitored as a function of incident kinetic energy for both sites. Our results indicate a direct dissociation mechanism on both sites with higher reactivity on steps than on terraces consistent with a difference in an activation barrier height of at least 30 kJ/mol. State-specific preparation of incident CH4 with one quantum of antisymmetric (ν3) stretch vibration further increases the CH4 reactivity enabling comparison between translational and vibrational activation on both steps and terraces. The reaction is modeled with first principles quantum theory that accurately describes dissociative chemisorption at different sites on the surface.

  20. CROP YIELDS ALONG THE TOPOSEQUENCE OF TERRACED ANDOSOLS IN NAROK, KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Chepkemoi Ruto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The principle objective of terracing is to reduce runoff and soil loss but it also contributes to increasing the soil moisture content through improved infiltration. A field experiment was conducted in Suswa, Narok County during the short and long rain seasons of 2013-2015 to assess the effect of terracing on crop yields. A randomized complete block design was used with maize and beans as the test crops. The study examined maize plant height, leaf area index (LAI, above ground biomass yields, number of bean pods and grain yields in the upper (U, upper middle (UM, middle (M, lower middle (LM and lower (L terrace, slope positions with farmers’ fields where terraces were not maintained were used as the control. The results showed that yields were significantly (PLM>UM>M>U, with values ranging from 7.2 t ha-1 to 3.0 t ha-1 for maize and 1374 kg ha-1 to 306 kg ha-1 for beans. Significant differences (P<0.05 were also observed  according to cropping patterns with CP2 on average recording the highest (803 kg ha-1 bean yields and CP4 (control  the lowest (576 kg ha-1 in season I. CP3 had the highest (4.97 t ha-1 maize yields compared to CP4 (3.25 t ha-1 in season II. From the results of the study, it was possible to conclude that soil conservation measures and cropping patterns implemented at Suswa increased crop yields and the technology should be promoted for improved livelihoods.

  1. River terraces and alluvial fans: The case for an integrated Quaternary fluvial archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, A. E.; Stokes, M.; Whitfield, E.

    2017-06-01

    The fluvial archive literature is dominated by research on river terraces with appropriate mention of adjacent environments such as lakes. Despite modern sedimentary basins comprising a significant (>88%) volume of distributive fluvial systems, of which alluvial fans (>1 km, dynamic role of alluvial fans within the fluvial landscape and their interaction with river systems, highlighting the potential value of alluvial fans to the wider fluvial archive community. Published literature is used to examine both thematic and geographical based benefits of alluvial fan research that can assist understanding of Quaternary fluvial archives. 3 regional case studies are presented that illustrate the interaction between alluvial fan and river terrace archives at Quaternary time-scales at 3 different stages of landscape evolution. These are i) continuous mountain front alluvial fans interacting with a non incising but laterally eroding axial fluvial system; ii) alluvial fans which transition into fluvial terraces as sedimentary basins shift from net aggradation to net incision and iii) tributary-junction alluvial fans that develop predominantly within incising river valley systems. A simple conceptual model is proposed to summarise the dynamic role of alluvial fans within this landscape context. The alluvial fans act as potential 'buffers' between hillslopes and river terrace records under 'top down' climate-driven high sediment supply and alluvial fan aggradation, and 'couplers' during periods of less sediment (in relation to water) discharge and alluvial fan incision. These dynamics will change with the addition of 'bottom up' controls such as main river incision, which will typically enhance the coupling effect of both systems.

  2. Emergence and detailed structure of terraced surfaces produced by oblique-incidence ion sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Matt P.; Pearson, Daniel A.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2017-09-01

    We study the nanoscale terraced topographies that arise when a solid surface is bombarded with a broad ion beam that has a relatively high angle of incidence θ . We find that the surface is not completely flat between the regions in which the surface slope changes rapidly with position: Instead, small-amplitude ripples propagate along the surface. Our analytical work on these ripples yields their propagation velocity as well as the scaling behavior of their amplitude. Our simulations establish that the surfaces exhibit interrupted coarsening, i.e., the characteristic width and height of the surface disturbance grow for a time but ultimately asymptote to finite values as the fully terraced state develops. In addition, as θ is reduced, the surface can undergo a transition from a terraced morphology that changes little with time as it propagates over the surface to an unterraced state that appears to exhibit spatiotemporal chaos. For different ranges of the parameters, our equation of motion produces unterraced topographies that are remarkably similar to those seen in various experiments, including pyramidal structures that are elongated along the projected beam direction and isolated lenticular depressions.

  3. Surface deformation and seismic signatures associated with the eruption cycle of Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, F. G.; Johnson, H. E., III; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Sandvol, E. A.; Nayak, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are important subjects for studying processes involved with multi-phase eruptions. As part of a larger field effort, this study applies imaging geodesy and seismology to study eruptive cycles of the Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. Lone Star Geyser is an ideal candidate for such study, as it erupts with a nearly regular period of approximately 3 hours. The geyser includes a 5 m diameter cone that rises 2 meters above the sinter terrace, and the entire system can be viewed from a nearby hillside. Fieldwork was accomplished during April 2014. Ground-based interferometric radar (GBIR) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) were used to image possible surface deformations associated with Lone Star Geyer's eruption cycles. Additional observations were provided by global positioning system (GPS) measurements and six broad-band seismometers deployed in the immediate vicinity of the geyser. The GBIR and TLS were deployed approximately 65 meters from the sinter cone of the geyser. The GBIR involves a ku-band radar (1.7 cm wavelength) that is sensitive to approximately half-millimeter changes in the line-of-sight distance. Radar images were acquired every minute for 3 or more eruptions per day. Temporally redundant, overlapping interferograms were used to improve the sensitivity and interpolate a minute-wise time series of line-of-sight displacement, and efforts were made to account for possible path-delay effects resulting from water vapor around the geyser cone. Repeat (every minute) high-speed TLS scans were acquired for multiple eruption cycles over the course of two-days. Resulting measurement point spacing on the sinter cone was ~3cm. The TLS point-clouds were geo-referenced using static surveyed reflectors and scanner positions. In addition to measuring ground deformation, filtering and classification of the TLS point cloud was used to construct a mask that allows radar interferometry to exclude non-ground areas (vegetation, snow, sensors

  4. Spatial patterns of (137)Cs inventories and soil erosion from earth-banked terraces in the Yimeng Mountains, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunqi; Long, Yi; An, Juan; Yu, Xingxiu; Wang, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    The Yimeng Mountains is one of China's most susceptible regions to soil erosion. In this region, slopes are composed of granite- or gneiss-derived soils that are commonly cultivated using earth-banked terraces. Based on the (137)Cs measurement for nine reference cores, the present study analysed the spatial patterns of (137)Cs inventory and soil erosion using 105 sampling points in a seven-level earth-banked terrace system. The mean (137)Cs inventory, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and allowable error for the nine reference cores were 987 Bq m(-2), 71 Bq m(-2), 7%, and 6%, respectively, values that may reflect the heterogeneity of the initial (137)Cs fallout deposit. Within each terrace, the (137)Cs inventory generally increases from the rear edge to the front edge, accompanied by a decrease in the erosion rate. This results from planation by tillage and rainfall runoff during the development of the earth-banked terraces. Across the entire seven-level terrace system, (137)Cs inventories decrease from the highest terrace downwards, but increase in the lower terraces, whereas erosion rate displays the opposite trend. These trends are the result of the combined effects of the earth-bank segmented hillslope, the limited protection of the earth banks, and rainfall runoff in combination with tillage. The high coefficients of variation of (137)Cs inventories for the 21 sampling rows, with a mean value of 44%, demonstrate the combined effects of variations in original microtopography, anthropogenic disturbance, the incohesive soils weathered from underlying granite, and the warm climate. Although earth-banked terraces can reduce soil erosion to some extent, the estimated erosion rates for the study area are still very high. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extraction of Terraces on the Loess Plateau from High-Resolution DEMs and Imagery Utilizing Object-Based Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanqing Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Terraces are typical artificial landforms on the Loess Plateau, with ecological functions in water and soil conservation, agricultural production, and biodiversity. Recording the spatial distribution of terraces is the basis of monitoring their extent and understanding their ecological effects. The current terrace extraction method mainly relies on high-resolution imagery, but its accuracy is limited due to vegetation coverage distorting the features of terraces in imagery. High-resolution topographic data reflecting the morphology of true terrace surfaces are needed. Terraces extraction on the Loess Plateau is challenging because of the complex terrain and diverse vegetation after the implementation of “vegetation recovery”. This study presents an automatic method of extracting terraces based on 1 m resolution digital elevation models (DEMs and 0.3 m resolution Worldview-3 imagery as auxiliary information used for object-based image analysis (OBIA. A multi-resolution segmentation method was used where slope, positive and negative terrain index (PN, accumulative curvature slope (AC, and slope of slope (SOS were determined as input layers for image segmentation by correlation analysis and Sheffield entropy method. The main classification features based on DEMs were chosen from the terrain features derived from terrain factors and texture features by gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM analysis; subsequently, these features were determined by the importance analysis on classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Extraction rules based on DEMs were generated from the classification features with a total classification accuracy of 89.96%. The red band and near-infrared band of images were used to exclude construction land, which is easily confused with small-size terraces. As a result, the total classification accuracy was increased to 94%. The proposed method ensures comprehensive consideration of terrain, texture, shape, and

  6. Transmission of brucellosis from elk to cattle and bison, Greater Yellowstone area, U.S.A., 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyan, Jack C; Nol, Pauline; Quance, Christine; Gertonson, Arnold; Belfrage, John; Harris, Lauren; Straka, Kelly; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee

    2013-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis has been nearly eliminated from livestock in the United States. Bison and elk in the Greater Yellowstone Area remain reservoirs for the disease. During 1990-2002, no known cases occurred in Greater Yellowstone Area livestock. Since then, 17 transmission events from wildlife to livestock have been investigated.

  7. High-resolution aeromagnetic mapping of volcanic terrain, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Morgan, Lisa A.

    2002-06-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over Yellowstone National Park (YNP) show contrasting patterns reflecting differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene, Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, a series of mostly altered, andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks partially exposed in mountains on the eastern margin of YNP, produces high-amplitude, positive magnetic anomalies, strongly contrasting with the less magnetic, younger, latest Cenozoic, Yellowstone Plateau Group, primarily a series of fresh and variably altered rhyolitic rocks covering most of YNP. The Yellowstone caldera is the centerpiece of the Yellowstone Plateau; part of its boundary can be identified on the aeromagnetic map as a series of discontinuous, negative magnetic anomalies that reflect faults or zones along which extensive hydrothermal alteration is localized. The large-volume rhyolitic ignimbrite deposits of the 0.63-Ma Lava Creek Tuff and the 2.1-Ma Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, which are prominent lithologies peripheral to the Yellowstone caldera, produce insignificant magnetic signatures. A zone of moderate amplitude positive anomalies coincides with the mapped extent of several post-caldera rhyolitic lavas. Linear magnetic anomalies reflect the rectilinear fault systems characteristic of resurgent domes in the center of the caldera. Peripheral to the caldera, the high-resolution aeromagnetic map clearly delineates flow unit boundaries of pre- and post-caldera basalt flows, which occur stratigraphically below the post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and are not exposed extensively at the surface. All of the hot spring and geyser basins, such as Norris, Upper and Lower Geyser Basins, West Thumb, and Gibbon, are associated with negative magnetic anomalies, reflecting hydrothermal alteration that has destroyed the magnetic susceptibility of minerals in the volcanic rocks. Within

  8. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents1. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot2. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  9. Testing Magnetotelluric Constraints on the Physical State of the Yellowstone Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. S.; Egbert, G. D.; Humphreys, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent inversions of long-period magnetotelluric (MT) datasets (Kelbert et al., 2012; Meqbel et al., 2014) have suggested that the mantle lithosphere directly beneath the modern Yellowstone caldera is electrically resistive. This observation implies that the uppermost mantle does not contain significant quantities of melt and therefore seems to contradict seismic tomography studies that find a major low-velocity plume-like feature directly beneath Yellowstone. Our ongoing investigation of the long-period Earthscope MT data suggests that these data are relatively insensitive to the conductivity structure in the upper mantle due to screening of deeper features by the modern electrically conductive magma chamber(s). Hence, at present we cannot conclude that the uppermost mantle directly beneath Yellowstone is electrically resistive. However, we do resolve a major electrically conductive anomaly that dips generally to the west at approximately 30 degrees from the vicinity of the seismically imaged magma reservoir(s) beneath the Yellowstone. The MT data therefore may indicate that the flow of melt is at least partially influenced by structures to the west of the modern caldera, specifically ancient (Paleoproterozoic) structures at the edge of the Wyoming Craton. While the geochemistry of Yellowstone eruptive products remains ambiguous with regards to source, radiogenic isotope model ages could be interpreted as supporting this possibility.

  10. On the origin of brucellosis in bison of Yellowstone National Park: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Mary; Meyer, Margaret E.

    1994-01-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus occurs in the free-ranging bison (Bison bison) of Yellowstone and Wood Buffalo National Parks and in elk (Cervus elaphus) of the Greater Yellowstone Area. As a result of nationwide bovine brucellosis eradication programs, states and provinces proximate to the national parks are considered free of bovine brucellosis. Thus, increased attention has been focused on the wildlife within these areas as potential reservoirs for transmission to cattle. Because the national parks are mandated as natural areas, the question has been raised as to whether Brucella abortus is endogenous or exogenous to bison, particularly for Yellowstone National Park. We synthesized diverse lines of inquiry, including the evolutionary history of both bison and Brucella, wild animals as Brucella hosts, biochemical and genetic information, behavioral characteristics of host and organism, and area history to develop an evaluation of the question for the National Park Service. All lines of inquiry indicated that the organism was introduced to North America with cattle, and that the introduction into the Yellowstone bison probably was directly from cattle shortly before 1917. Fistulous withers of horses was a less likely possibility. Elk on winter feedgrounds south of Yellowstone National Park apparently acquired the disease directly from cattle. Bison presently using Grand Teton National Park probably acquired brucellosis from feedground elk.

  11. Prodigious degassing of a billion years of accumulated radiogenic helium at Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J B; Evans, W C; Bergfeld, D; Hunt, A G

    2014-02-20

    Helium is used as a critical tracer throughout the Earth sciences, where its relatively simple isotopic systematics is used to trace degassing from the mantle, to date groundwater and to time the rise of continents. The hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park is famous for its high helium-3/helium-4 isotope ratio, commonly cited as evidence for a deep mantle source for the Yellowstone hotspot. However, much of the helium emitted from this region is actually radiogenic helium-4 produced within the crust by α-decay of uranium and thorium. Here we show, by combining gas emission rates with chemistry and isotopic analyses, that crustal helium-4 emission rates from Yellowstone exceed (by orders of magnitude) any conceivable rate of generation within the crust. It seems that helium has accumulated for (at least) many hundreds of millions of years in Archaean (more than 2.5 billion years old) cratonic rocks beneath Yellowstone, only to be liberated over the past two million years by intense crustal metamorphism induced by the Yellowstone hotspot. Our results demonstrate the extremes in variability of crustal helium efflux on geologic timescales and imply crustal-scale open-system behaviour of helium in tectonically and magmatically active regions.

  12. Environmental factors influencing the distribution of agricultural terraces: Case study of Horný Tisovník, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slámová Martina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cadastral district of Horný Tisovník represents a traditionally managed Carpathian mountain agricultural landscape with extensive terraces. It was historically governed by two counties with different feudal economic systems - agricultural and industrial. This paper aims to enrich traditional methods in environmental history. We applied geospatial statistics and multivariate data analysis for the assessment of environmental factors influencing the distribution of agricultural terraces. Using linear models, the hypothesis was tested that the terrace distribution is functionally related to selected factors (affiliation to the historic counties; average altitude and slope; distance from water, buildings and settlements; units of natural potential vegetation; and current land use. Significantly greater amounts of terraces were located in the agricultural county compared to the industrial county. A principal component analysis showed the coincidence between the current agricultural land use and higher concentrations of terraces occurring in lower altitudes, closer to settlements and buildings, and within the unit of Carpathian oak-hornbeam forests. These findings regarding the most significant factors influencing the distribution of terraces are used in proposals for incentives to improve the management of the traditional agricultural landscape.

  13. Role of atomic terraces and steps in the electron transport properties of epitaxial graphene grown on SiC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kuramochi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal decomposition of vicinal SiC substrates with self-organized periodic nanofacets is a promising method to produce large graphene sheets toward the commercial exploitation of graphene's superior electronic properties. The epitaxial graphene films grown on vicinal SiC comprise two distinct regions of terrace and step; and typically exhibit anisotropic electron transport behavior, although limited areas in the graphene film showed ballistic transport. To evaluate the role of terraces and steps in electron transport properties, we compared graphene samples with terrace and step regions grown on 4H-SiC(0001. Arrays of field effect transistors were fabricated on comparable graphene samples with their channels parallel or perpendicular to the nanofacets to identify the source of measured reduced mobility. Minimum conductivity and electron mobility increased with the larger proportional terrace region area; therefore, the terrace region has superior transport properties to step regions. The measured electron mobility in the terrace region, ∼1000 cm2/Vs, is 10 times larger than that in the step region, ∼100 cm2/Vs. We conclusively determine that parasitic effects originate in regions of graphene that grow over step edges in 4H-SiC(0001.

  14. The evolution of crop cultivation and paleoenvironment in the Longji Terraces, southern China: Organic geochemical evidence from paleosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongjian; Li, Shijie; Chen, Wei; Cai, Desuo; Liu, Yan

    2017-11-01

    The Longji ancient agricultural terraces in the Longji Mountain area (Guilin, southern China), which still remain in use, are famous for their magnificent terraced landscape with a mix of ecosystem and human inhabitation. Previous research has revealed the genesis and preliminary paleoenvironmental record of the agricultural terraces, but little is known about variations in crop cultivation over time. In this study, organic geochemical analyses and radiocarbon dating of an aggradational cultivated soil from a terrace profile were used to explore crop type variation and relevant paleoenvironmental change during the period of cultivation on the Longji Terraces. Hydroponic farming with rice (C 3 ) planting has been the dominant cultivation mode since the initial construction of the terraces. Warm-dry climate contributed to the growth of drought-tolerant crop (C 4 ) cultivation in the late 15th century. Temperature deterioration during the Little Ice Age had a negative impact on dry and hydroponic farming activities from the late 15th century to the late 19th century, while climate warming after the Little Ice Age promoted the redevelopment of hydroponic farming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applying the seedling-emergence method under waterlogged conditions to detect the seed bank of aquatic plants in submerged sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; ter Heerdt, GNJ; Bakker, JP

    Seed bank studies focused on submerged aquatic plants are generally performed under submerged conditions, using the seedling-emergence method. However, if a study targets at both submerged species and helophytes, submerged conditions are generally not suitable. We tested the emergence of seedlings

  16. Quantifying ages of river terraces and basin wide denudation rates in Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaymonova, Vasila A.; Fuchs, Margret C.; Gloaguen, Richard; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The Pamir is located at the western edge of the Indian indenter and results from the India-Asia collision. The Pamir also lies at the transition between zones dominated either by the Westerlies or the Indian Summer Monsoon. The ongoing tectonic deformation together with the climatic gradients from the two prevailing atmospheric circulation systems provide a natural laboratory to study surface processes and their rates. To determine and quantify the interaction between tectonics and the drainage system in the Tajik Pamir we use cosmogenic nuclide based techniques. We measured 10Be and 26Al concentrations of modern fluvial sediments sampled from drainage system of Pamirs. Depth profiles enable to determine exposure ages of fluvial terraces, while the modern river sediments reveal basin-wide erosion rates. However, accurate measurement results depend on the quality of the sample preparation. The samples from Pamir contain a high amount of various feldspars that are very difficult to separate from quartz using standard procedures such as magnetic or density separation. Unclean samples cause uncertainties in chemical procedures, especially in the case of combined 10Be and 26Al analysis. We developed a feldspar flotation in addition to our sample preparation procedure that allowed an almost complete separation of the quartz, up to 95%. Several depth profiles were analyzed to determine the exposure age of fluvial terraces. The first results of one terrace along the southern Panj River east of Langar, and one along the Shakhdara River are promising. The AMS results demonstrated that the depth profiles are consistent, with 10Be and 26Al concentrations decreasing with depth. The results of both fluvial terraces show similar denudation rates 0.5mm/yr., while exposure age analysis yields 3.5 ka for the Langar and 19 ka Shakhdara terrace. Further analyses are ongoing. These ages are validated by OSL dates at or nearby the same sites. 10Be denudation rates on modern river

  17. Taxonomic and environmental soil diversity of marine terraces of Gronfjord (West Spitsbergen island)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Ivan; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2017-04-01

    Soil surveys in polar region are faced to problems of soil diagnostics, evolution, geography and pedogenesis with the aim to assess the actual state and future dynamics of soil cover under changing environmental conditions. This investigation is devoted to specification of taxonomic and environmental soil diversity of marine terraces of Gronfjord (Svalbard archipelago, West Spitsbergen Island). It was established 3 key plots (Grendasselva, Aldegonda rivers and marine terrace in surroundings of Barentsburg aerodrome). Soil diagnostics was carried out according to Russian soil classification system and WRB. Grendasselva river valley is characterized by numerous patterned ground elements combined with lichen-moss and moss-lichen patches with sporadic inclusions of higher plants (mostly Lusula pilosa). Soil cover is represented by Typic Cryosols on elevated sites and Histic Gleysols, Turbic Gleysols and Histosols on well-drained boggy sites. Aldegonda river valley characterizes by predominance of entic soils (soil with non-pronounced profile differentiation) on moraine material (mostly Cryic Leptosols). Vegetation is presented by sporadic plant communities comprised by Lusula pilosa and thin lichen-moss ground layer (developed only in well-moistened micro depression). Marine terrace in surroundings of Barentsburg aerodrome is covered by moss-lichen tundra with sporadic inclusions of Lusula pilosa. On the top of the terrace compressed barren circles are quite abundant. Soil catena has been established within this key plot. Soil types are represented by Typic Cryosols in watershed parts of catena, Gleysols and Histic Gleysols in accumulation positions. The active layer depths have been distinguished using vertical electrical sounding. They ranged from 80-90 cm at Grendasselva and Aldegonda river key plot to 140-150 cm at marine terrace in surroundings of Barentsburg aerodrome. Regional differences in this indicator may be explained not only by local differences in

  18. Mapping of buried river terraces on the Kopite Hill, Gerecse Mts., Northern Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Dániel; Szőts, Gergely K.; Ruszák, Zsófia; Bereczki, László; Molnár, Gábor; Timár, Gábor; Fodor, László; Csillag, Gábor; Lantos, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    The Gerecse Mountains is a part of the Transdanubian Mountain Range. The Kopite Hill located on the northern part of the Gerecse Mountains, on the southern side of the Danube and the Hungarian-Slovakian border. At the southern side of the Danube (100 m a.s.l.) a 290 m high hill of Pannonian (Miocene) marine clay, silt and sand can be found. These Pannonian strata are covered with Pliocene-Pleistocene alluvial sediments, loess and travertine. On the Kopite Hill some small outcrops of gravel can be found, which thought to be one of the highest river terrace levels, but it is not proved. To the northwest there is 270-300 m high plateau of the 'Roman-quarry' with a formerly mined travertine-body. According to a recent discovery a Mammoth-tooth and other fossils of mammals were found there, which were dated and correlated. Because the travertine body is at lower height than the assumed terrace level, a maximum rate of uplift can be given. The aim of our fieldwork was to determine the geometry of gravel strata and the connections between the distinct outcrops and the travertine body. We used multielectrode measurements with supplementary VES measurements. We found that on the north side of Kopite Hill and to south from the Roman-quarry there is an almost horizontal 300*100 m large, 8-13 m thick pebble stratum. Direct connection to the travertine body is not possible, because there is a few tens of meters gap between the two bodies, filled with loess. We assume the gravel stratum with its 258-252 m height (gently dips to the south) is a river terrace. On the southest point of this river terrace the thickness of the gravel suddenly increases to 22 meters. To the south there are also some gravel outcrops, and also a drill which suggest that the bottom of these gravels are higher on higher level, about at 265 m a.s.l.. We interpret this phenomenon as a higher terrace level. With the use of geoelectrical methods we could determine the geometry of gravel stratum on the Kopite

  19. The role of a mantle plume in the formation of Yellowstone volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Tiffany; Liu, Lijun

    2016-02-01

    The origin of the Yellowstone volcanic province remains debated. Proposed hypotheses involve either a mantle plume or not. Recent tomographic images allow a quantitative evaluation of the plume hypothesis and its interaction with the Farallon slabs. Using 4-D geodynamic models with data assimilation, we find that the slab is always in the way of the initially rising plume and that the plume could reach the surface only through the broken slab hinge at ~15 Ma. For most of the time, the sinking slabs dominate the mantle flow and prohibit upwelling. We find that a plume that satisfies the present mantle image beneath Yellowstone fails to predict both voluminous hot materials at shallow depths beneath the western U.S. and the age migration of the hot spot tracks. We suggest that a plume is likely to have much less influence on the Yellowstone volcanism than previously thought.

