WorldWideScience

Sample records for submerged rice soils

  1. Composted Cattle Manure Increases Microbial Activity and Soil Fertility More Than Composted Swine Manure in a Submerged Rice Paddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvendu Das

    2017-09-01

    nitrogen (N were the major, while total organic carbon (TOC, total nitrogen (TN, and available phosphorus (P were the minor drivers of variation in bacterial communities. Overall, our observations suggest that CCM amendment is better than CSM amendment to improve soil fertility and crop yield in a submerged rice cropping system.

  2. Composted Cattle Manure Increases Microbial Activity and Soil Fertility More Than Composted Swine Manure in a Submerged Rice Paddy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Jeong, Seung Tak; Das, Subhasis; Kim, Pil Joo

    2017-01-01

    the major, while total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and available phosphorus (P) were the minor drivers of variation in bacterial communities. Overall, our observations suggest that CCM amendment is better than CSM amendment to improve soil fertility and crop yield in a submerged rice cropping system.

  3. Oxygen dynamics in submerged rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy D.; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Complete submergence of plants prevents direct O2 and CO2 exchange with air. Underwater photosynthesis can result in marked diurnal changes in O2 supply to submerged plants. Dynamics in pO2 had not been measured directly for submerged rice (Oryza sativa), but in an earlier study, radial O2 loss...

  4. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

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    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  5. Degradation and metabolism of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in submerged soil and soil-plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feifei; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander; Nastold, Peter; Jiang, Bingqi; Ji, Rong; Corvini, Philippe Francois-Xavier

    2014-12-16

    Contamination by tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used brominated flame retardant, is a matter of environmental concern. Here, we investigated the fate and metabolites of (14)C-TBBPA in a submerged soil with an anoxic-oxic interface and planted or not with rice (Oryza sativa) and reed (Phragmites australis) seedlings. In unplanted soil, TBBPA dissipation (half-life 20.8 days) was accompanied by mineralization (11.5% of initial TBBPA) and the substantial formation (60.8%) of bound residues. Twelve metabolites (10 in unplanted soil and 7 in planted soil) were formed via four interconnected pathways: oxidative skeletal cleavage, O-methylation, type II ipso-substitution, and reductive debromination. The presence of the seedlings strongly reduced (14)C-TBBPA mineralization and bound-residue formation and stimulated debromination and O-methylation. Considerable radioactivity accumulated in rice (21.3%) and reed (33.1%) seedlings, mainly on or in the roots. While TBBPA dissipation was hardly affected by the rice seedlings, it was strongly enhanced by the reed seedlings, greatly reducing the half-life (11.4 days) and increasing monomethyl TBBPA formation (11.3%). The impact of the interconnected aerobic and anaerobic transformation of TBBPA and wetland plants on the profile and dynamics of the metabolites should be considered in phytoremediation strategies and environmental risk assessments of TBBPA in submerged soils.

  6. Contribution of seedling vigour and anoxia/hypoxia-responsive genes to submergence tolerance in Vietnamese lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.

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    Hien Thi Thu Vu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A direct-seeded rice cultivation system has been widely adopted in Asian countries. Optimum germination and vigorous seedling growth under submergence are key traits for the practice of direct seeding. We studied the post-germination seedling vigour in Vietnamese lowland rice accessions based on three bio-parameters, shoot elongation growth under five-day submergence in water-filled test-tubes, seedling recovery rate five days after transferring submerged seedlings to pots with soil and seedling survival rate 21 days after sowing seeds in nursery beds and immediate incubation under submergence. A large diversity was found in seedling vigour thus estimated among the accessions. Significantly high correlations were observed among all three bio-parameters, verifying the contribution of seedling vigour to the manifestation of submergence tolerance at this critical stage of rice development. To examine the roles of anoxia/hypoxia-responsive genes, the expression of 17 candidate genes was studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and compared between selected vigorous and non-vigorous groups of accessions. Transcripts of all but two genes showed marked accumulation in submerged seedlings. No differences, however, were found between the two contrasting groups. The observed common and coordinate expression of anoxia/hypoxia-induced genes suggests that they might assume roles in attaining baseline tolerance against submergence stress. It was also suggested that some unknown genetic factors are operating in determining cultivar/genotype-specific levels of submergence tolerance as assessed by post-germination seedling vigour.

  7. Leaf gas films contribute to rice (Oryza sativa) submergence tolerance during saline floods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Max; Konnerup, Dennis; Pedersen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Floods and salinization of agricultural land adversely impact global rice production. We investigated whether gas films on leaves of submerged rice delay salt entry during saline submergence. Two-week-old plants with leaf gas films (+GF) or with gas films experimentally removed (-GF) were submerg...

  8. Bioavailability to grains of rice of aged and fresh DDD and DDE in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fenxia; Yu, Guifen; Bian, Yongrong; Yang, Xinglun; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    DDT had been widely used around the world before 1980s and is still under production and use for non-agricultural purposes in China. Because of their special physicochemical properties, p,p'-DDT and its main metabolites, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE, accumulated and persisted in the environment, presenting potential menace on biota. A green-house study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE to grains of rice and the influences of traditional Chinese farming practices on their bioaccumulation. Paddy rice and dry rice were grown in submerged paddy soils and non-submerged upland soils, respectively. Two types of soil, Hydragric Anthrosols (An) and Hydragric Acrisols (Ac), were employed. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) of DDE ranged from 0.67 for rice grown in non-submerged An to 0.84 in submerged An in the control group, whilst BAFs were all below 0.04 in experimental groups. BAFs of DDD varied from 1.39 for submerged An to 2.26 for submerged Ac in original soils. In contrast, BAFs were between 0.05 for non-submerged Ac and 0.08 for submerged An in DDD-contaminated soils. Flooding seemed to have two contradictory effects on the DDE/DDD accumulation by rice: on one hand, it made the pollutants more mobile and bioavailable; while on the other hand, it enhanced the degradation and binding of POPs. Adding rice straw to the soils protected DDE from being taken up yet promoted DDD accumulation by rice. Furthermore, the distinct inorganic component of the soils might also play an important role in the environmental activities of POPs.

  9. Rice SUB1A constrains remodelling of the transcriptome and metabolome during submergence to facilitate post-submergence recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Anna M; Barding, Gregory A; Sathnur, Sumukh; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2017-11-02

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) ethylene-responsive transcription factor gene SUB1A-1 confers tolerance to prolonged, complete submergence by limiting underwater elongation growth. Upon desubmergence, SUB1A-1 genotypes rapidly recover photosynthetic function and recommence development towards flowering. The underpinnings of the transition from stress amelioration to the return to homeostasis are not well known. Here, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were conducted to identify mechanisms by which SUB1A improves physiological function over the 24 hr following a sublethal submergence event. Evaluation of near-isogenic genotypes after submergence and over a day of reaeration demonstrated that SUB1A transiently constrains the remodelling of cellular activities associated with growth. SUB1A influenced the abundance of ca. 1,400 transcripts and had a continued impact on metabolite content, particularly free amino acids, glucose, and sucrose, throughout the recovery period. SUB1A promoted recovery of metabolic homeostasis but had limited influence on mRNAs associated with growth processes and photosynthesis. The involvement of low energy sensing during submergence and recovery was supported by dynamics in trehalose-6-phosphate and mRNAs encoding key enzymes and signalling proteins, which were modulated by SUB1A. This study provides new evidence of convergent signalling pathways critical to the rapidly reversible management of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in submergence resilient rice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Vinegar rice (Oryza sativa L. produced by a submerged fermentation process from alcoholic fermented rice

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    Wilma Aparecida Spinosa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the limited availability of technology for the production of rice vinegar and also due to the potential consumer product market, this study aimed to use alcoholic fermented rice (rice wine (Oryza sativa L. for vinegar production. An alcoholic solution with 6.28% (w/v ethanol was oxidized by a submerged fermentation process to produce vinegar. The process of acetic acid fermentation occurred at 30 ± 0.3°C in a FRINGS® Acetator (Germany for the production of vinegar and was followed through 10 cycles. The vinegar had a total acidity of 6.85% (w/v, 0.17% alcohol (w/v, 1.26% (w/v minerals and 1.78% (w/v dry extract. The composition of organic acids present in rice vinegar was: cis-aconitic acid (6 mg/L, maleic acid (3 mg/L, trans-aconitic acid (3 mg/L, shikimic + succinic acid (4 mg/L, lactic acid (300 mg/L, formic acid (180 mg/L, oxalic acid (3 mg/L, fumaric acid (3 mg/L and itaconic acid (1 mg/L.

  11. Development of New Submergence Tolerant Rice Variety for Bangladesh Using Marker-Assisted Backcrossing

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    Khandakar Md Iftekharuddaula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Submergence tolerant high yielding rice variety was developed using BR11 as a recipient parent applying foreground, phenotypic and background selection approaches. Recombinant selection was found essential to minimize linkage drag by BC2F2 generation. Without recombinant selection, the introgression size in the backcross recombinant lines (BRLs was approximately 15 Mb on the carrier chromosome. The BRLs were found submergence tolerance compared to the check varieties under complete submergence for two weeks at Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, and produced higher yield compared to the isogenic Sub1-line under controlled submerged condition. The BRL IR85260-66-654-Gaz2 was released as BRRI dhan52 in 2010, which was the first high yielding submergence tolerant variety in Bangladesh. BRRI dhan52 produced grain yield ranging from 4.2 to 5.2 t/hm2 under different flash flood prone areas of Bangladesh in three consecutive seasons. The study demonstrated the efficiency of recombinant selection and better adaptability of the newly released submergence tolerant high yielding variety in flash flood prone different areas of the country with respect to submergence tolerance and yield potential.

  12. Nitrogen fertilizer management for tidal submergence tolerant landrace rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivars

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    M.A.A. Mamun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In tidal submergence ecosystem, nitrogen (N is a crucial nutrient for improved and sustainable rice production. Therefore, a series of on-farm and on-station field experiments were conducted to develop a suitable N management practice for tidal submergence tolerant landrace aman rice. In on-farm, urea deep placement (UDP through urea super granule before panicle initiation (PI stage was compared with no fertilizer application. Similarly, five N fertilizer management practices viz. (i. two splits of prilled urea (PU, (ii. UDP at 10 DAT, (iii. UDP before PI, (iv. full dose PU before PI and (v. No urea (control were compared at on-station trial. Tidal submergence tolerance aman rice varieties (Rajashail, Kutiagni, Sadamota and Lalmota were used as testing materials. In on farm experiment, aman cultivars produced 2.0–2.5 t ha−1 grain without N fertilizer. But, cultivated Rajashail, Kutiagni, Sadachikon, Sadapajam, Lalmota and Sadamota gave 3.0–3.5 t ha−1 grain yield with the UDP before PI in tidal prone areas. Though UDP required fertilizer and application cost but it gave profit upto 22,000 BDT ha−1 (Bangladeshi Taka. In on-station experiment, UDP before PI stage significantly increased rice yield and economic return although it was comparable to two splits of PU and top dressing of PU before PI stage. However, UDP at 10 DAT increased straw yield but failed to increase grain yield even compared to control. It could be concluded that UDP before PI stage of rice is an effective method for increasing rice yield and farm income in tidal prone areas.

  13. Mapping QTLs for submergence tolerance during germination in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Progress in the generation of a molecular genetic map and marker for rice has made possible a new phase of mapping individual genes associated with complex traits. (Yano and Sasaki, 1997) including those controlling tolerance to anaerobic condition during germination (Ling et al., 2004, 2006). Recent ...

  14. Submergence rice cultivation in southern Bangladesh: farmers opinion and adaptations practices

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    AKM Abdul Ahad Biswas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice productivity in coastal Bangladesh is lower than the national average and total coastal area is considered to be submergence-prone and higher vulnerable in July to January cropping season. The selected study areas are Kalapara and Patuakhali Sadar Upazila that are too vulnerable to agriculture practices. Field survey was conducted during 01st June to 30th July, 2015 to investigate the impact of submergence on Aman rice cultivation (ARC, existing adopted local adaptation practices with impacts and options to address the submergence problem. Primary data was collected through Focus Group Discussion (FGD, Individual Interview and Key Informant Interview methods and secondary data was collected from different secondary sources. A well-structured pretested questionnaire schedule was developed keeping in mind the objectives and variables under this study. After cyclone SIDR and AILA devastation, the rate of traditional ARC is decreasing every year and in 2015 it was 26.51%. Recently farmers have adopted new cropping practices and strategies like modern ARC in Aman season as single crop; Boro-Aus-Aman season as triple crop and Aus-Aman season as double crop are practicing. Approximately all farmers have adopted to grow stress tolerant rice varieties (STRV; farmer’s curiosities to familiar with and to have the STRV are encouraging. Farmers were fully adopted BRRIdhan52 rice cultivation with positive perceptions of higher yield and lower production cost. Therefore it can be concluded that the intensity of adoption of adaptation and mitigation measures are significantly influenced positively by the STRV yield capability; farmer’s participation in intervention programs; livelihood diversification; frequency of extension personnel contact; submergence and inundation characteristics; tolerance attributes of STRV and availability of STRV cultivation information.International Journal of Environment Vol.4(4 2015: 100-113

  15. The mechanism of improved aeration due to gas films on leaves of submerged rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboven, Pieter; Pedersen, Ole; Ho, Quang Tri; Nicolai, Bart M; Colmer, Timothy D

    2014-10-01

    Some terrestrial wetland plants, such as rice, have super-hydrophobic leaf surfaces which retain a gas film when submerged. O2 movement through the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) of floodwater, gas film and stomata into leaf mesophyll was explored by means of a reaction-diffusion model that was solved in a three-dimensional leaf anatomy model. The anatomy and dark respiration of leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were measured and used to compute O2 fluxes and partial pressure of O2 (pO2 ) in the DBL, gas film and leaf when submerged. The effects of floodwater pO2 , DBL thickness, cuticle permeability, presence of gas film and stomatal opening were explored. Under O2 -limiting conditions of the bulk water (pO2  gas film significantly increases the O2 flux into submerged leaves regardless of whether stomata are fully or partly open. With a gas film, tissue pO2 substantially increases, even for the slightest stomatal opening, but not when stomata are completely closed. The effect of gas films increases with decreasing cuticle permeability. O2 flux and tissue pO2 decrease with increasing DBL thickness. The present modelling analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of how leaf gas films facilitate O2 entry into submerged plants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Drying-submergence alternation enhanced crystalline ratio and varied surface properties of iron plaque on rice (Oryza sativa) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Jian; Xu, Zhihong; Shen, Hong

    2017-11-21

    Iron plaque (IP) is valuable in nutrient management and contaminant tolerance for rice (Oryza sativa) because it can adsorb various nutrients and toxic ions. Crystalline ratio (CR) can be defined as the proportion of crystalline iron (CI) to total IP to describe IP crystallinity. Although the knowledge on IP has abounded, the information on the relationship among its formation condition, surface properties, and CR remains insufficient. In this study, quartz sand-soil cultivation with rice was conducted to explore the effect of drying-submergence alternation (DSA) on CI, amorphous iron (AI), CR, root oxidizing capacity (ROC), and surface properties of IP with different treatment durations and at different stages. Fourteen-day DSA treatment increased CI to 2.20 times of that after continuous submergence (CS) but decreased AI to 72.3% of that after CS. Correspondingly, CR was raised to 6.89% from 4.08%. Remarkably, CR of IP after DSA ending in submergence and ending in drying was 6.89% and 4.23%, respectively. In addition, ROC after 14-day DSA was enhanced to twice of that after CS. Results from scanning electronic microscope suggested that 14-day DSA induced thinner sheets with finer particles in IP compared to that after CS. Results from X-ray diffraction revealed that IP contained higher proportions of goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, and hematite after DSA than those after CS. Variable charge and surface area of IP after DSA were only 26.5% and 32.0% of those after CS, respectively. Together, our results indicated that proper strength DSA promoted ROC and transformation from AI to CI, and consequently increased CR of IP, while it changed its surface properties.

  17. The effect of biofertilizer fungi on Ciherang rice growth at some level of soil salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Y.B. SUBOWO

    2014-01-01

    A research about the effect of fungus contained biofertilizer on Ciherang rice that was growth on different level of soil salinity was conducted. One of the effect of global climate changes is the increase of sea water level. It leads to the expansion of sea water submerged land for agriculture. Salt intrution to the agriculture area considerably decrease soil fertility because of the high salinity. Some of microbes especially soil fungi such as Aspergillus sp and Penicillium sp. are able...

  18. Growth and yield of rice submergence stress conditions in two types of swampy lowland of South Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribaldi, Nurlaili, Danial, E.; Rahim, S. E.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to determine the best fertilizer treatment at vegetative stage for the growth and yield of rice submergence stress conditions on two types of swampy lowland. The experimental design used in this research was spilt-plot design with three replications. The main plot was fertilization treatment consisting of P1 = base fertilization, P2 = fertilizer before being submerged, P3 = fertilizer after being submerged + PPC Micro, P4 = fertilization before and after being submerged. The subplots are varieties of rice, V1 = Inpara 5, V2 = IR 64. The subplot was rice variety which consisted of V1 = Inpara 5, V2 = IR 64. The results showed fertilization treatment can increase rice production growth and submergence stress conditions, varieties of Inpara 5 added with fertilization before flooded can suppress a decrease in grain yield for 16 % in the shallow-backswamp and 6 % in middle-backswamps or with each production of 2.9 and 5.1 tons per hectare, varieties of Inpara 5 which is giving fertilization before flooded, tends to be a good treatment to be developed in rice submergence cultivation both in the the shallow-backswamp and middle-backswamps.

  19. Soil quality assessment in rice production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    In the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, rice production is one of the most important regional activities. Farmers are concerned that the land use practices for rice production in the Camaquã region may not be sustainable because of detrimental effects on soil quality. The study presented in this

  20. Improvement of Photosynthesis by Sub1 QTL in Rice Under Submergence: Probed by Chlorophyll Fluorescence OJIP Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Debabrata

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of submergence on the photosynthetic activity in rice plants either possessing or not possessing Sub1 QTL i.e. Swarna and Swarna Sub1 cultivars (cv. were evaluated under simulated complete submergence. The leaf photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance decreased in both the cv. during the progression of submergence as compared to control plant but significant varietal differences was observed after 1 day (d of submergence. Submergence also alters the photo-system (PS II activity, as reflected in a decrease in the values of Fo, Fm and the Fv/Fm ratio and degradation of chlorophyll, more in Swarna than that of Swarna Sub1. Under complete submergence the shape of the OJIP transient also changed in rice leaves with decrease in maximal fluorescence (P=Fm intensity, resulted lowering of variable fluorescence levels. The decrease was more pronounced in Swarna compared to the Swarna Sub1 cv. Thus, Swarna Sub1 improves photosynthetic activity showing more photosynthetic rate compared to Swarna under submergence because, of less degradation of chlorophyll, higher stomatal conductance, and efficient PS II activity.

  1. Lactic acid production from submerged fermentation of broken rice using undefined mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Luiza Varela; de Barros Correa, Fabiane Fernanda; de Oliva Neto, Pedro; Mayer, Cassia Roberta Malacrida; Escaramboni, Bruna; Campioni, Tania Sila; de Barros, Natan Roberto; Herculano, Rondinelli Donizetti; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2017-04-01

    The present work aimed to characterize and optimize the submerged fermentation of broken rice for lactic acid (LA) production using undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge. A microorganism with amylolytic activity, which also produces LA, Lactobacillus amylovorus, was used as a control to assess the extent of mixed culture on LA yield. Three level full factorial designs were performed to optimize and define the influence of fermentation temperature (20-50 °C), gelatinization time (30-60 min) and broken rice concentration in culture medium (40-80 g L-1) on LA production in pure and undefined mixed culture. LA production in mixed culture (9.76 g L-1) increased in sixfold respect to pure culture in optimal assessed experimental conditions. The optimal conditions for maximizing LA yield in mixed culture bioprocess were 31 °C temperature, 45 min gelatinization time and 79 g L-1 broken rice concentration in culture medium. This study demonstrated the positive effect of undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge to produce LA from culture medium formulated with broken rice. In addition, this work establishes the basis for an efficient and low-cost bioprocess to manufacture LA from this booming agro-industrial by-product.

  2. Comparison of GC-MS and NMR for metabolite profiling of rice subjected to submergence stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barding, Gregory A; Béni, Szabolcs; Fukao, Takeshi; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Larive, Cynthia K

    2013-02-01

    Natural disasters such as drought, extreme temperatures, and flooding can severely impact crop production. Understanding the metabolic response of crops threatened with these disasters provides insights into biological response mechanisms that can influence survival. In this study, a comparative analysis of GC-MS and (1)H NMR results was conducted for wild-type and tolerant rice varieties stressed by up to 3 days of submergence and allowed 1 day of postsubmergence recovery. Most metabolomics studies are conducted using a single analytical platform. Each platform, however, has inherent advantages and disadvantages that can influence the analytical coverage of the metabolome. In this work, a more thorough analysis of the plant stress response was possible through the use of both (1)H NMR and GC-MS. Several metabolites, such as S-methyl methionine and the dipeptide alanylglycine, were only detected and quantified by (1)H NMR. The high dynamic range of NMR, as compared with that of the GC-TOF-MS used in this study, provided broad coverage of the metabolome in a single experiment. The sensitivity of GC-MS facilitated the quantitation of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids, some of which were not detected by NMR, and provided additional insights into the regulation of the TCA cycle. The combined metabolic information provided by (1)H NMR and GC-MS was essential for understanding the complex biochemical and molecular response of rice plants to submergence.

  3. Phytoremediation of arsenic in submerged soil by wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomjun, Nateewattana; Siripen, Trichaiyaporn; Maliwan, Saeouy; Jintapat, Nateewattana; Prasak, Thavornyutikarn; Somporn, Choonluchanon; Petch, Pengchai

    2011-01-01

    Wetland aquatic plants including Canna glauca L., Colocasia esculenta L. Schott, Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were used in the phytoremediation of submerged soil polluted by arsenic (As). Cyperus papyrus L. was noticed as the largest biomass producer which has arsenic accumulation capacity of 130-172 mg As/kg plant. In terms of arsenic removal rate, however, Colocasia esculenta L. was recognized as the largest and fastest arsenic remover in this study. Its arsenic removal rate was 68 mg As/m2/day while those rates of Canna glauca L., Cyperus papyrus L. and Typha angustifolia L. were 61 mg As/m2/day, 56 mg As/m2/day, and 56 mg As/m2/day, respectively. Although the 4 aquatic plants were inferior in arsenic accumulation, their high arsenic removal rates were observed. Phytostabilization should be probable for the application of these plants.

  4. Rice production in relation to soil quality under different rice-based cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Ba, Linh; Sleutel, Steven; Nguyen Van, Qui; Thi, Guong Vo; Le Van, Khoa; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil quality of shallow paddy soils may be improved by introducing upland crops and thus a more diverse crop cultivation pattern. Yet, the causal relationship between crop performance and enhanced soil traits in rice-upland crop rotations remains elusive. The objectives of this study were to (i) find correlations among soil properties under different rice-upland crop systems and link selected soil properties to rice growth and yield, (ii) present appropriate values of soil parameters for sustainable rice productivity in heavy clay soil, (iii) evaluate the effect of rotating rice with upland crops on rice yield and economic benefit in a long-term experiment. A rice-upland crop rotational field experiment in the Vietnamese Mekong delta was conducted for 10 years using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replications. Treatments were: (i) rice-rice-rice (control - conventional system as farmers' practice), (ii) rice-maize-rice, (iii) rice-mung bean-rice, and (iv) rice-mung bean-maize. Soil and plant sampling were performed after harvest of the rice crop at the end of the final winter-spring cropping season (i.e. year 10). Results show differences in rice growth and yield, and economic benefit as an effect of the crop rotation system. These differences were linked with changes in bulk density, soil porosity, soil aggregate stability index, soil penetration resistance, soil macro-porosity, soil organic carbon, acid hydrolysable soil C and soil nutrient elements, especially at soil depth of 20-30 cm. This is evidenced by the strong correlation (P < 0.01) between rice plant parameters, rice yield and soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, soil organic carbon and Chydrolysable. It turned out that good rice root growth and rice yield corresponded to bulk density values lower than 1.3 Mg m-3, soil porosity higher than 50%, penetration resistance below 1.0 MPa, and soil organic carbon above 25 g kg-1. The optimal

  5. Soil Management Methods under Rice Cultivation in Ndokwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the soil management methods under rice cultivation in. Ndokwa grassland soils with the aim of determining the most effective soil management measures for rice cultivation. Soil samples were collected at three locations where rice is presently cultivated in the area. Five plots of 20m x 20m were ...

  6. Surviving floods: leaf gas films improve O2 and CO2 exchange, root aeration, and growth of completely submerged rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, Sarah Meghan; Colmer, Timothy David

    2009-01-01

    that the improved gas exchange was not caused by differences in diffusive boundary layers adjacent to submerged leaves with or without gas films; instead, reduced resistance to gas exchange was probably due to the enlarged water–gas interface (cf. aquatic insects). When gas films were removed artificially......When completely submerged, the leaves of some species retain a surface gas film. Leaf gas films on submerged plants have recently been termed 'plant plastrons', analogous with the plastrons of aquatic insects. In aquatic insects, surface gas layers (i.e. plastrons) enlarge the gas–water interface...... to promote O2 uptake when under water; however, the function of leaf gas films has rarely been considered. The present study demonstrates that gas films on leaves of completely submerged rice facilitate entry of O2 from floodwaters when in darkness and CO2 entry when in light. O2 microprofiles showed...

  7. Production of surfactin from rice mill polishing residue by submerged fermentation using Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Jigar; Sengupta, Bina

    2015-08-01

    Rice mill polishing residue (RMPR), an abundant and cheap agro residue, was used as substrate for microbial growth of Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2423 by submerged fermentation process to produce surfactin. Nutrients present in the residue were sufficient to sustain the growth of the microorganism. Multi stage foam fractionation followed by acid precipitation was used to concentrate and recover the product. Recoverable yield of surfactin was 4.17 g/kg residue. Product recovered in the foamate accounted for 69% of the total yield. The residual broth containing ∼ 30% surfactin exhibited biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values of 23 and 69 mg/L respectively. The microbial growth data was correlated using three parameter sigmoid models. Surfactin synthesized had a predominance of molecular weight 1076 Da. Foam separation of copper using surfactin resulted in a maximum removal of 72.5%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Soil Incorporation of Silica-Rich Rice Husk Decreases Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; Morris, Andrew H; Gill, Rattandeep; Kearns, Kelli A; Mann, Jessica N; Paukett, Michelle; Leskanic, Corey

    2016-05-18

    Arsenic decreases rice yield, and inorganic grain As threatens human health; thus, strategies to decrease rice As are critically needed. Increased plant-available silica (Si) can decrease rice As, yet the source of Si matters. Rice husk, an underutilized and Si-rich byproduct of rice production that contains less labile C and an order of magnitude less As than rice straw, may be an economically viable Si resource to decrease rice As, yet the impact of rice husk incorporation on As in the rice-soil nexus has not been reported. This proof-of-concept study shows that rice husk incorporation to soil (1% w/w) decreases inorganic grain As by 25-50% without negatively affecting grain Cd, yield, or dissolved CH4 levels. Rice husk is a critical yet perhaps overlooked resource to improve soil quality through enhanced nutrient availability and attenuate human health risks through consumption of As-laden grain.

  9. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in tropical rice soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhasis; Adhya, Tapan K

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) phosphorothioate] is used worldwide as an agricultural insecticide against a broad spectrum of insect pests of economically important crops including rice, and soil application to control termites. The insecticide mostly undergoes hydrolysis to diethyl thiophosphoric acid (DETP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), and negligible amounts of other intermediate products. In a laboratory-cum-greenhouse study, chlorpyrifos, applied at a rate of 10 mg kg(-1) soil to five tropical rice soils of wide physico-chemical variability, degraded with a half-life ranging from 27.07 to 3.82 days. TCP was the major metabolite under both non-flooded and flooded conditions. Chlorpyrifos degradation had significant negative relationship with electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay and sand contents of the soils under non-flooded conditions. Results indicate that degradation of chlorpyrifos was accelerated with increase in its application frequency, across the representative rice soils. Management regimes including moisture content and presence or absence of rice plants also influenced the process. Biotic factors also play an important role in the degradation of chlorpyrifos as demonstrated by its convincing degradation in mineral salts medium inoculated with non-sterile soil suspension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HEAVY METAL LEVELS IN PADDY SOILS AND RICE (ORYZA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    metals in O. sativa grains harvested locally as well as to set the baseline levels of some heavy ... Machiwa – Heavy Metal Levels in Paddy Soils and Rice … .... where 0.5 g of dried soil or rice (polished rice and paddy rice) samples were weighed in 50 ml volumetric flasks. De-ionized water. (1 ml) was added, the flasks were ...

  11. Soil Management Methods under Rice Cultivation in Ndokwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ... properties in the soil using the most probable instruments and analytical methods. The yield of rice harvested was measured in tons per hectares (He). The results revealed that the application of soil management techniques has enhanced rice yields by. 23.45tons/He. The combination of slash and burn, tillage and soil.

  12. Effects of Soil Veterinary Antibiotics Pollution on Rice Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Qiu-tong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the potential effect of soil veterinary antibiotics pollution on the growth of rice, a main food crop in China, oxytetracycline which was used widely in livestock and poultry breeding was selected to test the effects of different levels of soil antibiotics pollution on growth and yield of rice plant at both seedling and growth periods. Relationship between oxytetracycline accumulated in different organs of rice plant and oxytetracycline pollution levels in the soil was characterized. The results showed that the effects of soil oxytetracycline pollution on rice growth mainly occurred at the seedling stage, and the effect on the underground part was obviously greater than the above-ground part of rice. Significant negative effects on biomass of the underground part of rice, root activity, and chlorophyll content and oxidase activity of the leave at the seedling stage were found when soil oxytetracycline pollution concentrations was over 30 mg·kg-1. The consequence from the impact of soil oxytetracycline pollution on rice seedling could be extended to the whole growth period of the plant, which could reduce the number of tiller and rice yield. Oxytetracycline accumulated in various organs of rice plant was in the sequence of root> leaf> stem> grain. Rice roots had low capacity to uptake oxytetracycline from the soil, the transfer capacity of oxytetracycline from the roots to leaf, stem, and grain was also weak. Considering the low oxytetracycline pollution levels in most of current actual farmland soils (less than 10 mg·kg-1 and lower accumulation character of oxytetracycline in the grain, it is thought that the direct damage of soil oxytetracycline pollution on rice production is small.

  13. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat2003@gmail.com; Haque, Md. Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo, E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH{sub 4}) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO{sub 3}–N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). However, N{sub 2}O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N{sub 2}O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N{sub 2}O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N{sub 2}O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha{sup −1} and 27 Mg ha{sup −1} rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH{sub 4} emission flux while decreased N{sub 2}O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N{sub 2}O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha{sup −1} cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (< 250 μm), and that proportionately increased the N{sub 2}O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N{sub 2}O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N{sub 2}O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH{sub 4}, but N{sub 2}O should also be

  14. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH4) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO3-N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, N2O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N2O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N2O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N2O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha(-1) and 27 Mg ha(-1) rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH4 emission flux while decreased N2O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N2O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha(-1) cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH4, but N2O should also be considered especially for fallow season to calculate total GWP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing Water and Soils to Achieve Adaptation and Reduce Methane Emissions and Arsenic Contamination in Asian Rice Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Wichelns

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice production is susceptible to damage from the changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, and in the frequency of major storm events that will accompany climate change. Deltaic areas, in which millions of farmers cultivate from one to three crops of rice per year, are susceptible also to the impacts of a rising sea level, submergence during major storm events, and saline intrusion into groundwater and surface water resources. In this paper, I review the current state of knowledge regarding the potential impacts of climate change on rice production and I describe adaptation measures that involve soil and water management. In many areas, farmers will need to modify crop choices, crop calendars, and soil and water management practices as they adapt to climate change. Adaptation measures at the local, regional, and international levels also will be helpful in moderating the potential impacts of climate change on aggregate rice production and on household food security in many countries. Some of the changes in soil and water management and other production practices that will be implemented in response to climate change also will reduce methane generation and release from rice fields. Some of the measures also will reduce the uptake of arsenic in rice plants, thus addressing an important public health issue in portions of South and Southeast Asia. Where feasible, replacing continuously flooded rice production with some form of aerobic rice production, will contribute to achieving adaptation objectives, while also reducing global warming potential and minimizing the risk of negative health impacts due to consumption of arsenic contaminated rice.

  16. Soil Management Methods under Rice Cultivation in Ndokwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Soil samples were collected and analyzed for physical, chemical and heavy metals properties in the soil using the most probable instruments and analytical methods. The yield of rice harvested was measured in tons per hectares (He). The results revealed that the application of soil management techniques has enhanced ...

  17. Changes of Soil Chemical Properties during Rice Straw Decomposition in Different Types of Acid Sulphate Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Hairani; Ani Susilawati

    2013-01-01

    Organic residues often exhibit different physico-chemical properties and affect the soil ecosystem in different ways. Hence, the study of their impact on soil is essential to benefit from their potential as amendments and to avoid adverse environmental effects. It is required to study the role of rice straw in the changes of soil properties during decomposition processes in the rice field. The research was conducted on potential acid sulphate soil (PASS) and actual acid sulphate soil (AASS) i...

  18. Submerged pedology: the soils of minor islands in the Venice lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Washa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Minor islands of the Venice lagoon are part of a delicate ecosystem, with equilibrium that depends on multiple factors deriving from both the aqueous and the terrestrial compartment, and represent useful indicators of the lagoon ecosystem status. Over centuries, some islands emerged, some others disappeared, others are being submerged in consequence of sea level rise, or are dismantled by marine erosion. Ecological survey and soil sampling evidenced rather homogeneous environment and soil characters, likely due to the same genesis from HTM during centuries, and to environmental conditions such as moisture and brackish groundwater. Four of the examined soils are Inceptisols, while the others present limited horizon differentiation, and are Entisols. All the profiles reflect udic or aquic conditions, and some of them are submerged for most time. Most soils are moderately alkaline (7.9 250 g/kg; organic carbon content at surface is within the normal range (8 17 g/kg and carbonates. Moreover, the textural class is generally silty-loam with increasing clay content with depth. Currently, the soils examined present hydromorphic pedofeatures, which are the result of the most important pedogenic process in the lagoon. Alternating reduction/oxidation processes would increase as a consequence of sea level rise, determining reducing conditions at bottom, and conversely enhancing salt concentration uppermost, with negative consequences for both pedogenic evolution and vegetation survival.

  19. Tungsten (W) bioavailability in paddy rice soils and its accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Blessing; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Pei; Wu, Mingyan; Li, Hong Hong; Khaliq, Muhammad Athar; Jayasuriya, Pathmamali; James, Swithin; Wang, Guo

    2017-10-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accumulation characteristics of tungsten (W) by different indica rice cultivars from the soil and to assess the potential risks to human health via dietary intake of W in rice consumption. A total of 153 rice (ear) samples of 15 cultivars and the corresponding surface soil samples were collected from 7 cities in Fujian Province of southeastern China. The available soil W were extracted using H2C2O4·2H2O-(NH4)2C2O4·H2O at pH 3.3). Results showed that the total soil W ranged from 2.03 mg kg(-1) to 15.34 mg kg(-1 )and available soil W ranged from 0.03 mg kg(-1) to 1.61 mg kg(-1). The W concentration in brown rice varied from 7 μg kg(-1) to 283 μg kg(-1) and was significantly correlated with the available soil W. The highest mean TFavail (transfer factor based on available soil W) was 0.91 for Te-you 627 (hybrid, indica rice), whereas the lowest was 0.08 for Yi-you 673 (hybrid, indica rice). The TFavail decreased with the increase in available soil W, clay content, and cation exchange capacity. The consumption of the brown rice produced from the investigated areas in some cultivars by the present study may cause risks to human health.

  20. Iron and zinc isotope fractionation during uptake and translocation in rice (Oryza sativa) grown in oxic and anoxic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Markovic, Tamara; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Schönbächler, Maria; Rehkämper, Mark; Zhao, Fangjie J.; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope fractionation is emerging quickly as a powerful novel technique to study metal uptake and translocation in plants. Fundamental to this development is a thorough understanding of the processes that lead to isotope fractionation under differing environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated Zn and Fe isotope fractionation in rice grown to maturity in anaerobic and aerobic soils under greenhouse conditions. The overall Zn isotope fractionation between the soil and above ground plant material was negligible in aerobic soil but significant in anaerobic soil with isotopically lighter Zn in the rice plant. The observed range of fractionation is in line with previously determined fractionations of Zn in rice grown in hydroponic solutions and submerged soils and emphasizes the effect of taking up different chemical forms of Zn, most likely free and organically complexed Zn. The Zn in the grain was isotopically lighter than in the rest of the above ground plant in rice grown in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. This suggests that in the course of the grain loading and during the translocation within the plant important biochemical and/or biophysical processes occur. The isotope fractionation observed in the grains would be consistent with an unidirectional controlled transport from shoot to grain with a fractionation factor of α ≈ 0.9994. Iron isotopes showed an isotopic lighter signature in shoot and grain compared to the bulk soil or the leachate in aerobic and anaerobic soils alike. The negative direction of isotopic fractionation is consistent with possible changes in the redox state of Fe occurring during the uptake and translocation processes. The isotope fractionation pattern between shoots and grain material are different for Zn and Fe which finally suggests that different mechanisms operate during translocation and grain-loading in rice for these two key micronutrients.

  1. The effect of biofertilizer fungi on Ciherang rice growth at some level of soil salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y B Subowo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A research about the effect of fungus contained biofertilizer on Ciherang rice that was growth on different level of soil salinity was conducted. One of the effect of global climate changes is the increase of sea water level. It leads to the expansion of sea water submerged land for agriculture. Salt intrution to the agriculture area considerably decrease soil fertility because of the high salinity. Some of microbes especially soil fungi such as Aspergillus sp and Penicillium sp. are able to grow at high salinity environment. Those fungi were also able to degrade lignocellulose, sollubilize in organic phosphate and provide organic phosphat and produce plant growth hormon especially IAA. Such activities benefit to improve soil fertility in high salinity land as a bio-fertilizer.The objective of this research was to know the growth of rice plant that treated with fungus contained bio-fertilizer on land with different level of salinity. The rice were planted in Green house of Cibinong Science Centre, Cibinong.The research was set up as complete random design with five replication. The rice were watered by 5 conditions: 50% of sea water, 100% of sea water, 100% sea water + 2 % NaCl , fresh water + 5 % NaCl and 100% fresh water as the control. Fertilizer was added to the medium twice. Ten grams of fertilizer were used per polybag (10g/7 Kg, 2 weeks after planting and before flowering subsequently. The observed parameters were plant height, number of tiller, leaves colour, biomass dry weight, soil organic carbon content, cellulosic and lignin degrading activities of the fungus, fungus phosphate-solubilizing potency and fungus production of IAA.The watering treatment lead to 5 level of salinity i.e. : 5,93 dS/m (50% sea water, 9,15 dS/m (100% sea water, 10,42 dS/m (sea water + 2% NaCl, 12,43 dS/m (fresh water + 5% NaCl and 0,74 dS/m (fresh water. The result showed that among those 5 watering condition, the rice grew best on 5,93 dS/m (watering 50% of

  2. Evaluation of gravel concentration and soil strength in upland rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of gravel concentration and soil strength in upland rice cultivation in Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria. FK Salako, O Osiname. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Soil Sciences Vol. 16 (1) 2006: pp. 67-76. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Farmers’ assessment of soil quality in rice production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, A.C.R.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.; Sacco dos Anjos, F.

    2011-01-01

    In the recent past there has been increasing recognition that local knowledge of farmers can yield insight into soil quality. With regard to constraints and possibilities for the production of irrigated rice in the south of Brazil there is no documentation on local soil knowledge. The goals of this

  4. The effect of irrigated rice cropping on the alkalinity of two alkaline rice soils in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, van P.J.A.; Zelfde, van 't J.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Hammecker, C.

    2004-01-01

    Irrigated rice cropping is practiced to reclaim alkaline-sodic soils in many parts of the world. This practice is in apparent contrast with earlier studies in the Sahel, which suggests that irrigated rice cropping may lead to the formation of alkaline-sodic soils. Soil column experiments were done

  5. Evaluation of potential effects of soil available phosphorus on soil arsenic availability and paddy rice inorganic arsenic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Hou, Qingye; Yang, Zhongfang; Zhong, Cong; Zheng, Guodong; Yang, Zhiqiang; Li, Jie

    2014-05-01

    The transfer of arsenic from paddy field to rice is a major exposure route of the highly toxic element to humans. The aim of our study is to explore the effects of soil available phosphorus on As uptake by rice, and identify the effects of soil properties on arsenic transfer from soil to rice under actual field conditions. 56 pairs of topsoil and rice samples were collected. The relevant parameters in soil and the inorganic arsenic in rice grains were analyzed, and then all the results were treated by statistical methods. Results show that the main factors influencing the uptake by rice grain include soil pH and available phosphorus. The eventual impact of phosphorus is identified as the suppression of As uptake by rice grains. The competition for transporters from soil to roots between arsenic and phosphorus in rhizosphere soil has been a dominant feature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HEAVY METAL LEVELS IN PADDY SOILS AND RICE (ORYZA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    in different locations including closer to mining and within urbanized areas in Tanzania. The objective of the study ... natural resources of social-economic value, .... Game reserve area. 18. Kyabakari. S 01o 29.252´/ E 033o 49.029´. Rural area. Sample collection and analysis. Sampling of soil and paddy rice was conducted ...

  7. Modeling aerobic decomposition of rice straw during the off-rice season in an Andisol paddy soil in a cold temperate region of Japan: Effects of soil temperature and moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Miyuki; Cheng, Weiguo; Tang, Shuirong; Hori, Yasuaki; Yaginuma, Eiko; Hattori, Satoshi; Hanayama, Susumu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Xu, Xingkai

    2016-01-01

    Submerged rice paddies are a major source of methane (CH4) which is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide (CO2). Accelerating rice straw decomposition during the off-rice season could help to reduce CH4 emission from rice paddies during the single rice-growth season in cold temperate regions. For understanding how both temperature and moisture can affect the rate of rice straw decomposition during the off-rice season in the cold temperate region of Tohoku district, Jap...

  8. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities.

  9. Bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengying; Liu, Hong; Xing, Yidong; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gurevich, Yu. L.

    To increase the closure of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), the bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate (SLS) by mushrooms and worms has been studied. The results showed that rice straw could be treated better by aerobic fermentation and succeeding growth of mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. In this process the total content of lignocellulose in the straw was removed by 37.74%. Furthermore, 46.68 g (fresh weight) of mushrooms could be produced from 100.0 g (dry weight) of rice straw. During the conversion of rice straw into a starting SLS by mushrooms and worms, the matter loss was 77.31%. The lettuce has been planted in the SLS and the yield when lettuce was cultivated on the SLS (8.77gm-2day-1) was comparable to the yield obtained on the nutrient solution. In addition, the silicon in the SLS ash can reach upto 32% and the circulation of it is expected during the growth of rice.

  10. Choosing soil management systems for rice production on lowland soils in South Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, A.C.R.; Hoogmoed, W.B.

    2009-01-01

    Lowland soils are commonly found in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern of Brazil, where they represent around 20% of the total area of the state. Deficient drainage is the most important natural characteristic of these soils which therefore are mainly in use for flood-irrigated rice (Oriza

  11. Arsenic concentrations in paddy soil and rice and health implications for major rice-growing regions of Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; McCurdy, Sarah; Schaefer, Michael V; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-05-06

    Despite the global importance of As in rice, research has primarily focused on Bangladesh, India, China, and the United States with limited attention given to other countries. Owing to both indigenous As within the soil and the possible increases arising from the onset of irrigation with groundwater, an assessment of As in rice within Cambodia is needed, which offers a "base-case" comparison against sediments of similar origin that comprise rice paddy soils where As-contaminated water is used for irrigation (e.g., Bangladesh). Here, we evaluated the As content of rice from five provinces (Kandal, Prey Veng, Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, and Kampong Thom) in the rice-growing regions of Cambodia and coupled that data to soil-chemical factors based on extractions of paddy soil collected and processed under anoxic conditions. At total soil As concentrations ranging 0.8 to 18 μg g(-1), total grain As concentrations averaged 0.2 μg g(-1) and ranged from 0.1 to 0.37 with Banteay Meanchey rice having significantly higher values than Prey Veng rice. Overall, soil-extractable concentrations of As, Fe, P, and Si and total As were poor predictors of grain As concentrations. While biogeochemical factors leading to reduction of As(V)-bearing Fe(III) oxides are likely most important for predicting plant-available As, husk and straw As concentrations were the most significant predictors of grain-As levels among our measured parameters.

  12. Imidacloprid application changes microbial dynamics and enzymes in rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Bibhab; Adak, Totan; Patil, Naveen K B; Pandi G, Guru P; Gowda, G Basana; Jambhulkar, N N; Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Panneerselvam, P; Kumar, Upendra; Munda, Sushmita; Jena, Mayabini

    2017-10-01

    Extensive use of imidacloprid in rice ecosystem may alter dynamics of microorganisms and can change soil biochemical properties. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of imidacloprid on growth and activities of microbes in tropical rice soil ecosystem. Four treatments, namely, recommended dose (at 25g a.i. ha-1, RD), double the recommended dose (at 50g a.i. ha-1, 2RD), five times the recommended dose (at 125g a.i. ha-1, 5RD) & ten times the recommended dose (at 250g a.i. ha-1, 10RD) along with control were imposed under controlled condition. Dissipation half lives of imidacloprid in soil were 19.25, 20.38, 21.65 and 33.00 days for RD, 2RD, 5RD and 10RD, respectively. In general bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and phosphate solubilising bacteria population were disturbed due to imidacloprid application. Changes in diversity indices within bacterial community confirmed that imidacloprid application significantly affected distribution of bacteria. Total soil microbial biomass carbon content was reduced on imidacloprid application. Except dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities, all other soil enzymes namely, β-glycosidase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, acid phosphatase and urease responded negatively to imidacloprid application. The extent of negative effect of imidacloprid depends on dose and exposure time. This study concludes imidacloprid application had transient negative effects on soil microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bulliform Phytolith Research in Wild and Domesticated Rice Paddy Soil in South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujia Huan

    Full Text Available Bulliform phytoliths play an important role in researching rice origins as they can be used to distinguish between wild and domesticated rice. Rice bulliform phytoliths are characterized by numerous small shallow fish-scale decorations on the lateral side. Previous studies have shown that domesticated rice has a larger number of these decorations than wild rice and that the number of decorations ≥9 is a useful feature for identifying domesticated rice. However, this standard was established based on limited samples of modern rice plants. In this study, we analyzed soil samples from both wild and domesticated rice paddies. Results showed that, in wild rice soil samples, the proportion of bulliform phytoliths with ≥9 decorations was 17.46% ± 8.29%, while in domesticated rice soil samples, the corresponding proportion was 63.70% ± 9.22%. This suggests that the proportion of phytoliths with ≥9 decorations can be adopted as a criterion for discriminating between wild and domesticated rice in prehistoric soil. This indicator will be of significance in improving the application of fish-scale decorations to research into rice origins and the rice domestication process.

  14. Bulliform Phytolith Research in Wild and Domesticated Rice Paddy Soil in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Xiujia; Lu, Houyuan; Wang, Can; Tang, Xiangan; Zuo, Xinxin; Ge, Yong; He, Keyang

    2015-01-01

    Bulliform phytoliths play an important role in researching rice origins as they can be used to distinguish between wild and domesticated rice. Rice bulliform phytoliths are characterized by numerous small shallow fish-scale decorations on the lateral side. Previous studies have shown that domesticated rice has a larger number of these decorations than wild rice and that the number of decorations ≥9 is a useful feature for identifying domesticated rice. However, this standard was established based on limited samples of modern rice plants. In this study, we analyzed soil samples from both wild and domesticated rice paddies. Results showed that, in wild rice soil samples, the proportion of bulliform phytoliths with ≥9 decorations was 17.46% ± 8.29%, while in domesticated rice soil samples, the corresponding proportion was 63.70% ± 9.22%. This suggests that the proportion of phytoliths with ≥9 decorations can be adopted as a criterion for discriminating between wild and domesticated rice in prehistoric soil. This indicator will be of significance in improving the application of fish-scale decorations to research into rice origins and the rice domestication process.

  15. Soil quality assessment in rice production systems: establishing a minimum data set.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.

    2008-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil's capacity to function, can be assessed by indicators based on physical, chemical, and biological properties. Here we report on the assessment of soil quality in 21 rice (Oryza sativa) fields under three rice production systems (semi-direct, pre-germinated, and

  16. Wheat Yield Trend and Soil Fertility Status in Long Term Rice-Rice-Wheat Cropping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Rawal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A long-term soil fertility experiment under rice-rice-wheat system was performed to evaluate the long term effects of inorganic fertilizer and manure applications on soil properties and grain yield of wheat. The experiment began since 1978 was laid out in randomized complete block design with 9 treatments replicated 3 times. From 1990 onwards, periodic modifications have been made in all the treatments splitting the plots in two equal halves of 4 x 3 m2 leaving one half as original. In the original treatments, recent data revealed that the use of Farm Yard Manure (FYM @10 t ha-1 gave significantly (P≤0.05 higher yield of 2.3 t ha-1 in wheat, whereas control plot gave the lowest grain yield of 277 kg ha-1. Similarly, in the modified treatments, the use of FYM @10 t ha-1 along with inorganic Nitrogen (N and Potassium oxide (K2O @ 50 kg ha-1 produced significantly (P≤0.05 the highest yield of 2.4 t/ha in wheat. The control plot with an indigenous nutrient supply only produced wheat yield of 277 kg ha-1 after 35th year completion of rice-rice-wheat system. A sharp decline in wheat yields was noted in minus N, phosphorus (P, Potassium (K treatments during recent years. Yields were consistently higher in the N:P2O5:K2O and FYM treatments than in treatments, where one or more nutrients were lacking. The application of P2O5 and K2O caused a partial recovery of yield in P and K deficient plots. There was significant (P≤0.05 effect of use of chemical fertilizers and manure on soil properties. The soil analysis data showed an improvement in soil pH (7.8, soil organic matter (4.1%, total N content (0.16%, available P (503.5 kg P2O5 ha-1 and exchangeable K (137.5 kg K2O ha-1 in FYM applied treatments over all other treatments. The findings showed that the productivity of the wheat can be increased and sustained by improving nutrient through the integrated use of organic and inorganic manures in long term.

  17. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide.

  18. Adsorption Kinetics of Carbamate Pesticide in Rice Field Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soontree Khuntong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic extraction (75.55% with petroleum ether:acetone (1:1, v/v was employed for extraction of carbofuran in rice field soil. The amounts of carbofuran were determined by reverse phase HPLC. The analytical method provided high precision and accuracy with the relative error of 0.47%. The percentage of recoveries varied from 84% to 77% in the con¬centration ranges of 10–40 mg/L of spiked soil samples. The carbofuran residues in the rice field soil significantly decreased year by year because of pesticide properties, soil properties and degradation conditions. A high amount of residues was found in the plots that contained high organic contents. The adsorption of carbofuran in soil reached equilibrium within 23 h. The percentage of adsorption varied from almost 30% to 80% depending on concentrations of carbofuran. The adsorption of carbofuran agreed with Freundlich isotherms; q = 7.07 x 10-5Cf2.5092; with the correlation coefficient of 0.9281. Organic carbon coefficient, Koc, was 1.91 x 10-3 mg/L calculated from Kd, and half-life (8.9 d of adsorbed carbofuran. The GUS index (6.37 calculated from Koc presented a high lixiviation potential. The positive ΔG indicated the non-spontaneous reaction. Carbofuran rapidly desorbed from soil at the desorption rate of 0.0228 mg/kg soil d. Kinetic studies provided the first order reaction with the reaction rate of 0.0779 mg/d and half-life of 8.9 days.

  19. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems. PMID:25944542

  20. Rice (Oryza sativa L) plantation affects the stability of biochar in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Feng, Qibo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Gielen, Gerty; Wu, Weixiang

    2015-05-01

    Conversion of rice straw into biochar for soil amendment appears to be a promising method to increase long-term carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The stability of biochar in paddy soil, which is the major determining factor of carbon sequestration effect, depends mainly on soil properties and plant functions. However, the influence of plants on biochar stability in paddy soil remains unclear. In this study, bulk and surface characteristics of the biochars incubated without rice plants were compared with those incubated with rice plants using a suite of analytical techniques. Results showed that although rice plants had no significant influence on the bulk characteristics and decomposition rates of the biochar, the surface oxidation of biochar particles was enhanced by rice plants. Using 13C labeling we observed that rice plants could significantly increase carbon incorporation from biochar into soil microbial biomass. About 0.047% of the carbon in biochar was incorporated into the rice plants during the whole rice growing cycle. These results inferred that root exudates and transportation of biochar particles into rice plants might decrease the stability of biochar in paddy soil. Impact of plants should be considered when predicting carbon sequestration potential of biochar in soil systems.

  1. Vegetable production after flooded rice improves soil properties in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, A.P.; Neeteson, J.J.; Pham Thi Thu, H.; Struik, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Vegetable production in South East Asia often is in rotation with °ooded rice. The puddling of the soil with flooded rice production may result in unfavourable soil conditions for the subsequent production of dry land crops. To establish whether permanent vegetable production results in favourable

  2. Heavy Metal Pollution in a Soil-Rice System in the Yangtze River Region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhouping; Zhang, Qiaofen; Han, Tiqian; Ding, Yanfei; Sun, Junwei; Wang, Feijuan; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-12-22

    Heavy metals are regarded as toxic trace elements in the environment. Heavy metal pollution in soil or rice grains is of increasing concern. In this study, 101 pairs of soil and rice samples were collected from the major rice-producing areas along the Yangtze River in China. The soil properties and heavy metal (i.e., Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr) concentrations in the soil and rice grains were analyzed to evaluate the heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the soil-rice systems. The results showed that the Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr concentrations in the soil ranged from 0.10 to 4.64, 0.01 to 1.46, 7.64 to 127.56, and 13.52 to 231.02 mg·kg(-)¹, respectively. Approximately 37%, 16%, 60% and 70% of the rice grain samples were polluted by Cd, Hg, Pb, and Cr, respectively. The degree of heavy metal contamination in the soil-rice systems exhibited a regional variation. The interactions among the heavy metal elements may also influence the migration and accumulation of heavy metals in soil or paddy rice. The accumulation of heavy metals in soil and rice grains is related to a certain extent to the pH and soil organic matter (SOM). This study provides useful information regarding heavy metal accumulation in soil to support the safe production of rice in China. The findings from this study also provide a robust scientific basis for risk assessments regarding ecological protection and food safety.

  3. Heavy Metal Pollution in a Soil-Rice System in the Yangtze River Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouping Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are regarded as toxic trace elements in the environment. Heavy metal pollution in soil or rice grains is of increasing concern. In this study, 101 pairs of soil and rice samples were collected from the major rice-producing areas along the Yangtze River in China. The soil properties and heavy metal (i.e., Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr concentrations in the soil and rice grains were analyzed to evaluate the heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the soil-rice systems. The results showed that the Cd, Hg, Pb and Cr concentrations in the soil ranged from 0.10 to 4.64, 0.01 to 1.46, 7.64 to 127.56, and 13.52 to 231.02 mg·kg−1, respectively. Approximately 37%, 16%, 60% and 70% of the rice grain samples were polluted by Cd, Hg, Pb, and Cr, respectively. The degree of heavy metal contamination in the soil-rice systems exhibited a regional variation. The interactions among the heavy metal elements may also influence the migration and accumulation of heavy metals in soil or paddy rice. The accumulation of heavy metals in soil and rice grains is related to a certain extent to the pH and soil organic matter (SOM. This study provides useful information regarding heavy metal accumulation in soil to support the safe production of rice in China. The findings from this study also provide a robust scientific basis for risk assessments regarding ecological protection and food safety.

  4. Partitioning of CH(4 and CO(2 production originating from rice straw, soil and root organic carbon in rice microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    Full Text Available Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas CH(4. Possible carbon sources for CH(4 and CO(2 production in rice fields are soil organic matter (SOM, root organic carbon (ROC and rice straw (RS, but partitioning of the flux between the different carbon sources is difficult. We conducted greenhouse experiments using soil microcosms planted with rice. The soil was amended with and without (13C-labeled RS, using two (13C-labeled RS treatments with equal RS (5 g kg(-1 soil but different δ(13C of RS. This procedure allowed to determine the carbon flux from each of the three sources (SOM, ROC, RS by determining the δ(13C of CH(4 and CO(2 in the different incubations and from the δ(13C of RS. Partitioning of carbon flux indicated that the contribution of ROC to CH(4 production was 41% at tillering stage, increased with rice growth and was about 60% from the booting stage onwards. The contribution of ROC to CO(2 was 43% at tillering stage, increased to around 70% at booting stage and stayed relatively constant afterwards. The contribution of RS was determined to be in a range of 12-24% for CH(4 production and 11-31% for CO(2 production; while the contribution of SOM was calculated to be 23-35% for CH(4 production and 13-26% for CO(2 production. The results indicate that ROC was the major source of CH(4 though RS application greatly enhanced production and emission of CH(4 in rice field soil. Our results also suggest that data of CH(4 dissolved in rice field could be used as a proxy for the produced CH(4 after tillering stage.

  5. Screening of filamentous fungi to produce xylanase and xylooligosaccharides in submerged and solid-state cultivations on rice husk, soybean hull, and spent malt as substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Menezes, Bruna; Rossi, Daniele Misturini; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the enzymatic complex produced by selected fungi strains isolated from the environment using the agro-industrial residues rice husk, soybean hull, and spent malt as substrates. Microbial growth was carried out in solid-state cultivation (SSC) and in submerged cultivations (SC) and the enzymatic activities of xylanase, cellulase, β-xylosidase, and β-glucosidase were determined. All substrates were effective in inducing enzymatic activities, with one strain of Aspergillus brasiliensis BLf1 showing maximum activities for all enzymes, except for cellulases. Using this fungus, the enzymatic activities of xylanase, cellulase, and β-glucosidase were generally higher in SSC compared to SC, producing maxima activities of 120.5, 25.3 and 47.4 U g-1 of dry substrate, respectively. β-xylosidase activity of 28.1 U g-1 of dry substrate was highest in SC. Experimental design was carried out to optimize xylanase activity by A. brasiliensis BLf1 in SSC using rice husk as substrate, producing maximum xylanase activity 183.5 U g-1 dry substrate, and xylooligosaccharides were produced and characterized. These results suggest A. brasiliensis BLf1 can be used to produce important lytic enzymes to be applied in the preparation of xylooligosaccharides.

  6. [Dynamics of active organic carbon in a paddy soil under different rice farming modes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming; Cao, Cou-Gui; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Jin-Ping; Yue, Li-Xin; Cai, Ming-Li

    2010-08-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in a paddy soil under integrated rice-duck farming (RD), intermittent irrigation (RW), and conventional flooded irrigation (CK), the three rice farming modes typical in southern China. Under these three farming modes, the soil DOC and MBC contents reached the highest during the period from rice booting to heading, while the soil ROC content had less change during the whole rice growth period. Two-factor variance analysis showed that soil MBC was greatly affected by rice growth stage, soil DOC was greatly affected by rice growth stage and farming mode, and soil ROC was mainly affected by farming mode. Comparing with CK, RD significantly increased the soil DOC and ROC contents and their availability, while RW significantly decreased the soil DOC content and its availability but increased the soil ROC content and its availability. No significant differences were observed in the soil MBC and microbial quotient among RD, RW, and CK.

  7. Quantifying the impact of soil and climate variability on rainfed rice production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, M.C.S.

    1993-01-01

    Methods and sampling strategies for measurement of soil hydraulic functions in puddled and non-puddled rice soils are discussed. A method was developed to measure in situ water percolation rate and soil water pressure head gradients in puddled soils. The number of measurements needed to

  8. Response of soil physico-chemical properties to restoration approaches and submergence in the water level fluctuation zone of the Danjiangkou Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, KeRong; Zhang, QuanFa; Wang, WeiBo

    2017-11-01

    With the completion of the Danjiangkou Dam, the impoundment and drainage of dams can significantly alter shorelines, hydrological regime, and sediment and can result in the loss of soil and original riparian vegetation. Revegetation may affect soil properties and have broad important implications both for ecological services and soil recovery. In this work, we investigated the soil properties under different restoration approaches, and before and after submergence in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the Danjiangkou Reservoir. Soil physical (bulk density and soil moisture), chemical (pH, soil organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents), and heavy metals were determined. This study reported that restoration approaches have impacts on soil moisture, pH, N, soil organic carbon, P, K and heavy metals in the WLFZ of the Danjiangkou Reservoir. Our results indicated that different restoration approaches could increase the soil moisture while decrease soil pH. Higher soil organic carbon in propagule banks transplantation (PBT) and shrubs restoration (SR) indicate that PBT and SR may provide soil organic matter more quickly than trees restoration (TR). SR and TR could significantly improve the soil total P and available P. PBT and SR could improve the soil total K and available K. SR and TR could significantly promote Cu and Zn adsorption, and Pb and Fe release by plant. Submergence could significantly affect the soil pH, NO3--N, NH4+-N, total P and available P. Submergence could promote NO3--N and available P adsorption, and NH4+-N and total P release by soil. The soil quality index (SQI) values implied that TR and PBT greatly improved soil quality. The present study suggests that PBT and TR could be effective for soil restoration in WLFZ of the Danjiangkou Reservoir. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of soil characteristics potentially affecting arsenic concentration in paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdan, Katja, E-mail: katja.bogdan@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Manfred K., E-mail: schenk@pflern.uni-hannover.d [Institute of Plant Nutrition, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Paddy rice may contribute considerably to the human intake of As. The knowledge of soil characteristics affecting the As content of the rice plant enables the development of agricultural measures for controlling As uptake. During field surveys in 2004 and 2006, plant samples from 68 fields (Italy, Po-area) revealed markedly differing As concentration in polished rice. The soil factors total As{sub (aquaregia)}, pH, grain size fractions, total C, plant available P{sub (CAL)}, poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} and plant available Si{sub (Na-acetate)} content that potentially affect As content of rice were determined. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant positive influence of the total As{sub (aquaregia)} and plant available P{sub (CAL)} content and a negative influence of the poorly crystalline Fe{sub (oxal.)} content of the soil on the As content in polished rice and rice straw. Si concentration in rice straw varied widely and was negatively related to As content in straw and polished rice. - Field selection for total As, poorly crystalline Fe and plant available P in soil might contribute to control As content of paddy rice.

