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Sample records for submerged cultured oyster

  1. An example of GIS potentiality for coastal zone management: preselection of submerged oyster culture areas near Marennes-Oleron (France)

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, H.; Guillaumont, Brigitte; Loarer, Ronan; Loubersac, Lionel; Heral, Maurice; Prou, Jean

    1994-01-01

    The Charente Maritime coast, in central western France, is the most important area for oyster and mussel production in Europe. High density, in this restricted intertidal area, induces low growing rate and socio-economic difficulties. One of the possible solutions is to shift some oysters from intertidal area to submerged areas. Bathymetry, sedimentology, hydrodynamism, fisheries and administrative rules are some conditions which are considered to establish the better selection of potential z...

  2. Submerged Cultivation of Mycelium with High Ergothioneine Content from the Culinary-Medicinal Golden Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus citrinopileatus (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Chien, Shih-Chang; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of submerged culture of the culinary-medicinal golden oyster mushroom, Pleurotus citrinopileatus, was studied using a one-factor-at-a-time, two-stage stimulation and central composite rotatable design to produce mycelia with high ergothioneine content. The optimal culture conditions for mycelia harvested at day 22 were a temperature of 25°C, an inoculation ratio of 5%, 2% glucose, 0.5% yeast extract, and adjustment of the initial pH value to 10. The biomass and ergothioneine content were 8.28 g/L and 10.65 mg/g dry weight (dw), respectively. The addition of an amino acid precursor increased the ergothioneine content of mycelia; cysteine was the most effective. In addition, the results obtained from central composite rotatable design showed that the recommended combination for cysteine, histidine, and methionine was 8, 4, and 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. The predicted ergothioneine content was 13.90 mg/g dw, whereas the experimental maximal ergothioneine content was 14.57 mg/g dw. With the addition of complex precursors and under optimal culture conditions, mycelia harvested at days 16-20 had higher ergothioneine content. Accordingly, the information obtained could be used to produce mycelia with high ergothioneine content.

  3. Length-Weight relationships of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The length-weight relationships (LWRs) of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar, cultured under continuous and periodic submergence in tidal ponds, for a period of seven months, February to August 2010 were determined. A total of 375 individuals each of pond A (continuous submergence) and B (periodic submergence) ...

  4. COMPARISON OF CARBON AND NITROGEN FLUXES IN TIDEFLAT FOOD WEBS DOMINATED BY BURROWING SHRIMP OR BY CULTURED OYSTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of indigenous, thalassinid burrowing shrimps are pests to the benthic culture of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) because deposition of sediment excavated by the shrimps buries or smothers the oysters. Carbaryl pesticide is used to reduce burrowing shrimp densitie...

  5. Coliform density in oyster culture waters and its relationship with environmental factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mignani, Luciene; Barbieri, Edison; Marques, Helcio Luis de Almeida; Oliveira, Ana Julia Fernandes Cardoso de

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the total and thermotolerant coliform densities in the oyster culture water of Cananeia, SP, Brazil, correlating these densities with environmental variables...

  6. Antioxidant Properties of the Edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in Submerged Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lung, Ming-Yeou; Chang, Yu-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM) and mycelia-free broth (MEB) and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM) by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as ...

  7. The effects of intertidal oyster (Crassostrea gigas) culture on the spatial distribution of waterbirds

    OpenAIRE

    Gittings, T.; O Donoghue, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Atkins was commissioned by the Marine Institute to provide ornithological services in relation to the appropriate assessment of aquaculture and fisheries activities on coastal Special Protecion Areas for birds (SPA's). Intertidal culture of the Pacific Oyster using oyster trestles is widespread in Ireland and occurs in 16 SPAs and the potential impact of this activity on waterbird populations will be an issue in a number of Appropriate Assessments. Therefore, a research programme was designed...

  8. Immunomodulatory properties of Grifola frondosa in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Cheng, Tso-Lin; Cheng, Su-Yun; Lian, Tzi-Wei; Wang, Lisu; Chiou, Shu-Yuan

    2006-04-19

    Maitake (Grifola frondosa) is a popular mushroom in Asia for its tasty flavor and immune-stimulating property. The aim of the study is to investigate the innate immunity augmentation effects of different extracts of mycelia and culture filtrate from G. frondosa in submerged cultures. The hot water extract of mycelia showed the strongest cytokine induction effect as a function of its concentration in human whole blood culture. The most potent fractions of hot water extract, Fr. I and II, were mainly composed of polysaccharides with molecular masses of 43-140 and 13-38 kDa, respectively. These fractions (0.025 mg/mL) showed marked activity in enhancing phagocytosis of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In parallel, the expression of CD11b, an early marker of PMN activation, was also up-regulated dose dependently. This result suggested that complement receptor 3 was primed by these fractions. In addition to activation of phagocytes, these bioactive fractions also increased human peripheral blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity. These results imply that the relatively low molecular mass polysaccharides isolated from mycelia of G. frondosa can enhance innate immunity in vitro and therefore may serve as biological response modifiers.

  9. Linkage disequilibrium in wild and cultured populations of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) can be applied for mapping the actual genes responsible for variation of economically important traits through association mapping. The feasibility and efficacy of association studies are strongly dependent on the extent of LD which determines the number and density of markers in the studied population, as well as the experimental design for an association analysis. In this study, we first characterized the extent of LD in a wild population and a cultured mass-selected line of Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas). A total of 88 wild and 96 cultured individuals were selected to assess the level of genome-wide LD with 53 microsatellites, respectively. For syntenic marker pairs, no significant association was observed in the wild population; however, three significant associations occurred in the cultured population, and the significant LD extended up to 12.7 cM, indicating that strong artificial selection is a key force for substantial increase of genome-wide LD in cultured population. The difference of LD between wild and cultured populations showed that association studies in Pacific oyster can be achieved with reasonable marker densities at a relatively low cost by choosing an association mapping population. Furthermore, the frequent occurrence of LD between non-syntenic loci and rare alleles encourages the joint application of linkage analysis and LD mapping when mapping genes in oyster. The information on the linkage disequilibrium in the cultured population is useful for future association mapping in oyster.

  10. Heavy metal content in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) cultured in the Ebro Delta in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Victoria; Barata, Carlos; Riva, M Carmen

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine heavy metal content (As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Cd, Pb, and Zn) in oysters transplanted in Ebro Delta bays (Alfacs and Fangar) where oysters are traditionally cultured for human consumption. Metal body burdens were monitored weekly during the period of maximal agriculture activity from May to June in 2008 and 2009. Results indicate that regardless of the high levels of metals reported in biota living in Ebro River, metal levels in oysters from both bays were similar to those found in unpolluted areas and far below the maximum limits of tolerance recommended by the European Commission. Nevertheless, metal accumulation patterns in oysters differentiate two sources of pollution: one coming from agriculture activities within the Ebro's delta for As, Cd, Cu, and Zn and other coming from Ebro River probably related to industrial activities upstream (Hg, Pb) or to lead shot pellets form hunting activities (Pb). Reported results, thus, are in concern with previous studies and indicate that metallic pollutants do not affect oysters cultures in Ebro Delta associated bays.

  11. Parasites of the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis cultured in Nayarit, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Vasquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; Padilla-Lardizábal, Gloria

    2010-09-01

    The pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis is collected and cultured in Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, and the improvement and promotion of its culture are seen as a possible source for the economic development of coastal populations. However, information about the parasite fauna of the pleasure oyster is almost completely lacking. A histopathological survey carried out in two estuaries, Boca del Camichín and Pozo Chino, revealed the presence of hypertrophied gametes, rickettsiales-like prokaryotes (RLPs), the protozoan Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan Nematopsis sp., Ancistrocoma-like ciliates (ALCs), Sphenophrya-like ciliates, a turbellarian Urastoma sp., and encysted crustaceans. In general, prevalence and intensity of parasites were similar in both localities except that ALCs and encysted crustaceans were more prevalent in Pozo Chino than in Boca del Camichín. Perkinsus marinus and RLPs seem to represent a more significant risk for the health of pleasure oysters than do the other parasites, and surveillance and control of these parasites are needed for the development of pleasure oyster culture.

  12. Insight into cordycepin biosynthesis of Cordyceps militaris: Comparison between a liquid surface culture and a submerged culture through transcriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparmin, Ahmad; Kato, Tatsuya; Dohra, Hideo; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris produces cordycepin, which is known to be a bioactive compound. Currently, cordycepin hyperproduction of C. militaris was carried out in a liquid surface culture because of its low productivity in a submerged culture, however the reason was not known. In this study, 4.92 g/L of cordycepin was produced at the 15th day of C. militaris NBRC 103752 liquid surface culture, but only 1 mg/L was produced in the submerged culture. RNA-Seq was used to clarify the gene expression profiles of the cordycepin biosynthetic pathways of the submerged culture and the liquid surface culture. From this analysis, 1036 genes were shown to be upregulated and 557 genes were downregulated in the liquid surface culture compared with the submerged culture. Specifically, adenylosuccinate synthetase and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide (SAICAR) synthase in purine nucleotide metabolism were significantly upregulated in the liquid surface culture. Thick mycelia formation in the liquid surface culture was found to induce the expression of hypoxia-related genes (GABA shunt, glutamate synthetase precursor, and succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase). Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases containing heme were also found to be significantly enriched, suggesting that a hypoxic condition might be created in the liquid surface culture. These results suggest that hypoxic conditions are more suitable for cordycepin production in the liquid surface culture compared with the submerged culture. Our analysis paves the way for unraveling the cordycepin biosynthesis pathway and for improving cordycepin production in C. militaris.

  13. The efficacy of x-ray doses on murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi, and tuna salad

    Science.gov (United States)

    n this investigation, we determined the efficacy of X-ray doses on reducing a human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogate [murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1)] in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna salad. The pure culture (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4), half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna s...

  14. The efficacy of X-ray does on murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi, and tuna salad

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this investigation, we determined the efficacy of X-ray doses on reducing a human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogate [murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1)] in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna salad. The pure culture (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4), half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna ...

  15. Production of mycelium and blastospores of sp. in submerged culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hirsutella sp. was grown in four liquid media containing either casamino acids, corn steep liquor, collagen peptone or casein peptone. These media were inoculated with a 7 day-old culture of mycelia and blastospores of Hirsutella sp. and the cultures incubated with shaking at 250 rpm at 26°C. The media containing corn ...

  16. Submerged cultivation of mycelium with high ergothioneine content from the culinary-medicinal king oyster mushroom Pleurotus eryngii (higher Basidiomycetes) and its composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Ling-Yi; Ho, Kung-Jui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2013-01-01

    The culinary-medicinal king oyster mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii, was used to produce mycelia with high ergothioneine content using a one-factor-at-a-time method. The optimal culture conditions for mycelia harvested at day 14 were 25°C, 10% inoculation rate, 2% glucose, 0.5% yeast extract, and no adjustment to the initial pH value. With histidine or amino acid mix added, biomasses and the ergothioneine content of mycelia were higher than those of the control. The ergothioneine content of mycelia harvested at days 16-20 were higher than that of mycelia harvested at day 14. In addition, the ergothioneine content of mycelia from the fermentor (5.84-5.76 mg/g) was much higher than that of mycelia from the shaken flask (4.93-5.04 mg/g). Mycelia with high ergothioneine content showed a profile of proximate composition similar to that of regular mycelia but lost its characteristic umami taste. Overall, mycelia high in ergothioneine could be prepared by optimal culture conditions, the addition of precursors, prolonged harvest, and aeration in the fermentor.

  17. Oyster and mussel farming

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The article discusses the oyster and mussel culture practices in western Visayas, Philippines. Spat collection, culture methods and management, and harvesting technique are discussed. The article also discusses mussel culture in New Zealand.

  18. Production of Pleurotus sajor-caju strain PS-2001 biomass in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confortin, Fernanda Grison; Marchetto, Rosane; Bettin, Fernanda; Camassola, Marli; Salvador, Mirian; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2008-10-01

    Mushrooms or fruiting bodies of many basidiomycetes are commonly produced in solid-state fermentation, generally after 20-60 days of growth. However, it is also possible to produce biomass from these fungi, in submerged fermentation in shorter time. This work was aimed at evaluating biomass production with the basidiomycete Pleurotus sajor-caju, in a submerged process and to determine the proportion of chemical components of this biomass. Initially, an optimization of the culture medium was done to produce a faster growth of microbial mass by changing the concentrations of ammonium sulfate, soy protein and yeast extract. Using the optimized culture medium, values of approximately 5.5 g L(-1) of biomass in a medium with 10 g L(-1) of glucose were attained. When the optimized culture medium was tested in a 5-L stirred tank bioreactor, using 10 g L(-1) of glucose or sucrose as carbon source, values of 8.18 and 5.94 g L(-1) of biomass concentration were obtained, respectively. In the medium with glucose, high yields (0.82 g g(-1)) and productivity of 0.085 g L(-1) h(-1) were obtained. The exopolysaccharide content (1.58 g dry matter L(-1)) in the culture was higher in the fermentation with sucrose. The nutritional composition of the biomass obtained in the submerged fermentation was similar to that of the fruiting body in terms of quantities of total carbohydrates, ash and calories, but total fat and protein were higher.

  19. Inulinase Production by a Mexican Semi-Desert Xerophylic Penicillium citrinum Strain under Submerged Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana C. Flores-Gallegos; Jesús Morlett-Chávez; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.; Raúl Rodríguez-Herrera

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to produce inulinase under submerged culture (SmC) by a xerophylic fungal strain isolated from the Mexican semi-dessert and to verify its potential as an industrial inulinase producer. This enzyme can be obtained from microorganisms that live in close association with inulin plant store tissues. Inulin is a widespread plant polyfructan that serves as a storage polysaccharide in several plants and its depolymerization involves the action of inulinase. Inulinases are cl...

  20. Modern morphological engineering techniques for improving productivity of filamentous fungi in submerged cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Antecka, Anna; Bizukojc, Marcin; Ledakowicz, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Morphological engineering techniques have recently gained popularity as they are used for increasing the productivity of a variety of metabolites and enzymes in fungi growing in submerged cultures. Their action is mainly associated with the changes they evoke in fungal morphology. Traditional morphological engineering approaches include manipulation of spore concentration, pH-shifting and mechanical stress exerted by stirring and aeration. As the traditional methods proved to be insufficient,...

  1. Medium selection for exopolysaccharide and biomass production in submerged cultures of culinary-medicinal mushrooms from Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kizilcik, M.; Yamaç, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biomass production of 18 strains of 15 species of culinary-medicinal higher Basidiomycetes in submerged culture under four different media. Gloeophyllum abietinum and Schizophyllum commune produced the highest EPS and biomass

  2. Antioxidant Properties of the Edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in Submerged Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yeou Lung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM and mycelia-free broth (MEB and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as evidenced by low EC50 values (< 10 mg/mL. Total flavonoid is mainly found in hot water extracts; however, total phenol is rich in methanol and hot water extracts from mycelia. Ascorbic acid and total phenol contents are well correlated with the reducing power and the scavenging effect on superoxide anions. Total flavonoid content is dependent on the antioxidant activity and the chelating effect on ferrous ions. Total antioxidant component contents are closely related to the antioxidant activity and the scavenging superoxide anion ability. Results confirm that extracts with good antioxidant properties from fermenting products by A. mellea are potential good substitutes for synthetic antioxidants and can be applied to antioxidant-related functional food and pharmaceutical industries.

  3. Antioxidant Properties of the Edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in Submerged Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Ming-Yeou; Chang, Yu-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM) and mycelia-free broth (MEB) and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM) by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as evidenced by low EC50 values (Total flavonoid is mainly found in hot water extracts; however, total phenol is rich in methanol and hot water extracts from mycelia. Ascorbic acid and total phenol contents are well correlated with the reducing power and the scavenging effect on superoxide anions. Total flavonoid content is dependent on the antioxidant activity and the chelating effect on ferrous ions. Total antioxidant component contents are closely related to the antioxidant activity and the scavenging superoxide anion ability. Results confirm that extracts with good antioxidant properties from fermenting products by A. mellea are potential good substitutes for synthetic antioxidants and can be applied to antioxidant-related functional food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22072892

  4. Improved production, purification and bioactivity of a polysaccharide from submerged cultured Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huabin; Liu, Gaoqiang; Huang, Furu; Wu, Xiangting; Yang, Hailong

    2014-12-01

    Polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum showed multiple biological activities, such as immuno-modulating, antitumor, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective activity, etc. Adlay oil was added into the media to enhance polysaccharide production by submerged culture of G. lucidum in this work. The results revealed the optimal concentration of adlay oil was 1.5 % for polysaccharide production of G. lucidum. Analysis of the polysaccharide components confirmed that no novel components were biosynthesized by the addition of adlay oil. The main fraction of extracellular polysaccharide, GLEP-2, was isolated from the submerged culture broth of G. lucidum by ethanol precipitation, filtration, DEAE cellulose-52 and Sepharose CL-6B chromatography. GLEP-2, which was composed of glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose, and rhamnose in a ratio of 332:55:32:13:3 respectively, had an average molecular weight of ~2.08 × 10(4) Da. The bioactivity tests demonstrated that GLEP-2 enhanced the T lymphocyte proliferation significantly at a concentration of 200 μg/mL and B lymphocyte proliferation at lower concentrations of 50 μg/mL. The results suggest polysaccharides from the submerged culture of G. lucidum are potential candidates for further development and possible commercial applications, especially in the pharmaceutical and functional foods industries.

  5. Lactic acid production from submerged fermentation of broken rice using undefined mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Luiza Varela; de Barros Correa, Fabiane Fernanda; de Oliva Neto, Pedro; Mayer, Cassia Roberta Malacrida; Escaramboni, Bruna; Campioni, Tania Sila; de Barros, Natan Roberto; Herculano, Rondinelli Donizetti; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2017-04-01

    The present work aimed to characterize and optimize the submerged fermentation of broken rice for lactic acid (LA) production using undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge. A microorganism with amylolytic activity, which also produces LA, Lactobacillus amylovorus, was used as a control to assess the extent of mixed culture on LA yield. Three level full factorial designs were performed to optimize and define the influence of fermentation temperature (20-50 °C), gelatinization time (30-60 min) and broken rice concentration in culture medium (40-80 g L-1) on LA production in pure and undefined mixed culture. LA production in mixed culture (9.76 g L-1) increased in sixfold respect to pure culture in optimal assessed experimental conditions. The optimal conditions for maximizing LA yield in mixed culture bioprocess were 31 °C temperature, 45 min gelatinization time and 79 g L-1 broken rice concentration in culture medium. This study demonstrated the positive effect of undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge to produce LA from culture medium formulated with broken rice. In addition, this work establishes the basis for an efficient and low-cost bioprocess to manufacture LA from this booming agro-industrial by-product.

  6. Cell growth and catecholase production for Polyporus versicolor in submerged culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroad, P.A.; Wilke, C.R.

    1977-04-01

    Cell growth and catecholase production for Polyporus versicolor (ATCC 12679) were studied in mechanically agitated submerged culture, as functions of temperature. The exponential-phase growth rate exhibited a maximum at 28/sup 0/C. Over the range of 20/sup 0/C to approximately 30/sup 0/C, both cell mass and enzyme yield factors were constant. At higher temperatures (30 to 40/sup 0/C) cell mass yield factor decreased and enzyme yield factor increased. Specific respiration rate of P. versicolor was determined. Thermal deactivation of catecholase was investigated between 30 and 50/sup 0/C, and deactivation rates were fit to an Arrhenius rate expression.

  7. Cell growth and catecholase production for Polyporus versicolor in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroad, P A; Wilke, C R

    1977-04-01

    Cell growth and catecholase production for Polyporus veriscolor (ATCC 12679) were studied in mechanically agitated submerged culture, as functions of temperature. The exponential-phase growth rate exhibited a maximum at 28 degrees C. Over the range of 20 degrees C to approximately 30 degrees C, both cell mass and enzyme yield factors were constant. At higher temperatures (30 to 40 degrees C) cell mass yield factor decreased and enzyme yield factor increased. Specific respiration rate of P. versicolor was determined. Thermal deactivation of catecholase was investigated between 30 and 50 degrees C, and deactivation rates were fit to an Arrhenius rate expression.

  8. Natural and cultured populations of the mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula from Sinaloa, Mexico, infected by Perkinsus marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Martínez, Jorge; Ortega, Mauricio García; Vásquez-Yeomans, Rebeca; García, Teresa de Jesús Pineda; Stokes, Nancy A; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2012-07-01

    The mangrove oyster Saccostrea palmula coexists with the pleasure oyster Crassostrea corteziensis in coastal lagoons of northwest Mexico. Recent discovery of Perkinsus marinus infecting the pleasure oyster in the region prompted evaluation of S. palmula as an alternative P. marinus host. An analysis to determine the possible presence of P. marinus in natural and cultured populations of S. palmula at four coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico was carried out during October-November 2010. Tissues from apparently healthy S. palmula were evaluated using Ray's fluid thioglycollate method (RFTM), which revealed a Perkinsus sp. to be present in all four locations at 6.7-20.0% prevalence. Histopathological analysis of these specimens showed tissue alterations and parasite forms consistent with moderate P. marinus infection, which was confirmed by ribosomal non-transcribed spacer (NTS)-based PCR assays on DNA samples from oysters positive by RFTM and histology. DNA sequencing of amplified NTS fragments (307 bp) produced a sequence 98-100% similar to GenBank-deposited sequences of the NTS from P. marinus. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for Perkinsus spp. and P. marinus corroborated the PCR results, showing clear hybridization of P. marinus in host tissues. This is the first record of P. marinus infecting a species from genus Saccostrea and the first record of the parasite from coastal lagoons in Sinaloa, Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Response of sago pondweed, a submerged aquatic macrophyte, to herbicides in three laboratory culture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Ailstock, M.S.; Momot, J.J.; Norman, C.M.; Gorsuch, Joseph W.; Lower, William R.; Wang, Wun-cheng; Lewis, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The phytotoxicity of atrazine, paraquat, glyphosate, and alachlor to sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submerged aquatic macrophyte, was tested under three types of laboratory culture conditions. In each case, tests were conducted in static systems, the test period was four weeks, and herbicide exposure was chronic, resulting from a single addition of herbicide to the test vessels at the beginning of the test period. The three sets of test conditions employed were(1) axenic cultures in 125-mL flasks containing a nutrient media and sucrose; (2) a microcosm system employing 18.9-L buckets containing a sand, shell, and peat substrate; and (3) an algae-free system employing O.95-L jars containing reconstituted freshwater and a nutrient agar substrate. The primary variable measured was biomass production. Plants grew well in all three test systems, with biomass of untreated plants increasing by a factor of about 5 to 6.5 during the four-week test period. Biomass production in response to herbicide exposure differed significantly among culture systems, which demonstrates the need for a standardized testing protocol for evaluating the effects of toxics on submerged aquatic plants.