  20. Source and fate of inorganic solutes in the Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA: I. Low-flow discharge and major solute chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Susong, David D.; Ball, James W.; Holloway, JoAnn M.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is an important natural resource and habitat for fisheries and wildlife. However, the Gibbon River differs from most other mountain rivers because its chemistry is affected by several geothermal sources including Norris Geyser Basin, Chocolate Pots, Gibbon Geyser Basin, Beryl Spring, and Terrace Spring. Norris Geyser Basin is one of the most dynamic geothermal areas in YNP, and the water discharging from Norris is much more acidic (pH 3) than other geothermal basins in the upper-Madison drainage (Gibbon and Firehole Rivers). Water samples and discharge data were obtained from the Gibbon River and its major tributaries near Norris Geyser Basin under the low-flow conditions of September 2006. Surface inflows from Norris Geyser Basin were sampled to identify point sources and to quantify solute loading to the Gibbon River. The source and fate of the major solutes (Ca, Mg, Na, K, SiO2, Cl, F, HCO3, SO4, NO3, and NH4) in the Gibbon River were determined in this study and these results may provide an important link in understanding the health of the ecosystem and the behavior of many trace solutes. Norris Geyser Basin is the primary source of Na, K, Cl, SO4, and N loads (35–58%) in the Gibbon River. The largest source of HCO3 and F is in the lower Gibbon River reach. Most of the Ca and Mg originate in the Gibbon River upstream from Norris Geyser Basin. All the major solutes behave conservatively except for NH4, which decreased substantially downstream from Gibbon Geyser Basin, and SiO2, small amounts of which precipitated on mixing of thermal drainage with the river. As much as 9–14% of the river discharge at the gage is from thermal flows during this period.

  1. Methods for geothermal reservoir detection emphasizing submerged environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C.W.; Wilde, P.

    1976-05-21

    This report has been prepared for the California State Lands Commission to aid them in evaluating exploration programs for geothermal reservoirs, particularly in submerged land environments. Three charts show: (1) a logical progression of specific geologic, geochemical, and geophysical exploration techniques for detecting geothermal reservoirs in various geologic environments with emphasis on submerged lands, (2) various exploration techniques which can be used to develop specific information in geothermal areas, and (3) if various techniques will apply to geothermal exploration according to a detailed geologic classification. A narrative in semi-outline form supplements these charts, providing for each technique; a brief description, advantages, disadvantages, special geologic considerations, and specific references. The specific geologic situation will control the exploration criterion to be used for reservoir detection. General guidelines are established which may be of use in evaluating such a program, but the optimum approach will vary with each situation.

  2. Consumption of pondweed rhizomes by Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, D.J.; Podruzny, S.R.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Pondweeds (Potamogeton spp.) are common foods of waterfowl throughout the Northern Hemisphere. However, consumption of pondweeds by bears has been noted only once, in Russia. We documented consumption of pondweed rhizomes by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Yellowstone region, 1977-96, during investigations of telemetry locations obtained from 175 radiomarked bears. We documented pondweed excavations at 25 sites and detected pondweed rhizomes in 18 feces. We observed grizzly bears excavating and consuming pondweed on 2 occasions. All excavations occurred in wetlands that were inundated during and after snowmelt, but dry by late August or early September of most years. These wetlands were typified by the presence of inflated sedge (Carex vesicaria) and occurred almost exclusively on plateaus of Pliocene-Pleistocene detrital sediments or volcanic rhyolite flows. Bears excavated wetlands with pondweeds when they were free of standing water, most commonly during October and occasionally during spring prior to the onset of terminal snowmelt. Most excavations were about 4.5 cm deep, 40 cubic decimeter (dm3) in total volume, and targeted the thickened pondweed rhizomes. Starch content of rhizomes collected near grizzly bear excavations averaged 28% (12% SD; n = 6). These results add to the documented diversity of grizzly bear food habits and, because pondweed is distributed circumboreally, also raise the possibility that consumption of pondweed by grizzly bears has been overlooked in other regions.

  3. Water discharge from Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone NP, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Hurwitz, S.

    2014-12-01

    During four days in April, 2014 we made a series of measurements at Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, WY. This work included the continuous measurement of liquid water discharge from the geyser and some nearby not springs, and concurrent meteorological measurements. The discharge of the geyser and the hot springs was measured in channels that carry the water to the Firehole River. We found that average measured discharge varies from day to night, likely due to melting of geyser-generated and meteoric snow during warmer daylight hours and freezing of erupted liquid and vapor during the night. The nearby hot springs contribute a nearly constant flow of about 3 l/s to the Firehole River, while during eruptions the total discharge increases to a maximum of about 25 l/s. Two small geysers within 5 meters of the Lone Star Geyser cone were observed to erupt during a time when Lone Star Geyser was not erupting. The water discharged from these small geysers is a very small fraction of that from Lone Star Geyser.

  4. The Shifting Climate Portfolio of the Greater Yellowstone Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam J; Tercek, Michael T; Al-Chokhachy, Robert; Ray, Andrew M; Thoma, David P; Hossack, Blake R; Pederson, Gregory T; Rodman, Ann W; Olliff, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of climatic variability at small spatial extents (Yellowstone Area (GYA) of the interior western United States. This important biological reserve is the largest protected area in the Lower 48 states and provides critical habitat for some of the world's most iconic wildlife. We focused our analyses on temporal shifts and shape changes in the annual distributions of seasonal minimum and maximum air temperatures among valley-bottom and higher elevation sites from 1948-2012. We documented consistent patterns of warming since 1948 at all 50 sites, with the most pronounced changes occurring during the Winter and Summer when minimum and maximum temperature distributions increased. These shifts indicate more hot temperatures and less cold temperatures would be expected across the GYA. Though the shifting statistical distributions indicate warming, little change in the shape of the temperature distributions across sites since 1948 suggest the GYA has maintained a diverse portfolio of temperatures within a year. Spatial heterogeneity in temperatures is likely maintained by the GYA's physiographic complexity and its large size, which encompasses multiple climate zones that respond differently to synoptic drivers. Having a diverse portfolio of temperatures may help biological reserves spread the extinction risk posed by climate change.

  5. The Shifting Climate Portfolio of the Greater Yellowstone Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Sepulveda

    Full Text Available Knowledge of climatic variability at small spatial extents (< 50 km is needed to assess vulnerabilities of biological reserves to climate change. We used empirical and modeled weather station data to test if climate change has increased the synchrony of surface air temperatures among 50 sites within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA of the interior western United States. This important biological reserve is the largest protected area in the Lower 48 states and provides critical habitat for some of the world's most iconic wildlife. We focused our analyses on temporal shifts and shape changes in the annual distributions of seasonal minimum and maximum air temperatures among valley-bottom and higher elevation sites from 1948-2012. We documented consistent patterns of warming since 1948 at all 50 sites, with the most pronounced changes occurring during the Winter and Summer when minimum and maximum temperature distributions increased. These shifts indicate more hot temperatures and less cold temperatures would be expected across the GYA. Though the shifting statistical distributions indicate warming, little change in the shape of the temperature distributions across sites since 1948 suggest the GYA has maintained a diverse portfolio of temperatures within a year. Spatial heterogeneity in temperatures is likely maintained by the GYA's physiographic complexity and its large size, which encompasses multiple climate zones that respond differently to synoptic drivers. Having a diverse portfolio of temperatures may help biological reserves spread the extinction risk posed by climate change.

  6. Colors of thermal pools at Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Paul W; Shaw, Joseph A; Vollmer, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The brilliant visible colors of various hot springs and pools in Yellowstone National Park are explained with a combination of scattering from the water and from microbial mats that coat the bottoms of these thermal features. A simple 1D radiative transfer model was used to simulate the colors recorded in visible photographs and the spectrum of light making up these colors. The model includes attenuation in water by absorption and molecular scattering as well as reflection characteristics of the microbial mats and surface reflection of the water. Pool geometries are simulated as simple rough cones scaled to have depths and widths that match published data. Thermal images are also used to record the spatial distribution of water skin temperature. The measurements and simulations confirm that colors observed from shallow-water features arise primarily from the spectral properties of the microbial mat, which is related to the water temperature, while colors observed from deeper water arise primarily from the wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering in the water.

  7. Antitumor activity of submerged biomass of Hericium erinaceus

    OpenAIRE

    Avtonomova, A.; Bakanov, A.; Vinokurov, V.; Bukhman, V.; Krasnopolskaya, L.

    2011-01-01

    Submerged cultivation of Hericium erinaceus in various media has been studied. The yield of biomass was shown to depend mainly on the carbon source, whereas the content of watersoluble polysaccharides depended primarily on the nitrogen source. Using optimal medium composition, the biomass yield of 22-23 g/l in 7 days was achieved. The antitumor activity was studied in vivo with using 2 tumor strains. The inhibition ratio of tumor in these experience reached 86%. An exposure of mice with tumor...

  8. Submerged beachrock preservation in the context of wave ravinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Lauren; Green, Andrew N.; Andrew Cooper, J.

    2018-02-01

    This study examines a Holocene-aged submerged shoreline, Limestone Reef, located in the shallow subtidal zone of South Africa's east coast. It comprises an elongate, coast-oblique, slab-like outcrop of beachrock situated above the contemporary fair-weather wave base. It is currently undergoing mechanical disintegration. Its unique and rare preservation in a high-energy setting affords an opportunity to examine the mechanical processes occurring during wave ravinement associated with rising sea level. The submerged shoreline and the adjacent shoreface were examined using high-resolution seismic reflection, side-scan sonar and shallow-water multibeam echosounding techniques. Limestone Reef rests on top of unconsolidated Holocene deposits. The structure's surface is characterised by reef-perpendicular gullies with rubble derived from the slab fringing its seaward edge. Limestone Reef slopes gently seawards and has a steep landward-facing edge where gullies are most prominently developed. Teardrop-shaped rippled scour depressions, marked by high backscatter, are located seawards of the submerged shoreline. These elongate in a seaward direction and are filled with bioclastic gravels and residual rubble from Limestone Reef. The gullies in the upstanding structure are indicative of wave plucking and abrasion of the shoreline. The material exposed by the rippled scour depressions is identical to that comprising the postglacial ravinement surface identified in the offshore stratigraphy. These deposits are considered to represent the contemporary, actively forming wave ravinement surface. The results suggest that wave ravinement of submerged shorelines is a discontinuous process dominated by the seaward entrainment of material from its landward edge controlled by high-energy drawback during storm surges. The ravinement process appears to operate at the seasonal scale and averages out over the long-term millennial scale for the continuous surface.

  9. Submerged Pagodas of Mahabalipuram - Study based on underwater investigations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Rao, K.M.

    - gested that this place could have served as an ancient port (Dayalan, 1992). Mahabalipuram was well known to earlier mariners as 'Seven Pagodas' since the 1 7h century AD. it is generally believed that out of 7 temples originally con- structed, all... based on the local traditions and available literature. The local tradition and the people of Mahabalipuram believe that five temples similar to the Shore Temple have been submerged in the sea. On the basis of local traditions Ancient Tamil...

  10. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; Ferrer, J.

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON® , Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the follo...

  11. Mantle-Crust Volcanics and Geodynamics of the Yellowstone Hotspot from Seismic and GPS Imaging and Earthquake Swarm Magmatic Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. B.; Farrell, J.; Puskas, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Yellowstone hotspot is the product of plume-plate interaction that has produced a large and active silicic volcanic field within the N. American Plate. Our newest research on Yellowstone includes: 1) A recent discovery by seismic imaging that the Yellowstone volcanic system extends as a connected magmatic system from at least 1000 km deep in the mantle with melt ascending upward in a WNW tilted plume to a newly discovered lower-crustal magma body at 20-45 km depth and 4x larger than the shallow crustal reservoir 5-15 km deep. Moreover the shallow 70 km NE-SW crustal magma body unexpectedly extends 15 km NE well beyond Yellowstone's volcanic field a distance that N. American Plate would advance in 640,000 years, i.e., the time of the last Yellowstone super eruption and hence reflecting plate motion over the Yellowstone mantle plume; 2) Yellowstone's giant mantle-crust connected magma system represents ~48,000 km3 with ~1800 km3 of melt that fuels Yellowstone's extraordinarily high heat flux of up to ~ 3 Watts/meter2 that in turn drives Yellowstone's world renown hydrothermal system; and 3) How migration of magma vertically into and laterally out of the crustal magma reservoir, measured by GPS and earthquake correlation, reveals the mechanics of Yellowstone's "natural volcano pressure relief valve" that retards volcanic eruptions for thousands of years, but that occasionally breach the brittle-ductile transition in volcanic eruptions. We will also discuss the most recent and largest earthquake in Yellowstone in over 30 years, a magnitude 4.8 event, on March 30, 2014 near Norris Geyser Basin. This earthquake was part of a larger sequence of swarm activity in the Norris area that began in September 2013 and continued into June 2014. GPS derived deformation at Norris revealed unusually high uplift rates at ~15 cm/yr. attaining 60 mm of uplift at the time of the MW4.8 event and that dramatically reversed to subsidence at rates of ~17 cm/yr. Notably, however the much

  12. Detection of the submerged topography along the Egyptian Red Sea Coast using bathymetry and GIS-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moawad Badawy Moawad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A long time ago the Red Sea was only known by small-scale bathymetric, magnetic anomaly maps and a few seismic reflection or refraction profiles. Therefore, detection of the major submerged coastal features was unattainable. This study is based on the integration of different data sets of topography and bathymetry (e.g. the global bathymetry data set, the SRTM DTED® 2, the soviet military topographic maps of scale 1:200.000 and the US army topographic maps of scale 1:250.000 to reveal the main submarine landforms that marked the continental shelf and its related slopes along the Egyptian Red Sea Coast from latitude 27°43′N to the Egyptian-Sudanese border at latitude 22°00′N. The study deduced that the continental shelf is noticeably influenced by the surface fault system extending eastward into the main Red Sea depression, showing the continental edge mostly like a fault-scarp of ∼60° anticlockwise fault plane. Sea ridges and subbasins were distinguished at the lower toe of the continental slope, which seem to be a result of a regional fold system. Two sea peaks of extinct volcanoes were recognized. Two types of submarine canyons were recognized as deep incised Messinian canyons and shallow canyons. The deep incised canyons (∼500 m bsl carve the continental edge with remarkable steep walls. They might be formed as a result of the Messinian event (∼5.59 Ma. The shallow canyons are mostly developed during the Pleistocene lower sea level (∼90–130 m bsl where the major wadis cut their water courses through the continental shelf. Some individual submerged deltas were identified, showing a close relationship with the present-day drainage system, although they were supposed to be produced by an ancestor drainage system. Notable submarine terraces were recognized at depths 20–25, 50–75, and 100–120 m bsl that are in agreement with the generalized global curve of sea-level rise since the LGM (∼23–18 ka bp. It is

  13. On the submerging of a spherical intruder into granular beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan-Yu; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Lan

    2017-06-01

    Granular materials are complex systems and their mechanical behaviours are determined by the material properties of individual particles, the interaction between particles and the surrounding media, which are still incompletely understood. Using an advanced discrete element method (DEM), we simulate the submerging process of a spherical projectile (an intruder) into granular materials of various properties with a zero penetration velocity (i.e. the intruder is touching the top surface of the granular bed and released from stationary) and examine its settling behaviour. By systematically changing the density and size of the intruder and the particle density (i.e. the density of the particles in the granular bed), we find that the intruder can sink deep into the granular bed even with a zero penetration velocity. Furthermore, we confirm that under certain conditions the granular bed can behave like a Newtonian liquid and the submerging intruder can reach a constant velocity, i.e. the terminal velocity, identical to the settling of a sphere in a liquid, as observed experimentally. A mathematical model is also developed to predict the maximum penetration depth of the intruder. The model predictions are compared with experimental data reported in the literature,good agreement was obtained, demonstrating the model can accurately predict the submerging behaviour of the intruder in the granular media.

  14. Research efforts for detection and recovery of submerged oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K. [United States Coast Guard, Groton, CT (United States). Research and Development Center

    2009-07-01

    Submerged oil can sink and destroy shellfish and other marine populations in addition to causing closure of water intakes at industrial facilities and power plants. However, current methods to find and recover oil from spills involving submerged oil are inadequate. The underwater environment presents major challenges such as poor visibility, difficulty in tracking oil spill movement, colder temperatures, inadequate containment methods and problems with the equipment's interaction with water. This paper reported on a multi-year project launched by the Research and Development Center of the United States Coast Guard to develop a complete approach for spills of submerged oil. The project involved detection technologies and recovery methods for oil on the bottom of any body of water. Proof of concept (POC) and prototype tests of potential detection technologies were evaluated during tests at the Ohmsett facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. The technologies included sonar, laser fluorometry, real-time mass spectrometry and in-situ fluorometry. This paper described the development of a complete specification for an integrated recovery system along with a plan for future development. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Measurement of Submerged Oil/Gas Leaks using ROV Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin; de Vera, Giorgio; Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Ömer

    2013-11-01

    Drilling for oil or gas in the Gulf of Mexico is increasing rapidly at depths up to three miles. The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak concluded that inaccurate estimates of the leak rate from the Deepwater Horizon caused an inadequate response and attempts to cap the leak to fail. The first response to a submerged oil/gas leak will be to send a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) down to view the leak. During the response to the Deepwater Horizon crisis, the authors Savas and Shaffer were members of the Flow Rate Technical Group's Plume Team who used ROV video to develop the FRTG's first official estimates of the oil leak rate. Savas and Shaffer developed an approach using the larger, faster jet features (e.g., turbulent eddies, vortices, entrained particles) in the near-field developing zone to measure discharge rates. The authors have since used the Berkeley Tow Tank to test this approach on submerged dye-colored water jets and compressed air jets. Image Correlation Velocimetry has been applied to measure the velocity of visible features. Results from tests in the Berkeley Tow Tank and submerged oil jets in the OHMSETT facility will be presented.

  16. Production of Alpha Amylase by Bacillus cereus in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H. Raplong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have the ability to secrete enzymes when they are grown in the presence of certain substrates. Amylases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in biotechnological studies. Bacteria belonging to the genus Bacillus were isolated using mannitol egg yolk polymyxin B (MYP agar a highly selective media for Bacillus cereus isolation. The isolates were tested for α-amylase production on nutrient agar supplemented with starch and in submerged fermentation. The bacteria isolated and identified (using the Microgen Bacillus identification kit were all Bacillus cereus and SB2 had the largest zone of hydrolysis of 12mm on nutrient agar supplemented with starch as well as the highest enzyme activity of 1.62U/ml. Amylase activity of 2.56U/ml was obtained after 24 hours incubation in submerged fermentation. When amylase enzyme production parameters where optimized, maximum amylase activity was obtained at a pH of 6.5, temperature of 350C, incubation time of 24 hours and 4% inoculums concentration. Bacillus cereus SB2 is a potential isolate for alpha-amylase production with soluble starch as the sole carbon source in submerged fermentation.

  17. On the submerging of a spherical intruder into granular beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chuan-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular materials are complex systems and their mechanical behaviours are determined by the material properties of individual particles, the interaction between particles and the surrounding media, which are still incompletely understood. Using an advanced discrete element method (DEM, we simulate the submerging process of a spherical projectile (an intruder into granular materials of various properties with a zero penetration velocity (i.e. the intruder is touching the top surface of the granular bed and released from stationary and examine its settling behaviour. By systematically changing the density and size of the intruder and the particle density (i.e. the density of the particles in the granular bed, we find that the intruder can sink deep into the granular bed even with a zero penetration velocity. Furthermore, we confirm that under certain conditions the granular bed can behave like a Newtonian liquid and the submerging intruder can reach a constant velocity, i.e. the terminal velocity, identical to the settling of a sphere in a liquid, as observed experimentally. A mathematical model is also developed to predict the maximum penetration depth of the intruder. The model predictions are compared with experimental data reported in the literature,good agreement was obtained, demonstrating the model can accurately predict the submerging behaviour of the intruder in the granular media.