  10. Long-term effect of rice-based farming systems on soil health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Priyanka; Nayak, A K; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Shahid, M; Raja, R; Tripathi, R; Bhattacharyya, P; Panda, B B; Mohanty, S; Rao, K S

    2015-05-01

    Integrated rice-fish culture, an age-old farming system, is a technology which could produce rice and fish sustainably at a time by optimizing scarce resource use through complementary use of land and water. An understanding of microbial processes is important for the management of farming systems as soil microbes are the living part of soil organic matter and play critical roles in soil C and N cycling and ecosystem functioning of farming system. Rice-based integrated farming system model for small and marginal farmers was established in 2001 at Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, Odisha. The different enterprises of farming system were rice-fish, fish-fingerlings, fruits, vegetables, rice-fish refuge, and agroforestry. This study was conducted with the objective to assess the soil physicochemical properties, microbial population, carbon and nitrogen fractions, soil enzymatic activity, and productivity of different enterprises. The effect of enterprises induced significant changes in the chemical composition and organic matter which in turn influenced the activities of enzymes (urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in the C, N, and P cycles. The different enterprises of long-term rice-based farming system caused significant variations in nutrient content of soil, which was higher in rice-fish refuge followed by rice-fish enterprise. Highest microbial populations and enzymatic properties were recorded in rice-fish refuge system because of waterlogging and reduced condition prolonged in this system leading to less decomposition of organic matter. The maximum alkaline phosphatase, urease, and FDA were observed in rice-fish enterprise. However, highest acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase activity were obtained in vegetable enterprise and fish-fingerlings enterprise, respectively.

  11. Establishment of a rice-duck integrated farming system and its effects on soil fertility and rice disease control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Qing; Hu, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Chang; Luo, Zhi-Qing; Luo, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Rice-duck integrated farming is an ecological farming system newly established in some areas of southern China . It was reported that the ducks walking around the paddy fields is beneficial to control weed hazards and reduce rice pests and diseases. To study and evaluate the effects of the rice-duck integrated farming on soil fertility and rice disease control, a field experiment of rice cultivation was carried out in the suburb of Shanghai in 2014. It includes a treatment of raising ducks in the fields and a control without ducks. The treatment was implemented by building a duck coop nearby the experimental fields and driving 15 ducks into a plot at daytime since the early stage of rice growth. Each plot is 667 m2 in area. The treatment and control were replicated for three times. No any herbicides, pesticides, fungicides and chemical fertilizers were applied during the experiment to prevent any disturbance to duck growing and rice weed hazards and disease incidences from agrochemicals. The results are as follows: (1) The incidences of rice leaf rollers (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) and stem borers treated with ducks, 0.45%and 1.18% on average, respectively, are lower than those of the control, 0.74% and 1.44% on average, respectively. At the late stage of rice growth, the incidence of rice sheath blight treated with ducks, 13.15% on average, is significantly lower than that of the control, 16.9% on average; and the incidence of rice planthoppers treated with ducks, 11.3 per hill on average, is also significantly lower than that of the control, 47.4 per hill on average. (2) The number of weeds in the plots treated with ducks, 8.3 per m2 on average, is significantly lower than that of the control, 87.5 m2 on average. (3) Raising ducks in the fields could also enhance soil enzyme activity and nutrient status. At the late stage of rice growth, the activities of urease, phosphatase, sucrase and catalase in the soils treated with ducks are 1.39 times, 1.40 times, 1

  12. Soil quality assessment in rice production systems: establishing a minimum data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues de Lima, Ana Cláudia; Hoogmoed, Willem; Brussaard, Lijbert

    2008-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil's capacity to function, can be assessed by indicators based on physical, chemical, and biological properties. Here we report on the assessment of soil quality in 21 rice (Oryza sativa) fields under three rice production systems (semi-direct, pre-germinated, and conventional) on four soil textural classes in the Camaquã region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The objectives of our study were: (i) to identify soil quality indicators that discriminate both management systems and soil textural classes, (ii) to establish a minimum data set of soil quality indicators and (iii) to test whether this minimum data set is correlated with yield. Twenty-nine soil biological, chemical, and physical properties were evaluated to characterize regional soil quality. Soil quality assessment was based on factor and discriminant analysis. Bulk density, available water, and micronutrients (Cu, Zn, and Mn) were the most powerful soil properties in distinguishing among different soil textural classes. Organic matter, earthworms, micronutrients (Cu and Mn), and mean weight diameter were the most powerful soil properties in assessing differences in soil quality among the rice management systems. Manganese was the property most strongly correlated with yield (adjusted r2 = 0.365, P = 0.001). The merits of sub-dividing samples according to texture and the linkage between soil quality indicators, soil functioning, plant performance, and soil management options are discussed in particular.

  13. Soil Phosphorus Stoichiometry Drives Carbon Turnover Along a Soil C Gradient Spanning Mineral and Organic Soils Under Rice Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, W.; Ye, R.; Horwath, W. R.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) cycling is linked to the availability of nutrients like nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, the role of soil P in influencing soil C turnover and accumulation is poorly understood, with most models focusing on C:N ratios based on the assumption that terrestrial ecosystems are N limited. To determine the effects of N and P availability on soil C turnover, we compared soil respiration over the course of a growing season in four adjacent rice fields with 5%, 10%, 20% and 25% soil C. In each of these fields, plots were established to test the effect of N additions on plant growth, using control and N addition treatments (80 kg N/ha urea). Although soil P was not manipulated in parallel, prior work has shown soil P concentrations decline markedly with increasing soil C content. Soil CO2 flux was monitored using static chambers at biweekly intervals during the growing season, along with porewater dissolved organic C and ammonium. Soils were collected at the end of the growing season, and tested for total C, N, and P, extractable N and P, pH, base cations and trace metals. Soil DNA was also extracted for 16S rRNA sequencing to profile microbial communities. Soil N additions significantly increased CO2 flux and soil C turnover (seasonal CO2 flux per unit soil C) in 5% and 10% C fields, but not in 20% or 25% C fields. Soil C content was closely related to soil N:P stoichiometry, with N:P ratios of ca. 12, 16, 24, and 56 respectively in the 5, 10, 20 and 25% C fields. Seasonal CO2 fluxes (per m2) were highest in 10% C soils. However, soil C turnover was inversely related to soil C concentrations, with the greatest C turnover at the lowest values of soil C. Soil C turnover showed stronger relationships with soil chemical parameters than seasonal CO2 fluxes alone, and the best predictors of soil C turnover were soil total and extractable N:P ratios, along with extractable P alone. Our results show that soil P availability and stoichiometry influence the

  14. Rice husk ash with high carbon content proves favourable for soil stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, P.V.; van der Star, WRL; van Paassen, L.A.; Ye, G.

    2015-01-01

    Rice husk ash is a promising pozzolanic material produced from rice husk burning and has significant potential a sustainable replacement for cement in construction and ground improvement applications. In this study the effect of burning conditions on the ash reactivity and its potential for soil

  15. Evaluation of nutrients status of soils under rice cultivation in cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrients status of soils under rice cultivation in Cross River State Nigeria was evaluated to ascertain the present status and suggest management practices needed for an increased rice production. A reconnaissance survey of the entire State was undertaken. A total number of eight Local Government Areas, namely ...

  16. Factors affecting the soil arsenic bioavailability, accumulation in rice and risk to human health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Shah Md Golam Gousul; Sarker, Tushar C; Naz, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic (As), a class one carcinogen, reflects a disastrous environmental threat due to its presence in each and every compartment of the environment. The high toxicity of As is notably present in its inorganic forms. Irrigation with As contaminated groundwater in rice fields increases As concentration in topsoil and its bioavailability for rice crops. However, most of the As in paddy field topsoils is present as As(III) form, which is predominant in rice grain. According to the OECD-FAO, rice is the second most extensively cultivated cereal throughout the world. This cereal is a staple food for a large number of populations in most of the developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, South and South-east Asia. Rice consumption is one of the major causes of chronic As diseases including cancer for Asian populations. Thus, this review provides an overview concerning the conditions involved in soil that leads to As entrance into rice crops, phytotoxicity and metabolism of As in rice plants. Moreover, the investigations of the As uptake in raw rice grain are compiled, and the As biotransfer into the human diet is focused. The As uptake by rice crop represents an important pathway of As exposure in countries with high rice and rice-based food consumption because of its high (more than the hygienic level) As levels found in edible plant part for livestock and humans.

  17. Soil quality assessment of rice production systems in South of Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.

    2007-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil capacity to function, can be quantified by indicators based on physical, chemical and biological properties. Maintaining soil quality at a desirable level in the rice cropping system is a very complex issue due to the nature of the production systems used. In

  18. Effect of temperature on composition of the methanotrophic community in rice field and forest soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohanty, S.R.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Conrad, R.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature change affects methane consumption in soil. However, there is no information on possible temperature control of methanotrophic bacterial populations. Therefore, we studied CH4 consumption and populations of methanotrophs in an upland forest soil and a rice field soil incubated at

  19. Utilisation of rice husk ash for improvement of deficient soils in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of studies, mostly carried out at laboratory scale, on the utilisation of Rice Husk Ash (RHA) for improvement of deficient soils in Nigeria is presented. Although, few studies have focused on using the RHA as soil improving additive alone, most of the studies have been on its usage as additive to the conventional soil ...

  20. Utilization of organic fertilizer to increase paddy growth and productivity using System of Rice Intensification (SRI method in saline soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V . O . Subardja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity has negative effect on soil biodiversity as well as microbial activities. Hence, rice growth also effected by salinity. Application of organic fertilizer and adoption of System of Rice Intensification (SRI cultivation might improve the (biological soil properties and increase rice yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different rice cultivation methods namely conventional rice cultivation method and System of Rice Intensification (SRI rice cultivation method and two kinds organic fertilizer on improvement of soil biological properties and rice yield. In this study, a split plot experimental design was applied where rice cultivation method (conventional and SRI was the main plot and two kinds of organic fertilizer (market waste and rice straw was the sub plot. The treatments had four replicates. The results showed that SRI cultivation with market waste organic fertilizer could increase soil biological properties (population of microbe, fungi and soil respiration. The same treatment also increased rice growth and production. Combination of SRI and market waste organic fertilizer yielded the highest rice production (7.21 t/ha.

  1. Productivity of Rice Grown on Arsenic Contaminated Soil under a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Plaganas, M.; Muehe, E. M.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Rice is the staple food for more than 50% of the global population. In South and Southeast Asia, native soil arsenic coupled with arsenic-laden irrigation water result in paddy soils having arsenic levels that decrease the quality and productivity of rice and thus compromise food security worldwide. However, it remains unknown how climate change will affect the accumulation of arsenic in rice plants, specifically grain, grown in arsenic-bearing paddy soils. We hypothesize that the bioavailability of arsenic in the paddy soil will increase with climate change leading to an even sharper decrease of rice productivity and quality than presently estimated. In order to shed light on this question, we performed greenhouse studies to simulate today's climate condition in Asian paddy soils and compare it to the conditions projected for the year 2100. We investigated climate conditions estimated in the 5th assessment report of the IPCC1, indicating up to a 5°C increase in temperature and doubled atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Under these current and future climate conditions, we examined rice physiology including plant height and biomass, leaf chlorophyll content, grain number and weight as well as contents of accumulated arsenic, and its species in the different rice tissues. We further correlate different geochemical parameters of the soil, including arsenic and other relevant metal dynamics in the soil, to plant response. In sum, our analyses will allow us to better predict the productivity of rice and its grain quality in a future climate condition, and may help to take precautions to avoid a global food crisis, particularly for South and Southeast Asia where rice is a daily staple. 1IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2013, The Physical Science Basis.

  2. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3–12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems. PMID:26778218

  3. Mechanistic understanding of MeHg-Se antagonism in soil-rice systems: the key role of antagonism in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Evans, R. Douglas; Zhong, Huan; Zhao, Jiating; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice has great implications for human health. Here, effects of selenium (Se) on MeHg availability to rice are explored by growing rice under soil or foliar fertilization with Se. Results indicate that soil amendment with Se could reduce MeHg levels in soil and grain (maximally 73%). In contrast, foliar fertilization with Se enhanced plant Se levels (3-12 folds) without affecting grain MeHg concentrations. This evidence, along with the distinct distribution of MeHg and Se within the plant, demonstrate for the first time that Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels (i.e., MeHg-Se antagonism in soil) rather than MeHg-Se interactions within the plant might be the key process triggering the decreased grain MeHg levels under Se amendment. The reduction in soil MeHg concentrations could be mainly attributed to the formation of Hg-Se complexes (detected by TEM-EDX and XANES) and thus reduced microbial MeHg production. Moreover, selenite and selenate were equally effective in reducing soil MeHg concentrations, possibly because of rapid changes in Se speciation. The dominant role of Se-induced reduction in soil MeHg levels, which has been largely underestimated previously, together with the possible mechanisms advance our mechanistic understanding about MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems.

  4. Ground cover rice production system facilitates soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Dannenmann, M.; Lin, S.; Saiz, G.; Yan, G.; Yao, Z.; Pelster, D.; Tao, H.; Sippel, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zuo, Q.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-02-01

    Rice production is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, however covering paddy rice soils with films (ground cover rice production system: GCRPS) can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the vegetation period resulting in increased grain yields in colder regions of rice production with seasonal water shortages. It has been speculated that the increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS may result in losses of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional scale experiment, conducted by sampling paired adjacent Paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites in the Shiyan region, which is typical for many mountainous areas across China. Parameters evaluated included soil C and N stocks, soil physical and chemical properties, potential carbon mineralization rates, fractions of soil organic carbon and stable carbon isotopic composition of plant leaves. Furthermore, root biomass was quantified at maximum tillering stage at one of our paired sites. Against expectations the study showed that: (1) GCRPS significantly increased soil organic C and N stocks 5-20 years following conversion of production systems, (2) there were no differences between GCRPS and Paddy in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths with the exception of soil bulk density, (3) GCRPS had lower mineralization potential for soil organic C compared with Paddy over the incubation period, (4) GCRPS showed lower δ15N in the soils and plant leafs indicating less NH3 volatilization in GCRPS than in Paddy; and (5) GCRPS increased yields and root biomass in all soil layers down to 40 cm depth. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative rice production technique that not only increases yields using less irrigation water, but that it also is environmentally beneficial due to increased soil C and N stocks at regional scale.

  5. Dissipation of the Herbicide Benzobicyclon Hydrolysate in a Model California Rice Field Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katryn L; Gladfelder, Joshua J; Quigley, Lindsay L; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2017-10-25

    The herbicide benzobicyclon (BZB; 3-(2-chloro-4-(methylsulfonyl)benzoyl)-2-phenylthiobicyclo[3.2.1]oct-2-en-4-one) has recently been approved for use on California rice fields by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). Hydrolysis of BZB rapidly forms the active compound, benzobicyclon hydrolysate (BH), whose fate is currently not well understood. A model California rice soil was used to determine BH soil dissipation. The pKa and aqueous solubility were also determined, as experimental values are not currently available. Sorption data indicate BH does not bind tightly, or irreversibly, with this soil. Flooding resulted in decreased BH loss, indicating anaerobic microbes are less likely to transform BH compared to aerobic microorganisms. Temperature increased dissipation, while autoclaving decreased BH loss. Overall, dissipation was slow regardless of treatment. Further investigation is needed to elucidate the exact routes of loss in soil, though BH is expected to dissipate slowly in flooded rice field soil.

  6. Soil biochemical activity and growth response of rice Oryza sativa in flyash amended soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarangi, P.K.; Mahakur, D.; Mishra, P.C.

    2001-07-01

    Soil amended with different proportions of flyash, was evaluated as a soil conditioner and nutrient supplement during a field study on the growth of rice, Oryza sativa. Generally, pH and organic carbon (OC) content did not increase significantly in flyash amended soil, but significant increases in soil conductivity (32%), available phosphorus (48%) and organic matter (OM, 29%) were observed during harvest at the 20 t ha{sup -1} flyash application rate. Amylase, invertase, dehydrogenase and protease activities, and CO{sub 2} evolution increased in flyash amended soil over the control. Total plants biomass and aboveground biomass increased significantly (17% and 25%, respectively) at the 20 t ha{sup -1} flyash application. However, there was a retarded growth of underground biomass. Although, a significant increase in plant biomass and grain yield in flyash amended soil is encouraging from the point of waste disposal and management, elucidation of reasons for retarded growth in underground biomass will require additional research based on long-term studies.

  7. Ground cover rice production systems increase soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Dannenmann, M.; Lin, S.; Saiz, G.; Yan, G.; Yao, Z.; Pelster, D. E.; Tao, H.; Sippel, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zuo, Q.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2015-08-01

    Rice production is increasingly limited by water scarcity. Covering paddy rice soils with films (so-called ground cover rice production system: GCRPS) can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the growing season, which results in greater grain yields in relatively cold regions and also in those suffering from seasonal water shortages. However, it has been speculated that both increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS result in lower soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional-scale experiment conducted in Shiyan, a typical rice-producing mountainous area of China. We sampled paired adjacent paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites. Measured parameters included soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks (to 1 m depth), soil physical and chemical properties, δ15N composition of plants and soils, potential C mineralization rates, and soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions at all sampling sites. Root biomass was also quantified at one intensively monitored site. The study showed that: (1) GCRPS increased SOC and N stocks 5-20 years following conversion from traditional paddy systems; (2) there were no differences between GCRPS and paddy systems in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths, with the exception of soil bulk density; (3) GCRPS increased above-ground and root biomass in all soil layers down to a 40 cm depth; (4) δ15N values were lower in soils and plant leaves indicating lower NH3 volatilization losses from GCRPS than in paddy systems; and (5) GCRPS had lower C mineralization potential than that observed in paddy systems over a 200-day incubation period. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative production technique that not only increases rice yields using less irrigation water, but that it also increases SOC and N stocks.

  8. Cadmium transfer from contaminated soils to the human body through rice consumption in southern Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyuan; Chang, Qing; Yuan, Xuyin; Li, Jizhou; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Chen, Hongyan; Zhang, Xinjian; Song, Yinxian; Song, Wenzhi

    2017-06-21

    Consumption of crops grown in cadmium-contaminated soils is an important Cd exposure route to humans. The present study utilizes statistical analysis and in vitro digestion experiments to uncover the transfer processes of Cd from soils to the human body through rice consumption. Here, a model was created to predict the levels of bioaccessible Cd in rice grains using phytoavailable Cd quantities in the soil. During the in vitro digestion, a relatively constant ratio between the total and bioaccessible Cd in rice was observed. About 14.89% of Cd in soils was found to be transferred into rice grains and up to 3.19% could be transferred from rice grains to the human body. This model was able to sufficiently predict rice grain cadmium concentrations based on CaCl 2 extracted zinc and cadmium concentrations in soils (R 2 = 0.862). The bioaccessible Cd concentration in rice grains was also able to be predicted using CaCl 2 extracted cadmium from soil (R 2 = 0.892). The models established in this study demonstrated that CaCl 2 is a suitable indicator of total rice Cd concentrations and bioaccessible rice grain Cd concentrations. The chain model approach proposed in this study can be used for the fast and accurate evaluation of human Cd exposure through rice consumption based on the soil conditions in contaminated regions.

  9. Dynamics of pH, Ferrum and Mangan, and Phosphorus on Newly Opened Paddy Soil having High Soil Organic Matter on Rice Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukristyonubowo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research had been carried out at the Research and Soil Testing Laboratory and Greenhouse of Soil ResearchInstitute, Bogor using newly opened paddy soil from Pesisir Selatan districts, West Sumatra (one year old. Totaltreatments tested were 12 which were combination of farmer rate, NPK recommendation (½×; ¾×; 1½×, strawcompost (½×; ¾×; 1½×, and dolomite. The trial was conducted using a completely randomized design with threereplications. This research had been prepared in two units, one unit for observing plant response to nutrientmanagement and another unit for incubation trial with the same treatment placed in the greenhouse. Rice cultivarused was IR-42 in accordance to the preferred varieties of local farmers. The sampling method for measuring thesolubility of Fe2+ and Mn2+, as well as the availability of PO43- was by centrifuge 50 g mud samples from theincubation pots then separated clear extract using filter paper. The observation results on dynamics of pH, Fe2+,Mn2+ and PO4-3 mainly occured in 1 to 14 days after submerging (incubation. After 14 days soil reaction had reachedthermodynamic sequence of oxidation-reduction processes, the PO43- more available and pH of the soil reached thepeak. The optimum dose of NPK fertilizer obtained 0.875 NPK or equal to 175 kg of urea, 87.5 kg of SP-36 and 87.5 kgKCl ha-1. The highest number of hills achieved from straw compost treatment 1½ organic matter (OM or 3 tons withan increase of 20%. Application of ameliorant dolomite increased the number of tillers about 2-3%, but insignificantlydifferent with no dolomite treatment.

  10. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist. PMID:26503629

  11. Improving soil fertility through Azolla application in low land rice: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam Subedi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The continuous usages of chemical fertilizers have harmful effects on soil organic matter reserves, soil health and environmental safety. The use of Bio-fertilizers like Azolla not only increases the rice productivity but also improves the long term soil fertility. Azolla is a fast growing aquatic pteridophyte which fixes atmospheric Nitrogen by forming a symbiotic association with the Blue-Green Algae, Anabaena azollae. Azolla is an efficient Nitrogen fixer. It is grown in lowland rice fields because flooded habitat is suitable for it. Under favorable field condition, it fixes atmospheric nitrogen at a rate exceeding that of the Legume-Rhizobium symbiotic relationship. It increases the rice yield equivalent to that produced by 30-60 kg N/ha. As green manure in water logged soil, it enhances the rapid mineralization of nitrogen. It reduces the NH3 volatilization losses through its influence on floodwater pH that leads to the conservation of urea-N in the system to improve the efficiency of N fertilizers. It significantly improves the physical and chemical properties of the soil including improvement in soil microbial activities. It helps in addition of Organic Matter and release of cations such as Magnesium, Calcium and Sodium. The total N, available P and exchangeable K in the soil and N-uptake by rice can be improved. Therefore, Azolla application is considered as a good practice for sustaining soil fertility and crop productivity irrespective of some limitations.

  12. Trace metals distribution and uptake in soil and rice grown on a 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of vermicompost (VC) on trace metals distribution and uptake in soil and rice plant in research field as split plot arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications in 2008. Main-plot was VC and chemical fertilizer (CF) that were added to soil ...

  13. Management systems in irrigated rice affect physical and chemical soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Pauletto, E.A.; Pinto, L.F.S.

    2009-01-01

    Lowland soils are commonly found in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern of Brazil, where they represent around 20% of the total area. Deficient drainage is the most important natural characteristic of these soils which therefore are mainly in use for irrigated rice (Oriza sativa). Degradation

  14. Cation dynamics in soils with different salinity levels growing irrigated rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Campos Carmona

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Salinity levels in soils of the Outer Coastal Plain of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, can be high, due to excess of Na in the irrigation water, evapotranspiration and soil development from marine sediments. The cultivation of irrigated rice could be an alternative, since ion uptake as well as leaching by the establishment of a water layer could mitigate the effects of soil salinity. This study aimed to evaluate the dynamics of basic cations in the solution of Albaqualf soils with different salinity levels growing irrigated rice. The plow layer contained exchangeable Na percentages (ESP of 5.6, 9.0, 21.2 and 32.7 %. The plant stand, dry matter, Na, K and Ca + Mg uptake at full flowering and grain yield were evaluated. The levels of Na, K, Ca + Mg and electrical conductivity (EC in the soil solution were also measured weekly during the rice cycle at four soil depths, in the water layer and irrigation water. The Na, K and Ca + Mg uptake by rice at full flowering was used to estimate ion depletion from the layer under root influence. Soil salinity induced a reduction in the rice stand, especially in the soil with ESP of 32.7 %, resulting in lower cation uptake and very low yield at that site. As observed in the water layer and irrigation water, the Na, K, Ca + Mg and EC levels in the soil solution decreased with time at depths of 5, 10 and 20 cm, regardless of the original soil salinity, showing that cation dynamics in the plow layer was determined by leaching and root uptake, rather than by the effect of evapoconcentration of basic cations in the soil surface layer.

  15. Conservation of peat soils in agricultural use by infiltration of ditch water via submerged drains: results of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Jan J. H.; Hendriks, Rob F. A.

    2017-04-01

    About 8% of all soils in The Netherlands are peat soils which almost all drained with ditches and mainly in agricultural use as permanent pasture for dairy farming. The largest part of the peat meadow area is situated in the densely populated western provinces South- and North-Holland and Utrecht and is called the Green Heart and is valued as a historic open landscape. Conservation of these peats soil by raising water levels and converting the peat meadow areas mainly in very extensive grasslands or wet nature proved to be a very costly and slow process due to the strong opposition of farmers and many others who value the open cultural historic landscape and meadow birds. The use of submerged drains seems to be a promising solution acceptable for dairy farmers and effective in diminishing peat oxidation and so the associated subsidence and CO2 emissions. Oxidation of peat soils strongly depends on the depth of groundwater levels in dry periods. In dry periods the groundwater level can be 30 to 50 cm lower than the ditchwater level, which is 30 - 60 cm below soil surface. Infiltration of ditchwater via submerged drain can raise the groundwater level up to the ditchwater level and diminish the oxidation and associated subsidence and CO2 emissions with at least 50%. Since 2003 several pilots with submerged drains are started to check this theoretical reduction and to answer questions raised about water usage and water quality and grass yields and trafficability etcetera. In our presentation we focus on the results of a pilot in South-Holland concerning the hydrological aspects, however, include results from the other pilots to consider the long term aspects such as the reduction of subsidence. The use of submerged drains proves to be promising to reduce peat oxidation and so subsidence and CO2 emissions with at least 50%. Grass yields are more or less equal in parcels with versus parcels without submerged drains. Trafficability in wet periods is better and trampling

  16. Gypsum amendment to rice paddy soil stimulated bacteria involved in sulfur cycling but largely preserved the phylogenetic composition of the total bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, Susanne; Zecchin, Sarah; Dan, Jianguo; Todorova, Nadezhda Hristova; Loy, Alexander; Conrad, Ralf; Pester, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Rice paddies are indispensable for human food supply but emit large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane. Sulfur cycling occurs at high rates in these water-submerged soils and controls methane production, an effect that is increased by sulfate-containing fertilizers or soil amendments. We grew rice plants until their late vegetative phase with and without gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2 O) amendment and identified responsive bacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Gypsum amendment decreased methane emissions by up to 99% but had no major impact on the general phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community. It rather selectively stimulated or repressed a small number of 129 and 27 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (out of 1883-2287 observed) in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, respectively. Gypsum-stimulated OTUs were affiliated with several potential sulfate-reducing (Syntrophobacter, Desulfovibrio, unclassified Desulfobulbaceae, unclassified Desulfobacteraceae) and sulfur-oxidizing taxa (Thiobacillus, unclassified Rhodocyclaceae), while gypsum-repressed OTUs were dominated by aerobic methanotrophs (Methylococcaceae). Abundance correlation networks suggested that two abundant (>1%) OTUs (Desulfobulbaceae, Rhodocyclaceae) were central to the reductive and oxidative parts of the sulfur cycle. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Assessment of reclaimed wastewater irrigation impacts on water quality, soil, and rice cultivation in paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moon Seong; Kim, Sang Min; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jeong Jae; Yoo, Kyung H

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this research was to monitor and assess the impact of reclaimed wastewater irrigation on water quality, soil, and rice cultivation by comparing the effects of various wastewater treatment levels on the growth and yield of rice. A randomized complete block design was used for the application methods of the wastewater effluents to paddy rice, with five treatments and six replications. The treatments were: control with groundwater irrigation (GW); irrigation with polluted water form a nearby stream (SW); and three treatments of reclaimed wastewater irrigation at different treatment levels. The three levels of wastewater treatments included wastewater effluents: (i) directly from the wastewater plant (WW); (ii) after passing through a sand filter (WSF); and (iii) after passing a sand filter followed by an ultraviolet treatment (WSFUV). Each plot was 4 x 4 m and was planted with rice (Oryza sativa L.) in 2002 and 2003. The results indicated that irrigation of rice with reclaimed municipal wastewater caused no adverse effects on the growth and yield of rice. The chemical compositions of the rice from all plots were within the normal ranges of brown rice quality in Korea. No adverse effects were observed on chemical concentrations including the heavy metals Cu, As, Cd, Zn, Hg, and Pb, in either the brown rice or the field. The results showed that treated municipal wastewater can be safely used as an alternative water source for the irrigation of rice, although continued monitoring will be needed to determine the long-term effects with regard to soil contamination and other potential health concerns.

  18. Seed treatment, soil compaction and nitrogen management affect upland rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneraldo Pinheiro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water availability for cultivation of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L. is decreasing worldwide. Therefore, new technologies are needed to grow rice under aerobic conditions, in order to produce rice grains without yield losses and with lower water consumption. This study aimed at determining the best combination of management options for producing upland rice. A randomized blocks design, in a factorial scheme, was used. The treatments consisted of a combination of five rice cultivars (BRS Caçula, BRS Serra Dourada, BRS Primavera, BRS Sertaneja and BRS Esmeralda with two compaction pressures in the seed furrow (25 kPa or 126 kPa, two types of seed treatment (with or without pesticide and two types of N management (all at sowing or all at topdressing. Applying N at sowing instead of at topdressing produced higher grain yield in the no-tillage system (NTS. Under this system, upland rice genotypes show higher grain yield with higher compaction pressure. Seed treatment with pesticide provided greater grain yield for the BRS Sertaneja, in NTS, and for all genotypes in the conventional tillage system (CTS. BRS Esmeralda, in NTS, and BRS Esmeralda and BRS Primavera, in CTS, were the most productive genotypes. Moreover, in NTS, the application of N at sowing and the compaction pressure on the seed furrow are important for increasing upland rice grain yield. In CTS, seed treatment is important to improve upland rice grain yield.

  19. EFFECT OF SOIL AMENDMENT WITH RICE HUSKS AND COW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pythium damping-off was less severe in the seedlings raised under rice husk and cow dung amendments. Increase in days of decomposition before planting also influenced significantly the effect of rice husk and cow compost on the incidence and severity of the the disease. The number of developed leaves of melon ...

  20. UV-irradiation enhances rice allelopathic potential in rhizosphere soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Khan, Muhammad Bismillah; Song, Yuan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation is rising continuously due to stratospheric ozone depletion over temperate latitudes. This study investigated effects of UV exposure on rice allelopathic potentials. For this purpose, two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars BR-41 (high allelopathic = able to inhibit neighbori...

  1. The contrasting responses of soil microorganisms in two rice cultivars to elevated ground-level ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youzhi; Yu, Yongjie; Tang, Haoye; Zu, Qianhui; Zhu, Jianguo; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-02-01

    Although elevated ground-level O₃ has a species-specific impact on plant growth, the differences in soil biota responses to O₃ pollution among rice cultivars are rarely reported. Using O₃ Free-Air Concentration Enrichment, the responses of the rhizospheric bacterial communities in the O₃-tolerant (YD6) and the O₃-sensitive (IIY084) rice cultivars to O₃ pollution and their differences were assessed by pyrosequencing at rice tillering and anthesis stages. Elevated ground-level O₃ negatively influenced the bacterial community in cultivar YD6 at both rice growth stages by decreasing the bacterial phylogenetic diversities and response ratios. In contrast, in cultivar IIY084, the bacterial community responded positively at the rice tillering stage under O₃ pollution. However, several keystone bacterial guilds were consistently negatively affected by O₃ pollution in two rice cultivars. These findings indicate that continuously O₃ pollution would negatively influence rice agroecosystem and the crop cultivar is important in determining the soil biota responses to elevated O₃. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Pretilachlor on Soil Enzyme Activities in Tropical Rice Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Subhashree; Adak, Totan; Bagchi, Torit B; Kumar, Upendra; Munda, Sushmita; Saha, Sanjoy; Berliner, J; Jena, Mayabini; Mishra, B B

    2017-03-01

    Pretilachlor treatments, namely, recommended dose at 600 g a.i. ha-1 (RD), double the recommended dose at 1200 g a.i. ha-1 (2RD), ten times of the recommended dose at 6000 g a.i. ha-1 (10RD) along with control, were used to study the effects of pretilachlor on soil enzymes in tropical rice soil. Pretilachlor, at recommended dose completely dissipated 30 days after herbicide application. Twenty days after herbicide application, the dehydrogenase activity was inhibited up to 27 %, 28 % and 40 % of initial values of RD, 2RD and 10RD treatments, respectively. Increase in fluorescein diacetate hydrolase activity was observed during the first 25 days post herbicide application up to 29 %, 36 % and 10 % of initial values of RD, 2RD and 10RD treatments, respectively. β-Glucosidase activity in the experiment did not provide a specific trend. In general, urease and acid phosphatase activities were not influenced by pretilachlor application. There were significant differences in alkaline phosphatase activities among the treatments until 25 days after herbicide application. Hence, pretilachlor may cause short term transitory changes in soil enzyme parameters. However, it has negative impact on soil enzymes at very high dose.

  3. Effects of Different Tillage and Straw Return on Soil Organic Carbon in a Rice-Wheat Rotation System

    OpenAIRE

    Liqun Zhu; Naijuan Hu; Minfang Yang; Xinhua Zhan; Zhengwen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Soil management practices, such as tillage method or straw return, could alter soil organic carbon (C) contents. However, the effects of tillage method or straw return on soil organic C (SOC) have showed inconsistent results in different soil/climate/cropping systems. The Yangtze River Delta of China is the main production region of rice and wheat, and rice-wheat rotation is the most important cropping system in this region. However, few studies in this region have been conducted to assess th...

  4. The impact of wood biochar as a soil amendment in aerobic rice systems of the Brazilian Savannah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Keywords: tropical Savannah, biochar, soil fertility, aerobic rice, grain yield, N2O emission Márcia Thaís de Melo Carvalho (2015). The impact of wood biochar as a soil amendment in aerobic rice systems of the Brazilian Savannah. PhD thesis, Wageningen

  5. Contamination and Spatial Variation of Heavy Metals in the Soil-Rice System in Nanxun County, Southeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing concern about heavy metal contamination in farmland in China and worldwide. In order to reveal the spatial features of heavy metals in the soil-rice system, soil and rice samples were collected from Nanxun, Southeastern China. Compared with the guideline values, elevated concentrations of heavy metals in soils were observed, while heavy metals in rice still remained at a safe level. Heavy metals in soils and rice had moderate to strong spatial dependence (nugget/sill ratios: 13.2% to 49.9%. The spatial distribution of copper (Cu, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn in soils illustrated that their high concentrations were located in the southeast part. The high concentrations of cadmium (Cd in soils were observed in the northeast part. The accumulation of all the studied metals is related to the long-term application of agrochemicals and industrial activities. Heavy metals in rice showed different spatial distribution patterns. Cross-correlograms were produced to quantitatively determine the spatial correlation between soil properties and heavy metals composition in rice. The pH and soil organic matter had significant spatial correlations with the concentration of heavy metals in rice. Most of the selected variables had clear spatial correlation ranges for heavy metals in rice, which could be further applied to divide agricultural management zones.

  6. Effect of temperature on composition of the methanotrophic community in rice field and forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Santosh R; Bodelier, Paul L E; Conrad, Ralf

    2007-10-01

    Temperature change affects methane consumption in soil. However, there is no information on possible temperature control of methanotrophic bacterial populations. Therefore, we studied CH(4) consumption and populations of methanotrophs in an upland forest soil and a rice field soil incubated at different temperatures between 5 and 45 degrees C for up to 40 days. Potential methane consumption was measured at 4% CH(4). The temporal progress of CH(4) consumption indicated growth of methanotrophs. Both soils showed maximum CH(4) consumption at 25-35 degrees C, but no activity at >40 degrees C. In forest soil CH(4) was also consumed at 5 degrees C, but in rice soil only at 15 degrees C. Methanotroph populations were assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes. Eight T-RFs with relative abundance >1% were retrieved from both forest and rice soil. The individual T-RFs were tentatively assigned to different methanotrophic populations (e.g. Methylococcus/Methylocaldum, Methylomicrobium, Methylobacter, Methylocystis/Methylosinus) according to published sequence data. Two T-RFs were assigned to ammonium monooxygenase (amoA) gene sequences. Statistical tests showed that temperature affected the relative abundance of most T-RFs. Furthermore, the relative abundance of individual T-RFs differed between the two soils, and also exhibited different temperature dependence. We conclude that temperature can be an important factor regulating the community composition of methanotrophs in soil.

  7. Different farming and water regimes in Italian rice fields affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal soil communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumini, Erica; Vallino, Marta; Alguacil, Maria M; Romani, Marco; Bianciotto, Valeria

    2011-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) comprise one of the main components of soil microbiota in most agroecosystems. These obligate mutualistic symbionts colonize the roots of most plants, including crop plants. Many papers have indicated that different crop management practices could affect AMF communities and their root colonization. However, there is little knowledge available on the influence of conventional and low-input agriculture on root colonization and AMF molecular diversity in rice fields. Two different agroecosystems (continuous conventional high-input rice monocropping and organic farming with a five-year crop rotation) and two different water management regimes have been considered in this study. Both morphological and molecular analyses were performed. The soil mycorrhizal potential, estimated using clover trap cultures, was high and similar in the two agroecosystems. The diversity of the AMF community in the soil, calculated by means of PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) and 18S rDNA sequencing on clover trap cultures roots, was higher for the organic cultivation. The rice roots cultivated in the conventional agrosystem or under permanent flooding showed no AMF colonization, while the rice plants grown under the organic agriculture system showed typical mycorrhization patterns. Considered together, our data suggest that a high-input cropping system and conventional flooding depress AMF colonization in rice roots and that organic managements could help maintain a higher diversity of AMF communities in soil.

  8. Utilization of maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal as soil amendments for improving acid soil fertility and productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhidayati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline in soil fertility in agricultural land is a major problem that causes a decrease in the production of food crops. One of the causes of the decline in soil fertility is declining soil pH that caused the decline in the availability of nutrients in the soil. This study aimed to assess the influence of alternative liming materials derived from maize cob biochar and rice husk charcoal compared to conventional lime to improve soil pH, soil nutrient availability and maize production. The experiment used a factorial complete randomized design which consisting of two factors. The first factor is the type of soil amendment which consists of three levels (calcite lime, rice husk charcoal and cob maize biochar. The second factor is the application rates of the soil amendment consisted of three levels (3, 6 and 9 t/ha and one control treatment (without soil amendment. The results of this study showed that the application of various soil amendment increased soil pH, which the pH increase of the lime application was relatively more stable over time compared to biochar and husk charcoal. The average of the soil pH increased for each soil amendment by 23% (lime, 20% (rice husk charcoal and 23% (biochar as compared with control. The increase in soil pH can increase the availability of soil N, P and K. The greatest influence of soil pH on nutrient availability was shown by the relationship between soil pH and K nutrient availability with R2 = 0.712, while for the N by R2 = 0.462 and for the P by R2 = 0.245. The relationship between the availability of N and maize yield showed a linear equation. While the relationship between the availability of P and K with the maize yield showed a quadratic equation. The highest maize yield was found in the application of biochar and rice husk charcoal with a dose of 6-9 t/ha. The results of this study suggested that biochar and husk charcoal could be used as an alternative liming material in improving acid soil

  9. Sulfur utilization by rice and Crotalaria juncea from sulfate - 34S applied to the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivelin Paulo Cesar Ocheuze

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical soils with intensive agriculture an increasing sulfur deficiency has been verified in several crops. The low available S in these soils is caused by the continuous use of concentrated NPK fertilizers. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization by rice (Oriza sativa L. and crotalaria juncea (Crotalaria juncea L. of sulfur applied to the soil, under greenhouse conditions. Pots with 3 kg of an Argisol (Paleudalf were used to test the isotopic technique with the stable isotope 34S, adding a solution of sodium sulfate labeled with 34S (14.30 ± 0.05 atom % of 34S to the soil (70 mg SO4-S per kg-1 of soil 18 days after sowing both species. The shoots of the crotalaria and rice were harvested, respectively on the 72nd and 122nd days after S fertilization. The concentration and the amount of sulfur in the crotalaria were higher than in rice, due to the higher legume requirement for this nutrient. The sulfur requirement and the short time interval between fertilization and harvest of the crotalaria resulted in a small amount of native SO4-S mineralized in the soil and a small quantity of 34SO4 immobilized by soil microorganisms. Thus, the percentage of sulfur in the crotalaria derived from the fertilizer (Sdff was higher than in the rice (%Sdff crotalaria = 91.3 ± 3.5%; %Sdff rice = 66.3 ± 0.8%. The expressive values of %Sdff indicate a low rate of mineralization of SO4-S probably as a consequence of the low available sulfur content in the soil.

  10. Effects of winter cover crops residue returning on soil enzyme activities and soil microbial community in double-cropping rice fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-Ming, Tang; Xiao-Ping, Xiao; Wen-Guang, Tang; Ye-Chun, Lin; Ke, Wang; Guang-Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Residue management in cropping systems is useful to improve soil quality. However, the studies on the effects of residue management on the enzyme activities and microbial community of soils in South China are few. Therefore, the effects of incorporating winter cover crop residue with a double-cropping rice (Oryza sativa L.) system on soil enzyme activities and microbial community in Southern China fields were studied. The experiment has conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Soil and Fertilizer Research, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Science, China since winter 2004. Four winter cropping systems were used: rice-rice-ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) (R-R-Ry), rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus L.) (R-R-Mv), rice-rice-rape (Brassica napus L.) (R-R-Ra) and rice-rice with winter fallow (R-R-Fa). The result indicated that the enzyme activities in the R-R-Ry, R-R-Mv and R-R-Ra systems were significantly higher (Pcover crops into rotations may increase enzyme activities and microbial community in soil and therefore improve soil quality.

  11. Distribution of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana in rice ecosystems and its effect on soil enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yong; Zhou, Jia-Yu; He, Jia-Xi; Du, Wei; Bu, Yuan-Qing; Liu, Chang-Hong; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2013-11-01

    Fungal entomopathogens, especially Beauveria bassiana, are often studied within the context of their use in biological pest control; however, there is limited knowledge of their distributions in host plants and soil ecosystem. We examined the distribution of B. bassiana and its influence on rice plants and paddy soils. B. bassiana could only be detected on the foliar surfaces of rice plants within 15 days under Bb-4 (7.5 × 10(4) conidia/mL) and Bb-7 (7.5 × 10(7) conidia/mL) treatments. The endophytic colonization of B. bassiana could not be found in stems, roots, or seeds of rice plants under Bb-4 and Bb-7 treatments. The fungus was found only in the leaves of rice plants under Bb-4 and Bb-7 treatments at 15 days after inoculation. Moreover, B. bassiana was absent from paddy soils under Bb-4 and Bb-7 treatments at all times. Enzyme activity (urease and phosphatase) in the paddy soils of Bb-4 and Bb-7 treatments showed no significant difference from the control. It is possible that B. bassiana was not able to colonize paddy soil. Detailed understanding of distribution and ecological interactions of B. bassiana is helpful for understanding and predicting the effects of fungal entomopathogens on host populations, and the interactions among fungal entomopathogens and other organisms in the community.

  12. Utilization of composted sugar industry waste (pressmud) to improve properties of sodic soil for rice cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Rashi; Chandra, R; Kumar, Narendra; Tyagi, A K

    2005-07-01

    Sulphitation pressmud (SPM) and its composts were prepared by heap, pit, NADEP and vermicomposting methods and their effects were compared with soil properties and growth, yield and nutrient uptake by rice in a sodic soil under pot conditions. Application of 15 t ha(-1) SPM and its different composts significantly increased the plant height and dry matter accumulation at different intervals, grain and straw yields and N, P and K uptake by the crop over the control. NADEP compost of SPM alone recorded the maximum and significant plant height by 8.5 to 19.3% and plant dry matter by 14.6 to 32.8% over the raw SPM at different intervals. NADEP composts of SPM alone and SPM + rice straw were also found to be superior than raw SPM by recording 34.8 and 27.8% more grain yield respectively. The SPM composts prepared by NADEP and SPM by vermicomposting methods significantly accumulated higher N and K in rice grains and straw, while NADEP compost of SPM and SPM + rice straw recorded more P in grains and straw than raw SPM. Application of SPM and its composts reduced the pH, EC and bulk density of the soil after rice harvesting, though the reductions were not significant in comparison to the control. However, these treatments increased the soil organic C by 33.33 to 69.0%, available N by 41.4 to 74.8%, available P by 47.1 to 97.8%, available K by 11.8 to 59.2% and available S by 10.3 to 90.7% over the control. NADEP composts, in general, were found to be superior than the raw SPM and other composts in residual soil nutrient content after rice crop.

  13. Activity and diversity of methanotrophs in the soil-water interface and rhizospheric soil from a flooded temperate rice field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, L; Tarlera, S

    2009-01-01

    To combine molecular and cultivation techniques to characterize the methanotrophic community in the soil-water interface (SWI) and rhizospheric soil from flooded rice fields in Uruguay, a temperate region in South America. A novel type I, related to the genus Methylococcus, and three type II methanotrophs were isolated from the highest positive dilution steps from the most probable number (MPN) counts. Potential methane oxidation activities measured in slurried samples were higher in the rhizospheric soil compared to the SWI and were stimulated by N-fertilization. PmoA (particulate methane monooxygenase) clone libraries were constructed for both rice microsites. SWI clones clustered in six groups related to cultivated and uncultivated members from different ecosystems of the genera Methylobacter, Methylomonas, Methylococcus and a novel type I sublineage while cultivation and T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis confirmed the presence of type II methanotrophs. Cultivation techniques, cloning analysis and T-RFLP fingerprinting of the pmoA gene revealed a diverse methanotrophic community in the rice rhizospheric soil and SWI. This study reports, for the first time, the analysis of the methanotrophic diversity in rice SWI and this diversity may be exploited in reducing methane emissions.

  14. Cultivar specific plant-soil feedback overrules soil legacy effects of elevated ozone in a rice-wheat rotation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qi; Yang, Yue; Bao, Xuelian; Zhu, Jianguo; Liang, Wenju; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tropospheric ozone has been recognized as one of the most important air pollutants. Many studies have shown that elevated ozone negatively impacts yields of important crops such as wheat or rice, but how ozone influences soil ecosystems of these crops and plant growth in rotation systems is

  15. Production of micro- and nanosilica from soil inhabiting Folsomia candida fed with treated rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Murguía, Barbara; Soto-Mercado, Jorge R; Morales-Malacara, Juan B; Castaño, Victor M

    2015-08-01

    Rice husk was employed as a source for producing silica micro- and nanoparticles through its digestion by soil fauna. Although many physicochemical methods for producing nanostructures have been studied, the biological processes remain mostly unexplored. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide with continuous control of reaction pH allowed removal of lignin bonds while preserving most of the cell wall and the silica present in the rice husk. The accessibility of lignocellulose was achieved without removing appreciable amounts of lignin, so this agricultural byproduct can be employed as feeding material for microarthropods Folsomia candida (Collembola). When these microarthropods are placed on a substrate of treated rice husk, more than 85% of degraded material is obtained, as compared to the untreated rice husk substrate, while the silica particles obtained show a slight decrease in average size.

  16. Silicon fertilization and soil water tensions on rice development and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakeline R. de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The cultivation of upland rice (Oryza sativa in Brazil occurs mainly in the Cerrado, a region with adverse weather conditions. The use of silicon in its cultivation becomes important, since this nutrient provides higher rigidity, lower transpiration and higher resistance to dry spells in rice plants. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of silicon fertilization and soil water tensions on upland rice development and yield in a Cerrado Oxisol. A 5 x 5 fractionated factorial with five soil water tensions (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 kPa and five silicon doses (0, 120, 240, 480 and 960 mg dm-3 was used, which were distributed in a randomized block design, with four replicates. Plant height, number of tillers, number of panicles, number of grains per panicle, numbers of full and empty grains and percentage of empty grains were evaluated. Silicon fertilization promotes increased tillering in rice plants at the dose of 960 mg dm-3. The numbers of tillers and panicles decreased with the application of silicon up to the doses of 460 and 490 mg dm-3, respectively. The increase in soil water tensions reduced plant height and the number of full grains, and increased the percentage of empty grains of upland rice.

  17. Enhanced candicidal compound production by a new soil isolate Penicillium verruculosum MKH7 under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Shruti; Talukdar, Madhumita; Buragohain, Manorama; Yadav, Archana; Yadav, R N S; Bora, T C

    2016-12-09

    Microorganisms are a rich source of structurally diverse secondary metabolites that exert a major impact on the control of infectious diseases and other medical conditions. The biosynthesis of these metabolites can be improved by manipulating the nutritional or environmental factors. This work evaluates the effects of fermentation parameters on the production of a lactone compound effective against Candida albicans by Penicillium verruculosum MKH7 under submerged fermentation. Design-Expert version8.0 software was used for construction of the experimental design and statistical analysis of the experimental data. The important factors influencing antibiotic production selected in accordance with the Plackett-Burman design were found to be initial pH, temperature, peptone, MgSO 4 .7H 2 O. Orthogonal central composite design and response surface methodology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interaction between the variables and identify the optimum values that catalyse maximum metabolite production. The determination coefficient (R 2 ) of the fitted second order model was 0.9852. The validation experiments using optimized conditions of initial pH 7.4, temperature 27 °C, peptone 9.2 g/l and MgSO 4 .7H 2 O 0.39 g/l resulted in a significant increase (almost 7 fold from 30 to 205.5 mg/l) in the metabolite production which was in agreement with the prediction (211.24 mg/l). Stability of the compound was also assessed on the basis of its response to physical and chemical stresses. So far as our knowledge goes, till date there are no reports available on the production of antibiotics by Penicillium verruculosum through media optimization using RSM. Optimization not only led to a 7 fold increase in metabolite yield but the same was achieved at much lesser time (8-10 days compared to the earlier 12-15 days). The enhanced yield of the antibiotic strongly suggests that the fungus P. verruculosum MKH7 can be efficiently used for antibiotic production on a

  18. Effect of biochars and microorganisms on cadmium accumulation in rice grains grown in Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Pimthong, Apinya; Dhurakit, Prapai; Mekvichitsaeng, Phenjun; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contaminated in rice grains is a serious problem because most Asians consume rice on a daily basis. Rice grown in Cd-contaminated soil normally did not have high concentration of Cd. However, soil samples used in this study had high concentrations of Cd. The purpose of this study was to clearly see the effects of biochar and microorganism addition in rice growing in Cd-contaminated soil. The initial Cd concentration in Cd-contaminated soil used in this study was about 650 mg kg(-1). Cadmium concentration in rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of 1% (w/w) different biochars such as sawdust fly ash (SDFA), bagasse fly ash (BGFA), and rice husk ash (RHA) was investigated. The results showed that SDFA was the best biochar in terms of reducing cadmium accumulation in rice grains when compared to BGFA and RHA under the same conditions. In addition, rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of various nonpathogenic microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Beauveria bassiana were also studied. The results showed that the addition of 2% (v/v) microorganisms can reduce Cd accumulation in grains. It was found that grains obtained from Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of P. aeruginosa had the lowest cadmium concentration compared to the ones from soil amended with other strains. This was due to the fact that P. aeruginosa adsorbed more Cd itself into its cells than other strains. The rice plants grown in Cd-contaminated soil with the addition of biochars and microorganisms were also compared. The results showed that adding 2% (v/v) microorganisms seemed to reduce Cd accumulation in rice grains better than adding 1% (w/w) biochars. In addition, the amounts of calcium and magnesium in rice grains and the dry weight of plant in Cd-contaminated soil amended with P. aeruginosa were the highest in comparison to other microorganisms, biochars, and the soil without any amendments (Cd-soil

  19. Composting rice straw with sewage sludge and compost effects on the soil-plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L; Martínez, C; Marcilla, P; Boluda, R

    2009-05-01

    Composting organic residue is an interesting alternative to recycling waste as the compost obtained may be used as organic fertilizer. This study aims to assess the composting process of rice straw and sewage sludge on a pilot-scale, to evaluate both the quality of the composts obtained and the effects of applying such compost on soil properties and plant development in pot experiments. Two piles, with shredded and non-shredded rice straw, were composted as static piles with passive aeration. Throughout the composting process, a number of parameters were determined, e.g. colour, temperature, moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter, C/N ratio, humification index, cation exchange capacity, chemical oxygen demand, and germination index. Moreover, sandy and clayey soils were amended with different doses of mature compost and strewed with barley in pot experiments. The results show that compost made from shredded rice straw reached the temperatures required to maximise product sanitisation, and that the parameters indicating compost maturity were all positive; however, the humification index and NH(4) content were more selective. Therefore, using compost-amended soils at a dose of 34 Mg ha(-1) for sandy soil, and of 11 Mg ha(-1) for clayey soil improves soil properties and the growth of Hordeum vulgare plants. Under there conditions, the only limiting factor of agronomic compost utilisation was the increased soil salinity.

  20. The impact of wood biochar as a soil amendment in aerobic rice systems of the Brazilian Savannah

    OpenAIRE

    CARVALHO, M. T. de M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Keywords: tropical Savannah, biochar, soil fertility, aerobic rice, grain yield, N2O emission Márcia Thaís de Melo Carvalho (2015). The impact of wood biochar as a soil amendment in aerobic rice systems of the Brazilian Savannah. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, with summaries in English, Dutch and Portuguese,  160 pp. Rice is a staple food for 3 billion people in the world. In Brazil, rice is a traditional staple food mostly cultivated by smallh...

  1. Stability of submerged rock berms exposed to motion of liquefied soil in waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Dixen, Figen Hatipoglu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    . Various berm materials were used, stones of size 0.74–2.5cm, plastic balls of size 3.6cm, brass of size 2.5cm and steel of size 1.0cm. The experiments show that rock berms that are stable under very large waves can be unstable when they are exposed to the motion of liquefied soil. The limited data...

  2. Soil fertility and upland rice yield after biochar application in the Cerrado

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petter, F.A.; Madari, B.E.; Silva, da M.A.S.; Carneiro, M.A.C.; Melo Carvalho, de M.T.; Marimon, B.; Pacheco, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of biochar made from Eucalyptus on soil fertility, and on the yield and development of upland rice. The experiment was performed during two years in a randomized block design with four replicates, in a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. Four doses of

  3. Effects of compost on soil fertility in irrigated rice growing at Kou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of compost on soil fertility in irrigated rice growing at Kou Valley (Burkina Faso) : Amélioration de la fertilité du sol par utilisation du compost en riziculture irriguée dans la Vallée du Kou au Burkina Faso.

  4. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water- Crop-Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brinkhoff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth. Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor.

  5. Trace metals distribution and uptake in soil and rice grown on a 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... This study was designed to investigate the influence of vermicompost (VC) on trace metals distribution and uptake in soil and rice plant in research field as split plot arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications in 2008. Main-plot was VC and chemical fertilizer (CF) that.

  6. Soil carbon balance of rice-based cropping systems of the Indo-Gangetic Plains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shibu, M.E.; Keulen, van H.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Aggarwal, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    An agricultural land use system centred on rice-based cropping systems as common in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), with its annual cycles of wet and dry, puddling and ploughing, is unique and exerts a specific influence on soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics. Reports of yield ‘stagnation’ in some

  7. Dynamic of Saline Soil Cations after NaCl Application on Rice Growth and Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanti Mindari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saline soil cation dynamic is determined by the proportion of salt cations dissolved either acidic or alkaline. Common base cations in saline soil are in the proportion of Na > Ca > Mg > K. They affects the availability of water, nutrients, and plant growth. The six level of NaCl were 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 mM and two types of soil (saline and non saline from Gununganyar and Mojokerto were evaluated to soil sample cations taken from depth of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-20 cm. Rice growth and yields were measured. The experiment indicated that increasing doses of NaCl increased the soil Na after rice harvest and decreased K, Ca and Mg contents, both of non-saline and saline soil, decreased of rice growth and yield (straw, grain, number of tiller. NaCl up to 30 mM caused highest Ca:Mg ratio, about 8, suppressed nutrient available, inhibited root growth and reduced nutrient uptake.

  8. Assessment of the Impacts of Rice Cropping through a Soil Quality Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sione, S. M.; Wilson, M. G.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    In Entre Ríos (Argentina), rice cultivation is carried out mainly in Vertisols. Several factors, such as the use of sodium bicarbonate waters for irrigation, the excessive tillage required, and the lack of proper planning for land use, mainly regarding the crop sequence, cause serious impacts on the soil and have an effect on sustainable agriculture. Thus, the development of methodologies to detect these impacts has become a priority. The aim of this study was to standardize soil quality indicators (SQI) and integrate them into an index to evaluate the impacts of the rice production system on soil, at the farm scale. The study was conducted in farms of the traditional rice cultivation area of Entre Ríos province, Argentina. We evaluated a minimum data set consisting of six indicators: structural stability and percolation, total organic matter content (TOM), exchangeable sodium content (ESC), electrical conductivity of saturation extract (ECe) and reaction of the soil (pH). From a database from 75 production lots, we determined the reference values, i.e. limits to ensure the maintenance of long-term productivity and the allowable thresholds for each indicator. The indicators were standardized and integrated into a soil quality index. Five ranges of soil quality were established: very low, low, moderate, high and very high, depending on the values assigned to each SQI. This index allowed differentiating the impact of different crop sequences and showed that the increased participation of rice crop in the rotation resulted in a deterioration of the soil structure due to the decrease in the TOM and to the cumulative increase in ESC caused by the sodium bicarbonate water used for irrigation. Soil management strategies should aim to increase TOM values and to reduce the input of sodium to the exchange complex. A rotation with 50% to 60% of pasture and 40 to 50% of agriculture with a participation of rice lower than 20 to 25% would allow the sustainability of the

  9. Interactive effects of straw-derived biochar and N fertilization on soil C storage and rice productivity in rice paddies of Northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Yanghui [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Gao, Jiping [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Liaoning Biochar Engineering & Technology Research Center, Shenyang Agricultural University, Dongling Rd, Shenyang 110866 (China); Liu, Caihong; Zhang, Wenzhong [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Lan, Yu [Liaoning Biochar Engineering & Technology Research Center, Shenyang Agricultural University, Dongling Rd, Shenyang 110866 (China); Li, Shuhang [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Meng, Jun [Liaoning Biochar Engineering & Technology Research Center, Shenyang Agricultural University, Dongling Rd, Shenyang 110866 (China); Xu, Zhengjin, E-mail: xuzhengjin@126.com [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Tang, Liang, E-mail: tl_rice@126.com [Rice Research Institute, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Impacts of biochar on greenhouse gas emissions and C sequestration in agricultural soils have been considered as the key to mitigate climate change. There is limited knowledge regarding the effects of rice straw-derived biochar and interaction with N fertilization on soil C sequestration and rice productivity in fertile paddy fields. A 2-year (2013 and 2014) consecutive field trial was performed using straw treatment (5.05 t ha{sup −1}) and biochar amendment (0, 1.78, 14.8 and 29.6 t ha{sup −1}) with or without urea application in a rice paddy in Northeast China. A super high yielding rice variety (Oryza sativa L. subsp. Japonica cv. ‘Shennong 265’) was cultivated with permanent flooding. Results showed that biochar amendments significantly decreased CH{sub 4} emissions relative to straw treatment irrespective of N fertilization, especially in N-fertilized soils with 1.78 t ha{sup −1} biochar. There were no differences in CO{sub 2} emissions with respect to biochar amendments, except for 14.8 t ha{sup −1} biochar with N fertilization. Straw treatment had the highest global warming potential over a 100-year time frame, which was nearly 1.5 times that of 14.8 t ha{sup −1} biochar amendment without N fertilization. Biochar addition increased total soil C by up to 5.75 mg g{sup −1} and 11.69 mg g{sup −1} (with 14.8 and 29.6 t ha{sup −1} biochar, respectively), whereas straw incorporation increased this value by only 3.92 mg g{sup −1}. The aboveground biomass of rice in biochar-amended soils increased to varying degrees compared with that in straw-treated soils. However, biochar application had no effects on rice yield, regardless of N fertilization. This study indicated that transforming straw to biochar was more stabilized and more suitable to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and increase C storage in agriculture soils in Northeast China. - Highlights: • Rice straw-derived biochar significantly reduced CH{sub 4} emission. • Rice straw

  10. Soil-Root Processes Responsible for Arsenic Uptake in Rice: A Route of Human Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, A.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is causing the largest mass poisoning in history, but we are only beginning to understand the extent of human exposure through contaminated food. Although second to drinking water in terms of human exposure, the consumption of As-laden food, such as rice, can be a significant portion of daily As exposure especially for populations already exposed through drinking water. Arsenic contamination of soils and groundwater is widespread In South and Southeast Asia, which is also one of the largest rice-growing regions of the world. As the demand for food has increased, so too has the use of irrigation practices to meet food demand, and much of this is via water contaminated with arsenic. In order to accurately predict human exposure to arsenic through rice consumption, we must first understand the processes that affect As dynamics in the rhizosphere and thus uptake by rice. Here, we examine As cycling in the rhizosphere, As distribution on and uptake by rice roots, the influence of Fe dynamics on As uptake, and mitigation strategies to reduce concentrations of As in rice grains.