  10. Coliform density in oyster culture waters and its relationship with environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Mignani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the total and thermotolerant coliform densities in the oyster culture water of Cananeia, SP, Brazil, correlating these densities with environmental variables and tidal variations. Superficial water samples were collected in two tide conditions (spring and neap from three areas of Cananéia municipality (Mandira, Itapitangui and Cooperostra. The three studied areas showed good conditions for the culture regarding coliform densities. The two tidal conditions differed significantly as to total coliform concentration; however, the same procedure was not performed for thermotolerant coliforms. No correlation was observed between water temperature, pH, and concentrations of total and thermotolerant coliforms. Coliform density was positively correlated with rainfall and negatively correlated with salinity. Spring and neap tides differed significantly as to coliform number. Simple diagnosis of environmental conditions of the crop fields is insufficient to assess water quality of shellfish cultivation. A continuous monitoring program of planted areas is necessary both for the assessment of water quality potential for marine culture and for ensuring safe consumption of seafood, besides constituting an important tool to understand the relationships between contamination and the involved environmental variables.

  11. Alpha-terpineol promotes triterpenoid production of Antrodia cinnamomea in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhen-Ming; Geng, Yan; Li, Hua-Xiang; Sun, Qing; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea is a medicinal mushroom producing potent bioactive triterpenoids. However, triterpenoids of A. cinnamomea in submerged culture are much less than those in fruiting bodies. Here we evaluated effects of different extracts from a host-related species, Cinnamomum camphora, on the mycelial growth and triterpenoid production of A. cinnamomea in submerged culture. The hot water extract of the stem showed the strongest promotion of the mycelial growth. The petroleum ether extract of the stem (PES) (0.05 g L(-1)) showed the greatest stimulatory effect on content and production of triterpenoids. A total of 39 compounds including terpenoids, phenolic and aromatic compounds were identified in the PES by GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, the effects of seven compounds contained in the PES on the mycelial growth and triterpenoid production of A. cinnamomea were evaluated. Among them, α-terpineol (0.5 mg L(-1)) showed the greatest stimulatory effect on the triterpenoid content (23.31 mg g(-1)) and triterpenoid production (91.33 mg L(-1)) of A. cinnamomea. Results of LC-MS analysis showed that α-terpineol (0.5 mg L(-1)) stimulated the syntheses of six triterpenoids in the mycelia of A. cinnamomea. This indicates that α-terpineol can act as an elicitor for triterpenoid biosynthesis in A. cinnamomea. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  13. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Pil-Mun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Seok [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Min [Atomic Energy Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Gwacheon 427-715 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Jin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D{sub 10} value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  14. Analysis of single hyphal growth and fragmentation in submerged cultures using a population model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabben, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    1997-01-01

    Descriptions of population dynamics in submerged cultures are important when studying the mechanisms of growth and fragmentation of filamentous microorganisms. Population models are traditionally formulated as population balance equations. Population models of filamentous morphology are difficult...... to solve because of random fragmentation, which introduces an integral term into the population balance equations. Balances for the systemic properties, e.g. concentration of hyphal elements, substrate concentration, average total hyphal length, and average number of growing tips, are set up. Based...... on these balances one can solve the inverse problem, i.e. determination of kinetic parameters directly from measurements of the hyphal morphology. Both a Monte Carlo method and a discretization method have been used to calculate the steady-state population distribution. The two methods are compared and the Monte...

  15. EXOPOLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION AND ITS BIOACTIVITIES OF THE EDIBLE PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS IN SUBMERGED CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IWAN SASKIAWAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Submerged cultures were used to study the influence of various carbon sources on the mycelial biomass and exopolysaccharide production of Pleurotus ostreatus. The antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of the exopolysaccharide were also determined. The yield of mycelial biomass of 7.06 g/l, 5.12 g/l, 4.66 g/l, and 2.96 g/l was obtained by utilization of maltose, glucose, lactose and starch as a carbon source, respectively. Furthermore, in the medium containing maltose, lactose, glucose, and starch produce 100.05 mg/l, 97.73 mg/l, 78.63 mg/l, and 70.45 mg/l of exopolysaccharide, respectively. The assay of antimicrobial and antioxidant activity showed that the exopolysaccharide is more active to inhibit the growth of B. subtilis rather than those of E. coli and S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, the exopolysaccharide was also indicated to have antioxidant activity.

  16. Transcriptional and Enzymatic Profiling of Pleurotus ostreatus Laccase Genes in Submerged and Solid-State Fermentation Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanera, Raúl; Pérez, Gúmer; Omarini, Alejandra; Alfaro, Manuel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Faraco, Vincenza; Amore, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the white rot basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus includes 12 phenol oxidase (laccase) genes. In this study, we examined their expression profiles in different fungal strains under different culture conditions (submerged and solid cultures) and in the presence of a wheat straw extract, which was used as an inducer of the laccase gene family. We used a reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)-based approach and focused on determining the reaction parameters (in particular, the reference gene set for the normalization and reaction efficiency determinations) used to achieve an accurate estimation of the relative gene expression values. The results suggested that (i) laccase gene transcription is upregulated in the induced submerged fermentation (iSmF) cultures but downregulated in the solid fermentation (SSF) cultures, (ii) the Lacc2 and Lacc10 genes are the main sources of laccase activity in the iSmF cultures upon induction with water-soluble wheat straw extracts, and (iii) an additional, as-yet-uncharacterized activity (Unk1) is specifically induced in SSF cultures that complements the activity of Lacc2 and Lacc10. Moreover, both the enzymatic laccase activities and the Lacc gene family transcription profiles greatly differ between closely related strains. These differences can be targeted for biotechnological breeding programs for enzyme production in submerged fermentation reactors. PMID:22467498

  17. Effects of culture conditions on spore types of Clonostachys rosea 67-1 in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M H; Chen, Y M; Liu, J F; Li, S D; Ma, G Z

    2014-04-01

    The promising biocontrol isolate Clonostachys rosea 67-1 was investigated to clarify the effects of culture conditions on chlamydospore production in submerged fermentation. Culture conditions significantly affected both performance and types of C. rosea sporulation. C. rosea 67-1 was hard to generate chlamydospores under conventional conditions. However, the proportion of resistant spores increased to 17·4 and 15·5% in PD and rice meal media, respectively, in 8 days. Chlamydospore productivity was boosted (>threefold) with the addition of 50-200 mg l(-1) CuSO4 . The pH of the medium played a vital role in 67-1 sporulation. The percentage of chlamydospores decreased rapidly with increased pH (88·1% at pH 3·0 to 1·0% at pH 6·5). The optimal pH for conidia production was 6·0-6·5, at which chlamydospore forming was strongly inhibited. Regulating pH during fermentation contributed to improving output and proportion of resistant spores. When 67-1 was inoculated into broth with an initial pH of 6·5, followed by adjustment to pH 3·5 after 48 h, the number of chlamydospores reached 1·1 × 10(8) ml(-1). The impact of temperature and rotational speed was also analysed; an ultimate capacity of chlamydospores was achieved at 30°C and the speed above 120 rev min(-1) (P culture conditions on performance and types of C. rosea sporulation and subsequently inadequate research on the techniques for chlamydospore production. In addressing these concerns, this study provides a unique insight into the manipulation of C. rosea sporulation and chlamydospore fermentation of the biocontrol fungus. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Applications of image analysis in the characterization of Streptomyces olindensis in submerged culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamboukian Celso R. Denser

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of Streptomyces olindensis (producer of retamycin, an antitumor antibiotic grown in submerged culture was assessed by image analysis. The morphology was differentiated into four classes: pellets, clumps (or entangled filaments, branched and unbranched free filaments. Four morphological parameters were initially considered (area, convex area, perimeter, and convex perimeter but only two parameters (perimeter and convex perimeter were chosen to automatically classify the cells into the four morphological classes, using histogram analysis. Each morphological class was evaluated during growth carried out in liquid media in fermenter or shaker. It was found that pellets and clumps dominated in early growth stages in fermenter (due to the inoculum coming from a shaker cultivation and that during cultivation, the breakage of pellets and clumps caused an increase in the percentage of free filaments. The criteria of morphological classification by image analysis proposed were useful to quantify the percentage of each morphological class during fermentations and may help to establish correlations between antibiotic production and microorganism morphology.

  19. Comparison of Extraction Methods of Chitin from Ganoderma lucidum Mushroom Obtained in Submerged Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Ospina Álvarez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chitin was isolated from the Ganoderma lucidum submerged cultures mycelium as potential source of chitin under biotechnological processes. The extraction of chitin was carried out through 5 different assays which involved mainly three phases: pulverization of the mushroom, deproteinization of the mycelia with NaOH solution, and a process of decolorization with potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. The chitin contents extracted from 9-day mycelia were 413, 339, 87, 78, and 144 mg/g−1 (milligrams of chitin/grams of dry biomass for A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5, respectively. Obtained chitin was characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and by thermal analysis (TGA. The results showed that Ganoderma lucidum chitin has similar characteristic of chitin from different fonts. The advantage of the biotechnological processes and the fact that Ganoderma lucidum fungus may be used as a potential raw material for chitin production were demonstrated.

  20. Modern morphological engineering techniques for improving productivity of filamentous fungi in submerged cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antecka, Anna; Bizukojc, Marcin; Ledakowicz, Stanislaw

    2016-12-01

    Morphological engineering techniques have recently gained popularity as they are used for increasing the productivity of a variety of metabolites and enzymes in fungi growing in submerged cultures. Their action is mainly associated with the changes they evoke in fungal morphology. Traditional morphological engineering approaches include manipulation of spore concentration, pH-shifting and mechanical stress exerted by stirring and aeration. As the traditional methods proved to be insufficient, modern techniques such as changes of medium osmolality or addition of mineral microparticles to the media (microparticle-enhanced cultivation, MPEC) were proposed. Despite the fact that this area of knowledge is still being developed, there are a fair amount of scientific articles concerning the cultivations of filamentous fungi with the use of these techniques. It was described that in Ascomycetes fungi both MPEC or change of osmolality successfully led to the change of mycelial morphology, which appeared to be favorable for increased productivity of secondary metabolites and enzymes. There are also limited but very promising reports involving the successful application of MPEC with Basidiomycetes species. Despite the fact that the mineral microparticles behave differently for various microorganisms, being strain and particle specific, the low cost of its application is a great benefit. This paper reviews the application of the modern morphology engineering techniques. The authors critically assess the advantages, shortcomings, and future prospects of their application in the cultivation of fungi.

  1. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MORPHOLOGY, RHEOLOGY AND GLUCOAMYLASE PRODUCTION BY Aspergillus awamori IN SUBMERGED CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R.D. Pamboukian

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of inoculum preparation on Aspergillus awamori morphology, broth rheology and glucoamylase synthesis in submerged cultures was investigated. A series of runs were performed in fermenters, using initial total reducing sugar concentrations of 20 g/L and 80 g/L. The inocula were prepared in a rotary shaker, at 35oC and 200 rev/min, using a spore concentration of 9.2 x 105 spores/mL and varying both cultivation time and medium pH during the spore germination step. Three types of inocula were used: inoculum cultivated for 24 hours at an initial pH of 5.0, and inocula cultivated for 7 hours at both a pH of 2.5 and a pH of 5.5. Regarding glucoamylase production, the inoculum which provided the best results was shaker cultivated for 7 hours at a pH of 2.5. This inoculum produced glucoamylase of about 1,221 U/L in the fermenter, which was between 20% and 30% higher than those obtained using other inocula.

  2. Towards high-siderophore-content foods: optimisation of coprogen production in submerged cultures of Penicillium nalgiovense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, Tamás; Tóth, Viktória; Nagy, Csilla Terézia; Nagy, Gábor; Pócsi, Imre; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Antal, Károly; Balla, József; Balla, György; Román, Gyula; Kovács, István; Pócsi, István

    2013-07-01

    Fungal siderophores are likely to possess atheroprotective effects in humans, and therefore studies are needed to develop siderophore-rich food additives or functional foods to increase the siderophore uptake in people prone to cardiovascular diseases. In this study the siderophore contents of mould-ripened cheeses and meat products were analysed and the coprogen production by Penicillium nalgiovense was characterised. High concentrations of hexadentate fungal siderophores were detected in penicillia-ripened Camembert- and Roquefort-type cheeses and also in some sausages. In one sausage fermented by P. nalgiovense, the siderophore content was comparable to those found in cheeses. Penicillium nalgiovense produced high concentrations of coprogen in submerged cultures, which were affected predominantly by the available carbon and nitrogen sources under iron starvation. Considerable coprogen yields were still detectable in the presence of iron when the fermentation medium was supplemented with the iron chelator Na₂-EDTA or when P. nalgiovense was co-cultivated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data may be exploitable in the future development of high-siderophore-content foods and/or food additives. Nevertheless, the use of P. nalgiovense fermentation broths for these purposes may be limited by the instability of coprogen in fermentation media and by the β-lactam production by the fungus. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Rapid, Quantitative Assessment of Submerged Cultural Resource Degradation Using Repeat Video Surveys and Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, J. R.; Zant, C. N.; Gulley, J. D.; Thomsen, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring, managing and preserving submerged cultural resources (SCR) such as shipwrecks can involve time consuming detailed physical surveys, expensive side-scan sonar surveys, the study of photomosaics and even photogrammetric analysis. In some cases, surveys of SCR have produced 3D models, though these models have not typically been used to document patterns of site degradation over time. In this study, we report a novel approach for quantifying degradation and changes to SCR that relies on diver-acquired video surveys, generation of 3D models from data acquired at different points in time using structure from motion, and differencing of these models. We focus our study on the shipwreck S.S. Wisconsin, which is located roughly 10.2 km southeast of Kenosha, Wisconsin, in Lake Michigan. We created two digital elevation models of the shipwreck using surveys performed during the summers of 2006 and 2015 and differenced these models to map spatial changes within the wreck. Using orthomosaics and difference map data, we identified a change in degradation patterns. Degradation was anecdotally believed to be caused by inward collapse, but maps indicated a pattern of outward collapse of the hull structure, which has resulted in large scale shifting of material in the central upper deck. In addition, comparison of the orthomosaics with the difference map clearly shows movement of objects, degradation of smaller pieces and in some locations, an increase in colonization of mussels.

  4. Improved Production and Antitumor Properties of Triterpene Acids from Submerged Culture of Ganoderma lingzhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Ding, Zhong-Yang; Liu, Gao-Qiang; Yang, Hailong; Zhou, Guo-Ying

    2016-10-20

    Triterpene acids (TAs) are the major bioactive constituents in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma lingzhi . However, fermentative production of TAs has not been optimized for commercial use, and whether the TAs isolated from G. lingzhi submerged culture mycelia possess antitumor activity needs to be further proven. In this study, enhanced TA yield and productivity were attained with G. lingzhi using response surface methodology. The interactions of three variables were studied using a Box-Benhnken design, namely initial pH, dissolved oxygen (DO) and fermentation temperature. The optimum conditions were an initial pH of 5.9, 20.0% DO and 28.6 °C. These conditions resulted in a TA yield of 308.1 mg/L in a 5-L stirred bioreactor. Furthermore, the optimized conditions were then successfully scaled up to a production scale of 200 L, and maximum TA production and productivity of 295.3 mg/L and 49.2 mg/L/day were achieved, which represented 80.9% and 111.5% increases, respectively, compared with the non-optimized conditions. Additionally, the triterpene acid extract (TAE) from G. lingzhi mycelia was found to be cytotoxic to the SMMC-7721 and SW620 cell lines in vitro, and the TAE exhibited dose-dependent antitumor activity against the solid tumor sarcoma 180 in vivo. Chemical analysis revealed that the key active triterpene compounds, ganoderic acid T and ganoderic acid Me, predominated in the extract.

  5. Comparison of Extraction Methods of Chitin from Ganoderma lucidum Mushroom Obtained in Submerged Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina Álvarez, Sandra Patricia; Ramírez Cadavid, David Alexander; Ossa Orozco, Claudia Patricia; Zapata Ocampo, Paola; Atehortúa, Lucía

    2014-01-01

    The chitin was isolated from the Ganoderma lucidum submerged cultures mycelium as potential source of chitin under biotechnological processes. The extraction of chitin was carried out through 5 different assays which involved mainly three phases: pulverization of the mushroom, deproteinization of the mycelia with NaOH solution, and a process of decolorization with potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. The chitin contents extracted from 9-day mycelia were 413, 339, 87, 78, and 144 mg/g−1 (milligrams of chitin/grams of dry biomass) for A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5, respectively. Obtained chitin was characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and by thermal analysis (TGA). The results showed that Ganoderma lucidum chitin has similar characteristic of chitin from different fonts. The advantage of the biotechnological processes and the fact that Ganoderma lucidum fungus may be used as a potential raw material for chitin production were demonstrated. PMID:24551839

  6. Growth and survival of the pearl oyster Pteria hirundo (L.,1758) in an intermediate stage of culture in Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, M C P; Alves, R; Zanandrea, A C V; Ferreira, J F; Melo, C M R; Magalhães, A R M

    2012-02-01

    There are no records in Brazil for the culture of Pteridae family oysters, genus Pteria and Pinctada. The intermediate culture can be considered one of the critical stages during the oyster farming. The changes in life conditions from a semi-closed environment provided by the collector to the structures utilized for the growth represents a considerable stress factor to which the animals are subjected. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the growth and survival of the pearl oyster Pteria hirundo (Linnaeus, 1758) kept in intermediate lanterns. Seeds of P. hirundo, obtained through larviculture carried out at the Marine Molluscs Laboratory (UFSC), southern Brazil were detached from the collectors, transferred and kept in an intermediate culture system (oyster lantern). During 6 months, growth (dorso-ventral height - DVH in mm) and survival (%) were evaluated. Two size classes were tested: medium (M), between 3.4 and 4.4 mm, and large (L), bigger than 4.5 mm. The density of occupation in each floor of the lantern was 50%. At the end of the experiment, the survivals observed were 90 and 94% for the sizes M and L, respectively. Medium juveniles of Pteria hirundo had an average (Std) increase of 16.1 (±4.38) mm in the dorso-ventral height, and large juveniles an average increase of 11.4 (±3.77) mm after six months of experiment. The results observed during the intermediate stage of cultivation indicate that Pteria hirundo presents survival and growth similar to other species of pearl oysters traditionally used in the pearl industry in several countries.

  7. Quantification of the fractal nature of mycelial aggregation in Aspergillus niger submerged cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagianni Maria

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractal geometry estimates have proven useful in studying the growth strategies of fungi in response to different environments on soil or on agar substrates, but their use in mycelia grown submerged is still rare. In the present study, the effects of certain important fermentation parameters, such as the spore inoculum level, phosphate and manganese concentrations in the medium, on mycelial morphology of the citric acid producer Aspergillus niger were determined by fractal geometry. The value of employing fractal geometry to describe mycelial structures was examined in comparison with information from other descriptors including classic morphological parameters derived from image analysis. Results Fractal analysis of distinct morphological forms produced by fermentation conditions that influence fungal morphology and acid production, showed that the two fractal dimensions DBS (box surface dimension and DBM (box mass dimension are very sensitive indexes, capable of describing morphological differences. The two box-counting methods applied (one applied to the whole mass of the mycelial particles and the other applied to their surface only enabled evaluation of fractal dimensions for mycelial particles in this analysis in the region of DBS = 1.20–1.70 and DBM = 1.20–2.70. The global structure of sufficiently branched mycelia was described by a single fractal dimension D, which did not exceed 1.30. Such simple structures are true mass fractals (DBS = DBM = D and they could be young mycelia or dispersed forms of growth produced by very dense spore inocula (108–109 spores/ml or by addition of manganese in the medium. Mycelial clumps and pellets were effectively discriminated by fractal analysis. Fractal dimension values were plotted together with classic morphological parameters derived from image analysis for comparisons. Their sensitivity to treatment was analogous to the sensitivity of classic morphological parameters

  8. Production of Trametes pubescens Laccase under Submerged and Semi-Solid Culture Conditions on Agro-Industrial Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alexander; Osma, Johann F.; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sánchez, Oscar F.

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are copper-containing enzymes involved in the degradation of lignocellulosic materials and used in the treatment of phenol-containing wastewater. In this study we investigated the effect of culture conditions, i.e. submerged or semi-solid, and copper supplementation on laccase production by Trametespubescens grown on coffee husk, soybean pod husk, or cedar sawdust. The highest specific laccase activity was achieved when the culture was conducted under submerged conditions supplemented with copper (5 mM), and using coffee husk as substrate. The crude extracts presented two laccase isoforms with molecular mass of 120 (Lac1) and 60 kDa (Lac2). Regardless of the substrate, enzymatic crude extract and purified fractions behaved similarly at different temperatures and pHs, most of them presented the maximum activity at 55 °C and a pH range between 2 and 3. In addition, they showed similar stability and electro-chemical properties. At optimal culture conditions laccase activity was 7.69±0.28 U mg-1 of protein for the crude extract, and 0.08±0.001 and 2.86±0.05 U mg-1 of protein for Lac1 and Lac2, respectively. In summary, these results show the potential of coffee husk as an important and economical growth medium to produce laccase, offering a new alternative use for this common agro-industrial byproduct. PMID:24019936

  9. The use of additives as the stimulator on mycelial biomass and exopolysaccharide productions in submerged culture of Grifola umbellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Bing; Huang, Hung-Chang; Chen, Chih-I; I, Yet-Pole; Liu, Yung-Chuan

    2010-03-01

    In this study, various additives including organic acids, alcohols, vegetable oils, surfactants and polymers were added in the cultural medium to investigate their stimulatory effects on Grifola umbellate mycelia growth and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. It was found that the commonly used stimulatory additives, effective in other mushrooms' cultures, exhibited negative results in Grifola umbellata submerged culture. In contrast, the polymer additive, polyethylene glycol (PEG), displayed an effective stimulatory effect on both biomass and EPS productions. With the addition of PEG8 (molecular weight: 8,000 Da), the mycelial biomass production at day 12 was increased from 4.69 to 6.30 g/L, accounting for a 34% increase. Meanwhile, the EPS production was enhanced from 0.478 to 0.767 g/L, accounting for 60% increase.