  18. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-03-25

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention.

  19. Landsat 7 - First Cloud-free Image of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Yellowstone Lake, in the center of Yellowstone National Park, was taken by Landsat 7 on July 13, 1999. Bands 5 (1.65um),4 (.825um), and 2 (.565um) were used for red, green, and blue, respectively. Water appears blue/black, snow light blue, mature forest red/green, young forest pink, and grass and fields appear light green. Southwest of the lake is young forest that is growing in the wake of the widespread fires of 1988. For more information, see: Landsat 7 Fact Sheet Landsat 7 in Mission Control Image by Rich Irish, NASA GSFC

  20. Quaternary fans and terraces in the Khumbu Himal south of Mount Everest: their characteristics, age and formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P.L.; Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Large fans and terraces are frequent in the Khumbu Himal within the high Himalayan valleys south of Mt. Everest. These features are composed of massive matrix- and clast-supported diamicts that were formed from both hyperconcentrated flows and coarse-grained debris flows. Cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) exposure ages for boulders on fans and terraces indicate that periods of fan and terrace formation occurred at c. 16, c. 12, c. 8, c. 4 and c. 1.5 ka, and are broadly coincident with the timing of glaciation in the region. The dating precision is insufficient to resolve whether the surfaces formed before, during or after the correlated glacial advance. However, the sedimentology, and morphostratigraphic and geomorphological relationships suggest that fan and terrace sedimentation in this part of the Himalaya primarily occurs during glacier retreat and is thus paraglacial in origin. Furthermore, modern glacial-lake outburst floods and their associated deposits are common in the Khumbu Himal as the result of glacial retreat during historical times. We therefore suggest that Late Quaternary and Holocene fan and terrace formation and sediment transfer are probably linked to temporal changes in discharge and sediment load caused by glacier oscillations responding to climate change. The timing of major sedimentation events in this region can be correlated with fans and terraces in other parts of the Himalaya, suggesting that major sedimentation throughout the Himalaya is synchronous and tied to regional climatic oscillations. Bedrock incision rates calculated from strath terrace ages average c. 3.9 mm a−1, suggesting that the overall rate of incision is set by regional uplift.

  1. Fluvial terrace formation in the lower Awhea and Pahaoa River valleys, New Zealand: implications for tectonic and sea-level controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Nicola J.; Clark, Kate J.

    2015-02-01

    Altitudes and ages of fluvial terraces along the lower Awhea and Pahaoa River valleys are compared with the altitudes and ages of Holocene marine deposits and terraces in the actively uplifting southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. From these, we infer fluvial terrace formation processes and examine implications for controls on river behaviour and the likely mechanism of uplift. Both river valleys contain a prominent fill terrace (PgT) radiocarbon dated at 10,000-8000 cal. y BP, which formed in response to the rapid estuary infilling during the late stage of post-glacial sea-level rise. Older and younger terraces are primarily degradation terraces, with the exception of the oldest terraces mapped, which are fill terraces inferred to date from the Last Glacial Coldest Period. These results show the Awhea and Pahaoa Rivers respond to a number of competing controls including climate, tectonics, sea-level and anthropogenic (land use) changes, gradient and valley width. The influence of tectonic uplift can be isolated and Holocene marine terraces, estuarine deposits and the PgT tread altitudes are used to constrain the single-event displacement and slip rate of the submarine Palliser-Kaiwhata Fault, of 2-5 m and 2.5 ± 1 mm/y, respectively. The results also provide insight into likely future response of rivers such as the Awhea and Pahaoa to sea-level rise and tectonic uplift.

  2. Raised marine terraces in the Northern Calabrian Arc (Southern Italy: a ~ 600 kyr-long geological record of regional uplift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cucci

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sibari Plain in the Northeastern Calabrian Arc displays a well-developed suite of marine terraces. This paper deals with i the identification and correlation of the terraces; ii their age assignment and a tentative reconstruction of the uplift history of the area; iii the relationships between terraces and major faults in the study area and between uplift in the Plain and pattern of Quaternary uplift throughout the Calabrian Arc. Identifying wavecut platforms and inner-edge fragments over a linear extent of ~ 100 km was achieved by photo interpretation, 1:25 000 scale map analyses and field survey. Morphological evidence led to the correlation of the identified fragments into five complete strandlines (numbered #1 to #5 lowest to highest, at elevations ranging from 60 m to ~ 650 m. Analysis of two parameters of the emerged platform-cliff systems, namely the platform-cliff ratio and the dissection percentage, further testifies that the two lowest terraces are strongly correlative. A 130 kyr AAR age of in situ fossil samples of Glycymeris collected at 114 m elevation within the deposit of Terrace #2 indicates a key correlation of T#2 with MIS 5.5 (the peak of the last interglacial, 124 kyr, i.e. an uplift rate of ~ 0.98 mm/yr for this strandline. The other four terraces have been tentatively associated with MIS 5.3, 7, 9 and 15. Geological observations independent of geochronological evidence provide consistent lower age boundaries for the terraces and supply further constraints to this interpretation. Investigating the relations between setting of the terraces and location of major tectonic structures in the region is suggestive of no recent activity of two previously recognized faults, the «Sangineto Line» and the «Corigliano-Rossano Line». Instead, some limited anomalies that affect the terraces are tentatively associated with the activity of the Castrovillari Fault. Therefore, sustained uplift has been the long-term dominant

  3. Correlation functions in an exactly solvable terrace-ledge-kink model

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, D B; Latremoliere, F T

    1999-01-01

    We solve exactly a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model describing a vicinal section of a crystal surface at a microscopic level, with either repulsive or attractive interactions between the ledges. As expected there is a faceting, or reconstructive, phase transition, driven either by temperature or by the chemical potential, that controls the mean slope of the surface. In the rough phase we carry out a thorough investigation of microscopic thermal fluctuations of the interface. This is done by combining Bethe ansatz and Conformal Field Theory methods in order to calculate appropriately defined correlators.

  4. Autocatalytic surface hydroxylation of MgO(100) terrace sites observed under ambient conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newberg, J.T.; Mysak, E.R.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the reaction of water vapor with the MgO(100) surface using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), which permits the study of the chemical composition of the MgO/water vapor interface at p(H2O) in the Torr range. Water dissociation on thin MgO(100) films...... interacting with a fully hydroxylated interface on MgO(100). The observed onset of hydroxylation near 0.01% RH is suggested to be due to water molecules aggregating at the surface, leading to an autocatalytic dissociation of water at MgO(100) terrace sites....

  5. Soil-plant mercury concentrations in the Idrijca river terraces (Slovenia)

    OpenAIRE

    Mateja Gosar

    2004-01-01

    The subjects of research are mercury contents in plants and soils on river terraces in the lower reaches of the Idrijca River. Samples of averaged meadow forage and plaintain (Plantago lanceolata) contain from 0.055 to 0.220 mg Hg/kg in dry matter. In comparison to samples from Idrija in the 1970's these contents are relatively low with respect to mercury in soil. They are similar to those established in the surroundings of the abandoned Podljubelj mercury mine. However, with respect to conte...

  6. Linking terrace geomorphology and canopy characteristics in the Peruvian Amazon using high resolution airborne remote sensing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is home to over half a million square kilometers of forest, nearly three quarters of which is supported by terrace landforms with variable histories. Characteristics of these terrace ecosystems have been contrasted with neighboring floodplain systems along riverine transportation corridors, but the ecological complexity within these terrace landscapes has remained largely unexplored. Airborne remote measurements provide an opportunity to consider the relationship between forest canopy characteristics and geomorphic gradients at high resolution over large spatial extents. In 2011 the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) was used to map a large section of intact lowland humid tropical forest in the southwestern Peruvian Amazon, including over nine thousand hectares of terrace forest. The CAO collected high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data with its Visible-Shortwave Imaging Spectrometer (VSWIR) and digital elevation and canopy structure data with its high-resolution dual waveform LiDAR. These data, supplemented with field data collection, were used to quantify relationships between forest canopy traits and geomorphic gradients. Results suggest that both spectral properties of the canopy with known relationships to canopy chemistry, including pigment and nutrient concentrations, and canopy structural traits, including vegetation height and leaf area, are associated with geomorphic characteristics of this terrace landscape.

  7. River terrace development in the NE Mediterranean region (Syria and Turkey): Patterns in relation to crustal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgland, David R.; Demir, Tuncer; Seyrek, Ali; Daoud, Mohamad; Abou Romieh, Mohammad; Westaway, Rob

    2017-06-01

    It is widely recognized that the optimal development of river terraces globally has been in the temperate latitudes, with NW and Central Europe being areas of particular importance for the preservation of such archives of Quaternary environmental change. There is also a growing consensus that the principal drivers of terrace formation have been climatic fluctuation against a background of progressive (but variable) uplift. Nonetheless river terraces are widely preserved in the Mediterranean region, where they have often been attributed to the effects of neotectonic activity, with a continuing debate about the relative significance of fluctuating temperature (glacials-interglacials) and precipitation (pluvials-interpluvials). Research in Syria and southern-central Turkey (specifically in the valleys of the Tigris and Ceyhan in Turkey, the Kebir in Syria and the trans-border rivers Orontes and Euphrates) has underlined the importance of uplift rates in dictating the preservation pattern of fluvial archives and has revealed different patterns that can be related to crustal type. The NE Mediterranean coastal region has experienced unusually rapid uplift in the Late Quaternary. The relation between the Kebir terraces and the staircase of interglacial raised beaches preserved along the Mediterranean coastline of NW Syria reinforces previous conclusions that the emplacement of the fluvial terrace deposits in the Mediterranean has occurred during colder climatic episodes.

  8. Do agricultural terraces and forest fires recurrence in Mediterranean afforested micro-catchments alter soil quality and soil nutrient content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Lucas-Borja, Manuel; Calsamiglia, Aleix; Fortesa, Josep; García-Comendador, Julián; Gago, Jorge; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Bioclimatic characteristics and intense human pressure promote Mediterranean ecosystems to be fire-prone. Afforestation processes resulting from the progressive land abandonment during the last decades led to greater biomass availability increasing the risk of large forest fires. Likewise, the abandonment and lack of maintenance in the terraced lands constitute a risk of land degradation in terms of soil quantity and quality. Despite the effects of fire and the abandonment of terraced lands on soil loss and physico-chemical properties are identified, it is not clearly understood how wildfires and abandonment of terraces affect soil quality and nutrients content. Microbiological soil parameters and soil enzymes activities are biomarkers of the soil microbial communitýs functional ability, which potentially enables them as indicators of change, disturbance or stress within the soil community. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of terracing (abandoned and non-abandoned) on the soil enzyme activities, microbiological soil parameters and soil nutrients dynamics in three Mediterranean afforested micro-catchments (i.e., abandonment and the lack of terraced management. In addition, forest fire recurrence exacerbates soil degradation processes due to the direct effects on vegetation and soil properties.

  9. The Yellowstone REU Site Project: Building Confidence, Competence and Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Henry, D.

    2010-12-01

    The Yellowstone REU site project is focused on the evolution of Precambrian basement in the northern part of Yellowstone National Park. This is part of a larger, long-term research program on the genesis and evolution of continental crust in the Wyoming Province, and encompasses elements of igneous and metamorphic petrology, structural geology, sedimentary geology, geochemistry, geochronology, and thermochronology. Students selected for this project have the opportunity to conduct detailed field studies in the summer, visit analytical laboratories to conduct mineral, whole-rock geochemical and isotopic analysis during the school year, and to present scientific results at a professional society meeting. The field setting and scope of the research questions provide an ideal environment for students to engage integrated geoscience research as an important step in their professional development. The REU project was carefully designed to ensure a successful experience for the students, and an important progression of our research objectives. Initial selection of the students was based on academic preparation, and personal statements of interest, motivation and curiosity. A dedicated project website introduced the students to each other, the scientific objectives with overarching questions, and background literature. Activities during the initial two weeks in the field were carefully scaffolded to systematically introduce students to the variety of rock types, structures, geography and topography of the study area; individual and group instruction was focused on taking field notes, obtaining structural data, use of tools (Brunton compasses, GPS, GeoPads), and appropriate sampling methods. All students traversed the entire study area, were fully engaged with the central research questions, and attained a high level of proficiency in navigating and collecting geologic data in the field. During the second two weeks, each student defined an individual research question to

  10. Heat flow in vapor dominated areas of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: implications for the thermal budget of the Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Harris, Robert; Werner, Cynthia Anne; Murphy, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the vigor of magmatic activity in Yellowstone requires knowledge of the mechanisms and rates of heat transport between magma and the ground surface. We present results from a heat flow study in two vapor dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas in the Yellowstone Caldera, the 0.11 km2 Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) and the 0.25 km2 Solfatara Plateau Thermal Area (SPTA). Conductive heat flux through a low permeability layer capping large vapor reservoirs is calculated from soil temperature measurements at >600 locations and from laboratory measurements of soil properties. The conductive heat output is 3.6 ± 0.4 MW and 7.5 ± 0.4 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively. The advective heat output from soils is 1.3 ± 0.3 MW and 1.2 ± 0.3 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively and the heat output from thermal pools in the OPTA is 6.8 ± 1.4 MW. These estimates result in a total heat output of 11.8 ± 1.4 MW and 8.8 ± 0.4 MW from OPTA and SPTA, respectively. Focused zones of high heat flux in both thermal areas are roughly aligned with regional faults suggesting that faults in both areas serve as conduits for the rising acid vapor. Extrapolation of the average heat flux from the OPTA (103 ± 2 W·m−2) and SPTA (35 ± 3 W·m−2) to the ~35 km2 of vapor dominated areas in Yellowstone yields 3.6 and 1.2 GW, respectively, which is less than the total heat output transported by steam from the Yellowstone Caldera as estimated by the chloride inventory method (4.0 to 8.0 GW).

  11. Comparative analysis of the performance of mixed terraces and level and graded terraces=Análise comparativa do desempenho de terraços mistos com terraços em nível e com gradiente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Paulúcio da Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The terracing of agricultural land is the most widespread mechanical practice used among farmers in the control of water erosion. The objective of this paper was to carry out a comparative analysis between mixed terraces and level and graded terraces. The dimensioning of level terraces was carried out based on the surface runoff volume, while the graded terrace dimensions were based on the maximum runoff flow rate. For the mixed terraces, the dimensioning was carried by considering two surface runoff hydrographs, one for the determination of the terrace channel capacity and another to estimate the flow rate at the extremity of the terrace channel. Therefore, in order to contain and transport the excess volume, an additional value was calculated and added to the depth of the channel. A case study was performed for the Uberaba, Minas Gerais State (Brazil rainfall conditions, considering events with return periods of 10, 30, and 50 years. The obtained results provided quantitative evidence that mixed terraces have a lower height than level terraces and a higher level than the graded terraces, resulting in direct consequences for the soil movement for the terrace construction.O terraceamento de terras agrícolas consiste na prática mecânica mais difundida entre os agricultores no controle da erosão hídrica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi proceder a análise comparativa do desempenho de terraços mistos com terraços em nível e com gradiente. O dimensionamento de terraços em nível foi feito com base no volume de escoamento superficial, enquanto o de terraços com gradiente foi baseado na vazão máxima de escoamento superficial. Para o dimensionamento de terraços mistos são utilizados dois hidrogramas de escoamento superficial, sendo um para a determinação da capacidade de armazenamento do terraço e o outro para a estimativa da vazão que escoa na extremidade do canal do terraço. Assim, de maneira a conter e transportar o excesso de

  12. Antioxidant Properties of the Edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in Submerged Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lung, Ming-Yeou; Chang, Yu-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM) and mycelia-free broth (MEB) and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM) by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as ...

  13. Enhanced effects of biotic interactions on predicting multispecies spatial distribution of submerged macrophytes after eutrophication

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Kun; Cui, Yichong; Zhang, Xijin; Pan, Yingji; Xu, Junli; Xu, Kaiqin; Da, Liangjun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Water eutrophication creates unfavorable environmental conditions for submerged macrophytes. In these situations, biotic interactions may be particularly important for explaining and predicting the submerged macrophytes occurrence. Here, we evaluate the roles of biotic interactions in predicting spatial occurrence of submerged macrophytes in 1959 and 2009 for Dianshan Lake in eastern China, which became eutrophic since the 1980s. For the four common species occurred in 1959 and 2009,...

  14. Population growth of Yellowstone grizzly bears: Uncertainty and future monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.B.; White, Gary C.; Schwartz, C.C.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of the US Rocky Mountains have recently increased in numbers, but remain vulnerable due to isolation from other populations and predicted reductions in favored food resources. Harris et al. (2006) projected how this population might fare in the future under alternative survival rates, and in doing so estimated the rate of population growth, 1983–2002. We address issues that remain from that earlier work: (1) the degree of uncertainty surrounding our estimates of the rate of population change (λ); (2) the effect of correlation among demographic parameters on these estimates; and (3) how a future monitoring system using counts of females accompanied by cubs might usefully differentiate between short-term, expected, and inconsequential fluctuations versus a true change in system state. We used Monte Carlo re-sampling of beta distributions derived from the demographic parameters used by Harris et al. (2006) to derive distributions of λ during 1983–2002 given our sampling uncertainty. Approximate 95% confidence intervals were 0.972–1.096 (assuming females with unresolved fates died) and 1.008–1.115 (with unresolved females censored at last contact). We used well-supported models of Haroldson et al. (2006) and Schwartz et al. (2006a,b,c) to assess the strength of correlations among demographic processes and the effect of omitting them in projection models. Incorporating correlations among demographic parameters yielded point estimates of λ that were nearly identical to those from the earlier model that omitted correlations, but yielded wider confidence intervals surrounding λ. Finally, we suggest that fitting linear and quadratic curves to the trend suggested by the estimated number of females with cubs in the ecosystem, and using AICc model weights to infer population sizes and λ provides an objective means to monitoring approximate population trajectories in addition to demographic

  15. Trophic cascades from wolves to grizzly bears in Yellowstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripple, William J; Beschta, Robert L; Fortin, Jennifer K; Robbins, Charles T

    2014-01-01

    We explored multiple linkages among grey wolves (Canis lupus), elk (Cervus elaphus), berry-producing shrubs and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Yellowstone National Park. We hypothesized competition between elk and grizzly bears whereby, in the absence of wolves, increases in elk numbers would increase browsing on berry-producing shrubs and decrease fruit availability to grizzly bears. After wolves were reintroduced and with a reduced elk population, we hypothesized there would be an increase in the establishment of berry-producing shrubs, such as serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia), which is a major berry-producing plant. We also hypothesized that the percentage fruit in the grizzly bear diet would be greater after than before wolf reintroduction. We compared the frequency of fruit in grizzly bear scats to elk densities prior to wolf reintroduction during a time of increasing elk densities (1968-1987). For a period after wolf reintroduction, we calculated the percentage fruit in grizzly bear scat by month based on scats collected in 2007-2009 (n = 778 scats) and compared these results to scat data collected before wolf reintroduction. Additionally, we developed an age structure for serviceberry showing the origination year of stems in a northern range study area. We found that over a 19-year period, the percentage frequency of fruit in the grizzly diet (6231 scats) was inversely correlated (P wolves and other large carnivores on elk, a reduced and redistributed elk population, decreased herbivory and increased production of plant-based foods that may aid threatened grizzly bears. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  16. Air toxic emissions from snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Shively, David; Mao, Huiting; Russo, Rachel S; Pape, Bruce; Mower, Richard N; Talbot, Robert; Sive, Barkley C

    2010-01-01

    A study on emissions associated with oversnow travel in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) was conducted for the time period of February 13-16, 2002 and February 12-16, 2003. Whole air and exhaust samples were characterized for 85 volatile organic compounds using gas chromatography. The toxics including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (p-, m-, and o-xylene), and n-hexane, which are major components of two-stroke engine exhaust, show large enhancements during sampling periods resulting from increased snowmobile traffic. Evaluation of the photochemical history of air masses sampled in YNP revealed that emissions of these air toxics were (i) recent, (ii) persistent throughout the region, and (iii) consistent with the two-stroke engine exhaust sample fingerprints. The annual fluxes were estimated to be 0.35, 1.12, 0.24, 1.45, and 0.36 Gg yr(-1) for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and n-hexane, respectively, from snowmobile usage in YNP. These results are comparable to the flux estimates of 0.23, 0.77, 0.17, and 0.70 Gg yr(-1) for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, respectively, that were derived on the basis of (i) actual snowmobile counts in the Park and (ii) our ambient measurements conducted in 2003. Extrapolating these results, annual emissions from snowmobiles in the U.S. appear to be significantly higher than the values from the EPA National Emissions Inventory (1999). Snowmobile emissions represent a significant fraction ( approximately 14-21%) of air toxics with respect to EPA estimates of emissions by nonroad vehicles. Further investigation is warranted to more rigorously quantify the difference between our estimates and emission inventories.

  17. Dietary breadth of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Kerry A.; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Frey, Kevin L.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Cain, Steven L; van Manen, Frank T.; Fortin, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) are opportunistic omnivores that eat a great diversity of plant and animal species. Changes in climate may affect regional vegetation, hydrology, insects, and fire regimes, likely influencing the abundance, range, and elevational distribution of the plants and animals consumed by GYE grizzly bears. Determining the dietary breadth of grizzly bears is important to document future changes in food resources and how those changes may affect the nutritional ecology of grizzlies. However, no synthesis exists of all foods consumed by grizzly bears in the GYE. We conducted a review of available literature and compiled a list of species consumed by grizzly bears in the GYE. We documented >266 species within 200 genera from 4 kingdoms, including 175 plant, 37 invertebrate, 34 mammal, 7 fungi, 7 bird, 4 fish, 1 amphibian, and 1 algae species as well as 1 soil type consumed by grizzly bears. The average energy values of the ungulates (6.8 kcal/g), trout (Oncorhynchus spp., 6.1 kcal/g), and small mammals (4.5 kcal/g) eaten by grizzlies were higher than those of the plants (3.0 kcal/g) and invertebrates (2.7 kcal/g) they consumed. The most frequently detected diet items were graminoids, ants (Formicidae), whitebark pine seeds (Pinus albicaulis), clover (Trifolium spp.), and dandelion (Taraxacum spp.). The most consistently used foods on a temporal basis were graminoids, ants, whitebark pine seeds, clover, elk (Cervus elaphus), thistle (Cirsium spp.), and horsetail (Equisetum spp.). Historically, garbage was a significant diet item for grizzlies until refuse dumps were closed. Use of forbs increased after garbage was no longer readily available. The list of foods we compiled will help managers of grizzly bears and their habitat document future changes in grizzly bear food habits and how bears respond to changing food resources.