  11. Response of rice advance line PB-95 to potassium application in saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Shahzada Munawar; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Hafeez, Mudassar

    2007-09-01

    A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the response of rice crop to potassium fertilization in saline-sodic soil during 2005. Soil samples were collected before transplanting of rice crop and analysed for physical and chemical properties of the soil. In this experiment five rates of K2O (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 kg ha(-1)) were applied in the presence of basal doses of N and P2O5 i.e., 110 and 90 kg ha(-1), respectively. Whole of P, K and 1/2 of N were applied at the time of rice transplanting. Twelve and halfkg ha(-1) ZnSO4 was also applied 15 days after rice transplanting. The remaining half of N was applied 30 days after rice transplanting. The system of layout was Randomized Complete Block Design with four replications. The net plot size was 6x4 m. Fertilizer sources of NPK were urea, TSP and SOP, respectively. Rice salt tolerant line PB-95 was used as test crops. The data of growth parameters and yield was recorded and samples of paddy and straw were collected treatment-wise and analysed for N, P and K contents. Soil samples after harvesting the crop were also collected, processed and analysed for the changes in the extractable soil K. The results showed that increasing rates of potassium fertilizer increased the number of tillers m(-2), plant height (cm), 1000-paddy weight and paddy as well as straw yield significantly. Maximum paddy (3.24 t ha(-1)) and straw (3.92 t ha(-1)) yields were obtained in T5 (100 kg K2O ha(-1)) which was at par with T4 (75 kg K2O ha(-1)). With increasing rates of potassium fertilizer, concentration of potassium in paddy and straw increased significantly. After harvesting the crop, the extractable potassium contents of soil increased from that of the original soil. It was concluded from the results that there was an increase of 30.65% in paddy over control by applying potassium (100 kg K2O ha(-1)) in saline-sodic soil.

  12. Effects of Conservation Tillage and Nutrient Management Practices on Soil Fertility and Productivity of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)–Rice System in North Eastern Region of India

    OpenAIRE

    Gulab Singh Yadav; Rahul Datta; Shamina Imran Pathan; Rattan Lal; Ram Swaroop Meena; Subhash Babu; Anup Das; S. N. Bhowmik; Mrinmoy Datta; Poulami Saha; Pawan Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Over centuries and even today, traditional farming practices are well performed without any ecological degradation. However, management practice such as conservative tillage combined with nutrient and residue could increase the crop production as well as soil fertility. A three-year replicated study was conducted to assess the effects of agronomic modification of traditional farming practices on productivity and sustainability of rice (wet season)–rice (dry season) system (RRS). The replaceme...

  13. The influence of bioavailable heavy metals and microbial parameters of soil on the metal accumulation in rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling; Guan, Dongsheng; Peart, M R; Chen, Yujuan; Li, Qiqi; Dai, Jun

    2017-10-01

    A field-based study was undertaken to analyze the effects of soil bioavailable heavy metals determined by a sequential extraction procedure, and soil microbial parameters on the heavy metal accumulation in rice grain. The results showed that Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations in rice grain decreases by 65.9%, 78.9%, 32.6%, 80.5%, 61.0% and 15.7%, respectively in the sites 3 (far-away), compared with those in sites 1 (close-to). Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that soil catalase activity, the MBC/MBN ratio, along with bioavailable Cd, Cr and Ni could explain 68.9% of the total eigenvalue, indicating that these parameters have a great impact on the heavy metal accumulation in rice grain. The soil bioavailable heavy metals have a dominant impact on their accumulation in rice grain, with a variance contribution of 60.1%, while the MBC/MBN has a regulatory effect, with a variance contribution of 4.1%. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the MBC/MBN, urease and catalase activities are the key microbial parameters that affect the heavy metal accumulation in rice by influencing the soil bioavailable heavy metals or the translocation of heavy metals in rice. RDA showed an interactive effect between Cu, Pb and Zn in rice grain and the soil bioavailable Cd, Cr and Ni. The heavy metals in rice grain, with the exception of Pb, could be predicted by their respective soil bioavailable heavy metals. The results suggested that Pb accumulation in rice grain was mainly influenced by the multi-metal interactive effects, and less affected by soil bioavailable Pb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitigating methane emission from paddy soil with rice-straw biochar amendment under projected climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xingguo; Sun, Xue; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Mengxiong; Dong, Da; Zhong, Ting; Thies, Janice E; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-04-19

    Elevated global temperatures and increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere associated with climate change will exert profound effects on rice cropping systems, particularly on their greenhouse gas emitting potential. Incorporating biochar into paddy soil has been shown previously to reduce methane (CH4) emission from paddy rice under ambient temperature and CO2. We examined the ability of rice straw-derived biochar to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soil under elevated temperature and CO2 concentrations expected in the future. Adding biochar to paddy soil reduced CH4 emission under ambient conditions and significantly reduced emissions by 39.5% (ranging from 185.4 mg kg(-1) dry weight soil, dws season(-1) to 112.2 mg kg(-1) dws season(-1)) under simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2. Reduced CH4 release was mainly attributable to the decreased activity of methanogens along with the increased CH4 oxidation activity and pmoA gene abundance of methanotrophs. Our findings highlight the valuable services of biochar amendment for CH4 control from paddy soil in a future that will be shaped by climate change.

  15. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  16. Uptake of zwitterionic antibiotics by rice (Oryza sativa L.) in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Darryl W; Cropp, Roger; Boonsaner, Maliwan

    2013-12-15

    Antibiotics, including members of the tetracycline and fluoroquinolone families, are emerging organic environmental contaminants. Uptake from soil by plants is a means for antibiotics to enter terrestrial food chains. Chemical exchange between plant and the soil/water matrix occurs simultaneously with degradation in the soil/water matrix. In this study, the comparative temporal behaviour of rice (Oryza sativa L.) towards the zwitterionic antibiotics oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline and norfloxacin at initial soil/water concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 μg g(-1) (dry weight) is investigated. This is accomplished within the framework of an activity-based mass-conserving dynamic model. Plant antibiotic concentrations are observed to increase to a maximum then decline. Maximum concentrations in rice are compound-dependent linear functions of initial soil/water concentrations, but the relationships are not related to the compound octan-1-ol/water distribution ratio (DOW). The times required to attain maximal concentrations are independent of initial soil/water levels for a given antibiotic, but again vary between antibiotics and are not related to DOW values. Translocation from root to other tissues is not observed. The magnitudes of Root Concentration Factors (RCFs), the ratio of root and soil/water concentrations, are consistent with significant sorption to soil and consequent relatively low concentrations in interstitial water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil Nitrogen Status Modifies Rice Root Response to Nematode-Bacteria Interactions in the Rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Cheng

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that faunal activity in the rhizosphere influences root growth via an auxin-dependent pathway. In this study, two methods were used to adjust nematode and bacterial populations within experimental soils. One is "exclusion", where soil mixed with pig manure was placed in two bags with different mesh sizes (1mm and 5μm diameter, and then surrounded by an outer layer of unamended soil resulting in soil with a greater populations of bacterial-feeding nematodes (1mm and a control treatment (5μm. The second method is "inoculation", whereby autoclaved soil was inoculated with bacteria (E. coli and Pseudomonas and Nematodes (Cephalobus and C. elegans. In order to detect the changes in the rice's perception of auxin under different nutrient and auxin conditions in the presence of soil bacterial-feeding nematodes, responses of soil chemistry (NH4+, NO3- and indole acetic acid (IAA, rice root growth and the expression of an auxin responsive gene GH3-2 were measured. Results showed that, under low soil nutrient conditions (exclusion, low NO3- correlated with increased root branching and IAA correlated with increased root elongation and GH3-2 expression. However, under high soil nutrient conditions (inoculation, a high NH4+ to NO3- ratio promoted an increase in root surface area and there was an additional influence of NH4+ and NO3- on GH3-2 expression. Thus it was concluded that soil bacterial-feeding nematodes influenced soil nutritional status and soil IAA content, promoting root growth via an auxin dependent pathway that was offset by soil nitrogen status.

  18. The influence of rice husk and tobacco waste biochars on soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hamzah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution in agricultural land threatens soil and food quality. Soil pollution could be remediate using biochar, but the effectiveness of biochar on soil quality improvement is determined by types of feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. This study was aimed to explore the effect of different types of biochar on soil properties.  Biochar from rice husk and tobacco waste was applied to soil contaminated with lead and mercury. This study was conducted at Sumber Brantas, Malang East Java, and used a completely randomized design with three replicates. Heavy metals content was measured using AAS. The results of measurements were analyzed using analysis of variance at 5% and 1% significance levels. The initial analysis of the soil properties at the research site showed that the soil nutrient status was low, i.e. N (0.2 %, K (0.50 cmol+/kg, and CEC (5.9 me/100g respectively, but soil pH was neutral (6.8. The research site also has crossed the threshold of heavy metal content for Hg (0.5 ppm, Pb (25.22 ppm, Cd (1.96 ppm, and As (0.78 ppm. Biochar added had a positive influence on soil characteristics improvement. It could increase the content of organic C, i.e. 35.12% and 31.81% and CEC (cation exchange capacity, i.e.30.56 me/100g and 28.13 me/100 g for rice husk biochar and tobacco waste biochar, respectively.  However, N, P, and K contents were low i.e. N ( 0.33 and 0.30 %; P2O5 (148.79 and 152 ppm; K (1.58 and 2.11 mg/100g for rice husk biochar and tobacco waste biochar, respectively.

  19. The respective effects of soil heavy metal fractions by sequential extraction procedure and soil properties on the accumulation of heavy metals in rice grains and brassicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling; Guan, Dongsheng; Peart, M R; Chen, Yujuan; Li, Qiqi

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine heavy metal accumulation in rice grains and brassicas and to identify the different controls, such as soil properties and soil heavy metal fractions obtained by the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction, in their accumulation. In Guangdong Province, South China, rice grain and brassica samples, along with their rhizospheric soil, were collected from fields on the basis of distance downstream from electroplating factories, whose wastewater was used for irrigation. The results showed that long-term irrigation using the electroplating effluent has not only enriched the rhizospheric soil with Cd, Cr, Cu, and Zn but has also increased their mobility and bioavailability. The average concentrations of Cd and Cr in rice grains and brassicas from closest to the electroplating factories were significantly higher than those from the control areas. Results from hybrid redundancy analysis (hRDA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that the BCR fractions of soil heavy metals could explain 29.0 and 46.5 % of total eigenvalue for heavy metal concentrations in rice grains and brassicas, respectively, while soil properties could only explain 11.1 and 33.4 %, respectively. This indicated that heavy metal fractions exerted more control upon their concentrations in rice grains and brassicas than soil properties. In terms of metal interaction, an increase of residual Zn in paddy soil or a decrease of acid soluble Cd in the brassica soil could enhance the accumulation of Cd, Cu, Cr, and Pb in both rice grains and brassicas, respectively, while the reducible or oxidizable Cd in soil could enhance the plants' accumulation of Cr and Pb. The RDA showed an inhibition effect of sand content and CFO on the accumulation of heavy metals in rice grains and brassicas. Moreover, multiple stepwise linear regression could offer prediction for Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn concentrations in the two crops by soil heavy metal fractions and soil properties.

  20. Growth and Cd uptake by rice (Oryza sativa) in acidic and Cd-contaminated paddy soils amended with steel slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huaidong; Tam, Nora F Y; Yao, Aijun; Qiu, Rongliang; Li, Wai Chin; Ye, Zhihong

    2017-12-01

    Contamination of rice (Oryza sativa) by Cd is of great concern. Steel slag could be used to amend Cd-contaminated soils and make them safe for cereal production. This work was conducted to study the effects of steel slag on Cd uptake and growth of rice plants in acidic and Cd-contaminated paddy soils and to determine the possible mechanisms behind these effects. Pot (rhizobag) experiments were conducted using rice plants grown on two acidic and Cd-contaminated paddy soils with or without steel slag amendment. Steel slag amendment significantly increased grain yield by 36-45% and root catalase activity, and decreased Cd concentrations in brown rice by 66-77% compared with the control, in both soils. Steel slag amendment also markedly decreased extractable soil Cd, Cd concentrations in pore-water and Cd translocation from roots to above-ground parts. It also significantly increased soil pH, extractable Si and Ca in soils and Ca concentrations in roots. Significant positive correlations were found between extractable soil Cd and Cd concentrations in rice tissues, but it was negatively correlated with soil pH and extractable Si. Calcium in root tissues significantly and negatively correlated with Cd translocation factors from roots to straw. Overall, steel slag amendment not only significantly promoted rice growth but decreased Cd accumulation in brown rice. These benefits appear to be related to improvements in soil conditions (e.g. increasing pH, extractable Si and Ca), a reduction in extractable soil Cd, and suppression of Cd translocation from roots to above-ground parts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proposal for Reference Soil Concentrations of Radiocesium Applicable to Accidentally Contaminated Rice and Soybean Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Radionuclides in arable soil can be transferred to food plants via root uptake. If radionuclide concentrations in food plants to be grown in contaminated soil are estimated to be higher than the authorized food standards, their culture needs to be cancelled or ameliorating practices need to be taken. Therefore, it is necessary to establish soil concentration limits or reference soil concentrations of radiocesium standing with the food standards in preparation for potential severe NPP accidents in this and adjacent countries. In the present study, reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean, two of the most important food plants in Korea, were provisionally established using all relevant domestic data of soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF). The reference soil concentrations of radiocesium for rice and soybean were calculated using available domestic TF data, and were proposed for provisional use at the time of a severe NPP accident. The present RSCs are based on limited numbers of {sup 137}Cs TF values. More amounts of relevant TF data should be produced to have more reliable RSCs. For other staple-food plants such as Chinese cabbage and radish, RSCs of radiocesium should also be established. However, only a couple of relevant domestic TF values are available for these vegetables.

  2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Peat Soils Cultivated to Rice Field, Oil Palm and Vegetable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenani Abu Bakar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Presently, about 20% of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq fields in Indonesia are on peat soil, in addition to that otherarea of peat soil has been conventionally used for rice field and vegetables. To elucidate the global warmingpotentials of peat soils cultivated to oil palm, vegetable or rice field, field experiment has been carried out in SouthKalimantan. Air samples were taken from rice field, oil palm and vegetable fields in weekly basis for six month periodand analyzed for concentrations of N2O, CH4 and CO2. The global warming potentials (GWP of the three gases werecalculated by multiplying the emission of each gas with their respective mole warming potential. This step wasfollowed by the addition of the three gases’ GWP to have the total GWP. The results showed that the emissions ofgreenhouse gases from peat soils changed seasonally and varied with the crops cultivated. Oil palm has resultedthe highest GWP, mostly contributed by N2O. There was no statistical different in total GWP of paddy andvegetable fields. The annual N2O emission from oil palm field was 4,582 g N ha-1 yr-1. Water, nutrients and organicmatter managements are among the potential techniques to minimize gas emissions from oil palm field which needfield trials.

  3. Effects of different tillage and straw return on soil organic carbon in a rice-wheat rotation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhu

    Full Text Available Soil management practices, such as tillage method or straw return, could alter soil organic carbon (C contents. However, the effects of tillage method or straw return on soil organic C (SOC have showed inconsistent results in different soil/climate/cropping systems. The Yangtze River Delta of China is the main production region of rice and wheat, and rice-wheat rotation is the most important cropping system in this region. However, few studies in this region have been conducted to assess the effects of different tillage methods combined with straw return on soil labile C fractions in the rice-wheat rotation system. In this study, a field experiment was used to evaluate the effects of different tillage methods, straw return and their interaction on soil total organic C (TOC and labile organic C fractions at three soil depths (0-7, 7-14 and 14-21 cm for a rice-wheat rotation in Yangzhong of the Yangtze River Delta of China. Soil TOC, easily oxidizable C (EOC, dissolved organic C (DOC and microbial biomass C (MBC contents were measured in this study. Soil TOC and labile organic C fractions contents were significantly affected by straw returns, and were higher under straw return treatments than non-straw return at three depths. At 0-7 cm depth, soil MBC was significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage, but EOC was just opposite. Rotary tillage had significantly higher soil TOC than plowing tillage at 7-14 cm depth. However, at 14-21 cm depth, TOC, DOC and MBC were significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage except for EOC. Consequently, under short-term condition, rice and wheat straw both return in rice-wheat rotation system could increase SOC content and improve soil quality in the Yangtze River Delta.

  4. Effects of different tillage and straw return on soil organic carbon in a rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liqun; Hu, Naijuan; Yang, Minfang; Zhan, Xinhua; Zhang, Zhengwen

    2014-01-01

    Soil management practices, such as tillage method or straw return, could alter soil organic carbon (C) contents. However, the effects of tillage method or straw return on soil organic C (SOC) have showed inconsistent results in different soil/climate/cropping systems. The Yangtze River Delta of China is the main production region of rice and wheat, and rice-wheat rotation is the most important cropping system in this region. However, few studies in this region have been conducted to assess the effects of different tillage methods combined with straw return on soil labile C fractions in the rice-wheat rotation system. In this study, a field experiment was used to evaluate the effects of different tillage methods, straw return and their interaction on soil total organic C (TOC) and labile organic C fractions at three soil depths (0-7, 7-14 and 14-21 cm) for a rice-wheat rotation in Yangzhong of the Yangtze River Delta of China. Soil TOC, easily oxidizable C (EOC), dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) contents were measured in this study. Soil TOC and labile organic C fractions contents were significantly affected by straw returns, and were higher under straw return treatments than non-straw return at three depths. At 0-7 cm depth, soil MBC was significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage, but EOC was just opposite. Rotary tillage had significantly higher soil TOC than plowing tillage at 7-14 cm depth. However, at 14-21 cm depth, TOC, DOC and MBC were significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage except for EOC. Consequently, under short-term condition, rice and wheat straw both return in rice-wheat rotation system could increase SOC content and improve soil quality in the Yangtze River Delta.

  5. Effects of different treatments of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of Indian wild rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisoi, Sidhanta Sekhar; Mishra, Swati S; Barik, Jijnasa; Panda, Debabrata

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the present study was investigation of the effects of fly ash and mining soil on growth and antioxidant protection of two cultivars of Indian wild rice (Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon) for possible phytoremediation and restoration of metal-contaminated site. In this study, Indian wild rice showed significant changes in germination, growth, and biochemical parameters after exposure to different ratio of fly ash and mining soil with garden soil. There was significant reduction of germination, fresh weight, dry weight, leaf chlorophyll content, leaf area, Special Analysis Device Chlorophyll (SPAD) Index, proteins, and activities of antioxidant enzymes in both cultivars of the wild rice grown in 100% fly ash and mining soil compared to the plants grown in 100% garden soil. Results from this study showed that in both cultivars of wild rice, all growth and antioxidant parameters increased when grown in 50% fly ash and mining soil. Taken together, Indian wild rice has the capacity to tolerate 50% of fly ash and mining soil, and can be considered as a good candidate for possible phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  6. Short-term effects of compost amendment on the fractionation of cadmium in soil and cadmium accumulation in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Kai-Wei; Ho, Pei-Chi; Yu, Chun-Hui

    2012-06-01

    We used a sequential extraction to investigate the effects of compost amendment on Cd fractionation in soil during different incubation periods in order to assess Cd stabilization in soil over time. Pot experiments using rice plants growing on Cd-spiked soils were carried out to evaluate the influence of compost amendment on plant growth and Cd accumulation by rice. Two agricultural soils (Pinchen and Lukang) of Taiwan were used for the experiments. The relationship between the redistribution of Cd fractions and the reduction of plant Cd concentration due to compost amendment was then investigated. Compost amendment in Pinchen soil (lower pH) could transform exchangeable Cd into the Fe- and Mn-oxide-bound forms. With increasing incubation time, exchangeable Cd tended to transform into carbonate- and Fe- and Mn-oxide-bound fractions. In Lukang soil (higher pH), carbonate- and Fe- and Mn-oxide-bonded Cd were the main fractions. Exchangeable Cd was low. Compost amendment transformed the carbonate-bound form into the Fe and Mn oxide form. Pot experiments of rice plants showed that compost amendment enhanced plant growth more in Pinchen soil than in Lukang soil. Compost amendment could significantly reduce Cd accumulation in rice roots in both Pinchen and Lukang soils and restrict internal transport of Cd from the roots to the shoots. Because exchangeable Cd can be transformed into the stronger bonded fractions quickly in Pinchen soil, a reduction of Cd accumulation in rice due to compost amendment of Pinchen soil was significant by 45 days of growth. However, carbonate-bonded fractions in Lukang soil may provide a source of available Cd to rice plants, and exchangeable and carbonate-bonded fractions are transformed into the other fractions slowly. Thus, reduction of Cd accumulation by rice due to compost amendment in Lukang soil was significant by 75 days of growth. The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of compost amendment used for stabilization of

  7. Biochar improves fertility of a clay soil in the Brazilian Savannah: short term effects and impact on rice yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Thais de Melo Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to report single season effects of wood biochar (char application coupled with N fertilization on soil chemical properties, aerobic rice growth and grain yield in a clayey Rhodic Ferralsol in the Brazilian Savannah. Char application effected an increase in soil pH, K, Ca, Mg, CEC, Mn and nitrate while decreasing Al content and potential acidity of soils. No distinct effect of char application on grain yield of aerobic rice was observed. We believe that soil properties impacted by char application were inconsequential for rice yields because neither water, low pH, nor the availability of K or P were limiting factors for rice production. Rate of char above 16 Mg ha^(−1 reduced leaf area index and total shoot dry matter by 72 days after sowing. The number of panicles infected by rice blast decreased with increasing char rate. Increased dry matter beyond the remobilization capacity of the crop, and high number of panicles infected by rice blast were the likely cause of the lower grain yield observed when more than 60 kg N ha^(−1 was applied. The optimal rate of N was 46 kg ha^(−1 and resulted in a rice grain yield above 3 Mg ha^(−1.

  8. Tracing remobilization of nutrients and toxic elements after application of rice straw or derived ash / biochar in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg; Wang, Jiajia; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2017-04-01

    More than 600 million tons of rice straw are produced each year as byproduct of rice grain production. As an increasing application, besides e.g. composting or fodder for animals, the straw remains on the field for decomposition and nutrient supply. A central concern during rice cultivation is accumulation of arsenic, but it is currently unclear how the application of rice straw or derived ash or biochar to paddy soils will influence arsenic uptake by the next generation of rice plants. Consequently, we assessed the element mobilization via soil microcosm incubations with straw or derived ash or biochar or without those amendments under flooding (40 days) and subsequent drainage (14 days). We focused on elements potentially influencing the uptake of arsenic by the next generation of rice plants (e.g. silicon, phosphorus, iron), or which are nutrients but toxic themselves at higher levels (sulfur, sulfide, iron, iron(II), manganese, copper, and zinc). We found significant differences in the release of arsenic, iron(II), sulfide, total sulfur, DOC, manganese, copper, and zinc . For example highest pore water Mn and As concentrations were found for soil amended with straw, whereas the straw amendment reduced S mobilization, possibly due to sulfate reduction by straw decomposing microbes. For P, we found highest pore water concentrations for straw, followed by biochar, ash and control. In summary, application of rice straw or derived ash or biochar strongly affect the element availability in paddy soil.

  9. Improvement of Soil Biology Characteristics at Paddy Field by System of Rice Intensification

    OpenAIRE

    Widyatmani Sih Dewi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research was to test the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) method in improving the biological properties of paddy soil. The indicators of improvement were measured by the number of earthworm feces (cast), and the population of some microbial and nutrient content in the cast. The experiments were performed by comparing the three methods, namely: (1) SRI, (2) semi-conventional, and (3) conventional, using Randomized Completely Block Design. Each treatment was repeated nine tim...

  10. EFFECT OF FLUCTUATION OF WETTING AND DRYING PHENOMENA ON SOIL FERTILITY STATUS UNDER RICE CULTIVATION IN WETLAND SOIL IN RWANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamudu Rukangantambara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, wetland s in Rwanda have been considered as important areas for agriculture intensification through improving food security and incomes to the farmers. However, changes in the soil nutrient status due to repeatedly wetting and drying phenomena may considerably affect soil fertility status thus leading to low crop productivity of the wetlands. This has consequently created fear to the wetland users especially the local farmers, extension workers and agronomists. The comparative study was conducted to assess the effect of drained and irrigated phenomena at Mamba, Rwasave and Rugeramigozi marshlands on soil fertility change under rice growing. 24 samples were taken with 12 samples under drained and 12 under irrigated areas. The samples were collected randomly from top soil ( 0- 20 cm. The following parameters were quantified; soil pH( H 2O in soil water suspension with ratio 1:2.5; Al exchangeable( 1N Kcl, organic carbon( walkely and black method in Sumner method modified (1984, Total nitrogen kjeldahl (TNK in Bremner modified method, available phosphorus ( bray 1. Bases exchangeable with 1 N ammonium acetate following AAS and CEC and available Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn (DTDA diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Data analyses were processed with GEN STAT version 3. The results showed that the fluctuation of wet and dry water have significantly affected soil fertility status at p= 0,05. The phosphorus and potassium are in the low levels of deficiency 2.32 ppm and 47.72 ppm in irrigated area while crop requirement nutrients are 20 ppm and 200 ppm respectively. And Al is in toxic level conditions, 27.5% in drained area while rice tolerance is 20%. Fe was 641.51 ppm in irrigated area while requirement narrowed to 300 ppm. As conclusion, the soil fertility is low and toxic which constitutes a limitation. The wetland soil in Rwanda should offer opportunities for paddy growing ( rice, etc, if soil fertility factors would be amended by lime for its

  11. Acid drainage from coal mining: Effect on paddy soil and productivity of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Burhan U; Malang, Akbar; Webster, Richard; Mohapatra, Kamal P; Verma, Bibhash C; Kumar, Manoj; Das, Anup; Islam, Mokidul; Hazarika, Samarendra

    2017-04-01

    Overburden and acid drainage from coal mining is transforming productive agricultural lands to unproductive wasteland in some parts of Northeast India. We have investigated the adverse effects of acid mine drainage on the soil of rice paddy and productivity by comparing them with non-mined land and abandoned paddy fields of Jaintia Hills in Northeast India. Pot experiments with a local rice cultivar (Myngoi) as test crop evaluated biological productivity of the contaminated soil. Contamination from overburden and acid mine drainage acidified the soil by 0.5 pH units, increased the exchangeable Al3+ content 2-fold and its saturation on clay complexes by 53%. Available sulfur and extractable heavy metals, namely Fe, Mn and Cu increased several-fold in excess of critical limits, while the availability of phosphorus, potassium and zinc contents diminished by 32-62%. The grain yield of rice was 62% less from fields contaminated with acid mine drainage than from fields that have not suffered. Similarly, the amounts of vegetation, i.e. shoots and roots, in pots filled with soil from fields that received acid mine drainage were 59-68% less than from uncontaminated land (average shoot weight: 7.9±2.12gpot-1; average root weight: 3.40±1.15gpot-1). Paddy fields recovered some of their productivity 4years after mining ceased. Step-wise multiple regression analysis affirmed that shoot weight in the pots and grain yield in field were significantly (p<0.01) and positively influenced by the soil's pH and its contents of K, N and Zn, while concentration of S in excess of threshold limits in contaminated soil significantly (p<0.01) reduced the weight of shoots in the pots and grain yield in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of sulfur on the accumulation of mercury in rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) growing in mercury contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyun; Zhao, Jiating; Guo, Jingxia; Liu, Mengjiao; Xu, Qinlei; Li, Hong; Li, Yu-Feng; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gao, Yuxi

    2017-09-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element for plant growth and its biogeochemical cycling is strongly linked to the species of heavy metals in soil. In this work, the effects of S (sulfate and elemental sulfur) treatment on the accumulation, distribution and chemical forms of Hg in rice growing in Hg contaminated soil were investigated. It was found that S could promote the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and decrease total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice grains, straw, and roots. Hg in the root was dominated in the form of RS-Hg-SR. Sulfate treatment increased the percentage of RS-Hg-SR to T-Hg in the rice root and changed the Hg species in soil. The dominant Hg species (70%) in soil was organic substance bound fractions. Sulfur treatment decreased Hg motility in the rhizosphere soils by promoting the conversion of RS-Hg-SR to HgS. This study is significant since it suggests that low dose sulfur treatment in Hg-containing water irrigated soil can decrease both T-Hg and MeHg accumulation in rice via inactivating Hg in the soil and promoting the formation of iron plaque in rice root, which may reduce health risk for people consuming those crops. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Soil CO 2 fluxes from direct seeding rice fields under two tillage practices in central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-fang; Kou, Zhi-kui; Yang, Jin-hua; Cai, Ming-li; Wang, Jin-ping; Cao, Cou-gui

    2010-07-01

    Agricultural practices affect the production and emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2) from paddy soils. It is crucial to understand the effects of tillage and N fertilization on soil CO 2 flux and its influencing factors for a better comprehension of carbon dynamics in subtropical paddy ecosystems. A 2-yr field study was conducted to assess the effects of tillage (conventional tillage [CT] and no-tillage [NT]) and N fertilization (0 and 210 kg N ha -1) on soil CO 2 fluxes during the 2008 and 2009 rice growing seasons in central China. Treatments were established following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices as the main plot and N fertilizer level as the split-plot treatment. The soil CO 2 fluxes were measured 24 times in 2008 and 17 times in 2009. N fertilization did not affect soil CO 2 emissions while tillage affected soil CO 2 emissions, where NT had similar soil CO 2 emissions to CT in 2008, but in 2009, NT significantly increased soil CO 2 emissions. Cumulative CO 2 emissions were 2079-2245 kg CO 2-C ha -1 from NT treatments, and 2084-2141 kg CO 2-C ha -1 from CT treatments in 2008, and were 1257-1401 kg CO 2-C ha -1 from NT treatments, and 1003-1034 kg CO 2-C ha -1 from CT treatments in 2009, respectively. Cumulative CO 2 emissions were significantly related to aboveground biomass and soil organic C. Before drainage of paddy fields, soil CO 2 fluxes were significantly related to soil temperature with correlation coefficients ( R) of 0.67-0.87 in 2008 and 0.69-0.85 in 2009; moreover, the Q 10 values ranged from 1.28 to 1.55 and from 2.10 to 5.21 in 2009, respectively. Our results suggested that NT rice production system appeared to be ineffective in decreasing carbon emission, which suggested that CO 2 emissions from integrated rice-based system should be taken into account to assess effects of tillage.

  14. Soil organic carbon in riparian forests, rice fields, and pastures in Piedras, Tolima, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Jair Andrade-Castañeda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to estimate the soil organic carbon (SOC storage in the interface between riparian forests and a matrix of rice fields and pastures with organic management. The study took place in Piedras, Tolima, Colombia. Two plots in production (rice and pasture were selected and SOC was estimated in these areas and in the edge and the interior of adjacent riparian forests at a depth of 0 to 20 cm. Bulk density and SOC concentration were quantified between May and July, 2013. Potential change in SOC storage due to land use change among rice fields, pastures, and riparian forests was estimated. The interfaces rice field-riparian forest and pasture-riparian forest stored an average of 65.6 and 61.3 t C/ha, respectively, with no statistical differences (p>0.05. Statistical differences were not detected (p>0.05 between agricultural matrices (rice fields and pastures in any of the variables. The sampling position (matrix and the edge and interior of forests had a significant impact (p<0.05 just in bulk density: 1.7 vs 1.1 vs 1.0 g/cm3 in interior and edge of the riparian forests and the matrix, respectively. SOC was not statistically affected (p>0.05 by the position in the riparian forest-matrix interface. Conversion from riparian forests to rice fields or pastures with organic management is not emitting greenhouse gases, on the contrary, it is increasing SOC in 3.2 t C/ha. 

  15. Antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) in Sb mining impacted paddy soil from Xikuangshan, China: differences in mechanisms controlling soil sequestration and uptake in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Zhu, Yong-Guan; He, Junwen; Li, Xi; Luo, Lei; Mulder, Jan

    2012-03-20

    Foods produced on soils impacted by antimony (Sb) mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the contaminant metalloids (Sb) and arsenic (As). Here we report for the first time the chemical speciation of Sb in soil and porewater of flooded paddy soil, impacted by active Sb mining, and its effect on uptake and speciation in rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv Jiahua). Results are compared with behavior and uptake of As. Pot experiments were conducted under controlled conditions in a climate chamber over a period of 50 days. In pots without rice plants, flooding increased both the concentration of dissolved Sb (up to ca. 2000 μg L(-1)) and As (up to ca. 1500 μg L(-1)). When rice was present, Fe plaque developing on rice roots acted as a scavenger for both As and Sb, whereby the concentration of As, but not Sb, in porewater decreased substantially. Dissolved Sb in porewater, which occurred mainly as Sb(V), correlated with Ca, indicating a solubility governed by Ca antimonate. No significant differences in bioaccumulation factor and translocation factor between Sb and As were observed. Greater relative concentration of Sb(V) was found in rice shoots compared to rice root and porewater, indicating either a preferred uptake of Sb(V) or possibly an oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) in shoots. Adding soil amendments (olivine, hematite) to the paddy soil had no effect on Sb and As concentrations in porewater.

  16. Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rob F. A.; van den Akker, Jan J. A.

    2017-04-01

    Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands In the Netherlands, about 8% of the area is covered by peat soils. Most of these soils are in use for dairy farming and, consequently, are drained. Drainage causes decomposition of peat by oxidation and accordingly leads to surface subsidence and greenhouse gas emission. Submerged drains that enhance submerged infiltration of water from ditches during the dry and warm summer half year were, and are still, studied in The Netherlands as a promising tool for reducing peat decomposition by raising groundwater levels. For this purpose, several pilot field studies in the Western part of the Dutch peat area were conducted. Besides the effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing peat decomposition and subsidence by raising groundwater tables, some other relevant or expected effects of these drains were studied. Most important of these are water management and loading of surface water with nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphate. Because most of these parameters are not easy to assess and all of them are strongly depending on the meteorological conditions during the field studies some of these studies were modelled. The SWAP model was used for evaluating the hydrological results on groundwater table and water discharge and recharge. Effects of submerged drains were assessed by comparing the results of fields with and without drains. An empirical relation between deepest groundwater table and subsidence was used to convert effects on groundwater table to effects on subsidence. With the SWAP-ANIMO model nutrient loading of surface water was modelled on the basis of field results on nutrient concentrations . Calibrated models were used to assess effects in the present situation, as thirty-year averages, under extreme weather

  17. SOIL N, P AND K CONCENTRATIONS AND RICE YIELD INCREASED DUE TO THE APPLICATION OF Azolla pinnata

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    A. Arivin Rivaie*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies showed that application of Azolla pinnata as biofertilizer improved soil fertility some agricultural crops, including rice, whereas farmers in Lampung consider that A. pinnata suppresses growth of rice seedlings, so they throw it field by raising irrigation water surface. Information on effects A. pinnata application on changes in nutrient availability and rice yield obtained from paddy fields of regions still rare. A study was carried out to investigate effects of different rates of A. pinnata on changes in N, P, K concentrations in paddy soils, N uptake, and rice yield. A well-irrigated paddy field was incorporated with A. pinnata, and then rice seedlings of Ciherang variety had been grown from June up to December 2009. Results: application of A. pinnata at dose of five t per ha increased concentration of N, P and K as well as rice yield. A. pinnata had a relatively high N content, ie 2.43 percent. Application of A. pinnata of 7.5 t per ha increased significantly available soil P, indicated that A. pinnata requires a fairly high P to grow optimally. Application of A. pinnata of 7.5 t per ha gave highest dry grain yield, suggests that application A. pinnata did not suppress rice yield, even use of A. pinnata as organic matter source will help to conserve fossil fuels and foreign exchange as well as will allow more paddy fields that can be fertilized by N.

  18. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF RICE HUSK ASH, POWDERED GLASS AND CEMENT AS LATERITIC SOIL STABILIZERS

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    Adebisi Ridwan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the stabilizing effects of three different materials, namely: rice husk ash, powdered glass, and cement on the properties of lateritic soil. The basic properties of the lateritic soil were first obtained through colour, moisture content determination, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests. Each of the stabilizing materials was then mixed with the lateritic soil in varying percentages of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15% by weight of the soil. Thereafter, compaction and California bearing ratio (CBR tests were carried out on the sample mixes to determine the effects of the materials on the lateritic soil. Chemical tests were also carried out on the samples to determine their percentage oxides composition. The compaction test showed that the highest maximum dry densities (MDD obtained for the mixed samples were 2.32 g/cm3 (at 2.5% cement addition, 2.28g/cm3 (at 5% powdered glass (PG addition and 2.18 g/cm3 (at 5% rice husk ash (RHA addition with corresponding optimum moisture contents (OMC of 10.06%, 14.3% and 12.31% respectively. The CBR tests showed that the CBR values increased in all cases as the materials were added with those of the cement and powdered glass giving the highest values and showing close semblance under unsoaked conditions. The chemical test showed that the significant oxides present in the cement, powdered glass and rice husk ash were CaO (53.60%, SiO2 (68.45% and SiO2 (89.84% respectively.

  19. Sulfur-modified rice husk biochar: A green method for the remediation of mercury contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, David; Peng, Tianyue; Li, Guanghe; Wang, Shuxiao; Duan, Lei; Mulder, Jan; Cornelissen, Gerard; Cheng, Zhenglin; Yang, Shengmao; Hou, Deyi

    2017-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of surface soils has increased by ~86Giga grams due to anthropogenic activities. There is an urgent need to find new, effective and preferably 'green' remediation technologies to protect human health and the environment. Sulfur-modification of sorbents can greatly enhance Hg sorption capacity - by forming low solubility HgS (cinnabar). However, S-modified sorbents are not considered suitable for soil remediation due to the economic cost and secondary environmental impacts of sorbents such as granulated activated carbon (GAC), and the toxicity of S-modifiers such as thiol compounds. It was previously found that if biochar is used as an alternative to GAC then the overall environmental impact can be significantly reduced. However, due to a lack of experimental evidence, the practicality of S-modified biochar remains uncertain. The present study was undertaken to provide a proof-of-concept for the 'green' remediation of Hg contaminated soils with rice husk biochar modified with non-toxic elemental S. It was found that the S modification process increased the biochar S content from 0.2% to 13.04% via surface deposition or volume pore filling. This increased the biochar's Hg2+ adsorptive capacity (Qmax) by ~73%, to 67.11mg/g. To assess the performance of S-modified rice husk biochar for soil remediation it was applied to a high 1000mg/kg Hg2+ contaminated soil. Treatment dosages of 1%, 2% and 5% (dry wt.) were found to reduce freely available Hg in TCLP (toxicity characterization leaching procedure) leachates by 95.4%, 97.4% and 99.3%, respectively, compared to untreated soil. In comparison, unmodified rice husk biochar reduced Hg concentrations by 94.9%, 94.9% and 95.2% when applied at the same treatment dosage rates, respectively. This study has revealed that S-modified rice husk biochar has potential to stabilize Hg as a 'green' method for the remediation of contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Levels and Native Soil Properties on Rice Grain Fe, Zn and Protein Contents

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    G. CHANDEL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of protein and metal ions (Fe, Zn in rice grains is a complex polygenic trait showing considerable environmental effect. To analyze the effect of nitrogen application levels and native soil properties on rice grain protein, iron (Fe and zinc (Zn contents, 32 rice genotypes were grown at three different locations each under 80 and 120 kg/hm2 nitrogen fertilizer applications. In treatments with nitrogen fertilizer application, the brown rice grain protein content (GPC increased significantly (1.1% to 7.0% under higher nitrogen fertilizer application (120 kg/hm2 whereas grain Fe/Zn contents showed non-significant effect of nitrogen application level, thus suggesting that the rate of uptake and translocation of macro-elements does not influence the uptake and translocation of micro-elements. The pH, organic matter content and inherent Fe/Zn levels of native soil showed significant effects on grain Fe and Zn contents of all the rice genotypes. Grain Zn content of almost all the tested rice genotypes was found to increase at Location III having loamy soil texture, neutral pH value (pH 6.83 and higher organic matter content than the other two locations (Locations I and II, indicating significant influence of native soil properties on brown rice grain Zn content while grain Fe content showed significant genotype × environment interaction effect. Genotypic difference was found to be the most significant factor to affect grain Fe/Zn contents in all the tested rice genotypes, indicating that although native soil properties influence phyto-availability of micronutrients and consequently influencing absorption, translocation and grain deposition of Fe/Zn ions, yet genetic makeup of a plant determines its response to varied soil conditions and other external factors. Two indica rice genotypes R-RF-31 (27.62 μg/g grain Zn content and 7.80% GPC and R1033-968-2-1 (30.05 μg/g grain Zn content and 8.47% GPC were identified as high grain Zn and

  1. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  2. Eliminating Aluminum Toxicity in an Acid Sulfate Soil for Rice Cultivation Using Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB, ground magnesium limestone (GML and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0 at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM. Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB, GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  3. Exploiting Co-Benefits of Increased Rice Production and Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emission through Optimized Crop and Soil Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ning; Fan, Mingsheng; Zhang, Fusuo; Christie, Peter; Yang, Jianchang; Huang, Jianliang; Guo, Shiwei; Shi, Xiaojun; Tang, Qiyuan; Peng, Jianwei; Zhong, Xuhua; Sun, Yixiang; Lv, Shihua; Jiang, Rongfeng; Dobermann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the future food security challenge without further sacrificing environmental integrity requires transformative changes in managing the key biophysical determinants of increasing agronomic productivity and reducing the environmental footprint. Here, we focus on Chinese rice production and quantitatively address this concern by conducting 403 on-farm trials across diverse rice farming systems. Inherent soil productivity, management practices and rice farming type resulted in confounded and interactive effects on yield, yield gaps and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2-equivalent) with both trade-offs and compensating effects. Advances in nitrogen, water and crop management (Best Management Practices-BMPs) helped closing existing yield gaps and resulted in a substantial reduction in CO2-equivalent emission of rice farming despite a tradeoff of increase N2O emission. However, inherent soil properties limited rice yields to a larger extent than previously known. Cultivating inherently better soil also led to lower GHG intensity (GHG emissions per unit yield). Neither adopting BMPs only nor improving soils with low or moderate productivity alone can adequately address the challenge of substantially increasing rice production while reducing the environmental footprint. A combination of both represents the most efficient strategy to harness the combined-benefits of enhanced production and mitigating climate change. Extrapolating from our farm data, this strategy could increase rice production in China by 18%, which would meet the demand for direct human consumption of rice by 2030. It would also reduce fertilizer nitrogen consumption by 22% and decrease CO2-equivalent emissions during the rice growing period by 7% compared with current farming practice continues. Benefits vary by rice-based cropping systems. Single rice systems have the largest food provision benefits due to its wider yield gap and total cultivated area, whereas double-rice system

  4. Exploiting Co-Benefits of Increased Rice Production and Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emission through Optimized Crop and Soil Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning An

    Full Text Available Meeting the future food security challenge without further sacrificing environmental integrity requires transformative changes in managing the key biophysical determinants of increasing agronomic productivity and reducing the environmental footprint. Here, we focus on Chinese rice production and quantitatively address this concern by conducting 403 on-farm trials across diverse rice farming systems. Inherent soil productivity, management practices and rice farming type resulted in confounded and interactive effects on yield, yield gaps and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2-equivalent with both trade-offs and compensating effects. Advances in nitrogen, water and crop management (Best Management Practices-BMPs helped closing existing yield gaps and resulted in a substantial reduction in CO2-equivalent emission of rice farming despite a tradeoff of increase N2O emission. However, inherent soil properties limited rice yields to a larger extent than previously known. Cultivating inherently better soil also led to lower GHG intensity (GHG emissions per unit yield. Neither adopting BMPs only nor improving soils with low or moderate productivity alone can adequately address the challenge of substantially increasing rice production while reducing the environmental footprint. A combination of both represents the most efficient strategy to harness the combined-benefits of enhanced production and mitigating climate change. Extrapolating from our farm data, this strategy could increase rice production in China by 18%, which would meet the demand for direct human consumption of rice by 2030. It would also reduce fertilizer nitrogen consumption by 22% and decrease CO2-equivalent emissions during the rice growing period by 7% compared with current farming practice continues. Benefits vary by rice-based cropping systems. Single rice systems have the largest food provision benefits due to its wider yield gap and total cultivated area, whereas double-rice

  5. Soil salinity and acidity : spatial variabil[it]y and effects on rice production in West Africa's mangrove zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the mangrove environment of West Africa, high spatial and temporal variability of soil constraints (salinity and acidity) to rice production is a problem for the transfer and adoption of new agronomic techniques, for land use planning, and for soil and water management. Recently, several

  6. Comparison of partial and complete soil K budgets under intensive rice cropping in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoa, N.M.; Janssen, B.H.; Oenema, O.; Dobermann, A.

    2006-01-01

    Crop response to added fertilizer K was often found to be small in trials conducted on favorable soils of tropical rice ecosystems. Hence, applications of only fertilizer N and P were recommended. This has resulted in soil K mining in intensive cropping systems in China, India and other Asian

  7. Community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in rice field soil as affected by nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Ke, Xiubin; Wu, Liqin; Lu, Yahai

    2009-02-01

    Little information is available on the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) in flooded rice soils. Consequently, a microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on the composition of AOB and AOA communities in rice soil by using molecular analyses of ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments. Experimental treatments included three levels of N (urea) fertilizer, i.e. 50, 100 and 150 mgNkg(-1) soil. Soil samples were operationally divided into four fractions: surface soil, bulk soil deep layer, rhizosphere and washed root material. NH(4)(+)-N was the dominant form of N in soil porewater and increased with N fertilization. Cloning and sequencing of amoA gene fragments showed that the AOB community in the rice soil consisted of three major groups, i.e. Nitrosomonas communis cluster, Nitrosospira cluster 3a and cluster 3b. The sequences related to Nitrosomonas were predominant. There was a clear effect of N fertilizer and soil depth on AOB community composition based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting. Nitrosomonas appeared to be more abundant in the potentially oxic or micro-oxic fractions, including surface soil, rhizosphere and washed root material, than the deep layer of anoxic bulk soil. Furthermore, Nitrosomonas increased relatively in the partially oxic fractions and that of Nitrosospira decreased with the increasing application of N fertilizer. However, AOA community composition remained unchanged according to the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses.

  8. Assessment of total soil and plant trace elements in rice-based production systems in NE Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Claudio; Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Kato, Yoichi; Vianello, Gilmo; Vittori, Livia; Wahsha, Mohammad; Spiandorello, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Macro- and micronutrients concentrations, and PTEs contents in soils and plants (rice) from the rice district in the Venetian territory (NE Italy) have been determined by ICP-MS spectrometry, with the following aims: - to determine the background levels of macro- and microelements in the study area; - to assess possible contamination of soils and plants; - to calculate the Translocation Factor (TF) of metals from soil to plant, and the possible hazard for human health. Four rice plots with different rotation systems were investigated from seedling time to harvesting; sampling of soils (0-30cm) and plants was carried out 4 times during growing season (three replicates). Rice plants were separated into roots, stems, leaves and grains, and then oven-dried. Chemical and physical analyses were carried out at the Soil Science Lab of the University of Bologna and Venice, respectively. The results obtained point to a land with moderate soil contamination by trace elements (namely Li, Sn, Tl, Sr, Ti, Fe). Heavy metal (Sb, As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, V, Zn ) concentrations in soils are below the threshold indicated by the Italian legislation (DM 152/2006). Cd, Sn, and Ti contents in soils are positively correlated with soil pH, while As, Fe, Li, Ti, Tl and Zn are negatively correlated with organic matter content. With the exception of Strontium, soil metal contents are always correlated between variable couples. HMs in plants vary according to the sampling season, texture and moisture, and soil pH. Most non-essential trace elements are accumulated in rice roots and, only in cases of essential micronutrients, in leaves. Therefore, rice can be assumed as an accumulator plant of As, Pb, Cr, Ba, and Ti, whereas it is as an indicator plant for Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn and Zn. The results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that soil pH has a larger effect on Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ti and Zn concentrations in grain than other soil parameters. The average translocation of

  9. Increasing Efficiency of Soil Fertility Map for Rice Cultivation Using Fuzzy Logic, AHP and GIS

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    javad seyedmohammadi

    2017-02-01

    fertility groups for better management of soil and plant nutrition. Weight of soil parameters was0.54, 0.29 and 0.17 for organic carbon, available phosphor and potassium, respectively. Fuzzy map of study area includes five soil fertility groups as: 22.9% very high fertility, 27.7% high fertility, 35.53% medium fertility, 10.48% low fertility and 3.39% very low fertility. Consequently, a separated map for soil fertility prepared to evaluate soil fertility of study area for rice cultivation. Toinvestigatethe efficiency of fuzzy model and AHP in increasing the accuracy of soil fertility map, soil fertility map with Boolean method prepared as well. Boolean map showed 58.88% fertile and 41.12% unfertile.15 soil samples from different soil fertility groups of study area were derived fromcontrol of maps accuracy. 13 renewed samples of 15 and 9 soil samples have matched with fuzzy and Boolean map, respectively. Comparison of parameters mean in fuzzy map fertility groups showed that parameters mean amounts of very high and high fertility groups are higher than optimum level except potassium that is a few lower than optimum level in high fertility group, therefore, addition of fertilizers in these groups could not be useful to increase rice crop production. Phosphorus parameter amount is lower than the critical level in very low, low and medium fertility groups, then in these groups phosphorus fertilizer should be added to the soil toincreaserice production. The amount of potassium parameter is higher than the critical level and lower than optimum limit in very low, low, medium and high fertility groups, then in these groups addition of potassium fertilizer will results in theincrease of production. Organic carbon amount is lower than optimum level in very low and low fertility groups. With regard to the relation between organic carbon andnitrogen and phosphorus, therefore, the addition of organic carbon fertilizer could compensate deficit of nitrogen and phosphorus in these groups

  10. The availabilities of arsenic and cadmium in rice paddy fields from a mining area: The role of soil extractable and plant silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Shirong; Yi, Jicai; Liu, Chuanping; Xu, Xianghua; Wang, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Adequate silicon (Si) can greatly boost rice yield and improve grain quality through alleviating stresses associated with heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd). The soil plant-available Si is relatively low in South China due to severe desilicification and allitization of the soils in this region. Conversely, pollution of heavy metals and metalloids in the soils of this region occurs widely, especially As and Cd pollution in paddy soil. Therefore, evaluating the plant availability of Si in paddy soil of South China and examining its correlation with the availability of heavy metals and metalloids are of great significance. Accordingly, in our study, 107 pairs of soil and rice plant samples were collected from paddy fields contaminated by As and Cd in South China. Significantly positive correlations between Si in rice plants and Si fractions in soils extracted with citric acid, NaOAc-HOAc buffer, and oxalate-ammonium oxalate buffer suggest that these extractants are more suitable for use in extracting plant-available Si in the soils of our present study. Significantly negative correlations between different Si fractions and As or Cd in rice plant tissues and negative exponential correlations between the molar ratios of Si to As/Cd in rice roots, straws, husks or grains and As/Cd in rice grains indicate that Si can significantly alleviate the accumulation of As/Cd from soils to the rice plants. Finally, a contribution assessment of soil properties to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains based on random forest showed that in addition to Si concentrations in soil or rice plants, other factors such as Fe fractions and total phosphorus also contributed largely to As/Cd accumulation in rice grains. Overall, Si exhibited its unique role in mitigating As or Cd stress in rice, and our study results provide strong field evidence for this role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Conservation Tillage and Nutrient Management Practices on Soil Fertility and Productivity of Rice (Oryza sativa L.–Rice System in North Eastern Region of India

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    Gulab Singh Yadav

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over centuries and even today, traditional farming practices are well performed without any ecological degradation. However, management practice such as conservative tillage combined with nutrient and residue could increase the crop production as well as soil fertility. A three-year replicated study was conducted to assess the effects of agronomic modification of traditional farming practices on productivity and sustainability of rice (wet season–rice (dry season system (RRS. The replacement of farmers practice (T2 with conservation effective tillage (no-till (NT and integrated nutrient management (INM practice along with 30% residue retention (T5 enhanced the straw, root and biomass yield of both wet season rice (WR, dry season rice (DR and system as a whole over T2. Treatment T5 recorded significantly lower soil bulk density (ρb and higher pH than the T2 after three years of the experiment. Further, treatment T5 increased total soil organic carbon (2.8%, total soil organic carbon stock (2.8%, carbon sequestration rate (336.5 kg ha−1 year−1, cumulative carbon stock (142.9% and carbon retention efficiency (141.0% over T2 of 0–20 cm depth after three year. The soil microbial biomass carbon concentration was significantly the highest under T5. Similarly, the dehydrogenase activity was the maximum under T5. Adoption of conservation tillage and nutrient management practice involving NT and INM along with residue retention can enhance the system productivity, and C and N sequestration in paddy soils is thereby contributing to the sustainability of the RRS.

  12. The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanlu; Xu, Binbin; Song, Qiujin; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-02-15

    Chinese agricultural soils and crops are suffering from increasing damage from heavy metals, which are introduced from various pollution sources including agriculture, traffic, mining and especially the flourishing private metal recycling industry. In this study, 219 pairs of rice grain and corresponding soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang Province to identify the spatial relationship and pollution hotspots of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the soil-rice system. The mean soil concentrations of heavy metals were 0.316 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 47.3 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 31.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 131 mg kg(-1) for Zn, and the metal concentrations in rice grain were 0.132 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 2.46 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 0.223 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 17.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn. The coefficient of variability (CV) of soil Cd, Cu and rice Cd were 147%, 146% and 180%, respectively, indicating an extensive variability. While the CVs of other metals ranged from 23.4% to 84.3% with a moderate variability. Kriging interpolation procedure and the Local Moran's I index detected the locations of pollution hotspots of these four metals. Cd and Cu had a very similar spatial pattern, with contamination hotspots located simultaneously in the northwestern part of the study area, and there were obvious hotspots for soil Zn in the north area, while in the northeast for soil Ni. The existence of hotspots may be due to industrialization and other anthropogenic activities. An Enrichment Index (EI) was employed to measure the uptake of heavy metals by rice. The results indicated that the accumulation and availability of heavy metals in the soil-rice system may be influenced by both soil heavy metal concentrations and soil physico-chemical properties. Cross-correlograms quantitatively illustrated that EIs were significantly correlated with soil properties. Soil pH and organic matter were the most important factors controlling the uptake of heavy metals by rice. As results, positive measures should be taken into

  13. Randomized Soil Survey of the Distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Rice Fields in Laos ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Langla, Sayan; Amornchai, Premjit; Sirisouk, Joy; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Moore, Catrin E.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Buisson, Yves; Newton, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Melioidosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia, where the causative organism (Burkholderia pseudomallei) is present in the soil. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos), B. pseudomallei is a significant cause of sepsis around the capital, Vientiane, and has been isolated in soil near the city, adjacent to the Mekong River. We explored whether B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soil distant from the Mekong River, drawing three axes across northwest, northeast, and southern Laos to create nine sampling areas in six provinces. Within each sampling area, a random rice field site containing a grid of 100 sampling points each 5 m apart was selected. Soil was obtained from a depth of 30 cm and cultured for B. pseudomallei. Four of nine sites (44%) were positive for B. pseudomallei, including all three sites in Saravane Province, southern Laos. The highest isolation frequency was in east Saravane, where 94% of soil samples were B. pseudomallei positive with a geometric mean concentration of 464 CFU/g soil (95% confidence interval, 372 to 579 CFU/g soil; range, 25 to 10,850 CFU/g soil). At one site in northwest Laos (Luangnamtha), only one sample (1%) was positive for B. pseudomallei, at a concentration of 80 CFU/g soil. Therefore, B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soils beyond the immediate vicinity of the Mekong River, alerting physicians to the likelihood of melioidosis in these areas. Further studies are needed to investigate potential climatic, soil, and biological determinants of this heterogeneity. PMID:21075883

  14. Impact of rice-straw biochars amended soil on the biological Si cycle in soil-plant ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zimin; Delvaux, Bruno; Struyf, Eric; Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ronsse, Frederik; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar used as soil amendment can enhance soil fertility and plant growth. It may also contribute to increase the plant mineralomass of silicon (Si). However, very little studies have focused on the plant Si cycling in biochar amended soils. Here, we study the impact of two contrasting biochars derived from rice straws on soil Si availability and plant Si uptake. Rice plants were grown in a hydroponic device using Yoshida nutrient solution, respectively devoid of H4SiO4 (0 ppm Si: Si-) and enriched with it (40 ppm Si: Si+). After 12 weeks, the plants were harvested for further pyrolysis, conducted with holding time of 1h at 500˚ C. The respective rice-biochars are Si-/biochar and Si+/biochar. They exhibit contrasting phytolith contents (0.3 g Si kg-1 vs. 51.3 g Si kg-1), but identical physico-chemical properties. They were applied in two soils differing in weathering stage: a weathered Cambisol (CA) and a highly weathered Nitisol (NI). We then studied the effects of the amended biochar on CaCl2 extractable Si using a 64-days kinetic approach, on the content of soil biogenic Si, and on the uptake of Si by wheat plants grown for 5 weeks. We also quantified Si mineralomass in plants. We compared the effects of biochars to that of wollastonite (Wo)-(CaSiO3), a common Si-fertilizer. Our results show that Si+/biochar significantly increase the content of BSi in both soils. In CA, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si amounts to 85 mg kg-1 after Si+/biochar amendment, which is below the amount extracted after Wo application (100 mg kg-1). In contrast, in NI, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si is 198 mg kg-1 in the Si+/biochar amended treatment, which is far above the one measured after Wo application (93 mg kg-1). The Si-/biochar has no effect on the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si in either soil type. Biochars and wollastonite increase the biomass of wheat on both soils. The increase is, however, larger in NI than in CA. In terms of Si

  15. Pore Mn²⁺ dynamics of the rhizosphere of flooded and non-flooded rice during a long wet and drying phase in two rice growing soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, K M Shamsul; Eberbach, Philip L; Weston, Leslie A; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Howitt, Julia A

    2015-09-01

    Flooded rice soils produce elevated concentrations of soluble manganous manganese (Mn(2+)) that could be potentially toxic to subsequent crops. To provide insight into how soil pore Mn(2+) changes its concentration in a rice and post rice drying soil, we used an artificial microcosm system to follow Mn(2+) concentrations in two different soil types (red sodosol and grey vertosol) and under two irrigation regimes (flooded and saturated). Soil pore water was collected from four different depths of soil (2.5 cm, 7.5 cm, 15 cm and 25 cm) and Mn(2+) concentrations were analysed during and after the rice phase over a one year cycle. Mn(2+) increased with the advancement of anaerobic conditions at all soil depths, but the concentration was higher in flooded soil compared to saturated soil. Initially, the highest concentration of Mn(2+) was found at a depth of 7.5 cm, while at the later stage of rice growth, more Mn(2+) was found in the deepest sampling depth (25 cm). Plants grown in saturated soils showed a delay in flowering of approximately 3 weeks compared to flooded cultures. Moreover, plants grown in flooded soil produced more tillers and leaf area than those grown in saturated soil. Peak concentrations of soil Mn(2+) were associated with the reproductive stage of rice growth. Mn(2+) concentrations decreased after drainage of water. In post rice soils, Mn(2+) remained elevated for some time (lag phase), and then rapidly declined. Regression analysis revealed that the process of oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(4+) following water drainage decreased with soil depth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EFFECT OF RICE STRAW AND NITRATE LEVELS IN SOIL SOLUTION ON NITROUS OXIDE EMISSION

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    André Carlos Cruz Copetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide (N2O is considered important, in view of a global warming potential 296 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 and its dynamics strongly depend on the availability of C and mineral N in the soil. The understanding of the factors that define emissions is essential to develop mitigation strategies. This study evaluated the dynamics of N2O emissions after the application of different rice straw amounts and nitrate levels in soil solution. Pots containing soil treated with sodium nitrate rates (0, 50 and 100 g kg-1 of NO−3-N and rice straw levels (0, 5 and 10 Mg ha-1, i.e., nine treatments, were subjected to anaerobic conditions. The results showed that N2O emissions were increased by the addition of greater NO−3 amounts and reduced by large straw quantities applied to the soil. On the 1st day after flooding (DAF, significantly different N2O emissions were observed between the treatments with and without NO−3 addition, when straw had no significant influence on N2O levels. Emissions peaked on the 4th DAF in the treatments with highest NO−3-N addition. At this moment, straw application negatively affected N2O emissions, probably due to NO−3 immobilization. There were also alterations in other soil electrochemical characteristics, e.g., higher straw levels raised the Fe, Mn and dissolved C contents. These results indicate that a lowering of NO−3 concentration in the soil and the increase of straw incorporation can decrease N2O emissions.