  10. Bonamia exitiosa (Haplosporidia) observed infecting the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis cultured on the Spanish Mediterranean coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco, N.; Villalba, A.; Andree, K.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Lacuesta, B.; Ramilo, A.; Gairin, I.; Furones, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Bonamia exitiosa and Bonamia ostreae are parasites that reproduce within the haemocytes of several oyster species. In Europe, the host species is the flat oyster Ostrea edulis. The parasite B. ostreae has been responsible for mortalities since the late 1970s throughout the European Atlantic coast.

  11. Screening of phytase producers and optimization of culture conditions for submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali

    2014-04-01

    Phytase (myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate phosphohydrolase) is an enzyme, which breaks down phytate to inositol and orthophosphoric acid. Phytase has been used as feed additive, and in some medical applications for years. To date, phytase production has been usually performed as a solid-state fermentation with small production volumes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to increase the phytase activity in submerged fermentations by screening several microorganism strains based on the literature to select the most productive phytase producer and optimizing growth parameters such as temperature, pH, and aeration level using response surface methodology (RSM). As a result, among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Aspergillus ficuum (NRRL 3135) was selected as the most productive strain. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration values were determined as 33 °C, 4.5, and 0.9 vvm, respectively, for A. ficuum in 2-l batch submerged phytase productions. Under these conditions, phytase activity was measured as 2.27 U/ml. Therefore, this is a unique study showing the production of phytase with A. ficuum successfully in submerged fermentation as opposed to the traditional solid-state fermentation.

  12. Effect of Cold Stress on Fruiting Body Production by Medicinal Basidiomycetes in Submerged and Solid-phase Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Vetchinkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the medicinal xylotrophic basidiomycetes Lentinus edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma lucidum and Grifola frondosa to produce typical and atypical fruiting bodies with viable basidiospores in submerged and solid-phase culture under stationary conditions in a beer wort-containing medium under cold stress was shown. The examined mushrooms, when not exposed to temperature stress, did not form fruiting bodies. In solid-phase culture in an agarized medium after cold treatment, the basidiome formation period was shortened by 1.5–2 times. Furthermore, the use of a mycelium subjected to temperature stress for inoculation induced and accelerated the formation of fruiting bodies on an industrial wood substrate, which is of great biotechnological importance.

  13. A single-use site selection technique, using GIS, for aquaculture planning: choosing locations for mangrove oyster raft culture in Margarita Island, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Joaquín; Rada, Martín; Hernández, Hernando; Buitrago, Esperanza

    2005-05-01

    Oyster culture has a potential to generate income for coastal communities and to lessen pressure on natural overexploited populations. A project to transfer mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae raft culture technology to selected coastal communities in Margarita Island, Venezuela is being developed, and an optimum location selection technique was devised. To pick the variables or factors that determine site suitability, a bibliographic database was made, aspects of interest chosen, and the most comprehensive ones singled out, eliminating redundant ones. Twenty variables were grouped in criteria based on the way they influence the project. Variables were classified as intrinsic environmental, environmental extrinsic, logistic, and socioeconomic criteria. Thirty-five experts were asked to evaluate the factors and to score each according to their suitability weight. Logistic criterion received the highest values, followed by environmental extrinsic issues. A Geographic Information System using a base map compiled from 1:25,000 scale maps was developed. A thematic map for each factor was completed, dividing graphically the 3896-km2 study area into polygons of equal weight for each factor. The Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) was used to combine the variables. Resultant vectors in thematic maps were added to obtain smaller polygons with the same value sum. Finally, MCE was used to generate a final output: the optimum sites for oyster aquaculture resulting from the added values of over 3000 polygons in the maps, for the 20 criteria. Higher scores were reached in 13 areas covering 4.1 km2, those places having the optimum conditions for oyster raft aquaculture in the region. Additional locations meeting 75% to 70% of the demanded criteria for a final suitable selection cover 137 sites encompassing 37.5 km2.

  14. Submerged Culture of Grifola gargal and G. sordulenta (Higher Basidiomycetes) from Argentina as a Source of Mycelia with Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postemsky, Pablo Daniel; Curvetto, Néstor Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Submerged culture is an alternative mycelium source for Grifola gargal and G. sordulenta, two rare edible mushrooms related to Grifola frondosa. This work studies their mycelia as a source of antioxidants. The efficient concentrations of methanolic extracts in both radical scavenging (RS) and reducing power (RP) abilities in G. gargal and in G. sordulenta showed a high antioxidant activity. In the experimental design used, the antioxidant activity mainly depended on the culture conditions rather than on the media composition. Irrespective of the basal culture medium, mycelium methanolic extracts of G. sordulenta obtained from culture in Erlenmeyer flasks showed equivalents to ascorbic acid (EQ(AA)) RS-EQ(AA) and RP-EQ(AA) contents higher than the corresponding values obtained with jar cultures. Under stationary cultivation, G. sordulenta produced approximately 50% higher content in both RS-EQ(AA) and RP-EQ(AA) than the medicinal mushroom G. frondosa. Phenolics correlated with RS-EQ(AA) and RP-EQ(AA) in G. gargal and with RP-EQ(AA) in G. sordulenta; besides, thin-layer chromatography showed these compounds to be at least in part related to the RS capacity. It is concluded that G. gargal and G. sordulenta mycelia are excellent sources of antioxidant metabolites.

  15. Anti-complementary Activities of Exo- and Endo-biopolymer Produced by Submerged Mycelial Culture of Eight Different Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byung-Keun; Gu, Young-Ah; Jeong, Yong-Tae

    2007-01-01

    The Elfvingia applanata (EA), Hericium erinaceum (HE),Grifola frondosa (GF), Pholiota nameko (PN), Pleurotus eryngii (PE), Trametes suaveolens (TS), Fomes fomentarius (FF), and Inonotus obliquus (IO) could produce the endo- (EN) and exo-biopolymer (EX) in submerged culture. The highest anti-complementary activity of the EN was exhibited by PN (49.1%), followed by HE (38.6%), TS (37.0%),and FF (33.0%),whereas the high activity of the EX was found with GF (59.8%),followed by HE (36.3%),TS (30.8%),and IO (28.8%). The EN of P. nameko (EN-PN) and EX of G. frondosa (EX-GF) were found to contain 78.6% and 41.2% carbohydrates, while 21.4% and 58.8% protein, respectively. The sugar and amino acid compositions of EN-PN and EX-GF were also analyzed in detail. PMID:24015085

  16. The influences of sugars and plant growth regulators on β-glucan synthesis of G. lucidum mycelium in submerged culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Cao Phuong; Tien, Le Thi Thuy

    2017-09-01

    β - glucan is intracellular polysaccharide (IPS), extracted from Ganoderma lucidum mycelium that can enhance human immune respond. This study aimed to stimulate the production of β - glucan in G. lucidum mycelium through optimating the carbonhydrates and plant rowth regulators in submerged culture. The results showed that the stimulation or inhibition of IPS production as well as β - glucan biosynthesis could be adjusted depend on the type and concentration of carbonhydrates and plant growth regulators. The supplement of lactose 80 g/L and BA 1 mg/L in medium could cause the highest IPS production (644.478 mg/g DW) and β - glucan increased up to 0.15/DW, that raised twice as much as without plant growth regulators. Futhermore, the optimation of other environmental elements were figured out were completely dark and 150 rpm on rotary shaker. This result could be used as premise for production of β - glucan in pilot.

  17. Enhanced production of triterpenoid in submerged cultures of Antrodia cinnamomea with the addition of citrus peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Te-Wei; Lai, Yueting; Yang, Fan-Chiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, Antrodia cinnamomea has become a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan. Triterpenoids are considered one of the most biologically active components found in A. cinnamomea. The aim of this research is to investigate the feasibility of enhancing triterpenoid production in shake flask cultures of A. cinnamomea by adding citrus peel extract. As a result of its containing essential oils, citrus peel extract is inhibitory to mycelial growth. In the experiments, the appropriate adding time is determined to be on day 7. Of the various citrus peel extracts tested, tangerine proves to be the most effective in enhancing polyphenol and triterpenoid production. With an addition of 2% (v/v), the content and production of total polyphenols rises from 5.95 mg/g DW of the control and 56.73 mg/L to 23.52 mg/g DW and 224.39 mg/L, respectively, on day 28. The production of triterpenoids also increases from 99.93 to 1,028.02 mg/L, for more than a tenfold increase. An optimal level of tangerine peel additive is determined to be around 4%. Furthermore, when compared with the mycelia of the control culture, the profiles of the HPLC analysis show that the mycelia cultured with the tangerine-peel addition contain more kinds of triterpenoids. This study demonstrates that the addition of citrus peel extract effectively enhances the production of bioactive metabolites in the submerged cultures of A. cinnamomea.

  18. Oyster Mushroom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to look into the possibility of using the different lignocellulosic biomasses for Pleurotus sajor-caju (oyster mushroom) cultivation. The mushroom species was cultivated on nine types of substrates; namely three acacia species, three types of straws, coffee husk and saw dust obtained from two.

  19. The effect of pH on the production of chitinolytic enzymes of Verticillium fungicola in submerged cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Coutiño, Laura; Espinosa-Marquez, Jesús; Peter, Martin G; Shirai, Keiko

    2010-12-01

    Chitinase and N-acetylhexosaminidase activities in submerged cultures of Verticillium fungicola increased up to 5-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively when the pH of the culture medium was raised from 5 to 8. SDS-PAGE and zymograms of the freeze-dried crude enzyme obtained from the cultures indicated four chitin degrading proteins of M(w) 24, 40, 55 and 63 kDa, whereas isoelectric focusing displayed the separation of three chitin degrading enzymes with isoelectric points of 4.7, 6.8 and 10, as well as two N-acetylhexosaminidases having isoelectric points of 3.2 and 13. Freeze-dried crude enzyme was characterized for its ability to produce chito-oligosaccharides from chitosans. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analyses revealed that monomers as well as hetero-oligomers with degree of polymerization 4 were initially the main products, whereas oligomers with degree of polymerization 2-11 were detected after extended reaction times. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. COMPARATIVE EVALUTION OF CEPHALOSPORIN-C PRODUCTION IN SOLID STATE FERMENTATION AND SUBMERGED LIQUID CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rezazarandi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of solid state fermentation (SSF utilization in producing enzymes & secondary metabolites have been shown, whereas, submerged liquid fermentation (SLF condition has the major usage in industrial production of antibiotics. As an antibiotic of B-lactams group, cephalosporin-C (CPC is indicated due to its wide effect and broad convention in treatment of infectious diseases. Regarding industrial production of CPC regularly done in SLF condition, we compared CPC production sum in SLF and SSF conditions. In this analysis, A. chrysogenum was employed, which was inoculated to SLF and SSF, while internal fermenter conditions were totally under control. After extraction of CPC, productions in two states of SLF and SSF were compared using the cylinder plate method. According to Antibiotic assay and production amount comparison, results expressed a ratio of development of production in SSF conditions to SLF conditions. Regarding previous studies on a solid state fermenter and its advantages, in this study, convenience of SSF conditions compared to SLF conditions was experimented. Also mentioning that maintaining the condition of solid state fermenter is more comfortable and practical than liquid state fermenter, using a solid based fermenter to produce antibiotics, especially CPC, can be appropriate. Considering appropriate control conditions of SSF to produce secondary metabolites, decrease in expenses, and increase of production, taking advantage of it in order to increase production parallel to modern methods, such as genetically manipulating CPC producing microorganisms are recommended to pharmacological industries. Also, to make this method applicable, further studies in industrial criterion seem necessary.

  1. Effects of Cultivating Conditions on the Water Soluble Polysaccharides Content of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelium in Submerged Flask Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosyida, V. T.; Hayati, S. N.; Apriyana, W.; Darsih, C.; Hernawan; Poeloengasih, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    The carcinostatic substance in Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) Karst (Polyporaceae) is a water soluble polysaccharides (WSP) which might be useful in immunotherapy. Attempt to produce effective substances from cultured mycelia is important to carry out since solid cultivation is a time consuming and quality fluctuating. The effects of cultivating conditions on the water soluble polysaccharides content of G. Lucidum mycelium were investigated in submerged flask cultures. Culture from fruiting bodies was maintained on potato dextrose-agar slope. Slopes were inoculated and incubated at 30°C for 7 days, and stored at 4°C. The flask experiments were performed in 100 ml erlenmeyer flasks containing 20 ml of the sterilized media. Actively growing mycelia (1 piece, 5 mm X 5 mm) from a newly prepared slant culture (about 7 days incubation at 30°C) were inoculated into the flask. The pH was measured and adjusted to the desired value by addition of either 4 M HCl or 2.5 M NaOH. Incubation temperature were 20, 25, and 30°C. At the end of inoculation period (14 days) mycelium consisting of individual pellets was harvested and wash for the analysis. WSP content was analysed using phenol-sulfuric acid method. The optimal initial pH for metabolite production would depend on the culture medium. Generally, high values of pH, such as 9, negatively affect both cell growth and WSP production. The optimum temperature range for the high G. lucidum mycelium and WSP production were found to be 25 – 30 °C at pH values 5 – 7 in both of media.

  2. Production of Mushroom Mycelium as a Protein and Fat Source in Submerged Culture in Medium of Vinasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanghe, H.

    1962-01-01

    Of ten mushroom cultures investigated, only Agaricus campestris, Boletus indecisus, and Tricholoma nudum were capable of growing in submerged culture in medium of vinasse with added salts. Higher fermentative efficiencies were found under these conditions than in medium containing molasses or waste sulfite liquor. A. campestris showed a better capacity to produce protein but, since B. indecisus is capable of developing greater mycelium weight, its fermentative efficiencies are comparable. Both microorganisms could be grown in medium of vinasse with greatly varied amounts, producing higher mycelial weight in media with greater vinasse. The capacity of B. indecisus and A. campestris to utilize the noncarbohydrate fraction in total solids, instead of the total carbohydrates when they are in smaller amount, was observed in medium containing vinasse. B. indecisus and A. campestris were easily separated by filtration from the medium, although T. nudum was difficult to separate by this procedure. In experiments with A. campestris, the adaptative capacity of the organism to vinasse was demonstrated. PMID:13962715

  3. Culture condition improvement for whole-cell lipase production in submerged fermentation by Rhizopus chinensis using statistical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yun; Xu, Yan

    2008-06-01

    Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 was a versatile strain capable of producing whole-cell lipase with synthetic activity in submerged fermentation. In order to improve the production of whole-cell lipase and study the culture conditions systematically, the combination of taguchi method and response surface methodology was performed. Taguchi method was used for the initial optimization, and eight factors viz., maltose, olive oil, peptone, K2HPO4, agitation, inoculum size, fermentation volume and pH were selected for this study. The whole-cell lipase activity yield was two times higher than the control experiment under initial optimal conditions, and four significant factors (inoculum, olive oil, fermentation volume and peptone) were selected to test the effect on the lipase production using response surface methodology. The optimal fermentation parameters for enhanced whole-cell lipase yield were found to be: inoculum 4.25 x 10(8) spores/L, olive oil 2.367% (w/v), fermentation volume 18 mL/250 mL flask, peptone 4.06% (w/v). Subsequent experimental trails confirmed the validity of the model. These optimal culture conditions in the shake flask led to a lipase yield of 13875 U/L, which 120% increased compare with the non-optimized conditions.

  4. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative overview of antioxidative properties and phenolic profiles of different fungal origins: fruiting bodies and submerged cultures of Coprinus comatus and Coprinellus truncorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tešanović, Kristina; Pejin, Boris; Šibul, Filip; Matavulj, Milan; Rašeta, Milena; Janjušević, Ljiljana; Karaman, Maja

    2017-02-01

    Bioactive properties of fungi considerably differ between the fruiting body (FB) and the submerged culture as regards mycelia (M) and the fermentation broth (F). Antioxidant properties of hot-water extracts obtained from three different fungal origins: FB, M and F of two autochthonous fungal species (Northern Serbia), Coprinus comatus and Coprinellus truncorum were investigated. Free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) was evaluated in vitro by the DPPH assay and reducing power ability (FRAP assay). Considering possible bioactive properties of different compounds present in fungal extracts, the content of total proteins (TP), phenols (TC) and flavonoids (TF) were investigated colorimetrically. The chemical characterisation of the examined extracts was evaluated using the HPLC-MS/MS method. C. comatus showed the strongest RSC activity; more precisely, fermentation broth extract (FCc) on DPPH radicals (IC50 = 5.06 μg mL-1) and fruiting body extract (FBCc) for the FRAP assay (42.86 mg ascorbic acid equivalents (AAE)/g). Submerged M extract of both species showed the highest TC (MCc 81.95 mg gallic acid eq (GAE)/g d.w.; MCt 81.64 mg GAE/g d.w.), while FB extracts contained the highest content of TP. Comparing LC-MS phenolic profiles between species-interspecifically and among different fungal origins-intraspecifically (fruiting bodies and submerged cultures), high variations were noticed. In submerged M or F extracts of C. comatus, vanillic, gallic, gentisic and cinnamic acids were detected, as opposed to FB. Considering that diverse phenolic profiles of detected antioxidant compounds were obtained by submerged cultivation, this type of cultivation is promising for the production of antioxidant substances.

  6. Assimilation of peptides and amino acids and dissimilation of lactate during submerged pure cultures of Penicillium camembertii and Geotrichum candidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziza, M; Adour, L; Amrane, A

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of Penicillium camembertii and Geotrichum candidum growing in submerged pure cultures on simple (glutamate) or complex (peptones) substrates as nitrogen and carbon sources and an lactate as a second carbon source was examined. Similar to the behavior previously recorded on a simple substrate (glutamate), a clear differentiation between the carbon source and the energy source was also shown on peptones and lactate during P. camembertii growth, since throughout growth, lactate was only dissimilated, viz., used for energy supply by oxidation into CO2, whereas peptides and amino acids from peptones were used for carbon (and nitrogen) assimilation. Because of its deaminating activity, G. candidum preferred peptides and amino acids to lactate as energy sources, in addition to being assimilated as carbon and nitrogen sources. From this, on peptones and lactate, G. candidum grew faster than P. camembertii (0.19 and 0.08 g/l/h, respectively) by assimilating the most readily utilizable peptides and amino acids; however, owing to its lower proteolytic activity, the maximum biomass was lower than that of P. camembertii (3.7 and 5.5 g/l, respectively), for which continuous proteolysis and assimilation of peptides were shown.

  7. Competition during submerged mixed culture of Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium camembertii on glucose and threonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziza, Majda; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2008-02-01

    Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium camembertii were cultivated in pure and mixed cultures on glucose and threonine. In pure cultures, G. candidum used glucose as a carbon and an energy source and threonine only as a nitrogen source, even after glucose exhaustion. Contrarily, when growing in isolation, P. camembertii used simultaneously threonine and glucose as carbon sources. A diauxic growth was recorded during the mixed culture of both species, which competed for glucose, the sole carbon source available for G. candidum growth, leading to higher glucose consumption rates than those recorded during pure cultures, while after glucose exhaustion, low growth was recorded in a second step, showing a 'competition' for threonine, the sole remaining carbon and nitrogen sources, confirmed by the increase of 1.0+/-0.1 log of the G. candidum Colony Forming Units. 'Competition' between G. candidum and P. camembertii for the limiting substrate was found to have a positive effect on growth, since it did not lead to the annihilation of one species, as usually observed, but in their coexistence, leading to a rather similar final number of the CFUs for the two populations. 'Competition' resulted in the absence of assimilation of the second available carbon substrate (lactate) as previously observed, or its use only as a nitrogen source, as was the case for threonine in this work.

  8. Production of multiple extracellular enzyme activities by novel submerged culture of Aspergillus kawachii for ethanol production from raw cassava flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Toshikazu; Makita, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Koutaro; Shoji, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Cassava is a starch-containing root crop that is widely used as a raw material in a variety of industrial applications, most recently in the production of fuel ethanol. In the present study, ethanol production from raw (uncooked) cassava flour by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using a preparation consisting of multiple enzyme activities from Aspergillus kawachii FS005 was investigated. The multi-activity preparation was obtained from a novel submerged fermentation broth of A. kawachii FS005 grown on unmilled crude barley as a carbon source. The preparation was found to consist of glucoamylase, acid-stable α-amylase, acid carboxypeptidase, acid protease, cellulase and xylanase activities, and exhibited glucose and free amino nitrogen (FAN) production rates of 37.7 and 118.7 mg/l/h, respectively, during A. kawachii FS005-mediated saccharification of uncooked raw cassava flour. Ethanol production from 18.2% (w/v) dry uncooked solids of raw cassava flour by SSF with the multi-activity enzyme preparation yielded 9.0% (v/v) of ethanol and 92.3% fermentation efficiency. A feasibility study for ethanol production by SSF with a two-step mash using raw cassava flour and the multi-activity enzyme preparation manufactured on-site was verified on a pilot plant scale. The enzyme preparation obtained from the A. kawachii FS005 culture broth exhibited glucose and FAN production rates of 41.1 and 135.5 mg/l/h, respectively. SSF performed in a mash volume of about 1,612 l containing 20.6% (w/v) dry raw cassava solids and 106 l of on-site manufactured A. kawachii FS005 culture broth yielded 10.3% (v/v) ethanol and a fermentation efficiency of 92.7%.

  9. High Cellobiase and Xylanase Production by Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 Mutant in Submerged Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, J C; Shewale, J G; Deshpande, M V

    1980-04-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 mutant secretes high levels of cellobiase and xylanase in addition to having high cellulase production. The apparent K(m) and V(max) of cellobiase (grown in NM-2 + 2% corn steep liquor medium) with cellobiose as a substrate were 5.6 mM and 22.2 mumol of glucose liberated per min per ml of culture filtrate, respectively. The addition of 2% corn steep liquor to NM-2 medium increased endo-beta-glucanase, cellobiase, and xylanase yields by approximately 1.5-fold.