  18. Leaders' perspectives in the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, D.J.; Clark, S.G.; Byrd, K.L.; Brown, S.R.; Robinson, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) was created in 1993 to advance conservation in a 1.2 million km2 portion of the North American Rocky Mountains. We assembled 21 people with influence over Y2Y in a workshop to elucidate perspectives on challenges and solutions for this organization at a key point in its evolution, and used Q method to define four perspectives on challenges and three on solutions. Participants were differentiated by four models for effecting change-vision-based advocacy, practice-based learning, political engagement, and scientific management-with emphasis on the first three. Those with authority in Y2Y aligned with vision-based advocacy and expressed ambivalence about practice-based adaptive learning and rigorous appraisals of existing strategies. Workshop results were consistent with an apparent trend toward organizational maturation focused on stabilizing revenues, developing formal organizational arrangements, and focusing strategies. Consolidation of power in Y2Y around a long-standing formula does not bode well for the effectiveness of Y2Y. We recommend that leaders in Y2Y and similar organizations focused on large-scale conservation to create and maintain an open system-philosophically and operationally-that capitalizes on the diverse perspectives and skills of individuals who are attracted to such efforts. We also recommend that the Y2Y initiative be followed closely to harvest additional lessons for potential application to large-scale conservation efforts elsewhere. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC(outside the USA).2011.

  19. GigaUnit Transplant System: A New Mechanical Tool for Transplanting Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shafer, Deborah J

    2008-01-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) performs many important ecosystem functions, including wave attenuation and sediment stabilization, water quality improvement, primary production, food web support for secondary consumers...

  20. Performance of Yellowstone and Snake River Cutthroat Trout Fry Fed Seven Different Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five commercial diets and two formulated feeds were fed to initial-feeding Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri fry and Snake River cutthroat trout O. clarkii spp. (currently being petitioned for classification as O. clarkii behnkei) fry for 18 weeks to evaluate fish performance...

  1. Regeneration and survival of whitebark pine after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana F. Tomback; Anna W. Schoettle; Mario J. Perez; Kristen M. Grompone; Sabine Mellmann-Brown

    2011-01-01

    Successional whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) communities are dependent on fire and other disturbances for renewal (Arno 2001). Where whitebark pine regenerates results from cache site selection by Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) in relation to the environmental tolerances of seeds and seedlings (Tomback 2001). After the 1988 Yellowstone fires, we...

  2. Twenty Years After the 1988 Yellowstone Fires: Lessons About Disturbance and Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romme, W.H.; Boyce, M.S.; Gresswell, R.; Merrill, E.H.; Minshall, G.W.; Whitlock, C.; Turner, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The 1988 Yellowstone fires were among the first in what has proven to be an upsurge in large severe fires in the western USA during the past 20 years. At the time of the fires, little was known about the impacts of such a large severe disturbance because scientists had had few previous opportunities to study such an event. Ecologists predicted short- and long-term effects of the 1988 fires on vegetation, biogeochemistry, primary productivity, wildlife, and aquatic ecosystems based on scientific understanding of the time. Twenty-plus years of subsequent study allow these early predictions to be evaluated. Most of the original predictions were at least partially supported, but some predictions were refuted, others nuanced, and a few postfire phenomena were entirely unexpected. Post-1988 Yellowstone studies catalyzed advances in ecology focused on the importance of spatial and temporal heterogeneity, contingent influences, and multiple interacting drivers. Post-1988 research in Yellowstone also has changed public perceptions of fire as an ecological process and attitudes towards fire management. Looking ahead to projected climate change and more frequent large fires, the well-documented ecological responses to the 1988 Yellowstone fires provide a foundation for detecting and evaluating potential changes in fire regimes of temperate mountainous regions. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. Mayflies (Insecta: Ephemeroptera of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCafferty, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ephemeroptera (Insecta fauna ofYellowstone National Park consists of 46 speciesin 24 genera among eight families. These speciesare listed, and fifteen of the species (includingcollection data are reported for the first time.Another 13 species have been taken adjacent tothe park in Wyoming and Montana and noted asexpected to occur in the park.

  4. The U S national parks in international perspective: The Yellowstone model or conservation syncretism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Schelhas

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, international conservation scholars and practitioners have largely dismissed the U.S. national park experience, often termed the “Yellowstone model,” as being too protectionist and exclusionary, and therefore irrelevant and even detrimental to park management and policy in lesser developed countries. A review of the U.S. national park experience finds...

  5. Vegetation Cover Change in Yellowstone National Park Detected Using Landsat Satellite Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Results from Landsat satellite image analysis since 1987 in all unburned areas (since the 1880s) of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) showed that consistent decreases in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) have been strongly dependent on periodic variations in peak annual snow water equivalents (SWE).

  6. Water chemistry and electrical conductivity database for rivers in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clor, Laura E.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Huebner, Mark A.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Heasler, Henry P.; Mahony, Dan L.; Maloney, Tim; Evans, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Chloride flux has been used to estimate heat flow in volcanic environments since the method was developed in New Zealand by Ellis and Wilson (1955). The method can be applied effectively at Yellowstone, because nearly all of the water discharged from its thermal features enters one of four major rivers (the Madison, Yellowstone, Snake, and Falls Rivers) that drain the park, and thus integration of chloride fluxes from all these rivers provides a means to monitor the total heat flow from the entire Yellowstone volcanic system (Fournier and others, 1976; Fournier, 1979). Fournier (1989) summarized the results and longterm heat-flow trends from Yellowstone, and later efforts that applied the chloride inventory method to estimate heat flow were described by Ingebritsen and others (2001) and Friedman and Norton (2007). Most recently, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in conjunction with the National Park Service, has provided publicly accessible reports on solute flux, based on periodic sampling at selected locations (Hurwitz and others, 2007a,b). While these studies have provided a wealth of valuable data, winter travel restrictions and the great distances between sites present significant logistical challenges and have limited collection to a maximum of 28 samples per site annually.

  7. The Impact of Field Experiences in Yellowstone National Park on Practice in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    The current study focused on how six participants of a 2009 professional development activity at Yellowstone National Park described their experience and classroom instructional impact. The author focused on words and phrases illustrating perspective gathering, reflection and public performance to determine the impact of both the experience at…

  8. Database for the geologic map of Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendini, Atosa A.; Robinson, Joel E.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick; White, D. E.; Beeson, Melvin H.; Truesdell, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    This dataset contains contacts, geologic units, and map boundaries from Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1371, "The Geologic map of upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone, National Park, Wyoming". This dataset was constructed to produce a digital geologic map as a basis for ongoing studies of hydrothermal processes.

  9. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony L. Westerling; Monica G. Turner; Erica A. H. Smithwick; William H. Romme; Michael G. Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is likely to alter wildfire regimes, but the magnitude and timing of potential climate-driven changes in regional fire regimes are not well understood. We considered how the occurrence, size, and spatial location of large fires might respond to climate projections in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE) (Wyoming), a large wildland ecosystem dominated...

  10. Mayflies (Insecta: Ephemeroptera) of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, W. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Ephemeroptera (Insecta) fauna of Yellowstone National Park consists of 46 species in 24 genera among eight families. These species are listed, and fifteen of the species (including collection data) are reported for the first time. Another 13 species have been taken adjacent to the park in Wyoming and Montana and noted as expected to occur in the park.

  11. Seeking a scientific approach to backcountry management in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Thomas Olliff; Sue Consolo Murphy

    2000-01-01

    Three criteria are used to assess how Yellowstone’s wilderness managers incorporate science into management: preciousness, vulnerability and responsiveness to management. Four observations are proposed. First, where scientists lead, managers will follow. Scientists that leave the best trail will be followed most closely. Second, managers need to refocus efforts on...

  12. Winter visitor use planning in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Sacklin; Kristin L. Legg; M. Sarah Creachbaum; Clifford L. Hawkes; George Helfrich

    2000-01-01

    Winter use in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks increased dramatically in the 1980s and early 1990s. That increase and the emphasis on snowmobiles as the primary mode of transportation brought into focus a host of winter-related issues, including air pollution, unwanted sound, wildlife impacts and the adequacy of agency budgets, staff and infrastructure to...

  13. Aspen overstory recruitment in northern Yellowstone National Park during the last 200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Larsen; William J. Ripple

    2001-01-01

    Using a monograph provided by Warren (1926) and two sets of aspen increment cores collected in 1997 and 1998, we analyzed aspen overstory recruitment in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) over the past 200 years. We found that successful aspen overstory recruitment occurred on the northern range of YNP from the middle to late 1700s until the 1920s, after which it...

  14. The Yellowstone Plan: Individualized Education Program for Emotionally Handicapped Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryngelson, Jim

    This paper presents an educational program for seriously emotionally disturbed students at the Yellowstone Ranch, a residential treatment facility and school focusing on the enhancement of each student's self esteem. Located in Montana, which in 1965 created a special school district to serve the needs of special needs children, the school has as…

  15. Estimating occupancy in large landscapes: Evaluation of amphibian monitoring in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Gould; Debra A. Patla; Rob Daley; Paul Stephen Corn; Blake R. Hossack; Robert Bennetts; Charles R. Peterson

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of natural resources is crucial to ecosystem conservation, and yet it can pose many challenges. Annual surveys for amphibian breeding occupancy were conducted in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks over a 4-year period (2006-2009) at two scales: catchments (portions of watersheds) and individual wetland sites. Catchments were selected in a stratified...

  16. Fueling a Crisis: Public Argument and the 1988 Yellowstone Fire Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy-Short, Dayle; Short, C. Brant

    Debate surrounding the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fires provides material for a case study into the relationship between a crisis and public argument. Studies like this reflect the importance of a recent trend in higher education, namely, the analysis of environmental issues from different academic perspectives. In this case, analysis of…

  17. Monitoring white pine blister rust infection and mortality in whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathie Jean; Erin Shanahan; Rob Daley; Gregg DeNitto; Dan Reinhart; Chuck Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for information on the status and trend of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Concerns over the combined effects of white pine blister rust (WPBR, Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae), and climate change prompted an interagency working group to design and implement...

  18. Vulnerability of landscape carbon fluxes to future climate and fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erica A. H. Smithwick; Anthony L. Westerling; Monica G. Turner; William H. Romme; Michael G. Ryan

    2011-01-01

    More frequent fires under climate warming are likely to alter terrestrial carbon (C) stocks by reducing the amount of C stored in biomass and soil. However, the thresholds of fire frequency that could shift landscapes from C sinks to C sources under future climates are not known. We used the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) as a case study to explore the conditions...

  19. The climate adaptation programs and activities of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy L. Francis

    2011-01-01

    The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) is an innovative transboundary effort to protect biodiversity and facilitate climate adaptation by linking large protected core areas through compatible land uses on matrix lands. The Y2Y organization acts as the keeper of the Y2Y vision and implements two interconnected programs - Science and Action, and Vision...

  20. Insights From the Kilgore Tuff: Surprising Homogeneity of Supervolcanic Magmas in Yellowstone Hotspot Calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, K. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Schmitt, A. K.; Morgan, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Supervolcanic eruptions in the late Miocene Heise volcanic field in eastern Idaho concluded ~4.5Ma with the eruption of the Kilgore Tuff, an extremely voluminous (1,800km3) caldera-forming ignimbrite. The Heise volcanic field represents the most recently extinct phase of volcanism over the Yellowstone hotspot and is the most immediate predecessor to the active Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field in western Wyoming. Thus, the climactic Kilgore Tuff of the Heise field is an important example of silicic magma genesis in the Yellowstone hotspot track, and may serve as an analog to large volume, late-stage magmatism in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. We present major and trace element analyses, oxygen isotope ratios of bulk and individual phenocrysts, strontium isotope ratios of whole rock powders, and uranium-lead zircon crystallization ages of five geographically discrete and compositionally diverse samples of the Kilgore Tuff. Despite the presence of both high and low-silica rhyolites, with and without quartz phenocrysts, our isotopic and geochronologic data indicate that the Kilgore Tuff was erupted from a remarkably homogeneous silicic magma chamber with a constant and low δ18O value of 3.32±0.02‰, a 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.7105±0.0001, and a 238U-206Pb crystallization age of 4.64±0.05Ma (uncertainties are 1σ). Our new data support a shallow crustal recycling model of magma genesis for the Kilgore Tuff, in which low-δ18O intracaldera fill, consisting of hydrothermally altered and buried volcanic rocks from three previous caldera-forming eruptions, is remelted in batches and rapidly assembled into one voluminous, well-mixed magma chamber. Following isotopic homogenization by convection, fractional crystallization resulted in low and high-silica magma types in the parental Kilgore batholith. Similar processes may also explain effusive, large volume silicic magma genesis of the low-δ18O Central Plateau Member rhyolites (0.25-0.07Ma, 700km3) in the

  1. High electrochemical selectivity of edge versus terrace sites in two-dimensional layered MoS2 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haotian; Zhang, Qianfan; Yao, Hongbin; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Hsu, Po-Chun; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2014-12-10

    Exploring the chemical reactivity of different atomic sites on crystal surface and controlling their exposures are important for catalysis and renewable energy storage. Here, we use two-dimensional layered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) to demonstrate the electrochemical selectivity of edge versus terrace sites for Li-S batteries and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Lithium sulfide (Li2S) nanoparticles decorates along the edges of the MoS2 nanosheet versus terrace, confirming the strong binding energies between Li2S and the edge sites and guiding the improved electrode design for Li-S batteries. We also provided clear comparison of HER activity between edge and terrace sites of MoS2 beyond the previous theoretical prediction and experimental proof.

  2. Single-grain and multi-grain OSL dating of river terrace sediments in the Tabernas Basin, SE Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geach, M.R.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2015-01-01

    River terraces represent important records of landscape response to e.g. base-level change and tectonicmovement. Both these driving forces are important in the southern Iberian Peninsula. In this study,Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating was used to date two principal river terraces...... in theTabernas Basin, SE Spain. A total of 23 samples was collected from the fluvial terraces for dating usingquartz OSL. Sixteen of the samples could not be dated because of low saturation levels (e.g. typical2xD0 ... usingboth multi-grain and single-grain analysis. Single grain results show that: (i) measurements from multigrainaliquots overestimate ages by up to ~ 4 ka for modern analogues and young samples (

  3. Geomorphological implications of systematic age overestimations in the OSL dating of post-LGM fluvial terraces (Rangitikei river, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieser, U.; Bonnet, S.; Moulin, L.; Lacoste, A.; Lague, D.; Davy, P.

    2009-12-01

    Along the Rangitikei river flows (North Island, New Zealand), a widespread climatically-controlled fluvial terrace formed from ~30 ka to the Last Glacial Maximum. At that time, the river had a braided course and was aggrading. Since the LGM, the river has cut into the bedrock and the LGM terrace is presently preserved 75 m above the current level of the river. The post-LGM entrenchment is characterized by the formation of bedrock gorges with near-vertical valley walls, while the river was meandering. There, some minor, autocyclic fluvial terraces have been abandoned during downcutting and the flight of up to 22 post-LGM terraces is observed locally. The mapping and elevation survey of 376 LGM and post-LGM terraces highlight a bimodal elevation distribution of post-LGM terraces and the lack of post-LGM terraces within the elevation range between 20 and 50 m above the current level of the river. Optically Simulated Luminescence dating has been used to estimate the deposition age of 20 post-LGM strath terrace deposits (feldspars/polymineral silt samples with the aim to constrain in details the post-LGM incision of the river. We used Multiple Aliquot Additive Dose technique with late-light subtraction or Single Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) protocol. 19 samples give an age older than the LGM, which is the maximum age possible for these terraces. It implies a systematic overestimation of the ages. Overestimation is confirmed by the OSL dating of present-day river sediments and of sediments deposited during a major flood that occurred in 2004, whose measured ages are of 37.4 +/- 3.1 and 55.1 +/- 3.5 ka respectively. The elevation distribution of all the ages shows that overestimation is not randomly distributed: from the elevation of the LGM terrace (+75 m) to the current level of the river, all the ages align along a curve with a boomerang shape ( > ). The elevation of the older measured ages (104.4 +/- 7.7 and 106.5 +/- 7.6 ka; elevations of +30 and +20 m respectively

  4. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, G.; Shimada, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Urakami, T.; Koyama, K.; Komura, M.; Matsuda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching.

  5. Electrical resistivity and spatial variation in agriculture terraces: statistical correlation between ert and flow direction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes J.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The construction of earthen embankment terraces in the Douro Region raises a set of problems related to hydrological processes. The main objective of this study is the evaluation of the spatial variation of electrical resistivity in agriculture terraces at Douro valley (Portugal. To achieve this objective, two variables are analysed, the soil electrical resistivity and the flow direction algorithm. In a field survey we recorded 13 electrical resistivity profiles. The contributing area was calculated with the algorithms D∞ (Deterministic Infinity Flow and MFD (Multiple Flow Direction and the results are the base of the internal runoff modelling, both supported by the digital elevation model with a spatial resolution of 1m2. A correlation between the spatial variation of the soil electrical resistivity represented by the standard deviation of the electrical resistivity for each profile and the average value of the contributing area coincident with each profile was established. The electrical resistivity standard deviation seems to be moderately well correlated according to the D∞ algorithm at about 1m of depth, and it has a good correlation at 1,5m to 2m of depth with the MFD algorithm. Taken together, the results show a significant positive statistical correlation between the electrical resistivity standard deviation and the contributing areas (MFD and D∞ depending on the soil depth.

  6. Seismic Hazards Implications of Uplifted Pleistocene Coral Terraces in the Gulf of Aqaba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, W; Montagna, P; Pons-Branchu, E; Rasul, N; Taviani, M

    2017-02-24

    The Gulf of Aqaba transform plate boundary is a source of destructive teleseismic earthquakes. Seismicity is concentrated in the central sub-basin and decreases to both the north and south. Although principally a strike-slip plate boundary, the faulted margins of the Gulf display largely dip-slip extensional movement and accompanying footwall uplift. We have constrained rates of this uplift by measurements of elevated Pleistocene coral terraces. In particular the terrace that formed during the last interglacial (~125 ka) is found discontinuously along the length of the Gulf at elevations of 3 to 26 m. Global sea level was ~7 m higher than today at 125 ka indicating net maximum tectonic uplift of ~19 m with an average rate of ~0.015 cm/yr. Uplift has been greatest adjacent to the central sub-basin and like the seismicity decreases to the north and south. We suggest that the present pattern of a seismically active central region linked to more aseismic areas in the north and south has therefore persisted for at least the past 125 kyr. Consequently the potential for future destructive earthquakes in the central Gulf is greater than in the sub-basins to the north and south.

  7. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent and dramatic events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments from source craters that range from a few meters up to more than 2 km in diameter; associated breccia can be emplaced as much as 3 to 4 km from the largest craters. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam- and liquid-saturated fluids with temperatures at or near the boiling curve underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in confi ning pressure causes fluids to fl ash to steam, resulting in signifi cant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, hydrothermal explosions are a potentially signifi cant hazard for visitors and facilities and can damage or even destroy thermal features. The breccia deposits and associated craters formed from hydrothermal explosions are mapped as mostly Holocene (the Mary Bay deposit is older) units throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and are spatially related to within the 0.64-Ma Yellowstone caldera and along the active Norris-Mammoth tectonic corridor. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 m in diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters have been identifi ed; the scale of the individual associated events dwarfs similar features in geothermal areas elsewhere in the world. Large hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka averaging ??1 every 700 yr; similar events are likely in the future. Our studies of large hydrothermal explosion events indicate: (1) none are directly associated with eruptive volcanic or shallow intrusive events; (2) several historical explosions have been triggered by seismic events; (3) lithic clasts and comingled matrix material that form hydrothermal explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating that explosions occur in areas subjected to intense hydrothermal processes; (4) many lithic clasts contained in explosion breccia deposits preserve evidence of repeated fracturing

  8. Comparing OSL and CN techniques for dating fluvial terraces and estimating surface process rates in Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Pohl, Eric; Sulaymonova, Vasila; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of surface process rates is crucial for understanding the topographic evolution of high mountains. Spatial and temporal variations in fluvial incision and basin-wide erosion enable to decipher the role of tectonic and climatic drivers. The Pamir is peculiar in both aspects because of its location at the western end of the India-Asia collision zone, and its position at the edge of two atmospheric circulation systems, the Westerlies and the Indian Summer Monsoon. The architecture of the Panj river network indicates prominent variations across the main tectonic structures of the Pamir. The trunk stream, deflects from the predominantly westward river orientation and cuts across the southern and central Pamir domes before doubling back to the west and leaving the orogen. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of fluvial terraces reveals short-term sedimentation along the trunk stream during the last ~25 kyr. The agreement of OSL results to new exposure ages based on the cosmogenic nuclide (CN) 10Be confirms accurate terrace age modelling and treatment of incomplete bleaching. The consistent terrace sedimentation and exposure ages suggest also fast terrace abandonment and rapid onset of incision. Considerable differences in terrace heights reflect high spatial variations of fluvial incision, independent of time interval, change in rock type or catchment increase. Highest rates of (5.9 ± 1.1) mm/yr to (10.0 ± 2.0) mm/yr describe the fluvial dynamic across the Shakhdara Dome and that related to the Darvaz Fault Zone. Lower rates of (3.9 ± 0.6) mm/yr to (4.5 ± 0.7) mm/yr indicate a transient stage north of the Yazgulom Dome. Fluvial incision decreases to rates ranging from (1.7 ± 0.3) mm/yr to (3.9 ± 0.7) mm/yr in graded river reaches associated to southern dome boundaries. The pattern agrees to the interpretation of successive upstream river captures across the southern and central Pamir domes inferred from morphometric analyses of river

  9. Restoring Ecological Function to a Submerged Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2010-01-01

    Impacts of global climate change, such as sea level rise and severe drought, have altered the hydrology of coastal salt marshes resulting in submergence and subsequent degradation of ecosystem function. A potential method of rehabilitating these systems is the addition of sediment-slurries to increase marsh surface elevation, thus ameliorating effects of excessive inundation. Although this technique is growing in popularity, the restoration of ecological function after sediment addition has received little attention. To determine if sediment subsidized salt marshes are functionally equivalent to natural marshes, we examined above- and belowground primary production in replicated restored marshes receiving four levels of sediment addition (29-42 cm North American Vertical Datum of 1988 [NAVD 88]) and in degraded and natural ambient marshes (4-22 cm NAVD 88). Moderate intensities of sediment-slurry addition, resulting in elevations at the mid to high intertidal zone (29-36 cm NAVD 88), restored ecological function to degraded salt marshes. Sediment additions significantly decreased flood duration and frequency and increased bulk density, resulting in greater soil drainage and redox potential and significantly lower phytotoxic sulfide concentrations. However, ecological function in the restored salt marsh showed a sediment addition threshold that was characterized by a decline in primary productivity in areas of excessive sediment addition and high elevation (>36 cm NAVD 88). Hence, the addition of intermediate levels of sediment to submerging salt marshes increased marsh surface elevation, ameliorated impacts of prolonged inundation, and increased primary productivity. However, too much sediment resulted in diminished ecological function that was equivalent to the submerged or degraded system. ?? 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  10. Enhanced Sorbitol Production under Submerged Fermentation using Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Nadiya Jan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Sorbitol is a non-toxic and slightly hygroscopic compound with different applications. Zymomonas mobiles produces sorbitol from sucrose or mixtures of glucose and fructose (formation is coupled with the dehydrogenation of glucose to glucono-δ- lactone. Recombinant Zymomonas mobilis may produce sorbitol and gluconic acid from glucose and fructose using different divalent metal ions with reduced the ethanol yield andsignificantly increased yield of sorbitol. Current study envisaged to alter the media components, physical process parameters and supplementation of amino acids for enhanced sorbitol production.Material and Methods: Several process variables were evaluated on sorbitol production including carbon sources (glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, carbon concentrations (5, 10, 20 and 25 g l-1, nitrogen sources (peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract and organic nitrogen mix, temperatures (25, 29, 33, 37, 41°C, pH (6, 6.5, 7 , 7.5 ,8, agitation rate (50, 100, 150, 200 rpm and amino acids (cysteine, cystine, tryptophanin batch cultivation ofLactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2912. Shake flask cultivation performed under optimum conditions like temperature 37°C, pH 7.0 and agitation rate of 150 rpm, resulted in enhanced sorbitol production. Comparative study of sorbitol production in solid state fermentation and submerged fermentation was also evaluated.Results and Conclusion: Batch cultivation under submerged conditions further performed in 7.5-l lab scale bioreactor (working volume 3.0-l under optimized conditions resulted in maximum cell biomass of 8.95±0.03 g g-1 and a sorbitol content of 9.78±0.04 g l-1 after 42.0 h of fermentation. Scale up study on bioreactor resulted in maximum sorbitol yield (Yp/x and productivity of 1.11 g g-1 and 0.50 g l-1 h under submerged fermentation, respectively.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  11. Late Quaternary stream piracy and strath terrace formation along the Belle Fourche and lower Cheyenne Rivers, South Dakota and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, John F.; Hendricks, Robert R.; Sawyer, J. Foster; Mahan, Shannon A.; Zaprowski, Brent J.; Geibel, Nicholas M.; Azzolini, David C.