  17. Effects of P-efficient Transgenic Rice OsPT4 on Inorganic Phosphorus Fractions in Red Soil

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    WEI Lin-lin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In a rhizobox experiment with phosphorus(P fertilizer application and P-deficiency, planting wild-type rice(Nipp, P-efficient mutant rice(PHO2, P-efficient transgenic rice(OsPT4 were chosen to evaluate effects of phosphorus efficient transgenic rice on inorganic phosphorus in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil. The obtained results were summarized as follows:(1Significant higer dry weight and P accumulation were observed in OsPT4 and PHO2 than in Nipp, but lower total P and inorganic phosphorus observed in OsPT4 and PHO2 than in Nipp;(2The concentrations of inorganic phosphorus fractions in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil were sorted as follows:O-P > Fe-P > Al-P > Ca-P, and the order of inorganic phosphorus fractions adapted to three rice materials;(3When added phosphorus fertilizer, the concents of rhizospheric Al-P, Fe-P and non-rhizospheric Ca-P in three rice materials had no significant difference. The concents of rhizospheric soil O-P and Ca-P in OsPT4 and PHO2 were significantly inferior to Nipp, and their concents of non-rhizospheric soil Al-P, Fe-P and O-P were significantly lower than Nipp. When added no phosphorus fertilizer, the concents of rhizospheric Al-P, O-P, Ca-P and non-rhizosphere Al-P, Ca-P in three rice materials had no significant difference, and the concents of rhizosphere Fe-P and non-rhizosphere soil Fe-P, O-P in OsPT4 and PHO2 were significantly lower than Nipp, but rhizosphere Ca-P was significantly higher than Nipp.

  18. Heavy Metal Concentration and Risk Assessment of Soil and Rice in and around an Open Dumpsite in Thailand

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    Tanjira Klinsawathom

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the heavy metal concentration in the soil and rice in and around Nakhonluang district open dumpsite in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya province of Thailand and to assess the human health risk of these metals. The soil samples demonstrated heavy metal concentrations in the following order: Fe > Mn >Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb (Cd was not detected, and the average concentrations of each metal in soil from the dumpsite area were higher than those in the surrounding area. The average concentrations of Mn in the soils exceeded the screening level for higher plant protection of the USEPA’s Eco-SSL while the average Zn and Cu concentrations in the soil samples from the dumpsite exceeded the level for good soil and safety to life recommended by LDD. The rice exhibited metal concentrations in the following order: root > straw > grain. A carcinogenic human health risk assessment (RTotal indicated that the values from the soil samples and the rice were at safe levels. The sum of noncarcinogenic hazard values (Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicated that exposure to the soils around the dumpsite area may pose adverse health effects (HI < 1 while exposure to the soils in the dumpsite area carries a high risk of causing adverse health effects both in children (HI = 10.5 and adults (HI = 2.18. It is suggested that suitable management measures should be applied to prevent or reduce heavy metal contamination in and around the dumpsite area.

  19. Utilization of crops residues as compost and biochar for improving soil physical properties and upland rice productivity

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    J. Barus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of crops waste in the agricultural field can be converted to organic fertilizer throughout the process of composting or pyrolysis to return back into the soil. The study aimed to elucidate the effect of compost and biochar application on the physical properties and productivity of upland rice at Village of Sukaraja Nuban, Batanghari Nuban Sub district, East Lampung Regency in 2015. The amendment treatments were A. control; B. 10 t rice husk biochar/ ha; C. 10 t maize cob biochar/ha; D. 10 t straw compost/ha; E. 10 t stover compost/ha, F. 10 t rice husk biochar/ha + 10 t straw compost/ha; F. 10 t maize cob biochar/ha + 10 t maize stover compost/ha. The treatments were arranged in randomized block design with four replicates. The plot size for each treatment was 10 x 20 m. After incubation for about one month, undisturbed soil samples were taken using copper ring at 10–20 cm depth for laboratory analyzes. Analyses of soil physical properties included bulk density, particle density, total porosity, drainage porosity, and soil water condition. Plant observations conducted at harvest were plant height, number of panicle, number of grain/panicle, and grain weight/plot. Results of the study showed that biochar and compost improved soil physical properties such as bulk density, total porosity, fast drainage pores, water content, and permeability of soil. The combination of rice husk biochar and straw compost gave better effect than single applications on rice production components (numbers of panicle and grains of rice, and gave the highest yield of 4.875 t/ha.

  20. Lignin from rice straw Kraft pulping: effects on soil aggregation and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C; Bolton, R; Pan, W L

    2007-05-01

    Lignin contained in pulping liquor that is generated during the pulping process for papermaking is a disposal problem for the pulp and paper industry. Separating lignin and other organic components from pulping liquor with inorganic acids may improve its applicability to fields as a beneficial soil amendment while offering a potential disposal alternative. Sulfuric acid-precipitated lignin from rice straw pulping liquor applied at rates of 1.67 and 3.34 g C kg(-1) soil was incubated to evaluate its effects on soil properties over 8 weeks of incubation. Addition of this acid-precipitated lignin at these rates decreased soil pH by 0.24-0.53 units over 8 weeks of incubation, suggesting that this sulfuric acid-precipitated lignin from pulping liquor may have potential as a soil acidifying agent. Soil electrical conductivity (EC) only increased by up to 0.36 d Sm(-1), but highest EC levels were less than 4 d Sm(-1), indicating that lignin applied at both rates would not cause salinity problems. Application of this lignin increased soil organic C by 1.46 and 3.13 g C kg(-1), and total soil N by 0.07 and 0.17 g N kg(-1) over the incubation period. Lignin improved the macroaggregation of >2mm size fraction, and increased wet microaggregate stability of >2mm and 0.5-0.25 mm aggregates compared to a nonamended control. The results of this study suggest that this acid-precipitated lignin from pulping liquor may have potential as a beneficial soil amendment.

  1. [Nitrous oxide emission, nitrification, denitrification and nitrogen mineralization during rice growing season in 2 soils from Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illarze, Gabriela; Del Pino, Amabelia; Riccetto, Sara; Irisarri, Pilar

    2017-09-23

    Microbial processes such as mineralization, nitrification and denitrification regulate nitrogen dynamics in the soil. The last two processes may produce nitrous oxide (N2O). In this work N2O fluxes were quantified at four moments of the rice cycle, sowing, tillering, panicle initiation and maturity, in two sites that differed mainly in their soil organic matter (OM) content, Salto (higher OM) and Treinta y Tres. Potential net N mineralization, ammonium oxidation and denitrification as well as the most probable numbers (MPN) of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers were determined. Potential N mineralization did not vary with the soil type and increased at rice maturity. Neither ammonia oxidation potential nor MPN were different among the soils. However, the soil with higher OM exhibited higher activity and MPN of denitrifiers, irrespective of the rice stage. In turn, at the latest phases of the crop, the MPN of denitrifiers increased coinciding with the highest mineralization potential and mineral N content of the soil. Significant differences in N2O flux were observed in Salto, where the highest emissions were detected at rice maturity, after the soil was drained (44.2 vs 20.8g N-N2O/ha d in Treinta y Tres). This work shows the importance of considering the soil type and end-of-season drainage of the rice field to elaborate GHGs (greenhouse gases) inventories. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and their straw amendment on soil enzymes, respiration, functional diversity and community structure of soil microorganisms under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hua; Dong, Bin; Yan, Hu; Tang, Feifan; Wang, Baichuan; Yu, Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    With the development of transgenic crops, there is an increasing concern about the possible adverse effects of their vegetation and residues on soil environmental quality. This study was carried out to evaluate the possible effects of the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines Huachi B6 (HC) and TT51 (TT) followed by the return of their straw to the soil on soil enzymes (catalase, urease, neutral phosphatase and invertase), anaerobic respiration activity, microbial utilization of carbon substrates and community structure, under field conditions. The results indicated that the vegetation of the two transgenic rice lines (HC and TT) and return of their straw had few adverse effects on soil enzymes and anaerobic respiration activity compared to their parent and distant parent, although some transient differences were observed. The vegetation and subsequent straw amendment of Bt rice HC and TT did not appear to have a harmful effect on the richness, evenness and community structure of soil microorganisms. No different pattern of impact due to plant species was found between HC and TT. It could be concluded that the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and the return of their straw as organic fertilizer may not alter soil microbe-mediated functions.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF RICE SOILS FROM THE TIDAL FLAT AREAS OF MUSI BANYUASIN, SOUTH SUMATRA

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    B.H. Prasetyo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tidal flats in the Musi Banyuasin region that cover more than 200,000 ha are the largest area for agricultural development in South Sumatra Province. Only about a half of this has been used for tidal swamp rice fields, therefore, the other half needs to be developed. To obtain a better understanding of their properties for appropriate soil management, soil characteristics of the area need to be studied. To characterize the soil, thirty-four soil samples from seven soil profiles were analyzed for their chemical and mineralogical composition at the laboratories of the Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research and Development. The results indicate that soils from the tidal flat areas have an aquic soil moisture regime, the upper parts of the soils are mostly ripe, and most of the pedons show the presence of sulfidic materials below 65 cm of the mineral soil surface. The soils are classified as Sulfic Endoaquept (P1, P2, Histic Sulfaquent (P3, Typic Sulfaquept (P4, Fluvaquentic Endoaquept (P5, and Sulfic Hydraquent (P6, P7. Mineral composition of the sand fraction is dominated by quartz, while the clay minerals consist of predominantly kaolinite, mixed with small amount of smectite, illite, quartz, and crystoballite. Organic carbon content is high to very high, potential phosphate content of most pedons ranges from very low to medium, while potential potassium content varies from very low to medium in the upper layers and medium to very high in the bottom layers. Phosphate retention of topsoil sample varies from 56 to 97%, and is positively correlated (r2 = 0.73 with aluminum from amorphous materials. Exchangeable cations are dominated by Mg cation, and in all pedons cation exchange capacity values are medium to very high, and seem to be influenced by organic carbon. Specific chemical properties, particularly soil pH and content of exchangeable aluminum exhibit a significant change about 1-2 months after soil samples were taken from the field

  4. Carbon dioxide flux from rice paddy soils in central China: effects of intermittent flooding and draining cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wan, Kai-yuan; Tao, Yong; Li, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Guo-shi; Li, Shuang-lai; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to (i) examine the diurnal and seasonal soil carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes pattern in rice paddy fields in central China and (ii) assess the role of floodwater in controlling the emissions of CO(2) from soil and floodwater in intermittently draining rice paddy soil. The soil CO(2) flux rates ranged from -0.45 to 8.62 µmol.m(-2).s(-1) during the rice-growing season. The net effluxes of CO(2) from the paddy soil were lower when the paddy was flooded than when it was drained. The CO(2) emissions for the drained conditions showed distinct diurnal variation with a maximum efflux observed in the afternoon. When the paddy was flooded, daytime soil CO(2) fluxes reversed with a peak negative efflux just after midday. In draining/flooding alternating periods, a sudden pulse-like event of rapidly increasing CO(2) efflux occured in response to re-flooding after draining. Correlation analysis showed a negative relation between soil CO(2) flux and temperature under flooded conditions, but a positive relation was found under drained conditions. The results showed that draining and flooding cycles play a vital role in controlling CO(2) emissions from paddy soils.

  5. Soil amendments and cultivar selection can improve rice yield in salt-influenced (tsunami-affected) paddy fields in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G; Panamulla, Sunil; Subasinghe, Siripala; Wimmer, Bernhard

    2009-10-01

    The tsunami disaster in the Indian Ocean in December 2004 caused devastation of agricultural soils by salt water over wide areas. Many rice fields located close to the coast were affected by the flood of seawater. Electric conductivity (EC) of soils in tsunami-affected rice fields was found to be higher compared to unaffected fields 2 years after the tsunami. Four soil amendments (gypsum, dolomite, cinnamon ash and rice-husk-charcoal) were tested for their influence on improving the yield parameters of rice grown in a tsunami-affected and a non-affected area. Yield parameters were compared with an untreated control of the same cultivar (AT362) and with a salt resistant rice variety (AT354). The salt resistant variety had the highest grain yield. The two amendments gypsum and rice-husk-charcoal led to an increase in grain yield compared to the untreated control, whereas dolomite and cinnamon ash had no significant effect on grain yield.

  6. Temporal variability in trace metal solubility in a paddy soil not reflected in uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunyu; Koopmans, Gerwin F; Bonten, Luc T C; Song, Jing; Luo, Yongming; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Comans, Rob N J

    2016-12-01

    Alternating flooding and drainage conditions have a strong influence on redox chemistry and the solubility of trace metals in paddy soils. However, current knowledge of how the effects of water management on trace metal solubility are linked to trace metal uptake by rice plants over time is still limited. Here, a field-contaminated paddy soil was subjected to two flooding and drainage cycles in a pot experiment with two rice plant cultivars, exhibiting either high or low Cd accumulation characteristics. Flooding led to a strong vertical gradient in the redox potential (Eh). The pH and Mn, Fe, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations increased with decreasing Eh and vice versa. During flooding, trace metal solubility decreased markedly, probably due to sulfide mineral precipitation. Despite its low solubility, the Cd content in rice grains exceeded the food quality standards for both cultivars. Trace metal contents in different rice plant tissues (roots, stem, and leaves) increased at a constant rate during the first flooding and drainage cycle but decreased after reaching a maximum during the second cycle. As such, the high temporal variability in trace metal solubility was not reflected in trace metal uptake by rice plants over time. This might be due to the presence of aerobic conditions and a consequent higher trace metal solubility near the root surface, even during flooding. Trace metal solubility in the rhizosphere should be considered when linking water management to trace metal uptake by rice over time.

  7. Soil concentration of glyphosate and AMPA under rice cultivation with contrasting levels of fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Montoya, Tania; Micaela Biassoni, María; Graciela Herber, Luciana; De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the world's most important crop species and occupies c. 150 mill ha. The province of Corrientes in Argentina leads the national production of rice cultivation. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide commonly used to control weeds. The molecule is inactivated once applied due to its adsorption in the soil, and once desorbed is degraded by soil microflora resulting in sarcosine and aminomethylphosphoric acid (AMPA) molecules. The objective of this investigation was to compare glyphosate and AMPA concentration in soil under different levels of fertilization along the growth season of the rice crop. A field experiment following a completely randomized design was carried out with four replicates. We evaluated four levels of fertilization (0-18-40): Control: 0 kg ha-1, Dose 1: 120 kg ha-1, Dose 2: 150 kg ha-1, Dose 3: 180 kg ha-1; and two levels of Glyphosate: with (Gly) or without (No) application. Four sampling moments were defined: pre-sowing (taken as reference), vegetative stage (V4, 30 days after application), in floral primordial differentiation-DPF (80 days post-application), and at physiological maturity-MF (125 days after application). Flooding was applied in V4 after sampling. The method used for determination and quantification was by ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to ESI UHPLC-MS / MS tandem mass spectrometer (+/-) (Acquit-Quattro Premier). We found that glyphosate and AMPA varied their concentration in soil according to the time of sampling. Detected levels of both molecules at pre-sowing indicate the persistence of this herbicide from earlier crop seasons. The highest concentration was measured in MF followed by V4. Interestingly, AMPA concentration showed higher values in V4 without application compared to the treatment with glyphosate application. On the other hand, in flooded soil both molecules presented a decrease in their concentration probably because of their dilution in water, increasing it again after

  8. Improvement of Soil Biology Characteristics at Paddy Field by System of Rice Intensification

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    Widyatmani Sih Dewi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to test the System of Rice Intensification (SRI method in improving the biological properties of paddy soil. The indicators of improvement were measured by the number of earthworm feces (cast, and the population of some microbial and nutrient content in the cast. The experiments were performed by comparing the three methods, namely: (1 SRI, (2 semi-conventional, and (3 conventional, using Randomized Completely Block Design. Each treatment was repeated nine times. The experiments were performed in the paddy fields belonging to farmers in Sukoharjo, Central Java. The result showed that the SRI (application of 1 tons ha-1 of vermicompost + 50% of inorganic fertilizer dosage tends to increase the number of earthworms cast. It is an indicator of earthworm activity in soil. Earthworms cast contains more phosphate solubilizing bacteria (12.98 x 1010cfu and N content (1.23% compared to its surrounding soil. There is a close functional relation between earthworms cast with total tiller number. SRI method is better than the other two methods to improve the biological characteristics of paddy soil that has the potential to maintain the sustainability of soil productivity.

  9. Effects of cultivation of OsrHSA transgenic rice on functional diversity of microbial communities in the soil rhizosphere

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    Xiaobing Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With the widespread cultivation of transgenic crops, there is increasing concern about unintended effects of these crops on soil environmental quality. In this study, we used the Biolog method and ELISA to evaluate the possible effects of OsrHSA transgenic rice on soil microbial utilization of carbon substrates under field conditions. There were no significant differences in average well-color development (AWCD values, Shannon–Wiener diversity index (H, Simpson dominance indices (D and Shannon–Wiener evenness indices (E of microbial communities in rhizosphere soils at eight samplings between OsrHSA transgenic rice and its non-transgenic counterpart. The main carbon sources utilized by soil microbes were carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids and polymers. The types, capacities and patterns of carbon source utilization by microbial communities in rhizosphere soils were similar throughout the detection period. We detected no OsrHSA protein in the roots of OsrHSA transgenic rice. We concluded that OsrHSA transgenic rice and the rHSA protein it produced did not alter the functional diversity of microbial communities in the rhizosphere.

  10. Microbial activity promoted with organic carbon accumulation in macroaggregates of paddy soils under long-term rice cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Ding, Yuanjun; Lu, Haifei; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Filley, Timothy; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Pan, Genxing

    2016-12-01

    While soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation and stabilization has been increasingly the focus of ecosystem properties, how it could be linked to soil biological activity enhancement has been poorly assessed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected from a series of rice soils shifted from salt marshes for 0, 50, 100, 300 and 700 years from a coastal area of eastern China. Soil aggregates were fractioned into different sizes of coarse sand (200-2000 µm), fine sand (20-200 µm), silt (2-20 µm) and clay (properties were determined to investigate niche specialization of different soil particle fractions in response to long-term rice cultivation, including recalcitrant and labile organic carbon, microbial diversity of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, soil respiration and enzyme activity. The results showed that the mass proportion both of coarse-sand (2000-200 µm) and clay (< 2 µm) fractions increased with prolonged rice cultivation, but the aggregate size fractions were dominated by fine-sand (200-20 µm) and silt (20-2 µm) fractions across the chronosequence. SOC was highly enriched in coarse-sand fractions (40-60 g kg-1) and moderately in clay fractions (20-25 g kg-1), but was depleted in silt fractions (˜ 10 g kg-1). The recalcitrant carbon pool was higher (33-40 % of SOC) in both coarse-sand and clay fractions than in fine-sand and silt fractions (20-29 % of SOC). However, the ratio of labile organic carbon (LOC) to SOC showed a weakly decreasing trend with decreasing size of aggregate fractions. Total soil DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) content in the size fractions followed a similar trend to that of SOC. Despite the largely similar diversity between the fractions, 16S ribosomal gene abundance of bacteria and of archaeal were concentrated in both coarse-sand and clay fractions. Being the highest generally in coarse-sand fractions, 18S rRNA gene abundance of fungi decreased sharply but the diversity gently, with decreasing size of the aggregate

  11. Application of biochar to soil reduces cancer risk via rice consumption: a case study in Miaoqian village, Longyan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sardar; Reid, Brian J; Li, Gang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-07-01

    Consumption of rice contaminated with potentially toxic elements (PTEs) is a major pathway for human exposure to PTEs. This is particularly true in China's so called "Cancer Villages". In this study, sewage sludge biochar (SSBC) was applied to soil (at 5% and 10%) to suppress PTE phytoavailability and as a consequence to reduce PTE levels in rice grown in mining impacted paddy soils. Risk assessment indicated that SSBC addition (10%) markedly (P≤0.05) decreased the daily intake, associated with the consumption of rice, of PTEs (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn by: 68, 42, 55, 29, 43, 38 and 22%, respectively). In treatments containing SSBC (10%) the health quotient (HQ) indices for PTEs (except for As, Cu and Mn) were consumption of rice was significantly (P≤0.01) reduced by 66%. These findings suggest that SSBC could be a useful soil amendment to mitigating PTE exposure, through rice consumption, in China's "Cancer Villages". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrated nutrient management for rice-wheat cropping system in a recently reclaimed soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzada Munawar Mehdi, Muhammad Sarfraz, Syed Touqueer Abbas*, Ghulam Shabbir and Jalil Akhtar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted for integrated nutrient management in a recently reclaimed soil. For thispurpose a saline sodic field was selected at soil salinity research farm having ECe, 7.40 (dS m-1; pHs, 8.90; SAR,38.26 (mmol L-1½ and gypsum requirement, 3.52 (ton acre-1; deficient in total nitrogen (0.017% and availablephosphorus (4.20 mg kg-1 and medium in extractable K (90 mg kg-1. This field was reclaimed by applying gypsumat 100% G.R. After reclamation, different combinations of FYM, Sesbania and chemical fertilizers were applied.The experiment was layed out in randomized complete block design with three replications. Rice variety Shaheenbasmati was transplanted. The data showed that different combinations of organic manures with chemical fertilizersincreased paddy and straw yield significantly over application of organic manures alone. Among differentcombinations, Sesbania at 20 ton ha-1 + 75% recommended dose (R.D. proved to be the best combination followedby Sesbania 20 ton ha-1 + 50% R.D. and least in FYM alone at 20 ton ha-1. It was also noted that sesbania greenmanuring alone was found superior to FYM alone. The NPK contents both in paddy and straw were increasedsignificantly by applying various combinations of organic manures with chemical fertilizers over application oforganic manures. Maximum contents of NPK both in paddy and straw of rice were recorded in the combination ofSesbania at 20 ton ha-1 + 75% R.D. followed by Sesbania 20 ton ha-1 + 50% R.D. and least in FYM alone at 20 tonha-1.The soil analysis after harvest of rice showed that it was still slightly sodic in nature but free from salinity,deficient in total N and available P but adequate in extractable K. After harvest of rice crop in the same layoutwheat variety Inqulab 91 was sown. Percent recommended dose of NPK was applied to all the plots as per treatmentplan to see the residual effect of the organic manures applied to rice crop. Crop was harvested at maturity

  13. Impact of tillage practices on soil bacterial diversity and composition under the tobacco-rice rotation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yanping; Xiao, Yongliang; Li, Lifeng; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Zu, Chaolong; Li, Tian; Cao, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Tobacco-rice rotation is a common farming system in south China, and many tillage practices such as straw mulching, dolomite dust, and quicklime application have been adopted to improve crop production. These agricultural management practices alter soil physical and chemical properties and affect microbial life environment and community composition. In this research, six tillage practices including no tobacco and rice straw mulching (CK), tobacco and rice straw mulching (TrSr), rice straw returning fire (TrSc), tobacco and rice straw mulching with dolomite dust (TSD), rice straw returning fire and quicklime (TSQ), and rice straw returning fire, quicklime and reduced fertilizer (TSQf) were conducted to detect changes in soil bacterial diversity and composition using Illumina sequencing. The results showed that the total number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the six treatments was 2030, and the number of mutual OTUs among all samples was 550. The TrSc treatment had the highest diversity and richness, while TSQf had the lowest. Soil physio-chemical properties and microbial diversity can influence each other. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria had the greatest proportion in all treatments. The abundance of Nitrospirae was the highest in the TrSc treatment. The TSQf treatment had the highest abundance of Firmicutes. The abundance of Nitrospira in the TrSc treatment was 2.29-fold over CK. Streptomyces affiliated with Firmicutes improved by 37.33% in TSQf compared to TSQ. TSQf treatment was considered to be the most important factor in determining the relative abundance at the genus level.

  14. The effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dafang; Ma, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Bao, Yanyu

    2017-03-01

    Although the role of iron plaque on rice root surface has been investigated in recent years, its effect on antibiotic uptake remains uncertain. In the study, pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin (adding 10 and 50 mg·kg(-1) treatments) in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil. Iron plaque was induced by adding different amounts of Fe(II) in soil. The results showed that the presence of norfloxacin can decrease the amount of iron plaque induced. After rice with iron plaque induced, norfloxacin was mainly accumulated in iron plaque on root surface, followed by inside root, but its translocation from root to other rice tissues is not observed. Iron plaque played the role of a barrier for norfloxacin uptake into rice roots under high norfloxacin concentration of 50 mg·kg(-1), however not that under low concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1). And the barrier function was the most strongest with adding Fe(II) of 30 mg·kg(-1) as combined action of iron plaque and rhizosphere effect. Fluorescence microscope analysis showed that norfloxacin mainly distributed in the outside of root cell, which showed its translocation as apoplastic pathway in rice. Comparing with non-rhizosphere, more norfloxacin was accumulated in rhizosphere soil. Maybe, strong root oxidization (high Eh values) induced more iron oxide formation in rhizosphere and on root surface, which led to norfloxacin's mobility towards to rhizosphere through its strong adsorption of iron oxides and then promoted its uptake by rice on root surface.

  15. The Short-Term Effects of Rice Straw Biochar, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer on Rice Yield and Soil Properties in a Cold Waterlogged Paddy Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Si

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Crop productivity in cold waterlogged paddy fields can be constrained by chronic flooding stress and low temperature. Farmers typically use chemical fertilizer to improve crop production, but this conventional fertilization is not very effective in a cold waterlogged paddy field. Biochar amendment has been proposed as a promising management approach to eliminating these obstacles. However, little is known about the performance of biochar when combined with N fertilizer and P fertilizer in cold waterlogged soils. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the main effects and interactive effects of rice straw biochar, N and P fertilizer on rice growth and soil properties in a cold waterlogged paddy field. The field treatments consisted of a factorial combination of two biochar levels (0 and 2.25 t ha−1, two N fertilizer levels (120.0 and 180.0 kg ha−1 and two P fertilizer levels (37.5 and 67.5 kg ha−1 which were arranged in a randomized block design, with three replicates. Results confirmed that biochar application caused a significant increase in the soil pH due to its liming effect, while this application resulted in a significant decrease in soil exchangeable cations, such as exchangeable Ca, Mg, Al and base cations. The interactive effect of N fertilizer, P fertilizer and biochar was significant for soil total N. Moreover, a negative effect of biochar on the internal K use efficiency suggested that K uptake into rice may benefit from biochar application. According to the partial Eta squared values, the combined application of N fertilizer and biochar was as effective as pure P fertilization at increasing straw P uptake. The addition of biochar to farmers’ fertilization practice treatment (180.0 kg N ha−1, 67.5 kg P2O5 ha−1 and 67.5 kg K2O ha−1 significantly increased rice yield, mainly owing to improvements in grains per panicle. However, notable effects of biochar on rice yield and biomass production were not detected

  16. Cropping systems affect paddy soil organic carbon and total nitrogen stocks (in rice-garlic and rice-fava systems) in temperate region of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Anqiang; Liu, Jian; Liu, Hongbin; Lei, Baokun; Zhai, Limei; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Hongyuan

    2017-12-31

    The accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in agricultural soils is critical to food security and climate change. However, there is still limited information on the dynamic trend of SOC sequestration following changes in cropping systems. Paddy soils, typical of temperate region of southern China, have a large potential for carbon (C) sequestration and nitrogen (N) fixation. It is of great importance to study the impacts of changes in cropping systems on stocks of SOC and total nitrogen (TN) in paddy soils. A six-year field experiment was conducted to clarify the dynamics of SOC and TN stocks in the paddy topsoil (0-20cm) when crop rotation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) -garlic (Allium sativum) (RG) was changed to rice-fava (Vicia faba L.) (RF), and to examine how the dynamics were affected by two N management strategies. The results showed that SOC stocks increased by 24.9% in the no N (control) treatment and by 18.9% in the treatment applied with conventional rate of N (CON), when RG was changed to RF. Correspondingly, TN stocks increased by 8.5% in the control but decreased by 2.6% in the CON. Compared with RG, RF was more conducive to increase the contents of soil microbial biomass C and N. Moreover, changing the cropping system from RG to RF increased the year-round N use efficiency from 21.6% to 34.4% and reduced soil N surplus in the CON treatment from 547kg/ha to 93kg/ha. In conclusion, changes in the cropping system from RG to RF could markedly increase SOC stocks, improve N utilization, reduce soil N surplus, and thus reduce the risk of N loss in the paddy soil. Overall, this study showed the potential of paddy agro-ecological systems to store C and maintain N stocks in the temperate regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil fertility and upland rice yield after biochar application in the Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of biochar made from Eucalyptus on soil fertility, and on the yield and development of upland rice. The experiment was performed during two years in a randomized block design with four replicates, in a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. Four doses of NPK 05-25-15, annually distributed in stripes (0, 100, 200 and 300 kg ha-1, and four doses of biochar (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha-1, applied once in the first year - alone or with NPK - were evaluated. In the first year, biochar positively affected soil fertility [total organic carbon (TOC, Ca, P, Al, H+Al, and pH], at 0-10 cm soil depth, and it was the only factor with significant effect on yield. In the second year, the effect of biochar diminished or was overcome by the fertilizer. TOC moved down in the soil profile to the 0-20 cm depth, influencing K availability in this layer. In the second year, there was a significant interaction between biochar and the fertilizer on plant growth and biomass dry matter accumulation.

  18. Strain-specific incorporation of methanotrophic biomass into eukaryotic grazers in a rice field soil revealed by SIP-PLFA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murase, J.; Hordijk, C.A.; Tayasu, I.; Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2011-01-01

    In wetland ecosystems, methane is actively utilized by methanotrophs. The immobilized methane carbon is then passed on to other organisms such as grazers. Here, we traced the incorporation of methanotrophic biomass into eukaryotes in a rice field soil using phospholipid fatty acid stable-isotope

  19. Effects of compost amended lead-arsenate contaminated soils on total and inorganic arsenic concentration in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple crop for over fifty percent of the world’s population, is also a source of dietary arsenic because of its efficiency at accumulating As. Pesticides containing As were once widely used in agriculture, and some soils in which these pesticides were used are now being u...

  20. Reducing Soil CO2 Emission and Improving Upland Rice Yield with no-Tillage, Straw Mulch and Nitrogen Fertilization in Northern Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou-Yovo, E.; Brueggemann, N.; Naab, J.; Huat, J.; Ampofo, E.; Ago, E.; Agbossou, E.

    2015-12-01

    To explore effective ways to decrease soil CO2 emission and increase grain yield, field experiments were conducted on two upland rice soils (Lixisols and Gleyic Luvisols) in northern Benin in West Africa. The treatments were two tillage systems (no-tillage, and manual tillage), two rice straw managements (no rice straw, and rice straw mulch at 3 Mg ha-1) and three nitrogen fertilizers levels (no nitrogen, recommended level of nitrogen: 60 kg ha-1, and high level of nitrogen: 120 kg ha-1). Potassium and phosphorus fertilizers were applied to be non-limiting at 40 kg K2O ha-1 and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1. Four replications of the twelve treatment combinations were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Soil CO2 emission, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured at 5 cm depth in 6 to 10 days intervals during the rainy season and every two weeks during the dry season. Soil moisture was the main factor explaining the seasonal variability of soil CO2 emission. Much larger soil CO2 emissions were found in rainy than dry season. No-tillage planting significantly reduced soil CO2 emissions compared with manual tillage. Higher soil CO2 emissions were recorded in the mulched treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were higher in fertilized treatments compared with non fertilized treatments. Rice biomass and yield were not significantly different as a function of tillage systems. On the contrary, rice biomass and yield significantly increased with application of rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer. The highest response of rice yield to nitrogen fertilizer addition was obtained for 60 kg N ha-1 in combination with 3 Mg ha-1 of rice straw for the two tillage systems. Soil CO2 emission per unit grain yield was lower under no-tillage, rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer treatments. No-tillage combined with rice straw mulch and 60 kg N ha-1 could be used by smallholder farmers to achieve higher grain yield and lower soil CO2 emission in upland rice fields in northern Benin.

  1. Effects of Controlled Release Urea on Physiological Characteristics and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Rice and NO3--N Contents in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DU Jun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted to study the effects of controlled release urea(CRU on key enzymes activities of nitrogen metabolism of rice, nitrogen use efficiency and soil and NO3--N contents, in order to verify the mechanism of CRU on increasing nitrogen use efficiency and increasing soil NO3--N accumulation. The results showed that CRU could improve significantly nitrate reductase(NR activities of rice leaves in full heading stage and milk stage, especially in milk stage. The activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamine transversase of rice leaves were obviously increased, and the enhancement continued till dough grain stage, especially in full heading stage. Meanwhile, CRU was able to promote significantly protease activity of rice leaves in milk stage and dough grain stage. The treatment of 4(CRU60%+PU40% was the best treatment of the key enzymes activities of nitrogen metabolism. CRU also had better effect on promoting glutamine synthetase and glutamine transversase activities of brown rice, and increased significantly rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency, especially the treatment of 4. CRU enhanced significantly protein contents in brown rice, therefore which improved quality of rice to some extent. Moreover, CRU could reduce NO3--N accumulation in soil profile significantly. CRU application could evidently decrease the quantity of soil NO3--N leached to deep soil and lessen the risk to ground water pollution.

  2. Microbial utilization of rice straw and its derived biochar in a paddy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Fuxia [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yaying [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315800 (China); Chapman, Stephen James [The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Khan, Sardar [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Department of Environmental Science, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Yao, Huaiying, E-mail: hyyao@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Ningbo Urban Environment Observation and Research Station-NUEORS, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315800 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The application of straw and biochar to soil has received great attention because of their potential benefits such as fertility improvement and carbon (C) sequestration. The abiotic effects of these materials on C and nitrogen (N) cycling in the soil ecosystem have been previously investigated, however, the effects of straw or its derived biochar on the soil microbial community structure and function are not well understood. For this purpose, a short-term incubation experiment was conducted using {sup 13}C-labeled rice straw and its derived biochar ({sup 13}C-labeled biochar) to deepen our understanding about soil microbial community dynamics and function in C sequestration and greenhouse gas emission in the acidic paddy soil amended with these materials. Regarding microbial function, biochar and straw applications increased CO{sub 2} emission in the initial stage of incubation and reached the highest level (0.52 and 3.96 mg C kg{sup −1} soil h{sup −1}) at 1 d and 3 d after incubation, respectively. Straw amendment significantly (p < 0.01) increased respiration rate, total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and {sup 13}C-PLFA as compared to biochar amendment and the control. The amount and percent of Gram positive bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes were also significantly (p < 0.05) higher in {sup 13}C-labeled straw amended soil than the {sup 13}C-labeled biochar amended soil. According to the {sup 13}C data, 23 different PLFAs were derived from straw amended paddy soil, while only 17 PLFAs were derived from biochar amendments. The profile of {sup 13}C-PLFAs derived from straw amendment was significantly (p < 0.01) different from biochar amendment. The PLFAs 18:1ω7c and cy17:0 (indicators of Gram negative bacteria) showed high relative abundances in the biochar amendment, while 10Me18:0, i17:0 and 18:2ω6,9c (indicators of actinomycetes, Gram positive bacteria and fungi, respectively) showed high relative abundance in the straw amendments. Our results suggest

  3. Non-target effect of continuous application of chlorpyrifos on soil microbes, nematodes and its persistence under sub-humid tropical rice-rice cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Adak, Totan; Rath, Prakash C; Dey, Avro; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad N; Panneerselvam, P; Kumar, Anjani; Mohapatra, Shyamranjan D

    2017-01-01

    Application of pesticide in agricultural fields is "unnecessary evil" for non-target microflora and fauna. Hence, to identify the safer pesticide molecules against non-target microbes, a long-term pesticide experiment was initiated at National Rice Research Institute, Cuttack, India. In the present study, the effect of continuous application of chlorpyrifos (0.5kgha -1 ) in rice fields on non-target groups of soil microbes and nematodes was studied for seven seasons (four wet and three dry seasons) during 2009-2013. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications of chlorpyrifos-treated (0.5kg a.i. ha -1 ) (CT) and untreated control (UT) plots. During seven seasons of experimentation, regular application of chlorpyrifos had no significant effect on population of heterotrophic aerobic, anaerobic, oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria in CT compared to UT, whereas, population of asymbiotic aerobic nitrogen fixer, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, gram positive and spore-forming bacteria were significantly reduced by nearly 0.25-2 fold in CT than UT. However, comparatively less deviation in population of actinomycetes, fungi, phosphate solubilizing and sulfur oxidizing bacteria were observed in CT than UT. Significant interactions were found between effects of chlorpyrifos with time in population dynamics of microbes. In plant parasitic nematode species, Meloidogyne graminicola (RRKN) and Hirschmanniella spp. (RRN), were significantly lower (p<0.01) in CT compared to UT after first year onwards. The overall observation of five years data indicated that the RRKN population showed a decreasing trend (R 2 =0.644) whereas RRN showed increasing trend (R 2 =0.932) in CT. The drastic chlorpyrifos dissipation was noticed after 15 days of application from the initial residue of 0.25mgkg -1 soil, which indicated that chlorpyrifos residue in rice field soil was not persistent and its half-life was found to be 4.02 days. Overall, the present

  4. Dissipation and effects of tricyclazole on soil microbial communities and rice growth as affected by amendment with alperujo compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M; Redondo-Gómez, S; Barcia-Piedras, J M; Aguilar, M; Jurado, V; Hermosín, M C; Cox, L

    2016-04-15

    The presence of pesticides in surface and groundwater has grown considerably in the last decades as a consequence of the intensive farming activity. Several studies have shown the benefits of using organic amendments to prevent losses of pesticides from runoff or leaching. A particular soil from the Guadalquivir valley was placed in open air ponds and amended at 1 or 2% (w/w) with alperujo compost (AC), a byproduct from the olive oil industry. Tricyclazole dissipation, rice growth and microbial diversity were monitored along an entire rice growing season. An increase in the net photosynthetic rate of Oryza sativa plants grown in the ponds with AC was observed. These plants produced between 1100 and 1300kgha(-1) more rice than plants from the unamended ponds. No significant differences were observed in tricyclazole dissipation, monitored for a month in soil, surface and drainage water, between the amended and unamended ponds. The structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities were also studied by the use of the polymerase chain reaction denaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) from DNA extracted directly from soil samples. The banding pattern was similar for all treatments, although the density of bands varied throughout the time. Apparently, tricyclazole did not affect the structure and diversity of bacteria and fungi communities, and this was attributed to its low bioavailability. Rice cultivation under paddy field conditions may be more efficient under the effects of this compost, due to its positive effects on soil properties, rice yield, and soil microbial diversity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Dynamics of the mineralization and transformation of rice photosynthesized carbon in paddy soils--a batch incubation experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Min; Peng, Pei-Qin; Li, Ke-Lin; Li, Bao-Zhen; Nie, San-An; Ge, Ti-Da; Tong, Cheng-Li; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesized carbon is an important part in C cycling of "atmosphere-plant-soil" and is the source of soil organic carbon (SOC), but its mineralization and transformation dynamics in paddy soils remains still unclear. Therefore, a batch incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the mineralization and transformation of rice photosynthesized carbon in paddy soils after rice harvest. The results showed that the mineralization rate of native SOC ranged from 4.44 to 17.8 microg x (g x d)(-1), while that of photosynthesized carbon (new carbon) was 0.15- 1.51 micro x (gx d)(-1) during the course of 100-day-incubation span. Rice photosynthesized carbon input significantly influenced the soil active carbon (DOC, MBC) transformation. During the incubation period (100 d), the amount of 14C-DOC transformation ranged from 1.89 to 5.32 mg x 8 kg(-1), and that of native DOC varied from 61.13 to 90.65 mg x kg(-2), with the transformation rates ranged from 0.18 to 0.34 mg x (kg x d)(-1) and from 4.10 to 5.48 mg. (kg x d)(-1), respectively. However, the 14C-MBC and native original MBC were 10.92-44.11 mg x kg(-1) and 463.31-1153.46 mg x kg(-1), respectively, and their transformation rates were 0.80-2.87, 41.60-74.46 mg x (kg-d)(-1), respectively. It suggested that the turnover of MBC was greater than that of DOC. Furthermore, "new carbon" was easier to be mineralized and decomposed than native SOC. The mineralized portion in "new carbon" was 13.5%-20.2%, whereas that in native SOC was only 2.2%-3.7%. Therefore, we concluded that the incorporation of rice photosynthesized carbon was vital to maintain the soil carbon sink for paddy soils.

  6. Biochar amendment reduces rice Cd uptake in polluted and unpolluted paddy soils: a long term field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, R.; Cui, L.; Pan, G.; Li, L.

    2012-04-01

    The bioavailability of Cd in agricultural soils has been a great health concern due to the potential risk through exposure of agro-food produced in Cd-contaminated fields. Yet, rice subject to Cd contamination appears to have expanded at the last decade due to irrigation with waste water and chemical fertilization in south china. This is supposed to raise the Cd accumulation of rice grain. Therefore, techniques to reduce Cd mobility and plant uptake have been a urgent demand for food safety in China.A field experiment was performed in a high-polluted (HP), mid-pollute (MP) and unpolluted (UP) paddy soil with biochar(BC) amendment in 2011. BC was applied in HP, MP and UP in 2008, 2009, 2009 with the rates of 0, 10, 20, 40t ha-1 in HP, MP and 0, 40t ha-1 in UP. The experiment was monitored in 2011. It was observed that BC amendment did not affect rice grain yield but significantly increased soil pH by 0.58-0.77, 1.30 units in MP, UP and there was no difference in HP. The Cacl2 extracted Cd in soil was decreased by 18.1%-28.9% in HP, 49.3%-67.5% in MP and 83.1% in UP, respectively. Meanwhile, H2O extractable Cd in soil was decreased by 20.0%-31.7% in HP, 32.7%-44.2% in MP and 25.0% in UP, respectively. With the BC treatment, rice grain Cd concentration was decreased 4.7%-17.6% in HP, 35.9%-53.4% in MP. Especially in UP field, the rice grain Cd concentration was decreased from 0.22mg kg-1 to 0.07mg kg-1 which was below National standard (0.20mg kg-1) in China. The straw and root Cd contents were also significantly decreased with BC application. Therefore, BC amendment in polluted and unpolluted fields can sustainably reduce rice Cd uptake and it may offer a basic option to reduce Cd levels in rice. Keywords: Biochar, Cd, bioavailability, paddy soil, food safety

  7. Influence of gypsum amendment on methane emission from paddy rice soil affected by saline irrigation water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei eTheint

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of gypsum application on methane (CH4 emission from paddy rice soil affected by saline irrigation water, two pot experiments with the rice cultivation were conducted. In pot experiment (I, salinity levels 30 mMNaCl (S30 and 90 mMNaCl (S90, that showed maximum and minimum CH4 production in an incubation experiment, respectively, were selected and studied without and with application of 1 Mg gypsum ha-1(G1. In pot experiment (II, CH4 emission was investigated under different rates of gypsum application: 1 (G1, 2.5 (G2.5 and 5 (G5 Mg gypsum ha-1 under a non-saline and saline condition of 25 mMNaCl (S25. In experiment (I, the smallest CH4 emission was observed in S90. Methane emission in S30 was not significantly different with the non-saline control. The addition of gypsum showed significant lower CH4 emission in saline and non-saline treatments compared with non-saline control. In experiment (II, the CH4 emissions in the saline treatments were not significantly different to the non-saline treatments except S25-G5. However, our work has shown that gypsum can lower CH4 emissions under saline and non-saline conditions. Thus, gypsum can be used as a CH4 mitigation option in non-saline as well as in saline conditions.

  8. US State Submerged Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. Section 1301 et seq.) grants coastal states title to natural resources located within their coastal submerged lands and navigable...

  9. IMPACT OF BRACHIARIA, ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA, AND POTASSIUM ENRICHED RICE STRAW COMPOST ON ALUMINIUM, POTASSIUM AND STABILITY OF ACID SOIL AGGREGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bariot Hafif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acid soil is commonly grown with cassava, which in general, tolerate low soil  fertility and aluminum (Al toxicity. However, without any improvement efforts such soil will become worse. Intercropping cassava with Brachiaria decumbens (BD which adapts to acid soil and tolerates low fertility soils as well as application of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and organic matters are among the important efforts to rehabilitate this soil. The experiment was conducted to  examine the impact of BD, AM, and potassium (K enriched rice straw compost on exchangeable Al, available K, and stability of soil aggregates. Experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with three factors and three replications. The first factor was BD as cassava intercropping, the second factor was AM, and the third factor was 2 t ha-1 rice straw compost enriched with 0 kg, 50 kg, 100 kg, and 200 kg KCl ha-1. Brick pots (1 m length x 1 m width x 0.45 m depth filled with Kanhapludult soil was used for growing cassava in which row of BD was planted at 60 cm from cassava stem. K-enriched rice straw compost and AM (10 g per stem were applied around cassava stem at 2 and 12 days after planting, respectively. BD was cut every 30 days and the cutting was returned to the soil. Soil exchangeable Al was analyzed at 0, 3, 6 and 9 months after planting (MAP, while Al and K contents as well as aggregate stability were measured at 6 MAP. The results showed that planting BD decreased 33% exchangeable Al, which means that the root exudates of this grass was effective in detoxifying Al3+. Treatment of BD and/or in combination with AM was effective in preserving K added to the soil, increasing total polysaccharides, and improving soil aggregate stability. This indicated that planting BD and applying AM and Kenriched rice straw compost improved acid soil fertility, and therefore can be recommended in cassava cultivation.

  10. Assessment of Ammonia Volatilization Losses and Nitrogen Utilization during the Rice Growing Season in Alkaline Salt-Affected Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of different fertilizer types and application rates on ammonia volatilization loss and to explore nitrogen distribution and nitrogen use efficiency using the 15N isotope tracing technique in different alkaline salt-affected conditions in the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. The results showed a decreasing trend in ammonia volatilization loss from ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, but not that from urea, as the electrical conductivity gradient increased, whereas the reverse trend was found as the pH gradient increased. Ammonia volatilization loss increased in moderately salt-affected soil compared with that in slightly salt-affected soil, particularly during the tillering stage, regardless of the N fertilizer rate. The percentage of N absorbed by rice plants increased from urea but decreased from the soil as the amount of nitrogen was increased. Interestingly, the N retention rate in soil decreased and rice grain yield and nitrogen agronomic efficiency increased as the amount of nitrogen increased in both salt-affected soil conditions. The nitrogen application amount of highest N physiological efficiency was 225 kg·N/ha. Considering high rice production and a minimal environmental threat, we should fully consider controlling ammonia volatilization losses by adjusting the fertilizer type and the crop stage when the fertilizer is applied.

  11. [Effects of no-tillage and stubble-remaining on soil enzyme activities in broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wan-Jun; Huang, Yun; Wu, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Dai-Yin; Yang, Wen-Yu

    2011-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of four cultivation modes (conventional tillage, no-tillage, conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, and no-tillage + stubble-remaining) on the activities of urease, acid phosphatase, protease, and cellulose in different soil layers in a broadcasting rice seedlings paddy field. Under the four cultivation modes, the activities of test enzymes were higher in upper than in deeper soil layers, and had a greater difference between the soil layers under no-tillage + stubble-remaining. In upper soil layers, the activities of test enzymes were higher in the treatments of no-tillage than in the treatments of conventional tillage, being the highest under no-tillage + stubble-remaining and the lowest under conventional tillage. In deeper soil layers, the test enzyme activities were the highest under conventional tillage + stubble-remaining, followed by no-tillage + stubble-remaining, no-tillage, and conventional tillage. During the growth period of rice, soil urease and cellulose activities were lower at tillering stage, increased to the maximum at booting stage, and decreased then, soil acid phosphatase activity was higher at tillering stage but lower at elongating stage, whereas soil protease activity peaked at tillering and heading stages.

  12. Effects of aqueous extract of soil-like substrate made from three different materials on seed germination and seedling growth of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lingzhi; Fu, Yuming; Fu, Wenting; Yan, Min; Li, Leyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Biologically processing rice and wheat straws into soil-like substrate (SLS) and then reusing them in plant cultivation system to achieve waste recycle is very crucially important in Bioregenerative life support system (BLSS). However, rice is a plant with strong allelopathic potential. It is not clear yet that what kinds of raw materials can be processed into proper SLS to grow rice in BLSS. Therefore, in this study, the aqueous extract of SLS made from three different materials including rice straw, wheat straw and rice-wheat straw mixture was utilized to investigate its effects on the seed germination and seedling growth of rice. The gradients of the extract concentrations (soil:water) were 1:3, 1:5, 1:9, and 1:15 with deionized water used as control. The effects of different types of SLS on seed germination and seedling vitality of rice were confirmed by analyzing the germination rate, seedling length, root length, the fresh weight and other indicants. In addition, based on the analysis towards pH, organic matter composition and other factors of the SLS as well as the chlorophyll, hormone content of rice, and the mechanism of the inhibition was speculated in order to explore the preventive methods of the phenomenon. Finally, the feasibility of cultivating rice on SLSs made from the raw materials mentioned above was evaluated and wheat raw was determined as the most appropriate material for growing rice.

  13. Estimating on Management Practices (Tillage and Flooding) Effects for Assessing Methane Mitigation from Rice-paddy Soil: On Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, W.; Hyun, S.; MIN, H.; Kim, J. G.; Cho, K.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is over 25 times greater than carbon dioxide, and rice-paddy soil represents one of the largest artificial source of methane emission. Changes in management practices (tillage depth, flooding method, cultivation time, etc.) has a significant effect on methane emission. In this study, the process based model (DNDC; DeNitrification and DeComposition) was used to estimate methane emission according to alterations management practices (tillage and flooding) of rice cultivation for the entire South Korea paddy soil (1km2 scale grid cell). Simulations of the DNDC model were performed under four tillage depths (no-till, 5 cm, 10 cm and 20 cm) and two flooding methods (conventional and marginal). For operating DNDC model, basic input parameters (daily climate data, soil pH, soil organic matter contents, soil bulk density and soil clay contents) were obtained from domestic national organizations (Korea meteorological administration and rural development administration). Simulating period to investigate changes of management practices was 2001 to 2015. The simulation results of tillage depths for the 2015 annual methane emission of each depth decreased in the following order: 20 cm > 10 cm > 5 cm > no-till, as expected. However, the grain yield of rice was not significantly different among 20 cm, 10 cm, and 5 cm. For the flooding method, the conventional method had five times greater methane emission than the marginal method. However, the grain yield of rice was also lower under the marginal method. The differences in annual methane emission pertaining to tillage depths and flooding methods were consistent on a national scale. Further research should target to find the best management practices to mitigate methane emission while maintaining the grain yield.

  14. [Change characteristics of rice yield and soil organic matter and nitrogen contents under various long-term fertilization regimes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Gao, Ju-Sheng; Zhang, Yang-Zhu; Qin, Dao-Zhu; Xu, Ming-Gang

    2013-07-01

    A long-term (1982-2010) field experiment was conducted in the Red Soil Experiment Station of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Qiyang County of Hunan Province, South-central China to investigate the dynamic changes of rice yield and soil organic matter (OM) and nitrogen contents under different fertilization treatments. The treatments included NPK, NPKM (M: manure), NPM, NKM, PKM, M, and CK. Fertilization increased the soil OM, total N, and alkaline-hydrolysable N contents and the rice yield. In treatment NPKM, the rice yield across the 28 years maintained at the highest level; while in treatment NPK, the yield showed a decreasing trend, being lower than that in other fertilization treatments. In the treatments applied with manure only or in combining with chemical fertilizers, the soil OM content increased rapidly in the first 16 years, and then fluctuated around a constant level (29.42-39.32 g x kg(-1)). In the treatments of chemical fertilization, the soil OM content only had a quicker increase in the first 8 years, and then fluctuated within a relatively stable range. Fertilization with manure increased the soil OM significantly, as compared to fertilization with chemical fertilizers only. The soil total N content in all fertilization treatments showed a rapid increase in the first 8 years, and the increment was the highest in treatment NPKM. The soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content in all fertilization treatments had a slower increase in the first 12 years, with an average annual increment of 0.66-2.25 mg x kg(-1) x a(-1). In 1994-1998, the soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content in fertilization treatments had a quicker increase, with an average annual increment of 6.45-32.45 mg x kg(-1) x a(-1); but after 1998, the soil alkaline-hydrolysable N content had a slight decrease. It was concluded that organic fertilization was the key measure to stably improve the physical and chemical properties and the productivity of red paddy soils by increasing their

  15. Arsenic mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under iron compound amendments at different growth stages of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Wang, Xiangqin; Li, Fangbai; Li, Bin; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe)-based solids can reduce arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability in soils, which has been well recognized. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies on As uptake at different growth stages of rice under Fe compound amendments. In addition, the formation of Fe plaques at different growth stages of rice has also been rarely reported. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate As mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under Fe compound amendments throughout the whole growth stage of rice plants. Amendments of poorly crystalline Fe oxides (PC-Fe), FeCl2+NaNO3 and FeCl2 reduced grain As by 54% ± 3.0%, 52% ± 3.0% and 46% ± 17%, respectively, compared with that of the non-amended control. The filling stage was suggested to be the key stage to take measures to reduce As uptake. At this stage, all soil amendments significantly reduced As accumulation in rice plants. At the maturation stage, PC-Fe amendment significantly reduced mobile pools and increased immobile pools of soil As. Besides, PC-Fe treatment promoted the transformation of Fe fractions from dissolved Fe to adsorbed, poorly crystalline and free Fe oxides. Moreover, significant positive correlations between soil Fe fractions and As fractions were found. Accordingly, we hypothesized that Fe compound amendments might affect the concentration distribution of Fe fractions first and then affect As fractionation in soil and its bioavailability to rice plants indirectly. The formation of Fe plaques varied with growth stages and different treatments. Significantly negative correlations between mobile pools of As and Fe or As in Fe plaques indicated that Fe plaques could immobilize mobile As in soils and thus affect As bioavailability. Overall, the effect of the soil amendments on reduction of As uptake varied with growth stages and different treatments, and further research on the key stage for reducing As uptake is still required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Effect of Pseudomonas Sp. Bacteria on Soil Chemical and Biological Properties, Yield and Its Components of Two Rice Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. AminDeldar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB on soil physical and chemical indices, yield and its components of two rice cultivars, an experiment was arranged in Rice Researches Institute of Guilan Province during 2009. The experiment design consisted of four randomized complete blocks in a factorial arrangement having 16 treatments in every block. In this research, two factors were evaluated: first, two cultivars (Khazar and Hashemi and second, eight levels of seed inoculation with PGPB (P.fluorescens strain 168, P.fluorescens strain 93, P.fluorescens strain 177, P.fluorescens strain 136, P.fluorescens strain 103, P.fluorescens strain 169, P.fluorescens strain 4 and control (without inoculation. Investigated characteristics consisted of: soil minerals, no.microorganisms in soil, grain yield, number of seed per panicle, number of seed per plant, 1000-seed weight, biological and economic yield. In this experiment, effect of cultivar and bacteria were significant in the most of studied characteristics, but effect of cultivar*bacteria (except yield components wasn’t significant. The results of experiment showed that inoculation with bacterial strains had a stimulating effect on growth and development of rice cultivars. In this experiment, Khazar had positive effect on the most of studied characteristics in compared with Hashemi. Between bacterial different strains, seed inoculation with 168, 177 and 93 strains in compared with other strains increased evaluated characteristics significantly. Seed inoculation with PGPB improved studied characteristics and microorganisms in soil, too.

  17. Effect of fertilization in interaction with glyphosate on the availability of phosphorus in rice soils of Corrientes - Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaela biassoni, Maria; Rey Montoya, Tania; Herber, Luciana; De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    The rice crop (Oryza sativa) in the province of Corrientes, Argentina, represents 46% of the national production. To obtain potential yields, adequate practices of fertilization, pesticides application, and management of the irrigation system are needed. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) are key minerals in rice production. In Argentina, P deficiency is a common problem in rice crops and represents a main yield limiting factor, therefore P fertilization is a regular practice. On the other hand, glyphosate is widely used to control weeds. This molecule is rapidly inactivated in soil due to the adsorption to clay particles and organic matter, however, is excluded from adsorption sites by inorganic phosphates. Meanwhile, both practices of fertilization and herbicide application can interact and influence the phosphate nutrition of rice plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different doses of fertilizer in interaction with glyphosate on the availability of soil phosphorus. A field experiment following a completely randomized design was carried out with four replicates. We evaluated four levels of fertilization (0-18-40): Control: 0 kg ha-1, Dose 1: 120 kg ha-1, Dose 2: 150 kg ha-1, Dose 3: 180 kg ha-1; and two levels of Glyphosate: with (Gly) or without (no-Gly) application. Soil sampling was carried out at three moments along crop season: vegetative stage before irrigation (V4), in floral primordial differentiation (DPF) with flooded soil, and at physiological maturity (MF). The method used for the determination of P was Bray & Kurtz I. We found a negative relation and non-significant interaction (p glyphosate for adsorption sites and they were available in soil solution while herbicide molecules were retained by colloidal particles.

  18. Enumeration, Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterial Strains at Seedling Stage in Rhizosphere of Rice Grown in Non-Calcareous Grey Flood Plain Soil of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Md. Harunor Rashid; Md.,Mohiuddin; M, Rahman

    2008-01-01

    Non-symbiotic diazotrophic systems for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in agriculture are most promising but the possibility for the extension of nitrogen fixation by rice is still speculative. Accordingly, the present study was conducted for the Enumeration, isolation and identification of nitrogen fixing bacterial strains at seedling stage (30 days after seed sowing) in rhizosphere of rice (BR 10, Oryza sativa L.) grown in Non-Calcareous Grey Flood Plain soil of Bangladesh. The soil is c...

  19. Dynamics of bacterial communities in rice field soils as affected by different long-term fertilization practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Shin Ae; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Kim, Myung-Sook; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2016-11-01

    Fertilization and the response of the soil microbial community to the process significantly affect crop yield and the environment. In this study, the seasonal variation in the bacterial communities in rice field soil subjected to different fertilization treatments for more than 50 years was investigated using 16S rRNA sequencing. The simultaneous application of inorganic fertilizers and rice straw compost (CAPK) maintained the species richness of the bacterial communities at levels higher than that in the case of non-fertilization (NF) and application of inorganic fertilizers only (APK) in the initial period of rice growth. The seasonal variation in the bacterial community structure in the NF and APK plots showed cyclic behavior, suggesting that the effect of season was important; however, no such trend was observed in the CAPK plot. In the CAPK plot, the relative abundances of putative copiotrophs such as Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were higher and those of putative oligotrophs such as Acidobacteria and Plactomycetes were lower than those in the other plots. The relative abundances of organotrophs with respiratory metabolism, such as Actinobacteria, were lower and those of chemoautotrophs that oxidize reduced iron and sulfur compounds were higher in the CAPK plot, suggesting greater carbon storage in this plot. Increased methane emission and nitrogen deficiency, which were inferred from the higher abundances of Methylocystis and Bradyrhizobium in the CAPK plot, may be a negative effect of rice straw application; thus, a solution for these should be considered to increase the use of renewable resources in agricultural lands.

  20. Influence of tillage practices and straw incorporation on soil aggregates, organic carbon, and crop yields in a rice-wheat rotation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ke; Yang, Jianjun; Xue, Yong; Lv, Weiguang; Zheng, Xianqing; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a fixed-site field experiment was conducted to study the influence of different combinations of tillage and straw incorporation management on carbon storage in different-sized soil aggregates and on crop yield after three years of rice-wheat rotation. Compared to conventional tillage, the percentages of >2 mm macroaggregates and water-stable macroaggregates in rice-wheat double-conservation tillage (zero-tillage and straw incorporation) were increased 17.22% and 36.38% in the 0-15 cm soil layer and 28.93% and 66.34% in the 15-30 cm soil layer, respectively. Zero tillage and straw incorporation also increased the mean weight diameter and stability of the soil aggregates. In surface soil (0-15 cm), the maximum proportion of total aggregated carbon was retained with 0.25-0.106 mm aggregates, and rice-wheat double-conservation tillage had the greatest ability to hold the organic carbon (33.64 g kg-1). However, different forms occurred at higher levels in the 15-30 cm soil layer under the conventional tillage. In terms of crop yield, the rice grown under conventional tillage and the wheat under zero tillage showed improved equivalent rice yields of 8.77% and 6.17% compared to rice-wheat double-cropping under zero tillage or conventional tillage, respectively.

  1. Sewage sludge biochar influence upon rice (Oryza sativa L) yield, metal bioaccumulation and greenhouse gas emissions from acidic paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sardar; Chao, Cai; Waqas, Muhammad; Arp, Hans Peter H; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-08-06

    Biochar addition to soil has been proposed to improve plant growth by increasing soil fertility, minimizing bioaccumulation of toxic metal(liod)s and mitigating climate change. Sewage sludge (SS) is an attractive, though potentially problematic, feedstock of biochar. It is attractive because of its large abundance; however, it contains elevated concentrations of metal(loid)s and other contaminants. The pyrolysis of SS to biochar (SSBC) may be a way to reduce the availability of these contaminants to the soil and plants. Using rice plant pot experiments, we investigated the influence of SSBC upon biomass yield, bioaccumulation of nutrients, and metal(loid)s, and green housegas (GHG) emissions. SSBC amendments increased soil pH, total nitrogen, soil organic carbon and available nutrients and decreased bioavailable As, Cr, Co, Ni, and Pb (but not Cd, Cu, and Zn). Regarding rice plant properties, SSBC amendments significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased shoot biomass (71.3-92.2%), grain yield (148.8-175.1%), and the bioaccumulation of phosphorus and sodium, though decreased the bioaccumulation of nitrogen (except in grain) and potassium. Amendments of SSBC significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced the bioaccumulation of As, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, and Pb, but increased that of Cd and Zn, though not above limits set by Chinese regulations. Finally regarding GHG emissions, SSBC significantly (P < 0.01) reduced N2O emissions and stimulated the uptake/oxidation of CH4 enough to make both the cultivated and uncultivated paddy soil a CH4 sink. SSBC can be beneficial in rice paddy soil but the actual associated benefits will depend on site-specific conditions and source of SS; long-term effects remain a further unknown.