  10. High Cellobiase and Xylanase Production by Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 Mutant in Submerged Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, J. C.; Shewale, J. G.; Deshpande, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 mutant secretes high levels of cellobiase and xylanase in addition to having high cellulase production. The apparent Km and Vmax of cellobiase (grown in NM-2 + 2% corn steep liquor medium) with cellobiose as a substrate were 5.6 mM and 22.2 μmol of glucose liberated per min per ml of culture filtrate, respectively. The addition of 2% corn steep liquor to NM-2 medium increased endo-β-glucanase, cellobiase, and xylanase yields by approximately 1.5-fold. PMID:16345562

  11. Raspberry ketone from submerged cultured cells of the basidiomycete Nidula niveo-tomentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böker, A; Fischer, M; Berger, R G

    2001-01-01

    The basidiomycete Nidula niveo-tomentosa produced 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-butan-2-one (raspberry ketone), one of the character impact components of raspberry flavor, and its corresponding alcohol. A systematic attempt was made to improve the productivity of this fungus. Variation of nutrient medium composition, precursor amount, time of supplementation, and cultivation period yielded a 50-fold increase in metabolite concentrations. Raspberry ketone and alcohol were easily isolated from the culture medium by solvent extraction. Glycosidically bound forms or accumulation of raspberry compounds in fungal cells were not detected. This microbial process offers an alternative for the production of natural raspberry flavor.

  12. Formation of keratinocyte multilayers on filters under airlifted or submerged culture conditions in medium containing calcium, ascorbic acid, and keratinocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Akira; Kitagawa, Norio; Matsuura, Takashi; Sato, Hironobu; Inai, Tetsuichiro

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is a powerful in vitro technique to study the stratification and differentiation of keratinocytes. However, culture conditions, including culture media, supplements, and scaffolds (e.g., collagen gels with or without fibroblasts), can vary considerably. Here, we evaluated the roles of calcium, L-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (APM), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in a chemically defined medium, EpiLife, in 3D cultures of primary human epidermal keratinocytes directly plated on polycarbonate filter inserts under airlifted or submerged conditions. Eight culture media containing various combinations of these three supplements were examined. Calcium was necessary for the stratification and differentiation of keratinocytes based on the localization of keratins and involucrin. However, the localization patterns of keratins and integrin β4 were partially disrupted and Ki67-positive basal cells almost disappeared 3 weeks after airlift. The addition of KGF, but not APM, prevented these changes. Further addition of APM markedly improved the tissue architecture, including basal cell morphology and the appearance of keratohyalin granules and localized involucrin in the upper suprabasal cells, even after 1 week. Although the submerged culture also formed cornified epithelium-like multilayers, involucrin was localized in the cornified layer, where nuclei were often found. Based on these results, it is most effective to culture keratinocytes at the air-liquid interface in EpiLife medium supplemented with calcium, APM, and KGF to form well-organized and orthokeratinized multilayers as skin analogues.

  13. Optimization of catalase biosynthesis in submerged cultures of Aspergillus niger mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromada, A; Fiedurek, J

    1997-01-01

    The effect of some medium components, viscous substances and metabolic inhibitors, on catalase production by mutant Aspergillus niger has been studied in shake culture. Altering the composition of the basal medium, particularly substituting NaNO3 for KNO3, and peptone for yeast extract brought an increase in extra- and intracellular catalase activity by 1.5- and 3-fold, respectively. The addition of 2.0-6.0 mg sodium alginate or pectin/ml as viscous additive to the medium, containing glucose as carbon source, increased the medium viscosity and catalase production in shake culture by about 2.8- to 3.0-fold. The highest yield of extracellular catalase activity of A. niger was obtained in the presence of sodium orthovanadate and Triton X-100, which improved the activity of this enzyme by about 1.5-2.2-fold. A significant increase in intracellular catalase activity was observed in the presence of hematin, Tween 80 and sodium orthovanadate (1.7-, 1.6- and 1.4-fold respectively). The time course of growth and enzyme production by A. niger in the optimized medium is also reported.

  14. Submerged culture mycelium and broth of Grifola frondosa improve glycemic responses in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Chen, Ching-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Grifola frondosa, an edible fungus with a large fruiting body and overlapping caps, has been demonstrated to be a natural source of health-promoting substances, mainly due to its polysaccharides beta-glucan. By using male Wistar rats injected with saline (normal rats) or nicotinamide plus streptozotocin (diabetic rats), we investigated the effects of an orally ingested placebo (CON and STZ groups), culture mycelium (CGM and SGM groups), broth (CGB and SGB groups), and mycelium plus broth (CGX and SGX groups) of Grifola frondosa on glycemic responses. During the experimental period (from day 0 to day 15), the STZ group had significantly lower body weight compared to the CON group (one-way ANOVA, pGrifola frondosa have bioactivities for improving glycemic responses.

  15. Production of microsclerotia by Brazilian strains of Metarhizium spp. using submerged liquid culture fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Kobori, Nilce Naomi; de Jesus Vital, Rayan Carlos; Jackson, Mark Alan; Quintela, Eliane Dias

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the potential production and desiccation tolerance of microsclerotia (MS) by Brazilian strains of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma), M. acridum (Mc) and M. robertsii (Mr). These fungi were grown in a liquid medium containing 16 g carbon l⁻¹ with a carbon:nitrogen ratio of 50:1. One hundred milliliters cultures were grown in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks in a rotary incubator shaker at 28 °C and 200 rpm for 5 days. Five-day-old MS were harvested, mixed with diatomaceous earth (DE) and air-dried for 2 days at 30 °C. The air-dried MS-DE granular preparations were milled by mortar + pestle and stored in centrifuged tubes at either 26 or -20 °C. Desiccation tolerance and conidia production were assessed for dried MS granules by measuring hyphal germination after incubation for 2 days on water agar plates at 26 °C and for conidia production following 7 days incubation. Yields of MS by all strains of Metarhizium were 6.1-7.3 × 10⁶ l⁻¹ after 3 days growth with maximum MS yields (0.7-1.1 × 10⁷ l⁻¹) after 5 days growth. No differences in biomass accumulation were observed after 3 days growth, whereas Ma-CG168 showed the highest biomass accumulation after 5 days growth. Dried MS-DE preparations of all fungal strains were equally tolerant to desiccation (≥93 % germination) and the highest conidia production was obtained by MS granules of Mc-CG423 (4 × 10⁹ conidia g⁻¹). All MS granules showed similar stability after storage at either 26 or -20 °C for 3.5 months.

  16. Cell wall α-1,3-glucan prevents α-amylase adsorption onto fungal cell in submerged culture of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Silai; Sato, Hiroki; Ichinose, Sakurako; Tanaka, Mizuki; Miyazawa, Ken; Yoshimi, Akira; Abe, Keietsu; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2017-07-01

    We have previously reported that α-amylase (Taka-amylase A, TAA) activity disappears in the later stage of submerged Aspergillus oryzae culture as a result of TAA adsorption onto the cell wall. Chitin, one of the major components of the cell wall, was identified as a potential factor that facilitates TAA adsorption. However, TAA adsorption only occurred in the later stage of cultivation, although chitin was assumed to be sufficiently abundant in the cell wall regardless of the submerged culture period. This suggested the presence a factor that inhibits TAA adsorption to the cell wall in the early stage of cultivation. In the current study, we identified α-1,3-glucan as a potential inhibiting factor for TAA adsorption. We constructed single, double, and triple disruption mutants of three α-1,3-glucan synthase genes (agsA, agsB, and agsC) in A. oryzae. Growth characteristics and cell wall component analysis of these disruption strains showed that AgsB plays a major role in α-1,3-glucan synthesis. In the ΔagsB mutant, TAA was adsorbed onto the mycelium in all stages of cultivation (early and later), and the ΔagsB mutant cell walls had a significantly high capacity for TAA adsorption. Moreover, the α-1,3-glucan content of the cell wall prepared from the wild-type strain in the later stage of cultivation was markedly reduced compared with that in the early stage. These results suggest that α-1,3-glucan is a potential inhibiting factor for TAA adsorption onto the cell wall component, chitin, in the early stage of submerged culture in A. oryzae. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antidiabetic activities of ethanol extract of dry matters of culture broth of Coriolus versiolor in submerged culture

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    Zuofa Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the antihyperglycemic and antilipidperoxidative effects of ethanol extract of the dry matter from culture broth of Coriolus versicolor (ECBC in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mice. Blood glucose level, insulin level, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol(LDL-C, high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C in serum and reduced glutathione level (GSH, lipid peroxidation, glycogen, antioxidant enzymes in liver were evaluated. Moreover, histopathological observation was conducted. Streptozotocin treatment (150 mg/kg body weight induced the decrease of GSH level, antioxidant enzymes activities, glycogen content in liver, HDL-C content and insulin level in serum, accompanied by the elevation of the lipid peroxidation in liver, serum blood glucose level, contents of TC, TG and LDL-C. Treatment with ECBC restored the changes in the above parameters up to the basal level. The protective effects were further supported by the attenuation of the degree of pancreas damage in ECBC treated mice.

  18. Submerged Culture of Mushrooms in Bioreactors – Challenges, Current State-of-the-Art, and Future Prospects

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    Li-Wen Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal mushrooms have profound health-promoting benefits. Recently, a number of substances of mushroom origin have been isolated, identified and shown to have physiological activities, such as antitumor, immunomodulating, cardiovascular, antihypercholesterolemia, antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic activities. Currently, commercial products from medicinal mushrooms are mostly obtained through the field-cultivation of the fruiting body. However, in this case it is difficult to control the quality of the final product. Submerged fermentation of the mycelial form of mushroom-producing fungi has received much attention as a promising alternative for efficient production of the biomass of medicinal mushrooms and their active metabolites. However, in order for the production to be successful at industrial scale, various technical problems need to be solved, including characterization of the variations that occur during the submerged cultivation of mushrooms in bioreactors and their effects on growth and product formation. This review outlines the major factors that affect the submerged cultivation of mushrooms in bioreactors, including oxygen supply, shear and mixing, morphology and rheology, as well as two-stage cultivation strategies and high-cell-density cultivation strategies such as fed-batch fermentation.

  19. Melanisation of Aspergillus terreus-Is Butyrolactone I Involved in the Regulation of Both DOPA and DHN Types of Pigments in Submerged Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palonen, Elina K; Raina, Sheetal; Brandt, Annika; Meriluoto, Jussi; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Soini, Juhani T

    2017-05-04

    Pigments and melanins of fungal spores have been investigated for decades, revealing important roles in the survival of the fungus in hostile environments. The key genes and the encoded enzymes for pigment and melanin biosynthesis have recently been found in Ascomycota, including Aspergillus spp. In Aspergillus terreus, the pigmentation has remained mysterious with only one class of melanin biogenesis being found. In this study, we examined an intriguing, partially annotated gene cluster of A. terreus strain NIH2624, utilizing previously sequenced transcriptome and improved gene expression data of strain MUCL 38669, under the influence of a suggested quorum sensing inducing metabolite, butyrolactone I. The core polyketide synthase (PKS) gene of the cluster was predicted to be significantly longer on the basis of the obtained transcriptional data, and the surrounding cluster was positively regulated by butyrolactone I at the late growth phase of submerged culture, presumably during sporulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the extended PKS revealed remarkable similarity with a group of known pigments of Fusarium spp., indicating a similar function for this PKS. We present a hypothesis of this PKS cluster to biosynthesise a 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-type of pigment during sporulation with the influence of butyrolactone I under submerged culture.

  20. Melanisation of Aspergillus terreus—Is Butyrolactone I Involved in the Regulation of Both DOPA and DHN Types of Pigments in Submerged Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina K. Palonen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pigments and melanins of fungal spores have been investigated for decades, revealing important roles in the survival of the fungus in hostile environments. The key genes and the encoded enzymes for pigment and melanin biosynthesis have recently been found in Ascomycota, including Aspergillus spp. In Aspergillus terreus, the pigmentation has remained mysterious with only one class of melanin biogenesis being found. In this study, we examined an intriguing, partially annotated gene cluster of A. terreus strain NIH2624, utilizing previously sequenced transcriptome and improved gene expression data of strain MUCL 38669, under the influence of a suggested quorum sensing inducing metabolite, butyrolactone I. The core polyketide synthase (PKS gene of the cluster was predicted to be significantly longer on the basis of the obtained transcriptional data, and the surrounding cluster was positively regulated by butyrolactone I at the late growth phase of submerged culture, presumably during sporulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the extended PKS revealed remarkable similarity with a group of known pigments of Fusarium spp., indicating a similar function for this PKS. We present a hypothesis of this PKS cluster to biosynthesise a 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-type of pigment during sporulation with the influence of butyrolactone I under submerged culture.

  1. Submerged-Culture Mycelia and Broth of the Maitake Medicinal Mushroom Grifola frondosa (Higher Basidiomycetes) Alleviate Type 2 Diabetes-Induced Alterations in Immunocytic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a disease with impaired glucose, protein and lipid metabolism, low-grade chronic inflammation, and immune dysfunction, is a global public health crisis. We previously demonstrated that Grifola frondosa has bioactivities in improving glycemic responses in diabetic rats. Herein, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of the submerged-culture mycelia and broth of G. frondosa on the peripheral blood cells (PBL) and splenocytes. Male Wistar rats were administered with saline (normal rats) or streptozotocin plus nicotinamide (T2DM rats) and were intragastrically administered with placebo, fermented mycelia, broth, or mycelia plus broth (1 g kg-1 day-1) for two weeks. In normal rats, ingestion of mycelia significantly decreased monocytes and ingestion of mycelia and broth significantly decreased the productions of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 from the PBL and splenocytes. In T2DM rats, ingestion of mycelia, broth, and mycelia plus broth significantly alleviated the increases in 2 h postprandial blood glucose and the productions of IFN-γ from the T-leukocytes, IL-4, and IL-6 from the monocytes and IL-4 from the T-splenocytes, as well as significantly improved the productions of tumor-necrosis factor-α from the macrophages. In conclusion, submerged-culture mycelia and broth of G. frondosa may decrease cell-medicated immunity in normal rats and improve hyperglycemia and diabetes-induced alterations in cell-medicated and innate immunities in T2DM rats.

  2. Impact of Hurricane Irene on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentrations in surface water, sediment, and cultured oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, MD, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kristi S; Jacobs, John M; Crump, Byron C

    2014-01-01

    To determine if a storm event (i.e., high winds, large volumes of precipitation) could alter concentrations of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in aquacultured oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and associated surface water and sediment, this study followed a sampling timeline before and after Hurricane Irene impacted the Chesapeake Bay estuary in late August 2011. Aquacultured oysters were sampled from two levels in the water column: surface (0.3 m) and near-bottom (just above the sediment). Concentrations of each Vibrio spp. and associated virulence genes were measured in oysters with a combination of real-time PCR and most probable number (MPN) enrichment methods, and in sediment and surface water with real-time PCR. While concentration shifts of each Vibrio species were apparent post-storm, statistical tests indicated no significant change in concentration for either Vibrio species by location (surface or near bottom oysters) or date sampled (oyster tissue, surface water, and sediment concentrations). V. vulnificus in oyster tissue was correlated with total suspended solids (r = 0.41, P = 0.04), and V. vulnificus in sediment was correlated with secchi depth (r = -0.93, P depth [r = -0.48, P = 0.02 (sediment); r = -0.97, P <0.01 (surface water)] and tidal height [r = -0.96, P <0.01 (sediment), r = -0.59, P <0.01 (surface water)]. The concentrations of Vibrio spp. were higher in oysters relative to other studies (average V. vulnificus 4 × 10(5) MPN g(-1), V. parahaemolyticus 1 × 10(5) MPN g(-1)), and virulence-associated genes were detected in most oyster samples. This study provides a first estimate of storm-related Vibrio density changes in oyster tissues, sediment, and surface water at an aquaculture facility in the Chesapeake Bay.

  3. Screening of endophytic sources of exopolysaccharides: Preliminary characterization of crude exopolysaccharide produced by submerged culture of Diaporthe sp. JF766998 under different cultivation time

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    Ravely Casarotti Orlandelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endophytic fungi have been described as producers of important bioactive compounds; however, they remain under-exploited as exopolysaccharides (EPS sources. Therefore, this work reports on EPS production by submerged cultures of eight endophytes isolated from Piper hispidum Sw., belonging to genera Diaporthe, Marasmius, Phlebia, Phoma, Phyllosticta and Schizophyllum. After fermentation for 96 h, four endophytes secreted EPS: Diaporthe sp. JF767000, Diaporthe sp. JF766998, Diaporthe sp. JF767007 and Phoma herbarum JF766995. The EPS from Diaporthe sp. JF766998 differed statistically from the others, with a higher percentage of carbohydrate (91% and lower amount of protein (8%. Subsequently, this fungus was grown under submerged culture for 72, 96 and 168 h (these EPS were designated EPSD1-72, EPSD1-96 and EPSD1-168 and the differences in production, monosaccharide composition and apparent molecular were compared. The EPS yields in mg/100 mL of culture medium were: 3.0 ± 0.4 (EPSD1-72, 15.4 ± 2.2 (EPSD1-96 and 14.8 ± 1.8 (EPSD1-168. The EPSD1-72 had high protein content (28.5% and only 71% of carbohydrate; while EPSD1-96 and EPSD1-168 were composed mainly of carbohydrate (≈95 and 100%, respectively, with low protein content (≈5% detected at 96 h. Galactose was the main monosaccharide component (30% of EPSD1-168. Differently, EPSD1-96 was rich in glucose (51%, with molecular weight of 46.6 kDa. It is an important feature for future investigations, because glucan-rich EPS are reported as effective antitumor agents.

  4. Effect of different pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse on cellulase and xylanases production by the mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 grown in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo J P

    2014-01-01

    The main limitation to the industrial scale hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of cellulase production. This study evaluated cellulase and xylanase enzyme production by the cellulolytic mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 using pretreated sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source. Most cultures grown with pretreated bagasse showed similar enzymatic activities to or higher enzymatic activities than cultures grown with cellulose or untreated sugar cane bagasse. Higher filter paper activity (1.253 ± 0.147 U · mL(-1)) was detected in the medium on the sixth day of cultivation when bagasse samples were pretreated with sodium hydroxide, hydrogen peroxide, and anthraquinone. Endoglucanase enzyme production was also enhanced by pretreatment of the bagasse. Nine cultures grown with bagasse possessed higher β -glucosidase activities on the sixth day than the culture grown with cellulose. The highest xylanase activity was observed in cultures with cellulose and with untreated sugar cane bagasse. These results indicate that pretreated sugar cane bagasse may be able to serve as a partial or total replacement for cellulose in submerged fermentation for cellulase production using P. echinulatum, which could potentially reduce future production costs of enzymatic complexes capable of hydrolyzing lignocellulosic residues to form fermented syrups.

  5. SCREENING AND OPTIMIZATION OF CULTURE CONDITIONS FOR CELLULASE PRODUCTION BY ASPERGILLUS NIGER NSPR012 IN SUBMERGED FERMENTATION

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    Juliet Bamidele Akinyele

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at screening of selected fungal strains and optimization of process parameters for cellulases production in submerged fermentation. Aspergillus niger NSPR012 was selected for further studies as the most potent in producing cellulase of high activity. Utilization of various agro-wastes as substitute tocarboxy methyl cellulose (CMC for cellulase production was also investigated. Among tested carbon sources, banana peels at a concentration of 5% was found to be the most effective carbon source. The cellulase production by Aspergillus niger NSPR012 in mineral salt medium attained maximum after 96 h of incubation. Maximum cellulase activity (0.466µmol/min/mL was obtained with locust beans as the best organic nitrogen source. The optimum incubation temperature and initial pH were 37°C and 5.5, respectively. With this information, banana peels could have good biotechnological potential for bio-products formation in which cellulase is one.

  6. Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of an Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line to Airborne Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface: A Comparison with Conventional, Submerged Cell-Culture Conditions

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    Anke-Gabriele Lenz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of inhalable nanoparticles have been widely studied in vitro with pulmonary cells cultured under submerged and air-liquid interface (ALI conditions. Submerged exposures are experimentally simpler, but ALI exposures are physiologically more realistic and hence potentially biologically more meaningful. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of human alveolar epithelial-like cells (A549 to airborne agglomerates of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles at the ALI, compared it to the response under submerged culture conditions, and provided a quantitative comparison with the literature data on different types of particles and cells. For ZnO nanoparticle doses of 0.7 and 2.5 μg ZnO/cm2 (or 0.09 and 0.33 cm2 ZnO/cm2, cell viability was not mitigated and no significant effects on the transcript levels of oxidative stress markers (HMOX1, SOD-2 and GCS were observed. However, the transcript levels of proinflammatory markers (IL-8, IL-6, and GM-CSF were induced to higher levels under ALI conditions. This is consistent with the literature data and it suggests that in vitro toxicity screening of nanoparticles with ALI cell culture systems may produce less false negative results than screening with submerged cell cultures. However, the database is currently too scarce to draw a definite conclusion on this issue.

  7. Impact of Hurricane Irene on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus concentrations in surface water, sediment and cultured oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi S Shaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine if a storm event (i.e., high winds, large volumes of precipitation could alter concentrations of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in aquacultured oysters (Crassostrea virginica and associated surface water and sediment, this study followed a sampling timeline before and after Hurricane Irene impacted the Chesapeake Bay estuary in late August 2011. Aquacultured oysters were sampled from two levels in the water column: surface 0.3 m and near-bottom just above the sediment. Concentrations of each Vibrio spp. and associated virulence genes were measured in oysters with a combination of real-time PCR and most probable number enrichment methods, and in sediment and surface water with real-time PCR. While concentration shifts of each Vibrio species were apparent post-storm, statistical tests indicated no significant change in concentration change for either Vibrio species by location (surface or near bottom oysters or date sampled (oyster tissue, surface water and sediment concentrations. V. vulnificus in oyster tissue was correlated with total suspended solids (r=0.41, p=0.04, and V. vulnificus in sediment was correlated with secchi depth (r=-0.93, p< 0.01, salinity (r=-0.46, p=0.02, tidal height (r=-0.45, p=0.03, and surface water V. vulnificus (r=0.98, p< 0.01. V. parahaemolyticus in oyster tissue did not correlate with environmental measurements, but V. parahaemolyticus in sediment and surface water correlated with several measurements including secchi depth (r=-0.48, p=0.02[sediment]; r=-0.97 p< 0.01[surface water] and tidal height (r=-0.96. p< 0.01[sediment], r=-0.59,p< 0.01 [surface water]. The concentrations of Vibrio spp. were higher in oysters relative to other studies (average V. vulnificus 4x105 MPN g-1, V. parahaemolyticus 1x105 MPN g-1, and virulence-associated genes were detected in most oyster samples. This study provides a first estimate of storm-related Vibrio density changes in oyster tissues, sediment and

  8. Improving the Fermentation Production of the Individual Key Triterpene Ganoderic Acid Me by the Medicinal Fungus Ganoderma lucidum in Submerged Culture

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    Gao-Qiang Liu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced ganoderic acid Me (GA-Me, an important anti-tumor triterpene yield was attained with the medicinal fungus Ganoderma lucidum using response surface methodology (RSM. Interactions were studied with three variables, viz. glucose, peptone and culture time using a Central Composite Design (CCD. The CCD contains a total of 20 experiments with the first 14 experiments organized in a fractional factorial design, with the experimental trails from 15 to 20 involving the replications of the central points. A polynomial model, describing the relationships between the yield of GA-Me and the three factors in a second-order equation, was developed. The model predicted the maximum GA-Me yield of 11.9 mg·L−1 for glucose, peptone, culture time values of 44.4 g·L−1, 5.0 g·L−1, 437.1 h, respectively, and a maximum GA-Me yield of 12.4 mg·L−1 was obtained in the validation experiment, which represented a 129.6% increase in titre compared to that of the non-optimized conditions. In addition, 11.4 mg·L−1 of GA-Me was obtained in a 30-L agitated fermenter under the optimized conditions, suggesting the submerged culture conditions optimized in the present study were also suitable for GA-Me production on a large scale.