    2013-09-01

    Stream piracy substantially affected the geomorphic evolution of the Missouri River watershed and drainages within, including the Little Missouri, Cheyenne, Belle Fourche, Bad, and White Rivers. The ancestral Cheyenne River eroded headward in an annular pattern around the eastern and southern Black Hills and pirated the headwaters of the ancestral Bad and White Rivers after ~ 660 ka. The headwaters of the ancestral Little Missouri River were pirated by the ancestral Belle Fourche River, a tributary to the Cheyenne River that currently drains much of the northern Black Hills. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques were used to estimate the timing of this piracy event at ~ 22-21 ka. The geomorphic evolution of the Cheyenne and Belle Fourche Rivers is also expressed by regionally recognized strath terraces that include (from oldest to youngest) the Sturgis, Bear Butte, and Farmingdale terraces. Radiocarbon and OSL dates from fluvial deposits on these terraces indicate incision to the level of the Bear Butte terrace by ~ 63 ka, incision to the level of the Farmingdale terrace at ~ 40 ka, and incision to the level of the modern channel after ~ 12-9 ka. Similar dates of terrace incision have been reported for the Laramie and Wind River Ranges. Hypothesized causes of incision are the onset of colder climate during the middle Wisconsinan and the transition to the full-glacial climate of the late-Wisconsinan/Pinedale glaciation. Incision during the Holocene of the lower Cheyenne River is as much as ~ 80 m and is 3 to 4 times the magnitude of incision at ~ 63 ka and ~ 40 ka. The magnitude of incision during the Holocene might be due to a combined effect of three geomorphic processes acting in concert: glacial isostatic rebound in lower reaches (~ 40 m), a change from glacial to interglacial climate, and adjustments to increased watershed area resulting from piracy of the ancestral headwaters of the Little Missouri River.

  12. Alluvial terrace development and changing landscape connectivity in the Great Karoo, South Africa. Insights from the Wilgerbosch River catchment, Sneeuberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Christopher J.; Hooke, Janet M.

    2017-07-01

    Dendritic channel networks in the Wilgerbosch River catchment draining the south side of the Sneeuberg, South Africa, are deeply incised exposing terrace fills of varying thickness and extent. Channel long sections exhibit 'stepped' profiles where resistant rock strata cross valley floors but are now partially or completely breached. Using a combination of aerial image analysis, geomorphological mapping, sedimentological investigations (field logging, grain size, and magnetic susceptibility analyses), and geochronology (OSL, 14C), this study demonstrates the patterns and controls on erosion and sedimentation and, to a lesser extent, the age structure of fills in two low-order tributaries (Africanders Kloof and Wilgerbosch Kloof) and several reaches of the higher-order Wilgerbosch River. A conceptual model of terrace development in relation to changing conditions of connectivity is presented. Valley headwaters are dominated by discontinuous palaeochannel and floodout sediments; whilst in second- to fourth-order tributaries, four sedimentologically and stratigraphically distinct terrace fills that exceed the scale and complexity of deposits on the northward side of the Sneeuberg were identified and analysed. The early part of this regional terrace succession highlights the importance of interactions between periglacial and fluvial activity on cut, fill, and pedogenesis around the time of the deglacial period. Terrace development is shown to have been a complex response to reconnection of the channel network with upland colluvial stores resulting in the valleys becoming choked with sediment. This caused a rise in groundwater and formation of extensive calcretised rootmats on valley floors and slopes acting to 'blanket' terraces 1 and 2. The thickness and longevity of this blanket is shown to restrict depth of incision in subsequent phases (T3, T4). The deposits in these headwater valleys have, until now, been overlooked as a source of palaeoenvironmental information

  13. Understanding the physics of the Yellowstone magmatic system with geodynamic inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The Yellowstone magmatic system is one of the largest magmatic systems on Earth. Thus, it is important to understand the geodynamic processes that drive this very complex system on a larger scale ranging from the mantle plume up to the shallow magma chamber in the upper crust. Recent geophysical results suggest that two distinct magma chambers exist: a shallow, presumably felsic chamber and a deeper and partially molten chamber above the Moho [1]. Why melt stalls at different depth levels above the Yellowstone plume, whereas dikes cross-cut the whole lithosphere in the nearby Snake River Plane is puzzling. Therefore, we employ lithospheric-scale 2D and 3D geodynamic models to test the influence of different model parameters, such as the geometry of the magma chamber, the melt fraction, the rheological flow law, the densities and the thermal structure on their influence on the dynamics of the lithosphere. The melt content and the rock densities are obtained by consistent thermodynamic modelling of whole rock data of the Yellowstone stratigraphy. We present derivations in the stress field around the Yellowstone plume, diking areas and different melt accumulations. Our model predictions can be tested with available geophysical data (uplift rates, melt fractions, stress states, seismicity). By framing it in an inverse modelling approach we can constrain which parameters (melt fractions, viscosities, geometries) are consistent with the data and which are not. [1] Huang, Hsin-Hua, et al. "The Yellowstone magmatic system from the mantle plume to the upper crust." Science 348.6236 (2015): 773-776.

  14. Three-Dimensional Velocity Field of the Yellowstone Deformation from Ascending and Descending ENVISAT Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M. H.; Cochran, E. S.

    2009-05-01

    The complex Yellowstone volcanic system is characterized by episodic crustal deformation that occurs on a decadal scale. Previous geodetic studies indicated that the 640 k year-old Yellowstone Caldera was recently subsiding until mid 2004, and then a new episode of uplift has occurred with rapid rates up to 7 cm/yr. However, Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) from either ascending or descending orbits permits measurements only in the line-of-sight (LOS) direction; and the Global Positioning System (GPS) provides point measurements and thus a limited spatial view of the ongoing deformation. In this study, we present the three-dimensional velocity field of Yellowstone deformation constructed from ascending and descending ENVISAT LOS components. Based on the ENVISAT satellite imaging and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) geometries, we calculated the look vector, the elevation angle (the angle between the look vector and the horizontal surface plane), and the orientation angle (the angle between the projection of the look vector on the horizontal surface plane and the East direction) for each InSAR image pixel. The outputs indicate that the majority of observed deformation across the Yellowstone Caldera (approximately 7 cm/yr) and near the Norris Geyser Basin (approximately 4 cm/yr) occurred in the vertical direction during July 2005 - August 2006; however, significant horizontal deformation in the East-West direction occurred at the southeastern rim of the caldera and around Hebgen Lake, and slight deformation in the North-South direction occurred across the caldera during the same time period. The constructed three-dimensional velocity field provides new constraints on the depth and geometry of the Yellowstone magma chamber.

  15. Geomicrobiology of sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake: Geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA is a large high-altitude (2200 m, fresh-water lake, which straddles an extensive caldera and is the center of significant geothermal activity. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study was to evaluate the microbial populations inhabiting thermal vent communities in Yellowstone Lake (Yellowstone Lake using 16S rRNA gene and random metagenome sequencing, and to determine how geochemical attributes of vent waters influence the distribution of specific microorganisms and their metabolic potential. Thermal vent waters and associated microbial biomass were sampled during two field seasons (2007 - 2008 using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Sublacustrine thermal vent waters (circa 50 - 90 oC contained elevated concentrations of numerous constituents associated with geothermal activity including dissolved hydrogen, sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide. Microorganisms associated with sulfur-rich filamentous ‘streamer’ communities of Inflated Plain and West Thumb (pH range 5 - 6 were dominated by bacteria from the Aquificales, but also contained thermophilic archaea from the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Novel groups of methanogens and members of the Korarchaeota were observed in vents from West Thumb and Elliot’s Crater (pH 5 - 6. Conversely, metagenome sequence from Mary Bay vent sediments did not yield large assemblies, and contained diverse thermophilic and nonthermophilic bacterial relatives. Analysis of functional genes associated with the major vent populations indicated a direct linkage to high concentrations of carbon dioxide, reduced sulfur (sulfide and/or elemental S, hydrogen and methane in the deep thermal ecosystems. Our observations show that sublacustrine thermal vents in Yellowstone Lake support novel thermophilic communities, which contain microorganisms with functional attributes not found to date in terrestrial geothermal systems of YNP.

  16. [Genetic algorithm for fermentation kinetics of submerged fermentation by Morchella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Piao, Meizi; Sun, Yonghai

    2008-08-01

    Fermentation kinetics is important for optimizing control and up-scaling fermentation process. We studied submerged fermentation kinetics of Morchella. Applying the genetic Algorithm in the Matlab software platform, we compared suitability of the Monod and Logistic models, both are commonly used in process of fungal growth, to describe Morchella growth kinetics. Meanwhile, we evaluated parameters involved in the models for Morchella growth, EPS production and substrate consumption. The results indicated that Logistic model fit better with the experimental data. The average error of this model was 5.8%. This kinetics model can be useful for optimizing and up-scaling fungal fermentation process.

  17. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  18. Slag Metal Reactions during Submerged Arc Welding of Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    The transfer of Cr, Si, Mn, P, S, C, Ni, and Mo between the slag and the weld pool has been studied for submerged arc welds made with calcium silicate and manganese silicate fluxes. The results show a strong interaction between Cr and Si transfer but no interaction with Mn. The manganese silicate flux produces lower residual sulfur while the calcium silicate fluxes are more effective for removal of phosphorus. The effective oxygen reaction temperature lies between 1700 and 2000 °C for all elements studied. Evidence of Cr and Mn loss by metal vaporization is also presented.

  19. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers—An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard; Crone, Anthony J.; Duross, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4–1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  20. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers-An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony J.; DuRoss, Christopher B.

    2017-11-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4-1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  1. Processes of Terrace Formation on the Piedmont of the Santa Cruz River Valley During Quaternary Time, Green Valley-Tubac Area, Southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, David A.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    In this report we describe a series of stepped Quaternary terraces on some piedmont tributaries of the Santa Cruz River valley in southeastern Arizona. These terraces began to form in early Pleistocene time, after major basin-and-range faulting ceased, with lateral planation of basin fill and deposition of thin fans of alluvium. At the end of this cycle of erosion and deposition, tributaries of the Santa Cruz River began the process of dissection and terrace formation that continues to the present. Vertical cutting alternated with periods of equilibrium, during which streams cut laterally and left thin deposits of channel fill. The distribution of terraces was mapped and compiled with adjacent mapping to produce a regional picture of piedmont stream history in the middle part of the Santa Cruz River valley. For selected tributaries, the thickness of terrace fill was measured, particle size and lithology of gravel were determined, and sedimentary features were photographed and described. Mapping of terrace stratigraphy revealed that on two tributaries, Madera Canyon Wash and Montosa Canyon Wash, stream piracy has played an important role in piedmont landscape development. On two other tributaries, Cottonwood Canyon Wash and Josephine Canyon Wash, rapid downcutting preempted piracy. Two types of terraces are recognized: erosional and depositional. Gravel in thin erosional terraces has Trask sorting coefficients and sedimentary structures typical of streamflood deposits, replete with bar-and-swale surface topography on young terraces. Erosional-terrace fill represents the channel fill of the stream that cuts the terrace; the thickness of the fill indicates the depth of channel scour. In contrast to erosional terraces, depositional terraces show evidence of repeated deposition and net aggradation, as indicated by their thickness (as much as 20+ m) and weakly bedded structure. Depositional terraces are common below mountain-front canyon mouths where streams drop their

  2. Surface-water sampling stations, National Water-Quality Assessment, Yellowstone River Basin, Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, an investigation of the Yellowstone River Basin study unit is being conducted to...

  3. Using environmental tracers and numerical simulation to investigate regional hydrothermal basins—Norris Geyser Basin area, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, W. Payton; Susong, David D; Solomon, D. Kip; Heasler, Henry P

    2013-01-01

    Heat and fluid flow fields are simulated for several conceptual permeability fields and compared to processes inferred from environmental tracers in springs around Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park...

  4. Sixth-Year Results Following Partial Cutting For Timber and Wildlife Habitat in a Mixed Oak-Sweetgum-Pine Stand on a Minor Creek Terrace in Southeast Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Norwin E. Linnartz

    2002-01-01

    Hardwood management has primarily focused on highly productive river bottom and upland sites. Less is known about hardwood growth and development on terrace sites. Such sites are usually converted to other uses, especially pine plantations. The objectives of this study, implemented in a minor creek terrace in southeast Louisiana, were to describe changes in stand...

  5. Properties of anthropogenic soils in ancient run-off capturing agricultural terraces in the Central Negev desert (Israel) and related effects of biochar and ash on crop growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asperen, van H.L.; Bor, A.M.C.; Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Bruins, H.J.; Lazarovitch, N.

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Negev hills (Israel) many ancient terraced wadis exist, which captured run-off and caused gradual soil aggradation, which enabled agricultural practices. In these terraces, dark colored soil horizons were observed, containing charcoal, as can be found in Terra Preta soils, suggesting

  6. Chronology of fluvial terrace sequences for large Atlantic rivers in the Iberian Peninsula (Upper Tagus and Duero drainage basins, Central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pablo G.; Roquero, Elvira; López-Recio, Mario; Huerta, Pedro; Martínez-Graña, Antonio M.

    2017-06-01

    This work analyses the chronology of fluvial terrace sequences of the two most important fluvial basins from central Spain draining to the Atlantic Ocean (Upper Tagus and Duero drainage basins). Both basins evolved under similar Mediterranean climatic conditions throughout the Pleistocene and present comparable number of fluvial terraces (16-17) after excluding the higher terrace levels of the Tagus (T1-T5) entrenched in the Raña surface. These higher ;rañizo terraces; was formed in response to fan-head trenching in this high alluvial piedmont (+220 m) and therefore not properly controlled by Quaternary fluvial downcutting. The study accomplishes the implementation of multiple regression analyses for terrace height-age relationships. To transform relative terrace heights above the present river thalwegs (i.e. +100 m) in numerical ages a ;height-age transference function; has been developed on the basis of preliminary statistical geochronological approaches proposed for Central Spain. The resultant height-age transference function gather 73 published geochronological data for terrace sequences, featuring a 3rd Order Polynomial Function (R2 0.90). This function describes the overall trend of valley downcutting for the last c. 2.3 Ma in Central Spain and is used to assign numerical ages to terrace levels at different relative elevation.

  7. The initial dispersal and radiative forcing of a Northern Hemisphere mid latitude super volcano: a Yellowstone case study

    OpenAIRE

    Timmreck, C.; Graf, H.-F.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The chemistry climate model MAECHAM4/CHEM with interactive and prognostic volcanic aerosol and ozone, was used to study the initial dispersal and radiative forcing of a possible Yellowstone super eruption. Tropospheric climate anomalies are not analysed since sea surface temperatures are kept fix. Our experiments show that the global dispersal of a Yellowstone super eruption is strongly dependent on the season of the eruption. In Northern Hemisphere summer the volcanic...

  8. Heat Budget Monitoring in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, R. A. M.; Neale, C. M. U.; Jaworowski, C.

    2014-12-01

    Frequent estimation of heat flux in active hydrothermal areas are required to monitor the variation in activity. Natural changes in geothermal and hydrothermal features can include rapid significant changes in surface temperature distribution and may be an indication of "re-plumbing" of the systems or potential hydrothermal explosions. Frequent monitoring of these systems can help Park managers make informed decisions on infrastructure development and/or take precautionary actions to protect the public. Norris Geyser Basin (NGB) is one of Yellowstone National Park's hottest and most dynamic basins. Airborne high-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing was used to estimate radiometric temperatures within NGB and allow for the estimation of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface temperatures and the heat flow budget. The airborne monitoring occurred in consecutive years 2008-2012 allowing for the temporal comparison of heat budget in NGB. Airborne thermal infrared images in the 8-12 µm bands with 1-m resolution were acquired using a FLIR SC640 scanner. Digital multispectral images in the green (0.57 μm), red (0.65 μm), and near infrared (0.80 μm) bands were also acquired to classify the terrain cover and support the atmospheric and emissivity correction of the thermal images. The airborne images were taken in the month of September on selected days with similar weather and under clear sky conditions. In the winter of 2012, images were also taken in March to compare the effect of the cold weather and snow cover on the heat budget. Consistent methods were used to acquire and process the images each year to limit the potential variability in the results to only the variability in the hydrothermal system. Data from radiation flux towers installed within the basin were used to compare with airborne radiometric surface temperatures and compensate for residual solar heating in the imagery. The presentation will discuss the different mechanisms involved in

  9. Cathodic disbonding of organic coatings on submerged steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Ole oeystein

    1998-12-31

    In offshore oil production, submerged steel structures are commonly protected by an organic coating in combination with cathodic protection. The main advantage is that the coating decreases the current demand for cathodic protection. But the coating degrades with time. This thesis studies one of the most important mechanisms for coating degradation in seawater, cathodic disbonding. Seven commercial coatings and two model coatings with various pigmentations have been studied. Parameter studies, microscopy and studies of free films were used in the mechanism investigations. Exposure to simulated North Sea conditions was used in the performance studies. The effect of aluminium and glass barrier pigments on cathodic disbonding was investigated. The mechanism for the effect of the aluminium pigments on cathodic disbonding was also investigated. The transport of charge and oxygen to the steel/coating interface during cathodic disbonding was studied for two epoxy coatings. Cathodic disbonding, blistering and current demand for cathodic protection was measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures, using the ASTM-G8 standard test and a long term test under simulated North Sea conditions. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated. 171 refs., 40 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Period Doubling in Bubbling from a Submerged Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Jordan; Grace, Laura; Lehman, Susan

    The timing of bubbles rising from a nozzle submerged in a viscous solution was measured to examine the period-doubling route to chaos in this system. A narrow nozzle was submerged in a mixture of water and glycerin, and nitrogen was supplied to the nozzle at a varying flow rate. The bubbles were detected using a laser and photodiode system; when the bubbles rise through the laser beam, they scatter the light so that the signal at the photodiode decreases. The period between bubbles as well as the duration of each bubble (a function of bubble size and bubble velocity) was determined, and examined as the nitrogen flow rate increased, for solutions with five different concentrations of glycerin. Bubbles were also recorded visually using a high-speed camera. Within the flow rates tested, we observed a bifurcation of the period to period-2 behavior for all solutions tested, and a further bifurcation to period-4 for all solutions except pure glycerin. The solution viscosity affected both the onset of the bifurcation and the precise bubble behavior during the bifurcation. Unusually, a short period/long period pair of bubbles recurring at a regular interval was sometimes observed in the low flow regime which is typically period-1, an observation which requires further investigation. Research supported by NSF DMR 1560093.