  2. Effects of nitrogen and biochar amendment on soil methane concentration profiles and diffusion in a rice-wheat annual rotation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wu, Zhen; Dong, Yubing; Zhou, Ziqiang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-12-01

    The CH4 emissions from soil were influenced by the changeable CH4 concentrations and diffusions in soil profiles, but that have been subjected to nitrogen (N) and biochar amendment over seasonal and annual time frames. Accordingly, a two-year field experiment was conducted in southeastern China to determine the amendment effects on CH4 concentrations and diffusive effluxes as measured by a multilevel sampling probe in paddy soil during two cycles of rice-wheat rotations. The results showed that the top 7-cm soil layers were the primary CH4 production sites during the rice-growing seasons. This layer acted as the source of CH4 generation and diffusion, and the deeper soil layers and the wheat season soil acted as the sink. N fertilization significantly increased the CH4 concentration and diffusive effluxes in the top 7-cm layers during the 2013 and 2014 rice seasons. Following biochar amendment, the soil CH4 concentrations significantly decreased during the rice season in 2014, relative to the single N treatment. Moreover, 40 t ha-1 biochar significantly decreased the diffusive effluxes during the rice seasons in both years. Therefore, our results showed that biochar amendment is a good strategy for reducing the soil profile CH4 concentrations and diffusive effluxes induced by N in paddy fields.

  3. Influence of Plastic Waste Fibers on the Strength of Lime-Rice Husk Ash Stabilized Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Muntohar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been undertaken to investigate the strength of stabilized clay-soil reinforced with randomly distributed discrete plastic waste fibers by carrying out unconfined compressive strength and tensile-split strength test. In this study, the clay soil was stabilized with lime and rice husk ash mixtures. The effect of the fiber length and content on the compressive and split tensile strength was investigated. The laboratory investigation results show that inclusion of the plastic waste fiber increased significantly both the unconfined compressive strength and tensile-split strength of the stabilized clay soil. The fiber length plays a significant contribution in increasing the soil strength. To contribute for any significant improvement on compression as well as tensile strength, the fiber length should be in range of 20 mm to 40 mm. Fiber reinforcements also reduced soil brittleness by providing smaller loss of post-peak strength.

  4. X-ray CT imaging and image-based modelling study of gas exchange in the rice rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affholder, Marie-Cecile; Keyes, Samuel David; Roose, Tiina; Heppell, James; Kirk, Guy

    2016-04-01

    We used X-ray computer tomography and image-based modelling to investigate CO2 uptake by rice roots growing in submerged soil, and its consequences for the chemistry and biology of the rhizosphere. From previous work, three processes are known to greatly modify the rhizophere of rice and other wetland plants: (1) oxygenation of the submerged, anoxic soil by O2 transported through the root gas channels (aerenchyma); (2) oxidation of ferrous iron and resulting accumulation of ferric oxide; and (3) pH changes due to protons formed in iron oxidation and released from the roots to balance excess intake of cations over anions. A further process, so far not much investigated, is the possibility of CO2 uptake by the roots. Large amounts of CO2 accumulate in submerged soils because CO2 formed in soil respiration escapes only slowly by diffusion through the water-saturated soil pores. There is therefore a large CO2 gradient between the soil and the aerenchyma inside the root, and CO2 may be taken up by the roots and vented to the atmosphere. The extent of this and its consequences for rhizosphere chemistry and biology are poorly understood. We grew rice plants in a submerged, strongly-reduced, Philippine rice soil contained in 10-cm diameter, 20-cm deep Perspex pots. Four-week old rice seedlings, grown in nutrient culture, were transplanted into the pots at either 1 or 4 plants per pot, planted closely together. After 3 and 4 weeks, the pots were analysed with an X-ray CT scanner (Custom Nikon/Xtek Hutch; 80 mm by 56 mm field of view and 40 μm voxel size). Gas bubbles were extracted from the data by 3D median filtering and roots using a region-growth method. The images showed prominent and abundant gas bubbles in the soil bulk, but no or very few bubbles in the soil close to roots. There was a clear relation between the absence of gas bubbles and the presence of roots, as well as an increasing concentration of bubbles with depth through the soil. Analysis of the bubbles

  5. Previous Crop and Cultivar Effects on Methane Emissions from Drill-Seeded, Delayed-Flood Rice Grown on a Clay Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alden D. Smartt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to anaerobic conditions that develop in soils under flooded-rice (Oryza sativa L. production, along with the global extent of rice production, it is estimated that rice cultivation is responsible for 11% of global anthropogenic methane (CH4 emissions. In order to adequately estimate CH4 emissions, it is important to include data representing the range of environmental, climatic, and cultural factors occurring in rice production, particularly from Arkansas, the leading rice-producing state in the US, and from clay soils. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of previous crop (i.e., rice or soybean (Glycine max L. and cultivar (i.e., Cheniere (pure-line, semidwarf, CLXL745 (hybrid, and Taggart (pure-line, standard-stature on CH4 fluxes and emissions from rice grown on a Sharkey clay (very-fine, smectitic, thermic Chromic Epiaquerts in eastern Arkansas. Rice following rice as a previous crop generally had greater (p<0.01 fluxes than rice following soybean, resulting in growing season emissions (p<0.01 of 19.6 and 7.0 kg CH4-C ha−1, respectively. The resulting emissions from CLXL745 (10.2 kg CH4-C ha−1 were less (p=0.03 than those from Cheniere or Taggart (15.5 and 14.2 kg CH4-C ha−1, resp., which did not differ. Results of this study indicate that common Arkansas practices, such as growing rice in rotation with soybean and planting hybrid cultivars, may result in reduced CH4 emissions relative to continuous rice rotations and pure-line cultivars, respectively.

  6. Potential risks of copper, zinc, and cadmium pollution due to pig manure application in a soil-rice system under intensive farming: a case study of Nanhu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiachun; Yu, Xiulin; Zhang, Mingkui; Lu, Shenggao; Wu, Weihong; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metal (copper [Cu], zinc [Zn], and cadmium [Cd]) pollution of soils from pig manures in soil-rice ( L.) systems under intensive farming was investigated, taking Nanhu, China, as the case study area. Two hundred pig manures and 154 rice straws, brown rice samples, and corresponding surface soil (0-15 cm) samples were collected in paddy fields from 150 farms in 16 major villages within the study area. The mean Cu and Zn concentrations in pig manures consistently exceeded the related standard. About 44 and 60% of soil samples exceed the Chinese Soil Cu and Cd Environmental Quality Standards, respectively. The concentration of Cu, Zn, and Cd in brown rice did not exceed the Chinese Food Hygiene Standard. There was a significant positive correlation between total Cu and Zn contents in soil and application rate of pig manures. Strong correlation was observed between the extractable Cu, Zn, and Cd in soil and the Cu, Zn, and Cd contents in the brown rice. The spatial distribution maps of Cu and Zn concentrations in brown rice, straw, and extractable soil Cu and Zn concentration also showed similar geographical trends. Further analyses on heavy metals loading flux and accumulation rates from pig manure applied suggested that Cu and Cd contents in soil currently have already exceeded the maximum permissible limit, and Zn, if still at current manure application rates, will reach the ceiling concentration limits in 9 yr. This study assists in understanding the risk of heavy metals accumulating from pig manure applications to agricultural soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Mercury Content in Wetland Rice Soil and Water of Two Different Seasons at Small-scale Gold Mine Processing Areas

    OpenAIRE

    T. Sugianti; F. Zulhaedar; Batubara, S F

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the impact of small-scale gold processing activities on mercury content in wetland rice soil and water during the rainy and first dry seasons in Central Lombok and West Lombok Districts. The method used for this study was survey method. Measurement of mercury levels in water samples was conducted at Agro Bogor Centre using SNI 6989.77: 2011methods. The data was collected and processed in a simple statisticpresented descriptively, in order to obtain information...

  8. Lime and Zn interactions effects on yield, yield component, and quality of rice in Zn deficit tropical paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Mahmoud Soltani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A glasshouse experiment was conducted to investigate the lime and Zn application and interactions on rice, yield and yield components, and rice quality in various Zn deficit tropical paddy soil types. The tiller number, plant height and straw dry matter at maximum tillering and flowering stages significantly increased by the application of lime and both at 5 and 10 kg ha-1 Zn levels in Kundur (KUR (pH= 5.2 and Telemong (TLM (pH=7 soil series, whereas in Tepus (TEP acid sulphate soil (pH=4, they increased in 5 kg ha-1 Zn and decrease at 10 kg ha-1. The grain per panicle(GPP, grain yield(GY, 1000grain weight(1000GW and straw dry matter(SDW significantly increased by application of Zn and increasing its levels. The highest increasing pattern were showed in Kundur (pH= 5.2 and Telemong (pH=7 soil series were recorded at 10 kg ha-1, whereas the highest and lowest values were obtained at 5 kg ha-1 and at 10 kg ha-1 in Tepus acid sulphate soil (pH=4. The highest grain and straw yield were obtained in TEP at 5 kg ha-1Zn level, which were 56 and 23% more than untreated Zn pots. The highest crude protein (CP and grain Zn (GZn were observed by 10 kg ha-1 applied Zn, 44% and 60% more than control, respectively. However, by lime addition CP and GZn decreased about 16 and 22% over the non-treated plots. The agronomic biofortification strategies such as Zn fertilization application and soil amendment addition improved rice MR219grain productivity and biofortification an average of 60%.

  9. [Effects of wheat-straw returning into paddy soil on dissolved organic carbon contents and rice grain yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liu, Meng; Chen, Jing-du; Gu, Hai-yan; Dai, Qi-gen; Ma, Ke-qiang; Jiang, Feng; He, Li

    2015-02-01

    A tank experiment using conventional rice cultivar Nanjing 44 as experimental material was conducted at the Experimental Farm of Yangzhou University to investigate the dynamics of wheat straw decomposition rate and the amount of carbon release in clay and sandy soils, as well as its effects on the content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and rice yield. The two rates of wheat straw returning were 0 and 6000 kg · hm(-2), and three N application levels were 0, 225, 300 kg · hm(-2). The results showed that, the rate of wheat straw decomposition and the amount of carbon release in clay and sandy soils were highest during the initial 30 days after wheat straw returning, and then slowed down after, which could be promoted by a higher level of nitrogen application. The rate of wheat straw decomposition and the amount of carbon release in clay soil were higher than that in sandy soil. The DOC content in soil increased gradually with wheat straw returning into paddy soil and at the twenty-fifth day, and then decreased gradually to a stable value. The DOC content at the soil depth of 15 cm was significantly increased by wheat straw returning, but not at the soil depth of 30 cm and 45 cm. It was concluded that wheat straw returning increased the DOC content in the soil depth of 0-15 cm mainly. N application decreased the DOC content and there was no difference between the two N application levels. Straw returning decreased the number of tillers in the early growth period, resulted in significantly reduced panicles per unit area, but increased spikelets per panicle, filled-grain percentages, 1000-grain mass, and then enhanced grain yield.

  10. Manures Effectivity to Enhanced the Availability of Phosphorus, Crops Growth and Yield of Rice and Corn in Acid Upland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoyo Soelaeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in Tamanbogo Station Research in the 2007 Rainy Season in upland rice-corn intercropping farming. The research design used Randomized Complete Block Design with 3 replications. The treatments were 1. 15 t ha-1 manures + Residues of rock phosphate (RRP, 2. Without manures + RRP, 3. 15 t ha-1 manures + 150 kg ha-1 SP 36 and 4. Without manures + 150 kg ha-1 SP 36. The upland rice was seeded in planting space of 25 cm x 25 cm, 2-3 seeds/hill. The land was treated with 1 t ha-1 of RP in the last farming year while SP36 was applicated each season. Urea and KCl fertilizers that were used on upland rice were 300 kg ha-1 and 100 kg ha-1, respectively while corns were fertilized with 250 kg ha-1 urea and 100 kg KCl ha-1. The research results showed that the availability of N and K nutrients in the soil at the time of before planting was low but the availability P was high. Application of manures and RRP increased C-organic, availability of P , Ca and Cation Exchangeable Capacity in the soil. Application of 15 t ha-1 of manures with RRP increased dry biomass weight of rice and corn, there were 45.17 % and 49.23 %, respectively. The grain yield of rice and corn on the treatment of manures and RRP were not gave significant different compare to the yield was gained with SP 36 fertilizer.

  11. Mercury content in wetland rice soil and water of two different seasons at small-scale gold mine processing areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sugianti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to identify the impact of small-scale gold processing activities on mercury content in wetland rice soil and water during the rainy and first dry seasons in Central Lombok and West Lombok Districts. The method used for this study was survey method. Measurement of mercury levels in water samples was conducted at Agro Bogor Centre using SNI 6989.77: 2011 methods. The data was collected and processed in a simple statistic presented descriptively, in order to obtain information. Results of the study showed that mercury content soils in the rainy season exceeded the threshold of 0.005 ppm, while in the first dry season the mercury content in soil decreased, but it was still above the threshold value permitted. The contents of mercury in water samples in the rainy season and the first dry season were still at a safe point that was less than 0.05 ppm. The wetland rice soil and water had been polluted with mercury, although the mercury content in the water was still below the threshold, but the accumulation of mercury that could have been absorbed by the plants are of particular concerns. The decrease of mercury content in soil in dry season was due to lack of gold processing activities.

  12. Sclerotia of Rhizoctonia solani, Their Production on Infected Rice Plants and Their Population in Different Soil Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Suwanto

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Production of sclerotia of Rhizoctonla solani on infected rice plants and their population in different soil types were evaluated during the year of 1992/1993 and 1993/1994. The production of sclerotia was estimated on 20 diseased rice plants and plant debris (rice straw placed on soil surface, in 10 cm depth, and in 20 cm depth. The population of sclerotia in the soil was estimated by separating the sclerotia from soil samples collected from different soil previously planted with different crops. Data indicated that during the rainy season of 1992/1993, the mean sclerotia produced were 14.85 and 10.95 per hill on the variety of IR64 and non-lR64, respectively. While during the dry season of 1993 the mean sclerotia produced on these varieties were 7.50 and 7 .25 per hill. On both varieties, the production of sclerotia was positively correlated with disease  severity of sheath blight, as indicated by the correlation coefficient of 0.90 and 0.70, for the variety of IR64 and non-IR64, reepectively. Their close relationship was estimated by the model of Y=-29.00+1.16x (R^2=0.82 and Y=-2.94+0.35x (R^2=0.45, for the variety of IR64 and non-IR.64, respectively. The production of sclerotia on the infected rice straw was significantly affected by the soil depth where the diseased straw were kept. On the straw of IR64, the sclerotia produced were 7.00, 5.25, and 1.25, when the straw were kept in the depth of 0, 10, and 20 cm, respectively. While on the straw of non-IR.64 variety, the sclerotia produced were 7.75, 5.25, and 0.50. when the straw were kept in the depth of 0, 10, and 20 cm, respectively. Highest number of sclerotia was observed in Ultisol soil previously planted with corn, while the smallest was in Ultisol previously planted with mungbean.

  13. Spatial distribution and controlling factors of heavy metals contents in paddy soil and crop grains of rice-wheat cropping system along highway in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinfei; Zhao, Jian; Bian, Xinmin; Zhang, Weijian

    2012-10-01

    There is consensus concerning the heavy metal pollution from traffic emission on roadside agricultural land. However, few efforts have been paid on examining the contamination characteristics of heavy metals in roadside paddy-upland rotation field, and especially in combination with detailed quantitative analysis. In this study, we investigated the concentrations of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr and Zn) in soil and crop grains of the rice-wheat cropping system along a major highway in East China in 2008 and analyzed the spatial distribution characteristics of heavy metals and their influencing factors with GIS and Classification and Regression Trees (CART). Significantly elevated levels of heavy metals in soil, rice and wheat grains indicated the heavy metals contamination of traffic emission in roadside rice-wheat rotation field. The contamination levels of Cd, Cr and Zn in wheat grain were higher than rice grain, while that of Pb showed an opposite trend. Obvious dissimilarities in the spatial distributions of heavy metals contents were found between in the soil, rice and wheat grains, indicating that the heavy metals contents in the roadside crop grains were not only determined by the concentrations of heavy metals in the paddy soil. Results of CART analysis showed that the spatial variation of the heavy metals contents in crop grains was mainly affected by the soil organic matter or soil pH, followed by the distance from highway and wind direction. Our findings have important implications for the environmental assessment and crop planning for food security along the highway.

  14. Selenium and iodine in soil, rice and drinking water in relation to endemic goitre in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fordyce, F.M. [British Geological Survey, West Mains Road, EH9 3LA Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.C.; Appleton, J.D. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, NG12 5GG Nottingham (United Kingdom); Navaratna, U.R.B.; Dissanayake, C.B. [Department of Geology, University of Peradeniya, Kandy (Sri Lanka)

    2000-12-18

    Endemic goitre has been reported in the climatic wet zone of south-west Sri Lanka for the past 50 years, but rarely occurs in the northern dry zone. Despite government-sponsored iodised salt programmes, endemic goitre is still prevalent. In recent years, it has been suggested that Se deficiency may be an important factor in the onset of goitre and other iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). Prior to the present study, environmental concentrations of Se in Sri Lanka and the possible relationships between Se deficiency and endemic goitre had not been investigated. During the present study, chemical differences in the environment (measured in soil, rice and drinking water) and the Se-status of the human population (demonstrated by hair samples from women) were determined for 15 villages. The villages were characterised by low (<10%), moderate (10-25%) and high (>25%) goitre incidence (NIDD, MIDD and HIDD, respectively). Results show that concentrations of soil total Se and iodine are highest in the HIDD villages, however, the soil clay and organic matter content appear to inhibit the bioavailability of these elements. Concentrations of iodine in rice are low ({<=}58 ng/g) and rice does not provide a significant source of iodine in the Sri Lankan diet. High concentrations of iodine (up to 84 {mu}g/l) in drinking water in the dry zone may, in part, explain why goitre is uncommon in this area. This study has shown for the first time that significant proportions of the Sri Lankan female population may be Se deficient (24, 24 and 40% in the NIDD, MIDD and HIDD villages, respectively). Although Se deficiency is not restricted to areas where goitre is prevalent, a combination of iodine and Se deficiency could be involved in the pathogenesis of goitre in Sri Lanka. The distribution of red rice cultivation in Sri Lanka is coincident with the HIDD villages. Varieties of red rice grown in other countries contain anthocyanins and procyanidins, compounds which in other foodstuffs are

  15. Growth inhibition of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings in Ga- and In-contaminated acidic soils is respectively caused by Al and Al+In toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jeng-Yan; Syu, Chien-Hui; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2017-10-12

    Limited information exists on the effects of emerging contaminants gallium (Ga) and indium (In) on rice plant growth. This study investigated the effects on growth and uptake of Ga and In by rice plants grown in soils with different properties. Pot experiment was conducted and the rice seedlings were grown in two soils of different pH (Pc and Cf) spiked with various Ga and In concentrations. The results showed concentrations of Ga, In, and Al in soil pore water increased with Ga- or In-spiking in acidic Pc soils, significantly decreasing growth indices. According to the dose-response curve, we observed that the EC50 value for Ga and In treatments were 271 and 390mgkg(-1) in Pc soils, respectively. The context of previous hydroponic studies suggests that growth inhibition of rice seedlings in Ga-spiked Pc soils is mainly due to Al toxicity resulting from enhanced Al release through competitive adsorption of Ga, rather than from Ga toxicity. In-spiked Pc soils, both In and Al toxicity resulted in growth inhibition, while no such effect was found in Cf soils due to the low availability of Ga, In and Al under neutral pH conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term dynamics of soil C and N in intensive rice-based cropping systems of the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP): A modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shibu, M.E.; Keulen, van H.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a summary model for the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen under varying weather, crop and soil conditions to investigate the role of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in yield formation in rice-based cropping systems of the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). The model consists of three modules:

  17. Effects of compost and chicken litter on soil nutrition, and sugarcane physiochemistry, yield, and injury caused by Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levels of Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar), infestation in sugarcane have been shown to be heavily influenced by drought stress on the plants, but the effects of soil quality have not been determined. Soil enrichment with two rates of compost and chicken litter were compared with conventio...

  18. Fertilizer nitrogen, soil chemical properties, and their determinacy on rice yield: Evidence from 92 paddy fields of a large-scale farm in the Kanto Region of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Nanseki, T.; Chomei, Y.; Yokota, S.

    2017-07-01

    Rice, a staple crop in Japan, is at risk of decreasing production and its yield highly depends on soil fertility. This study aimed to investigate determinants of rice yield, from the perspectives of fertilizer nitrogen and soil chemical properties. The data were sampled in 2014 and 2015 from 92 peat soil paddy fields on a large-scale farm located in the Kanto Region of Japan. The rice variety used was the most widely planted Koshihikari in Japan. Regression analysis indicated that fertilizer nitrogen significantly affected the yield, with a significant sustained effect to the subsequent year. Twelve soil chemical properties, including pH, cation exchange capacity, content of pyridine base elements, phosphoric acid, and silicic acid, were estimated. In addition to silicic acid, magnesia, in forms of its exchangeable content, saturation, and ratios to potassium and lime, positively affected the yield, while phosphoric acid negatively affected the yield. We assessed the soil chemical properties by soil quality index and principal component analysis. Positive effects were identified for both approaches, with the former performing better in explaining the rice yield. For soil quality index, the individual standardized soil properties and margins for improvement were indicated for each paddy field. Finally, multivariate regression on the principal components identified the most significant properties.

  19. Soil respiration, labile carbon pools, and enzyme activities as affected by tillage practices in a tropical rice-maize-cowpea cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, S; Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Panda, B B; Nayak, A K; Rao, K S; Manna, M C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify the viable option of tillage practices in rice-maize-cowpea cropping system that could cut down soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, sustain grain yield, and maintain better soil quality in tropical low land rice ecology soil respiration in terms of CO2 emission, labile carbon (C) pools, water-stable aggregate C fractions, and enzymatic activities were investigated in a sandy clay loam soil. Soil respiration is the major pathway of gaseous C efflux from terrestrial systems and acts as an important index of ecosystem functioning. The CO2-C emissions were quantified in between plants and rows throughout the year in rice-maize-cowpea cropping sequence both under conventional tillage (CT) and minimum tillage (MT) practices along with soil moisture and temperature. The CO2-C emissions, as a whole, were 24 % higher in between plants than in rows, and were in the range of 23.4-78.1, 37.1-128.1, and 28.6-101.2 mg m(-2) h(-1) under CT and 10.7-60.3, 17.3-99.1, and 17.2-79.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) under MT in rice, maize, and cowpea, respectively. The CO2-C emission was found highest under maize (44 %) followed by rice (33 %) and cowpea (23 %) irrespective of CT and MT practices. In CT system, the CO2-C emission increased significantly by 37.1 % with respect to MT on cumulative annual basis including fallow. The CO2-C emission per unit yield was at par in rice and cowpea signifying the beneficial effect of MT in maintaining soil quality and reduction of CO2 emission. The microbial biomass C (MBC), readily mineralizable C (RMC), water-soluble C (WSC), and permanganate-oxidizable C (PMOC) were 19.4, 20.4, 39.5, and 15.1 % higher under MT than CT. The C contents in soil aggregate fraction were significantly higher in MT than CT. Soil enzymatic activities like, dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and β-glucosidase were significantly higher by 13.8, 15.4, and 27.4 % under MT compared to CT. The soil labile C pools, enzymatic activities, and

  20. Identification of Soil Salinity Due to Seawater Intrusion on Rice Field in the Northern Coast of Indramayu, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deddy Erfandi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The rice fields in Indramayu district is 55% of the district area. The average rainfall is 1590 mm per year. Most lands on the North Coast of Java (northern were potentially affected by sea water intrusion. Extensive observations were 102.321 ha. Field observations were done by survey method. Observations had been conducted on rice fields Pantura, Indramayu, West Java. Soil salinity was measured by using the electromagnetic conductivity meter (EM-38. The results revealed that area had very high salinity which was 22.57%, closest to the beach Indramayu. In the South Region, soil salinity was lower, in accordance with the distance from the coastline. Some areas had a low, medium, and high salinity status in which 58.41%, 8.54% and 10.49%, respectively. Much of the research area had very high Sodium (Na and ECe (0 - 30 cm was between 1.37 to 16.38 dS m-1, while the ECe (30 - 70 cm was between 1.11 to 17.40 dS m-1. This research was expected to assist in the agricultural development planning, especially in wetlands which have been affected by the intrusion of sea water (salinity. Planning for the implementation of the development of rice varieties that are sensitive to high and very high salinity. Planning and improvement of irrigation networks as sources of clean water for washing the salts or pushing salt water into the sea.

  1. Heavy Metal Contamination in Soil and Brown Rice and Human Health Risk Assessment near Three Mining Areas in Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metal mining and waste discharge lead to regional heavy metal contamination and attract major concern because of the potential risk to local residents. Methods. This research was conducted to determine lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, arsenic (As, manganese (Mn, and antimony (Sb concentrations in soil and brown rice samples from three heavy metal mining areas in Hunan Province, central China, and to assess the potential health risks to local inhabitants. Results. Local soil contamination was observed, with mean concentrations of Cd, Pb, Sb, and As of 0.472, 193.133, 36.793, and 89.029 mg/kg, respectively. Mean concentrations of Cd, Pb, Sb, Mn, and As in brown rice were 0.103, 0.131, 5.175, 6.007, and 0.524 mg/kg, respectively. Daily intakes of Cd, As, Sb, Pb, and Mn through brown rice consumption were estimated to be 0.011, 0.0002, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0003 mg/(kg/day, respectively. The combined hazard index for the five heavy metals was 22.5917, and the total cancer risk was 0.1773. Cd contributed most significantly to cancer risk, accounting for approximately 99.77% of this risk. Conclusions. The results show that potential noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks exist for local inhabitants and that regular monitoring of pollution to protect human health is urgently required.

  2. Comparison of Translocation and Transformation from Soil to Rice and Metabolism in Rats for Four Arsenic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Geng, Anjing; Dong, Yan; Fu, Chongyun; Li, Hanmin; Zhao, Yarong; Li, Qing X; Wang, Fuhua

    2017-10-18

    Arsenic (As) is ubiquitously present in the environment. The toxicity of As is related to its forms. This study was designed to compare the translocation and transformation of four As species from soil to rice, and metabolism in rats for four arsenic species. A set of 26550 data was obtained from pot experiments of rice plants grown in soil fortified with four As species, and 4050 data were obtained from rat experiments in which 81 rats were administered with the four As species. The total As in grain from the methyl arsenate fortified soil was 6.1, 4.9, and 5.2 times that from As(III), As(V), and dimethyl arsenate fortified soil, respectively. The total As in husk was 1.2-7.8 times greater than that in grain. After oral administration of each As species to rats, 83-96% was accumulatively excreted via feces and urine, while 0.1-16% was detected in blood. The translocation, transformation, and metabolism of different forms of arsenic vary greatly.

  3. Productivity of sodic soils can be enhanced through the use of salt tolerant rice varieties and proper agronomic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Y P; Mishra, V K; Singh, Sudhanshu; Sharma, D K; Singh, D; Singh, U S; Singh, R K; Haefele, S M; Ismail, A M

    2016-04-01

    Regaining the agricultural potential of sodic soils in the Indo-Gangetic plains necessitates the development of suitable salt tolerant rice varieties to provide an entry for other affordable agronomic and soil manipulation measures. Thus selection of high yielding rice varieties across a range of sodic soils is central. Evaluation of breeding lines through on-station and on-farm farmers' participatory varietal selection (FPVS) resulted in the identification of a short duration (110-115 days), high yielding and disease resistant salt-tolerant rice genotype 'CSR-89IR-8', which was later released as 'CSR43' in 2011. Several agronomic traits coupled with good grain quality and market value contributed to commercialization and quick adoption of this variety in the sodic areas of the Indo-Gangetic plains of eastern India. Management practices required for rice production in salt affected soils are evidently different from those in normal soils and practices for a short duration salt tolerant variety differ from those for medium to long duration varieties. Experiments were conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute (ICAR-CSSRI), Regional Research Station, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India during 2011 and 2013 wet seasons, to test the hypothesis that combining matching management practices (Mmp) with an improved genotype would enhance productivity and profitability of rice in sodic soils. Mmp were developed on-station by optimizing existing best management practices (Bmp) recommended for the region to match the requirements of CSR43. The results revealed that transplanting 4 seedlings hill-1 at a spacing of 15 × 20 cm produced significantly higher yield over other treatments. The highest additional net gain was US$ 3.3 at 90 kg ha-1 N, and the lowest was US$ 0.4 at 150 kg ha-1 N. Above 150 kg ha-1, the additional net gain became negative, indicating decreasing returns from additional N. Hence, 150 kg N ha-1

  4. Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

    2013-09-01

    Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

  5. Rice in cropping systems - Modelling transitions between flooded and non-flooded soil environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaydon, D.S.; Probert, M.E.; Buresh, R.J.; Meinke, H.B.; Suriadi, A.; Dobermann, A.; Bouman, B.A.M.; Timsina, J.

    2012-01-01

    Water shortages in many rice-growing regions, combined with growing global imperatives to increase food production, are driving research into increased water use efficiency and modified agricultural practices in rice-based cropping systems. Well-tested cropping systems models that capture

  6. Risk assessment of potentially toxic element pollution in soils and rice (Oryza sativa) in a typical area of the Yangtze River Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang Xiaoshuai [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 Beijing East Road, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Huoyan, E-mail: hywang@issas.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 Beijing East Road, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhou Jianmin [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 Beijing East Road, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Ma Chengling [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 Beijing East Road, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China); Weifang Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau, Weifang 261041, Shandong Province (China); Du Changwen; Chen Xiaoqin [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 Beijing East Road, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2009-08-15

    Soil pollution with potentially toxic elements (PTEs) resulting from rapid industrial development has caused major concerns. Selected PTEs and their accumulation and distribution in soils and rice (Oryza sativa) collected from Changshu, east China, were analyzed to evaluate the potential health risk to the local population. The soils were primarily contaminated with Hg, followed by Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The concentrations of Pb, Hg, and Cd of 46, 32, and 1 rice samples exceeded their national maximum allowable levels in foods, respectively. Spatial distributions of total Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd in soils shared similar geographical trends. The risk assessment of PTEs through rice consumption suggests that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Cd in some rice samples exceed their reference oral dose for adults and children. In general, there was no target hazard quotient value of any individual element that was greater than 1, but hazard index values for adults and children were 1.726 and 1.523, respectively. - Industrial development has led to increased risk from potentially toxic elements in soils and rice.

  7. Growth, Metabolism and Yield of Rice Cultivated in Soils Amended with Fly Ash and Cyanobacteria and Metal Loads in Plant Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Padhy, Rabindra N.; Nayak, Nabakishore; Dash-Mohini, Rajesh R.; Rath, Shakti; Sahu, Rajani K

    2016-01-01

    Soil amendment with fly ash (FA) and combined supplementation with N2-fixing cyanobacteria masses as biofertilizer were done in field experiments with rice. Amendments with FA levels, 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kg/m2, caused increase in growth and yield of rice up to 8.0 kg/m2, monitored with several parameters. Pigment contents and enzyme activities of leaves were enhanced by FA, with the maximum level of FA at 10.0 kg/m2. Protein content of rice seeds was the highest in plants grow...

  8. Feasibility Study of Soil Quality Survey using Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy in Rice Paddy Fields in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Survey and monitoring of soil quality are needed to prevent soil degradation and are important for sustainable farming and food production. Conventional soil survey involves intensive soil sampling and laboratory analysis, which are time consuming and expensive. Visible and near infrared spectroscopy of soil has proved to be accurate, cheap and robust and has huge potential for survey of soil quality. To test its potential, 327 soil samples were taken from long-term paddy rice fields in four provinces in south of China and covered a wide range of soil types and texture. The samples were air-dried, ground and passed through a 2 mm sieve. They were then scanned by an ASD vis–NIR spectrometer with wavelength range from 350 to 2500 nm. Organic matter (OM, pH, total nitrogen (TN and available nitrogen (N_av were also measured on soil samples to build calibration models and also to validate the models’ accuracy. On the basis of the ratio of prediction deviation (RPD, which is standard deviation (SD of prediction divided by the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP, the accuracy of leave-one-out cross-validation of soil N_av model was classified very good (RPD=1.96 and soil OM and TN was good (RPD=1.78 and RPD=1.81, respectively. However, the model accuracy of pH was poor due to non-direct soil spectral response for soil pH in vis–NIR spectroscopy. The independent validation results showed excellent accuracy for soil N_av (RPD=3.26, good accuracy for OM and TN (RPD=1.76 and RPD=1.78 and relative poor accuracy for soil pH (RPD=1.27. This feasibility study is encouraging for the application of vis–NIR surveys of soil quality accuracy at regional and national scales; it found good to excellent accuracy for some important soil properties in quality survey.

  9. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam, E-mail: litonaslam@yahoo.com [Dept. of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan); Kim, P.J., E-mail: pjkim@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr [Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Inubushi, K. [Division of Environmental Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK + fly ash, NPK + silicate slag, NPK + phosphogypsum(PG), NPK + blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK + revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK + silicate slag (50%) + RFS (50%), NPK + biochar, NPK + biochar + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + silicate slag + Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK + phosphogypsum (PG) + Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH{sub 4} emissions were significantly increased by 9.5–14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0–12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0–30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43–50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. - Highlights: • Azolla-cyanobacteria with organic and

  10. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  11. Mitigating yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions through combined application of soil amendments: A comparative study between temperate and subtropical rice paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, P J; Inubushi, K

    2015-10-01

    Effects of different soil amendments were investigated on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and yield scaled GWPs in paddy soils of Republic of Korea, Japan and Bangladesh. The experimental treatments were NPK only, NPK+fly ash, NPK+silicate slag, NPK+phosphogypsum(PG), NPK+blast furnace slag (BFS), NPK+revolving furnace slag (RFS), NPK+silicate slag (50%)+RFS (50%), NPK+biochar, NPK+biochar+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+silicate slag+Azolla-cyanobacteria, NPK+phosphogypsum (PG)+Azolla-cyanobacteria. The maximum decrease in cumulative seasonal CH4 emissions was recorded 29.7% and 32.6% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus phospho-gypsum amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh respectively, followed by 22.4% and 26.8% reduction with silicate slag plus Azolla-cyanobacteria application. Biochar amendments in paddy soils of Japan and Bangladesh decreased seasonal cumulative N2O emissions by 31.8% and 20.0% respectively, followed by 26.3% and 25.0% reduction with biochar plus Azolla-cyanobacteria amendments. Although seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions were significantly increased by 9.5-14.0% with biochar amendments, however, global warming potentials were decreased by 8.0-12.0% with cyanobacterial inoculation plus biochar amendments. The maximum decrease in GWP was calculated 22.0-30.0% with Azolla-cyanobacteria plus silicate slag amendments. The evolution of greenhouse gases per unit grain yield (yield scaled GWP) was highest in the NPK treatment, which was decreased by 43-50% from the silicate slag and phosphogypsum amendments along with Azolla-cyanobacteria inoculated rice planted soils. Conclusively, it is recommended to incorporate Azolla-cyanobacteria with inorganic and organic amendments for reducing GWP and yield scaled GWP from the rice planted paddy soils of temperate and subtropical countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in soil microbial community composition and organic carbon fractions in an integrated rice-crayfish farming system in subtropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Guohan; Peng, Chenglin; Yuan, Jiafu; Xu, Xiangyu; Zhao, Shujun; Xu, Dabing; Wu, Jinshui

    2017-06-06

    Integrated rice-crayfish farming system is a highly efficient artificial ecosystem in which the rice (Oryza sativa) variety 'Jianzhen 2' is cultivated in waterlogged paddy fields along with crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). We investigated soil carbon fractions and microbial community structure by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis in a 10-year field experiment using an integrated rice-crayfish (CR) model and a rice monoculture (MR) model at soil depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, and 30-40 cm. Compared with the MR model, the CR model had significantly more total organic carbon, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic carbon contents in all of the layers examined and microbial biomass carbon content in the 20-40 cm layer. Principal components analysis revealed that microbial community composition in the CR model differed from that in the MR model in the 20-30 cm layer. Higher proportions of gram-negative bacteria, aerobic bacteria and fungi in the 20-30 cm soil layer were observed for the CR model than the MR model. These results indicate that the CR model increases soil carbon levels, and strongly affects microbial community composition and structure in the deeper layers of soil, thereby accelerating subsurface soil nutrient cycling.

  13. Effect of peanut shell and wheat straw biochar on the availability of Cd and Pb in a soil-rice (Oryza sativa L.) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Chen, Hao-Xiang; Xiang, Qian; Zhu, Han-Hua; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Qi-Hong; Huang, Dao-You; Zhang, Yang-Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Soil amendments, such as biochar, have been used to enhance the immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soil. A pot experiment was conducted to immobilize the available cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in soil using peanut shell biochar (PBC) and wheat straw biochar (WBC), and to observe the accumulation of these heavy metals in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The application of PBC and WBC led to significantly higher pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in paddy soil, while the content of MgCl2-extractable Cd and Pb was lower than that of untreated soil. MgCl2-extractable Cd and Pb showed significant negative correlations with pH, SOC, and CEC (p biochar to contaminated paddy soil led to reductions of 40.4-45.7 and 68.6-79.0%, respectively, in the content of MgCl2-extractable Cd and Pb. PBC more effectively immobilized Cd and Pb than WBC. Sequential chemical extractions revealed that biochar induced the transformation of the acid-soluble fraction of Cd to oxidizable and residual fractions, and the acid-soluble fraction of Pb to reducible and residual fractions. PBC and WBC clearly inhibited the uptake and accumulation of Cd and Pb in rice plants. Specially, when compared to the corresponding concentrations in rice grown in control soils, 5% PBC addition lowered Cd and Pb concentrations in grains by 22.9 and 12.2%, respectively, while WBC addition lowered them by 29.1 and 15.0%, respectively. Compared to Pb content, Cd content was reduced to a greater extent in grain by PBC and WBC. These results suggest that biochar application is effective for immobilizing Cd and Pb in contaminated paddy soil, and reduces their bioavailability in rice. Biochar could be used as a soil amendment for the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals.

  14. Effects of Inorganic-organic Incorporation on Productivity and Soil Fertility of Rice Cropping System in Red Soil Area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wei-jun; WANG Kai-rong; ZHANG Guan-yuan; XIE Xiao-li

    2002-01-01

    Results from ten-year (1990- 1999) field experiments indicated that the productivity and the soil fertility of rice cropping system were significantly influenced by the fertilization system adopted in red soil area of China. Contrasting with no-fertilizer treatment (CK), yield-increase rate of organic matter cycling,chemical NPK and inorganic-organic fertilizer incorporation treatments were 56.5%, 62.5% and 80.7%, respectively. In the case of optimum fertilization system, the largest contribution of inorganic fertilizer to the yield was 38.5% while that of inorganic-organic fertilizer incorporation was 44.7 %. The content of soil organic matter changed in tendency from decrease to equilibrium with heightened the extent of N, P and K incorporation while that of inorganic-organic fertilizer incorporation could be enhanced further. After N, P and K entered into the rice cropping system and maintained organic matter cycling in the system, the pools of total N, P and K could be strengthened.

  15. Biochar and rice straw have different effects on soil productivity, greenhouse gas emission and carbon sequestration in Northeast Thailand paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipa Thammasom

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the effects of biochar (BC made from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh., and rice (Orysa sativa L. straw (RS amendments on the soil productivity, carbon sequestration (Cseq and the possibility for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. A field trial was conducted with 10 treatments: the control, chemical fertilizer (CF and BC or RS each at four rates of L (6.25 t/ha, ML (12.50 t/ha, MH (18.75 t/ha and H (25.00 t/ha using a randomized complete block design with four replicates. The results showed that BC and RS not only increased the soil quality but also increased the rice yield (RY. During the growing season, BC and RS applications did not differ in the total CO2 emission. However, the total CH4 emission and total global warming potential significantly decreased in the BC application and significantly increased in the RS application, relative to the control. Soil Cseq increased under the BC application by 1.87–13.37 t C/ha, while the RS application reduced Cseq by 0.92–2.56 t C/ha. The high amount of recalcitrant C molecules in BC probably explained the decreases in the GHG-C loss and increases in Cseq. In contrast, RS had high amounts of labile components that enhanced the GHG-C emission and reduced Cseq. Finally, the GHG intensity of rice production was reduced for both BC and RS meaning that these two amendments can be considered as good options for the mitigation of climate change.

  16. Differences in Cellulosic Supramolecular Structure of Compositionally Similar Rice Straw Affect Biomass Metabolism by Paddy Soil Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Ogura

    Full Text Available Because they are strong and stable, lignocellulosic supramolecular structures in plant cell walls are resistant to decomposition. However, they can be degraded and recycled by soil microbiota. Little is known about the biomass degradation profiles of complex microbiota based on differences in cellulosic supramolecular structures without compositional variations. Here, we characterized and evaluated the cellulosic supramolecular structures and composition of rice straw biomass processed under different milling conditions. We used a range of techniques including solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy followed by thermodynamic and microbial degradability characterization using thermogravimetric analysis, solution-state NMR, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. These measured data were further analyzed using an "ECOMICS" web-based toolkit. From the results, we found that physical pretreatment of rice straw alters the lignocellulosic supramolecular structure by cleaving significant molecular lignocellulose bonds. The transformation from crystalline to amorphous cellulose shifted the thermal degradation profiles to lower temperatures. In addition, pretreated rice straw samples developed different microbiota profiles with different metabolic dynamics during the biomass degradation process. This is the first report to comprehensively characterize the structure, composition, and thermal degradation and microbiota profiles using the ECOMICS toolkit. By revealing differences between lignocellulosic supramolecular structures of biomass processed under different milling conditions, our analysis revealed how the characteristic compositions of microbiota profiles develop in addition to their metabolic profiles and dynamics during biomass degradation.

  17. Effects of rice straw, biochar and mineral fertiliser on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in a rain-fed lowland rice soil of Cambodia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ly, Proyuth; Duong, Quynh Vu; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of water regimes and nutrient amendments on CH4 and N2O emissions in a 2 × 3 factorial, completely randomised growth chamber experiment. Treatments included continuously flooded (CF) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD), and three organic amendments: no amendment-control,......We studied the effects of water regimes and nutrient amendments on CH4 and N2O emissions in a 2 × 3 factorial, completely randomised growth chamber experiment. Treatments included continuously flooded (CF) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD), and three organic amendments: no amendment......-control, rice straw (RS) and biochar (BC). Compound fertiliser was applied to all treatments. Rice was grown in columns packed with a paddy soil from Cambodia. Results revealed faster mineralisation of organic carbon (RS and BC) when applied in water-saturated conditions lasting for 2 weeks instead of flooding....... This resulted in lower total CH4 emissions in treatments under AWD than those under the CF water regime, namely 44 % in RS treatments and 29 % in BC treatments. Nitrous oxide fluxes were generally non-detectable during the experimental period except after fertilisation events, and the total N2O–N emissions...

  18. Improving soil microbiology under rice-wheat crop rotation in Indo-Gangetic Plains by optimized resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Singh, G; Sarkar, Sushil K; Singh, Rana P

    2015-03-01

    The resource-intensive agriculture involving use of chemical fertilizers, irrigation, and tillage practices is a major cause of soil, water, and air pollution. This study was conducted to determine whether integrated use of nutrient, water, and tillage (reduced) can be manipulated to improve the population of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (Azotobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas) to enhance soil fertility and yield. The study was conducted in the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) region of India, where resource-intensive agriculture is practiced. Various combinations of chemical (urea) and organic fertilizers (farmyard manure (FYM), biofertilizer, and green manure) were used on replicated field plots for all the experiments. The effect of integrated resource management (IRM) on activities of Azotobacter, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas and its relation to the yields of rice and wheat crops in subtropical soils of IGP region were also observed. The increased population of all the three microbes, namely, Azotobacter (5.01-7.74 %), Bacillus (3.37-6.79 %), and Pseudomonas (5.21-7.09 %), was observed due to improved structure and increased organic matter in the soil. Similarly, kernel number and 1000 kernel weight were found increased with sole organic N source, three irrigations, and conservation tillage. Thus, it was found that the IRM practices affect the environment positively by increasing the population of beneficial soil microbes and crop yield as compared to high-input agriculture (conventional practices).

  19. Biochar applied at an appropriate rate can avoid increasing NH3 volatilization dramatically in rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Sun, Haijun; Xue, Lihong; Liu, Yang; Gao, Qian; Lu, Kouping; Yang, Linzhang

    2017-02-01

    Biochar application can increase carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gases emissions in paddy soils. However, its influence on ammonia (NH3) volatilization is neglected. This soil column study was conducted using two biochars (wheat straw pyrolyzed at 500 °C and 700 °C) with two application rates (0.5 wt% and 3 wt%) to evaluate their impact on NH3 volatilization from rice paddy. Results showed that biochar application did not change NH3 volatilization fluxes pattern after N fertilization. Four biochar treatments recorded higher NH3 volatilization (20.50-31.88 kg N ha(-1)) compared with the control (18.65 kg N ha(-1)). Especially, two 3 wt% biochar treatments had significantly 40.8-70.9% higher NH3 volatilization than control. After the basal and first supplementary fertilization, the floodwater pH values were 7.61-7.79 and 7.51-7.76 under biochar treatments, higher than control (7.37 and 7.16, respectively). Meanwhile, after three split N fertilizations, the pH of surface soil received biochar increased by 0.19-0.45, 0.19-0.39, and 0.01-0.21 units, in comparison with the control soil. Furthermore, 3 wt% biochar treatments had higher floodwater and surface soil pH values than 0.5 wt% biochar treatments. Higher NH4(+)-N and lower NO3(-)-N concentrations of surface soil under biochar application were observed compared with control at tillering stage, whereas they were at similar level at jointing stage. The increased NH3 volatilization at 3 wt% biochar treatments is attributed to increased pH of surface floodwater and soil, and reduced nitrification processes induced by biochar application. Biochar should be applied at lower rate to rice paddy soil, considering the NH3 volatilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia. The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c kg(-1, respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis. The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65% existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  1. Metagenomic of Actinomycetes Based on 16S rRNA and nifH Genes in Soil and Roots of Four Indonesian Rice Cultivars Using PCR-DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyarudin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to study the metagenomic of actinomycetes based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA and bacterial nifH genes in soil and roots of four rice cultivars. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile based on 16S rRNA gene showed that the diversity of actinomycetes in roots was higher than soil samples. The profile also showed that the diversity of actinomycetes was similar in four varieties of rice plant and three types of agroecosystem. The profile was partially sequenced and compared to GenBank database indicating their identity with closely related microbes. The blast results showed that 17 bands were closely related ranging from 93% to 100% of maximum identity with five genera of actinomycetes, which is Geodermatophilus, Actinokineospora, Actinoplanes, Streptomyces and Kocuria. Our study found that Streptomyces species in soil and roots of rice plants were more varied than other genera, with a dominance of Streptomyces alboniger and Streptomyces acidiscabies in almost all the samples. Bacterial community analyses based on nifH gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that diversity of bacteria in soils which have nifH gene was higher than that in rice plant roots. The profile also showed that the diversity of those bacteria was similar in four varieties of rice plant and three types of agroecosystem. Five bands were closely related with nifH gene from uncultured bacterium clone J50, uncultured bacterium clone clod-38, and uncultured bacterium clone BG2.37 with maximum identity 99%, 98%, and 92%, respectively. The diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA gene differed from nifH gene and may not correlate with each other. The findings indicated the diversity of actinomycetes and several bacterial genomes analyzed here have an ability to fix nitrogen in soil and roots of rice plant.

  2. Land cover mapping using lidar data and aerial image and soil fertility degradation assessment for rice production area in Quezon, Nueva Ecija, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, R. T.; Damian, G. B.; Camaso, E. E.; Isip, M. F.

    2017-09-01

    Land-cover maps were important for many scientific, ecological and land management purposes and during the last decades, rapid decrease of soil fertility was observed to be due to land use practices such as rice cultivation. High-precision land-cover maps are not yet available in the area which is important in an economy management. To assure accurate mapping of land cover to provide information, remote sensing is a very suitable tool to carry out this task and automatic land use and cover detection. The study did not only provide high precision land cover maps but it also provide estimates of rice production area that had undergone chemical degradation due to fertility decline. Land-cover were delineated and classified into pre-defined classes to achieve proper detection features. After generation of Land-cover map, of high intensity of rice cultivation, soil fertility degradation assessment in rice production area due to fertility decline was created to assess the impact of soils used in agricultural production. Using Simple spatial analysis functions and ArcGIS, the Land-cover map of Municipality of Quezon in Nueva Ecija, Philippines was overlaid to the fertility decline maps from Land Degradation Assessment Philippines- Bureau of Soils and Water Management (LADA-Philippines- BSWM) to determine the area of rice crops that were most likely where nitrogen, phosphorus, zinc and sulfur deficiencies were induced by high dosage of urea and imbalance N:P fertilization. The result found out that 80.00 % of fallow and 99.81% of rice production area has high soil fertility decline.

  3. Metagenomic of Actinomycetes Based on 16S rRNA and nifH Genes in Soil and Roots of Four Indonesian Rice Cultivars Using PCR-DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyarudin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to study the metagenomic of actinomycetes based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA and bacterial nifH genes in soil and roots of four rice cultivars. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile based on 16S rRNA gene showed that the diversity of actinomycetes in roots was higher than soil samples. The profile also showed that the diversity of actinomycetes was similar in four varieties of rice plant and three types of agroecosystem. The profile was partially sequenced and compared to GenBank database indicating their identity with closely related microbes. The blast results showed that 17 bands were closely related ranging from 93% to 100% of maximum identity with five genera of actinomycetes, which is Geodermatophilus, Actinokineospora, Actinoplanes, Streptomyces and Kocuria. Our study found that Streptomyces species in soil and roots of rice plants were more varied than other genera, with a dominance of Streptomyces alboniger and Streptomyces acidiscabies in almost all the samples. Bacterial community analyses based on nifH gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that diversity of bacteria in soils which have nifH gene was higher than that in rice plant roots. The profile also showed that the diversity of those bacteria was similar in four varieties of rice plant and three types of agroecosystem. Five bands were closely related with nifH gene from uncultured bacterium clone J50, uncultured bacterium clone clod-38, and uncultured bacterium clone BG2.37 with maximum identity 99%, 98%, and 92%, respectively. The diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA gene differed from nifH gene and may not correlate with each other. The findings indicated the diversity of actinomycetes and several bacterial genomes analyzed here have an ability to fix nitrogen in soil and roots of rice plant.

  4. Community structure of methanogenic archaea and methane production associated with compost-treated tropical rice-field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Alpana; Singh, Ram S; Upadhyay, Siddh N; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tripathi, Ajay K; Dubey, Suresh K

    2012-10-01

    The diversity and density of methanogenic archaea and methane production were investigated ex situ at different growth stages of rice plant cultivated in compost-treated tropical rice fields. The qPCR analysis revealed variation in methanogens population from 3.40 × 10(6) to 1.11 × 10(7)  copies g(-1)  dws, in the year 2009 and 4.37 × 10(6) to 1.36 × 10(7)  copies g(-1)  dws in the year 2010. Apart from methanogens, a large number of bacterial (9.60 × 10(9) -1.44 × 10(10)  copies g(-1)  dws) and archaeal (7.13 × 10(7) -3.02 × 10(8)  copies g(-1)  dws) communities were also associated with methanogenesis. Methanogen population size varied in the order: flowering > ripening > tillering > postharvest > preplantation stage. The RFLP-based 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylogenetic analysis showed that clones were closely related to diverse group of methanogens comprising members of Methanomicrobiaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and RC I. Laboratory incubation studies revealed higher amount of cumulative CH(4) at the flowering stage. The integration of methanogenic community structure and CH(4) production potential of soil resulted in a better understanding of the dynamics of CH(4) production in organically treated rice-field soil. The hypothesis that the stages of plant development influence the methanogenic community structure leading to temporal variation in the CH(4) production has been successfully tested. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of Methane Precursor Compounds in Soil Porewater of Two Rice Cultivars Under Conditions of Natural Suppression of Methanogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrick, M. L.; Bilek, R. S.

    2004-05-01

    Under identical growing conditions, rice cultivars have exhibited significantly different seasonal emissions of methane (CH4), a greenhouse gas. Previous work on cultivar differences has focused primarily on determining the extent to which each methanogenic pathway, fermentation of acetate and reduction of carbon dioxide, contribute to methane production in the sediment of flooded paddy fields. In this study, amino acid and organic acid precursor compounds of methanogenesis were measured in soil porewater samples collected six times throughout the growing season from greenhouse plots of Mars and Lemont cultivars of rice and an unplanted plot. Samples were obtained by suction withdrawal of porewater from hydrophilic porous polymer tubes, of 0.10 micron diameter pore size, which remained permanently installed in growing plots throughout the experiment at 3, 10, 17 and 24 cm depths below the soil-water interface. In addition to analyzing porewater for acetate, alanine, and propionate, concentrations of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide were also determined. For much of the season, methane production was naturally suppressed by the reduction of iron (III), Fe3+. Methane porewater concentrations of greater than 20 μ M were not observed until 68 days after the plots were flooded and spectrophotometric analysis showed [Fe3+] of > 2 μ M until that time. In the absence of significant methanogenesis, measurements of methane precursors in situ provide an estimate of differences in root exudates with cultivar type.

  6. Effects of warming on uptake and translocation of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in a contaminated soil-rice system under Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li-Qiang; Cang, Long; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Global warming has received growing attentions about its potential threats to human in recent, however little is known about its effects on transfer of heavy metals in agro-ecosystem, especially for Cd in rice. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate Cd/Cu translocation in a contaminated soil-rice system under Free Air Temperature Increase (FATI). The results showed that warming gradually decreased soil porewater pH and increased water-soluble Cd/Cu concentration, reduced formation of iron plaque on root surface, and thus significantly increased total uptake of Cd/Cu by rice. Subsequently, warming significantly promoted Cd translocation from root to shoot, and increased Cd distribution percentage in shoot, while Cu was not significantly affected. Enhanced Cd uptake and translocation synergistically resulted in higher rice grain contamination with increasing concentration from 0.27 to 0.65 and 0.14-0.40 mg kg(-1) for Indica and Japonica rice, respectively. However increase of Cu in brown grain was only attributed to its uptake enhancement under warming. Our study provides a new understanding about the food production insecurity of heavy metal contaminated soil under the future global warming. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Methanocella conradii sp. nov., a thermophilic, obligate hydrogenotrophic methanogen, isolated from Chinese rice field soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Lü

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methanocellales contributes significantly to anthropogenic methane emissions that cause global warming, but few pure cultures for Methanocellales are available to permit subsequent laboratory studies (physiology, biochemistry, etc.. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining anaerobic culture and molecular techniques, a novel thermophilic methanogen, strain HZ254(T was isolated from a Chinese rice field soil located in Hangzhou, China. The phylogenetic analyses of both the 16S rRNA gene and mcrA gene (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase confirmed its affiliation with Methanocellales, and Methanocella paludicola SANAE(T was the most closely related species. Cells were non-motile rods, albeit with a flagellum, 1.4-2.8 µm long and by 0.2-0.3 µm in width. They grew at 37-60 °C (optimally at 55 °C and salinity of 0-5 g NaCl l(-1 (optimally at 0-1 g NaCl l(-1. The pH range for growth was 6.4-7.2 (optimum 6.8. Under the optimum growth condition, the doubling time was 6.5-7.8 h, which is the shortest ever observed in Methanocellales. Strain HZ254(T utilized H(2/CO(2 but not formate for growth and methane production. The DNA G+C content of this organism was 52.7 mol%. The sequence identities of 16S rRNA gene and mcrA gene between strain HZ254(T and SANAE(T were 95.0 and 87.5% respectively, and the genome based Average Nucleotide Identity value between them was 74.8%. These two strains differed in phenotypic features with regard to substrate utilization, possession of a flagellum, doubling time (under optimal conditions, NaCl and temperature ranges. Taking account of the phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, we propose strain HZ254(T as a representative of a novel species, Methanocella conradii sp. nov. The type strain is HZ254(T ( = CGMCC 1.5162(T = JCM 17849(T = DSM 24694(T. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain HZ254(T could potentially serve as an excellent laboratory model for studying Methanocellales due to its

  8. Open-pit coal-mining effects on rice paddy soil composition and metal bioavailability to Oryza sativa L. plants in Cam Pha, northeastern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Raul E; Marquez, J Eduardo; Hòa, Hoàng Thị Bích; Gieré, Reto

    2013-11-01

    This study quantified Cd, Pb, and Cu content, and the soil-plant transfer factors of these elements in rice paddies within Cam Pha, Quang Ninh province, northeastern Vietnam. The rice paddies are located at a distance of 2 km from the large Coc Sau open-pit coal mine. Electron microprobe analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive spectroscopy revealed a relatively high proportion of carbon particles rimmed by an iron sulfide mineral (probably pyrite) in the quartz-clay matrix of rice paddy soils at 20-30 cm depth. Bulk chemical analysis of these soils revealed the presence of Cd, Cu, and Pb at concentrations of 0.146±0.004, 23.3±0.1, and 23.5±0.1 mg/kg which exceeded calculated background concentrations of 0.006±0.004, 1.9±0.5, and 2.4±1.5 mg/kg respectively at one of the sites. Metals and metalloids in Cam Pha rice paddy soils, including As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn, were found in concentrations ranging from 0.2±0.1 to 140±3 mg/kg, which were in close agreement with toxic metal contents in mine tailings and Coc Sau coal samples, suggesting mining operations as a major cause of paddy soil contamination. Native and model Oryza sativa L. rice plants were grown in the laboratory in a growth medium to which up to 1.5 mg/kg of paddy soil from Cam Pha was added to investigate the effects on plant growth. A decrease in growth by up to 60% with respect to a control sample was found for model plants, whereas a decrease of only 10% was observed for native (Nep cai hoa vang variety) rice plants. This result suggests an adaptation of native Cam Pha rice plants to toxic metals in the agricultural lands. The Cd, Cu, and Pb contents of the native rice plants from Cam Pha paddies exceeded permitted levels in foods. Cadmium and Pb were highest in the rice plant roots with concentrations of 0.84±0.02 and 7.7±0.3 mg/kg, suggesting an intake of these metals into the rice plant as shown, for example, by Cd and Pb concentrations of 0

  9. Evaluation and statistical optimization of methane oxidation using rice husk amended dumpsite soil as biocover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Somvir; Singh, Anita; Kaushik, C P; Kaushik, Anubha

    2016-07-01

    A laboratory scale study was conducted to investigate the effect of rice husk amended biocover to mitigate the CH4 emission from landfills. Various physico-chemical and environmental variables like proportion of amended biocover material (rice husk), temperature, moisture content, CH4 concentration, CO2 concentration, O2 concentration and incubation time were considered in the study which affect the CH4 bio-oxidation. For the present study, sequential statistical approach with Placket Burman Design (PBD) was used to identify significant variables, having influential role on CH4 bio-oxidation, from all variables. Further, interactive effect of four selected variables including rice husk proportion, temperature, CH4 concentration and incubation time was studied with Box-Behnken Design (BBD) adopting Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to optimize the conditions for CH4 oxidation. In this study, the maximum CH4 oxidation potential of 76.83μgCH4g(-1)dwh(-1) was observed under optimum conditions with rice husk amendment of 6% (w/w), 5h incubation time at 40°C temperature with 40% (v/v) initial CH4 concentration. The results for CH4 oxidation potential also advocated the suitability of rice husk amendment in biocover system to curb emitted CH4 from landfills/open dumpsite over conventional clay or sand cover on supplying CH4 and O2 to microbes on maintaining proper aeration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cadmium accumulation characteristics of low-cadmium rice (Oryza sativa L.) line and F1hybrids grown in cadmium-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Yu, Haiying; Li, Tingxuan; Chen, Guangdeng; Huang, Fu

    2017-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution has threatened severely to food safety and human health. A pot experiment and a field experiment were conducted to investigate the difference of Cd accumulation between rice (Oryza sativa L.) lines and F 1 hybrids in Cd-contaminated soils. The adverse effect on biomass of rice lines was greater than that of F 1 hybrids under Cd treatments in the pot experiment. The variations of Cd concentration among rice cultivars in different organs were smaller in stem and leaf, but larger in root and ear. Average proportion of Cd in root of F 1 hybrids was 1.39, 1.39, and 1.16 times higher than those of rice lines at the treatment of 1, 2, and 4 mg Cd kg -1 soil, respectively. Cd concentrations in ear of F 1 hybrids were significantly lower than rice lines with the reduction from 29.24 to 50.59%. Cd concentrations in brown rice of all F 1 hybrids were less than 0.2 mg kg -1 at 1 mg Cd kg -1 soil, in which Lu98A/YaHui2816, 5406A/YaHui2816, and C268A/YaHui2816 could be screened out as cadmium-safe cultivars (CSCs) for being safe even at 2 mg Cd kg -1 soil. C268A/YaHui2816 showed the lowest Cd concentration in root among F 1 hybrids, while Lu98A/YaHui2816 and 5406A/YaHui2816 showed lower capability of Cd translocation from root to shoot under Cd exposure, which eventually caused the lower Cd accumulation in brown rice. The lower level of Cd translocation contributed to reducing the accumulation of Cd in brown rice had been validated by the field experiment. Thus, Lu98A/YaHui2816, 5406A/YaHui2816, and C268A/YaHui2816 could be considered as potential CSCs to cultivate in Cd-contaminated soils (<2 mg Cd kg -1 soil).