  9. US State Submerged Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. Section 1301 et seq.) grants coastal states title to natural resources located within their coastal submerged lands and navigable...

  10. Effect of different cultural conditions for phytase production by Aspergillus niger CFR 335 in submerged and solid-state fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunashree, B S; Venkateswaran, G

    2008-12-01

    The present article deals with the studies on the effect of media ingredients, such as carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphates, surfactants, and metal salts, on phytase enzyme production by Aspergillus niger CFR 335 in submerged (SmF) and solid-state fermentations (SSF). The results obtained showed a 1.5-fold higher enzyme yield in the presence of sucrose in both SmF and SSF, while peptone was found to be a favorable nitrogen source for SmF. Sodium dihydrogen phosphate (NaH(2)PO(4)) favored 34% higher enzyme yield than the control, which was followed by 19% higher activity in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)) in SSF at 0.015% w/v. The addition of Tween-20 in SmF showed a maximum yield of 12.6 U/mL while, SDS suppressed the growth of the fungus. None of the surfactants favored the enzyme yield in SSF. Calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) was extensively efficient in stimulating more than 55% higher phytase production in SmF at 0.01% v/v. In SSF, none of the metal salts stimulated phytase production.

  11. Suspension of oysters reduces the populations of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K M; Supan, J; Ramirez, A; Johnson, C N

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) and Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) are associated with the consumption of raw oysters and cause illnesses ranging from simple gastroenteritis to life-threatening septicaemia. These halophilic bacteria are frequently found in marine and estuarine systems, accumulating within the tissues of a number of aquatic organisms and passing on to humans after consumption, through contaminated water, or via open wounds. As benthic organisms capable of filtering 40 gallons of water per hour, sediment is an important source of potentially pathogenic vibrios in oysters destined for raw consumption. This research used off-bottom oyster culture to reduce vibrio concentrations in oysters. Colony hybridization was used to enumerate Vp and Vv in bottom and suspended oysters. Vv and Vp concentrations were generally lower in oysters suspended off-bottom, and suspension decreased vibrio loads in oysters by an average of 13%. Suspension of oysters reduced vibrio concentrations. This study found that oyster suspension significantly reduced some populations of potentially pathogenic vibrios. These results indicate that oyster suspension could be a viable approach for preharvest treatment to reduce illness in consumers of raw oysters. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Production of cyathane type secondary metabolites by submerged cultures ofHericium erinaceusand evaluation of their antibacterial activity by direct bioautography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, T; Morlock, G; Zorn, H

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota are well-known to form a broad spectrum of biologically active secondary metabolites, especially low molecular weight compounds such as terpenoids. Hericium erinaceus produces various cyathane type diterpenoids including erinacines. However, no quantitative data and production kinetics have been reported on the biosynthesis of the erinacines C and P in submerged cultures. In the present study, the production of erinacine C was optimized, and the product formation kinetics as well as the antimicrobial activity were studied by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and direct bioautography. Oatmeal and Edamin ® K were identified to be crucial media components for an efficient production of erinacine C. The highest concentrations of erinacine C were obtained in the optimized culture medium on the 9 th culture day (approximately 260 mg L -1 ). The production of erinacine P was strongly time dependent. The maximum concentration of erinacine P of 184 mg L -1 was observed on the third culture day. Afterwards, the concentrations of erinacine P decreased while the concentrations of erinacine C steadily increased. Comparable results were obtained by HPTLC with UV detection and HPLC with diode-array detection (DAD) analyses. Direct bioautography allowed for an additional analysis of the antimicrobial activity of the secondary metabolites. The C and N sources oatmeal and Edamin ® K induced the formation of erinacine C. Detailed product formation kinetics of the erinacines C and P have been reported for the first time. HPTLC combined with the Aliivibrio fischeri bioassay allowed for an instant detection of cyathane diterpenoids in crude extracts and for an evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the secondary metabolites directly on the plate.

  13. The culture of pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata (Gould, 1850 in Phuket with temperature shock method and survival rates on various feeds

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    Rativat, V.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine pearl farming at Phuket Island has exploited natural pearl oysters. In order to obtain sufficient pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata (Gould, 1850, the oyster cultivation was carried out to determine appropriate kinds of food and types of spat collectors. The male and female oysters were stimulated to spawn with this temperature shock method (treated with 32ºC and then with 26ºC. The fertilized eggs developed into the stages of polar body, cleavage, blastula, gastrula, trochophore and then D-shape larvae. At the ageof 19-26 hrs. the larvae were fed with three kinds of food: Isochrysis galbana, Chaetoceros calcitrans and the mixture of 1:1 I. galbana and C. calcitrans. Upon the first 30 days, shell lengths of the spats fed with I. Galbana, C. calcitrans and the mixture were 422.00±59.32, 221.33±12.46 and 347.33±67.98 μg, respectively. The 26-29th day spat stage settled to the collectors: saran net, plastic plates and wavy tile. Number of spats settling to saran net was the highest. But after being moved into the sea for 30 days, the survival rate was89.06% which was lower than for those settling to plastic plates (93.29% and wavy tile (93.99%.

  14. Purification and characterization of laccase produced by a white rot fungus Pleurotus sajor-caju under submerged culture condition and its potential in decolorization of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Arulmani, Manavalan; Nam, In-Hyun; Kim, Young-Mo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kalaichelvan, P Thangavelu

    2006-10-01

    An extracellular laccase was isolated and purified from Pleurotus sajor-caju grown in submerged culture in a bioreactor, and used to investigate its ability to decolorize three azo dyes. The extracellular laccase production was enhanced up to 2.5-fold in the medium amended with xylidine (1 mM). Purification was carried out using ammonium sulfate (70% w/v), DEAE-cellulose, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The enzyme was purified up to 10.3-fold from the initial protein preparation with an overall yield of 53%. The purified laccase was monomeric with an apparent molecular mass of 61.0 kDa. The purified enzyme exerted its optimal activity with 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS) and oxidized various lignin-related phenols. The catalytic efficiencies kcat/Km determined for ABTS and syringaldazine were 9.2x10(5) and 8.7x10(5), respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for the purified enzyme was 5.0 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Sodium azide completely inhibited the laccase activity. The absorption spectrum revealed type 1 and type 3 copper signals. The purified enzyme decolorized azo dyes such as acid red 18, acid Black 1, and direct blue 71 up to 90, 87, and 72%, respectively. Decolorization ability of P. sajor-caju laccase suggests that this enzyme could be used for decolorization of industrial effluents.

  15. Faster chitosan production by mucoralean strains in submerged culture Rápida produção de quitosana por linhagens de Mucorales em cultura submersa

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    Rosa Valéria da Silva Amorim

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Production of chitosan was conducted using two Mucoralean strains, Mucor racemosus and Cunninghamella elegans. Chitosan was extracted from mycelia of M. racemosus and C. elegans at different growth phases on YPD medium. In both fungi, chitosan was rapidly produced, while highest yield of extractable chitosan was found in 24h of cultivation in submerged culture. The yield of chitosan isolated from dry mycelia of M. racemosus was about 40% higher than from C. elegans. The degree of N-acetylation of chitosan was 49% in M. racemosus and 20% in C. elegans, and the D-glucosamine contents were about 48% and 90%, respectively.A produção microbiológica da quitosana foi realizada usando-se duas linhagens de Mucorales, Mucor racemosus and Cunninghamella elegans. Quitosana foi extraída a partir dos micélios de M. racemosus e C. elegans em diferentes fases de crescimento em meio YPD. Para ambos os fungos, quitosana foi rapidamente produzida, com rendimentos de quitosana mais elevados após 24h de cultivo em cultura submersa. O rendimento de quitosana isolada a partir de micélio seco de M. racemosus foi cerca de 40% maior do que de C. elegans. O grau de N-acetilação da quitosana foi 49% em M. racemosus e 20% em C. elegans, e os conteúdos de D-glicosamina foram cerca de 48 and 90%, respectivamente.

  16. Single Cell Protein Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using an Optimized Culture Medium Composition in a Batch Submerged Bioprocess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarjaribi, Mehrnoosh; Ardestani, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae PTCC5269 growth was evaluated to specify an optimum culture medium to reach the highest protein production. Experiment design was conducted using a fraction of the full factorial methodology, and signal to noise ratio was used for results analysis. Maximum cell of 8.84 log (CFU/mL) was resulted using optimized culture composed of 0.3, 0.15, 1, and 50 g L(-1) of ammonium sulfate, iron sulfate, glycine, and glucose, respectively at 300 rpm and 35 °C. Glycine concentration (39.32 % contribution) and glucose concentration (36.15 % contribution) were determined as the most effective factors on the biomass production, while Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth had showed the least dependence on ammonium sulfate (5.2 % contribution) and iron sulfate (19.28 % contribution). The most interaction was diagnosed between ammonium sulfate and iron sulfate concentrations with interaction severity index of 50.71 %, while the less one recorded for glycine and glucose concentration was equal to 8.12 %. An acceptable consistency of 84.26 % was obtained between optimum theoretical cell numbers determined by software of 8.91 log (CFU/mL), and experimentally measured one at optimal condition confirms the suitability of the applied method. High protein content of 44.6 % using optimum culture suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a good commercial case for single cell protein production.

  17. Characterisation and bioactivity of protein-bound polysaccharides from submerged-culture fermentation of Coriolus versicolor Wr-74 and ATCC-20545 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Goh, Kelvin Kim Tha; Archer, Richard; Singh, Harjinder

    2007-05-01

    The protein-bound polysaccharides of Coriolus versicolor (CPS) have been reported to stimulate overall immune functions against cancers and various infectious diseases by activating specific cell functions. A New Zealand isolate (Wr-74) and a patented strain (ATCC-20545) of C. versicolor were compared in this study. The fruit bodies of both strains were grown for visual verification. Both strains were grown in submerged-culture using an airlift fermentor with milk permeate as the base medium supplemented with glucose, yeast extract and salt. Metabolic profiles of both strains obtained over 7-day fermentation showed very similar trends in terms of biomass production (8.9-10.6 mg/ml), amounts of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) from the culture medium (1150-1132 microg/ml), and intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) from the mycelium (80-100 microg/ml). Glucose was the dominant sugar in both EPS and IPS, and the polymers each consisted of three molecular weight fractions ranging from 2 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(3 )Da. Both the EPS and IPS were able to significantly induce cytokine production (interleukin 12 and gamma interferon) in murine splenocytes in vitro. Highest levels of interleukin 12 (291 pg/ml) and gamma interferon (6,159 pg/ml) were obtained from samples containing Wr-74 IPS (0.06 microg/ml) and ATCC 20545 IPS (0.1 microg/ml), respectively. The results indicated that lower levels of EPS and IPS generally resulted in higher immune responses than did higher polymer concentrations.

  18. Oyster Fisheries App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Guerrero, Geraldo A.; Armstrong, Duane; Underwood, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This project is creating a cloud-enabled, HTML 5 web application to help oyster fishermen and state agencies apply Earth science to improve the management of this important natural and economic resource. The Oyster Fisheries app gathers and analyzes environmental and water quality information, and alerts fishermen and resources managers about problems in oyster fishing waters. An intuitive interface based on Google Maps displays the geospatial information and provides familiar interactive controls to the users. Alerts can be tailored to notify users when conditions in specific leases or public fishing areas require attention. The app is hosted on the Amazon Web Services cloud. It is being developed and tested using some of the latest web development tools such as web components and Polymer.

  19. Effect of air exposure on lysosomal tissues of Mytilus edulis L. from natural intertidal wild beds and submerged culture ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, M; Broeg, K; Wilhelm, C; Buchholz, C; Koehler, A

    2012-03-01

    Blue mussels collected from suspended culture ropes and from three natural intertidal wild beds from different areas of the German Bight were tested for their ability to cope with hypoxic conditions. During the experiment mussels were exposed to air from 0 to 72h. Mussels from all sampling sites displayed high tolerance to aerial exposure with moderate levels of mortality after 12 to 48h of exposure. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), a biomarker of general stress, changed notably between minimum values after 12h and maximum values after 24h of aerial exposure in intertidal mussels. In contrast, labilization times of mussels from the hanging culture increased continuously up to 48h of exposure. Intertidal mussels from the island of Heligoland exhibited significantly decreased membrane stability after 72h of air exposure, correlating to higher mortality rates. Intertidal mussels, although adapted to daily aerial exposure in their natural environment, showed a similar pattern of mortality and lower LMS values during the experiment than mussels from the suspended culture site. The increase of LMS values of mussels under hypoxic conditions at the beginning of the experiment at all sites was tested for the influence of macro-autophagic processes using immune labelling techniques. With this approach it could be demonstrated that high LMS values significantly correlate with low autophagic activity. However, hypoxic conditions do not enhance autophagic processes during the early periods of aerial exposure. Only at the end of the experiment, high values for autophagy were measured in mussels from an intertidal site accompanied with high mortalities. The results indicate that autophagic processes are not involved in the early adaptive processes that enable the mussel to cope with periods of aerial exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Submerged monoxenic culture of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae in an internal-loop airlift bioreactor using two configurations of the inner tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría-Hernández, Norberto; Sanjuan-Galindo, René; Rodríguez-Pastrana, Blanca-Rosa; Medina-Torres, Luis; Rodríguez-Hernández, Adriana-Inés

    2007-09-01

    This article reports the submerged culture of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae and its symbiotic bacterium, Xenorhabdus nematophila, within an internal-loop airlift bioreactor. Two configurations of the inner cylinder were tested: a standard draft tube (SDT) and a static mixer (SM), as well as two production media: MP1 (500 mL/L whey, among other ingredients) and MP2 (82 mL/L agave-juice from Agave spp., among other ingredients). Three fermentations were carried out: F1 --> SDT-MP1, F2 --> SM-MP1 and F3 --> SM-MP2. The operating conditions were expressed on the basis of dimensionless Reynolds number (Re) and volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a), both of them determined on riser and downcomer sections within the bioreactor. The experiments began with fewer than 1,000 infective juvenile nematode stages (IJ) per mL and at t = 20 d, they achieved (nematodes/mL-%IJ) 222,000-87%, 62,200-23% and 114,600-80%, within F1, F2 and F3 experiments, respectively. Nonetheless, the achieved maximum nematode biomass concentrations (g/L) were F1 --> 408, F2 --> 557 and F3 --> 613, and occurred at t = 16, 10 and 12 d, respectively. The fermentation operating conditions involved 0.042 (-) < Re < 647 (-) and 2.8 x 10(-4) s(-1) < k(L)a < 0.0447 s(-1), as functions of 0.004 m/s < superficial gas velocity (within the riser) < 0.079 m/s, 0.001 m/s < mean downcomer velocity < 0.014 m/s, and culture broth rheological properties which evolved from nearly the Newtonian behaviour to the pseudoplastic one. The maximum IJ concentration was achieved within F1 experiment (193,406 IJ/mL). Also, fermentation conditions involving higher riser-Re and lower downcomer-Re as well as higher nutriment concentrations in culture medium, promote higher nematode biomass concentrations but lower %IJ, maybe as a result of better conditions for the nematode population development.

  1. Efficient Accumulation and In Vitro Antitumor Activities of Triterpene Acids from Submerged Batch--Cultured Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Ding, Zhong-Yang; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Gao-Qiang; Zhou, Guo-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Triterpene acids are among the major bioactive constituents of lucidum. However, submerged fermentation techniques for isolating triterpene acids from G. lucidum have not been optimized for commercial use, and the antitumor activity of the mycelial triterpene acids needs to be further proven. The aim of this work was to optimize the conditions for G. lucidum culture with respect to triterpene acid production, scaling up the process, and examining the in vitro antitumor activity of mycelial triterpene acids. The key conditions (i.e., initial pH, fermentation temperature, and rotation speed) were optimized using response surface methodology, and the in vitro antitumor activity was evaluated using the MTT method. The optimum key fermentation conditions for triterpene acid production were pH 6.0; rotation speed, 161.9 rpm; and temperature, 30.1°C, resulting in a triterpene acid yield of 291.0 mg/L in the validation experiment in a 5-L stirred bioreactor; this yield represented a 70.8% increase in titer compared with the nonoptimized conditions. Furthermore, the optimized conditions were then successfully scaled up to a production scale of 200 L, and a triterpene productivity of 47.9 mg/L/day was achieved, which is, to our knowledge, the highest reported in the large-scale fermentation of G. lucidum. In addition, the mycelial triterpene acids were found to be cytotoxic to the SMMC-7721 and SW620 cell lines in vitro. Chemical analysis showed that the key active triterpene acid compounds, ganoderic acids T and Me, predominated in the extract, at 69.2 and 41.6 mg/g, respectively. Thus, this work develops a simple and feasible batch fermentation technique for the large-scale production of antitumor triterpene acids from G. lucidum.

  2. Dangerous Raw Oysters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-05

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch at the California Department of Public Health, discusses the dangers of eating raw oysters.  Created: 8/5/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/7/2013.

  3. Growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. Fr.) Kumm (oyster mushroom) on different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmay, Zenebe; Gorems, Weldesemayat; Birhanu, Getachew; Zewdie, Solomon

    2016-12-01

    Mushroom cultivation is reported as an economically viable bio-technology process for conversion of various lignocellulosic wastes. Given the lack of technology know-how on the cultivation of mushroom, this study was conducted in Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resource, with the aim to assess the suitability of selected substrates (agricultural and/or forest wastes) for oyster mushroom cultivation. Accordingly, four substrates (cotton seed, paper waste, wheat straw, and sawdust) were tested for their efficacy in oyster mushroom production. Pure culture of oyster mushroom was obtained from Mycology laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University. The pure culture was inoculated on potato dextrose agar for spawn preparation. Then, the spawn containing sorghum was inoculated with the fungal culture for the formation of fruiting bodies on the agricultural wastes. The oyster mushroom cultivation was undertaken under aseptic conditions, and the growth and development of mushroom were monitored daily. Results of the study revealed that oyster mushroom can grow on cotton seed, paper waste, sawdust and wheat straw, with varying growth performances. The highest biological and economic yield, as well as the highest percentage of biological efficiency of oyster mushroom was obtained from cotton seed, while the least was from sawdust. The study recommends cotton seed, followed by paper waste as suitable substrates for the cultivation of oyster mushroom. It also suggests that there is a need for further investigation on various aspects of oyster mushroom cultivation in Ethiopia to promote the industry.

  4. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    29(1): 1-6. Fraile ER, Bernardinelli SE, Handel M, Jauregui AM (1978). Selección de cepas de Mucor sp productoras de enzimas coagulantes de leche. Rev. Arg. Microbiol. 10(2): 65-69. Ghareib M, Hamdy HS, Khalil AA (2001). Production of intracellular milk clotting enzyme in submerged cultures of Fusarium subglutinans.

  5. Production of extracellular aspartic protease in submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal milk-clotting enzymes have gained value as bovine Chymosin substitutes in the cheese industry. In this work, the effects of culture conditions on the production of extracellular milk clotting enzymes from Mucor mucedo DSM 809 in submerged fermentation were studied. The maximum activity was observed after 48 h ...

  6. Macrofauna Settlement on Pearl Oyster Collectors in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in pearl culture in the Western Indian Ocean ... West Indian Ocean. These include the settlement of mangrove oyster, Saccostrea cucullata within the intertidal zone in Kenya (Van Someren and. Whitehead ..... Abundance of different species/taxa (mean±SE) identified from black plastic sheet collectors deployed.

  7. High protein complementation with high fiber substrates for oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural residues have been world widely accepted for oyster mushroom culture. In this study, we used wheat straw, barley straw, maize stem residue, and lawn residue as substrates coupled with wheat bran, rice bran and soybean powder as complements for the growth of Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus ostreatus as ...

  8. Detection of poliovirus type 2 in oysters by using cell culture and RT-PCR Detecção de poliovírus tipo 2 em ostras através de cultura celular e RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília E.B. Vinatea

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish are readily contaminated with viruses present in water containing sewage due to the concentrating effect of filter feeding. Enteroviruses are generally used as a model for the detection of viruses from shellfish due to their public health significance. In the present work, oysters were placed in glass aquaria containing seawater plus unicellular algae. Two experiments were performed: 1 oysters bioaccumulating four different poliovirus type 2 concentrations: 5 x 10(4, 2.5 x 10(4, 5 x 10³ and 5 x 10² PFU/mL during 20h; 2 oyster tissues directly inoculated with 6.0 x 10(5 and 1.0 x 10(5 PFU/mL. After viruses seeding, tissue samples were processed by an adsorption-elution-precipitation method. Positive controls were performed by seeding 6.0 x 10(5 PFU/mL of poliovirus type 2 directly on the final oyster tissue extracts. Oyster extracts were assayed for viruses recovery by plaque assay, RT-PCR and integrated cell culture-PCR methodologies (ICC/PCR. The last one was based on the inoculation of the samples onto VERO cell monolayer followed by RT-PCR analysis of the infected cell fluid. In the first experiment (20h bioaccumulation until 5 x 10³ PFU were detected after 24 and 48h growth on VERO cells. Direct RT-PCR and ICC/PCR were able to detect 3 and 0.04 PFU of poliovirus, respectively, when bioaccumulation assay was used. When direct tissue virus seeding was performed, the plaque assays showed that polioviruses were recovered in all tested concentrations. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that viable polioviruses can be detected in oysters after bioaccumulation and these techniques can be directly applied for monitoring virus contamination in environmental samples.Devido ao hábito alimentar filtrante, os moluscos bivalves são contaminados por vírus presentes em águas contaminadas por esgoto. Os enterovírus são geralmente usados como modelos para a detecção de vírus em moluscos bivalves devido a sua import

  9. Cars submerged in water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Crashes in which cars are submerged in deep water or in a ditch are often complicated and serious. Considering their severity and the fact that approximately half the fatalities in this crash type are not due to drowning but to injury, preventive measures are to be preferred above measures that have

  10. Distribution of Georgia Oyster Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The feature class in this ESRI Geodatabase contains polygons representing oyster reefs along the Georgia coastal waterways from Chatham County south to Glynn County....