  11. Magnetic imaging of a submerged Roman harbour, Caesarea Maritima, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, J. I.; Reinhardt, E. G.; Raban, A.; Pozza, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    The harbour built by King Herod's engineers at Caesarea represented a major advance in Roman harbour construction that incorporated the use of large (390 m^3), form-filled hydraulic concrete blocks to build an extensive foundation for the harbour moles and breakwater barriers. Marine geophysical surveys were recently conducted across the submerged harbour in an attempt to map the configuration of the buried concrete foundation. A total of 107 line km of high-resolution marine magnetic surveys (nominal 15 m line separations) and bathymetry data were acquired over a 1 km^2 area of the submerged harbour using an Overhauser marine magnetometer, integrated DGPS and single-beam (200 KHz) echosounder. The feasibility of magnetic detection of the concrete was established before the survey by magnetic susceptibility testing of concrete core samples. All concrete samples contained appreciable amounts of fe-oxide-rich volcanic ash ('pozzolana') and showed uniformly high susceptibility values (k > 10^-^4 cgs) when compared to harbour bottom sediments and building stones (k construction of the harbour moles and quays.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES ON SEDIMENTARY DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, Jesse C; Prairie, Yves T; Gregory-Eaves, Irene

    2011-12-01

    Submerged macrophytes are a central component of lake ecosystems; however, little is known regarding their long-term response to environmental change. We have examined the potential of diatoms as indicators of past macrophyte biomass. We first sampled periphyton to determine whether habitat was a predictor of diatom assemblage. We then sampled 41 lakes in Quebec, Canada, to evaluate whether whole-lake submerged macrophyte biomass (BiomEpiV) influenced surface sediment diatom assemblages. A multivariate regression tree (MRT) was used to construct a semiquantitative model to reconstruct past macrophyte biomass. We determined that periphytic diatom assemblages on macrophytes were significantly different from those on wood and rocks (ANOSIM R = 0.63, P macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV ≥525 μg · L(-1) ; total phosphorus [TP] macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV eutrophic lakes (TP ≥35 μg · L(-1) ; six lakes). A semiquantitative model correctly predicted the MRT group of the lake 71% of the time (P macrophytes have a significant influence on diatom community structure and that sedimentary diatom assemblages can be used to infer past macrophyte abundance. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  13. Protecting the geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park: toward a new national policy for a vulnerable environmental resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Kenneth A

    2010-01-01

    Geyser basins provide high value recreation, scientific, economic and national heritage benefits. Geysers are globally rare, in part, because development activities have quenched about 260 of the natural endowment. Today, more than half of the world's remaining geysers are located in Yellowstone National Park, northwest Wyoming, USA. However, the hydrothermal reservoirs that supply Yellowstone's geysers extend well beyond the Park borders, and onto two "Known Geothermal Resource Areas"-Island Park to the west and Corwin Springs on the north. Geysers are sensitive geologic features that are easily quenched by nearby geothermal wells. Therefore, the potential for geothermal energy development adjacent to Yellowstone poses a threat to the sustainability of about 500 geysers and 10,000 hydrothermal features. The purpose here is to propose that Yellowstone be protected by a "Geyser Protection Area" (GPA) extending in a 120-km radius from Old Faithful Geyser. The GPA concept would prohibit geothermal and large-scale groundwater wells, and thereby protect the water and heat supply of the hydrothermal reservoirs that support Yellowstone's geyser basins and important hot springs. Proactive federal leadership, including buyouts of private groundwater development rights, can assist in navigating the GPA through the greater Yellowstone area's "wicked" public policy environment. Moreover, the potential impacts on geyser basins from intrusive research sampling techniques are considered in order to facilitate the updating of national park research regulations to a precautionary standard. The GPA model can provide the basis for protecting the world's few remaining geyser basins.

  14. Reconciling Observations of the Yellowstone Hotspot with the Standard Plume Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihinger, P. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Johnson, B. R.

    2004-12-01

    The Yellowstone hotspot represents the type example of plume magmatism in the continental setting. The propagation of large silicic magmatic centers along the Snake River Plain independently tracks the southwestward trajectory of North American plate motion over the last 13 My. Structural deformation associated with the hotspot track is consistent with thermal upwelling, and tomographic studies image a well-defined cylindrical conduit at least down to the mantle transition zone. Furthermore, the high 3He/4He signatures suggest a deep mantle origin for Yellowstone magmas. Yet, there are several observations of the Yellowstone region that do not fit the standard plume model for hotspot magmatism. These include: 1) prevalent coeval magmatism in and around the hotspot track that continued well after passage of the underlying plume, 2) significant bimodal magmatism that occurred throughout the Great Basin during this time, and 3) the outpouring of the Miocene Columbia River flood basalts (CRFB) well north of the hotspot track. These features have led a number of researchers to favor a shallow upper mantle origin for Yellowstone hotspot activity controlled by structural weaknesses in the continental lithosphere. Here, we propose that the observations listed above conform to the standard plume model by considering interaction of the Yellowstone plume with the descending Farallon Plate beginning at 80 Ma. Anomalous geologic activity occurred throughout the Cenozoic Era in the North American Cordillera (NAC) and must be addressed in any model for the origin of magmatism in the western US, including the Yellowstone hotspot. In particular, extensive field and geochemical studies document a pronounced eastward migration of deformation and magmatism throughout the NAC from 80 to 40 Ma. Most researchers attribute this activity to shallowing of the Farallon slab beneath NA at this time. In addition, geochemical studies in the NAC document a transition in magmatism from

  15. Wait or escape? Contrasting submergence tolerance strategies of Rorippa amphibia, Rorippa sylvestris and their hybrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akman, M.; Bhikharie, A.V.; McLean, E.H.; Boonman, A.; Visser, E.J.W.; Schranz, M.E.; van Tienderen, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Differential responses of closely related species to submergence can provide insight into the evolution and mechanisms of submergence tolerance. Several traits of two wetland species from habitats with contrasting flooding regimes, Rorippa amphibia and Rorippa sylvestris, as well

  16. Growth rate, protein:RNA ratio and stoichiometric homeostasis of submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xing W.; Shi Q.; Liu H.; Liu G.

    2016-01-01

    Growth rate hypothesis (GRH) and stoichiometric homeostasis of photoautotrophs have always been questioned. However, little is known about GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of aquatic plants, especially submerged macrophytes. Therefore, we aim to test the GRH and explore stoichiometric homeostasis of four freshwater submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress. At the single species level and the multi-species level, N:P ratios ...

  17. Evidence of shoreline shift on the northern Saurashtra coast: Study based on the submerged temple complex at Pindara

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh

    . It is difficult to assign a particular reason for the submergence of the temple in discussion, however minor sea level rise and seismic activity might have played a vital role in submergence of the temple complex....

  18. Submerged beach ridge lineation and associated sedentary fauna in the innershelf of Gopalpur Coast, Orissa, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.M.; Murthy, K.S.R.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Lakshminarayana, S.; Rao, M.M.M.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Premkumar, M.K.; Sree, A.; Bapuji, M.

    . (e - mail: kmrao@kadali.nio.org) RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 81, NO. 7, 10 OCTOBER 2001 829 mic profiling to locate the submerged roc k outcrops. Though the submerged topographic features were r e por - ted by some...

  19. EAARL-B Submerged Topography–Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  20. THE STUDY ON THE DURABILITY OF SUBMERGED STRUCTURE DISPLACEMENT DUE TO CONCRETE FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures that exposed to marine environments are subjected to multiple deterioration mechanisms. An overview of the existing technology for submerged concrete, pressure resistant, concrete structures which related such as cracks, debonds, and delamination are discussed. Basic knowledge related to drowning durability such as submerged concrete structures in the maritime environment are the durability of a concrete and the ability to resist to weathering, chemical attack, abrasion or other deterioration processes. The measuring techniques and instrumentation for geometrical monitoring of submerged structural displacements have traditionally been categorized into two groups according to the two main groups, namely as geodetic surveying and geotechnical structural measurements of local displacements. This paper aims to study the durability of submerged concrete displacement and harmful effects of submerged concrete structures.

  1. [Effects of light on submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Sha, Zou; Ze-Yu, Nie; Xiao-Yan, Yao; Ji-Yan, Shi

    2013-07-01

    The restoration of submerged macrophytes is the key to remediate eutrophic water and maintain the health of aquatic ecosystem, while light is the main limiting factor. This paper summarized the factors affecting the light extinction in water and the mechanisms of light intensity affecting the physiology of submerged macrophytes, with the focuses on the metabolic mechanisms of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, the responses of antioxidant enzyme system, and the feedbacks of pigment composition and concentration in the common submerged macrophytes under low light stress. Several engineering techniques applied in the ecological restoration of submerged macrophytes were presented, and the framework of the restoration of submerged macrophytes in eutrophic water was proposed. Some problems in current research and several suggestions on future research were addressed, which could help the related research and engineering practices.

  2. GPS-Derived Models of Intraplate Deformation of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskas, C. M.; Smith, R. B.; Meertens, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    The 800-km long Yellowstone-Snake River Plain (YSRP) is interpreted to be the track of the Yellowstone hotspot. It has experienced over 150 giant silicic volcanic eruptions in the last 16 Ma from magmatic sources derived from interaction of the N. American Plate with a mantle heat source. GPS measurements at more than 170 temporary stations and 10 continuous sites were made between 1987 and the present to assess the kinematic deformation field. The GPS observations cover a 800 by 600 km area affected by the volcanic system and are used to constrain kinematic and dynamic models. The present center of YSRP volcanic activity, at the Yellowstone Plateau, exhibits extensive earthquake activity and anomalously high rates of crustal deformation of ~4 mm/yr SW extension. In contrast, the hotspot track along the eastern Snake River Plain has much lower displacement rates of ~2 mm/yr SW extension. GPS-derived principal strain rate fields for the entire YSRP reveal rotation of the extensional strain axes from N-S to E-W at Yellowstone. This change corresponds to similar directions for tensional stress axes derived from focal mechanisms, post-caldera vent alignments, and active faults. The YSRP deformation field is compared with other geodetic, geologic, and seismic observations of the strain field for western North America to examine how it fits into the plate boundary framework. Finite-element models of the resolved deformation incorporate GPS rates, fault slip rates, volcanic features, seismicity, etc. These models suggest compression of the Snake River Plain, which apparently deforms as a single block within the resolution of the GPS data. Higher displacement rates at the Yellowstone caldera are likely due to local volcanic activity combined with with regional extension, for regional extension rates alone do not account for the observed rates. Volcanic acitivity has reworked the topography, enhanced heat flow, and modified lithosphere composition through melting and

  3. Volatile emissions and gas geochemistry of Hot Spring Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Bergfeld, D.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Hunt, A.

    2008-01-01

    We characterize and quantify volatile emissions at Hot Spring Basin (HSB), a large acid-sulfate region that lies just outside the northeastern edge of the 640??ka Yellowstone Caldera. Relative to other thermal areas in Yellowstone, HSB gases are rich in He and H2, and mildly enriched in CH4 and H2S. Gas compositions are consistent with boiling directly off a deep geothermal liquid at depth as it migrates toward the surface. This fluid, and the gases evolved from it, carries geochemical signatures of magmatic volatiles and water-rock reactions with multiple crustal sources, including limestones or quartz-rich sediments with low K/U (or 40*Ar/4*He). Variations in gas chemistry across the region reflect reservoir heterogeneity and variable degrees of boiling. Gas-geothermometer temperatures approach 300????C and suggest that the reservoir feeding HSB is one of the hottest at Yellowstone. Diffuse CO2 flux in the western basin of HSB, as measured by accumulation-chamber methods, is similar in magnitude to other acid-sulfate areas of Yellowstone and is well correlated to shallow soil temperatures. The extrapolation of diffuse CO2 fluxes across all the thermal/altered area suggests that 410 ?? 140??t d- 1 CO2 are emitted at HSB (vent emissions not included). Diffuse fluxes of H2S were measured in Yellowstone for the first time and likely exceed 2.4??t d- 1 at HSB. Comparing estimates of the total estimated diffuse H2S emission to the amount of sulfur as SO42- in streams indicates ~ 50% of the original H2S in the gas emission is lost into shallow groundwater, precipitated as native sulfur, or vented through fumaroles. We estimate the heat output of HSB as ~ 140-370??MW using CO2 as a tracer for steam condensate, but not including the contribution from fumaroles and hydrothermal vents. Overall, the diffuse heat and volatile fluxes of HSB are as great as some active volcanoes, but they are a small fraction (1-3% for CO2, 2-8% for heat) of that estimated for the entire

  4. Controls on dryland mountain landscape development along the NW Saharan desert margin: Insights from Quaternary river terrace sequences (Dadès River, south-central High Atlas, Morocco)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokes, M.; Mather, A.E.; Belfoul, M.

    2017-01-01

    between 50 and 140 m. The rock strength, stratigraphy and structure of the mountain belt influences terrace distribution. Terraces are absent in river gorges of structurally thickened limestone; whilst well-developed, laterally continuous terraces (T1-T4) form along wide valleys occupying syncline...... spacing of terraces and their distribution throughout the orogen suggests sustained base-level lowering linked to uplift-exhumation of the High Atlas. Low incision rates (

  5. Environmental impact of introducing plant covers in the taluses of orchard terraces: implications for erosion and agricultural runoff control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Pleguezuelo, C.R.; Duran Zuazo, V.H.; Francia Martinez, J.R.; Martin Peinado, F.J.; Graaff, de J.; Muriel Fernandez, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    South-eastern Spain, and in particular the coastal areas of Granada and Malaga, feature a large area under subtropical crops, with orchards established on terraces built along the slopes of the mountainous areas. The climate, characterized by periodically heavy rainfall, variable in space and time,

  6. Soil nitrogen accretion along a floodplain terrace chronosequence in northwest Alaska: Influence of the nitrogen-fixing shrub Shepherdia Canadensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Rhoades; Dan Binkley; Hlynur Oskarsson; Robert Stottlemyer

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen enters terrestrial ecosystems through multiple pathways during primary succession. We measured accumulation of total soil nitrogen and changes in inorganic nitrogen (N) pools across a 300-y sequence of river terraces in northwest Alaska and assessed the contribution of the nitrogen-fixing shrub Shepherdia canadensis. Our work compared 5...

  7. Runoff and sediment generation on bench -terraced hillsides: measurements and up-scaling of a field-based model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.I.J.M.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Vertessy, R.A.; Ruijter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Despite widespread bench-terracing, stream sediment yields from agricultural hillsides in upland West Java remain high. We studied the causes of this lack of effect by combining measurements at different spatial scales using an erosion process model. Event runoff and sediment yield from two 4-ha

  8. Improvements in the Weeding of Levee Slope of Terraced Paddy Fields with Statutory Regulation of Places of Scenic Beauty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Ayumi

    A growing number of terraced paddy fields in Japan are being conserved as cultural assets like places of scenic beauty. This has meant that the task of weeding levee slope of these terraced paddy fields has become increasingly important, not only for general maintenance of the terraced paddy fields, but also because of the impact landscape, vegetation and the surrounding environment. However, the steep gradient of the levee slope and lack of footholds mean that the workability and safety associated with this weeding work is problematic. In addition, in the event that an area has been designated as a cultural asset, there are restrictions regarding how it can be modified and local farmers are reluctant to change their traditional farming methods in such cases. This study therefore sought to clarify the actual condition of the levee slope weeding work undertaken in the places of scenic beauty Obasute Tanada district. Empirical validations of potential measures for reforming the work environment were evaluated based on the findings of this investigation. We demonstrated that it is possible to modify current work practices while still maintaining and preserving the terraced paddy fields, even in designated scenic locations. To improve the working environment for levee slope weeding, we propose creating berms to serve as footholds at the toes of slopes.

  9. The hydrological response of a small catchment after the abandonment of terrace cultivation. A study case in northwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente-Adán, Jose A.; Lana-Renault, Noemí; Galilea, Ianire; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificacion

    2015-04-01

    Terrace construction for cultivation results in a complete transformation of the hillslopes to a series of flat sectors and almost vertical steps. This strategy, which involves a redistribution of soils and a re-organization of the drainage network, provides fertile soil over steep slopes, improves infiltration and controls overland flow under conditions of intense rainstorms. In Camero Viejo (north-western Iberian ranges) most of the hillslopes are occupied by terraced fields. During the XXth century, rural population declined and agricultural practices were abandoned. In this area, a small catchment (1.9 km2) was monitored in 2012 for studying how the abandonment of agricultural terraces affect water and sediment transfer from the hillslopes to the channels. Terraces occupy 40% of the catchment and are covered by sparse grass and shrubs. The equipment installed in the catchment registers continuously meteorological data, discharge and water table fluctuations. Data on suspended sediment transport is obtained by means of a rising-stage sampler. Here we present the hydrological results corresponding to the years 2012-13 and 2013-14. The hydrological response of the catchment was moderate (annual runoff coefficient generation process.

  10. Soil erosion, soil fertility and crop yield on slow-forming terraces in the highlands of Buberuka, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagabo, M.D.; Stroosnijder, L.; Visser, S.M.; Moore, D.

    2013-01-01

    Crop productivity in Rwanda is declining as a result of intensive farming on steep slopes, which leads to soil loss and declining soil fertility particularly in the northern highlands. Slow-forming terraces have been widely adopted in the northern highlands of Rwanda to control soil erosion however

  11. Landscape change in mediterranean farmlands: impacts of land abandonment on cultivation terraces in portofino (italy) and lesvos (greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der T.; Kizos, T.; Pedroli, G.B.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean landscape has been rapidly changing over the past decades. Many regions saw a population decline, which resulted in changing land use, abandonment of marginal lands and colonisation by shrubs and tree species. Typical features like farming terraces, olive yards, and upland

  12. Submarine terrace limestones from the continental slope off Saurashtra-Bombay: Evidence of Late Quaternary neotectonic activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Veerayya, M.

    m depth terrace was at intertidal depths at about 12,000 years BP. The eustatic sea-level, however, was at - 90 m at 12,000 years BP. This disparity suggests neotectonic activity and subsidence by about 40 m on the Saurashtra-Bombay region some time...

  13. The gap between plan and practice : Actual energy performance of the zero-energy refurbishment of a terraced house

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xexakis, G.; Van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Prêt-à-Loger, TU Delft’s entry to the Solar Decathlon Europe 2014 (SDE2014), demonstrated the conversion of a common terraced house to energy neutrality, whilst adding value to its living quality. The house was retrofitted according to principles of smart & bioclimatic design, using local

  14. Geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits of the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake, central Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River between Lake Overholser and Eufaula Lake, an area of about 1,835 square miles, and to determine the maximum annual yield of ground water. A 1982 water-level map of the alluvial and terrace aquifer was prepared using field data and published records. Data from test holes and other data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board were used to establish the approximate thickness of the alluvial and terrace deposits. The North Canadian River from Lake Overholser, near Oklahoma City, to Eufaula Lake is paralleled by a 2- to 3-mile wide band of alluvium. Scattered terrace deposits on either side of the alluvium reach an extreme width of 8 miles. Rocks of Permian age bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from the west to the midpoint of the study area; Pennsylvanian rocks bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from that point eastward. Three major aquifers are present in the study area: the alluvial and terrace aquifer, consisting of alluvium and terrace deposits of Quaternary age in a narrow band on either side of the North Canadian River; the Garber-Wellington aquifer of Permian age, consisting of an upper unconfined zone and a lower confined zone separated by relatively impermeable shales; and the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of Pennsylvanian age. At locations were the alluvial and terrace aquifer overlies either of the other aquifers, there is hydraulic continuity between the alluvial and terrace aquifer and the other aquifers, and water levels are the same. Most large-scale municipal and industrial pumping from the Garber-Wellington aquifer is from the lower zone and has little discernible effect upon the alluvial and terrace aquifer. The total estimated base flow of the North Canadian River for the studied reach is 264 cubic feet per second. Evapotranspiration from the basin in August is about 60 cubic

  15. Assessment of heavy metal contamination of surface soils from typical paddy terrace wetlands on the Yunnan Plateau of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Gong, Adu; Gao, Haifeng; Huang, Laibin

    Little research has been done to investigate heavy metal contamination in paddy soils along different altitudes under domestic sewage irrigation. Total concentrations of As, Cr, Cd and Pb were determined in surface paddy soils from Mengpin (MP) and Quanfuzhang (QFZ) paddy terraces on the Yunnan Plateau of China in December, 2004, in order to assess their contamination status. Results showed that the average concentrations of As and Cd in both terrace soils were significantly ( p Cr, the average concentrations are higher in MP soils while lower in QFZ soil than the reference concentration, while. Compared with MP soils, QFZ soils had lower heavy metal concentrations. However, only Cd greatly exceeded the guide value of soil quality. The contamination factor ( Cfi) values were generally moderate for As and Cd, and low for Pb in both sites. As for Cr, they were moderate in MP soils but low in QFZ soils. The contamination degree ( C d) values were generally moderate, showing a decreasing tendency along the increasing altitudes in MP terrace, while slowly increasing tendency in QFZ terrace.

  16. Architectural competitions and the issue of the autonomy of architecture: The case of Terazije Terrace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šišović Grozdana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Terazije Terrace in Belgrade and many different architectural projects for this space produced over the last almost 90 years are the subject matter of the analysis. The research is conducted with the aim to recognize and present diverse currents in the development of an architectural scene and shed light on the role of architectural competitions in these complex flows. The 1929-1930 competition won by Nikola Dobrović, as well as the 1968, 1991 and 1998 competitions with the awarded projects are the focal point of the paper as the samples of architectural practice significant for the understanding of the relations between the treatment of “grand architectural themes” and the dominant orientation of a local architectural culture. The theoretical framework refers to contemporary theoretical debate on the autonomy of the discipline (Somol and Whiting, 2002; Aureli, 2008; Hays, 2010; among the others.

  17. Rice Pricing during Organic Conversion of the Honghe Hani Rice Terrace System in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moucheng Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization initiated the Globally Important Agriculture Heritage Systems conservation program. Agricultural organic certification, based on traditional environmentally friendly technology, increases farmer income and encourages traditional agricultural heritage. However, during the organic conversion period, farmer income cannot be guaranteed; this period is also a bottleneck for heritage conservation via organic certification. Based on experiences at the Honghe Hani rice terrace system in Yunnan, China, we calculated and compared inputs and outputs of traditional and modern systems during organic conversion and developed a calculation method for determining opportunity costs of agricultural production. We found that the stability of farmer income during conversion can be guaranteed by setting the protective purchasing price at 6.93 CNY/kg, thereby achieving the goal of dynamic conservation of agricultural heritage systems.