  11. Seed longevity of red rice ecotypes buried in soil Longevidade de sementes de arroz-vermelho enterradas no solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Noldin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Red rice is a troublesome weed in irrigated rice production and is spread through contaminated commercial rice seed and machinery. Seed dormancy is a major trait for red rice. Studies were carried out at two locations to determine red rice seed longevity in the soil of several ecotypes from four US states. Five months after burial near Beaumont, Texas only three ecotypes had viable seed (O arroz-vermelho constitui-se na principal planta daninha infestante de lavouras de arroz irrigado e a sua disseminação ocorre, principalmente, pelo uso de sementes comerciais contaminadas e equipamentos agrícolas. A ocorrência de dormência nas sementes é uma das principais características que dificultam o controle do arroz-vermelho em lavouras. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar a longevidade no solo de ecótipos de arroz-vermelho provenientes de diferentes áreas de produção de arroz nos Estados Unidos. O estudo foi conduzido em dois locais: Beaumont e College Station, no estado do Texas (TX. Para sementes enterradas a 5 cm de profundidade em Beaumont, apenas três ecótipos apresentaram sementes viáveis (<1%. No entanto, quando as sementes foram enterradas em maior profundidade (25 cm, nove ecótipos tinham sementes viáveis após 2 anos. Trinta e seis meses após o enterrio, cinco ecótipos apresentavam sementes com alguma viabilidade, mas todos inferiores a 1%. Sementes de arroz-vermelho produzidas e enterradas em College Station na profundidade de 12 cm, um dia após a colheita, apresentaram maior longevidade que aquelas mantidas na superfície do solo. Após 17 meses, um dos ecótipos de arroz-preto (TX 4, enterrado a 12 cm, foi o que apresentou maior percentual de viabilidade (2%. Nos dois experimentos, observou-se que os cultivares comerciais, Lemont e Mars, não apresentaram sementes viáveis após cinco meses, independentemente da localização no solo. Os resultados deste estudo sugerem que em áreas com arroz-vermelho deve-se evitar o

  12. Effects of Soil Salinity and Alkalinity on Grain Quality of Tolerant, Semi-Tolerant and Sensitive Rice Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SUREKHA RAO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and alkalinity adversely affects the productivity and grain quality of rice. The grain quality of 19 rice genotypes characterized as salt tolerant (T, semi-tolerant (ST and sensitive (S was assessed in lysimeters containing saline and highly alkaline soils. Head rice recovery was reduced by salinity stress whereas it was not affected by alkalinity stress. The ratio of length to width (grain dimensions was significantly reduced in the T genotype even at low electrical conductivity (EC, 4 mS/cm and alkalinity (pH 9.5, whereas in the ST genotype, it was significantly reduced at high salinity (EC 8 mS/cm. There was no significant effect of any levels of salinity or alkalinity on grain dimensions in the S genotype. Amylose content was significantly reduced in T and ST groups even at low EC (4 mS/cm and alkalinity (pH 9.5 and the effect in the S genotype was only at high salinity. Starch content showed significant reduction at high salinity and alkalinity (EC 8 mS/cm and pH 9.8 in the T and ST genotypes and no significant effect was observed in the S genotype. The effect of both levels of salinity (EC 4 and 8 mS/cm and high alkalinity (pH 9.8 on gel consistency was observed only in the S genotype. The tolerant genotypes IR36 under high salinity, and CSR10 and CSR11 under alkali stress showed less reduction in amylose content. The T genotype BR4-10, and ST genotypes CSR30, CSR29 and CSR13 showed better gel consistency under saline and alkali stress. Amylose content was affected even at low salinity stress and thus important to be considered in breeding rice for salt tolerance. Overall, the grain quality of T and ST genotypes was less affected by saline and alkali stress compared to S ones.

  13. Soil nutrient enhancement by rice husk in smallholder farms of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil serves as both reservoir and resource of plant nutrients. When soil is unable to meet the requirements of plants, it is consider to be constrained. Low nutrient availability, retention, and holding, high acidity and low organic matter content are some constraints to soil productivity. A large proportion of soils in the humid ...

  14. Effects of Different Application Methods of Methane Fermentation Digested Liquid into the Paddy Plot on Soil Nitrogen Behavior and Rice Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoko; Nakamura, Kimihito; Seok Ryu, Chan; Iida, Michihisa; Kawashima, Shigeto

    Methane fermentation technique with the treatment of animal waste and food waste is drawing public attention as a good option for the utilization of biomass resources and it is investigated how to apply the by-product of fermentation (methane fermentation digested liquid) to agricultural fields as a fertilizer. It is important to determine an adequate method of applying digested liquid to a paddy plot as fertilizer taking into account the concentrations of soil nitrogen components and rice yield. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of three methods of applying digested liquid to paddy plots in terms of the nitrogen transformation in soil, rice yield, and nitrogen load in effluent. The three methods were pouring (with irrigation water), spreading onto the surface of a plot, and injection into paddy soil. It was found that the ammonium nitrogen concentration and the dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in soil of the spreading plot were higher than that for the pouring plot and that for the injecting plot. The rice yield was higher in the spreading plot than in the injecting and pouring plots. And, there was a significant correlation between the rice yield and the dissolved organic nitrogen just before and after the panicle initiation stage. There were no differences in the nitrogen effluent loads with surface drainage.

  15. Mitigation effects of silicon rich amendments on heavy metal accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) planted on multi-metal contaminated acidic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms of stabilization by silicon-rich amendments of cadmium, zinc, copper and lead in a multi-metal contaminated acidic soil and the mitigation of metal accumulation in rice were investigated in this study. The results from a pot experiment indicated that the application of fly ash (20 and...

  16. Highly stable rice-straw-derived charcoal in 3700-year-old ancient paddy soil: evidence for an effective pathway toward carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxiong; Yang, Min; Han, Xingguo; Zhong, Ting; Zheng, Yunfei; Ding, Pin; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-01-01

    Recalcitrant charcoal application is predicted to decelerate global warming through creating a long-term carbon sink in soil. Although many studies have showed high stability of charcoal derived from woody materials, few have focused on the dynamics of straw-derived charcoal in natural environment on a long timescale to evaluate its potential for agricultural carbon sequestration. Here, we examined straw-derived charcoal in an ancient paddy soil dated from ~3700 calendar year before present (cal. year BP). Analytical results showed that soil organic matter consisted of more than 25% of charcoal in charcoal-rich layer. Similarities in morphology and molecular structure between the ancient and the fresh rice-straw-derived charcoal indicated that ancient charcoal was derived from rice straw. The lower carbon content, higher oxygen content, and obvious carbonyl of the ancient charcoal compared with fresh rice straw charcoal implied that oxidation occurred in the scale of thousands years. However, the dominant aromatic C of ancient charcoal indicated that rice-straw-derived charcoal was highly stable in the buried paddy soil due to its intrinsic chemical structures and the physical protection of ancient paddy wetland. Therefore, it may suggest that straw charcoal application is a potential pathway for C sequestration considering its longevity.

  17. Puddling against dry plowing for lowland rice culture in Surinam : effect on soil and plant, and interactions with irrigation and nitrogen dressing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltema, W.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of tillage on rice grown on heavy Surinam clay soils was investigated in pot and field trials. Included were interactions with seed rate, nitrogen dressing and distribution, water management, and variety. Four procedures for tilled layer and seedbed preparation were studied

  18. Influence of Irrigation Water Discharge Frequency on Soil Salt Removal and Rice Yield in a Semi-Arid and Saline-Sodic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Huang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation practice for rice culture can be especially challenging in areas with limited water supply and soil salinization. In this study, we carried out a field experiment to assess the effects of different water discharge frequencies on soil salt content, rice yield and water use efficiency on a saline-sodic soil in a semi-arid region of Northeast China. The experiment comprised of three frequency levels of discharge [9-time (I-9-30, 6-time (I-6-30 and 3-time (I-3-30 discharge, all followed with a 30-mm irrigation] in comparison with the traditional irrigation practice of 2-time discharge followed with an 80-mm irrigation (I-2-80. Our initial hypothesis was that increasing discharge frequency would increase both salt reduction and rice yield. Daily precipitation was recorded by a nearby weather station, and evapotranspiration and soil water percolation rates were measured at experimental sites using soil pits. The measurements were used to establish a water balance for each treatment. Our results showed that soil salt reduction increased with the increasing discharge frequency at a 30-mm irrigation water depth. The 9-time discharge reduced a large amount of soil salt (995.0 kg ha−1 after five months of the study. Rice yield also increased with the increasing discharge frequency with a 30-mm irrigation water depth; however, when compared to the traditional 2-time discharge followed with an 80-mm irrigation, rice yield at the sites with more frequent discharge (i.e., I-9-30, I-6-30 and I-3-30 was 11%–18% lower. Because of this, rice yield and irrigation water use efficiency were significantly higher under the traditional practice of high-irrigation with low-frequency discharge (I-2-80 than under I-9-30, I-6-30 and I-3-30. These results indicate a need for a trade-off amongst salt reduction, rice yield and water use when considering selection of irrigation and discharge schedules.

  19. O-2 dynamics in the rhizosphere of young rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) as studied by planar optodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Santner, Jakob; Oburger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Radial O-2 loss (ROL) strongly affect the O-2 availability in the rhizosphere of rice. The ROL create an oxic zone around the roots, protecting the plant from toxic reduced chemical species and regulates the redox chemistry in the soil. This study investigates the spatio-temporal variability in O-2...... dynamics in the rice rhizosphere. Applying high-resolution planar optode imaging, we investigated the O-2 dynamics of plants grown in water saturated soil, as a function of ambient O-2 level, irradiance and plant development, for submerged and emerged plants. O-2 leakage was heterogeneously distributed...... with zones of intense leakage around roots tips and young developing roots. While the majority of roots exhibited high ROL others remained surrounded by anoxic soil. ROL was affected by ambient O-2 levels around the plant, as well as irradiance, indicating a direct influence of photosynthetic activity on ROL...

  20. Stimulation by ammonium-based fertilizers of methane oxidation in soil around rice roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Roslev, P.; Henckel, T.; Frenzel, P.

    2000-01-01

    Methane is involved in a number of chemical and physical processes in the Earths atmosphere, including global warming(1), Atmospheric methane originates mainly from biogenic sources, such as rice paddies and natural wetlands; the former account for at least 30% of the global annual emission of

  1. Modelling the role of algae in rice crop nutrition and soil organic carbon maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaydon, D.S.; Probert, M.E.; Buresh, R.J.; Meinke, H.B.; Timsina, J.

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic aquatic biomass (PAB – algae and other floodwater flora) is a significant source of organic carbon (C) in rice-based cropping systems. A portion of PAB is capable of fixing nitrogen (N), and is hence also a source of N for crop nutrition. To account for this phenomenon in long term

  2. Soil potassium dynamics under intensive rice cropping. A case study in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords:potassium, nutrient budgets, nutrient depletion, fertilizer, kinetics, adsorption,desorption, fixation, release, modeling, rice cropping system,

  3. Effects of aging process on adsorption-desorption and bioavailability of fomesafen in an agricultural soil amended with rice hull biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Lin, Dunli; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Yuan; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2017-06-01

    Biochar has been introduced as an acceptable soil amendment due to its environmental benefits such as sequestering soil contaminants. However, the aging process in biochar amended soil probably decreases the adsorption capacity of biochar through changing its physico-chemical properties. Adsorption, leaching and bioavailability of fomesafen to corn in a Chinese soil amended by rice hull biochar after 0, 30, 90 and 180days were investigated. Results showed that the addition of 0.5%-2% fresh biochar significantly increases the adsorption of fomesafen 4-26 times compare to unamended soil due to higher SSA of biochar. Biochar amendment also decreases fomesafen concentration in soil pore water by 5%-23% resulting lower risk of the herbicide for cultivated plants. However, the aging process decreased the adsorption capacity of biochar since the adsorption coefficient values which was 1.9-12.4 in 0.5%-2% fresh biochar amended soil, declined to 1.36-4.16, 1.13-2.78 and 0.95-2.31 in 1, 3 and 6-month aged treatments, respectively. Consequently, higher desorption, leaching and bioavailable fraction of fomesafen belonged to 6-month aged treatment. Nevertheless, rice hull biochar was effective for sequestering fomesafen as the adsorption capacity of biochar amended soil after 6months of aging was still 2.5-5 times higher compared to that of unamended soil. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Bio-chemical properties of sandy calcareous soil treated with rice straw-based hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2016-06-01

    The results obtained show that, application of the investigated hydrogels positively affects bio-chemical properties of the soil. These effects are assembled in the following: (a slightly decreasing soil pH, (b increasing cation exchange capacity (CEC of the soil indicating improvement in activating chemical reactions in the soil, (c increasing organic matter (OM, organic carbon, total nitrogen percent in the soil. Because the increase in organic nitrogen surpassed that in organic carbon, a narrower CN ratio of treated soils was obtained. This indicated the mineralization of nitrogen compounds and hence the possibility to save and provide available forms of N to growing plants, (d increasing available N, P and K in treated soil, and (e improving biological activity of the soil expressed as total count of bacteria and counts of Azotobacter sp., phosphate dissolving bacteria (PDB, fungi and actinomycetes/g soil as well as the activity of both dehydrogenase and phosphatase.

  5. Evaluating Non-Aromatic Rice Varieties for Growth and Yield under Different Rates of Soil Applied Boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Ahmed Shah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Balanced boron (B fertilization has prime importance to obtain maximum paddy yield. The range between B deficiency and toxicity is smaller than most plant nutrients, though B requirement among different crops varies widely. The adequate dose of B for one genotype can either be insufficient or toxic to other. Hence, without knowing the actual requirements of crop varieties, B application can be risky due to the toxicity hazards. A field experiment was undertaken at experimental farm of Nuclear Institute of Agriculture (NIA Tandojam during 2013, to evaluate the B requirement of two non-aromatic rice varieties. The experiment was arranged in split plot design with three repeats. Two rice varieties Sarshar and Shandar were grown in main plots with four rates of B: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kg ha-1 and control (0 kg ha-1 in sub plots. Both the varieties responded differently to B rates. Sarshar produced the highest paddy yield (5691 kg ha-1 at a rate of 1.5 kg B ha-1 and was 18% greater than control, Shandar produced the highest yield (6075 kg ha-1 at a rate of 1.0 kg B ha-1and was 5% greater than control. B accumulation in paddy and straw of both varieties increased with the increasing B rates. Both varieties were also significantly (p<0.05 varied in B accumulations. Comparatively, rice variety Sarshar accumulated 9% and 22% more B in straw and paddy than the Shandar. Thus, the B requirement of Sarshar was relatively higher than the Shandar. Shandar can be grown without the additional B application, whereas, Sarshar requires additional B for its maximum harvest in B deficient soils.

  6. The Artificial Neural Network Estimation for Daily and Hourly Rice Evapotranspiration in the Region of Red Soil, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuanshu; Ruthaikarn, Buaphean; Jin, Xinyi; Pang, Bo

    The evapotranspiration estimation is a key item for irrigation program. It has the important practical significance for high stable yield and water-saving in the region of red soil, South China. Penman-Monteith equation, recommended by FAO, is verified to be the most effective calculation to actual evaporation in many regions of the world. The only default is it has to use complete meteorological factors. To solve this problem, we are trying to find out a artificial neural network model (ANN) which can easily get its information and easy to calculate as well as guaranteed accuracy. A Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system and automatic weather station were employed for simultaneous measurement of actual evapotranspiration above the rice field. The frequency of 20-min recording provided the possibility for the estimation of daily and hourly evapotranspiration. The determined coefficient from the artificial neural network model on daily scale R2 is 0.9642, while hourly scale R2 is 0.9880. The reason was that the hourly scale training samples was greater than the daily scale measures. In general, the model gives an effective and feasible way for the evaluation of paddy rice evapotranspiration by the conventional parameters.

  7. Effects of ferric iron reduction and regeneration on nitrous oxide and methane emissions in a rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yu, Kewei; Gambrell, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory soil slurry experiment and an outdoor pot experiment were conducted to study effects of ferric iron (Fe(III)) reduction and regeneration on nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) emissions in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) soil. The anoxic slurry experiment showed that enhancing microbial Fe(III) reduction by ferrihydrite amendment (40 mol Fe g(-1)) transitionally stimulated N(2)O production and lowered CH(4) production by 16% during an initial 33-day incubation. Increased regeneration of Fe(III) through a 4-day aeration period in the Fe-amended slurry compared to the control slurry reduced CH(4) emission by 30% in the subsequent 15-day anaerobic incubation. The pot experiment showed that ferrihydrite amendment (63 micromol Fe g(-1)) stimulated N(2)O fluxes in the days following flooding. The Fe amendment suppression on CH(4) emission was obscured in the early season but became significant upon reflooding in the mid- and late-seasons. As a result, seasonal CH(4) emission in Fe-amended pots was 26% lower than the control with a single 2-day drainage and 69% lower with a double 2-day drainage. The reduction in CH(4) emission upon reflooding from the Fe-amended pots was mainly attributed to the increased Fe(III) regeneration during drainage showing a mechanism of Fe(III) regeneration in mitigating CH(4) emission by short-term drainage in flooded soils.

  8. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on the soil profile methane distribution and diffusion in rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Xuhui; Pan, Genxing; Zou, Jianwen; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the impacts of climate change on soil profile concentrations and diffusion effluxes of methane in a rice-wheat annual rotation ecosystem in Southeastern China. We initiated a field experiment with four treatments: ambient conditions (CKs), CO2 concentration elevated to ~500 μmol/mol (FACE), temperature elevated by ca. 2°C (T) and combined elevation of CO2 concentration and temperature (FACE+T). A multilevel sampling probe was designed to collect the soil gas at four different depths, namely, 7 cm, 15 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Methane concentrations were higher during the rice season and decreased with depth, while lower during the wheat season and increased with depth. Compared to CK, mean methane concentration was increased by 42%, 57% and 71% under the FACE, FACE+T and T treatments, respectively, at the 7 cm depth during the rice season (pCO2 concentration and temperature could significantly increase soil profile methane concentrations and their effluxes from a rice-wheat field annual rotation ecosystem (p<0.05). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  10. Effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and prokaryotic communities in rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Sik; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Gun-Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    The effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and soil prokaryotic communities were investigated in an experimental rice field. The water layer was kept at 1-2 cm in the water-saving (WS) irrigation treatment and at 6 cm in the continuous flooding (CF) irrigation treatment. WS irrigation decreased CH(4) emissions by 78 % and increased N(2)O emissions by 533 %, resulting in 78 % reduction of global warming potential compared to the CF irrigation. WS irrigation did not affect the abundance or phylogenetic distribution of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the abundance of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNAs. The transcript abundance of CH(4) emission-related genes generally followed CH(4) emission patterns, but the difference in abundance between mcrA transcripts and amoA/pmoA transcripts best described the differences in CH(4) emissions between the two irrigation practices. WS irrigation increased the relative abundance of 16S rRNAs and functional gene transcripts associated with Anaeromyxobacter and Methylocystis spp., suggesting that their activities might be important in emissions of the greenhouse gases. The N(2)O emission patterns were not reflected in the abundance of N(2)O emission-related genes and transcripts. We showed that the alternative irrigation practice was effective for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields and that it did not affect the overall size and structure of the soil prokaryotic community but did affect the activity of some groups.

  11. Nitrification Inhibitors: A Perspective Tool to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Rice Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep K. Malyan

    2016-01-01

    Rice fields are significant contributors of greenhouse gases mainly methane and nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Increasing concentrations of these greenhouse gases play significant role in changing atmospheric chemistry such as mean air temperature, rainfall pattern, drought, and flood frequency. Mitigation of greenhouse gases for achieving sustainable agriculture without affecting economical production is one the biggest challenge of twenty first century at national and global scale. On th...

  12. Variations in the patterns of soil organic carbon mineralization and microbial communities in response to exogenous application of rice straw and calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shuzhen [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China); Huang, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Ge, Yunhui [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Su, Yirong [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China); Xu, Xinwen; Wang, Yongdong [Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); He, Xunyang, E-mail: hbhpjhn@isa.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The addition of exogenous inorganic carbon (CaCO{sub 3}) and organic carbon has an important influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in karst soil, but the microbial mechanisms underlying the SOC priming effect are poorly understood. We conducted a 100-day incubation experiment involving four treatments of the calcareous soil in southwestern China's karst region: control, {sup 14}C-labeled rice straw addition, {sup 14}C-labeled CaCO{sub 3} addition, and a combination of {sup 14}C-labeled rice straw and CaCO{sub 3}. Changes in soil microbial communities were characterized using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR-DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (q-PCR). Both {sup 14}C-rice straw and Ca{sup 14}CO{sub 3} addition stimulated SOC mineralization, suggesting that organic and inorganic C affected SOC stability. Addition of straw alone had no significant effect on bacterial diversity; however, when the straw was added in combination with calcium carbonate, it had an inhibitory effect on bacterial and fungal diversity. At the beginning of the experimental period, exogenous additives increased bacterial abundance, although at the end of the 100-day incubation bacterial community abundance had gradually declined. Incubation time, exogenous input, and their interaction significantly affected SOC mineralization (in terms of priming and the cumulative amount of mineralization), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and microbial community abundance and diversity. Moreover, the key factors influencing SOC mineralization were MBC, bacterial diversity, and soil pH. Overall, these findings support the view that inorganic C is involved in soil C turnover with the participation of soil microbial communities, promoting soil C cycling in the karst region. - Highlights: • Different patterns of {sup 14}C-rice straw and Ca{sup 14}CO{sub 3} addition on positive priming effects of SOC mineralization. • Inorganic C is involved in

  13. Growth, Metabolism and Yield of Rice Cultivated in Soils Amended with Fly Ash and Cyanobacteria and Metal Loads in Plant Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N. Padhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil amendment with fly ash (FA and combined supplementation with N2-fixing cyanobacteria masses as biofertilizer were done in field experiments with rice. Amendments with FA levels, 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kg/m2, caused increase in growth and yield of rice up to 8.0 kg/m2, monitored with several parameters. Pigment contents and enzyme activities of leaves were enhanced by FA, with the maximum level of FA at 10.0 kg/m2. Protein content of rice seeds was the highest in plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2. Basic soil properties, pH value, percentage of silt, percentage of clay, water-holding capacity, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content increased due to the FA amendment. Parallel supplementation of FA amended plots with 1.0 kg/m2 N2-fixing cyanobacteria mass caused further significant increments of the most soil properties, and rice growth and yield parameters. 1000-grain weight of rice plants grown at FA level 4.0 kg/m2 along with cyanobacteria supplementation was the maximum. Cyanobacteria supplementation caused increase of important basic properties of soil including the total N-content. Estimations of elemental content in soils and plant parts (root and seed were done by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Accumulations of K, P, Fe and several plant micronutrients (Mn, Ni, Co, Zn and Cu and toxic elements (Pb, Cr and Cd increased in soils and plant parts as a function of the FA gradation, but Na content remained almost unchanged in soils and seeds. Supplementation of cyanobacteria had ameliorating effect on toxic metal contents of soils and plant parts. The FA level 4.0 kg/m2, with 1.0 kg/m2 cyanobacteria mass supplementation, could be taken ideal, since there would be recharging of the soil with essential micronutrients as well as toxic chemicals in comparative lesser proportions, and cyanobacteria mass would cause lessening toxic metal loads with usual N2-fixation.

  14. Effect of bamboo and rice straw biochars on the mobility and redistribution of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kouping; Yang, Xing; Gielen, Gerty; Bolan, Nanthi; Ok, Yong Sik; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Xu, Song; Yuan, Guodong; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaokai; Liu, Dan; Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Xingyuan; Wang, Hailong

    2017-01-15

    Biochar has emerged as an efficient tool to affect bioavailability of heavy metals in contaminated soils. Although partially understood, a carefully designed incubation experiment was performed to examine the effect of biochar on mobility and redistribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in a sandy loam soil collected from the surroundings of a copper smelter. Bamboo and rice straw biochars with different mesh sizes (Heavy metal concentrations in pore water were determined after extraction with 0.01 M CaCl2. Phytoavailable metals were extracted using DTPA/TEA (pH 7.3). The European Union Bureau of Reference (EUBCR) sequential extraction procedure was adopted to determine metal partitioning and redistribution of heavy metals. Results showed that CaCl2-and DTPA-extractable Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were significantly (p metal concentrations (p metal fractions, and the effect was more pronounced with increasing biochar application rate. The effect of biochar particle size on extractable metal concentrations was not consistent. The 5% rice straw biochar treatment reduced the DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in the order of Cd metals were mainly bound in the soil organic matter fraction. The results demonstrated that the rice straw biochar can effectively immobilize heavy metals, thereby reducing their mobility and bioavailability in contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from flood-irrigated rice by no incorporation of winter crop residues into the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Zschornack

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Winter cover crops are sources of C and N in flooded rice production systems, but very little is known about the effect of crop residue management and quality on soil methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O emissions. This study was conducted in pots in a greenhouse to evaluate the influence of crop residue management (incorporated into the soil or left on the soil surface and the type of cover-crop residues (ryegrass and serradella on CH4 and N2O emissions from a flooded Albaqualf soil cultivated with rice (Oryza sativa L.. The closed chamber technique was used for air sampling and the CH4 and N2O concentrations were analyzed by gas chromatography. Soil solution was sampled at two soil depths (2 and 20 cm, simultaneously to air sampling, and the contents of dissolved organic C (DOC, NO3-, NH4+, Mn2+, and Fe2+ were analyzed. Methane and N2O emissions from the soil where crop residues had been left on the surface were lower than from soil with incorporated residues. The type of crop residue had no effect on the CH4 emissions, while higher N2O emissions were observed from serradella (leguminous than from ryegrass, but only when the residues were left on the soil surface. The more intense soil reduction verified in the deeper soil layer (20 cm, as evidenced by higher contents of reduced metal species (Mn2+ and Fe2+, and the close relationship between CH4 emission and the DOC contents in the deeper layer indicated that the sub-surface layer was the main CH4 source of the flooded soil with incorporated crop residues. The adoption of management strategies in which crop residues are left on the soil surface is crucial to minimize soil CH4 and N2O emissions from irrigated rice fields. In these production systems, CH4 accounts for more than 90 % of the partial global warming potential (CH4+N2O and, thus, should be the main focus of research.

  16. Composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from periodically submerged soils in the Three Gorges Reservoir areas as determined by elemental and optical analysis, infrared spectroscopy, pyrolysis-GC-MS and thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Kaal, Joeri; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Yaoling; Wei, Shiqiang; Wang, Dingyong; Green, Nelson W

    2017-12-15

    Soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) has a major influence in biogeochemical processes related to contaminant dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions, due to its reactivity and its bridging role between the soil and aquatic systems. Within the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR, China) area, an extensive water-fluctuation zone periodically submerges the surrounding soils. Here we report a characterization study of soil-derived DOM across the TGR areas, using elemental and optical analysis, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), pyrolysis-GC-MS (Py-GC-MS) and thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). The results showed that the soil DOM from the TGR area is a mixture of "allochthonous" (i.e., plant-derived/terrigenous) and "autochthonous" (i.e., microbial) origins. The terrigenous DOM is composed primarily of phenolic and aliphatic structures from lignin and aliphatic biopolymers (i.e. cutin, suberin), respectively. Multivariate statistics differentiated between two fractions of the microbial DOM, i.e. chitin-derived, perhaps from fungi and arthropods in soil, and protein-derived, partially sourced from algal or aquatic organisms. Molecular proxies of source and degradation state were in good agreement with optical parameters such as SUVA254, the fluorescence index (FI) and the humification index (HIX). The combined use of elemental analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and Py-GC-MS provides rigorous and detailed DOM characterization, whereas THM-GC-MS is useful for more precise but qualitative identification of the different phenolic (cinnamyl, p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, syringyl and tannin-derived) and aliphatic materials. With the multi-methodological approach used in this study, FTIR was the least informative, in part, because of the interference of inorganic matter in the soil DOM samples. The soil DOM from the TGR's water fluctuation zone exhibited considerable compositional diversity, mainly related to the balance between DOM source (microbial- or plant

  17. Assessment of arsenic in Australian grown and imported rice varieties on sale in Australia and potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransisca, Yunnita; Small, Darryl M; Morrison, Paul D; Spencer, Michelle J S; Ball, Andrew S; Jones, Oliver A H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic dietary exposure to arsenic, particularly the inorganic forms (defined as elemental arsenic, predominantly As(3+) and As(5+), and all its inorganic compounds except arsine), is a matter of concern for human health. Ingestion of arsenic usually occurs via contaminated water but recent studies show there is also a risk of exposure from food, particularly Asian rice (Oryza sativa). Australia is a rice growing country, contributing around 2% of the world rice trade, and a large proportion of the population consumes rice regularly. In the present study we investigated concentrations of arsenic in both Australian grown and imported rice on sale in Australia and examined the potential links with irrigation practises and soil geochemistry. The results indicated a wide spread of arsenic levels of 0.09-0.33 mg kg(-1), with Australian grown Arborio and sushi varieties of O. sativa containing the highest mean value of ∼0.22 mg kg(-1). Arsenic levels in all samples were below the 1 mg kg(-1) limit set by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biochar application mode influences nitrogen leaching and NH3 volatilization losses in a rice paddy soil irrigated with N-rich wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haijun; Min, Ju; Zhang, Hailin; Feng, Yanfang; Lu, Kouping; Shi, Weiming; Yu, Min; Li, Xuewen

    2017-07-11

    Impacts of biochar application mode on nitrogen (N) leaching, ammonia (NH3) volatilization, rice grain yield and N use efficiency (NUE) are not well understood. Therefore, a field experiment was conducted to evaluate those impacts in a rice paddy soil received 225 kg N ha-1 from either urea or N-rich wastewater. One treatment received 10 t ha-1 biochar with the basal fertilization, and the other received same total amount of biochar but split applied with the three split N applications with same ratio as N fertilizer split ratio (40%, 30% and 30%). Results showed that N leaching loads were 4.20-6.22 kg ha-1. Biochar one-time application reduced N leaching by 23.1%, and biochar split application further reduced N leaching by 32.4%. Total NH3 volatilization loss was 15.5-24.5 kg ha-1. Biochar one-time application did not influence the NH3 volatilization, but biochar split application stimulated the cumulative NH3 volatilization by 57.7%. Both biochar treatments had no influence on NUE and rice grain yield. In conclusion, biochar application mode indeed influences the N leaching and NH3 volatilization in rice paddy soils, and biochar one-time application should be recommended for reducing N leaching without increasing NH3 volatilization.

  19. Influence of straw incorporation with and without straw decomposer on soil bacterial community structure and function in a rice-wheat cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Ni, Tian; Xun, Weibing; Huang, Xiaolei; Huang, Qiwei; Ran, Wei; Shen, Biao; Zhang, Ruifu; Shen, Qirong

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of straw incorporation with and without straw decomposer on bacterial community structure and biological traits, a 3-year field experiments, including four treatments: control without fertilizer (CK), chemical fertilizer (NPK), chemical fertilizer plus 7500 kg ha-1 straw incorporation (NPKS), and chemical fertilizer plus 7500 kg ha-1 straw incorporation and 300 kg ha-1 straw decomposer (NPKSD), were performed in a rice-wheat cropping system in Changshu (CS) and Jintan (JT) city, respectively. Soil samples were taken right after wheat (June) and rice (October) harvest in both sites, respectively. The NPKS and NPKSD treatments consistently increased crop yields, cellulase activity, and bacterial abundance in both sampling times and sites. Moreover, the NPKS and NPKSD treatments altered soil bacterial community structure, particularly in the wheat harvest soils in both sites, separating from the CK and NPK treatments. In the rice harvest soils, both NPKS and NPKSD treatments had no considerable impacts on bacterial communities in CS, whereas the NPKSD treatment significantly shaped bacterial communities compared to the other treatments in JT. These practices also significantly shifted the bacterial composition of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) rather than shared OTUs. The relative abundances of copiotrophic bacteria (Proteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) were positively correlated with soil total N, available N, and available P. Taken together, these results indicate that application of straw incorporation with and without straw decomposer could particularly stimulate the copiotrophic bacteria, enhance the soil biological activity, and thus, contribute to the soil productivity and sustainability in agro-ecosystems.

  20. Rice straw biochar affects water retention and air movement in a sand-textured tropical soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Ahmed, Fauziatu

    2017-01-01

    sampling times, soil water retention was significantly higher (20–150%) for the BC treatment due to increased fraction of smaller pores (Although there was no consistent effect of BC on air-filled porosity, BC significantly reduced air permeability and gas....../w) on water retention, gas transport and structure of a sand-textured tropical soil. We sampled 3 months and 15 months after BC application and measured wet- and dry-region soil water retention, air permeability and gas diffusivity at selected matric potentials. At all measured potentials and for both...

  1. Effects of Rice Husk Ash on Some Geotechnical Properties of Lateritic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidelis O. OKAFOR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is an investigation into the effect of RHA on some geotechnical properties of a lateritic soil classified as A-2-6 (0 or SW for sub-grade purposes. The investigation includes evaluation of properties such as compaction, consistency limits and strength of the soil with RHA content of 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 12.5% by weight of the dry soil. The results obtained show that the increase in RHA content increased the OMC but decreased the MDD. It was also discovered that increase in RHA content, reduced plasticity and increased volume stability as well as the strength of the soil. 10% RHA content was also observed to be the optimum content.

  2. Site Suitability Analysis for Dissemination of Salt-tolerant Rice Varieties in Southern Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, D. D.; Singh, A. N.; Singh, U. S.

    2014-11-01

    Bangladesh is a country of 14.4 million ha geographical area and has a population density of more than 1100 persons per sq. km. Rice is the staple food crop, growing on about 72 % of the total cultivated land and continues to be the most important crop for food security of the country. A project "Sustainable Rice Seed Production and Delivery Systems for Southern Bangladesh" has been executed by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in twenty southern districts of Bangladesh. These districts grow rice in about 2.9 million ha out of the country's total rice area of 11.3 million ha. The project aims at contributing to the Government of Bangladesh's efforts in improving national and household food security through enhanced and sustained productivity by using salinity-, submergence- and drought- tolerant and high yielding rice varieties. Out of the 20 project districts, 12 coastal districts are affected by the problem of soil salinity. The salt-affected area in Bangladesh has increased from about 0.83 million ha in 1973 to 1.02 million ha in 2000, and 1.05 million ha in 2009 due to the influence of cyclonic storms like "Sidr", "Laila" and others, leading to salt water intrusion in croplands. Three salinity-tolerant rice varieties have recently been bred by IRRI and field tested and released by the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI) and Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA). These varieties are BRRI dhan- 47 and Bina dhan-8 and - 10. However, they can tolerate soil salinity level up to EC 8-10 dSm-1, whereas the EC of soils in several areas are much higher. Therefore, a large scale dissemination of these varieties can be done only when a site suitability analysis of the area is carried out. The present study was taken up with the objective of preparing the site suitability of the salt-tolerant varieties for the salinity-affected districts of southern Bangladesh. Soil salinity map prepared by Soil Resources Development Institute of

  3. Quantifying methane emissions from rice fields in the Taihu Lake region, China by coupling a detailed soil database with biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available As China has approximately 22% of the world's rice paddies, the regional quantification of CH4 emissions from these paddies is important in determining their contribution to the global greenhouse gas effect. This paper reports the use of a biogeochemical model (DeNitrification and DeComposition or DNDC for quantifying CH4 emissions from rice fields in the Taihu Lake region of China. For this application, the DNDC model was linked to a 1:50 000 soil database derived from 1107 paddy soil profiles compiled during the Second National Soil Survey of China in the 1980s–1990s. The simulated results showed that the 2.3 Mha of paddy rice fields in the Taihu Lake region emitted the equivalent of 5.7 Tg C from 1982–2000, with the average CH4 flux ranging from 114 to 138 kg C ha−1 y−1. As for soil subgroups, the highest emission rate (660 kg C ha−1 y−1 was linked to gleyed paddy soils accounting for about 4.4% of the total area of paddy soils. The lowest emission rate (91 kg C ha−1 y−1 was associated with degleyed paddy soils accounting for about 18% of the total area of paddy soils. The most common soil in the area was hydromorphic paddy soils, which accounted for about 53% of the total area of paddy soils with a CH4 flux of 106 kg C ha−1 y−1. On a regional basis, the annual averaged CH4 flux in the Taihu Lake plain soil region and alluvial plain soil region were higher than that in the low mountainous and hilly soil region and the polder soil region. The model simulation was conducted with two databases using polygons or counties as the basic units. The county-based database contained soil information coarser than the polygon system built based on the 1:50 000 soil database. The modeled results with the two databases found similar spatial patterns of CH4 emissions in the Taihu

  4. Metabolic variation in rice cultivars of contrasting salt tolerance and its improvement by zinc in sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H P; Singh, T N

    2006-07-01

    The severity of Zn deficiency increased with increase in soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) with salt sensitive variety M1-48 scoring 6 at ESP 62 as against only score 3 by salt tolerant variety Pokkali under similar soil conditions. Strikingly, zinc contents were much higher in salt tolerant variety than in salt sensitive one. Zinc application increased zinc concentration in the roots by a factor of 2.85 to 3.87 in Pokkali whereas it rose from 2.37 to 4.35 times in M1-48 depending upon ESP but in the leaves it registered increase of 1.5 to 1.8 times only. In general, the concentrations of reducing sugar were less (about 2.2%) than that of non-reducing (about 3.8%) in both the varieties under normal soil conditions. However, the concentration of reducing sugar doubled (4.2-4.4%) at the highest ESP 62, whereas the concentration of non-reducing sugar though increased (4.1 to 5.1%) but not as vigorously as reducing one. Zinc application reduced the concentration of reducing sugar but not that of non-reducing at similar ESP values. In Pokkali, the concentrations of total sugar increased from 6% at ESP 20 to 9.34% at ESP 62, whereas it registered enhancements of 5.98 to 8.6% in M1-48 under similar conditions. The nitrate reductase (NR) activity decreased with increase in soil sodicity however, the varietal differences in NR activity were wider under Zn-stress than under conditions of applied zinc with Pokkali registering higher NR activities. Carbonic anhydrase activities were higher in salt tolerant variety. Inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity amounted to 23 and 45% in salt-sensitive variely M1-48 whereas only 19 and 33% in salt-tolerant variety Pokkali at ESP 41 and 62, respectively. The effects of zinc application at higher soil sodicity were more obvious in salt-sensitive variety than in salt-tolerant one. The findings suggest that the tolerance to Zn stress runs parallel to salt tolerance abilities of rice varieties.

  5. Presence, distribution and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rice-wheat continuous cropping soils close to five industrial parks of Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Long, Ling; Ge, Jing; Yang, Li-Xuan; Cheng, Jin-Jin; Sun, Ling-Xiang; Lu, Changying; Yu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) accumulated in agricultural soils are likely to threaten human health and ecosystem though the food chain, therefore, it is worth to pay more attention to soil contamination by PAHs. In this study, the presence, distribution and risk assessment of 16 priority PAHs in rice-wheat continuous cropping soils close to industrial parks of Suzhou were firstly investigated. The concentrations of the total PAHs ranged from 125.99 ng/g to 796.65 ng/g with an average of 352.94 ng/g. Phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLT), benzo [a] anthracene (BaA) and pyrene (PYR) were the major PAHs in those soil samples. The highest level of PAHs was detected in the soils around Chemical plant and Steelworks, followed by Printed wire board, Electroplate Factory and Paper mill. The composition of PAHs in the soils around Chemical plant was dominated by 3-ring PAHs, however, the predominant compounds were 4, 5-ring PAHs in the soils around other four factories. Meanwhile, the concentration of the total PAHs in the soils close to the factories showed a higher level of PAHs in November (during rice harvest) than that in June (during wheat harvest). Different with other rings of PAHs, 3-ring PAHs in the soils around Chemical plant and Steelworks had a higher concentration in June. The results of principal component analysis and isomeric ratio analysis suggested that PAHs in the studied areas mainly originated from biomass, coal and petroleum combustion. The risk assessment indicated that higher carcinogenic risk was found in those sites closer to the industrial park. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential of VIS-NIR-SWIR Spectroscopy from the Chinese Soil Spectral Library for Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilization Rates in the Paddy-Rice Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To meet growing food demand with limited land and reduced environmental impact, soil testing and formulated fertilization methods have been widely adopted around the world. However, conventional technology for investigating nitrogen fertilization rates (NFR is time consuming and expensive. Here, we evaluated the use of visible near-infrared shortwave-infrared (VIS-NIR-SWIR: 400–2500 nm spectroscopy for the assessment of NFR to provide necessary information for fast, cost-effective and precise fertilization rating. Over 2000 samples were collected from paddy-rice fields in 10 Chinese provinces; samples were added to the Chinese Soil Spectral Library (CSSL. Two kinds of modeling strategies for NFR, quantitative estimation of soil N prior to classification and qualitative by classification, were employed using partial least squares regression (PLSR, locally weighted regression (LWR, and support vector machine discriminant analogy (SVMDA. Overall, both LWR and SVMDA had moderate accuracies with Cohen’s kappa coefficients of 0.47 and 0.48, respectively, while PLSR had fair accuracy (0.37. We conclude that VIS-NIR-SWIR spectroscopy coupled with the CSSL appears to be a viable, rapid means for the assessment of NFR in paddy-rice soil. Based on qualitative classification of soil spectral data only, it is recommended that the SVMDA be adopted for rapid implementation.

  7. Impact of organic and mineral inputs onto soil biological and metabolic activities under a long-term rice-wheat cropping system in sub-tropical Indian Inceptisols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Nirmalendu; Datta, Ashim; Mitran, Tarik; Mandal, Biswapati; Mani, P K

    2016-01-01

    Long-term use of organic and mineral inputs has an overriding impact on soil biological and metabolic activities and crop management. Farm yard manure (FYM), paddy straw (PS) and green manure (GM, Sesbania sesban L.) were used for 24- years old rice (Oyza sativa L.) -wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping system in sub-tropical India to predict whether the screened soil biological and metabolic activities are correlated with system yield. The integrated approaches viz., NPK + FYM, NPK + PS and NPK + GM significantly increased both rice and wheat yield together by 67.5, 44.4 and 55.4%, respectively over control. However, for a few exceptions both soil microbial activity and metabolic activity were remarkably enhanced under integrated treatment NPK + FYM followed by NPK + PS, and NPK + GM, respectively. Among the studied attributes fluorescein diacetate hydrolyzing, dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase activity (β-glu) and microbial biomass C (C(mic)) were screened through principal component (PCA) and discriminate analysis (DA) that explained nearly 89% of total variations of the entire data set. Among the four identified attributes, only β-glu assay value could predict system yield (R2 = 0.65). Further, estimation of β-glu activity in soil can predict other soil biological properties (R2 = 0.96).

  8. Incorporation of plant residue-derived carbon into the microeukaryotic community in a rice field soil revealed by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Jun; Shibata, Manami; Lee, Chol Gyu; Watanabe, Takeshi; Asakawa, Susumu; Kimura, Makoto

    2012-02-01

    The microbial decomposition of plant residue is a central part of the carbon cycle in soil ecosystems. Here, we explored the microeukaryotic community responsible for the uptake of plant residue carbon in a rice field soil through DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) using dried rice callus labelled with (13) C as a model substrate. Molecular fingerprinting with PCR-DGGE showed that the total eukaryotic community in soil under drained (upland) conditions distinctly changed within 3 days after the callus was applied and stable thereafter. The predominant group of eukaryotes that incorporated callus carbon were fungi affiliated with the Mucoromycotina (Mortierella), Ascomycota (Galactomyces, Eleutherascus, Gibberella and Fusarium) and Zoopagomycotina (Syncephalis). 'Fungus-like' protists such as Pythium (stramenopiles) and Polymyxa (Cercozoa) were also involved in carbon flow from the callus. Some of these fungi and 'fungus-like' protists took up soil organic matter with time, which suggested a priming effect of the callus on the eukaryotic community. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of SIP not only to trace the carbon flow from fresh organic matter but also to study the effect of fresh organic matter on the utilization of soil organic matter by the microbial community. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Root-Derived Short-Chain Suberin Diacids from Rice and Rape Seed in a Paddy Soil under Rice Cultivar Treatments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ji, Haishi; Ding, Yuanjun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lianqing; Zhang, Dengxiao; Li, Zichuan; Sun, Jingling; Lashari, Muhammad Siddique; Joseph, Stephen; Meng, Yuanduo; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    ... with saponification and derivatization before analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Diacids C16 and C18 in bound lipids were detected both in rice and rape root samples, while diacids C20 and C22 were detected only in rape root samples...

  10. utilisation of rice husk ash for improvement of deficient soils in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    provision of stable and durable geotechnical structures, reduce cost of soil improvement and the environmental nuisance caused by the unused waste. This will .... tests at British Standard Light (BSL) compaction energy. Results obtained, indicate a ..... Structural, Construction and Architectural. Engineering, vol. 9(11): pp.

  11. Temporary wetland restoration after rice cultivation: is soil transfer required for aquatic plant colonization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller I.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean temporary wetlands have considerably declined in recent decades. Today, opportunities arise for the restoration of these wetlands due to land-use changes, such as the abandonment of cultivation. One critical question is whether communities, such as those observed in natural temporary wetlands, can develop alone or if active restoration should be implemented. In a series of experimental mesocosms, we transferred soil from several temporary wetlands chosen as a set of reference ecosystems. Four months after soil transfer, vegetation in transfer mesocosms was compared to that derived from spontaneous colonization (control mesocoms. Transfer mesocosms are colonized by all target hydrophyte species transferred with the soil and the resulting communities are similar to those of reference ecosystems. They also have fewer non-target species than the control mesocosms. Even though the study period was not sufficient to draw any definitive conclusion regarding the utility of forced dispersion by soil transfer, the preliminary results are promising for an application on a larger scale.

  12. Differential effects of nitrogenous fertilizers on methane-consuming microbes in rice field and forest soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohanty, S.R.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Floris, V.; Conrad, R.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of environmental perturbation (e.g., nitrogenous fertilizers) on the dynamics of methane fluxes from soils and wetland systems is poorly understood. Results of fertilizer studies are often contradictory, even within similar ecosystems. In the present study the hypothesis of whether these

  13. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta eMiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress have been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging

  14. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Submerged vanes are airfoils which are in general placed at certain angle with respect to the flow direction in a channel to induce artificial circulations downstream. By virtue of these artificially generated circulations, submerged vanes were utilized to protect banks of rivers against erosion, to control shifting of rivers, to avoid ...

  15. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Sharma

    velocities simulated from CFD using standard k-x model were very much in accordance with what it was measured by Wang and Odgaard [4]. Thus, model can be used to study the turbulence characteristics around submerged vanes and to predict various parameters downstream of the submerged vanes. After the model ...

  16. Evaluation of different agronomic managements on rice mesofauna: a case study in Piedmont (North Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Silvia; d'Errico, Giada; Gagnarli, Elena; Barzanti, Gian Paolo; Cito, Annarita; Papini, Rossella; Simoni, Sauro; Roversi, Pio Federico

    2014-05-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop in the developing world and, in Europe, Italy is leader in rice production. The intensive cultivation of rice leads to continuous inputs chemicals as fertilizers, weeding and pesticides. The intensification of sustainable rice production by minimizing the impact on the environment of cultivation is a main issue . In this context this study, supported by the Italian National Project POLORISO (MIPAAF), aims to afford preliminary indications about the evaluation of ecological impact by different managements on soil mesofauna biodiversity. Biomonitoring of soil mesofauna, in particular nematodes and microarthropods, allows to determine the effects of crop management on the communities; the lack and/or reduction of these organisms can allow inference on the soil quality. This preliminary study aims at evaluate the different influence of conventional, integrated and biological managements on mesofauna communities. The samplings were conducted in Summer and Autumn 2013 near Vercelli (North Italy) in three study sites with similar pedologic characteristics but different in control strategies (conventional, organic farming, Integrated Pest Management (IPM)). The extraction of nematodes and microarthropods was performed by Bermann method and the Berlese-Tullgren selector, respectively. All specimens were counted and determined up to the order level. The biological soil quality was evaluated by Maturity Index (MI) for nematodes, BSQar and the soil Biological Classes (sBC)(range I-VII) for microarthropods. Regarding nematodes, Rhabditidae, Dorylamidae, Mononchidae, Tylenchidae and Heteroderidae were the most represented families. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) evidenced that the trophic group of plant parasites was favored in organic farming, while groups of omnivores and predators were abundant in the other managements. The lowest nematodes' abundance was found in submerged rice soil with dominance of omnivores and plant

  17. Floristic diversity of the soil weed seed bank in a rice-growing area of Brazil: in situ and ex situ evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Luiz Ribeiro Mesquita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the ex situ and in situ floristic diversity of the soil weed seed bank of a rice field in northeastern Brazil. In a rice field in the county of Bacabal, located in the state of Maranhão, thirty 25-m² plots were laid out. From 15 plots, soil samples (6/plot; n = 90 were taken with a soil probe (25 × 16 × 3 cm and placed in aluminum trays in the greenhouse. From the remaining 15 plots, weed samples (6/plot; n = 90 were taken with the same soil probe. The number of seeds was estimated by germination. We evaluated the numbers of species and individuals, as well as the density, frequency, abundance and importance value (IV for each species. Diversity was computed by the Shannon index (H'. We recorded 13,892 individuals (among 20 families, 40 genera and 60 species, of which 11,530 (among 50 species germinated ex situ and 2,362 (among 34 species germinated in situ. The family Cyperaceae had the highest number of species (16, followed by Poaceae (10. The dominant species, in situ and ex situ, were Schoenoplectus juncoides (IV=47.4% and Ludwigia octovalvis (IV=34.8%, respectively. Floristic diversity was higher ex situ (H'=2.66. The information obtained here could help determine the infestation potential of these species, which could lead to improved management strategies.

  18. Performance of Low-Volume Roads with Wearing Course Layer of Silty Sandy Soil Modified with Rice Husk Ash and Lime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behak Katz, L.; Musso Laespiga, M.

    2016-07-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) is a by-product of rice milling. Its use as soil stabilizer is a way to replace the final disposal with environmental benefit. However, RHA is not cementitious itself but when mixed with lime forms cements which improve the soil properties. A research of performance of a silty sandy soil modified with RHA and lime as wearing course layer of low-volume roads was conducted through two full-scale test sections with different pavements built in Artigas, northern Uruguay. The alkaline reactivity of RHA is low because the husk burning is not controlled. The soil-RHA-lime mix design was conducted according to the Thompson’s Method. The pavement test sections were monitored through deflection measures by Benkelman beam and observations of surface condition. The deflections decreased over time in both test sections due to the development of cementation of the study materials. After one year, the dust emission was reduced, the wet skid resistance of pavement surfaces improved and there was not rutting. The researched pavements have had a good performance under the existing traffic and environmental conditions, demonstrating that wearing course layer of silty sand modified with RHA and lime is an alternative to improve the condition of low-volume roads and to replace the final disposal of RHA, with environmental, social and economic benefits. (Author)

  19. Reducing conditions on barium absorption in rice plants cultured in BaSO4-enriched soil

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães,Marcio Osvaldo Lima; Amaral Sobrinho,Nelson Moura Brasil do; Zonta, Everaldo; Becerra, Alfredo Tolón; Lastra-Bravo, Xavier Bolívar; Coutinho, Izabella Bezerra

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the possible solubilization of barium sulfate in soils under reducing conditions and its effects on barium bioavailability, an Oryza sativa pot trial was established. Increasing barium doses and two redox potential conditions were evaluated. The geochemical fractionation data demonstrated that reducing conditions led to an increase in the levels of more labile forms of barium and a reduction in more stable forms. Furthermore, higher doses of barium were found to have a negative im...

  20. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  1. Over-expression of Sub1 A, a submergence tolerance gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub1A, an ethylene-response-factor-like (ERE-like) gene, mediates the extinguished submergence tolerance of rice. To gain further insight into the function of Sub1A in other species, we transformed tobacco plants with the gene under the control of the ubiquitin promoter. Compared to the wild-type plants, transgenic plants ...

  2. Abscisic acid and the key enzymes and genes in sucrose-to-starch conversion in rice spikelets in response to soil drying during grain filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqin; Xu, Yunji; Chen, Tingting; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-05-01

    Abscisic acid mediates the effect of post-anthesis soil drying on grain filling through regulating the activities of key enzymes and expressions of genes involved in sucrose-to-starch conversion in rice spikelets. This study investigated if abscisic acid (ABA) would mediate the effect of post-anthesis soil drying on grain filling through regulating the key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion in rice (Oryza sativa L.) spikelets. Two rice cultivars were field-grown. Three treatments, well-watered (WW), moderate soil drying (MD), and severe soil drying (SD), were imposed from 6 days after full heading until maturity. When compared with those under the WW, grain filling rate, grain weight, and sink activity, in terms of the activities and gene expression levels of sucrose synthase, ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, and starch branching enzyme, in inferior spikelets were substantially increased under the MD, whereas they were markedly decreased in both superior and inferior spikelets under the SD. The two cultivars showed the same tendencies. Both MD and SD increased ABA content and expression levels of its biosynthesis genes in spikelets, with more increase under the SD than the MD. ABA content was significantly correlated with grain filling rate and sink activities under both WW and MD, while the correlations were not significant under the SD. Application of a low concentration ABA to WW plants imitated the results under the MD, and applying with a high concentration ABA showed the effect of the SD. The results suggest that ABA plays a vital role in grain filling through regulating sink activity and functions in a dose-dependent manner. An elevated ABA level under the MD enhances, whereas a too high level of ABA under the SD decreases, sink activity.

  3. Effect of an Alcaligenes faecalis inoculant strain on bacterial communities in flooded soil microcosms planted with rice seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, M.; Smalla, K.; Heuer, H.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2000-01-01

    The fate and impact of Alcaligenes faecalis strain A1501R, a rifampicin-resistant derivative of a rice inoculant strain, were studied in flooded silt loam microcosms planted with rice seedlings. Selective plating revealed that strain A1501R survived at high, initially stable and later slowly

  4. Comparing rice germplasm groups for growth, grain yield and weed-suppressive ability under aerobic soil conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, D.L.; Atlin, G.N.; Bastiaans, L.; Spiertz, J.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Germplasm and cultivars need to be selected as parents for breeding weed-competitive aerobic rice in the tropics. Forty rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars belonging to the aus, indica and tropical japonica germplasm groups, or derived from crosses among them, were evaluated in adjacent weed-free and

  5. Composting of rice straw with oilseed rape cake and poultry manure and its effects on faba bean (Vicia faba L.) growth and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Magdi T; Horiuchi, Takatsugu; Oba, Shinya

    2004-06-01

    Composting of rice straw with poultry manure and oilseed rape cake and its effects on growth and yield of faba bean and soil properties was studied in pot experiments at Gifu University, Japan in 2001/2002. The composts reached maturity in 90 days, were rich in organic matter and mineral nutrients, had a high level of stability, and no phytotoxicity. The addition of compost (20-200 g pot(-1)) improved selected soil chemical (increased total N, total C and CEC), physical (decreased particle density) and biological (increased soil respiration rate) properties. Application of composts at a rate of 20 g pot(-1) significantly increased growth, yield, yield components and total crude protein of faba bean plants. The benefit of this compost without chemical fertilizer demonstrated the validity and possibility of sustainable agronomic performance of faba bean using locally available recycled organic materials. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE and soil warming on CH4 emission from a rice paddy field: impact assessment and stoichiometric evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Okada

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Paddy fields are an important source of atmospheric CH4, the second most important greenhouse gas. There is a strong concern that the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2] and global warming are further stimulating CH4 emissions, but the magnitude of this stimulation varies substantially by study, and few open-field evaluations have been conducted. Here we report results obtained at a Japanese rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE site under water and soil temperature elevation during two growing seasons. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of high [CO2] (ambient + 200 μmol mol−1 and elevated soil temperature (+ 2 °C on CH4 emissions under completely open-field conditions. We found about 80% enhancement in total seasonal emissions by the additive effects of FACE and warming, indicating a strong positive feedback effect of global warming. The enhancement in CH4 emission from the FACE-effect alone (+ 26% was statistically non-significant (P = 0.19. Nevertheless, observed positive correlations between CH4 emissions and rice biomass agreed well with previous studies, suggesting that higher photosynthesis led to greater rhizodeposition, which then acted as substrates for methanogenesis. Soil warming increased the emission by 44% (P < 0.001, which was equivalent to a Q10 of 5.5. Increased rice biomass by warming could only partly explain the enhanced CH4 emissions, but stoichiometric analysis of the electron budget indicated that even a moderate enhancement in organic matter decomposition due to soil warming can cause a large increase in CH4 production under conditions where Fe(III reduction, which was little affected by soil warming, dominates electron-accepting processes. At later rice growth stages, advanced root senescence due to elevated temperature probably provided more substrate for methanogenesis. Our stoichiometric evaluation showed that in situ Fe reduction characteristics and root turnover in response to elevated

  7. Contrasting effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on Cu and Cd uptake by different rice varieties grown on contaminated soils with two levels of metals: Implication for phytoextraction and food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhongyang [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Tang Shirong, E-mail: tangshir@hotmail.com [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Deng Xiaofang; Wang Ruigang; Song Zhengguo [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Open Key Laboratory of Agro-environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China)

    2010-05-15

    A pot experiment in six open-top chambers with two levels of CO{sub 2} and two multi-metal contaminated soils was conducted to investigate combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} levels and metals (Cu and Cd) on rice. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly increased the total dry weight biomass of six Chinese rice by 20-108 and 32-142% for low and high levels of contaminated soils, respectively. We observed dilution/little varied phenomena in grain Cu concentration in six rice varieties grown on both contaminated soils under elevated CO{sub 2}. We found significantly higher Cd concentrations in the parts of three rice varieties under elevated CO{sub 2}, but lower levels for the others. Two major conclusions can be drawn from our study: (1) rice varieties with significantly increased biomass and metal uptake under elevated CO{sub 2} exhibit greater potential for phytoextraction and (2) given expected global increases in CO{sub 2} concentration, CO{sub 2}-induced accumulation of metals in rice might be a component contributing to the potential health risk in the future, with Cd being a more important threat to human health than Cu.

  8. Microbial ecology on the microcosm level: Activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria during early succession in a flooded rice field soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play an important role in natural wetlands and rice fields preventing large amounts of methane from escaping into the atmosphere. The occurrence of both type I and type II methanotrophs in the soil surface layer has been demonstrated in many studies. However, there is no profound understanding which of them are responsible for the oxidizing activity and how they differ ecologically. Hence, a gradient microcosm system was applied simulating oxic-anoxic interfaces of water saturated soils to unravel population dynamics in early succession of methanotrophs in a flooded rice paddy. Additionally, environmental parameters were analyzed to link environment, populations, and their specific activity. We measured pmoA-based (particulate methane monooxygenase) terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles both on transcription and population level. DNA T-RFLP patterns showed no major differences in the methanotrophic community structure remaining relatively constant over time. In contrast the active methanotrophic community structure as detected by pmoA mRNA T-RFLP analysis clearly demonstrated a distinct pattern from DNA T-RFLP profiles. While type II represented the most prominent group on the population level it seems to play a minor role on the transcription level. Furthermore there were no clear implications towards a link between soil parameters (e.g. NH4+ concentration) and methanotrophic community structure.

  9. Response of methane emissions, redox potential, and pH to eucalyptus biochar and rice straw addition in a paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipa Thammasom

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to comprehend the links between soil Eh and pH changes in eucalyptus biochar (BC and rice straw (RS amended soils and CH4 emissions. Increased CH4 emission rates and high total CH4 emissions (TCH4 were found in RS soils. In contrast, higher concentrations of refractory lignin, fixed C and volatile matter in BC suppressed C mineralization and terminal methanogenesis, resulting in low TCH4 . Eh in RS soils decreased more rapidly than in BC soils during the first phase as a single exponential function. This indicated that RS is a fast electron donor for an instant electron acceptor reduction and methanogenesis. During the second phase, Eh in BC soils decreased to very low values, probably because of the higher concentrations of electron donating phenolic compounds coupled with terminal methanogenesis. Meanwhile, hydrogen is consumed via electron acceptor reduction and methanogenesis simultaneously produce OH- corresponded with a rise of pH, a characteristic of reverse single exponential function.

  10. Responses of bacterial communities in arable soils in a rice-wheat cropping system to different fertilizer regimes and sampling times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhao

    Full Text Available Soil physicochemical properties, soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in a rice-wheat cropping system subjected to different fertilizer regimes were investigated in two seasons (June and October. All fertilizer regimes increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Both fertilizer regime and time had a significant effect on soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure. The combined application of inorganic fertilizer and manure organic-inorganic fertilizer significantly enhanced the bacterial diversity in both seasons. The bacterial communities across all samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi at the phylum level. Permutational multivariate analysis confirmed that both fertilizer treatment and season were significant factors in the variation of the composition of the bacterial community. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis distances further revealed that bacterial communities were separated primarily by season. The effect of fertilizer treatment is significant (P = 0.005 and accounts for 7.43% of the total variation in bacterial community. Soil nutrients (e.g., available K, total N, total P and organic matter rather than pH showed significant correlation with the majority of abundant taxa. In conclusion, both fertilizer treatment and seasonal changes affect soil properties, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure. The application of NPK plus manure organic-inorganic fertilizer may be a sound fertilizer practice for sustainable food production.