  11. Production of biomass, polysaccharides, and ganoderic acid using non-conventional carbon sources under submerged culture of the Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.)P. Karst. (higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Paola; Rojas, Diego; Atehortúa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different non-conventional carbon sources was studied in the submerged culture of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, for simultaneous production of mycelial biomass, bioactive ganoderic acid, and polysaccharides, in less time, using non-conventional carbon sources to minimize the high costs of current culture media. The optimal medium composition was defined as (g/L): 50 of barley flour, 0.2 of KH2PO4, 0.1 of MgSO4ⁱ7H2O, and 1 NH4Cl. Cultivated under this complex culture medium, the mycelial biomass production was 23.49 ± 0.37 g/L; the extracellular polysaccharides production was 2.72 ± 0.11 g/L; the intracellular polysaccharides production was 2.22 ± 0.06 g/L; the ganoderic acids production was 299.67 ± 11.63 mg/L. One liter of culture medium developed in this project was priced at USD $ 0.11 if barley flour is used as carbon source or $ 0.13 with oat flour in order to get a good amount of products of interest.

  12. Radiation resistances and decontamination of common pathogenic bacteria contaminated in white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thupila, Nunticha; Ratana-arporn, Pattama; Wilaipun, Pongtep

    2011-07-01

    In Thailand, white scar oyster ( Crassostrea belcheri) was ranked for premium quality, being most expensive and of high demand. This oyster is often eaten raw, hence it may pose health hazards to consumers when contaminated with food-borne pathogens. As limited alternative methods are available to sterilize the oyster while preserving the raw characteristic, irradiation may be considered as an effective method for decontamination. In this study, the radiation resistance of pathogenic bacteria commonly contaminating the oyster and the optimum irradiation doses for sterilization of the most radiation resistant bacteria were investigated. The radiation decimal reduction doses ( D10) of Salmonella Weltevreden DMST 33380, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802 and Vibrio vulnificus DMST 5852 were determined in broth culture and inoculated oyster homogenate. The D10 values of S. Weltevreden, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth culture were 0.154, 0.132 and 0.059 kGy, while those of inoculated oyster homogenate were 0.330, 0.159 and 0.140 kGy, respectively. It was found that among the pathogens tested, S. Weltevreden was proved to be the most resistant species. An irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy reduced the counts of 10 5 CFU/g S. Weltevreden inoculated in oyster meat to an undetectable level. The present study indicated that a low-dose irradiation can improve the microbial quality of oyster and further reduce the risks from the food-borne pathogens without adversely affecting the sensory attributes.

  13. Oyster investigations in the Northumberland Strait Region of New Brunswick. Vol.1 The nature of the growing area and the distribution of oysters: Études relatives aux huîtres dans la region du détroit de Northumberland. : Vol.1 Étude de la distribution des huîtres et de certains paramétres dans les zones de culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bacon, G.B

    1977-01-01

    .... In essence RPC was commissionned to investigate, on a comparative basis, hydrographic conditions, water chemistry, substrate characteristics, plankton assemblages and oyster populations in Bay du Vin...

  14. Persistence of caliciviruses in artificially contaminated oysters during depuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, You; Shoji, Mika; Suto, Atsushi; Tanabe, Toru; Okimura, Yoko; Kikuchi, Yoshihiko; Saito, Noriyuki; Sano, Daisuke; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-09-01

    The fate of calicivirus in oysters in a 10-day depuration was assessed. The norovirus gene was persistently detected from artificially contaminated oysters during the depuration, whereas feline calicivirus in oysters was promptly eliminated. The prolonged observation of norovirus in oysters implies the existence of a selective retention mechanism for norovirus within oysters.

  15. Persistence of Caliciviruses in Artificially Contaminated Oysters during Depuration▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ueki, You; Shoji, Mika; Suto, Atsushi; Tanabe, Toru; Okimura, Yoko; Kikuchi, Yoshihiko; Saito, Noriyuki; Sano, Daisuke; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    The fate of calicivirus in oysters in a 10-day depuration was assessed. The norovirus gene was persistently detected from artificially contaminated oysters during the depuration, whereas feline calicivirus in oysters was promptly eliminated. The prolonged observation of norovirus in oysters implies the existence of a selective retention mechanism for norovirus within oysters.

  16. Persistence of Caliciviruses in Artificially Contaminated Oysters during Depuration▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, You; Shoji, Mika; Suto, Atsushi; Tanabe, Toru; Okimura, Yoko; Kikuchi, Yoshihiko; Saito, Noriyuki; Sano, Daisuke; Omura, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    The fate of calicivirus in oysters in a 10-day depuration was assessed. The norovirus gene was persistently detected from artificially contaminated oysters during the depuration, whereas feline calicivirus in oysters was promptly eliminated. The prolonged observation of norovirus in oysters implies the existence of a selective retention mechanism for norovirus within oysters. PMID:17630304

  17. Submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms: bioprocesses and products (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms belonging to higher Basidiomycetes are an immensely rich yet largely untapped resource of useful, easily accessible, natural compounds with various biological activities that may promote human well-being. The medicinal properties are found in various cellular components and secondary metabolites (polysaccharides, proteins and their complexes, phenolic compounds, polyketides, triterpenoids, steroids, alkaloids, nucleotides, etc.), which have been isolated and identified from the fruiting bodies, culture mycelium, and culture broth of mushrooms. Some of these compounds have cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, antitumor, immunomodulating, antimicrobial, and antiviral activities ready for industrial trials and further commercialization, while others are in various stages of development. Recently, the submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms has received a great deal of attention as a promising and reproducible alternative for the efficient production of mushroom mycelium and metabolites. Submerged cultivation of mushrooms has significant industrial potential, but its success on a commercial scale depends on increasing product yields and development of novel production systems that address the problems associated with this technique of mushroom cultivation. In spite of many researchers' efforts for the production of bioactive metabolites by mushrooms, the physiological and engineering aspects of submerged cultures are still far from being thoroughly studied. The vast majority of studies have focused on polysaccharide and ganoderic acid production in submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms, and very little has been written so far on the antioxidant and hemagglutinating activity of submerged mushroom cultures. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the present state of the art and future prospects of submerged cultivation of medicinal mushrooms to produce mycelium and bioactive metabolites, and to make a

  18. Long-term spatiotemporal trends and health risk assessment of oyster arsenic levels in coastal waters of northern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Lifei; Jia, Xiaoping; Jackson, Donald A

    2017-09-01

    Long-term spatiotemporal trends and health risk assessment of oyster arsenic levels in the coastal waters of northern South China Sea were investigated in order to help improve the quality and safety control and sustainable aquaculture for mollusks in China. Cultured oysters (Crassostrea rivularis) collected from the waters of 23 bays, harbors, and estuaries along the coast of northern South China Sea from 1989 to 2012 were examined for spatial patterns and long-term temporal trends of oyster arsenic levels. Single-factor index and health risk assessment were used to quantify arsenic exposure to human health through oyster consumption. Overall, arsenic was detected in 97.4% of the oyster samples, and oyster arsenic levels were non-detectable-2.51 mg/kg with an average of 0.63 ± 0.54 mg/kg. Oyster arsenic levels in the coastal waters of northern South China Sea showed an overall decline from 1989 to 2012, remained relatively low since 2005, and slightly increased after 2007. Oyster arsenic levels in Guangdong coastal waters were much higher with more variation than in Guangxi and Hainan coastal waters, and the long-term trends of oyster arsenic levels in Guangdong coastal waters dominated the overall trends of oyster arsenic levels in the coastal waters of northern South China Sea. Within Guangdong Province, oyster arsenic levels were highest in east Guangdong coastal waters, followed by the Pearl River estuary and west Guangdong coastal waters. Single-factor index ranged between 0.27 and 0.97, and average health risk coefficient was 3.85 × 10 -5 , both suggesting that oyster arsenic levels in northern South China Sea are within the safe range for human consumption. However, long-term attention should be given to seafood market monitoring in China and the risk of arsenic exposure to human health through oyster consumption.

  19. The depuration dynamics of oysters (Crassostrea gigas artificially contaminated with hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Abreu Corrêa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the country of Brazil, Santa Catarina is a major shellfish producer. Detection of viral contamination is an important step to ensure production quality and consumer safety during this process. In this study, we used a depuration system and ultraviolet (UV disinfection to eliminate viral pathogens from artificially infected oysters and analysed the results. Specifically, the oysters were contaminated with hepatitis A virus (HAV or human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5. After viral infection, the oysters were placed into a depuration tank and harvested after 48, 72 and 96 h. After sampling, various oyster tissues were dissected and homogenised and the viruses were eluted with alkaline conditions and precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The oyster samples were evaluated by cell culture methods, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative-PCR. Moreover, at the end of the depuration period, the disinfected seawater was collected and analysed by PCR. The molecular assays showed that the HAdV5 genome was present in all of the depuration time samples, while the HAV genome was undetectable after 72 h of depuration. However, viral viability tests (integrated cell culture-PCR and immunofluorescence assay indicated that both viruses were inactivated with 96 h of seawater recirculation. In conclusion, after 96 h of UV treatment, the depuration system studied in this work purified oysters that were artificially contaminated with HAdV5 and HAV.

  20. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Submerged vanes are airfoils which are in general placed at certain angle with respect to the flow direction in a channel to induce artificial circulations downstream. By virtue of these artificially generated circulations, submerged vanes were utilized to protect banks of rivers against erosion, to control shifting of rivers, to avoid ...

  1. Optimization of submerged vane parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Sharma

    velocities simulated from CFD using standard k-x model were very much in accordance with what it was measured by Wang and Odgaard [4]. Thus, model can be used to study the turbulence characteristics around submerged vanes and to predict various parameters downstream of the submerged vanes. After the model ...

  2. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  3. An outbreak of norovirus infection linked to oyster consumption at a UK restaurant, February 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kenneth; Morris, Jill; McCarthy, Noel; Saldana, Luisa; Lowther, James; Collinson, Andrew; Young, Michael

    2011-06-01

    We present the investigation of an outbreak of gastroenteritis at a UK restaurant incorporating both epidemiological and microbiological analysis. Structured postal questionnaires were sent to 30 diners who ate at the restaurant during the outbreak period (5-7 February 2010). Stool specimens collected from staff and diners were submitted for bacterial culture and norovirus testing, and 15 Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from the batch served during the outbreak period were tested for norovirus. A strong association was observed between illness and oyster consumption (odds ratio undefined, confidence interval: 11.7 to infinity, P = 0.00001). Multiple different sequences of norovirus RNA were present in both stool and oyster specimens, typical of a shellfish origin. Several contemporaneous norovirus outbreaks throughout the UK were linked to oysters, particularly, though not exclusively, those sourced from Carlingford Lough in Ireland (as in this study), which were subsequently withdrawn from distribution. Despite the risk to human health, there is significant uncertainty surrounding the quantitative correlation between oyster norovirus levels and consumer illness. Continued research should help further our understanding of this crucial correlation and identify ways in which viral depuration of oysters can be enhanced.

  4. Noroviruses in oysters from local markets and oyster farms in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittigul, Leera; Pombubpa, Kannika; Sukonthalux, Suntharee; Rattanatham, Tippawan; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and eighteen oyster samples collected from local markets and oyster farms in southern Thailand were examined for noroviruses (NoVs) and bacterial indicators of fecal contamination (fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli). Using a virus concentration procedure followed by RT-nested PCR, NoVs were detected in 38% of the samples. Oysters collected from oyster farms were found with NoVs at a higher detection rate (25/53 samples) than oysters from local markets (20/65 samples). Of the 45 NoV-positive oyster samples, 67% belonged to NoV genogroup I (GI), 15% to GII, and 18% to both GI and GII. DNA sequencing showed that 2 NoVs belonged to NoV GI-2 genotype. Fecal coliforms in NoV-positive oyster samples were in the range of oyster samples contained fecal coliforms within the standard acceptable level of raw shellfish (oyster samples were within acceptable levels of E. coli contamination (oysters obtained from both markets and oyster farms might pose a potential risk of acute gastroenteritis associated with raw oyster consumption. Examination for both fecal bacterial indicators and enteric viruses should be conducted for microbiological food safety of shellfish.

  5. Kinds of nucleus for effective pearl cultivation of the pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjanachatree, K.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Seeding is the most important aspect of pearl cultivation, and appropriate nucleus can determine the quality of a pearl : nacre secretion and accumulation around the nucleus. This affects harvest time, nucleus extrusion, survival rate of the pearl oysters and the production cost. In order to provide nuclei to substitute for those imported from China which are made from freshwater pearl oyster-shells, 3 kinds of the local shells of Pinctada fucata, Pteria penguin and Pinctada maxima were selected for seed production. The obtained nuclei have various diameters depend on the shell width at the hinge region. The average diameters are 5.44, 6.78, 7.54 and 6.10 mm, while their production costs are 5, 7.7, 18.5 and 7.5 baht per 1 nucleus, respectively, for Pinctada fucata, Pteria penguin, Pinctada maxima and freshwater pearl oysters (control group. After nucleus implantation into the gonad of culture pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata, and rearing in the sea, the obtained pearls using nuclei made from the shells of Pinctada fucata and Pinctada maxima (both belong to the same genus as the implanted culture pearl oysters have as good nacre formation as that from freshwater pearl oysters. In contrast, the pearl production using nuclei made from Pteria penguin-shells have significantly worse nacre formation. Survival rate of the culture oysters seeded with nuclei made from Pinctada fucata-shells is highest at 47%, nucleus extrusion 8% only, and harvest rate 31%; while with Pinctada maxima-shells, these values are 38%, 17.5% and 14%, respectively. So the nuclei made from local Pinctada fucata-shells are appropriate for pearl cultivation and are comparable to imported nuclei. Although the obtained pearls are small, the nuclei made from Pinctada fucata-shells have low cost, low nucleus extrusion and high productivity.

  6. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable

  7. Application of Next-Generation Sequencing to Evaluate the Profile of Noroviruses in Pre- and Post-Depurated Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Saiki; Haruna, Mika; Goshima, Tomoko; Kanezashi, Hiromi; Okada, Tsukasa; Akimoto, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    The development of procedures for the efficient removal or inactivation of noroviruses from contaminated oysters is of great interest in oyster production. However, there is a critical limitation for evaluating the depuration efficacy of presently available procedures, as no suitable cell culture system currently exists to cultivate noroviruses. Thus, we applied a next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique to characterize norovirus genotypes in pre- and post-depurated oysters. As a result, we revealed the diversity of noroviruses in pre- and post-depurated oysters. Although the applied depuration procedure could reduce the number of bacterial agents to the level recommended by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, no significant changes were observed in the detection rate and the proportion of norovirus group (G) I and GII genotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate the profile of noroviruses in pre- and post-depurated oysters, specifically with respect to norovirus removal, using NGS; the findings imply that the removal of noroviruses from oysters through depuration is not presently sufficient. Further studies are needed to develop a more suitable depuration procedure for removing and/or inactivating noroviruses from contaminated oysters.

  8. New Hampshire recreational oyster harvesters: profile, perceptions, and attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto B. Manalo; Bruce E. Lindsay; George E. Frick

    1992-01-01

    A survey of holders of a 1989 New Hampshire oyster-harvesting license revealed that recreational oyster harvesting is pursued mostly by older men. The 1988 closing of some parts of Great Bay to oyster harvesting resulted in license holders' taking one fewer trip and taking about six minutes longer to harvest one bushel of oysters in 1989. The average annual...

  9. 21 CFR 161.130 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... oysters are drained on a strainer or skimmer which has an area of not less than 300 square inches per... evenly over the draining surface of the skimmer and drained for not less than 5 minutes; or (ii) The... packing by draining a representative gallon of oysters on a skimmer of the dimensions and in the manner...

  10. Norovirus contamination found in oysters worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peter K C; Wong, Derek K K; Chung, Thomas W H; Lim, Wilina W L

    2005-08-01

    Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses) are recognized as major causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Outbreaks of norovirus gastroenteritis are often associated with consumption of oysters. In this study, oysters imported into Hong Kong from 11 countries over a 3-year period were screened by RT-PCR. Overall, 53 out of 507 (10.5%) samples were positive for norovirus-RNA, and a wide variety of strains were found. Two novel genetic clusters were detected, which could indicate novel human or animal norovirus strains. However, whether these two new clusters are of human or animal origin is not known. Thirteen outbreaks, in which oysters were implicated as the source of infection were investigated: Norovirus RNA sequences could be detected in oysters from six outbreaks, but only in one outbreak the strains isolated from patients and oysters matched (>98% homology). Therefore, RT-PCR was of use in detecting norovirus contamination of oysters implicated in an outbreak, but was less useful in demonstrating an actual molecular epidemiological link with human cases. It was shown that contamination by noroviruses could be demonstrated in oysters worldwide, and therefore oysters may serve as an important vehicle for introducing novel norovirus strains. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Alternative substrates for cultivating oyster mushrooms ( Pleurotus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat straw has generally been used as the main substrate for cultivating oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus); however, in South Africa it is becoming expensive for small-scale farmers to utilise. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to investigate the use of alternative, but suitable substrates for planting oyster ...

  12. The impact of suspended oyster farming on nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide production in a sub-tropical Australian estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Dirk V.; Welsh, David T.; Bennet, William W.; Meziane, Tarik; Hubas, Cédric; Nizzoli, Daniele; Ferguson, Angus J. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this study we quantified nitrate (NO3-) reduction (denitrification, anammox and DNRA) and N2O production in sediments and epibiont communities associated with Sydney Rock Oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) farming. In sediments beneath an active suspended oyster farm, DNRA accounted for 98% of NO3- reduction with rates of up to 169 ± 45 μmol N m-2 h-1. Much of this DNRA was fuelled by NO3- derived from nitrification. Reference sediments had significantly lower DNRA rates of 83.8 ± 28.2 μmol N m-2 h-1, however this constituted 96% of the sites total NO3- reduction. Fatty acid analysis showed that sediment organic matter was more labile in the oyster impacted sediments, facilitating subtle shifts in sediment oxygen demand which increased the Fe2+ availability with respect to the reference sediments. The difference in DNRA rate between the sites was attributed to autotrophic oxidation of soluble Fe2+ in sediments underlying the oyster cultures. DNRA was absent in the oyster shell epibiont communities and rates of anammox and denitrification were lower than in the sediments. Production of NH4+ from the oysters and their associated epibionts was larger than DNRA and reached a rate of 206.2 μmol N m-2 h-1. Nitrous oxide production rates were generally low compared to other aquaculture systems and the net flux of N2O for the combined oyster cultivation system (i.e. sediments plus epibionts) was negative, i.e. there was N2O consumption in the sediments beneath the oysters. Overall, subtropical suspended oyster farming systems favour inorganic N retention over N loss.

  13. Comparison of methods for detection of norovirus in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Saadbye, Peter; Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Nørrung, Birgit

    2007-03-20

    In the absence of culture methods for noroviruses, detection in foods relies on molecular techniques such as Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) on extracted viral RNA followed by PCR product confirmation by hybridisation and/or sequencing. However, in order to obtain a successful detection it is of great importance to remove the tissue inhibitors during the viral RNA extraction. To select the most efficient extraction procedure of oysters we have compared four protocols. A pool of digestive gland material from oyster samples was divided into 1.5 g portions and spiked with 10-fold dilutions of human faecal samples containing norovirus genogroup II. The samples were tested on three different occasions using four different sample treatment protocols. The protocols were assessed with regard to their ability to recover viral RNA and detect norovirus in spiked oysters and for their in-house reproducibility. One method using viral elution by a Mixer Mill Cell Disrupter resulted in a 10-fold better recovery than the other three protocols when an RT-seminested PCR (G2SKR/COG2F and G2SKR/G2SKF) detection approach was applied. Although less distinctive this was also the case when NoV was detected by a single round RT-PCR approach using the primers JV13i and JV12y. The second most efficient method was a method using chloroform extraction and polyethylene precipitation.

  14. Effects of heavy metals on the oyster (Crassostrea virginica at Mandinga Lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Guzmán-García

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mandinga Lagoon in the Mexican State of Veracruz is an important ecological zone that produces 32% of the oyster output in the state of Veracruz, the main oyster producer in Mexico. Samples of water, sediment, and oysters were collected in 2003 and 2004 to study heavy metal pollution. Metal concentrations were determined in water, soil, and oyster tissues from fresh and detoxified Crassostrea virginica, and histology samples were analyzed. Metal (Cr, Cd, and Pb concentrations in water were within the Mexican legal limits. The recorded values in sediments corresponded to those not producing biological effects (ERL. In the tissues, the highest concentrations corresponded to Pb, above 5.84 μgg-1 dry weight (d.w.; Cd was of 2.23 μgg-1 d.w., and Cr above 6 μgg-1 d.w. The metal levels detected in oysters exceeded the maximum permissible limits (MPL for Cd and Pb, and oysters were unable to eliminate the concentrations of the bioaccumulated metals during the detoxification stage. The histopathological analysis revealed lesions in the digestive gland, edema, atrophy of epithelia in the digestive tubules, the presence of brown vesicles, hemocytic reaction, and necrosis. During detoxification, a higher number of epithelia were observed in the tubules, as well as an increase in brown vesicles and hemocytic reaction. Forty seven percent of oysters presented histopathological lesions related to metal concentrations. It is important to monitor metal concentrations, to detect the source of pollution, andto evaluate the effects on organisms to establish culture areas and adequate criteria for the exploitation of such an important fishery resource. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 955-962. Epub 2009 December 01.