  18. Luminescence dated Late Pleistocene wave-built terraces in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenitiro Suguio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents field and chronological investigations along the coast of northeastern Brazil from ~4°S to 9°S latitude, which corresponds to ~700 km of coastline under a semi-diurnal mesotidal regime. We investigated wave-built terrace deposits and dated sediments using the optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence methods on quartz grains. The wave-built terraces yielded two main age groups: 200-230 ka and 100-130 ka, which we interpreted as depositional ages. We correlated these age groups with oxygen-isotope stages 7c and 5e, respectively. These events correspond to the antepenultimate and penultimate transgressions along the Brazilian coast. The deposits occur mainly in patches on low-lying flat plateaus along the littoral zone and incision valleys that cut across coastal tablelands. The altitude of the base of the 200-230 ka terraces ranges from 10 m above mean sea level (asl to -2m asl, whereas the base of the 100-130 ka varies from 12 m asl to -2 m asl. Both terraces were deposited in the foreshore and upper shoreface zones. We noted a coincidence between sea-level highstand chronologies in northeastern Brazil and those in the Bahamas and Bermuda.Este estudo apresenta uma investigação de campo e geocronológica realizada ao longo da costa nordeste do Brasil entre ~4°S e 9°S de latitude, o que corresponde a ~700 km de costa submetida a um regime de meso-maré. Nós investigamos terraços marinhos construídos por ondas e datamos sedimentos usando luminescência oticamente estimulada e termoluminescência em grãos de quartzo. Os terraços marinhos forneceram dois grupos de idades: 200-230 ka e 100-130 ka, que interpretamos como idades de deposição. Nós correlacionamos estas idades com idades do estágio isotópico do oxigênio 7c e 5e, respectivamente. Estes eventos correspondem a antepenúltima e penúltima transgressões que ocorreram ao longo da costa brasileira. Os depósitos ocorrem predominantemente em

  19. Recent uplift of the Atlantic Atlas (offshore West Morocco): Tectonic arch and submarine terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdellouahed, M.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Rabineau, M.; Biari, Y.; Hafid, M.; Duarte, J. C.; Schnabel, M.; Baltzer, A.; Pedoja, K.; Le Roy, P.; Reichert, C.; Sahabi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Re-examination of marine geophysical data from the continental margin of West Morocco reveals a broad zone characterized by deformation, active faults and updoming offshore the High Atlas (Morocco margin), situated next to the Tafelney Plateau. Both seismic reflection and swath-bathymetric data, acquired during Mirror marine geophysical survey in 2011, indicate recent uplift of the margin including uplift of the basement. This deformation, which we propose to name the Atlantic Atlas tectonic arch, is interpreted to result largely through uplift of the basement, which originated during the Central Atlantic rifting stage - or even during phases of Hercynian deformation. This has produced a large number of closely spaced normal and reverse faults, ;piano key faults;, originating from the basement and affecting the entire sedimentary sequence, as well as the seafloor. The presence of four terraces in the Essaouira canyon system at about 3500 meters water depth and ;piano key faults; and the fact that these also affect the seafloor, indicate that the Atlantic Atlas is still active north of Agadir canyon. We propose that recent uplift is causing morphogenesis of four terraces in the Essaouira canyon system. In this paper the role of both Canary plume migration and ongoing convergence between the African and Eurasian plates in the formation of the Atlantic Atlas are discussed as possibilities to explain the presence of a tectonic arch in the region. The process of reactivation of passive margins is still not well understood. The region north of Agadir canyon represents a key area to better understand this process.

  20. Two millennia of soil dynamics derived from ancient desert terraces using high resolution 3-D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filin, Sagi; Arav, Reuma; Avni, Yoav

    2017-04-01

    Large areas in the arid southern Levant are dotted with ancient terrace-based agriculture systems which were irrigated by runoff harvesting techniques. They were constructed and maintained between the 3rd - 9th centuries AD and abandoned in the 10th century AD. During their 600 years of cultivation, these terraces documented the gradual aggradation of alluvial soils, erosion processes within the drainage basins, as well as flashflood damage. From their abandonment and onwards, they documented 1000 years and more of land degradation and soil erosion processes. Examination of these installations presents an opportunity to study natural and anthropogenic induced changes over almost two millennia. On a global scale, such an analysis is unique as it is rare to find intact manifestations of anthropogenic influences over such time-scales because of landscape dynamics. It is also rare to find a near millennia documentation of soil erosion processes. We study in this paper the aggradation processes within intact agriculture plots in the region surrounding the world heritage Roman-Byzantine ancient city of Avdat, Negev Highlands. We follow the complete cycle of the historical desert agriculture, from the configuration pre-dating the first anthropogenic intervention, through the centuries of cultivation, and up to the present erosion phase, which spans over more than a millennium. We use high resolution 3-D laser scans to document the erosion and the environmental dynamics during these two millennia. The high-resolution data is then utilized to compute siltation rates as well as erosion rates. The long-term measures of soil erosion and land degradation we present here significantly improve our understanding of the mechanism of long-term environmental change acting in arid environments. For sustainable desert inhabitation, the study offers insights into better planning of modern agriculture in similar zones as well as insights on strategies needed to protect such historical

  1. Agricultural terraces montoring and modeling: a field survey in Chianti region, Firenze, Italy - First part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Federico; Caruso, Marco; Dani, Andrea; Errico, Alessandro; Guastini, Enrico; Trucchi, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The two abstracts present the design and set-up of an experimental field plant whose aim is the study and modeling of water circulation in a terraced slope together with its influence on the stability of the retaining dry stone walls. The pilot plant is located at "Fattoria di Lamole" (Greve in Chianti, Firenze, Italy) where both ancient and recently restored or rebuilt dry stone retaining walls are present. The intense vineyards cultivation makes it very representative in terms of range of external stresses that affect both hillslopes and walls. The research is developed within a bigger framework of landscape preservation as a way to prevent hydrogeological instabilities and landslide risks. First Part A first/preliminary field survey was carried out in order to estimate the hydraulic and mechanical soil characteristics. Field saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements with the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) method on a terrace along an alignment were performed. Infiltrometer tests with a double ring device and soil texture determinations with both fine particle-size and skeleton fraction distributions were also performed. The Direct shear test on undisturbed and reconstituted soil samples will offer an estimation of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope parameters (friction angle and cohesion). A reference portion of a dry stone wall will be also monitored. Lateral earth pressure at backfill-retaining wall interface (compared to temperature and air pressure measured values), backfill volumetric water content (both in saturated and unsaturated states) and ground-water level are measured. Acknowledgements Italian Research Project of Relevant Interest (PRIN2010-2011), prot. 20104ALME4, National network for monitoring, modeling, and sustainable management of erosion processes in agricultural land and hilly-mountainous area

  2. The Pink and White Terraces of Lake Rotomahana: what was their fate after the 1886 Tarawera Rift eruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Fornari, D. J.; Ferrini, V. L.; Walker, S. L.; Davy, B. W.; LeBlanc, C.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Kukulya, A. L.; Littlefield, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Pink and White Terraces that once stood regally on the shores of old Lake Rotomahana, and which were unique in their beauty as a natural wonder of the world, were regarded by the local Māori as a taonga, or treasure, because of the therapeutic qualities of the waters and their majestic appearance. The eruption of Mt. Tarawera on June 10, 1886 is commonly cited as the cause of their demise, with the lake rapidly rising soon thereafter to drown the large, newly formed Rotomahana crater and other volcanic edifices shaped during the excavation of the old lake. Thus, the effects of the eruption have been masked from onlookers for more than 125 years. However, application of state-of-the-art survey techniques usually applied in the marine realm to modern Lake Rotomahana, including AUV surveys with numerous sensors, seismic profiling, water column surveys and deployment of deep sea cameras, has provided a wealth of new information about the state of hydrothermal systems in the lake and the probable fortunes of the Pink and White Terraces. We believe that the majority of both sets of terraces were destroyed during the eruption. However, some tantalizing evidence remains for remnants from both sites to exist to this day. High-resolution bathymetric mapping of the lake floor clearly recognizes some features of the post-1886 landscape, including a prominent landmark known as The Pinnacle. If we accept the postulated location of The Pinnacle on a pre-1886 map of Lake Rotomahana, then we appear to have captured a photograph of one of the buttresses to a tier of the nearby White Terraces. More revealing, are side-scan sonar images of structures located in the correct position of the Pink Terraces with respect to The Pinnacle, albeit ~ 20 m deeper than expected if the pre-1886 lake level of 292 m above sea level is to be believed. This work clearly shows that the greater Pink Terraces hydrothermal system survived the eruption and is very active today, whereas that part of

  3. Impacts of terracing on soil erosion control and crop yield in two agro-ecological zones of Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutebuka, Jules; Ryken, Nick; Uwimanzi, Aline; Nkundwakazi, Olive; Verdoodt, Ann

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion remains a serious limiting factor to the agricultural production in Rwanda. Terracing has been widely adopted in many parts of the country in the past years, but its effectiveness is not yet known. Besides the standard radical (bench) terraces promoted by the government, also progressive terraces (with living hedges) become adopted mainly by the farmers. The aim of this study was to measure short-term (two consecutive rainy seasons 2016A and 2016B) run-off and soil losses for existing radical (RT) and progressive (PT) terraces versus non-protected (NP) fields using erosion plots installed in two agro-ecological zones, i.e. Buberuka highlands (site Tangata) and Eastern plateau (site Murehe) and determine their impacts on soil fertility and crop production. The erosion plot experiment started with a topsoil fertility assessment and during the experiment, maize was grown as farmer's cropping preference in the area. Runoff data were captured after each rainfall event and the collected water samples were dried to determine soil loss. Both erosion control measures reduced soil losses in Tangata, with effectiveness indices ranging from 43 to 100% when compared to the NP plots. RT showed the highest effectiveness, especially in season A. In Murehe, RT minimized runoff and soil losses in both seasons. Yet, the PT were largely inefficient, leading to soil losses exceeding those on the NP plots (ineffectiveness index of -78% and -65% in season A and B, respectively). Though topsoil fertility assessment in the erosion plots showed that the soil quality parameters were significantly higher in RT and NP plots compared to the PT plots on both sites, maize grain yield was not correlated with the physical effectiveness of the erosion control measures. Finally, the effectiveness of soil erosion control measures as well as their positive impacts on soil fertility and production differ not only by terracing type but also by agro-ecological zone and the management or

  4. Spatial patterns and stability of soil water content in forested slope and terraced area on the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoce; Li, Zhanbin; Li, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) plays a vital role in hydrological and vegetation restoration processes. It is the principal limiting factor for vegetation restoration on the Loess Plateau of China. This study aimed to analyze the spatial patterns and stability of SWC in a terraced area containing jujube trees (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) and a forested slope with Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) following rainfall. The SWCs in nine soil layers at intervals of 0.2 m down to a depth of 1.8 m were measured at 21 locations both in the terraces and in the forested slope from July 19 to September 3 in 2014. The results showed that the SWCs at different soil depths were normally distributed. The SWC in terraces and forestland at each soil depth all had strong temporal stability. The temporal stability of SWC was lower in the 0-0.4 m soil layer than at the deeper soil depths. The representative locations for SWC were depth-dependent and the number of representative locations was not constant. The mean SWC was largest in the lower terrace slopes. The lowest mean SWC in the forested slope was at the mid-slope point due to the highest root distribution. The 0.4-0.6 m soil depth was generally the wettest in both terraces and forestland. The driest soil depth in terraces was 1.0-1.2 m while the driest soil depth in forestland was 0.8-1.0 m. The SWC had a significant positive correlation with clay and silt content. Moerover, the SWC had a significant positive correlation with SOC and did not have a significant correlation with root conten in the terraced area. But in the forested slope, the SWC had a significant negative correlation with roots and did not have a significant correlation with SOC. Although it is feasible to use the representative locations of SWC to represent the mean SWC of a hillslope over a period of time, the cumulative absolute error increases with the cumulative number of days. In conclusion, the SWC at different soil depths and locations showed strong spatial

  5. Terraced landscape: from an old best practice to a rising land abandoned-related soil erosion risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Preti, Federico; Romano, Nunzio

    2013-04-01

    Among the most evident landscape signatures of human fingerprint during the Holocene, the terraces related to agricultural activities deserve a great importance. Landscape terracing probably represents one of the oldest best practice primarily for crop production, but also for mitigating soil erosion and stabilizing hillslopes in landforms dominated by steep slopes. This technique is widely used in various parts of the world even under different environmental conditions. In some zones, terraced landscapes, because of their history and locations, can also be considered a historical heritage and a sort of "cultural landscape" to preserve, an absolutely value for tourism. To preserve their original role of soil erosion prevention, terraces should be properly designed built according to specific and sustainable engineering rules. Then, their maintenance is the most critical issue to deal with. It is well known from literature that terraced landscapes subject to abandonment would result in an increasing of terrace failure and related land degradation. If not maintained, a progressively increasing of gully erosion affects the structure of the walls. The results of this process is the increasing of connectivity and runoff. During the last few years and partly because of changing in the society perspective and migration toward metropolitan areas, some Countries have been affected by a serious and wider land abandonment with an increasing of soil erosion and derived landslide risk. Italy is one example. In this work, we consider three typical case studies of a terraced landscape where the lack of maintenance characterizing the last few years, increased the landslide risk with several problems to the population. The first case study is located along the renowed "Amalfi Coast" (a portion of land located near Salerno, southern Italy), the second is placed in the north of Toscana (a region located in Central Italy), and the third one along the so-called "Cinque Terre" (a region

  6. Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Max; Konnerup, Dennis; Pedersen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerg...

  7. Hydrothermal alteration products and stable isotope ratios of the Sulfur Creek Tuff; a window into the subsurface environment of the Yellowstone caldera in Yellowstone National Park, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonero, A.; Larson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Yellowstone Caldera in northwest Wyoming is the site of active hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal activity relating to the Yellowstone hotspot has resulted in the alteration of rhyolites within the caldera. Specifically, the Seven Mile Hole area of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone River provides an ideal location and opportunity to investigate the nature of the ongoing hydrothermal alteration. Here, erosion by the river has exposed a sequence of rocks which are host to hydrothermal fluids and are themselves significantly altered. Analyses of clay minerals and other alteration products, such as opal, has been undertaken in order to characterize and distinguish different zones of alteration. Hydrogen isotope ratios have been measured for the altered rock units within the Seven-Mile Hole area, and they range from -84.6 ‰ to -185.1 ‰ (VSMOW). Samples from this area commonly contain minerals such as kaolinite, illite, alunite, or buddingtonite, and the deuterium / hydrogen (D/H) ratios of these mineral phases are shown to vary considerably with respect to their location and elevation in the canyon. Additionally, oxygen isotope ratios have been measured on some samples in order to compare the samples' isotope values to the local meteoric water line. Plotting these samples in δD - δ18O space has shown that some values lie in a region trending away from the meteoric water line and along a "kaolinite line." This area is parallel to the array of Yellowstone hot spring fluids and a broad range of values are possible here depending on temperature of alteration. Furthermore, these data support a model where hydrothermal fluids flow upward through faults related to caldera collapse that are present in the sulfur creek tuff. This research may also show that the unique coloration patterns visible on the slopes of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone can be, in part, explained as the result of both surface oxidation and hydrothermal alteration processes. Major element XRF

  8. Exploring the State of Retention of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK in a Hani Rice Terrace Village, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK is one of the components of the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS, which are good examples of evolutionary adapted socio-ecosystems in human history. The Hani Rice Terraces System, located in China’s southwestern Yunnan Province, is a living example of GIAHS. The Hani Rice Terraces system has existed for more than one thousand years, following TEK related to cultivation and natural resources management, which was collected and practiced continually. Over this long time period, TEK has enabled the Hani people to manage their terraces and other natural resources in a sustainable way. This paper concentrates on the TEK transferring in the current Hani community, taking a small village, Mitian, as an example. Grouping the interviewees into three different age groups (young group, 0–30 years old; middle-age group, 31–50 years old; old group > 50 years old, we investigated their understanding and participation in 13 items of TEK in relation to rice cultivation and water utilization. The items of TEK were divided into four categories, namely “Festivals”, “Beliefs”, “Folk Songs”, and “Water Management”. From the data collected, it was learned that all the items of TEK are well known, but not necessarily practiced. Age and gender have significant influences on farmers’ understanding and participation in TEK. Our analysis suggested that both the knowledge and the practice showed declining trends from the older to the younger age group. Men and women behave differently in practices. In general, it is shown that TEK is declining in the Hani villages which will affect the rice terrace system in ways that are yet unknown. It is likely that a blended TEK, with old and new knowledge and practices, will emerge to sustain the upland rice terrace systems of Yunnan.

  9. Rates of river incision across the main tectonic units of the Pamir identified using optically stimulated luminescence dating of fluvial terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Margret C.; Gloaguen, Richard; Krbetschek, Matthias; Szulc, Adam

    2014-07-01

    Calculated incision rates along the Panj, the main river of the Pamir, are used to investigate any influence by tectonics or climate on the architecture of the river. The depositional ages of Panj River terraces were calculated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of terrace sand. Fluvial incision rates were generated by integrating the terrace depositional ages with accurate kinematic GPS measurements of terrace heights above the modern Panj. We investigated 16 terraces along the Panj at the western Pamir margin and one terrace from the Vakhsh River to the north of the Pamir. The results reveal brief periods of fluvial deposition over the past 26 kyr. The oldest Panj terrace depositional ages coincide with early MIS 2 and MIS 2/1 glaciations on the Pamir Plateau. Younger terrace ages have no apparent link with glacial cycles. Terraces with varying heights above the modern Panj at different localities yielded similar depositional ages. This suggests that local conditions have determined fluvial incision rates. Combining all of the terrace measurements, the average incision rate of the Panj over the last 26 kyr has been ~ 5.6 mm/yr. A high mean incision rate of ~ 7.3 mm/yr was calculated from terraces where the Panj has cut a steep-sided valley through the Shakhdara dome. Significantly lower incision rates (~ 2-3 mm/yr) were calculated from terraces where the Panj flows along the southern boundaries of the Shakhdara and Yazgulom domes. At those localities, graded segments of the Panj River profile and increased valley widths are indicative of local base levels. Downstream of the Yazgulom dome, river incision rates are generally lower (~ 4-5 mm/yr) than the Panj average. However, there is one exception where higher incision rates (~ 6 mm/yr) were calculated upstream of the Darvaz Fault Zone, a major tectonic feature that forms the western boundary of the Pamir. The Vakhsh River terrace to the north of the Pamir yielded a lower incision rate (~ 3 mm

  10. Effect of Coffee Pulp Compost and Terrace on Erosion, Run off and Nutrients Loss from Coffee Plantation in Lahat Regency, South Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Masreah Bernas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available On some coffee plantations in Lahat Regency South Sumatra, in some places the farmers did not apply agricultural practices, such as tillage, conservation practices, and fertilizers. Many researches have been done to study about effects of organic fertilizer on soil nutrients content and plant growth as well as and the impacts of terrace on soil water content, run-off and erosion. However, there was less research in the highland area. Whereas the possibility of run off, erosion and nutrient leaching the high land area was high. Thus, it was important to apply terrace and organic coffee pulp in this farm. The aims of this research were to determine the effect of terrace and organic fertilizer on run off and soil erosion, nutrients loss and nutrient content in coffee leaves. Terrace system and organic fertilizer were applied on a one year old coffee plantation in Lahat Regency. Before the treatment applied, coffee pulp as organic fertilizer was decomposed in the chamber for about 2 months. The experiment was conducted in factorial in a Randomized Block Design with two factors. The first factor was coffee pulp compost (0, 3, and 6 Mg ha-1, and the second factor was type of terrace (without, individual, and bund terraces. The size of each plot was 2 m width and 10 m length. Data was analysed by using LSD (Least Significant Different test. The result shows that bund terrace reduced runoff and erosion significantly up to 79% (for run off water and 78% (for eroded soil compared to without terrace. Organic fertilizer did not affect run off and soil erosion. This may be caused by properties of coffee pulp compost which were fine particulates and the dosages of application were too low to cover soil suface. Bund terrace decreased significantly N, P, K nutrients in soil loss (sediment. The amount of N loss was reduced from 3.37 kg ha-1 per four months (without terrace to about 0.75 kg ha-1 per four months (bund terrace. Terrace and organic fertilizer did

  11. Water-Chemistry Data for Selected Springs, Geysers, and Streams in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, James W.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Holloway, JoAnn M.

    2008-01-01

    Water analyses are reported for 157 samples collected from numerous hot springs, their overflow drainages, and Lemonade Creek in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) during 2003-2005. Water samples were collected and analyzed for major and trace constituents from ten areas of YNP including Terrace and Beryl Springs in the Gibbon Canyon area, Norris Geyser Basin, the West Nymph Creek thermal area, the area near Nymph Lake, Hazle Lake, and Frying Pan Spring, Lower Geyser Basin, Washburn Hot Springs, Mammoth Hot Springs, Potts Hot Spring Basin, the Sulphur Caldron area, and Lemonade Creek near the Solfatara Trail. These water samples were collected and analyzed as part of research investigations in YNP on arsenic, antimony, and sulfur redox distribution in hot springs and overflow drainages, and the occurrence and distribution of dissolved mercury. Most samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, trace metals, redox species of antimony, arsenic, iron, nitrogen, and sulfur, and isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Analyses were performed at the sampling site, in an on-site mobile laboratory vehicle, or later in a U.S. Geological Survey laboratory, depending on stability of the constituent and whether it could be preserved effectively. Water samples were filtered and preserved onsite. Water temperature, specific conductance, pH, Eh (redox potential relative to the Standard Hydrogen Electrode), and dissolved hydrogen sulfide were measured onsite at the time of sampling. Acidity was determined by titration, usually within a few days of sample collection. Alkalinity was determined by titration within 1 to 2 weeks of sample collection. Concentrations of thiosulfate and polythionate were determined as soon as possible (generally minutes to hours after sample collection) by ion chromatography in an on-site mobile laboratory vehicle. Total dissolved-iron and ferrous-iron concentrations often were measured onsite in the mobile laboratory vehicle. Concentrations of dissolved

  12. The Yellowstone magmatic system from the mantle plume to the upper crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. H.; Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.; Farrell, J.; Smith, R. B.; Tsai, V. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Yellowstone supervolcano is one of the largest active continental silicic volcanic fields in the world. An understanding of its properties is key to enhancing our knowledge of volcanic mechanisms and corresponding risk. Using a joint local and teleseismic earthquake P-wave seismic inversion, we unveil a basaltic lower-crustal magma body that provides a magmatic link between the Yellowstone mantle plume and the previously imaged upper-crustal magma reservoir. This lower-crustal magma body has a volume of 46,000 km3, ~4.5 times larger than the upper-crustal magma reservoir, and contains a melt fraction of ~2%. These estimates are critical to understanding the evolution of bimodal basaltic-rhyolitic volcanism, explaining the magnitude of CO2 discharge, and constraining dynamic models of the magmatic system for volcanic hazard assessment.