  11. Responses of Bacterial Communities in Arable Soils in a Rice-Wheat Cropping System to Different Fertilizer Regimes and Sampling Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Ni, Tian; Li, Yong; Xiong, Wu; Ran, Wei; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2014-01-01

    Soil physicochemical properties, soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structures in a rice-wheat cropping system subjected to different fertilizer regimes were investigated in two seasons (June and October). All fertilizer regimes increased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. Both fertilizer regime and time had a significant effect on soil physicochemical properties and bacterial community structure. The combined application of inorganic fertilizer and manure organic-inorganic fertilizer significantly enhanced the bacterial diversity in both seasons. The bacterial communities across all samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi at the phylum level. Permutational multivariate analysis confirmed that both fertilizer treatment and season were significant factors in the variation of the composition of the bacterial community. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis distances further revealed that bacterial communities were separated primarily by season. The effect of fertilizer treatment is significant (P = 0.005) and accounts for 7.43% of the total variation in bacterial community. Soil nutrients (e.g., available K, total N, total P and organic matter) rather than pH showed significant correlation with the majority of abundant taxa. In conclusion, both fertilizer treatment and seasonal changes affect soil properties, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure. The application of NPK plus manure organic-inorganic fertilizer may be a sound fertilizer practice for sustainable food production. PMID:24465530

  12. High resolution depth distribution of Bacteria, Archaea, methanotrophs, and methanogens in the bulk and rhizosphere soils of a flooded rice paddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jung eLee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The communities and abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, along with the oxygen, methane, and total organic carbon (TOC concentrations, were investigated along a depth gradient in a flooded rice paddy. Broad patterns in vertical profiles of oxygen, methane, TOC, and microbial abundances were similar in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, though methane and TOC concentrations and 16S rRNA gene copies were clearly higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil. Oxygen concentrations decreased sharply to below detection limits at the 8 mm depth. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial and archaeal communities varied according to the oxic, oxic-anoxic, and anoxic zones, indicating that oxygen is a determining factor for the distribution of bacterial and archaeal communities. Aerobic methanotrophs were maximally observed near the oxic-anoxic interface, while methane, TOC, and methanogens were highest in the rhizosphere soil at 30–200 mm depth, suggesting that methane is produced mainly from organic carbon derived from rice plants and is metabolized aerobically. The relative abundances of type I methanotrophs such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylocaldum decreased more drastically than those of type II methanotrophs (such as Methylocystis and Methylosinus with increasing depth. Methanosaeta and Methanoregula were predominant methanogens at all depths, and the relative abundances of Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanosphaerula, and GOM_Arc_I increased with increasing depth. Based on contrasts between absolute abundances of methanogens and methanotrophs at depths sampled across rhizosphere and bulk soils (especially millimeter-scale slices at the surface, we have identified populations of methanogens (Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, Methanocella, Methanobacterium, and Methanosphaerula and methanotrophs (Methylosarcina, Methylococcus, Methylosinus, and unclassified Methylocystaceae that are likely physiologically

  13. Improving Rice-Based Cropping Pattern Through Soil Moisture and Integrated Nutrient Management in Mid-Tropical Plain Zone of Tripura, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. SINGH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in three fallow paddy fields situated on the mid-tropical plain zone of a northeastern Indian state (Tripura to provide rice fallow management options using leftover soil moisture and nutrients. The three experimental fields were managed by growing rice under the system of rice intensification as the rainy season crop and then groundnut, lentil, rapeseed and potato as the post-rainy season crops. Fertilization under the integrated nutrient management system and lifesaving irrigation at critical stages of each post-rainy season crop were provided. Results showed that the field water use efficiency values were 5.93, 2.39, 2.37 and 59.76 kg/(hm2·mm and that the yield of these crops increased by approximately 20%, 34%, 40% and 20% after applying two lifesaving irrigations in groundnut, lentil, rapeseed and potato, respectively. Therefore, fallow paddy field can provide possible profitable crops during the post-rainy season by utilizing the residual moisture and minimum supplemental irrigation under improved nutrient management practices.

  14. Quantitative Estimation of Soil Carbon Sequestration in Three Land Use Types (Orchard, Paddy Rice and Forest in a Part of Ramsar Lands, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zakieh pahlavan yali

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing Greenhouse Gases in atmosphere is the main cause of climate and ecosystems changes. The most important greenhouse gas is CO2 that causes global warming or the greenhouse effect. One of the known solutions that reduces atmospheric carbon and helps to improve the situation, is carbon sequestration in vegetation cover and soil. Carbon sequestration refers to the change in atmospheric CO2 into organic carbon compounds by plants and capture it for a certain time . However, the ecosystems with different vegetation have Impressive Influence on soil carbon sequestration (SCS. Soil as the main component of these ecosystems is a world-wide indicator which has been known to play an important role in global balance of carbon sequestration. Furthermore, carbon sequestration can be a standard world trade and becomes guaranteed. Costs of transfer of CO2 (carbon transfer From the atmosphere into the soil based on the negative effects of increased CO2 on Weather is always increasing, This issue can be faced by developing countries to create a new industry, especially when conservation and restoration of rangeland to follow. This research was regarded due to estimation of SCS in three land use types (orchard, paddy rice and forest in a Part of Ramsar Lands, Northern Iran. Materials and Methods: Ramsar city with an area of about 729/7 km2 is located in the western part of Mazandaran province. Its height above sea level is 20 meters. Ramsar city is situated in a temperate and humid climate. Land area covered by forest, orchard and paddy rice. After field inspection of the area, detailed topographic maps of the specified zone on the study were also tested. In each of the three land types, 500 hectares in the every growing and totally 1,500 hectares as study area were selected .For evaluation the sequestration of carbon in different vegetation systems,15 soil profile selected and sampling from depth of 0 to 100 centimetres of each profile

  15. Evaluation of estimated daily intake (EDI) of cadmium and lead for rice (Oryza sativa L.) in calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamannejadian, Ali; Sayyad, Gholamabbas; Moezzi, Abdolamir; Jahangiri, Alireza

    2013-04-08

    The excessive amounts of cadmium and lead in food chain can cause health problems for humans and ecosystem. Rice is an important food in human diet. Therefore this study was conducted in order to investigate cadmium and Lead concentrations in seed rice (Oryza saliva) of paddy fields in southwest of Iran. A total of 70 rice seed samples were collected from paddy fields in five regions of Khuzestan province, Southwest Iran, during harvesting time. In the samples cadmium and Lead concentrations were measured. To assess the daily intake of Cadmium and Lead by rice, daily consumption of rice was calculated. The results showed that average concentrations of Cadmium and Lead in rice seeds were 273.6 and 121.8 μg/kg, respectively. Less than 72% of rice seed samples had Cadmium concentrations above 200 μg/kg (i.e. Guide value for cadmium); and less than 3% had Lead concentrations above 150 μg/kg (i.e. Guide value for Lead). The estimated daily intakes of cadmium by the local population was calculated to 0.59 μg/day kg bw, which corresponds to 59% of the tolerable daily intakes (i.e. 1 μg/day kg bw). Eleven out of 70 samples (15.71%) exceed the tolerable daily intakes. The dietary intakes for Lead in the local population ranged from 0.22 to 0.47 μg/day kg bw. Tolerable daily intakes for Lead is 3.6 μg/day kg bw. As a whole, long term consumption of the local rice may bear high risk of heavy metal exposure to the consumer in the study region.

  16. CH4 and N2O Emissions from Rice Paddy Soils in Vietnam - Identifying Regional Hotspots and Quantifying the Total Emission Strength using a Biogeochemical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Kraus, D.; Mai, T. V.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2016-12-01

    Agriculture is the economic backbone for over two thirds of Vietnam's population, providing food security, employment and income. However, agriculture in Vietnam is challenged by climate change and climate extremes and at the same time, agriculture remains a key source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first bi-annual update report (BUR1), published in 2014 indicated that while the proportion of GHG emissions from agriculture had fallen from 43.1% to 33.2% from 2000 to 2010, the emission total increased from 65.1 mio to 88.4 mio t CO2e. Reducing GHG emissions from agriculture has thus become a key issue within the national strategy of GHG emission management. Here we present first data using IPCC Tier 3 modeling for quantifying the source strength of rice based crop systems for CH4 and N2O. We used LandscapeDNDC and linked it to a newly developed spatial landuse and land management database (climate, soil properties, and detailed field management data). Site application showed good agreement of simulated biomass, yield and GHG emissions with field observations, providing confidence for model use at national scale. Our results also show good agreement with national yield data and total annual emissions of the simulated period (2006-2015) ranged from 1060 - 1502 kt CH4 and 6.2 - 7.7 kt N2O, respectively. The dominating emission hotspot for CH4 is the Mekong Delta region with its double and triple rice cropping systems (819 kt CH4/yr, Fig. 1). With regard to N2O, emission hotspots have been identified to be closely related to regions with high fertilizer use and single to double rice cropping systems (Fig. 1). Though, our emission estimates are likely representing the best of current knowledge on national GHG emissions from rice based systems in Vietnam, the uncertainty is significant as information on rice system management remains vague. Sensitivity studies show that changes in field management affecting the soil organic carbon dynamics (duration of flooding

  17. Relationship between CH₄ and N₂O flux from soil and their ambient mixing ratio in a riparian rice-based agroecosystem of tropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, A; Santra, S C; Adhya, T K

    2011-12-01

    Temporal variations of the ambient mixing ratio of greenhouse gas (CH(4) and N(2)O) in a riparian rice-based agro-ecosystem of tropical region were studied during 2005-2006 in coastal Odisha. The endeavour was made with the hypothesis that the ambient mixing ratio of CH(4) and N(2)O depends on the changes in the flux of CH(4) and N(2)O from the rice fields in the riparian rice ecosystems. A higher ambient mixing ratio of CH(4) was recorded during the tillering to grain filling stages of the rice crop, during both dry and wet seasons. The higher ambient mixing ratio of CH(4) during the wet season may attribute to the higher CH(4) emission from the rice field. The average mixing ratio of CH(4) was recorded as 1.84 ± 0.05 ppmv and 1.85 ± 0.06 ppmv during 2005 and 2006, respectively. The ambient CH(4) mixing ratio was recorded negatively correlated with the average ambient temperature. The N(2)O mixing ratio ranged from 261.57 to 399.44 ppbv with an average of 330.57 ppbv during 2005. However, the average mixing ratio of N(2)O was recorded as 318.83 ± 20.00 ppbv during 2006. The N(2)O mixing ratio was recorded to be negatively correlated with rainfall and average ambient temperature. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.209) of N(2)O with sunshine hours may attribute to the photochemical break down of N(2)O. The temporal variation of N(2)O flux from the rice field does not affect the ambient mixing ratio of N(2)O in the same way as in the case of the ambient mixing ratio of CH(4). However, the higher mixing ratio of N(2)O during the fallow period of the post monsoon period may attribute to the N(2)O flux from soil. Results indicate that intensively cultivated coastal ecosystems can be a major source of ambient greenhouse gas.

  18. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Rice Paddies as Influenced by Climate Change under Scenario A2 and B2 of an i-EPIC model of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppol Arunrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in soils constitutes an important option that can be used to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and reduce environmental impacts. Soil organic carbon (SOC is both a source of carbon release and a sink for carbon sequestration. Our objectives in this study were to validate the interactive Environmental Policy Impact Calculator (i-EPIC model version 0509, as well as to estimate SOC sequestration under climate change scenarios A2 and B2 SRES emission scenarios in Thailand. The SOC estimated by i-EPIC was compared with data from the Office of Soil Resources Survey and Research, Land Development Department. The results indicated that performance testing of i-EPIC is able to estimate SOC. Validation of SOC proved to be satisfactory with a resulting root mean square error (RMSE % value of 34.60. The SOC content showed a decreasing trend under B2 and A2 climate scenarios (average 0.87% and 0.85%, respectively compared to the reference from 2007 (average 0.92%. Stepwise regression analysis also revealed that carbon from residue decomposition, biomass pool carbon, and the total change of the carbon pool were directly correlated with the SOC (R2= 0.99, p< 0.01. Furthermore, the change from rain supplied water to irrigation also resulted in an increase of carbon inputs but a decrease in the SOC sequestered during the 2007-2017 period. Regression analyses indicated that soil carbon sequestration responds linearly to carbon input. Significant changes in carbon input as well as decreases in SOC levels were observed as temperature and precipitation increased. Based on the testing and analysis, we concluded that i-EPIC is capable of reliably simulating effects of climate change on SOC sequestration. Based on the results, this knowledge and information can increase effectiveness in the promotion of integrated rice management for rice production in Thailand.

  19. Sealing rice field boundaries in Bangladesh: a pilot study demonstrating reductions in water use, arsenic loading to field soils, and methane emissions from irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Pracht, Lara E; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf

    2014-08-19

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated and methane-rich groundwater loads arsenic into field soils and releases methane into the atmosphere. We tested the water-savings potential of sealing field bunds (raised boundaries around field edges) as a way to mitigate these negative outcomes. We found that, on average, bund sealing reduced seasonal water use by 52 ± 17% and decreased arsenic loading to field soils by 15 ± 4%; greater savings in both water use and arsenic loading were achieved in fields with larger perimeter-to-area ratios (i.e., smaller fields). Our study is the first to quantify emission of methane from irrigation water in Bangladesh, a currently unaccounted-for methane source. Irrigation water applied to unsealed fields at our site emits 18 to 31 g of methane per square-meter of field area per season, potentially doubling the atmospheric input of methane from rice cultivation. Bund sealing reduced the emission of methane from irrigation water by 4 to 19 g/m(2). While the studied outcomes of bund sealing are positive and compelling, widespread implementation of the technique should consider other factors, such as effect on yields, financial costs, and impact on the hydrologic system. We provide an initial and preliminary assessment of these implementation factors.

  20. Change of water sources reduces health risks from heavy metals via ingestion of water, soil, and rice in a riverine area, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li'e; Mo, Zhaoyu; Qin, Jian; Li, Qin; Wei, Yanhong; Ma, Shuyan; Xiong, Yuxia; Liang, Guiqiang; Qing, Li; Chen, Zhiming; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Yunfeng

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluates the effect of water source change on heavy metal concentrations in water, paddy soil, and rice, as well as the health risks to residents of three riverine communities in South China. The results show that after substituting the sources of drinking water, heavy metal levels (except for Pb at Tangjun) in drinking water were below WHO guideline values and the potential risk from drinking water may be negligible. The As (46.2-66.8%), Pb (65.7-82.6%), Cd (50.8-55.0%), and Hg (28.3-32.6%) concentrations in paddy soils in Sanhe and Lasha significantly (psoil ingestion and rice consumption. Despite that total non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks at Sanhe and Lasha were significantly decreased, they still exceeded the maximum acceptable limits recommended by US EPA, indicating that residents of these two communities remain at high risks of both non-cancer and cancer effects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Evaluation of Heavy Metals Contamination from Environment to Food Matrix by TXRF: The Case of Rice and Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabjola Bilo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the chemical analysis of contaminated soils of India and the rice grown in the same area. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a well-established technique for elemental chemical analysis of environmental samples, and it can be a useful tool to assess food safety. Metals uptake in rice crop grown in soils from different areas was studied. In this work soil, rice husk and rice samples were analyzed after complete solubilization of samples by microwave acid digestion. Heavy metals concentration detected in rice samples decreases in the following order: Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr. The metal content in rice husk was higher than in rice. This study suggests, for the first time, a possible role of heavy metals filter played by rice husk. The knowledge of metals sequestration capability of rice husk may promote some new management practices for rice cultivation to preserve it from pollution.

  2. Effects of submergence on growth and survival of saplings of three wetland trees differing in adaptive mechanisms for flood tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Iwanaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Withstanding total submergence and reaeration following submergence is essential for the survival and establishment of wetland species. We focused on “LOES–low oxygen escape syndrome” and “LOQS–low oxygen quiescence syndrome” and compared tolerances to total submergence among wetland woody species differing in morphological adaptation to soil flooding. Area of study, materials and methods: This study examined the survival of 2-year-old saplings of Taxodium distichum and Metasequioia glyptostroboides (LOQS species, and Alnus japonica (LOES species, during and after total submergence. Saplings were completely submerged, then de-submerged to determine trends in survival and growth Main results: The M. glyptostroboides and A. japonica saplings could not survive prolonged submergence for more than 8 weeks, whereas saplings of T. distichum survived for over 2 years. Submerged saplings of all species showed no significant growth or modifications in morphology and anatomy under water, such as shoot elongation, adventitious root formation, and/or aerenchyma development. All T. distichum saplings that were de-submerged in the second year had the same pattern of shoot growth regardless of differences in timing and seasonality of de-submergence. Wood formation in T. distichum saplings ceased during submergence and resumed after de-submergence in spring and summer, but not in autumn. Research highlights: T. distichum saplings, which survived longer submergence periods than A. japonica and M. glyptostroboides, had physiological characteristics, such as suspension of growth and metabolism, which allowed survival of protracted total submergence (at least 2 years when saplings were immersed during the dormant stage before leaf flushing.

  3. Microbial lipids in Paddy Soils of the Yangtze Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Niggemann, Cornelia; Bannert, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Cao, Zhihong; Schwark, Lorenz

    2010-05-01

    Geobiochemical studies of rice paddy soils and their effect on the global carbon cycle are of paramount importance. Paddy soils comprise manmade wetlands because soil flooding is a prerequisite for lowland rice cultivation. Except for sulphate-rich substrates, rice growth is not very sensitive to soil conditions prevailing prior to conversion of marine tidal flat sediments to paddy cultivation. Thus, soil management practices, such as artificial submergence or drainage, ploughing and puddling (i.e. ploughing a submerged soil), manuring, liming, and fertilization, are the major driving factors of paddy soil development. Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and humification proceeds in hydromorphic soils at a slower rate than in well-drained, aerated soils. Rice paddy soils thus also represent a suitable model system to study fundamental aspects of redox sensitive soil processes. These processes are of special interest because in flooded rice fields the anaerobic fermentation of SOM leads to the release of methane and to denitrification losses of inorganic nitrogen. Here we present results from a chronosequence study of paddy soils with different and well known starting dates of cultivation, in the Zhejiang province (Yangtze River delta) by land reclamation through the building of protective dikes over the past 2000 years. We here describe the biomarker geochemistry of six paddy soils that developed on marine tidal sediments and where cultivation started 50, 100, 300, 700, 1000 or 2000 years before present. As reference substrates recent marine and lacustrine sediments were selected. The differentiation of the lipid biomass was achieved by investigating glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT). These specific organic geochemical biomarkers allow for determining the abundance of fossil microbial consortia (archaea and bacteria input) into paddy soils, justified by the diversity of the archaeal and bacterial cell membrane constituents. The dominant proportion of

  4. AN ASSESSMENT OF LAND SUITABILITY FOR RICE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    Abstract. This study examined the suitability of the soil in Dobi, Gwagwalada Area Council, FCT, Nigeria for rice cultivation. Soil samples were collected from the plot using systematic sampling procedure, at two standard depths of 0-15cm (top soil) and 16-30cm (sub soil). Standard procedures as applied to tropical soils ...

  5. Drought and submergence tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hewei; Zhou, Yufan; Oksenberg, Nir; Ronald, Pamela

    2017-11-14

    The invention provides methods of genetically modified plants to increase tolerance to drought and/or submergence. The invention additionally provides plants having increased drought and/or submergence tolerance engineered using such methods.

  6. Genome sequence of the verrucomicrobium Opitutus terrae PB90-1, an abundant inhabitant of rice paddy soil ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the deeply branching phylum Verrucomicrobia are rarely cultured yet commonly detected in metagenomic libraries from aquatic, terrestrial, and intestinal environments. We have sequenced the genome of Opitutus terrae PB90-1, a fermentative anaerobe within this phylum, isolated from rice

  7. Effects of ammonium-based fertilisation on microbial processes involved in methane emission from soils planted with rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Hahn, A.P.; Arth, I.R.; Frenzel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The emission of the greenhouse gas CH4 from rice paddies is strongly influenced by management practices such as the input of ammonium-based fertilisers. We assessed the impact of different levels (200 and 400 kgN.ha(-1)) of urea and (NH4)(2)HPO4 on the microbial processes involved in production and

  8. Submerged membrane distillation for desalination of water

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2016-10-27

    Submerged membrane modules for use for desalination of water are disclosed. In one or more aspects, the membrane modules can be submerged either in a feed solution tank or the feed solution can pass through the lumen side of the membrane submerged within the tank. The feed solution can be a water-based feed stream containing an amount of salt.

  9. Epiphytic Cyanobacteria on Chara vulgaris Are the Main Contributors to N2 Fixation in Rice Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariosa, Yoanna; Quesada, Antonio; Aburto, Juan; Carrasco, David; Carreres, Ramón; Leganés, Francisco; Fernández Valiente, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of nitrogenase activity in the rice-soil system and the possible contribution of epiphytic cyanobacteria on rice plants and other macrophytes to this activity were studied in two locations in the rice fields of Valencia, Spain, in two consecutive crop seasons. The largest proportion of photodependent N2 fixation was associated with the macrophyte Chara vulgaris in both years and at both locations. The nitrogen fixation rate associated with Chara always represented more than 45% of the global nitrogenase activity measured in the rice field. The estimated average N2 fixation rate associated with Chara was 27.53 kg of N ha−1 crop−1. The mean estimated N2 fixation rates for the other parts of the system for all sampling periods were as follows: soil, 4.07 kg of N ha−1 crop−1; submerged parts of rice plants, 3.93 kg of N ha−1 crop−1; and roots, 0.28 kg of N ha−1 crop−1. Micrographic studies revealed the presence of epiphytic cyanobacteria on the surface of Chara. Three-dimensional reconstructions by confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed no cyanobacterial cells inside the Chara structures. Quantification of epiphytic cyanobacteria by image analysis revealed that cyanobacteria were more abundant in nodes than in internodes (on average, cyanobacteria covered 8.4% ± 4.4% and 6.2% ± 5.0% of the surface area in the nodes and internodes, respectively). Epiphytic cyanobacteria were also quantified by using a fluorometer. This made it possible to discriminate which algal groups were the source of chlorophyll a. Chlorophyll a measurements confirmed that cyanobacteria were more abundant in nodes than in internodes (on average, the chlorophyll a concentrations were 17.2 ± 28.0 and 4.0 ± 3.8 μg mg [dry weight] of Chara−1 in the nodes and internodes, respectively). These results indicate that this macrophyte, which is usually considered a weed in the context of rice cultivation, may help maintain soil N fertility in the rice field

  10. Sequestration of As by iron plaque on the roots of three rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars in a low-P soil with or without P fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Li, J-H; Zhu, Y-G; Huang, Y-Z; Hu, H-Q; Christie, P

    2005-04-01

    A pot experiment was carried out in a greenhouse to investigate the sequestration of As in iron plaques on root surface of three rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars. Phosphate (P) fertilization increased both plant biomass and tissue P concentrations significantly, indicating that the soils used in this study was highly P-deficient. Results from this study confirmed that low P supply improved the formation of iron plaque on rice roots. As a consequence, arsenic (As) concentrations in DCB-extracts with no P addition were significantly higher than those with P fertilization. Arsenic was highly sequestrated in iron plaque; arsenic concentration in iron was up to nearly 120 mg kg(-1), while arsenic concentrations in roots were just several mg kg(-1). Both arsenic and phosphate concentrations in iron plaque were highly positively correlated with the amounts of iron plaque (DCB-extractable Fe). Contrary to normal understanding that increasing P supply could reduced As accumulation in plants, results from the present study showed that P fertilization did not inhibit the As uptake by plants (As accumulation in aboveground), which was probably due to the fact that iron plaque formation was improved under low P conditions, thus leading to more As sequestration in the iron plaque. Thus results obtained in this study indicated that the iron plaque may inhibit the transfer of As from roots to shoots, and thus alter the P-As interaction in plant As uptake processes.

  11. Microbial activity promoted with organic carbon accumulation in macroaggregates of paddy soils under long-term rice cultivation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Ding, Yuanjun; Lu, Haifei; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Filley, Timothy; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

      While soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation and stabilization has been increasingly the focus of ecosystem properties, how it could be linked to soil biological activity enhancement has been poorly assessed...

  12. Seed wintering and deterioration characteristics between weedy and cultivated rice

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Jung-Sun; Chung, Nam-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidences of weedy rice continuously occurred in paddy fields because its shattering seeds were able to over-winter. In this research, the seed deterioration of weedy rice was investigated compared with cultivated rice, and the wintering characteristics of these two types of rice were investigated with the field wintering test, freezing resistance test, and accelerated aging test. Results For the wintering test, the seeds of weedy rice were placed on the soil surface of a paddy wi...

  13. Reducing conditions on barium absorption in rice plants cultured in BaSO4-enriched soil doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v36i1.17539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Osvaldo Lima Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the possible solubilization of barium sulfate in soils under reducing conditions and its effects on barium bioavailability, an Oryza sativa pot trial was established. Increasing barium doses and two redox potential conditions were evaluated. The geochemical fractionation data demonstrated that reducing conditions led to an increase in the levels of more labile forms of barium and a reduction in more stable forms. Furthermore, higher doses of barium were found to have a negative impact on grain production. The highest levels of barium accumulation in the leaves, roots, and grains were observed with the highest barium dose under reducing conditions. These results demonstrate that reducing conditions increased barium bioavailability and absorption by rice plants.

  14. Post-anthesis alternate wetting and moderate soil drying enhances activities of key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion in inferior spikelets of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hongwei; Yuan, Liming; Wang, Zhiqin; Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that a post-anthesis moderate soil drying can improve grain filling through regulating the key enzymes in the sucrose-to-starch pathway in the grains of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Two rice cultivars were field grown and two irrigation regimes, alternate wetting and moderate soil drying (WMD) and conventional irrigation (CI, continuously flooded), were imposed during the grain-filling period. The grain-filling rate and activities of four key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion, sucrose synthase (SuSase), adenosine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), starch synthase (StSase), and starch branching enzyme (SBE), showed no significant difference between WMD and CI regimes for the earlier flowering superior spikelets. However, they were significantly enhanced by the WMD for the later flowering inferior spikelets. The activities of both soluble and insoluble acid invertase in the grains were little affected by the WMD. The two cultivars showed the same tendencies. The activities of SuSase, AGPase, StSase, and SBE in grains were very significantly correlated with the grain-filling rate. The abscisic acid (ABA) concentration in inferior spikelets was remarkably increased in the WMD and very significantly correlated with activities of SuSase, AGPase, StSase, and SBE. Application of ABA on plants under CI produced similar results to those seen in plants receiving WMD. Applying fluridone, an indirect inhibitor of ABA synthesis, produced the opposite effect. The results suggest that post-anthesis WMD could enhance sink strength by regulating the key enzymes involved, and consequently, increase the grain-filling rate and grain weight of inferior spikelets. ABA plays an important role in this process.

  15. Prevalence and effect of schistosome and soil-transmitted helminth infection on labour input in rice-growing communities of Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Olufemi Sam-Wobo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH are public health problems in communities which lack basic social amenities with poor hygienic conditions. Studies were carried out to determine the prevalence and effect of schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths infection on labour input on rice production in 9 rice-growing communities of Ogun State. Parasitological examinations of urine and faecal samples, and structured questionnaires were conducted on 243 consented individuals from May 2009 to March 2010. The results showed an overall prevalence of 17% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for hookworms, 2% for Trichuris trichiura, 1% for Schistosoma haematobium and 1% for Schistosoma mansoni. A. lumbricoides and hookworms were more prevalent in Agbajege (25%, and varied in the other 8 communities. T. trichiura was prevalent in three communities, Agbajege (5%, Akodu (4.2%, and Moloko-Asipa (4.8 %; S. haematobium was prevalent only in Ayedere (2.6% and Lufoko (8%, while S. mansoni was prevalent only in Moloko-Asipa (9.5%. Infections among the gender were varied as 26.3 % of males and 33.8 % of females had an overall prevalence of: A. lumbricoides (16.8%, hookworms (11.8%, T. trichiura (1.6%, S. haematobium (1.1% and S. mansoni (1.1%. On frequency of infection to incapacitation per year, 45% of respondents were incapacitated 1-2 times, 27% 3-4 times and 19% were incapacitated more than 4 times. Understanding the effect of these two diseases will not only improve the health status of residents but also increase their productivity and ensure food security.

  16. From QTL to variety-harnessing the benefits of QTLs for drought, flood and salt tolerance in mega rice varieties of India through a multi-institutional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Renu; Singh, Yashi; Xalaxo, Suchit; Verulkar, S; Yadav, Neera; Singh, Shweta; Singh, Nisha; Prasad, K S N; Kondayya, K; Rao, P V Ramana; Rani, M Girija; Anuradha, T; Suraynarayana, Y; Sharma, P C; Krishnamurthy, S L; Sharma, S K; Dwivedi, J L; Singh, A K; Singh, P K; Nilanjay; Singh, N K; Kumar, Rajesh; Chetia, S K; Ahmad, T; Rai, M; Perraju, P; Pande, Anita; Singh, D N; Mandal, N P; Reddy, J N; Singh, O N; Katara, J L; Marandi, B; Swain, P; Sarkar, R K; Singh, D P; Mohapatra, T; Padmawathi, G; Ram, T; Kathiresan, R M; Paramsivam, K; Nadarajan, S; Thirumeni, S; Nagarajan, M; Singh, A K; Vikram, Prashant; Kumar, Arvind; Septiningshih, E; Singh, U S; Ismail, A M; Mackill, D; Singh, Nagendra K

    2016-01-01

    Rice is a staple cereal of India cultivated in about 43.5Mha area but with relatively low average productivity. Abiotic factors like drought, flood and salinity affect rice production adversely in more than 50% of this area. Breeding rice varieties with inbuilt tolerance to these stresses offers an economically viable and sustainable option to improve rice productivity. Availability of high quality reference genome sequence of rice, knowledge of exact position of genes/QTLs governing tolerance to abiotic stresses and availability of DNA markers linked to these traits has opened up opportunities for breeders to transfer the favorable alleles into widely grown rice varieties through marker-assisted backcross breeding (MABB). A large multi-institutional project, "From QTL to variety: marker-assisted breeding of abiotic stress tolerant rice varieties with major QTLs for drought, submergence and salt tolerance" was initiated in 2010 with funding support from Department of Biotechnology, Government of India, in collaboration with International Rice Research Institute, Philippines. The main focus of this project is to improve rice productivity in the fragile ecosystems of eastern, northeastern and southern part of the country, which bear the brunt of one or the other abiotic stresses frequently. Seven consistent QTLs for grain yield under drought, namely, qDTY1.1, qDTY2.1, qDTY2.2, qDTY3.1, qDTY3.2, qDTY9.1 and qDTY12.1 are being transferred into submergence tolerant versions of three high yielding mega rice varieties, Swarna-Sub1, Samba Mahsuri-Sub1 and IR 64-Sub1. To address the problem of complete submergence due to flash floods in the major river basins, the Sub1 gene is being transferred into ten highly popular locally adapted rice varieties namely, ADT 39, ADT 46, Bahadur, HUR 105, MTU 1075, Pooja, Pratikshya, Rajendra Mahsuri, Ranjit, and Sarjoo 52. Further, to address the problem of soil salinity, Saltol, a major QTL for salt tolerance is being transferred into

  17. Mapping QTLs for submergence tolerance during germination in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Quantitative trait loci were identified using single-point analysis. (SPA), interval mapping (IM) and composite interval mapping (CIM). The primary analysis was performed using SPA and IM using. QGene 3.4 software (Nelson, 1997). The QTLs detected by SPA and IM corresponded well, therefore the results ...

  18. Mapping QTLs for submergence tolerance during germination in rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To understand the genetic bases of tolerance and to identify relevant quantitative trait loci (QTLs), KHAIYAN (Aus type) was crossed with IR64, a semi-dwarf, modern variety moderately sensitive to anaerobic conditions during germination. Results of screening of BC2F2 lines showed that survival percentage in ...

  19. Development and validation of phytotoxicity tests with emergent and submerged aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.S. [Carolina Ecotox, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Powell, R.L. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Nelson, M.K. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity testing procedures have recently been developed for assessment of contaminant effects on emergent and submerged aquatic macrophytes commonly found in freshwater wetlands. These tests have potential application in risk assessments for contaminated wetlands as well as for new chemical substances. The objective of this study was to evaluate and modify, if necessary, these methods and to validate them, using two benchmark chemicals, in a contract laboratory setting. Oryza sativa (domestic rice) was used as a surrogate emergent vascular plant, while Ceratophylium demersum (coontail) and Myriophyllum heterophyllum (variable-leaf milfoil) were the representative submerged vascular plants. Subsequent to evaluating culturing techniques and testing conditions, toxicity tests were conducted using boron and metribuzin. The test procedure for the emergent plants involves a two-week pro-exposure period followed by a two-week aqueous exposure. Five types of sediment, including both natural and artificial sediments, were evaluated for use with rice. Fresh weight and chlorophyll a content were the selected test endpoints. The submerged plants were exposed for two weeks, and the response variables evaluated included length, weight (fresh and dry), and root number. The sensitivity of these tests were comparable to the results obtained for the same two chemicals using the green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum, and the duckweed, Lemna gibba, with the exception that rice was less sensitive to metribuzin than the other species.

  20. [Short-term effects of different tillage modes combined with straw-returning on the soil labile organic carbon components in a farmland with rice-wheat double cropping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Fang; Zhu, Li-Qun; Han, Xin-Zhong; Gu, Ke-Jun; Hu, Nai-Juan; Bian, Xin-Min

    2013-05-01

    A two-year (2009-2011) field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different tillage modes, straw-returning, and their interactions on the soil total organic carbon (TOC) and labile organic carbon (LOC) components (easily oxidizable organic carbon (EOC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC)) at the soil depths of 0-7, 7-14, and 14-21 cm in a farmland with rice-wheat double cropping. In all treatments of straw-returning, the TOC and LOC contents in each soil layer were significantly higher than those without straw-returning. Under plowing tillage, the MBC content in 0-7 cm soil layer was significantly higher than that under rotary tillage, but the EOC content was in adverse. Rotary tillage made the TOC content in 7 - 14 cm soil layer being significantly higher, as compared with plowing tillage. The TOC, WSOC, and MBC contents in 14-21 cm soil layer under plowing tillage were significantly higher than those under rotary tillage. Plowing tillage combined with rice and wheat straws-returning made the soil TOC content being higher than the other treatments.

  1. Rice yield prediction from yield components and limiting factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casanova, D.; Goudriaan, J.; Catala Former, M.M.; Withagen, J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    This article aims to quantify growth at field level in relation to crop status and soil properties in irrigated direct-seeded rice. Forty fields were selected in the Ebro Delta (Spain). Rice growth was monitored and soil properties measured. Yield was related to soil properties by a deductive

  2. The Use of Ameliorant Fe3+ and Rock Phosphates in Peat Soil at Several Water Condition on the P Content of Plants Rice and Carbon Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelvia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The addition of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation can reduce effect of toxic organic acids, increase peat stability through formation of complex compounds and reduce carbon emission. The research was conducted in the laboratory and green house of the Departement of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agriculture University. Peat samples with hemic degree of decomposition were taken from Riau. Rock phosphates were taken from the rock phosphates of PT. Petrokimia Gresik, Christmas Island phosphates, and Huinan China and FeCl3.6H2O was used as the other Fe3+ source. The aims of the research were to study (a the effect of the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates on the P content of plants dan (b the effect of the application ameliorant Fe3+ and the contribution of Fe cation in rock phosphates in the decrease of carbon emission. The results showed that the P content of plants rice increased 58 – 286% with the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates. The estimation of carbon loss through CO2 and CH4 emissions from peats if planted continuously with rice was around 2.5, 2.2 and 2.6 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 respectively in field capacity condition, two times of field capacity condition, and 5 cm of saturated condition. The application of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation increased the stability of peats and reduced the carbon loss around 1.7 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (64% in 5 cm of saturated condition, 1.3 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (58% in two times of field capacity condition, and 1.0 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (41% in field capacity condition.

  3. Soil reaction and absorption of silicon by rice Reação do solo e absorção de silício pelo arroz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Sartori de Camargo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The solubility and availability of silicon can be influenced by soil reaction. A pot experiment with a clayey textured Rhodic Acrustox was conducted under greenhouse conditions to evaluate the effect of soil reaction on silicon availability to rice plants. The experiment was set up in a completely randomized design, using a factorial scheme (4 x 4 with four materials (calcitic lime, calcium and magnesium silicate, pure silicic acid, and wollastonite, four rates (0, 2500, 5000 and 7500 mg per 5 kg-pot and four replicates. After 60 days, dry matter yield and silicon absorption by the rice shoot plants, pH CaCl2, and soluble silicon (0.5 mol L-1 acetic acid and 0.01 mol L-1CaCl2 in the soil were evaluated. The materials increased soil pH as the applied rates increased, except silicic acid. Soluble silicon extracted by 0.5 mol L-1 acetic acid also increased with applied rates. For calcium chloride, soluble silicon increased in the soil only with wollastonite and calcium and magnesium silicate, agreeing with its total content. Silicon absorption by the above-ground part of the rice plants was linearly correlated with rates of wollastonite, followed by calcium and magnesium silicate, silicic acid and calcitic lime. Soil pH increase with lime was not sufficient to provide silicon to the rice. The 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 soluble silicon had the best correlation with silicon absorption by plants. More studies are necessary under field conditions and other soils to corroborate the presented results.A solubilidade e disponibilidade de silício podem ser influenciadas pela reação do solo. Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da reação do solo sobre a disponibilidade de silício para a cultura do arroz, foi conduzido experimento em Latossolo Vermelho álico textura argilosa em casa-de-vegetação. O experimento foi conduzido em fatorial 4 x 4, delineamento em blocos inteiramente casualizados e quatro repetições. Quatro materiais (calcário, silicato de c

  4. Differences in Cellulosic Supramolecular Structure of Compositionally Similar Rice Straw Affect Biomass Metabolism by Paddy Soil Microbiota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogura, Tatsuki; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-01-01

    .... However, they can be degraded and recycled by soil microbiota. Little is known about the biomass degradation profiles of complex microbiota based on differences in cellulosic supramolecular structures without compositional variations...

  5. Land Evaluation for improved Rice Production in Watari Irrigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at raising irrigated rice production in Watari Irrigation scheme, in Kano state, as to bridge the gap between the demand for rice and its supply. The food and Agricultural Organization FAO, (1985) frame work for land evaluation for irrigated rice production was employed, and the soil map of the study area has ...

  6. Developing selection protocols for weed competitiveness in aerobic rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, D.L.; Atlin, G.N.; Bastiaans, L.; Spiertz, J.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic rice production systems, wherein rice is dry-sown in non-puddled soil and grown as an upland crop, offer large water savings but are subject to severe weed infestation. Weed-competitive cultivars will be critical to the adoption of aerobic rice production by farmers. Breeding

  7. Rice Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter presents the symptoms of deficiency and toxicity of the major and minor mineral nutrients in rice, as well as a current synopsis of nutrient transporters and their regulation. The availability of sequences from the recently completed rice genome has furthered the knowledge of how plants...

  8. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... shattering-prone Oryza glaberrima. It contains 2% more protein than their African or Asian parents. It is taller than most rice, making harvesting easier, pest resistant and tolerant to drought and infertile soils better than Asian varieties [18]. Rice is a cereal foodstuff which forms an important part of the diet of ...

  9. Bioavailability and release of nonextractable (bound) residues of chiral cycloxaprid using geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi in rice paddy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuanqi; Xu, Xiaoyong [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Hanxue [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Li, Chao; Shao, Xusheng [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Ye, Qingfu, E-mail: qfye@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Li, Zhong, E-mail: lizhong@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2015-09-01

    The widespread adoption of neonicotinoids has led to a move away from integrated pest management (IPM) and caused adverse effects on non-target invertebrate species. Due to their living in close contact with and consuming large amounts of soil, earthworms are a model organism used to study bioaccumulation. We investigated the bioaccumulation and release of bound, or non-extractable, residues (BRs) of {sup 14}C labeled racemic cycloxaprid (CYC) and its individual enantiomers by the geophagous earthworm Metaphire guillelmi. In a previous work, the fraction of BRs of {sup 14}C-CYC individual enantiomers reached up to 70–85% of the initially spiked radioactivity after 100 d of treatment. The bulk volume of the soil was then diluted by a factor of 15 with fresh soil. Here we showed that after earthworms lived in the soil-bound residues for 28 d, 11–25% of the previously bound radioactivity in soil was extractable by solvent, mineralized to CO{sub 2}, and accumulated in earthworm tissues. While earthworms were exposed to {sup 14}C-CYC a two-compartment accumulation model could explain the bio-accumulation as individual enantiomers. At the end of the experiment, the biota-sediment accumulation factors were between 0.59 and 0.82, which suggested CYC immobilization in the soil resulted in its bioavailability being reduced which enhanced its degradation. Additionally, the elimination of CYC individual enantiomers from M. guillelmi was fitted to an availability-adjusted decay model with a half-life of 9 d. Stereoselective release or bioavailability between CYC enantiomers was not observed. These results provide the important data about the release of BRs of CYC and potential transfer in the food chain to support the long-term environmental risk assessment of neonicotinoids. - Highlights: • 20% of the BRs were released and bioavailable. • Stereoselective behaviors were not observed.

  10. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although past investigations establish the effect of various parameters on scour around vertical submerged structures for live and clear water condition, yet further studies are required to analyze the scour around group of submerged structures for various bed sediments, understand the flow physics around the group and ...

  11. Spatial variability of soil salinity at different scales in the mangrove rice agro-ecosystem in West Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylla, M.; Stein, A.; Breemen, van N.; Fresco, L.O.

    1995-01-01

    Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal low lands results from a complex interaction of climate, river hydrology, topography and tidal flooding. The aim of this study was to determine the significant effects of these causal factors at different scales in the West African mangrove

  12. Aplicação de zinco em sementes de arroz irrigado e no solo / Application of zinc on rice seeds and on the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz Frouza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação do Departamento de Fitotecnia, na Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, com o objetivo de avaliar a eficiência da aplicação de zinco nas sementes da cultivar de arroz irrigado BRIRGA 410 e em sete amostras de solo, sobre altura de planta, número de afilhos e de panículas, massa fresca e seca da parte aérea e teor de zinco na massa seca da parte aérea das plantas de arroz. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi um bifatorial 4 x 7 em blocos ao acaso, com três repetições. Utilizou-se vaso de latão pintado, revestido com saco plástico, com 3,0 kg de cada solo. Os tratamentos com zinco constaram da aplicação na semente (100 g ha-1 Zn tendo como fonte ZnSO4.7H2O (22,73% de Zn, no solo (5,0 kg ha-1 Zn sendo a fonte Zincodur® (28% de Zn, as duas formas de aplicação combinadas e a testemunha sem zinco. Os resultados evidenciaram que não houve diferença estatística significativa nos tratamentos com zinco aplicado em três classes de solo e no tratamento de semente, sobre o crescimento das plantas, com exceção da variável teor de zinco na massa seca da parte aérea que foi superior para os tratamentos com zinco no solo e na semente + solo. O solo Vacacaí (PLANOSOLO HIDROMÓRFICO Eutrófico arênico, originário de São Gabriel (RS, destacou-se dentre os demais nas variáveis de números de afilhos, massa fresca e seca da parte aérea e teor de zinco na massa seca da parte aérea, pelo fato de apresentar originariamente teor mais elevado de zinco.AbstractThis experiment was conducted in the greenhouse of the Department of Plant Science, at the Federal University of Santa Maria, to evaluate the efficiency of application of zinc on the seeds of irrigated rice cultivar BR- IRGA 410 and on seven soil samples. Plant height, number of tillers, and panicle, fresh and dry shoot and zinc content in dry mass of shoots were evaluated. The experimental design used was a factorial 4 x 7 in

  13. Persistência dos herbicidas imazethapyr e imazapic em solo de várzea sob diferentes sistemas de manejo Persistence of the herbicides imazethapyr and imazapic in irrigated rice soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Kraemer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A mistura formulada dos herbicidas imazethapyr e imazapic é utilizada para controlar arroz-vermelho em cultivos de arroz irrigado. Entretanto, esses herbicidas podem persistir no solo por longos períodos, causando introxicação ao arroz suscetível cultivado em sucessão. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de diferentes manejos de solo, durante a entressafra do arroz, sobre a ação residual do imazethapyr e imazapic, em arroz não tolerante. O residual desses herbicidas causou introxicação no arroz suscetível após um ano da última aplicação dos herbicidas. A introxicação atingiu valores máximos até 25 dias após a emergência (DAE, ocorrendo redução da introxicação após esse período, até praticamente desaparecer (60 DAE. O residual do herbicida alterou o estande de plantas, o número de colmos m-2, o número de panículas m-2 e a altura de plantas, porém não afetou a produtividade de grãos do arroz. O revolvimento do solo diminuiu a atividade do herbicida na camada superficial de solo (0-3 m.The mixture of herbicides imazethapyr and imazapic is used to control red rice in irrigated rice crops. However, such herbicides might persist on the soil for a long period causing phytotoxicity on susceptible rice grown in succession. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of different soil tillage systems during the off-season on the residual phytotoxicity of imazethapyr and imazapic on non tolerant rice. Herbicide residues caused phytotoxicity on susceptible rice with the highest values being registered 25 days after emergence and decreasing after this period until almost disappearing 60 days after emergence. Herbicide residues affected plant stand, number of stems per m², number of panicles per m² and plant height, but did not affect grain yield. Soil movement decreased herbicide activity on the superficial soil layer (0-3 cm.

  14. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E

    2014-08-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Iodine Removal Efficiency in Non-Submerged and Submerged Self-Priming Venturi Scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Wang, Junlong; Mehboob; Khurram [Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China)

    2013-04-15

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I{sub 2}) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  16. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID ALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3 in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2 from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  17. Micro-aerobics: when rice plants lose their resistance against oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuss, J; Harren, F J M [Life Science Trace Gas Exchange Facility, Department of Molecular and Laser Physics, University of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld I, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: J.Reuss@science.ru.nl

    2008-10-15

    Photoacoustic determination of ethane, ethanol and acetaldehyde releases from 14 d old rice seedlings leads to the conclusion that rice seedlings start suffering significant lipid peroxidation under micro-aerobic conditions. To produce micro-aerobic conditions in otherwise normal atmospheres, the oxygen concentration has been reduced to a value between 0.3 and 0.05% (v/v). The defense of the rice seedlings against oxygenic radicals becomes insufficient under these almost anaerobic conditions. The findings presented here are relevant for the clarification of what causes non-survival of rice seedlings under prolonged submergence.

  18. Analysis of Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Cultivated and Weedy Rice Differing in Cold Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Caroline Borges; Basu, Supratim; Pereira, Andy; Tseng, Te-Ming; Zimmer, Paulo Dejalma; Burgos, Nilda Roma

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars show impairment of growth in response to environmental stresses such as cold at the early seedling stage. Locally adapted weedy rice is able to survive under adverse environmental conditions, and can emerge in fields from greater soil depth. Cold-tolerant weedy rice can be a good genetic source for developing cold-tolerant, weed-competitive rice cultivars. An in-depth analysis is presented here of diverse indica and japonica rice genotypes, mostly weedy rice, for cold stress response to provide an understanding of different stress adaptive mechanisms towards improvement of the rice crop performance in the field. We have tested a collection of weedy rice genotypes to: 1) classify the subspecies (ssp.) grouping (japonica or indica) of 21 accessions; 2) evaluate their sensitivity to cold stress; and 3) analyze the expression of stress-responsive genes under cold stress and a combination of cold and depth stress. Seeds were germinated at 25°C at 1.5- and 10-cm sowing depth for 10d. Seedlings were then exposed to cold stress at 10°C for 6, 24 and 96h, and the expression of cold-, anoxia-, and submergence-inducible genes was analyzed. Control plants were seeded at 1.5cm depth and kept at 25°C. The analysis revealed that cold stress signaling in indica genotypes is more complex than that of japonica as it operates via both the CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways, implicated through induction of transcription factors including OsNAC2, OsMYB46 and OsF-BOX28. When plants were exposed to cold + sowing depth stress, a complex signaling network was induced that involved cross talk between stresses mediated by CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways to circumvent the detrimental effects of stresses. The experiments revealed the importance of the CBF regulon for tolerance to both stresses in japonica and indica ssp. The mechanisms for cold tolerance differed among weedy indica genotypes and also between weedy indica and cultivated

  19. Analysis of Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Cultivated and Weedy Rice Differing in Cold Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Borges Bevilacqua

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivars show impairment of growth in response to environmental stresses such as cold at the early seedling stage. Locally adapted weedy rice is able to survive under adverse environmental conditions, and can emerge in fields from greater soil depth. Cold-tolerant weedy rice can be a good genetic source for developing cold-tolerant, weed-competitive rice cultivars. An in-depth analysis is presented here of diverse indica and japonica rice genotypes, mostly weedy rice, for cold stress response to provide an understanding of different stress adaptive mechanisms towards improvement of the rice crop performance in the field. We have tested a collection of weedy rice genotypes to: 1 classify the subspecies (ssp. grouping (japonica or indica of 21 accessions; 2 evaluate their sensitivity to cold stress; and 3 analyze the expression of stress-responsive genes under cold stress and a combination of cold and depth stress. Seeds were germinated at 25°C at 1.5- and 10-cm sowing depth for 10d. Seedlings were then exposed to cold stress at 10°C for 6, 24 and 96h, and the expression of cold-, anoxia-, and submergence-inducible genes was analyzed. Control plants were seeded at 1.5cm depth and kept at 25°C. The analysis revealed that cold stress signaling in indica genotypes is more complex than that of japonica as it operates via both the CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways, implicated through induction of transcription factors including OsNAC2, OsMYB46 and OsF-BOX28. When plants were exposed to cold + sowing depth stress, a complex signaling network was induced that involved cross talk between stresses mediated by CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways to circumvent the detrimental effects of stresses. The experiments revealed the importance of the CBF regulon for tolerance to both stresses in japonica and indica ssp. The mechanisms for cold tolerance differed among weedy indica genotypes and also between weedy indica and

  20. Indices to screen for grain yield and grain-zinc mass concentrations in aerobic rice at different soil-Zn levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, W.; Struik, P.C.; Zhao, M.; Keulen, van H.; Fan, T.Q.; Stomph, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Zinc is an important micronutrient for both crop growth and human nutrition. In rice production, yields are often reduced and Zn mass concentrations in the grains are often low when Zn is in short supply to the crop. This may result in malnutrition of people dependent on a rice-based diet. Plant

  1. 3. Integrated Organic-Inorganic Fertilizer Management for Rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    formation of soil aggregates, but partially decomposed, or fresh organic matter, e.g. rice straw, leads to the formation of water- stable aggregates, which give interspaces to soil as well as good supply of plant nutrients. Rice and banana are grown extensively on the Vertisols in the Kpong Irrigation. Project (KIP) sites at Akuse ...

  2. Aluminum and iron contents in phosphate treated swamp rice farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2006 aluminum and iron contents were determined in phosphate treated swamp rice farm of Mbiabet, Akwa Ibom State. The objectives were to determine the aluminum and iron contents, the effect of drying, phosphate and lime application in an acid sulphate soil grown to rice in Nigeria. The soil samples used were ...

  3. EFISIENSI ENERGI DAN PRODUKSI PADA USAHATANI PADI DI LAHAN SULFAT MASAM POTENSIAL (Efficiency of Production and Energy on Rice Farming in Acid Sulphate Soil Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudirman Umar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tidal swamp land is a potential land to overcome in the future national food security as a result of land conversion.  Generally, in farming system, farmer labor in used from land preparation till postharvest.  Experiment was conducted at experimental station of Belandean, Barito Kuala regency, South Kalimantan in April until September 2009.  The object of experiment was to evaluate distribution and consumption of energy for managing farming system on acid sulphate soil potential with introduction technology at dry season.  Energy consumption was analyzed on all steps of production process.  Result of analysis showed that rice cultivation on potential acid sulphate soil utilized physical energy (man power without tractor and power thresher as 253,116.80-195,170.55 k.cal ha-1.  Total energy for managing one hectare of that area was 274.858,90 k.cal ha-1 with introduction technology or 1.41 times more than by farmer technology.  Comparing with total of cost production, cost of man power with introduction technology was 56,92 %.  In production process, by applying input of physical and chemical cost, produced  energy output as 20,799,900 k.cal ha-1 and Rp 14,325,000 of cost output or increased as 48.15 %.  Based those input and output of energy was obtained production efficiency as 9,02% and 9,73 % for introduction and farmer technology. On farming system in potensial tidal swamp the energy input and production increased 1.54 and 1.15 times by addition introduction technology.  Result of evaluation showed that utilization production capital becoming more increase utilization of purun tikus (eleocharis dulcis, ameliorant and one way flow, production technology input increased as 54.31%. Keywords: Energy, acid sulphate land, rice ABSTRAK Lahan rawa pasang surut merupakan lahan alternatif yang potensial untuk mengatasi kekurangan pangan akibat menciutnya lahan subur yang telah beralih fungsi ke penggunaan non pertanian sehingga petani pun

  4. Cd Toxicity and Accumulation in Rice Plants Vary with Soil Nitrogen Status and Their Genotypic Difference can be Partly Attributed to Nitrogen Uptake Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin DU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two indica rice genotypes, viz. Milyang 46 and Zhenshan 97B differing in Cd accumulation and tolerance were used as materials in a hydroponic system consisting of four Cd levels (0, 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 µmol/L and three N levels (23.2, 116.0 and 232.0 mg/L to study the effects of nitrogen status and nitrogen uptake capacity on Cd accumulation and tolerance in rice plants. N-efficient rice genotype, Zhenshan 97B, accumulated less Cd and showed higher Cd tolerance than N-inefficient rice genotype, Milyang 46. There was consistency between nitrogen uptake capacity and Cd tolerance in rice plants. Increase of N level in solution slightly increased Cd concentration in shoots but significantly increased in roots of both genotypes. Compared with the control at low N level, Cd tolerance in both rice genotypes could be significantly enhanced under normal N level, but no significant difference was observed between the Cd tolerances under normal N (116.0 mg/L and high N (232.0 mg/L conditions. The result proved that genotypic differences in Cd accumulation and toxicity could be, at least in part, attributed to N uptake capacity in rice plants.

  5. Nutrientes do solo influenciados por diferentes manejos da palha após a colheita do arroz irrigado Soil nutrients influenced by different straw managements after the harvest of irrigated rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fabrício Sachet Massoni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Após a colheita do arroz irrigado, a palha produzida pode ser manejada de diferentes formas, o que deve afetar a disponibilidade dos nutrientes do solo. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito dos diferentes manejos do solo e da palha após a colheita do arroz sobre os teores de nitrogênio mineral, e de fósforo e potássio disponíveis do solo. Os tratamentos foram dispostos em blocos casualizados com avaliações em parcelas subdivididas no tempo, com os tratamentos correspondentes a sete diferentes manejos do solo: [1] lâmina de água permanente sem incorporação da palha, [2] incorporação da palha com preparo do solo seco logo após a colheita, [3] incorporação da palha com preparo do solo alagado após a colheita, [4] incorporação da palha com o solo seco somente em julho, [5] incorporação da palha com solo alagado logo após a colheita e gradagem da área em julho com solo seco, [6] incorporação da palha com solo seco logo após a colheita e gradagem da área em julho com solo seco, [7] sem incorporação e sem lâmina de água. Foram avaliados em cinco diferentes datas de coleta de solo, com quatro repetições. A manutenção da palha na superfície do solo provoca a maior variação nos teores de nitrogênio mineral durante o período avaliado; porém, independente do manejo pós-colheita utilizado para a palha de arroz irrigado, não há aumento nos teores de nitrogênio mineral e de fósforo e potássio disponível no solo ao final do período de entressafra.After harvesting irrigated rice, the straw produced can be managed in different ways, and these may affect the availability of soil nutrients. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different types of soil and straw management, carried out after the rice is harvested, on the levels of mineral nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium available in the soil,. The treatments were arranged in randomized blocks with plot evaluations split up in time, and

  6. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  7. Higher yields and lower methane emissions with new rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Huang, Shan; Hungate, Bruce A; van Kessel, Chris; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Yan, Xiaojun; Wang, Lili; Chen, Jin; Hang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Yi; Horwath, William R; Ye, Rongzhong; Linquist, Bruce A; Song, Zhenwei; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Weijian

    2017-11-01

    Breeding high-yielding rice cultivars through increasing biomass is a key strategy to meet rising global food demands. Yet, increasing rice growth can stimulate methane (CH4 ) emissions, exacerbating global climate change, as rice cultivation is a major source of this powerful greenhouse gas. Here, we show in a series of experiments that high-yielding rice cultivars actually reduce CH4 emissions from typical paddy soils. Averaged across 33 rice cultivars, a biomass increase of 10% resulted in a 10.3% decrease in CH4 emissions in a soil with a high carbon (C) content. Compared to a low-yielding cultivar, a high-yielding cultivar significantly increased root porosity and the abundance of methane-consuming microorganisms, suggesting that the larger and more porous root systems of high-yielding cultivars facilitated CH4 oxidation by promoting O2 transport to soils. Our results were further supported by a meta-analysis, showing that high-yielding rice cultivars strongly decrease CH4 emissions from paddy soils with high organic C contents. Based on our results, increasing rice biomass by 10% could reduce annual CH4 emissions from Chinese rice agriculture by 7.1%. Our findings suggest that modern rice breeding strategies for high-yielding cultivars can substantially mitigate paddy CH4 emission in China and other rice growing regions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Alterações nas concentrações de fósforo em solos cultivados com arroz irrigado no Rio Grande do Sul Phosphorus concentration changes in soils under flooded rice in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Kruger Gonçalves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Os solos utilizados para a cultura de arroz irrigado por alagamento no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul são oriundos de diferentes materiais de origem, os quais conferem diferentes características mineralógicas e químicas, que alteram de forma diferenciada a disponibilidade de P para a cultura. Com o objetivo de verificar essas diferenças na disponibilidade de P para o arroz em solos oriundos de diferentes materiais de origem, conduziu-se um experimento fatorial, delineado em blocos ao acaso, em que cinco solos foram submetidos à ausência ou presença de superfosfato triplo. Os solos derivados de sedimentos de arenito e granito (Planossolos apresentaram redução mais rápida do Fe com liberação do P adsorvido, quando comparados aos solos derivados de sedimento de basalto. Os Planossolos apresentaram maior quantidade de P acumulado no arroz que o Vertissolo e Chernossolo, sem ou com a adição de superfosfato triplo. A adição de superfosfato triplo resultou em maior quantidade de P acumulado na planta para todos os solos.Soils used for production of flooded rice in the state of Rio Grande do Sul are originated from different parent materials, resulting in different characteristics that affect P availability for the crop. The aim of this paper was to verify the differences in P availability for rice in soils originated from different parent materials. The experiment was carried out in a complete randomized block design, where five soils were exposed to absence or presence of triple superphosphate. In the soils derived from sandstone and granite sediment a faster Fe reduction and release of adsorbed P was observed than in soils originated from basalt. The amount of accumulated P in rice was higher in the Planosol than the Vertisol and Mollisol, with and without triple superphosphate application. Triple superphosphate fertilization resulted in greater amounts of P accumulated in all soils.

  9. EFEITO DE NÍVEIS DE ZINCO SOBRE A CULTURA DO ARROZ EM SOLO DE CERRADO EFFECT OF ZINC LEVELS FOR RICE IN A CERRADO SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Ribeiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    No presente trabalho, estudou-se o efeito de doses crescentes de sulfato de zinco sobre a produtividade e ocorrência de sintomas de deficiência de zinco na cultura do arroz de sequeiro em solo sob cerrado. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados com 6 tratamentos e 4 repetições. Os níveis de sulfato de zinco testados foram 5, 10, 20 e 40 kg/ha, os quais foram comparados com a testemunha e com um tratamento que recebeu além da adubação básica e calagem, uma aplicação de sulfato de amônia (40 kg/ha em cobertura. O experimento foi instalado em latossolo vermelho, limo-argiloso, sob formação edáfica típica de campo-cerrado. O cultivar usado foi o IAC—12/46, tendo sido as sementes desinfectadas com Neantina Seco a 0,3%. Na aferição dos resultados computou-se a produção de grãos e a intensidade de ocorrência dos sintomas de bronzeamento nas folhas. A análise dos dados revela que os tratamentos com sulfato de zinco, nas dosagens de 5, 10, 20 e 40 kg/ha, equivaleram-se estatisticamente e foram superiores à testemunha e à cobertura com sulfato de amônia. Concluiu-se que a aplicação de sulfato de zinco no sulco de plantio, na dosagem de 5 kg/ha, é suficiente para impedir a ocorrência de deficiência de zinco em intensidade capaz de provocar decréscimos notáveis na produtividade da cultura do arroz. A aplicação de sulfato de amônia em cobertura, na dosagem de 40 kg/ha, por si só, não impediu a manifestação drástica da ocorrência de deficiência de zinco nas plantas.