  15. Effects of heavy metals on the oyster (Crassostrea virginica) at Mandinga Lagoon, Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-García, X; Botello, A V; Martinez-Tabche, L; González-Márquez, H

    2009-12-01

    The Mandinga Lagoon in the Mexican State of Veracruz is an important ecological zone that produces 32% of the oyster output in the state of Veracruz, the main oyster producer in Mexico. Samples of water, sediment, and oysters were collected in 2003 and 2004 to study heavy metal pollution. Metal concentrations were determined in water, soil, and oyster tissues from fresh and detoxified Crassostrea virginica, and histology samples were analyzed. Metal (Cr, Cd, and Pb) concentrations in water were within the Mexican legal limits. The recorded values in sediments corresponded to those not producing biological effects (ERL). In the tissues, the highest concentrations corresponded to Pb, above 5.84 microgg(-1) dry weight (d.w.); Cd was of 2.23 microgg(-1) d.w., and Cr above 6 microgg(-1) d.w. The metal levels detected in oysters exceeded the maximum permissible limits (MPL) for Cd and Pb, and oysters were unable to eliminate the concentrations of the bioaccumulated metals during the detoxification stage. The histopathological analysis revealed lesions in the digestive gland, edema, atrophy of epithelia in the digestive tubules, the presence of brown vesicles, hemocytic reaction, and necrosis. During detoxification, a higher number of epithelia were observed in the tubules, as well as an increase in brown vesicles and hemocytic reaction. Forty seven percent of oysters presented histopathological lesions related to metal concentrations. It is important to monitor metal concentrations, to detect the source of pollution, andto evaluate the effects on organisms to establish culture areas and adequate criteria for the exploitation of such an important fishery resource.

  16. Composting-Like Conditions Are More Efficient for Enrichment and Diversity of Organisms Containing Cellulase-Encoding Genes than Submerged Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senta Heiss-Blanquet

    Full Text Available Cost-effective biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass depends on efficient degradation of the plant cell wall. One of the major obstacles for the development of a cost-efficient process is the lack of resistance of currently used fungal enzymes to harsh conditions such as high temperature. Adapted, thermophilic microbial communities provide a huge reservoir of potentially interesting lignocellulose-degrading enzymes for improvement of the cellulose hydrolysis step. In order to identify such enzymes, a leaf and wood chip compost was enriched on a mixture of thermo-chemically pretreated wheat straw, poplar and Miscanthus under thermophile conditions, but in two different set-ups. Unexpectedly, metagenome sequencing revealed that incubation of the lignocellulosic substrate with compost as inoculum in a suspension culture resulted in an impoverishment of putative cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes. However, mimicking composting conditions without liquid phase yielded a high number and diversity of glycoside hydrolase genes and an enrichment of genes encoding cellulose binding domains. These identified genes were most closely related to species from Actinobacteria, which seem to constitute important players of lignocellulose degradation under the applied conditions. The study highlights that subtle changes in an enrichment set-up can have an important impact on composition and functions of the microcosm. Composting-like conditions were found to be the most successful method for enrichment in species with high biomass degrading capacity.

  17. Production and partial characterization of alkaline polygalacturonase secreted by thermophilic Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 under submerged culture using pectin and corn steep liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Vicente Vieira de Andrade

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonase production by the thermophilic Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 cultivated in liquid cultures containing 0.5% (w/v apple pectin and supplemented with 0.3% (w/v corn steep liquor, reached its maximum after 36 hours with levels of 39 U.mL-1. The increase in apple pectin and corn steep liquor concentrations in the medium from 0.5 and 0.3%, respectively, to 0.65%, markedly affected the production of polygalacturonase, whose activity increased four times, reaching a maximum of 150.3 U.mL-1. Studies on polygalacturonase characterization revealed that the optimum temperature of this enzyme was between 60-70 °C. Thermostability profile indicated that the enzyme retained about 82 and 63% of its activity at 60 and 70 °C, respectively, after 2 hours of incubation. The optimum pH of the enzyme was found to be 10.0. After incubation of crude enzyme solution at room temperature for 2 hours at pH 8.0, a decrease of about 29% on its original activity was observed. At pH 10.0, the decrease was 25%.

  18. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Hao Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB and submerged culture mycelium (CM of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day. Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance.

  19. Drought and submergence tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hewei; Zhou, Yufan; Oksenberg, Nir; Ronald, Pamela

    2017-11-14

    The invention provides methods of genetically modified plants to increase tolerance to drought and/or submergence. The invention additionally provides plants having increased drought and/or submergence tolerance engineered using such methods.

  20. Tulane Virus as a Potential Surrogate To Mimic Norovirus Behavior in Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouaz, Najoua; Schaeffer, Julien; Farkas, Tibor; Le Pendu, Jacques; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2015-08-01

    Oyster contamination by noroviruses is an important health and economic problem. The present study aimed to compare the behaviors of Norwalk virus (the prototype genogroup I norovirus) and two culturable viruses: Tulane virus and mengovirus. After bioaccumulation, tissue distributions were quite similar for Norwalk virus and Tulane virus, with the majority of viral particles detected in digestive tissues, while mengovirus was detected in large amounts in the gills and mantle as well as in digestive tissues. The levels of persistence of all three viruses over 8 days were comparable, but clear differences were observed over longer periods, with Norwalk and Tulane viruses displaying rather similar half-lives, unlike mengovirus, which was cleared more rapidly. These results indicate that Tulane virus may be a good surrogate for studying norovirus behavior in oysters, and they confirm the prolonged persistence of Norwalk virus in oyster tissues. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Oyster Electrophysiology: Electrocardiogram Signal Recognition and Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After 100 years of published recording traces pertaining to the oyster electrocardiogram (ECG, we revisited the original experiments of Eiger (1913, using state-of-the-art electrophysiology recorders. Our aim was to confirm that a recordable ECG, similar to that of higher vertebrates, is present in the oyster heart. Portuguese oysters Crassostrea angulata, collected from the Guadiana estuary, Portugal, were used. The oysters were drilled through the right valve to reveal the pericardium. Gold and silver electrodes were placed through the hole and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. Stimulation of the oyster heart was performed in vivo and in vitro using a constant current power supply. Placement of electrodes around the heart revealed a trace that very closely matched the published ECG of Eiger (1913. However, we were unable to confirm that the recording was an ECG of the oyster heart. Moreover, measurements on isolated oyster hearts revealed a low conductivity (0.10 S m‒1. We did, however, record a depolarization signal from what we believe to be the visceral ganglia, and this preceded contractions of the oyster heart. Our findings indicate that so-called ECGs, previously recorded by [2] in Ostrea edulis, but also the “ECG” recorded by [4] in C. virginica from oyster hearts, are in fact an artifact arising from relative movement of the recording electrodes, giving rise to a baseline shift that mimics in some ways the P and QRS features of a typical ECG. Nevertheless, such recordings provide information pertaining to heart rate and are not without importance.

  2. Feeding traits of the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vismann, Bent

    2017-01-01

    with reduced RE (~35%). There were no differences in LTC between the two oysters. A closer examination of the relationship between LTC and different measures of the algae present (cell size, cell volume, chl a, C and N) suggests that the LTC, and also the CR, may depend in part on the internal energy status......Two oysters, the native flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, and the non-indigenous Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have partially overlapping distributions in European waters. Relatively little is known about particle selection by O. edulis, and the goal of the present study was to establish baselines...

  3. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L.; Le Guyader, Françoise S.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contamination levels were low and, surprisingly, oysters sampled directly from the producer were found to have less contamination than oysters from supermarkets. PMID:23973835

  4. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-09-02

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contamination levels were low and, surprisingly, oysters sampled directly from the producer were found to have less contamination than oysters from supermarkets. © 2013.

  5. Submerged membrane distillation for desalination of water

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2016-10-27

    Submerged membrane modules for use for desalination of water are disclosed. In one or more aspects, the membrane modules can be submerged either in a feed solution tank or the feed solution can pass through the lumen side of the membrane submerged within the tank. The feed solution can be a water-based feed stream containing an amount of salt.

  6. Comparison of methods for detection of norovirus in oysters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Saadbye, Peter; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of culture methods for noroviruses, detection in foods relies on molecular techniques such as Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) on extracted viral RNA followed by PCR product confirmation by hybridisation and/or sequencing. However, in order to obtain...... with I 0-fold dilutions of human faecal samples containing norovirus genogroup II. The samples were tested on three different occasions using four different sample treatment protocols. The protocols were assessed with regard to their ability to recover viral RNA and detect norovirus in spiked oysters...

  7. A Production Calendar Based on Water Temperature, Spat Size, and Husbandry Practices Reduce OsHV-1 μvar Impact on Cultured Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Ebro Delta (Catalonia), Mediterranean Coast of Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, Noèlia; Gairin, Ignasi; Pérez, Josu; Andree, Karl B; Roque, Ana; Fernández-Tejedor, Margarita; Rodgers, Chris J.; Aguilera, Cristobal; Furones, M. Dolors

    2017-01-01

    Since 2006, the production of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Ebro Delta area has dramatically declined from around 800 metric tons (MT) per year to 138 MT in 2011. This decline in production has had a significant socio-economic impact in a region where the shellfish sector is a traditional economic activity for many families. The identified agent responsible for this reduction in C. gigas production was Ostreid Herpesvirus microvar (OsHV-1 ?var), which has been associated with C. gig...

  8. Oyster Reef Projects 1997-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We used a quantitative sampling device to compare nekton use among high-relief live oyster reef, vegetated marsh edge Spartina alterniflora, and nonvegetated bottom...

  9. Survival of Salmonella Newport in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher M; Armstrong, Alexandra E; Evans, Sanford; Mild, Rita M; Langdon, Christopher J; Joens, Lynn A

    2011-08-02

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of laboratory-confirmed foodborne illness in the United States and raw shellfish consumption is a commonly implicated source of gastrointestinal pathogens. A 2005 epidemiological study done in our laboratory by Brands et al., showed that oysters in the United States are contaminated with Salmonella, and in particular, a specific strain of the Newport serovar. This work sought to further investigate the host-microbe interactions between Salmonella Newport and oysters. A procedure was developed to reliably and repeatedly expose oysters to enteric bacteria and quantify the subsequent levels of bacterial survival. The results show that 10 days after an exposure to Salmonella Newport, an average concentration of 3.7 × 10(3)CFU/g remains within the oyster meat, and even after 60 days there still can be more than 10(2)CFU/g remaining. However, the strain of Newport that predominated in the market survey done by Brands et al. does not survive within oysters or the estuarine environment better than any other strains of Salmonella we tested. Using this same methodology, we compared Salmonella Newport's ability to survive within oysters to a non-pathogenic strain of E. coli and found that after 10 days the concentration of Salmonella was 200-times greater than that of E. coli. We also compared those same strains of Salmonella and E. coli in a depuration process to determine if a constant 120 L/h flux of clean seawater could significantly reduce the concentration of bacteria within oysters and found that after 3 days the oysters retained over 10(4)CFU/g of Salmonella while the oysters exposed to the non-pathogenic strain of E. coli contained 100-times less bacteria. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that any of the clinically relevant serovars of Salmonella can survive within oysters for significant periods of time after just one exposure event. Based on the drastic differences in survivability between Salmonella and a non

  10. Sex determination: genetic models for oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    In oysters, sex is determined partly by environment, but previous studies employing controlled crosses suggest that genetic factors are also important. Sex ratios in both full- and half-sib families of the Pacific oyster show paternal control of sex ratio and suggest that a single major gene with 2 genotypes controls sex in the Pacific oyster, with FM oysters being male and FF oysters maturing as male or female. Here, we show that such a model does indeed produce a stable polymorphism for either single or multiple age-class populations, though under limited ranges of f, the probability that an FF individual matures as a female. However, this 2-genotype model cannot explain observed heterogeneity of sex ratios among progeny from different dams within half-sib families. We propose an alternative 3-genotype model that also produces a stable polymorphism, for either single or multiple age-class populations, but over all values of f between zero and one. This model accounts for sex ratio heterogeneity among male half-sib families because it features 2 types of females, a protandric FM and a fixed female FF. Furthermore, the 3-genotype model, accounts for the frequencies of mating types inferred from the observed sex ratios of families more closely than the 2-genotype model. Although the mechanism of sex determination may ultimately prove more complex, simple genetic mechanisms can account for the broad features of sexual maturation in oyster families and the stability of sex ratios in populations.

  11. Production of biodiesel from Chlorella sp. enriched with oyster shell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Cheol Soon; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the cultivation of the marine microalga Chlorella sp. without supplying an inorganic carbon source, but instead with enriching the media with extracts of oyster shells pretreated by a high-pressure homogenization process. The pretreated oyster shells were extracted by a weak acid, acetic acid, that typically has harmful effects on cell growth and also poses environmental issues. The concentration of the residual dissolved carbon dioxide in the medium was sufficient to maintain cell growth at 32 ppm and pH 6.5 by only adding 5% (v/v) of oyster shell extracts. Under this condition, the maximum cell density observed was 2.74 g dry wt./L after 27 days of cultivation. The total lipid content was also measured as 18.1 (%, w/w), and this value was lower than the 23.6 (%, w/w) observed under nitrogen deficient conditions or autotrophic conditions. The fatty acid compositions of the lipids were also measured as 10.9% of C16:1 and 16.4% of C18:1 for the major fatty acids, which indicates that the biodiesel from this culture process should be a suitable biofuel. These results suggest that oyster shells, environmental waste from the food industry, can be used as a nutrient and carbon source with seawater, and this reused material should be important for easily scaling up the process for an outdoor culture system.

  12. Production of Biodiesel from Chlorella sp. Enriched with Oyster Shell Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Soon Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the cultivation of the marine microalga Chlorella sp. without supplying an inorganic carbon source, but instead with enriching the media with extracts of oyster shells pretreated by a high-pressure homogenization process. The pretreated oyster shells were extracted by a weak acid, acetic acid, that typically has harmful effects on cell growth and also poses environmental issues. The concentration of the residual dissolved carbon dioxide in the medium was sufficient to maintain cell growth at 32 ppm and pH 6.5 by only adding 5% (v/v of oyster shell extracts. Under this condition, the maximum cell density observed was 2.74 g dry wt./L after 27 days of cultivation. The total lipid content was also measured as 18.1 (%, w/w, and this value was lower than the 23.6 (%, w/w observed under nitrogen deficient conditions or autotrophic conditions. The fatty acid compositions of the lipids were also measured as 10.9% of C16:1 and 16.4% of C18:1 for the major fatty acids, which indicates that the biodiesel from this culture process should be a suitable biofuel. These results suggest that oyster shells, environmental waste from the food industry, can be used as a nutrient and carbon source with seawater, and this reused material should be important for easily scaling up the process for an outdoor culture system.

  13. Oyster Mushroom as Cash-Crop Fungus Cultivated

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi, Ai Suminarti

    2017-01-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) is a fungus that much-loved by the community. In addition to the delicious, oyster mushrooms are also very beneficial to the health of the body. High nutritional content with a variety of essential amino acids contained in it, Oyster mushrooms also contain other compounds that are important for the medical aspects. It is easily cultivated and derives income as cash for the farmer. In nature, oyster mushrooms grow only in certain seasons in limited quanti...

  14. A PCR-based diagnostic assay for the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae in Crassostrea virginica affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, A.P.; Barber, B.J.; Boettcher, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a PCR-assay for the diagnosis of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) based on the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae directly from affected oysters. Species-specific primers are used to amplify the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of R. crassostreae, and confirmation of product identity is accomplished by restriction enzyme analysis. No false positives were obtained with either closely related bacterial species or from other DNAs present in oyster samples. The assay has the potential to detect as few as 10 cells of R. crassostreae per oyster when samples are taken from the inner valve surfaces of the animal. Inclusion of material from soft body surfaces is not necessary, and may reduce sensitivity approximately 10-fold. In a JOD-affected population, a positive PCR result was obtained from all oysters from which these bacteria were subsequently cultured. The assay also detected the presence of R. crassostreae in 2 oysters from which no R. crassostreae isolates were recovered. No R. crassostreae was detected by either PCR or bacteriology in oysters from a population that was not exhibiting JOD-signs. This assay is expected to advance regional disease management efforts and provide valuable insights into the disease process and epizootiology of JOD. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  15. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Norovirus Genogroup II Distribution in Sewage and Oysters: First Detection of GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 in Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jian; Kazama, Shinobu; Miura, Takayuki; Azraini, Nabila Dhyan; Konta, Yoshimitsu; Ito, Hiroaki; Ueki, You; Cahyaningrum, Ermaya Eka; Omura, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Toru

    2016-12-01

    Norovirus GII.3, GII.4, and GII.17 were detected using pyrosequencing in sewage and oysters in January and February 2015, in Japan. The strains in sewage and oyster samples were genetically identical or similar, predominant strains belonging to GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 lineage. This is the first report of GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 in oysters.

  16. Living oysters and their shells as sites of nitrification and denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jane M; Hollibaugh, James T; Mortazavi, Behzad

    2016-11-15

    Oysters provide a critical habitat, are a food resource for higher trophic levels and support important commercial fisheries throughout the world. Oyster reefs can improve water quality by removing phytoplankton. While sediment denitrification may be enhanced adjacent to oyster reefs, little is known about nitrification and denitrification associated with living oysters and their shells. We measured nitrification and denitrification in living oysters (Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea gigas) and empty oyster shells. Nitrification was similar between live oysters and empty oyster shells, however, denitrification was enhanced significantly on living oysters compared to shells. This is the first demonstration of nitrification and denitrification associated with living oysters and their shells. Our data suggest that loss of historic oyster reefs has likely affected the resilience of estuaries to eutrophication. The additional benefit of oyster mediated denitrification should be considered in restoration of oyster reefs as a tool for managing eutrophication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermal Inactivation of Enteric Viruses and Bioaccumulation of Enteric Foodborne Viruses in Live Oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araud, Elbashir; DiCaprio, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Lou, Fangfei; Gao, Yu; Kingsley, David; Hughes, John H; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-29

    Human enteric viruses are among the main causative agents of shellfish-associated outbreaks. In this study, the kinetics of viral bioaccumulation in live oysters and the heat stabilities of the predominant enteric viruses were determined both in tissue culture and in oyster tissues. A human norovirus (HuNoV) GII.4 strain, HuNoV surrogates (murine norovirus [MNV-1], Tulane virus [TV]), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and human rotavirus (RV) bioaccumulated to high titers within oyster tissues, with different patterns of bioaccumulation for the different viruses. We tested the thermal stability of each virus at 62, 72, and 80°C in culture medium. The viruses can be ranked from the most heat resistant to the least stable as follows: HAV, RV, TV, MNV-1. In addition, we found that oyster tissues provided protection to the viruses during heat treatment. To decipher the mechanism underlying viral inactivation by heat, purified TV was treated at 80°C for increasing time intervals. It was found that the integrity of the viral capsid was disrupted, whereas viral genomic RNA remained intact. Interestingly, heat treatment leading to complete loss of TV infectivity was not sufficient to completely disrupt the receptor binding activity of TV, as determined by the porcine gastric mucin-magnetic bead binding assay. Similarly, HuNoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and a HuNoV GII.4 strain retained some receptor binding ability following heat treatment. Although foodborne viruses have variable heat stability, 80°C for >6 min was sufficient to completely inactivate enteric viruses in oysters, with the exception of HAV. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Oyster condition index in Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828 from a heavy-metal polluted coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Rebelo

    Full Text Available The condition index (CI of oysters represents an ecophysiological approach to estimate meat quality and yield in cultured bivalve mollusks. In the present study, the CI of oysters from a heavy-metal polluted bay was analyzed with respect to Zn and Cd contamination in soft tissues, spawning, and polychaete infestation. The CI was calculated through a new technique based on molds made to measure the volume of oyster-shell internal cavities. The higher CI values (over 9 in the dry season were probably related availability of suspended particles rich in organic matter in the bay, while the rapid reduction in the CI from one season to the next at some stations suggests the effect of spawning. Polychaete infestation was considered low (18.7% and produced no clear CI effects. The Cd in the oyster tissue collected during the rainy season was weak, although still significantly correlated with the CI (r = -0.36; p < 0.05. All other comparisons of CI and metal concentrations demonstrated a non-significant correlation. The CI variations observed on the temporal and spatial scale were likely to have been caused by availability of organic matter and spawning, rather than spionid infestation or metal body burdens.

  19. Streptomyces effect on the bacterial microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bernal, M; Trabal Fernández, N; Saucedo Lastra, P E; Medina Marrero, R; Mazón-Suástegui, J M

    2017-03-01

    To determine the composition and diversity of the microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea treated during 30 days with Streptomyces strains N7 and RL8. DNA was extracted from oysters followed by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing. The highest and lowest species diversity richness was observed in the initial and final control group, whereas Streptomyces-treated oysters exhibited intermediate values. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (81·4-95·1%), followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The genera Anderseniella, Oceanicola, Roseovarius, Ruegeria, Sulfitobacter, Granulosicoccus and Marinicella encompassed the core microbiota of all experimental groups. The genus Bacteriovorax was detected in all groups except in the final control and the depurated N7, whereas Vibrio remained undetected in all Streptomyces-treated groups. RL8 was the only group that harboured the genus Streptomyces in its microbiota. Principal component analysis showed that Streptomyces strains significantly changed oyster microbiota with respect to the initial and final control. Crassostrea sikamea treated with Streptomyces showed high species diversity and a microbiota composition shift, characterized by keeping the predator genus Bacteriovorax and decreasing the pathogenic Vibrio. This is the first culture-independent study showing the effect of Streptomyces over the oyster microbiota. It also sheds light about the potential use of Streptomyces to improve mollusc health and safety for consumers after the depuration process. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Gametogenesis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a microarrays-based analysis identifies sex and stage specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Lelong, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Kellner, Kristell; Dubos, Marie-Pierre; Riviere, Guillaume; Boudry, Pierre; Favrel, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa) is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011) representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters. This study allowed us to identify potential markers of early sex

  1. Dredging related metal bioaccumulation in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedge, L H; Knott, N A; Johnston, E L

    2009-06-01

    Bivalves are regularly used as biomonitors of contaminants in coastal and estuarine waters. We used oysters to assess short term changes in metal availability caused by the resuspension of contaminated sediments. Sydney Rock Oysters, Saccostrea glomerata, were deployed at multiple sites in Port Kembla Harbour and two reference estuaries for 11weeks before dredging and for two equivalent periods during dredging. Saccostrea experienced large increases in accumulation of zinc, copper and tin during dredging in the Port relative to oysters deployed in reference estuaries. Lead and tin were found to be permanently elevated within Port Kembla. We present a clear and un-confounded demonstration of the potential for dredging activities to cause large scale increases in water column contamination. Our results also demonstrate the usefulness of external reference locations in overcoming temporal confounding in bioaccumulation studies.