  13. Tree-ring 14C links seismic swarm to CO2 spike at Yellowstone, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; McGeehin, J.P.; King, J.C.; Heasler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain swarms of shallow seismicity and inflation-deflation cycles at Yellowstone caldera (western United States) commonly invoke episodic escape of magma-derived brines or gases from the ductile zone, but no correlative changes in the surface efflux of magmatic constituents have ever been documented. Our analysis of individual growth rings in a tree core from the Mud Volcano thermal area within the caldera links a sharp ~25% drop in 14C to a local seismic swarm in 1978. The implied fivefold increase in CO2 emissions clearly associates swarm seismicity with upflow of magma-derived fluid and shows that pulses of magmatic CO2 can rapidly traverse the 5-kmthick brittle zone, even through Yellowstone's enormous hydrothermal reservoir. The 1978 event predates annual deformation surveys, but recognized connections between subsequent seismic swarms and changes in deformation suggest that CO2 might drive both processes. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  14. Monitoring Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem wetlands: Can long-term monitoring help us understand their future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Andrew M.; Sepulveda, Adam; Hossack, Blake R.; Patla, Debra; Thoma, David; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Litt, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), changes in the drying cycles of wetlands have been documented. Wetlands are areas where the water table is at or near the land surface and standing shallow water is present for much or all of the growing season. We discuss how monitoring data can be used to document variation in annual flooding and drying patterns of wetlands monitored across Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, investigate how these patterns are related to a changing climate, and explore how drying of wetlands may impact amphibians. The documented declines of some amphibian species are of growing concern to scientists and land managers alike, in part because disappearances have occurred in some of the most protected places. These disappearances are a recognized component of what is being described as Earth’s sixth mass extinction.

  15. Volcanology. The Yellowstone magmatic system from the mantle plume to the upper crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schmandt, Brandon; Farrell, Jamie; Smith, Robert B; Tsai, Victor C

    2015-05-15

    The Yellowstone supervolcano is one of the largest active continental silicic volcanic fields in the world. An understanding of its properties is key to enhancing our knowledge of volcanic mechanisms and corresponding risk. Using a joint local and teleseismic earthquake P-wave seismic inversion, we revealed a basaltic lower-crustal magma body that provides a magmatic link between the Yellowstone mantle plume and the previously imaged upper-crustal magma reservoir. This lower-crustal magma body has a volume of 46,000 cubic kilometers, ~4.5 times that of the upper-crustal magma reservoir, and contains a melt fraction of ~2%. These estimates are critical to understanding the evolution of bimodal basaltic-rhyolitic volcanism, explaining the magnitude of CO2 discharge, and constraining dynamic models of the magmatic system for volcanic hazard assessment. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Critical Assessment of Temperature Distribution in Submerged Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Negi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution during any welding process holds the key for understanding and predicting several important welding attributes like heat affected zone, microstructure of the weld, residual stress, and distortion during welding. The accuracy of the analytical approaches for modeling temperature distribution during welding has been constrained by oversimplified assumptions regarding boundary conditions and material properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to model the temperature distribution during submerged arc welding process using finite element modeling technique implemented in ANSYS v12. In the present analysis, heat source is assumed to be double-ellipsoidal with Gaussian volumetric heat generation. Furthermore, variation of material properties with temperature and both convective and radiant heat loss boundary condition have been considered. The predicted temperature distribution is then validated against the experimental results obtained by thermal imaging of the welded plate, and they are found to be in a good agreement.

  17. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  18. Numerical study on tsunami hazard mitigation using a submerged breakwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taemin; Yoo, Jeseon; Han, Sejong; Cho, Yong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Most coastal structures have been built in surf zones to protect coastal areas. In general, the transformation of waves in the surf zone is quite complicated and numerous hazards to coastal communities may be associated with such phenomena. Therefore, the behavior of waves in the surf zone should be carefully analyzed and predicted. Furthermore, an accurate analysis of deformed waves around coastal structures is directly related to the construction of economically sound and safe coastal structures because wave height plays an important role in determining the weight and shape of a levee body or armoring material. In this study, a numerical model using a large eddy simulation is employed to predict the runup heights of nonlinear waves that passed a submerged structure in the surf zone. Reduced runup heights are also predicted, and their characteristics in terms of wave reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients are investigated.

  19. Numerical Study on Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Using a Submerged Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taemin Ha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most coastal structures have been built in surf zones to protect coastal areas. In general, the transformation of waves in the surf zone is quite complicated and numerous hazards to coastal communities may be associated with such phenomena. Therefore, the behavior of waves in the surf zone should be carefully analyzed and predicted. Furthermore, an accurate analysis of deformed waves around coastal structures is directly related to the construction of economically sound and safe coastal structures because wave height plays an important role in determining the weight and shape of a levee body or armoring material. In this study, a numerical model using a large eddy simulation is employed to predict the runup heights of nonlinear waves that passed a submerged structure in the surf zone. Reduced runup heights are also predicted, and their characteristics in terms of wave reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients are investigated.

  20. Phytoremediation of arsenic in submerged soil by wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomjun, Nateewattana; Siripen, Trichaiyaporn; Maliwan, Saeouy; Jintapat, Nateewattana; Prasak, Thavornyutikarn; Somporn, Choonluchanon; Petch, Pengchai

    2011-01-01

    Wetland aquatic plants including Canna glauca L., Colocasia esculenta L. Schott, Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were used in the phytoremediation of submerged soil polluted by arsenic (As). Cyperus papyrus L. was noticed as the largest biomass producer which has arsenic accumulation capacity of 130-172 mg As/kg plant. In terms of arsenic removal rate, however, Colocasia esculenta L. was recognized as the largest and fastest arsenic remover in this study. Its arsenic removal rate was 68 mg As/m2/day while those rates of Canna glauca L., Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were 61 mg As/m2/day, 56 mg As/m2/day, and 56 mg As/m2/day, respectively. Although the 4 aquatic plants were inferior in arsenic accumulation, their high arsenic removal rates were observed. Phytostabilization should be probable for the application of these plants.

  1. Minimizing downstream scour due to submerged hydraulic jump using corrugated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of hydraulic structures due to hydraulic jump is considered one of the tedious and complicated problems facing their stability. Throughout this paper, an experimental study was conducted to study the effect of using different spaced corrugated aprons on the downstream local scour due to submerged jump. Sixty runs were carried out in a horizontal rectangular flume to determine the optimal corrugation wavelength which minimizing the scour. A case of flat apron included to estimate the influence of corrugated aprons on scour holes dimensions. Two types of non-cohesive soil were used. Experiments were performed for a range of Froude numbers between 1.68 and 9.29. The results showed that using spaced triangular corrugated aprons minimize the scour depth and length of fine sand by average percentage of 63.4% and 30.2%, respectively and for coarse sand by 44.2% and 20.6% in comparing with classical jump.

  2. Microbial production of four biodegradable siderophores under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Al-Shihri, Ayed S; Alfaifi, Mohammad Y; Saleh, Kamel A; Alshehri, Mohammed A; Elbehairi, Serag Eldin I; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Four siderophore analogues were isolated and purified from Escherichia coli, Bacillus spp. ST13, and Streptomyces pilosus microorganisms under some specific submerged fermentation conditions. In order to evaluate the highest production of this siderophore analogues through the growth, a rapid spectrophotometric screening semi-quantitative method was used, in which interestingly the analogues were isolated in its own form not its iron chelate. After chromatographic separation, the chemical structures of the isolated and purified siderophores were illustrated using detailed spectroscopic techniques. The biodegradation studies were done on that four novel isolated and purified siderophores following OECD protocols. In addition, the bioactivities of these siderophores and their iron complexes were examined and evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Jeffrey D. Smith; Kent D. Peasle

    2002-10-14

    Accretion formation and the associated clogging of SENs is a major problem for the steel industry leading to decreased strand speed, premature changing of SENs or strand termination and the associated reductions in productivity, consistency, and steel quality. A program to evaluate potentially clog resistance materials was initiated at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The main objective of the research effort was to identify combinations of steelmaking and refractory practices that would yield improved accretion resistance for tundish nozzles and submerged entry nozzles. A number of tasks were identified during the initial kick-off meeting and each was completed with two exceptions, the thermal shock validation and the industrial trials. Not completing these two tasks related to not having access to industrial scale production facilities. Though much of the results and information generated in the project is of proprietary nature.

  4. Slag-metal equilibrium during submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, C. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1981-09-01

    A thermodynamic model of the equilibria existing between the slag and the weld metal during submerged arc welding is presented. As formulated, the model applies only to fused neutral fluxes containing less than 20 pct CaF2, however some results indicate that the model may be useful in more general cases as well. The model is shown to be capable of predicting the gain or loss of both Mn and Si over a wide range of baseplate, electrode and flux compositions. At large deviations from the predicted equilibrium, the experimental results indicate considerable variability in the amount of Mn or Si transferred between the slag and metal phases, while closer to the calculated equilibrium, the extent of metal transfer becomes more predictable. The variability in metal transfer rate at large deviations from equilibrium may be explained by variations between the bulk and the surface concentrations of Mn and Si in both metal and slag phases.

  5. Endodontic Treatment in Submerged Roots: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Pameshwar Hiremath

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. While the extent and pattern of resorption is variable among individuals, there is a progressive loss of ridge contour as a result of physiologic bone remodeling. Even today, with best modalities of tooth preservation, there is a group of elderly individuals who do not benefit from modern preventive practices and who now present a dilemma in terms of maintaining the masticatory apparatus necessary for nutrition. Even with excellent dental care, such patients experience abrasion of the natural tooth crowns with age, and embedded roots are left within the alveolar bone. According to old concepts of dental care, extraction of these roots would have been recommended, but today’s goal of excellence in endodontics dictates otherwise. We report a case in which vital and non-vital root submergence was carried out to prevent alveolar ridge reduction.

  6. Siliceous algal and bacterial stromatolites in hot spring and geyser effluents of yellowstone national park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M R; Bauld, J; Brock, T D

    1972-10-27

    Growing algal and bacterial stromatolites composed of nearly amorphous silica occur around hot springs and geysers in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Some Precambrian stromatolites may be bacterial rather than algal, which has important implications in atmospheric evolution, since bacterial photo-synthesis does not release oxygen. Conophyton stromatolites were thought to have become extinct at the end of the Precambrian, but are still growing in hot spring effluents.

  7. Rapid heterogeneous assembly of multiple magma reservoirs prior to Yellowstone supereruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Jörn-Frederik Wotzlaw; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Richard A. Stern; Francois-Xavier D’Abzac; Urs Schaltegger

    2015-01-01

    Large-volume caldera-forming eruptions of silicic magmas are an important feature of continental volcanism. The timescales and mechanisms of assembly of the magma reservoirs that feed such eruptions as well as the durations and physical conditions of upper-crustal storage remain highly debated topics in volcanology. Here we explore a comprehensive data set of isotopic (O, Hf) and chemical proxies in precisely U-Pb dated zircon crystals from all caldera-forming eruptions of Yellowstone supervo...

  8. Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

    2006-05-30

    Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

  9. Trophic facilitation by introduced top predators: grey wolf subsidies to scavengers in Yellowstone National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Wilmers, C C; Crabtree, R L; Smith, D W; Murphy, K M; Getz, Wayne M.

    2003-01-01

    1. The reintroduction of grey wolves Canis lupus (L.) to Yellowstone National Park provides a natural experiment in which to study the effects of a keystone predator on ecosystem function. 2. Grey wolves often provision scavengers with carrion by partially consuming their prey. 3. In order to examine how grey wolf foraging behaviour influences the availability of carrion to scavengers, we observed consumption of 57 wolf-killed elk Cervus elaphus (L.) and determined the percentage of edible bi...

  10. Late Quaternary river terrace sequences in the eastern Kunlun Range, northern Tibet: A combined record of climatic change and surface uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An; Smith, Jacqueline A.; Wang, Guocan; Zhang, Kexin; Xiang, Shuyuan; Liu, Demin

    2009-04-01

    The Kunlun Range, a reactivated orogenic belt, constitutes the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The extreme relief and major landforms of the Kunlun Range are a product of late Cenozoic tectonics and erosion. However, well-developed late Quaternary terraces that occur along the northern slope of the Kunlun Range probably resulted from climatic change rather than surface uplift. The terrace sequences formed in thick Quaternary valley fills and have total incision depths of 50-60 m. Optically stimulated luminescence dating was employed to place time controls on the valley fills and associated terraces. Dating results suggest that periods of significant aggradation were synchronous between different rivers and correspond to the last glacial stage. The abrupt change from aggradation to incision occurred between 21.9 ± 2.7 and 16 ± 2.2 ka, coincident with the last glacial-interglacial transition. Additional terraces developed during the late glacial period and early to middle Holocene. Based on a broader set of chronological data in northern Tibet, at least four regional incision periods can be recognized. Chronological data, terrace elevation profiles, and climate proxy records suggest that these terracing periods were triggered by cool and/or wet climatic conditions. A geometric survey of the riverbed longitudinal profile suggests that surface uplift serves as a potential dynamic forcing for long-term incision. A model is proposed for terrace formation as a response to climatic perturbation in an uplifted mountain range.

  11. A Long-Term Comparison of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Abundance and Size Structure in Their Historical Range in Idaho.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Schill, Daniel J.; Elle, F. Steven

    2002-05-23

    We compared estimates of population abundance and size structure for Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri obtained by electrofishing 77 stream segments across southeastern Idaho in the 1980s and again in 1999-2000 to test whether populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout had changed. Sites sampled in the 1980s were relocated in 1999-2000 by using maps and photographs or by finding original site-boundary stakes, so that the same reach of stream was sampled during both periods. Abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout longer than 10 cm did not change, averaging 41 fish/100 m of stream during both the 1980s and 1999-2000. The proportion of the total catch of trout composed of Yellowstone cutthroat trout also did not change, averaging 82% in the 1980s and 78% in 1999-2000. At the 48 sites where size structure could be estimated for both periods, the proportion of Yellowstone cutthroat trout that were 10-20 cm long declined slightly (74% versus 66%), but the change was due entirely to the shift in size structure at the Teton River sites. The number of sites that contained rainbow trout O. mykiss or cutthroat trout 3 rainbow trout hybrids rose from 23 to 37, but the average proportion of the catch composed of rainbow trout and hybrids did not increase (7% in both the 1980s and 1999-2000). Although the distribution and abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout have been substantially reduced in Idaho over the last century, our results indicate that Yellowstone cutthroat trout abundance and size structure in Idaho have remained relatively stable at a large number of locations for the last 10-20 years. The expanding distribution of rainbow trout and hybrids in portions of the upper Snake River basin, however, calls for additional monitoring and active management actions.

  12. Development of New Submergence Tolerant Rice Variety for Bangladesh Using Marker-Assisted Backcrossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandakar Md Iftekharuddaula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Submergence tolerant high yielding rice variety was developed using BR11 as a recipient parent applying foreground, phenotypic and background selection approaches. Recombinant selection was found essential to minimize linkage drag by BC2F2 generation. Without recombinant selection, the introgression size in the backcross recombinant lines (BRLs was approximately 15 Mb on the carrier chromosome. The BRLs were found submergence tolerance compared to the check varieties under complete submergence for two weeks at Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, and produced higher yield compared to the isogenic Sub1-line under controlled submerged condition. The BRL IR85260-66-654-Gaz2 was released as BRRI dhan52 in 2010, which was the first high yielding submergence tolerant variety in Bangladesh. BRRI dhan52 produced grain yield ranging from 4.2 to 5.2 t/hm2 under different flash flood prone areas of Bangladesh in three consecutive seasons. The study demonstrated the efficiency of recombinant selection and better adaptability of the newly released submergence tolerant high yielding variety in flash flood prone different areas of the country with respect to submergence tolerance and yield potential.

  13. Physiological and transcriptomic characterization of submergence and reoxygenation responses in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Bishal G; Magliozzi, Joseph O; Maroof, M A Saghai; Fukao, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Complete inundation at the early seedling stage is a common environmental constraint for soybean production throughout the world. As floodwaters subside, submerged seedlings are subsequently exposed to reoxygenation stress in the natural progression of a flood event. Here, we characterized the fundamental acclimation responses to submergence and reoxygenation in soybean at the seedling establishment stage. Approximately 90% of seedlings succumbed during 3 d of inundation under constant darkness, whereas 10 d of submergence were lethal to over 90% of seedlings under 12 h light/12 h dark cycles, indicating the significance of underwater photosynthesis in seedling survival. Submergence rapidly decreased the abundance of carbohydrate reserves and ATP in aerial tissue of seedlings although chlorophyll breakdown was not observed. The carbohydrate and ATP contents were recovered upon de-submergence, but sudden exposure to oxygen also induced lipid peroxidation, confirming that reoxygenation induced oxidative stress. Whole transcriptome analysis recognized genome-scale reconfiguration of gene expression that regulates various signalling and metabolic pathways under submergence and reoxygenation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated genes in shoots and roots of soybean and other plants defines conserved, organ-specific and species-specific adjustments which enhance adaptability to submergence and reoxygenation through different metabolic pathways. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Submergence induced changes of molecular species in membrane lipids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulan Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of membrane lipids is sensitive to environmental stresses. Submergence is a type of stress often encountered by plants. However, how the molecular species of membrane lipids respond to submergence has not yet been characterised. In this study, we used a lipidomic approach to profile the molecular species of membrane lipids in whole plants of Arabidopsis thaliana that were completely submerged for three days. The plants survived one day of submergence, after which, we found that the total membrane lipids were only subtly decreased, showing significant decreases of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and phosphatidylcholine (PC and an increase of phosphatidic acid (PA; however, the basic lipid composition was retained. In contrast, three days of submergence caused plants to die, and the membranes deteriorated via the rapid loss of 96% of lipid content together with a 229% increase in PA. The turnover of molecular species from PG and MGDG to PA indicated that submergence-induced lipid changes occurred through PA-mediated degradation. In addition, molecular species of extraplastidic PG degraded sooner than plastidic ones, lyso-phospholipids exhibited various patterns of change, and the double-bond index (DBI remained unchanged until membrane deterioration. Our results revealed the unique changes of membrane lipids upon submergence and suggested that the major cause of the massive lipid degradation could be anoxia.

  15. The Performance and Fouling Control of Submerged Hollow Fiber (HF Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Akhondi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The submerged membrane filtration concept is well-established for low-pressure microfiltration (MF and ultrafiltration (UF applications in the water industry, and has become a mainstream technology for surface-water treatment, pretreatment prior to reverse osmosis (RO, and membrane bioreactors (MBRs. Compared to submerged flat sheet (FS membranes, submerged hollow fiber (HF membranes are more common due to their advantages of higher packing density, the ability to induce movement by mechanisms such as bubbling, and the feasibility of backwashing. In view of the importance of submerged HF processes, this review aims to provide a comprehensive landscape of the current state-of-the-art systems, to serve as a guide for further improvements in submerged HF membranes and their applications. The topics covered include recent developments in submerged hollow fiber membrane systems, the challenges and developments in fouling-control methods, and treatment protocols for membrane permeability recovery. The highlighted research opportunities include optimizing the various means to manipulate the hydrodynamics for fouling mitigation, developing online monitoring devices, and extending the submerged HF concept beyond filtration.

  16. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  17. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  18. Modeling survival: application of the Andersen-Gill model to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Boyce, Mark S.; Schwartz, Charles C.; Haroldson, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

     Wildlife ecologists often use the Kaplan-Meier procedure or Cox proportional hazards model to estimate survival rates, distributions, and magnitude of risk factors. The Andersen-Gill formulation (A-G) of the Cox proportional hazards model has seen limited application to mark-resight data but has a number of advantages, including the ability to accommodate left-censored data, time-varying covariates, multiple events, and discontinuous intervals of risks. We introduce the A-G model including structure of data, interpretation of results, and assessment of assumptions. We then apply the model to 22 years of radiotelemetry data for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) of the Greater Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, USA. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc) and multi-model inference to assess a number of potentially useful predictive models relative to explanatory covariates for demography, human disturbance, and habitat. Using the most parsimonious models, we generated risk ratios, hypothetical survival curves, and a map of the spatial distribution of high-risk areas across the recovery zone. Our results were in agreement with past studies of mortality factors for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Holding other covariates constant, mortality was highest for bears that were subjected to repeated management actions and inhabited areas with high road densities outside Yellowstone National Park. Hazard models developed with covariates descriptive of foraging habitats were not the most parsimonious, but they suggested that high-elevation areas offered lower risks of mortality when compared to agricultural areas.

  19. Use of naturally occurring mercury to determine the importance of cutthroat trout to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, L.A.; Schwartz, C.C.; Rye, R.O.; Gunther, K.A.; Crock, J.G.; Haroldson, M.A.; Waits, L.; Robbins, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Spawning cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki (Richardson, 1836)) are a potentially important food resource for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis Ord, 1815) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We developed a method to estimate the amount of cutthroat trout ingested by grizzly bears living in the Yellowstone Lake area. The method utilized (i) the relatively high, naturally occurring concentration of mercury in Yellowstone Lake cutthroat trout (508 ± 93 ppb) and its virtual absence in all other bear foods (6 ppb), (ii) hair snares to remotely collect hair from bears visiting spawning cutthroat trout streams between 1997 and 2000, (iii) DNA analyses to identify the individual and sex of grizzly bears leaving a hair sample, (iv) feeding trials with captive bears to develop relationships between fish and mercury intake and hair mercury concentrations, and (v) mercury analyses of hair collected from wild bears to estimate the amount of trout consumed by each bear. Male grizzly bears consumed an average of 5 times more trout/kg bear than did female grizzly bears. Estimated cutthroat trout intake per year by the grizzly bear population was only a small fraction of that estimated by previous investigators, and males consumed 92% of all trout ingested by grizzly bears.

  20. Taming of a Wild Research Well in Yellowstone National Park during November 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Robert O.; Moore, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Much of our current understanding of Yellowstone's geothermal areas comes from research drilling by the USGS during 1967 and 1968. Thirteen wells were drilled in thermal areas around the park. Scientists collected waters and rocks, measured temperatures and pressures and performed other tests to characterize the shallow subsurface at Yellowstone. Most wells were plugged and abandoned, but a few were left open for future scientific tests and sampling. One of those wells, the Y8, was located at Biscuit Basin, 2 miles north of Old Faithful. In November 1992, a valve at the ground surface failed, leading to a blowout, an uncontrolled eruption of steam and hot water. The USGS and Yellowstone National Park worked with a drilling contractor to control the flow and plug the well. The lead scientist, Robert Fournier, used video taken by the drilling contractor, Tonto Services, to create this fascinating 28-minute-long film. It is followed by a short news story by CNN, also from November 1992. Fifteen years later, we felt that the video was of sufficient scientific and historical interest that it was worth publishing as a USGS Open-file report, where it can be accessed into the future. Enjoy!