    In the present experiment, the effect of increasing doses of zinc sulphate on productivity and on the occurrence of symptoms of zinc deficiency was studied in upland rice grown in ‘cerrado’ soil. The experimental design was randomized blocks with six (6 treatments and four (4 repetitions. The zinc

  10. Effects of Cadmium Stress on the Quality of Rice Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, Juan; FANG, Hui; ZHANG, Ying; FAN, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Germination and hydroponic experiments are performed on rice seeds growing in soils treated with Cd stress, with rice seeds of the same variety that is not treated with Cd stress as a control, to study the effects of Cd stress on quality of rice seeds. The results have shown that: (1) Cd stress reduces the thousand grain weight of rice seeds, and higher Cd content means lower thousand grain weight; (2) The germination vigor and germination percentage of rice seeds under Cd stress as well as t...

  11. Restoring Ecological Function to a Submerged Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2010-01-01

    Impacts of global climate change, such as sea level rise and severe drought, have altered the hydrology of coastal salt marshes resulting in submergence and subsequent degradation of ecosystem function. A potential method of rehabilitating these systems is the addition of sediment-slurries to increase marsh surface elevation, thus ameliorating effects of excessive inundation. Although this technique is growing in popularity, the restoration of ecological function after sediment addition has received little attention. To determine if sediment subsidized salt marshes are functionally equivalent to natural marshes, we examined above- and belowground primary production in replicated restored marshes receiving four levels of sediment addition (29-42 cm North American Vertical Datum of 1988 [NAVD 88]) and in degraded and natural ambient marshes (4-22 cm NAVD 88). Moderate intensities of sediment-slurry addition, resulting in elevations at the mid to high intertidal zone (29-36 cm NAVD 88), restored ecological function to degraded salt marshes. Sediment additions significantly decreased flood duration and frequency and increased bulk density, resulting in greater soil drainage and redox potential and significantly lower phytotoxic sulfide concentrations. However, ecological function in the restored salt marsh showed a sediment addition threshold that was characterized by a decline in primary productivity in areas of excessive sediment addition and high elevation (>36 cm NAVD 88). Hence, the addition of intermediate levels of sediment to submerging salt marshes increased marsh surface elevation, ameliorated impacts of prolonged inundation, and increased primary productivity. However, too much sediment resulted in diminished ecological function that was equivalent to the submerged or degraded system. ?? 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  12. Influência da escória silicatada na acidez do solo e na produtividade de grãos do arroz de terras altas Influence of calcium silicate slag on soil acidity and upland rice grain yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morel Pereira Barbosa Filho

    2004-04-01

    this investigation were to evaluate in two consecutive years, soil acidity correction, grain yield and Si uptake in upland rice. Six doses of calcium silicate slag with 20% of total SiO2 (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 t ha-1 in form of calcium silicate slag, a subproduct of phosphorus processed in electric furnace was applied to oxisoil. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with five repetitions. Application of calcium silicate slag resulted in significant grain yield increase, tissue silicon content and silicon accumulation in straw and the filled grain percentage in the first and in the second year of rice cultivation. The critical Si level in the rice straw required for obtaining satisfactory yield was 2,25 g kg-1 of dry matter. In soil, the application of calcium silicate slag reduced soil acidity and increased available P, Si, exchangeable Ca, and saturation of bases. There was significant correlation between soluble Si extracted in acetic acid extraction 0.5 mol L-1 and water, in relation to soluble Si content found in soil after rice cultivation.

  13. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  14. Dinitrogen fixation of rice-Klebsiella associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, I.D.; Fujii, T.; Sano, Y.; Komagata, K.; Yoneyama, T.; Iyama, S.; Hirota, Y.

    N/sub 2/ fixation by Klebsiella oxytoca strain NG13, isolated from the rhizosphere of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) plant, in association with Indica type rice strain, C5444 is reported. The C/sub 2/H/sub 2/-reduction assays, biomass measurements, N content determinations, and /sup 15/N isotopic dilution assays indicated that inoculation of C5444 with NG13 resulted in a 6% increase of total plant+soil N content, and a 19% /sup 15/N isotopic dilution of plant N after 120 days of cultivation. Our results demonstrated significant levels of N/sub 2/ fixation by K. oxytoca when associated with rice. By optimizing such rice plant-bacterial N/sub 2/ fixation capacity, the N uptake by rice could be enhanced.

  15. EFFECT OF MICRONUTRIENTS AND LIME IN RICE IN CERRADO SOILS EFEITO DE MICRONUTRIENTES E CALCÁRIO NA CULTURA DO ARROZ EM SOLO DE CERRADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvo de Carvalho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Since the growing season of 1966-67, there have been abnormalities appearing in the rice plants cultivated in the "cerrado” in various regions of the State of Goiás. One of the abnormalities is brown coloring on the leaf blades which worsens as the life cycle progresses, eventually leaving green pigmentation only along the edges and the principal vein of the leaf. Generally, this symptom appears more intensely in spotty areas where the plants are stunted and can die, causing an appreciable loss in production. When the plants don’t die, their life cycle is retarded. It has been observed that these characteristic frequently appear in rice fields that have been with lime. In the present research project, the cause of these symptoms has been studied, by observing the effect of lime and micronutrients which were added to the soil. The research design was composed of random plots with four replications. The experiment was instatted near Goiânia in red latosol in an area of natural vegetation typical of the “campo-cerrado”. The variety of rice used was I. A. C. 12/46, after it had been disinfected with dry neantina at 0.3%. Dry brush country with stunted vegetation. The treatments were as follows: T1 - Basic fertilizer; T2 - Basic fertilizer + Ca B Zn; T3 - Basic fertilizer + Ca B Cu; T4 - Basic fertilizer + B Cu Zn; T5 - Basic fertilizer + Ca Cu Zn; T6 - Basic fertilizar + Ca B Zn. The doses were as follows: a basic fertilizer: 100 kg of P2O5 and 50 kg K2O per hectare. Simple superphosphate ( 20% of P2O5 and potassium chloride (60% of K2O were used; b lime: 3.0 t/ha; c zinc sulphate: 20 kg/ha; d copper sulphate: 20 kg/ha; e Sodium tetraborate: 20 kg/ha. The fertilizers, with the exception of the lime, which was sprin-kled over the plots, were placed in the planted furrows. Grain yield and the intensity of leaf symptoms were the data computed. The plots that received zinc were

  16. Elemental composition of Malawian rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Edward J M; Louise Ander, E; Broadley, Martin R; Young, Scott D; Chilimba, Allan D C; Hamilton, Elliott M; Watts, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Widespread potential dietary deficiencies of calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) have been identified in Malawi. Several deficiencies are likely to be compounded by high phytic acid (PA) consumption. Rice (Oryza sativa) is commonly consumed in some Malawian populations, and its mineral micronutrient content is important for food security. The considerable irrigation requirements and flooded conditions of paddy soils can also introduce or mobilise potentially toxic elements including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). The aim of this study was to determine the mineral composition of rice sampled from farmers' fields and markets in Malawi. Rice was sampled from 18 extension planning areas across Malawi with 21 white (i.e. polished) and 33 brown samples collected. Elemental composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Arsenic speciation was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-MS. Concentration of PA was determined using a PA-total phosphorus assay. Median total concentrations (mg kg-1, dry weight) of elements important for human nutrition in brown and white rice, respectively, were: Ca = 66.5 and 37.8; Cu = 3.65 and 2.49; Fe = 22.1 and 7.2; I = 0.006 and elements (mg kg-1, dry weight) in brown and white rice samples, respectively, were: As = 0.030 and 0.006; Cd  ≤ 0.002 and 0.006; Pb = 0.008 and 0.008. Approximately 95 % of As was found to be inorganic As, where this could be quantified. Malawian rice, like the more widely consumed staple grain maize, contains inadequate Ca, I, Se or Zn to meet dietary requirements. Biofortification strategies could significantly increase Se and Zn concentrations and require further investigation. Concentrations of Fe in rice grain varied greatly, and this was likely due to contamination of rice samples with soil. Risk of As, Cd or Pb toxicity due to rice consumption in Malawi appears to be minimal.

  17. Microbial community structure in the rhizosphere of rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eBreidenbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial community in the rhizosphere environment is critical for the health of land plants and the processing of soil organic matter. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which rice plants shape the microbial community in rice field soil over the course of a growing season. Rice (Oryza sativa was cultivated under greenhouse conditions in rice field soil from Vercelli, Italy and the microbial community in the rhizosphere of planted soil microcosms was characterized at four plant growth stages using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis and compared to that of unplanted bulk soil. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the rice rhizosphere were on average twice that of unplanted bulk soil, indicating a stimulation of microbial growth in the rhizosphere. Soil environment type (i.e. rhizosphere versus bulk soil had a greater effect on the community structure than did time (e.g. plant growth stage. Numerous phyla were affected by the presence of rice plants, but the strongest effects were observed for Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. With respect to functional groups of microorganisms, potential iron reducers (e.g. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and fermenters (e.g. Clostridiaceae, Opitutaceae were notably enriched in the rhizosphere environment. A Herbaspirillum species was always more abundant in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and was enriched in the rhizosphere during the early stage of plant growth.

  18. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  19. Response of aerobic rice to Piriformospora indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joy; Ramesh, K V; Maithri, U; Mutangana, D; Suresh, C K

    2014-03-01

    Rice cultivation under aerobic condition not only saves water but also opens up a splendid scope for effective application of beneficial root symbionts in rice crop unlike conventional puddled rice cultivation where water logged condition acts as constraint for easy proliferation of various beneficial soil microorganisms like arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Keeping these in view, an in silico investigation were carried out to explore the interaction of hydrogen phosphate with phosphate transporter protein (PTP) from P. indica. This was followed by greenhouse investigation to study the response of aerobic rice to Glomusfasciculatum, a conventional P biofertilizer and P. indica, an alternative to AM fungi. Computational studies using ClustalW tool revealed several conserved motifs between the phosphate transporters from Piriformospora indica and 8 other Glomus species. The 3D model of PTP from P. indica resembling "Mayan temple" was successfully docked onto hydrogen phosphate, indicating the affinity of this protein for inorganic phosphorus. Greenhouse studies revealed inoculation of aerobic rice either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass and yield with higher NPK, chlorophyll and sugar compared to uninoculated ones, P. indica inoculated plants being superior. A significantly enhanced activity of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase were noticed in the rhizosphere soil of rice plants inoculated either with P. indica, G. fasciculatum or both, contributing to higher P uptake. Further, inoculation of aerobic rice plants with P. indica proved to be a better choice as a potential biofertilizer over mycorrhiza.

  20. Melhorias nas propriedades químicas de um solo salino-sódico e rendimento de arroz, sob diferentes tratamentos Improvement in chemical properties of saline-sodic soil and rice yield under under different treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Mariano Gomes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Instalou-se um experimento num solo salino-sódico no Perímetro Irrigado de São Gonçalo, com o objetivo de se avaliar o efeito de diferentes produtos condicionadores nas propriedades químicas do solo e seus reflexos nos componentes de produção e rendimento de grãos na cultura de arroz irrigado (Oryza sativa L.. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os tratamentos estudados foram: gesso (20 Mg ha-1; casca de arroz (15 Mg ha-1; testemunha; vinhaça (40 m³ ha-1 e esterco de curral (40 Mg ha-1. Após aplicação dos tratamentos, o solo foi lixiviado durante 40 dias, mantendo uma lâmina de 8 cm de água nas parcelas. Os tratamentos mostraram efeitos positivos nas propriedades químicas do solo (percentagem de sódio trocável, condutividade elétrica do extrato de saturação e pH da pasta saturada sendo que o esterco de curral e gesso proporcionaram apreciáveis decréscimos em comparação aos outros tratamentos; entretanto, os produtos utilizados não mostraram efeitos significativos no número de panículas, peso de panículas e rendimento do arroz.An experiment was installed in a saline-sodic soil of the Irrigated Perimeter of São Gonçalo, with the objective of evaluating the effect of different amendments in the chemical properties of soil and its posterior reflexes in the components of production and grain yield of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L.. The experiment consisted of five treatments with five replications in a completely randomized design. The treatments studied were: gypsum (20 Mg ha-1; rice husk (15 Mg ha-1; control; stillage (40 m³ ha-1 and farmyard manure (40 Mg ha-1. After incorporation of amendments, the soil was leached for 40 days, keeping an 8 cm depth of water in the plots. The treatments showed positive effects in the chemical properties of the soil (exchangeable sodium percentage, electrical conductivity of saturation extract and pH of saturation

  1. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    .... We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements...

  2. [Mechanisms for the increased fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency of rice in wheat-rice rotation system under combined application of inorganic and organic fertilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Ren; Li, Xiang; Yu, Jie; Shen, Qi-Rong; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the nitrogen uptake by rice and the nitrogen supply by soil in a wheat-rice rotation system, and approach the mechanisms for the increased fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency of rice under the combined fertilization from the viewpoint of microbiology. Comparing with applying inorganic fertilizers, combined application of organic and inorganic fertilizers decreased the soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and soil mineral nitrogen contents before tillering stage, but increased them significantly from heading to filling stage. Under the combined fertilization, the dynamics of soil nitrogen supply matched best the dynamics of rice nitrogen uptake and utilization, which promoted the nitrogen accumulation in rice plant and the increase of rice yield and biomass, and increased the fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency of rice significantly. Combined application of inorganic and organic fertilizers also promoted the propagation of soil microbes, and consequently, more mineral nitrogen in soil was immobilized by the microbes at rice early growth stage, and the immobilized nitrogen was gradually released at the mid and late growth stages of rice, being able to better satisfy the nitrogen demand of rice in its various growth and development stages.

  3. Minimizing downstream scour due to submerged hydraulic jump using corrugated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of hydraulic structures due to hydraulic jump is considered one of the tedious and complicated problems facing their stability. Throughout this paper, an experimental study was conducted to study the effect of using different spaced corrugated aprons on the downstream local scour due to submerged jump. Sixty runs were carried out in a horizontal rectangular flume to determine the optimal corrugation wavelength which minimizing the scour. A case of flat apron included to estimate the influence of corrugated aprons on scour holes dimensions. Two types of non-cohesive soil were used. Experiments were performed for a range of Froude numbers between 1.68 and 9.29. The results showed that using spaced triangular corrugated aprons minimize the scour depth and length of fine sand by average percentage of 63.4% and 30.2%, respectively and for coarse sand by 44.2% and 20.6% in comparing with classical jump.

  4. Resíduos de azevém na superfície de um Planossolo alagado e seus efeitos na concentração de nutrientes na solução do solo e em plantas de arroz Ryegrass residues on soil surface of a flooded Albaqualf soil and their effects on nutrients concentration in soil solution and rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábiana Schmidt

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A incorporação de resíduos de culturas ao solo em lavouras de arroz irrigado tem o potencial de melhorar as características físicas, químicas e biológicas do solo e acelerar as reações de oxirredução durante o alagamento, proporcionando maior disponibilidade de nutrientes para as plantas, que respondem com maior crescimento e maior absorção de nutrientes. Com o objetivo de determinar a concentração de nutrientes na solução do solo e quantificar a absorção de nutrientes e o crescimento de plantas de arroz submetidas a quantidades crescentes de resíduos de azevém aplicadas na superfície do solo, foi conduzido um experimento em casa de vegetação. O experimento foi delineado em blocos ao acaso, com três repetições, sendo utilizadas como tratamentos doses de resíduos de azevém (0,0; 1,25; 2,5; 5,0; 7,5 e 10,0Mg ha-1 aplicadas na superfície de um Planossolo. Sementes de arroz pré-germinadas da cultivar 'BRS 7 Taim' foram semeadas na superfície do solo, que foi alagado 15 dias após, e as plantas foram cultivadas por um período de 45 dias. Nas plantas de arroz, foram avaliados a massa seca da parte aérea e os teores dos nutrientes: N, K, P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu e Zn. Na solução do solo, foram avaliados o potencial redox (Eh, o pH e as concentrações de Mn, Fe, K, Ca e Mg. Os resultados mostraram que a adição de doses crescentes de resíduos de azevém na superfície do solo alagado, até a dose máxima de 10Mg ha-1, intensificou o processo de oxirredução do solo, aumentando a concentração de Mn, Fe, Ca, Mg e K na solução do solo, aumentou os teores de K e Fe na parte aérea das plantas de arroz e aumentou a massa seca de arroz.The incorporation of ryegrass residues on the soil in rice irrigated fields can improve the physical, chemical and biological soil properties. It can also accelerate the redox reaction during the soil flooding, allowing a higher availability of nutrients to the plants, which responds

  5. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  6. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    29(1): 1-6. Fraile ER, Bernardinelli SE, Handel M, Jauregui AM (1978). Selección de cepas de Mucor sp productoras de enzimas coagulantes de leche. Rev. Arg. Microbiol. 10(2): 65-69. Ghareib M, Hamdy HS, Khalil AA (2001). Production of intracellular milk clotting enzyme in submerged cultures of Fusarium subglutinans.

  7. Topology optimization for submerged buoyant structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary structural topology optimization method for the design of completely submerged buoyant modules with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structure is used to support offshore rig installation and pipeline transportation at all water depths. The

  8. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal milk-clotting enzymes have gained value as bovine Chymosin substitutes in the cheese industry. In this work, the effects of culture conditions on the production of extracellular milk clotting enzymes from Mucor mucedo DSM 809 in submerged fermentation were studied. The maximum activity was observed after 48 h ...

  9. Remote sensing based change analysis of rice environments in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumma, Murali Krishna; Mohanty, Samarendu; Nelson, Andrew; Arnel, Rala; Mohammed, Irshad A; Das, Satya Ranjan

    2015-01-15

    The rainfed rice-growing environment is perhaps one of the most vulnerable to water stress such as drought and floods. It is important to determine the spatial extent of the stress-prone areas to effectively and efficiently promote proper technologies (e.g., stress-tolerant varieties) to tackle the problem of sustainable food production. This study was conducted in Odisha state located in eastern India. Odisha is predominantly a rainfed rice ecosystem (71% rainfed and 29% canal irrigated during kharif-monsoon season), where rice is the major crop and staple food of the people. However, rice productivity in Odisha is one of the lowest in India and a significant decline (9%) in rice cultivated area was observed in 2002 (a drought year). The present study analyzed the temporal rice cropping pattern in various ecosystems and identified the stress-prone areas due to submergence (flooding) and water shortage. The spatial distribution of rice areas was mapped using MODIS (MOD09Q1) 250-m 8-day time-series data (2000-2010) and spectral matching techniques. The mapped rice areas were strongly correlated (R(2) = 90%) with district-level statistics. Also the class accuracy based on field-plot data was 84.8%. The area under the rainfed rice ecosystem continues to dominate, recording the largest share among rice classes across all the years. The use of remote-sensing techniques is rapid, cost-effective, and reliable to monitor changes in rice cultivated area over long periods of time and estimate the reduction in area cultivated due to abiotic stress such as water stress and submergence. Agricultural research institutes and line departments in the government can use these techniques for better planning, regular monitoring of land-use changes, and dissemination of appropriate technologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternate wetting and drying of rice reduced CH4 emissions but triggered N2O peaks in a clayey soil of central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing CH4 and N2O emissions from rice cropping systems while sustaining production levels with less water requires a better understanding of the key processes involved. Alternate wetting and drying (AWD) irrigation is one promising practice that has been shown to reduce CH4 emissions. However, li...

  11. Lixiviação do imazethapyr em solo de várzea sob dois sistemas de manejo Imazethapyr leaching in rice paddy soil under two tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Fausto Kraemer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O imazethapyr está sendo amplamente utilizado no Rio Grande do Sul desde o desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Clearfield® (CL em arroz, em uma mistura formulada de imazethapyr + imazapic (75 + 25g L-1. No entanto, com o uso dessa tecnologia, surgiu o problema da persistência do herbicida no solo, afetando cultivos não tolerantes em sucessão com diferentes intensidades. A fitointoxicação está relacionada, dentre vários fatores, à localização do herbicida no perfil do solo. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo determinar o posicionamento do imazethapyr em profundidade, no perfil de um solo de várzea cultivado com arroz, frente a dois tipos de manejo. Foram coletadas amostras de solos, em diferentes profundidades (0-5, 5-10, 10-15 e 15-20cm, do solo de várzea sob dois sistemas de manejo: plantio convencional (PC e plantio direto (PD, em uma área onde havia sido utilizado arroz CL por dois anos e no terceiro ano, arroz não tolerante. A concentração do herbicida no solo foi analisada por HPLC-DAD. Há maior concentração de imazethapyr na superfície do solo (0-5cm, no sistema convencional, quando comparado com o sistema de plantio direto, e o herbicida lixiviou até 20cm nos dois sistemas. No PC, ocorreu uma distribuição uniforme do imazethapyr nos primeiros 15cm de solo, enquanto que, no PD, constatou-se acúmulo de imazethapyr nas camadas de 5-10 e 10-15cm.Imazethapyr has been widely used in Rio Grande do Sul since the development of Clearfield TechnologyTM(CL on rice, in a formulated mixture of imazethapyr + imazapic (75 + 25g L-1. However, the use of such technology raised the problem of herbicide carryover, which might affect non-tolerant crops in rotation with different intensities. The plant injury is related, among other factors, with the herbicide position in the soil profile. The present work had the objective of determining the depth positioning of imazethapyr on a lowland soil cultivated with rice in two soil tillage

  12. Utilization by rice and crotolaria juncea of the fertilizer sulfur (Na{sub 2} {sup 34} S O{sub 4}) applied to the soil; Utilizacao pelo arroz e crotalaria juncea do enxofre Na{sub 2} {sup 34} S O{sub 4}) aplicado ao solo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Carneiro Junior, Francisco [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil)

    1999-11-01

    The utilization by rice (Oriza sativa L.) and crotalaria juncea (Crotalaria juncea L.) of the fertilizer-{sup 34} S was evaluated under greenhouse condition, in pots with 3 kg of a Red Yellow Podzoic soil. A solution of sodium sulfate labeled with {sup 34} S (14.30{+-}0.05 atom % of {sup 34} S) was applied to the soil (70 mg kg{sup -1} of SO{sub 4}{sup 2}-S) on the 18{sup th} day after sowing both species. The shoots of the crotalaria and rice were harvest, respectively in the 72{sup nd} and I 22{sup nd} day after fertilization. The dry matter yield of the crotalaria was lower than of rice. In contrast, the concentration and the amount of the sulfur in the crotalaria were higher than in the rice, due to the higher legume requirement by the nutrient. The sulfur requirement and the short time interval between fertilization and harvest of the crotalaria resulted in a small amount of SO{sub 4}{sup 2}-S mineralized in the soil and a small quantity of {sup 34} SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} immobilized by soil microorganisms. Thus, the {sup 34} S abundance in the crotalaria and the percentage of sulfur in the crotalaria derived from the fertilizer (Sdff) were higher than in the rice (5 Sdff{sub crotalaria} = 91,3{+-}0,8%). The expressive values of Sdff in both species indicate a low rate of mineralization of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} -S as a consequence of the lack of the sulfur in the soil. (author) 13 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Corncob hydrolysate, an efficient substrate for Monascus pigment production through submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongxin; Yin, Zheng; Hu, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Monascus pigment has traditionally been produced by the fermentation of Monascus using rice powder or glucose as a culture substrate. Submerged fermentation can produce stable Monascus pigment yield and control the accumulation of the by-product, citrinin, which can then be more easily removed. To reduce the cost of Monascus submerged fermentation, the feasibility of corncob hydrolysate as an alternative substrate was investigated. Results showed that, when compared with a conventional glucose medium, the corncob hydrolysate medium produced an equivalent pigment yield without stimulating citrinin accumulation. Furthermore, the corncob hydrolysate medium and cultivation conditions were optimized to enhance pigment production and decrease citrinin synthesis. When Monascus sp. was cultured under dark conditions in the presence of caprylic acid, pigment production was increased to 25.8 ± 0.8 UA500 /mL, which was higher than that achieved in a glucose medium (24.0 ± 0.9 UA500 /mL), and those obtained in previously reported Monascus submerged fermentations using the same yield unit; on the other hand, citrinin accumulation was decreased to 26.2 ± 1.9 µg/L, which was significantly lower than that generated in the glucose control (44.3 ± 2.2 µg/L) and in those previously reported fermentations. Thus, corncob hydrolysate was proved to be an efficient alternative substrate for Monascus pigment production through submerged fermentation, which showed significant advantages over a conventional glucose substrate. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Improving zinc bioavailability in transition from flooded to aerobic rice. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Hoffland, E.; Stomph, T.J.; Grant, C.A.; Zou, C.; Zhang, F.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a widely occurring constraint for rice production and for human nutrition. Scarcity of water is leading to a shift from flooded to aerobic rice production, which can have an impact on Zn deficiency in rice. Zinc bioavailability is a function of both soil and plant factors

  15. Early senescence of rice and Drechslera oryzae in the Wageningen Polder, Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, A.O.

    1977-01-01

    Rice is grown in monoculture in the Wageningen Polder, Surinam, South America, which comprises 10 000 ha of heavy clay soil. Fungal diseases caused appreciable losses of the rice crop in several years. Drechslera oryzae van Breda de Haan was found to be the major pathogen of rice. Its most

  16. Effects of surrounding land use on metal accumulation in environments and submerged plants in subtropical ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Bu, Hongmei; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Wenzhi

    2015-12-01

    Ponds are widely used as stormwater treatment facilities to retain contaminants, including metals, and to improve water quality throughout the world. However, there is still a limited understanding of the effects of surrounding land use on metal accumulation in pond environments and organisms. To address this gap, we measured the concentrations of nine metals (i.e., Al, Ba, Ca, K, Li, Mg, Na, Se, and Sr) in water, sediments, and submerged plants collected from 37 ponds with different surrounding land uses in southwestern China and assessed the metal accumulation capacity of four dominant submerged plant species. Our results showed that Al, Ca, and K concentrations in the water were above drinking water standards. In the sediments, the average concentrations of Ca and Sr were higher than the corresponding soil background values. Ceratophyllum demersum L. could accumulate more K in aboveground biomass than Myriophyllum spicatum L. and Potamogeton maackianus A. Benn. The K concentration in submerged plants was positively influenced by the corresponding metal concentration in the water and negatively influenced by water temperature. Among the nine studied metals, only the water K concentration in ponds receiving agricultural runoff was significantly higher than that for ponds receiving urban and forested runoff. This result suggests that surrounding land use types have no significant effect on metal accumulation in sediments and submerged plants in the studied ponds. A large percentage of the metals in these ponds may be derived from natural sources such as the weathering of rocks.

  17. Heavy metals in water, sediments and submerged macrophytes in ponds around the Dianchi Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixiu; Yao, Lu; Liu, Guihua; Liu, Wenzhi

    2014-09-01

    Through retaining runoff and pollutants such as heavy metals from surrounding landscapes, ponds around a lake play an important role in mitigating the impacts of human activities on lake ecosystems. In order to determine the potential for heavy metal accumulation of submerged macrophytes, we investigated the concentrations of 10 heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in water, sediments, and submerged macrophytes collected from 37 ponds around the Dianchi Lake in China. Our results showed that both water and sediments of these ponds were polluted by Pb. Water and sediments heavy metal concentrations in ponds received urban and agricultural runoff were not significantly higher than those in ponds received forest runoff. This result indicates that a large portion of heavy metals in these ponds may originate from atmospheric deposition and weathering of background soils. Positive relationships were found among heavy metal concentrations in submerged macrophytes, probably due to the coaccumulation of heavy metals. For most heavy metals, no significant relationships were found between submerged macrophytes and their water and sediment environments. The maximum concentrations of Cr, Fe and Ni in Ceratophyllum demersum were 4242, 16,429 and 2662mgkg(-1), respectively. The result suggests that C. demersum is a good candidate species for removing heavy metals from polluted aquatic environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous determination of trifloxystrobin and trifloxystrobin acid residue in rice and soil by a modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xixi; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Tao, Yan; Pan, Xinglu; Zheng, Yongquan; Dong, Fengshou

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive analytical method for the simultaneous determination of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid in rice including straw, bran, brown rice and soil was developed by using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The fungicide trifloxystrobin and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid were extracted using acetonitrile with 1% formic acid v/v and subsequently cleaned up by primary secondary amine, octadecylsilane or graphitized carbon black prior to ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The determination of two target compounds was achieved in less than 3 min using an electrospray ionization source in positive mode. The limits of detection were below 0.22 μg/kg and the limits of quantification did not exceed 0.74 μg/kg in all matrices, which were much lower than the maximum residue levels established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The overall average recoveries in four matrix at three levels (0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg) ranged from 74.2 to 107.4% with a relative standard deviations of less than 7.8% (n = 5) for both analytes. The method was demonstrated to be convenient and reliable for the routine monitoring of trifloxystrobin and its metabolite. The developed method was validated and applied for the analysis of degradation study samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Survey of Rice Cropping Systems in Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker KLEINHENZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although Cambodia might have achieved self-sufficiency and an exported surplus in rice production, its rice-based farming systems are widely associated with low productivity, low farmer income and rural poverty. The study is based on a questionnaire village survey in 14 communes containing 97 villages of Kampong Chhnang Province from March to June, 2011. It analyzes the prevailing rice-based cropping systems and evaluates options for their improvement. Differences in cropping systems depend on the distance from the Tonle Sap water bodies. At distances greater than 10 km, transplanted wet-season rice cropping system with low productivity of about 1.6 t/hm2 prevails. This deficiency can be primarily attributed to soils with high coarse sand fractions and low pH ( 4.0. Farmers predominantly cultivate dry-season recession rice between January and April. Seventy-nine percent of the area is sown directly and harvested by combines. Adoption ratio of commercial rice seeds is 59% and yields average 3.2 t/hm2. Introduction of the second dry-season rice between April and July may double annual yields in this rice cropping system. Besides upgrading other cultivation technologies, using seeds from commercial sources will improve yield and rice quality. Along with rice, farmers grow non-rice crops at different intensities ranging from single annual crops to intensive sequences at low yields.

  20. Avian foods, foraging and habitat conservation in world rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, rice (Oryza sativa) agriculture typically involves seasonal flooding and soil tillage, which provides a variety of microhabitats and potential food for birds. Water management in rice fields creates conditions ranging from saturated mud flats to shallow (waste rice) is typically the most abundant potential food of birds in rice fields, with estimates of seed mass from North America ranging from 66672 kg/ha. Although initially abundant after harvest, waste rice availability can be temporally limited. Few abundance estimates for other foods, such as vertebrate prey or forage vegetation, exist for rice fields. Outside North America, Europe and Japan, little is known about abundance and importance of any avian food in rice fields. Currently, flooding rice fields after harvest is the best known management practice to attract and benefit birds. Studies from North America indicate specific agricultural practices (e.g. burning stubble) may increase use and improve access to food resources. Evaluating and implementing management practices that are ecologically sustainable, increase food for birds and are agronomically beneficial should be global priorities to integrate rice production and avian conservation. Finally, land area devoted to rice agriculture appears to be stable in the USA, declining in China, and largely unquantified in many regions. Monitoring trends in riceland area may provide information to guide avian conservation planning in rice-agriculture ecosystems.

  1. Excessive sulfur supply reduces cadmium accumulation in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Jianling [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71st East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); College of Resources and Environment, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu Zhengyi, E-mail: zhyhu@gucas.ac.c [College of Resources and Environment, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Ziadi, Noura [Soils and Crops Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2560 Hochelaga Boulevard, Quebec, QC, G1V 2J3 (Canada); Xia Xu; Wu Congyanghui [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71st East Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); College of Resources and Environment, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Human activities have resulted in cadmium (Cd) and sulfur (S) accumulation in paddy soils in parts of southern China. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of excessive S supply on iron plaque formation and Cd accumulation in rice plants, using two Cd levels (0, 1.5 mg kg{sup -1}) combined with three S concentrations (0, 60, 120 mg kg{sup -1}). The results showed that excessive S supply significantly decreased Cd accumulation in brown rice due to the decrease of Cd availability and the increase of glutathione in rice leaves. But excessive S supply obviously increased Cd accumulation in roots due to the decrease of iron plaque formation on the root surface of rice. Therefore, excessive S supply may result in loss of rice yield, but it could effectively reduce Cd accumulation in brown rice exposed to Cd contaminated soils. - Excessive sulfur reduces cadmium accumulation in brown rice.

  2. Biosynthesis, regulation and biological role of strigolactones in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moura Luis Cardoso, De C.S.

    2014-01-01

    In her thesis Catarina Cardoso studied strigolactone biosynthesis in rice. Strigolactones are multifunctional compounds produced by plants. They are plant hormones that regulate plant architecture, but in addition plants release strigolactones into the soil to communicate and initiate beneficial

  3. Bioconversion process of rice straw by thermotolerant cellulolytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    state fermentation for bioethanol production is a focus of current attention. A total of 10 actinomycetes isolates were isolated from soils and decayed rice straw. All these isolates were purified and screened for their cellulolytic activity; one strain ...

  4. Analysis of Eh Condition and Evolutional Trend of Paddy Soils in a Toposequence

    OpenAIRE

    javad seyedmohammadi; leila esmaeelnejad; hassan ramezanpour; kamran eftekhari

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Paddy soils are important and the base of agriculture in Guilan province. It is necessary to recognize these soils for understanding of their limitations and optimum use. Unsaturated soil submerging is the cause of collection of chemical and electrochemical process that has significant effects on soil fertility. Eh, rH and pH are important indexes that are used to investigate oxidation and reduction condition in submerged soils and have abundant effects on activity and sorption ...

  5. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugarcane production in U.S. involves either pre-harvest burning or after-harvest burning of the residue. Approximately 70-90% of the dry matter of harvested sugarcane trash is lost through open field burning. This practice has caused considerable concerns over air quality and soil sustainability. We propose an alternative conservation approach to convert the sugarcane residue to biochar and used as soil amendment to conserve carbon and potentially improve soil fertility. In this study, fundamental properties of biochars made from sugarcane residue along with rice residues were tested for agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane and rice harvest residues and milling processing byproducts bagasse and rice husk were converted to biochars at different pyrolysis temperatures and characterized. In general, sugarcane leave biochar contained more P, K, Ca and Mg than sugarcane bagasse biochar. Rice straw biochar had more S, K Ca but less P than rice husk biochar. Both biochars had higher available fraction of total P than that of total K. Sugarcane leave biochar converted at 450oC was dominated with various lignin derived phenols as well as non-specific aromatic compounds whereas bagasse biochar was with both lignin derived phenol and poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Rice straw char was dominated with non-specific aromatic compounds. At 750oC, charred material was dominated with aromatic ethers while losing the aromatic C=C structures. These molecular and surface property differences likely contributed to the difference in water holding capacities observed with these biochars. On the other hand, rice straw biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had no significant effect on rice germination. Soils treated with sugarcane leave/trash biochar significantly enhanced sugarcane growth especially the root length. Treating soil with either sugarcane leave or bagasse char also enhanced soil adsorption capacity of atrazine; a common herbicide used in sugarcane

  6. Pump Coastdown with the Submerged Flywheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Seo, KyoungWoo; Kim, Seong Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many research reactors are generally designed as open pool types in consideration of the heat removal of the nuclear fuels, reactor operation and accessibility. Reactor structure assembly is generally placed at the pool bottom as shown in Fig. 1. Primary cooling system pump circulates the coolant from the reactor structure to the heat exchanger in order to continuously remove the heat generated from the reactor core in the research reactor as shown in Fig. 1. The secondary cooling system releases the transferred heat to the atmosphere by the cooling tower. Coastdown flow rate of the primary cooling system pump with the submerged flywheel are calculated analytically in case of the accident situation. Coastdown flow rate is maintained until almost 80 sec when the pump stops normally. But, coastdown flow rate is rapidly decreased when the flywheel is submerged because of the friction load on the flywheel surface.

  7. METHANE EMISSION FROM DIRECT SEEDED RICE UNDER THE INFLUENCES OF RICE STRAW AND NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wihardjaka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into soil is a common practice to improve soil productivity and increase inorganic fertilizer availability. However, this practice could contribute to methane (CH4 emission; one of the greenhouse gases that causes global warming. Nitrification inhibitors such as neem cake and carbofuran may reduce methane emission following application of rice straw. The study aimed to evaluate the application of rice straw and nitrification inhibitor to methane emission in rainfed lowland rice system. A factorial randomized block design was used with three replications. The first factor was rice straw incorporation (5 t ha-1 fresh straw, 5 t ha-1 composted straw, and the second factor was nitrification inhibitor application (20 kg ha-1 neem cake, 20 kg ha-1 carbofuran. The experiment was conducted at rainfed lowland in Pati, Central Java, during 2009/2010 wet season. Ciherang variety was planted as direct seeded rice with spacing of 20 cm x 20 cm in each plot of 4 m x 5 m. The rice straw was treated together with soil tillage, whereas nitrification inhibitor was applied together with urea application. Parameters observed were methane flux, plant height, plant biomass, grain yield, organic C content, and bacterial population in soil. The methane flux and soil organic C were measured at 25, 45, 60, 75, and 95 days after emergence. The results showed that composted rice straw incorporation significantly emitted methane lower (73.2 ± 6.6 kg CH4 ha-1 season-1 compared to the fresh rice straw (93.5 ± 4.0 CH4 ha-1 season-1. Application of nitrification inhibitors neem cake and carbofuran reduced methane emission as much as 20.7 and 15.4 kg CH4 ha-1 season-1, respectively. Under direct seeded rice system, methane flux level correlated with plant biomass as shown by linear regression of Y = 0.0015 X + 0.0575 (R2 = 0.2305, n = 27. This means that higher plant biomass produced more methane flux. The study indicates that application of

  8. Making Rice Production More Environmentally-Friendly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Uphoff

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Irrigated rice production is one of the most essential agricultural activities for sustaining our global population, and at the same time, one of the agricultural sectors considered most eco-unfriendly. This is because it consumes a larger share of available freshwater resources, competing with varied ecosystems as well as other economic sectors; its paddy fields are responsible for significant emission of greenhouse gases; and the reliance on chemical fertilizers and various agrochemicals contributes to pollution of soils and water systems. These stresses on soils, hydrology and atmosphere are actually not necessary for rice production, which can be increased by modifying agronomic practices though more agroecologically-sound management practices. These, combined under the rubric of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI, can reduce requirements of irrigation water, chemical fertilizer and agrochemicals while increasing paddy yields and farmer’s net incomes. Here we discuss how irrigated rice production can be made more eco-friendly for the benefit of farmers, consumers and the environment. This is achieved by introducing practices that improve the growth and functioning of rice plants’ root systems and enhance the abundance, diversity and activity of beneficial soil organisms that live around plant roots and within the plants themselves as symbiotic endophytes.

  9. Coastline Protection by a Submerged Breakwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B. D.; Hayatdavoodi, M.; Ertekin, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal communities are in danger of the impact caused by storm surge and waves. Storm surge brings the water level to a higher elevation and farther inland. This rise in water level increases the chance of a higher number and larger set of waves approaching shorelines, and it can potentially devastate the coastal infrastructure. In this study, we evaluate the performance of a submerged, horizontal breakwater located near shore. Unlike other types of breakwaters, such as the ones that extend to the surface, either fixed or floating, a submerged horizontal breakwater does not create any visual distraction or limit most of the recreational and commercial activities in the nearshore areas. The Level I Green-Naghdi (GN) nonlinear water wave equations are utilized here to study the wave transformation over a submerged breakwater that is located in shallow water. The GN theory is based on the theory of directed fluid sheets and assumes an incompressible and inviscid fluid; no assumption on the rotationality of the flow is required. In this approach, the nonlinear boundary conditions and the averaged conservation laws are satisfied exactly. The reflection and transmission coefficients due to nonlinear shallow water waves are determined implementing two approaches which use Goda's (1976) and Grue's (1992) methods. The results are compared with the existing laboratory experiments, and close agreement is observed overall. Preliminary results of the performance of the breakwater on dissipating storm waves during Hurricane Ike (2008), approaching the shore of Galveston, Texas, are presented.

  10. Atributos químicos do solo afetado pelo manejo da água e do fertilizante potássico na cultura de arroz irrigado Chemical properties of soil affected by water and potassium fertilization management in irrigated rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto B. dos Santos

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento das culturas nas várzeas é extremamente influenciado pelo manejo destas, devido aos atributos químicos e físico-hídricos que elas possuem. O decréscimo na produtividade, verificado no monocultivo contínuo de arroz (Oryza sativa L. irrigado, pode estar relacionado à redução na fertilidade do solo, em decorrência da lixiviação de nutrientes. Com o objetivo de se avaliar os efeitos de manejo da água (MA1 - inundação contínua e MA2 - inundação intermitente seguida de contínua e do fertilizante potássico (K1 - na semeadura; K2 - adubação parcelada e K3 - meia dosagem parcelada na cultura de arroz irrigado sobre alguns atributos químicos de um solo Gley Pouco Húmico, foram conduzidos experimentos durante três anos consecutivos. Na inundação contínua ocorre maior lixiviação de cálcio e de potássio, teor de fósforo no solo e saturação por alumínio e menor pH na camada superficial do solo em relação à inundação intermitente, além de aumento do teor de potássio e do pH e diminuição de saturação por alumínio em profundidade. A inundação intermitente e o parcelamento do potássio podem contribuir na redução das perdas de nutrientes em solos de várzea que apresentam percolação excessiva. Alguns atributos químicos do solo podem ser melhorados através do manejo adequado da cultura do arroz irrigado, envolvendo manejo da água e do fertilizante potássico.Crop performance in lowland soils is influenced by management practices due to change in physico-chemical properties. Grain yield decrease in continuous monoculture of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L. may be associated with decrease in soil fertility due to leaching of nutrients. The objective of this study was to evaluate effect of water management (WM1 - continuous flooding, and WM2 - intermittent flooding followed by continuous flooding and potassium fertilization (K1 - at sowing; K2 - fractional application, and K3 - fractional

  11. Studies on the Ecological Adaptability of Growing Rice with Floating Bed on the Dilute Biogas Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the ecological adaptability and the possibility of growing rice with floating bed on the dilute biogas slurry. The results of the experiments show that the growth stage, rice plant height, and rice yield and quality were significantly affected by multiple dilutions; rice plants cultivated with 45 multiple dilutions had better ecological adaptability than others. In the 45 multiple dilutions’ group, the yield of rice was 13.3 g/bucket (8 rice plants, milled rice rate was 63.1%, and the content of crude protein in the rice was 6.3%. The concentrations of heavy metals in the rice cultivated with 30 multiple dilutions’ slurry, such as total lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic, were all below the national standard. The study shows that it is possible and safe to cultivate rice plants with no soil but diluted biogas slurry. In the experiments, the yield, milled rice rate, and crude protein of the rice cultivated with slurry were not as much as those of rice cultivated with regular way in soil. This study provides the basic theoretical support for the development of biogas projects and the potential achievement of organic farming in special agricultural facilities and circular economy.

  12. Studies on the Ecological Adaptability of Growing Rice with Floating Bed on the Dilute Biogas Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qi; Cheng, Bowen; Liao, Zhiqi; Sun, Chengcheng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the ecological adaptability and the possibility of growing rice with floating bed on the dilute biogas slurry. The results of the experiments show that the growth stage, rice plant height, and rice yield and quality were significantly affected by multiple dilutions; rice plants cultivated with 45 multiple dilutions had better ecological adaptability than others. In the 45 multiple dilutions' group, the yield of rice was 13.3 g/bucket (8 rice plants), milled rice rate was 63.1%, and the content of crude protein in the rice was 6.3%. The concentrations of heavy metals in the rice cultivated with 30 multiple dilutions' slurry, such as total lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic, were all below the national standard. The study shows that it is possible and safe to cultivate rice plants with no soil but diluted biogas slurry. In the experiments, the yield, milled rice rate, and crude protein of the rice cultivated with slurry were not as much as those of rice cultivated with regular way in soil. This study provides the basic theoretical support for the development of biogas projects and the potential achievement of organic farming in special agricultural facilities and circular economy. PMID:27882324

  13. Predicting Nitrogen Availability to Rice: II. Assessing Available Nitrogen in Silt Loams With Different Previous Year Crop History

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L. Sims; B. G. Blackmon

    1967-01-01

    Soil test method s that measure NH4+-N in silt 100ms before and after incubation under waterlogged conditions were evaluated as predictors of N availability to 'Nato' rice (Oriza sativa L.) frown in the greenhouse. Eighteen soils for each of five previous year crop histories were utilized. An soils were from crop rotations containing rice....

  14. Impact of elevated CO2 and temperature on soil C and N dynamics in relation to CH4 and N2O emissions from tropical flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Dash, P K; Nayak, A K; Mohanty, S; Baig, M J; Sarkar, R K; Rao, K S

    2013-09-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) (CEC, 550 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated CO2+elevated air temperature (CECT, 550 μmol mol(-1) and 2°C more than control chamber (CC)) on soil labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, microbial populations and enzymatic activities in relation to emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a flooded alluvial soil planted with rice cv. Naveen in open top chambers (OTCs). The labile soil C pools, namely microbial biomass C, readily mineralizable C, water soluble carbohydrate C and potassium permanganate oxidizable C were increased by 27, 23, 38 and 37% respectively under CEC than CC (ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)). The total organic carbon (TOC) in root exudates was 28.9% higher under CEC than CC. The labile N fractions were also increased significantly (29%) in CEC than CC. Methanogens and denitrifier populations in rhizosphere were higher under CEC and CECT. As a result, CH4 and N2O-N emissions were enhanced by 26 and 24.6% respectively, under CEC in comparison to open field (UC, ambient CO2, 394 μmol mol(-1)) on seasonal basis. The global warming potential (GWP) was increased by 25% under CEC than CC. However, emissions per unit of grain yield under elevated CO2 and temperature were similar to those observed at ambient CO2. The stimulatory effect on CH4 and N2O emissions under CEC was linked with the increased amount of soil labile C, C rich root exudates, lowered Eh, higher Fe(+2) concentration and increased activities of methanogens and extracellular enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A framework to improve fertilizer recommendations for irrigated rice in West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haefele, S.M.; Wopereis, M.C.S.; Ndiaye, M.K.; Kropff, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A framework to optimize soil fertility management in irrigated rice, based on soil and climate variability, fertilizer and paddy prices and farmers' objectives is presented. The framework uses three models in succession. The dynamic ecophysiological ORYZAS model simulates potential rice yields under

  16. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Majid; CHANGQI, YAN; ZHONGNING, SUN; HAIFENG, GU; JUNLONG, WANG; MEHBOOB, KHURRAM

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine...

  17. Silicon-mediated resistance in a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongqiang; Lei, Wenbin; Wen, Lizhang; Hou, Maolin

    2015-01-01

    The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée), is one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries. Rice varieties resistant to the rice leaf folder are generally characterized by high silicon content. In this study, silicon amendment, at 0.16 and 0.32 g Si/kg soil, enhanced resistance of a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder. Silicon addition to rice plants at both the low and high rates significantly extended larval development and reduced larval survival rate and pupation rate in the rice leaf folder. When applied at the high rate, silicon amendment reduced third-instars' weight gain and pupal weight. Altogether, intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase and net reproduction rate of the rice leaf folder population were all reduced at both the low and high silicon addition rates. Although the third instars consumed more in silicon-amended treatments, C:N ratio in rice leaves was significantly increased and food conversion efficiencies were reduced due to increased silicon concentration in rice leaves. Our results indicate that reduced food quality and food conversion efficiencies resulted from silicon addition account for the enhanced resistance in the susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder.

  18. Silicon-mediated resistance in a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Han

    Full Text Available The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée, is one of the most destructive rice pests in Asian countries. Rice varieties resistant to the rice leaf folder are generally characterized by high silicon content. In this study, silicon amendment, at 0.16 and 0.32 g Si/kg soil, enhanced resistance of a susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder. Silicon addition to rice plants at both the low and high rates significantly extended larval development and reduced larval survival rate and pupation rate in the rice leaf folder. When applied at the high rate, silicon amendment reduced third-instars' weight gain and pupal weight. Altogether, intrinsic rate of increase, finite rate of increase and net reproduction rate of the rice leaf folder population were all reduced at both the low and high silicon addition rates. Although the third instars consumed more in silicon-amended treatments, C:N ratio in rice leaves was significantly increased and food conversion efficiencies were reduced due to increased silicon concentration in rice leaves. Our results indicate that reduced food quality and food conversion efficiencies resulted from silicon addition account for the enhanced resistance in the susceptible rice variety to the rice leaf folder.

  19. Analysis of Eh Condition and Evolutional Trend of Paddy Soils in a Toposequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    javad seyedmohammadi

    2017-02-01

    iron were determined using nitric acid, dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate and ammonium oxalate methods, respectively. The means of different Fe forms values compared through LSD test. Results and Discussion: It can be seen especial morphological and physicochemical characteristics in studied paddy soils with high groundwater table due to artificial submerging in rice growing seasonDifferent Fe mottles such as orange mottles include lepidocrocite mineral was observed in studied soils. Low redox potential with average 145/7mV and rH with average 19.6 in lowland and coastal soils implicate intense reduction condition. In lowland soils Eh was lower than other units and it was lower in top horizons than to sub horizons in all of units. Eh index had inverse relationship with organic matter, because of high organic matter amount caused high activity of anaerobic micro-organisms, increase of iron reduction and reduction soils degree decrease. rH index amounts showed that studied soils had reduction condition and presence of brown iron and black manganese minerals proved this condition. CEC was high in top soil of physiographic units due to high amount of organic matter and clay content. Clay particles in plateaues were lower than other units because of alteration and suitable aeration and showed high evolution in these soils. Clay coatings were not observed due to high ground water table and its alternative fluctuation. Results showed amorphous iron in surface horizons with average amount of 24.3g kg-1 was higher than subsurface in all soils and had positive correlation with organic matter, because of high activity of anaerobic micro-organisms that prevent from transformation of amorphous iron to crystallized iron, therefore amorphous iron amount increased in presence of organic matter. Pedogenic iron was high in A and B horizons with regard to BC and C horizons due to aeration and weathering. In lowland and coastal land Fed was lower than plateaues and upper terraces and river

  20. Submergence tolerance in Hordeum marinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Malik, Al I.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Floodwaters differ markedly in dissolved CO(2), yet the effects of CO(2) on submergence responses of terrestrial plants have rarely been examined. The influence of dissolved CO(2) on underwater photosynthesis and growth was evaluated for three accessions of the wetland plant Hordeum marinum Huds......) movement, would all contribute to submergence tolerance in H. marinum. The present study demonstrates that dissolved CO(2) levels can determine submergence tolerance of terrestrial plants. So, submergence experiments should be conducted with defined CO(2) concentrations and enrichment might be needed...

  1. Resposta de arroz de terras altas, feijão, milho e soja à saturação por base em solo de cerrado Response of upland rice, dry bean, corn and soybean to base saturation in cerrado soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nand K. Fageria

    2001-12-01

    adequate. Nutrient accumulation was significantly influenced by different base saturation treatments as well as by the age of the four crops. Adequate levels of soil chemical properties, such as pH, contents of Ca and Mg, ratio of Ca/Mg, ratio of Ca/K, ratio of Mg/K, Ca saturation, Mg saturation and K saturation were established for upland rice, dry bean, corn and soybean grown in cerrado soil.

  2. Integrated rice-duck farming mitigates the global warming potential in rice season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guochun; Liu, Xin; Wang, Qiangsheng; Yu, Xichen; Hang, Yuhao

    2017-01-01

    Integrated rice-duck farming (IRDF), as a mode of ecological agriculture, is an important way to realize sustainable development of agriculture. A 2-year split-plot field experiment was performed to evaluate the effects of IRDF on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and its ecological mechanism in rice season. This experiment was conducted with two rice farming systems (FS) of IRDF and conventional farming (CF) under four paddy-upland rotation systems (PUR): rice-fallow (RF), annual straw incorporating in rice-wheat rotation system (RWS), annual straw-based biogas residues incorporating in rice-wheat rotation system (RWB), and rice-green manure (RGM). During the rice growing seasons, IRDF decreased the CH4 emission by 8.80-16.68%, while increased the N2O emission by 4.23-15.20%, when compared to CF. Given that CH4 emission contributed to 85.83-96.22% of global warming potential (GWP), the strong reduction in CH4 emission led to a significantly lower GWP of IRDF as compared to CF. The reason for this trend was because IRDF has significant effect on dissolved oxygen (DO) and soil redox potential (Eh), which were two pivotal factors for CH4 and N2O emissions in this study. The IRDF not only mitigates the GWP, but also increases the rice yield by 0.76-2.43% compared to CF. Moreover, compared to RWS system, RF, RWB and RGM systems significantly reduced CH4 emission by 50.17%, 44.89% and 39.51%, respectively, while increased N2O emission by 10.58%, 14.60% and 23.90%, respectively. And RWS system had the highest GWP. These findings suggest that mitigating GWP and improving rice yield could be simultaneously achieved by the IRDF, and employing suitable PUR would benefit for relieving greenhouse effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biochar amendment reduced methylmercury accumulation in rice plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Rui; Wang, Yongjie [School of Environment, Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China (China); Zhong, Huan, E-mail: zhonghuan@nju.edu.cn [School of Environment, Nanjing University, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China (China); Environmental and Life Sciences Program (EnLS), Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Biochar amendment could evidently reduce methylmercury (MeHg) levels in rice grain. • Biochar could enhance microbial production of MeHg, probably by providing sulfate. • Biochar could immobilize MeHg in soil, and reduce MeHg availability to rice plants. • Biochar amendment increased grain biomass, leading to biodilution of MeHg in grain. - Abstract: There is growing concern about methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in rice grains and thus enhanced dietary exposure to MeHg in Asian countries. Here, we explored the possibility of reducing grain MeHg levels by biochar amendment, and the underlying mechanisms. Pot (i.e., rice cultivation in biochar amended soils) and batch experiments (i.e., incubation of amended soils under laboratory conditions) were carried out, to investigate MeHg dynamics (i.e., MeHg production, partitioning and phytoavailability in paddy soils, and MeHg uptake by rice) under biochar amendment (1–4% of soil mass). We demonstrate for the first time that biochar amendment could evidently reduce grain MeHg levels (49–92%). The declines could be attributed to the combined effects of: (1) increased soil MeHg concentrations, probably explained by the release of sulfate from biochar and thus enhanced microbial production of MeHg (e.g., by sulfate-reducing bacteria), (2) MeHg immobilization in soils, facilitated by the large surface areas and high organosulfur content of biochar, and (3) biodilution of MeHg in rice grains, due to the increased grain biomass under biochar amendment (35–79%). These observations together with mechanistic explanations improve understanding of MeHg dynamics in soil-rice systems, and support the possibility of reducing MeHg phytoaccumulation under biochar amendment.

  4. Eficiência do uso e resposta à aplicação de fósforo de cultivares de arroz em solos de terras altas Use efficiency and response to phosphorus of application rice cultivars in highlands soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Aparecida Rotili

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho estudar a eficiência e resposta quanto ao uso de fósforo de cultivares de arroz em solos de terras altas no sul do Estado de Tocantins. Os tratamentos envolveram seis cultivares comerciais de arroz (BRS-Bonança BRS-Caiapó, BRS-Sertaneja, BRSMG-Curinga, BRSMG-Conai e BRS-Primavera, que foram cultivadas em dois ambientes distintos. Para simular ambientes com baixo e alto nível de fósforo, foram utilizadas as doses 20 e 120 kg ha-1 de P2O5. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Através da produtividade de grãos, classificaram-se as cultivares quanto à eficiência no uso e resposta à aplicação do fósforo. A cultivar BRS-Bonança foi mais eficiente quanto ao uso de fósforo e responsiva à sua aplicação.This research's objective was to study the efficiency in the usage of phosphorus by rice cultivars in highland soils in the South of Tocantins State. The experiments evaluated six commercial cultivars of rice (BRS-Bonança BRS-Caiapó, BRS-Sertaneja, BRSMG-Curinga, BRSMG-Conai and BRS-Primavera, grown in areas with high and low phosphorus application: 20 and 120 kg ha-1 of P2O5. The experiments were carried out in a completely randomized blocks design, with four replicates. Based on grain yield, cultivars were classified in respect to the efficiency and response to phosphorus fertilization. The cultivar BRS-Bonança presented the highest phosphorus use efficiency and was the most responsive.

  5. Variáveis microbiológicas e produtividade do arroz sob diferentes manejos do solo e água = Microbial variables and productivity of rice under different soil and water managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orivaldo Arf

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi verificar o efeito de diferentes manejos de solo (MS e água (MA no cultivo de arroz de terras altas por meio da quantificação do carbono da biomassa microbiana (CBM e do CO2 (C-CO2 liberado, do quociente metabólico (qCO2, da micorrização e da produtividade (PROD. O cultivar utilizado foi o IAC 202 e odelineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, sendo 3 MS: plantio direto (PD, grade pesada+grade niveladora (GG, escarificador+grade niveladora (EG e 3 MA: lâmina L0 (sem irrigação, lâmina L1 (irrigação na fase reprodutiva e de maturação e lâmina L2 (irrigação durante todo ciclo, com 4 repetições. As variáveis microbiológicas apresentaram sensibilidade em detectar diferenças entre períodos com bons e irregulares índices pluviométricos, onde PD + L1 mostraram os melhores resultados. Sob a ótica da produtividade e viabilidade econômica, o EG + L1 propiciaram resultados mais satisfatórios para a cultura do arroz.This experiment aimed to verify the effects of differents soil (MSand water (WM managements on upland rice cultivation through microbial biomass carbon (MBC quantification, evoluted CO2 (C-CO2, metabolic quotient (qCO2, micorrhization and crop yield. Cultivar IAC 202 was used. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design, with 3 SM: no-tillage (NT, heavy disk + leveling diskharrowing (HL, and chisel plowing + leveling disk harrowing (CL, plus 3 WM: no irrigation (WD0, water depth 1 (WD1, irrigation at the reproductive and maturation periods and water depth 2 (WD2, irrigation throughout the rice cycle, with four replications. The microbiological variables showed sensitivity in detecting differencesbetween good periods and irregular rainfall, where the NT + WD1 showed best results. However, under the viewpoint of productivity and economic viability, CL + WD1 propitiated the most satisfactory results for rice culture.

  6. Persistência do herbicida clomazone no solo e na água quando aplicado na cultura do arroz irrigado, sistema pré-germinado Clomazone soil and water persistence when applied in water seeded rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Noldin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A persistência do herbicida clomazone aplicado diretamente na lâmina d'água de arroz irrigado foi avaliada em três experimentos conduzidos em um solo do tipo argilo-siltoso, na Estação Experimental da EPAGRI em Itajaí-SC, a partir de duas formulações do herbicida clomazone, 500 CE (concentrado emulsionável e 360 CS (concentrado solúvel, na mesma dose do ingrediente ativo. Os experimentos com arroz irrigado em sistema pré-germinado foram conduzidos, durante três anos consecutivos, nas safras de 1996/97 a 98/99; o herbicida foi quantificado em solo e água, antes e após a aplicação, sendo após a aplicação retiradas diversas amostras de solo e água para análise até a colheita da cultura do arroz. As amostras foram analisadas através de cromatografia gasosa. No ano de 1996/97 foi avaliado o herbicida clomazone na formulação 500 CE, o qual foi detectado no solo até oito dias após a aplicação (DAA e, na água, até 32 DAA. Na safra 1996/97 os teores de herbicida na água aos 16 dias foram em torno de 3% da quantidade aplicada. O clomazone, na formulação CS, foi detectado na água e no solo até 24 DAA, sendo o período residual desta formulação superior ao da formulação CE. Esses resultados sugerem que até três a quatro semanas após a aplicação do herbicida, nas formulações CE e CS, a água deve ser mantida dentro dos quadros, a fim de minimizar os riscos de arrastamento do produto para fora da lavoura e a conseqüente contaminação das águas superficiais.Three field studies were carried out on a silty clay soil - Haplaquoll (Molic Gleysol, during the 1996/99 season, at Epagri/Itajaí Experimental Station in southern Brazil, 26(0 56' 35s S and 48(0 45' 37s W, to evaluate clomazone persistence in soil and water. Clomazone 500 EC (1996/97 and 360 CS (1997/98 and 1998/99 was applied in the water in post emergence of pre-germinated seed in flooded rice area. Herbicide concentration in the soil and water was

  7. Calibration of submerged multi-sluice gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to study experimentally and verify empirically the different parameters affecting the discharge through submerged multiple sluice gates (i.e., the expansion ratios, gates operational management, etc.. Using multiple regression analysis of the experimental results, a general equation for discharge coefficient is developed. The results show, that the increase in the expansion ratio and the asymmetric operation of gates, give higher values for the discharge coefficient. The obtained predictions of the discharge coefficient using the developed equations are compared to the experimental data. The present developed equations showed good consistency and high accuracy.

  8. Application of Rice Straw Compost with Different Bioactivators on the Growth and Yield of Rice Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunita Barus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnover of organic matters to the soil can increase the efficiency of chemical fertilizers, improve the plant growthand sustain the environment. Field experiment was carried out in the Buyut Udik Village, Gunung Sugih District,Central Lampung from May to August 2009. Rice straw was composted by three kinds of decomposer (bioactivatorA, B, and C. Rice straw compost (2 Mg ha-1 was applied to the paddy-field soil that was planted by rice (Oryzasativa of Ciherang Variety. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with three replicates. Theresults showed that application of rice straw compost reduced the numbers of empty grain per tiller compared tocontrol (without compost in which control had the highest percentage of empty grain (15.9%. The application ofri