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Associated with Consumption of Raw Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Ivan; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil; Vyas, Anix; Nookala, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram negative bacillus that is native to aquatic environments that is increasingly reported in humans. This case is remarkable for A. hydrophila with an initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain for two days. His past medical history was significant for alcohol abuse. Initial laboratory examination showed an elevated white blood cell count, elevated lipase, and elevated liver function tests (LFT). Computer tomography (CT) showed peripancreatic inflammatory changes and retroperitoneal free fluid, suggestive of acute pancreatitis. The patient was treated with intravenous (IV) fluids and IV meropenem. After two days, the patient developed sepsis and respiratory failure and was intubated. Blood cultures were positive for Aeromonas hydrophila sensitive to ciprofloxacin which was added to his treatment. Additionally, it was discovered that this patient had recently vacationed in Florida where he consumed raw oysters. He was discharged home on the eighth day of the hospital admission. Conclusion. This is a rare case of A. hydrophila sepsis in an elderly patient with acute pancreatitis and a history of consumption of raw oysters. This case suggests that A. hydrophila can cause disseminated infection in immunocompetent individuals.

  3. Growth rate, protein:RNA ratio and stoichiometric homeostasis of submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth rate hypothesis (GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of photoautotrophs have always been questioned. However, little is known about GRH and stoichiometric homeostasis of aquatic plants, especially submerged macrophytes. Therefore, we aim to test the GRH and explore stoichiometric homeostasis of four freshwater submerged macrophytes under eutrophication stress. At the single species level and the multi-species level, N:P ratios of Potamogeton maackianus, Myriophyllum spicatum, Vallisneria natans and Ceratophyllum demersum had no consistent trends with growth rates. However, protein:RNA ratios of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and V. natans all correlated negatively with growth rates, demonstrating GRH can apply to freshwater submerged macrophytes, even though they are threatening by eutrophication stress. Protein:RNA ratios positively correlated with N:P ratios in culture media and tissues in submerged macrophytes except in P. maackianus (30d, suggesting effects of varying N:P ratios in culture media on protein:RNA ratios are basically in concert with tissue N:P ratios under short-time eutrophication stress. Stoichiometric homeostasis coefficients (HN:P indicated submerged macrophytes have weak homeostasis. Stoichiometric homeostasis of V. natans was stronger than those of P. maackianus, M. spicatum and C. demersum. The differences in GRH and homeostasis of the four submerged macrophytes may be due to species traits.

  4. Directly measured denitrification reveals oyster aquaculture and restored oyster reefs remove nitrogen at comparable high rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for ecosystem functioning. Oyster restoration and aquaculture are both hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via benthic denitrification (DNF). However, this has...

  5. Oyster leases in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1997) [oyster_leases_USACE_1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set indicates the locations of oyster leases in Louisiana. The lease areas should be polygons, however, the source data has very poor topology including...

  6. Flow and scour around vertical submerged structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although past investigations establish the effect of various parameters on scour around vertical submerged structures for live and clear water condition, yet further studies are required to analyze the scour around group of submerged structures for various bed sediments, understand the flow physics around the group and ...

  7. Beneficial effects of the ethanol extract from the dry matter of a culture broth of Inonotus obliquus in submerged culture on the antioxidant defence system and regeneration of pancreatic beta-cells in experimental diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Yu; Sun, Jun-En; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dou, Wen-Fang; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2010-04-01

    The antihyperglycaemic and antilipidperoxidative effects of the ethanol extract from the dry matter of a culture broth (DMCB) of Inonotus obliquus were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice and the possible mechanism of action was also discussed. In alloxan-induced diabetic mice, treatment with the ethanol extract from DMCB of I. obliquus (30 and 60 mg kg(-1) body weight (b.w.) for 21 days) showed a significant decrease in blood glucose level: the percentage reductions on the 7th day were 11.54 and 11.15%, respectively. However, feeding of this drug for three weeks produced reduction of 22.51 and 24.32%. Furthermore, the ethanol extract from the DMCB of I. obliquus treatment significantly decreased serum contents of free fatty acids, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, whereas it effectively increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, insulin levels and hepatic glycogen contents in livers of diabetic mice. Besides this, the ethanol extracts from the DMCB treatment significantly increased catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, except for decreasing the maleic dialdehyde level in diabetic mice. Histological morphology examination showed that the ethanol extract from the DMCB of I. obliquus restored the damage of pancreatic tissues in mice with diabetes mellitus. The results showed that the ethanol extract from the DMCB of I. obliquus possesses significant antihyperglycaemic, antilipidperoxidative and antioxidant effects in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  8. Inactivation of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus during oyster fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Jina; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2014-12-01

    Fermented seafood is popular in Asian countries. This study examined the survival of feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) during oyster fermentation. Oysters spiked with FCV and MNV were fermented with 5% or 10% salt at 18 °C for 15 days, and MNV and FCV titers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations, pH, and enzymatic activity were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 days post-fermentation (DPF). Reductions in MNV and FCV were greater in 5% NaCl-supplemented oysters than in 10% NaCl-supplemented oysters. In 5% NaCl oysters, MNV and FCV titers significantly decreased by 1.60 log and 3.01 log, respectively, at 15 DPF. Populations of LAB increased from 3.62 log10 colony-forming units/g at 0 DPF to 8.77 log10 colony-forming units/g at 15 DPF during oyster fermentation supplemented with 5% NaCl supplementation, and the pH decreased gradually from 5.38 at 0 DPF to 4.17 at 15 DPF. During oyster fermentation, α-amylase, proteinase, and lipase were produced at higher levels in 5% salted oysters than in 10% salted oysters (P oysters could contribute to a reduction in foodborne viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of norovirus in oyster tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wu, Qingping; Kou, Xiaoxia; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Jumei

    2008-12-01

    To study the distribution of norovirus (NV) in oyster tissues. Five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against VP1 were selected from Balb/c mice. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to detect native NV in different tissues of artificially contaminated oysters using the MAbs. The data showed that the gills and the digestive glands are efficient tissues for accumulation of the NV. In addition, the NV was found on the cilia of the mantle after filtering. In our study, only NV RNA in the gills could be detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. NV was bioaccumulated in the gills, stomach, digestive diverticula and cilia of the mantle. Furthermore, the results suggested that the viral load of the gills and the digestive glands is heavier than that of the other tissues. This, to our knowledge, is the first paper to report the distribution of NV in oyster tissues by immunoassay after artificial contamination. Further understanding of the NV distribution in oyster may help us to sample appropriate tissues for detection of the virus.

  10. Improving biological efficiency of Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various crop residues can be used in producing Oyster mushrooms either as main substrates or in combinations with supplements. Yield response is determined by the type of crop residue and production practice used. Two factorial experiments were performed to evaluate the mycelium vigor and biological efficiency (BE) ...

  11. The role of phytoplankton in the modulation of dissolved and oyster cadmium concentrations in Deep Bay, British Columbia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassis, David, E-mail: dcassis@telus.net [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Lekhi, Priyanka [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Pearce, Christopher M. [Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC, Canada V9T 6N7 (Canada); Ebell, Nadene [Ministry of Agriculture, Nanaimo, BC, Canada V9T 6J9 (Canada); Orians, Kristin [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Maldonado, Maria T. [Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    We previously identified dissolved cadmium (Cd{sub diss}) as the main source of this metal in cultured Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in Deep Bay, British Columbia, Canada (Lekhi et al., 2008). Total suspended particulate Cd (Cd{sub part}) was not found to be a significant source of oyster Cd (Cd{sub oys}), with Cd{sub part} > 20 {mu}m negatively correlated with Cd{sub oys} concentration. High phytoplankton abundance in spring and summer was hypothesized to reduce Cd{sub oys} indirectly by drawing down Cd{sub diss} and increasing oyster growth. In the present study we expanded on these results by examining specifically how the phytoplankton community composition modulates both Cd{sub diss} and Cd{sub oys} concentrations in Deep Bay. Based on calculations of nutrients and Cd{sub diss} drawdown, phytoplankton accounted for approximately 90% of the overall summer reduction in Cd{sub diss} in the bay. Diatoms were the dominant phytoplankton group, being correlated negatively with Cd{sub oys} and positively with Cd{sub part}. This suggests that diatom growth mediates the transfer of Cd from the dissolved to the particulate phase, resulting in lower Cd{sub oys}. Spring blooms and sporadic harmful algal blooms may mediate a large flux of Cd{sub part} to the sediments. Thus, phytoplankton act as a sink, rather than a source, of Cd to oysters in Deep Bay and have a crucial role in the seasonality of Cd{sub oys} by reducing the concentration of Cd{sub diss} during the summer. Based on environmental variables, two descriptive models for annual Cd{sub oys} concentrations were developed using multiple linear regression. The first model (R{sup 2} = 0.870) was created to explain the maximum variability in Cd{sub oys} concentrations throughout the year, while the second (R{sup 2} = 0.806) was based on parameters that could be measured easily under farm conditions. Oyster age heavily affected both models, with the first model being secondarily affected by temperature and the

  12. Iodine Removal Efficiency in Non-Submerged and Submerged Self-Priming Venturi Scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Majid; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Zhongning; Gu, Haifeng; Wang, Junlong; Mehboob; Khurram [Harbin Engineering Univ., Harbin (China)

    2013-04-15

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I{sub 2}) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  13. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID ALI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3 in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2 from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions. In the non-submerged venturi scrubber, only the droplets take part in iodine removal efficiency. However, in a submerged venturi scrubber condition, the iodine gas is absorbed from gas to droplets inside the venturi scrubber and from bubbles to surrounding liquid at the outlet of a venturi scrubber. Experimentally, it is observed that the iodine removal efficiency is greater in the submerged venturi scrubber as compare to a non-submerged venturi scrubber condition. The highest iodine removal efficiency of 0.99±0.001 has been achieved in a submerged self-priming venturi scrubber condition. A mathematical correlation is used to predict the theoretical iodine removal efficiency in submerged and non-submerged conditions, and it is compared against the experimental results. The Wilkinson et al. correlation is used to predict the bubble diameter theoretically whereas the Nukiyama and Tanasawa correlation is used for droplet diameter. The mass transfer coefficient for the gas phase is calculated from the Steinberger and Treybal correlation. The calculated results for a submerged venturi scrubber agree well with experimental results but underpredicts in the case of the non-submerged venturi scrubber.

  14. Microbiological analysis and microbiota in oyster: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Liu, Z.; YShi; HH Ding

    2016-01-01

    Oyster, is a popular shellfish consumed globally. As a bivalve filter-feeding invertebrate mollusk, oyster harbors many microorganisms, which could eventually cause potential health risks of human. Microorganisms were correlated to oyster mortality, shelf life, spoilage, and foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Meanwhile, they could be adjusted by the preservative technologies in order to prolong the shelf life. With the development of molecular biological techniques, such as 16S Polyme...

  15. Levels of PCBs in Oysters Coming from Galicia Coast: Comparison to Mussels from the Same Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, N; García, I; Ignacio, M; Mouteira, A

    2016-05-01

    PCBs were analyzed in two species of oyster (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis) cultured in intertidal beds and rafts coming from the Galician Rías during the period 2011-2014. PCBs were also analyzed in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected in the same Rías during 2011. The main objective of this work is to investigate the distribution of PCBs in Galician oysters and to study their suitability as bioindicator in comparison to mussels. The levels of ΣPCBs (ten congeners) ranged from 5.58 to 179.49 ng g(-1) d.w. The effect of biological parameters (shell length, lipid content and condition index) on bioaccumulation of PCBs was also evaluated. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between species for higher chlorinated biphenyls (CBs 153 and 138). The spatial patterns were investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed differences between geographical areas (Rías Altas, Centrales and Baixas) in the distribution of PCBs.

  16. Aeromonas spp. isolated from oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed, Ceará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Barreto, Norma S; Vieira, Regine H S F; Carvalho, Fátima Cristiane T; Torres, Regina C O; Sant'Anna, Ernani S; Rodrigues, Dália P; Reis, Cristhiane M F

    2006-01-01

    Between April and October 2002, thirty fortnightly collections of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed at the Cocó River estuary in the Sabiaguaba region (Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil) were carried out, aiming to isolate Aeromonas spp. strains. Oyster samples were submitted to the direct plating (DP) and the presence/absence (P/A) methods. Aeromonas were identified in 15 (50%) samples analyzed by the DP method and in 13 (43%) analyzed by the P/A method. A. caviae, A. eucrenophila, A. media, A. sobria, A. trota, A. veronii bv. sobria, A. veronii bv. veronii and Aeromonas sp. were isolated. The predominant species was A. veronii (both biovars), which was identified in 13 (43%) samples, followed by A. media in 11 (37%) and A. caviae in seven (23%). From the 59 strains identified, 28 (48%) presented resistance to at least one of the eight antibiotics tested.

  17. Oyster parasites Bonamia ostreae and B. exitiosa co-occur in Galicia (NW Spain): spatial distribution and infection dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramilo, Andrea; González, Mar; Carballal, María J; Darriba, Susana; Abollo, Elvira; Villalba, Antonio

    2014-07-24

    Bonamiosis constrains the flat oyster industry worldwide. The protistan species Bonamia ostreae had been considered solely responsible for this disease in Europe, but the report of B. exitiosa infecting Ostrea edulis 5 yr ago in Galicia (NW Spain), and subsequently in other European countries, raised the question of the relevance of each species in bonamiosis. The spatial distribution of B. exitiosa and B. ostreae in Galicia was addressed by sampling 7 natural O. edulis beds and 3 culture raft areas, up to 3 times in the period 2009 to 2010. B. ostreae infected flat oysters in every natural bed and every raft culture area. True B. exitiosa infections (histological diagnosis) were detected in every raft culture area but only in 2 natural beds, i.e. in 4 rías. PCR-positive results for B. exitiosa were recorded in 4 out of 5 beds where true infections were not found, thus the occurrence of B. exitiosa in those 4 beds cannot be ruled out. Additionally, 4 cohorts of hatchery-produced oyster spat were transferred to a raft to analyse Bonamia spp. infection dynamics through oyster on-growing. The highest percentages of oysters PCR-positive for both Bonamia spp. were recorded in the first months of on-growing; other peaks of PCR-positive diagnosis were successively lower. Differences in the percentage of PCR-positive cases and in the prevalence of true infection between B. exitiosa and B. ostreae through on-growing were not significant. Our results support that B. exitiosa is adapted to infect O. edulis in the Galician marine ecosystem.

  18. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L.; Le Guyader, Soizick

    2013-01-01

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contam...

  19. Extraordinary intraspecific diversity in oyster sperm bindin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, G. W.; Springer, S. A.; Adams, S. L.; Swanson, W. J.; Vacquier, V. D.

    2008-01-01

    In free-spawning invertebrates sperm–egg incompatibility is a barrier to mating between species, and divergence of gamete recognition proteins (GRPs) can result in reproductive isolation. Of interest are processes that create reproductive protein diversity within species, because intraspecific variants are potentially involved in mate choice and early speciation. Sperm acrosomes of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas contain the protein bindin that bonds sperm to egg during fertilization. Oyster bindin is a single-copy gene encoding a diversity of protein variants. Oyster bindins have a conserved N-terminal region followed by one to five tandem fucose-binding lectin (F-lectin) domains. These repeats have diversified by positive selection at eight sites clustered on the F-lectin's fucose binding face. Additional bindin variants result from recombination in an intron in each F-lectin repeat. Males also express alternatively spliced bindin cDNAs with one to five repeats, but typically translate only one or two isoforms into protein. Thus, positive selection, alternative splicing, and recombination can create thousands of bindin variants within C. gigas. Models of sexual conflict predict high male diversity when females are diverse and sexual conflict is strong. The amount of intraspecific polymorphism in male GRPs may be a consequence of the relative efficiency of local (molecular recognition) and global (electrical, cortical, and physical) polyspermy blocks that operate during fertilization. PMID:18268333

  20. Surprising spectra of root-associated fungi in submerged aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, Petr; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Ctvrtlíková, Martina; Rydlová, Jana; Suda, Jan; Vohník, Martin; Sudová, Radka

    2012-04-01

    Similarly to plants from terrestrial ecosystems, aquatic species harbour wide spectra of root-associated fungi (RAF). However, comparably less is known about fungal diversity in submerged roots. We assessed the incidence and diversity of RAF in submerged aquatic plants using microscopy, culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. We studied RAF of five submerged isoetid species collected in four oligotrophic freshwater lakes in Norway. Levels of dark septate endophytes (DSE) colonization differed among the lakes and were positively related to the organic matter content and negatively related to pH. In total, we identified 41 fungal OTUs using culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, belonging to Mucoromycotina, Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota, Ascomycota as well as Basidiomycota. Sequences corresponding to aquatic hyphomycetes (e.g. Nectria lugdunensis, Tetracladium furcatum and Varicosporium elodeae) were obtained. Eight arbuscular mycorrhizal taxa belonging to the orders Archaeosporales, Diversisporales and Glomerales were also detected. However, the vast majority of the fungal species detected (e.g. Ceratobasidium sp., Cryptosporiopsis rhizophila, Leptodontidium orchidicola, and Tuber sp.) have previously been known only from roots of terrestrial plants. The abundance and phylogenetic distribution of mycorrhizal as well as nonmycorrhizal fungi in the roots of submerged plants have reshaped our views on the fungal diversity in aquatic environment. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The potential of aerial photography for estimating surface areas of intertidal Pacific oyster beds (Crassostrea gigas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, B.J.; Baars, J.M.D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Pacific oysters were introduced into the Eastern Scheldt in 1964 for breeding purposes. The first spatfall of wild Pacific oysters was recorded in 1976, and a second larval outburst in 1982 definitely settled wild Pacific oysters in the Eastern Scheldt waters. Oyster beds on intertidal and subtidal

  2. Cellulase production by Aspergillus niger in biofilm, solid-state, and submerged fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, Norma N; Villena, Gretty K; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel

    2010-06-01

    Cellulase production by Aspergillus niger was compared in three different culture systems: biofilm, solid-state, and submerged fermentation. Biofilm and solid-state fermentations were carried out on perlite as inert support, and lactose was used as a carbon source in the three culture systems. In cryo-scanning electron microscopy, biofilm and solid-state cultures gave similar morphological patterns and confirmed that both spore first attachment and hyphal adhered growth are helped by the production of an adhesive extracellular matrix. Biofilm cultures produced higher cellulase activities than those in submerged and solid-state cultures (1,768, 1,165, and 1,174 U l(-1), respectively). Although biofilm cultures grew less than the other cultures, they produced significantly higher cellulase yields (370, 212, and 217 U g(-1) lactose, respectively) and volumetric productivities (24, 16, and 16 U l(-1) h(-1), respectively). Likewise, endoglucanase and xylanase activities were higher in biofilm cultures. Under the conditions tested, it seems that fungal attached growth on perlite may favor better enzyme production. Biofilms are efficient systems for cellulase production and may replace solid-state fermentation. Biofilm fermentation holds promise for further optimization and development. The results of this work reveal that fungal biofilms may be used for the commercial production of cellulase employing the technology developed for submerged fermentation at high cell densities.

  3. Cultivation of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus spp.) on palm oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster mushroom is a popular mushroom due to its nutritional, medicinal and potential commercial value. In Malaysia, the fungus is currently cultivated on sawdust and rice husk. In this study, the efficiency of cultivating oyster mushroom was assessed using palm oil mesocarp fibre as a substrate. The experiment consisted ...

  4. Wild Black-lip Pearl Oyster (Pinctada margaritifera) Spat Collection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Pearl farming is a growing aquaculture activity in Tanzania but requires sufficient young pearl oysters to make it feasible. Collection of spat in the wild is the most viable way of doing this and was tested to establish whether it would yield sufficient juvenile pearl oysters to support an industry. A total of.

  5. Invertebrate Encrustations On The Mangrove Swamp Oyster And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mangrove swamp oyster Crassostrea tulipa demonstrates a symbiotic relationship with the barnacle. Balnus sp and other encrusting invertebrates. It is inferred that the latter militate against predatory drilling on the oyster by Thais califera as well as prevent algal infestation and the consequent bioerosion by herbivorous ...

  6. Shell Games. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experiences supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  7. Traditional exploitation of edible freshwater oyster Etheria elliptica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finally, oyster`s shell, a main substrate for larval settlement and bed restoration, were left on riverbanks after exploitation, reducing stocks reconstitution potential. Appropriate measures were suggested to Reserve staff for sustainable management. Keywords: Freshwater mollusk, harvesting activities, human pressure, ...

  8. Resource potential and status of pearl oyster fishery in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Many cultivable species of pearl oysters are known to occur in the Indo-Australian Archipelago which is an important region in the world distribution of pearl oysters. An account of the development of Indian pearl fisheries that took place over...

  9. Evaluation of Tea Wastes as an Alternative Substrate for Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor caju) is locally cultivated on sugarcane bagasse substrate. Due to decreasing supply of bagasse, there was an urgent need to identify alternative substrates. The aim of this study was to evaluate tea wastes as an alternative substrate for oyster mushroom cultivation. The first step was to ...

  10. Histone H3 gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793: molecular and cytogenetic characterisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bouilly

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 (2n = 20 is an economically important mollusc species cultured throughout the world. The most frequently used technique for molecular cytogenetic studies is fluorescence in situ hybridisation which offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. In oysters, it has been used to locate telomeric sequences, satellite DNA, simple sequence repeats, ribosomal RNA genes, and bacteriophage P1 clones. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been done with histone H3 gene. Histone H3 is among the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. Most histone H3 genes are repeatedly organised into clusters, which make them an ideal chromosomal marker. In bivalves, some data exist concerning sequence information but little knowledge is available concerning the physical mapping of histone genes. The histone H3 gene was sequenced in C. gigas and phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. gigas was more closely related to Ostrea edulis Linnaeus, 1758 and species of the genus Mytilus Linnaeus, 1758. In C. gigas, the histone H3 gene was mapped on two different pairs of chromosomes, one at an interstitial site on the long arm of chromosome pair 4, and the other on the telomeres of the smaller chromosome pair (pair 10. Polymorphism was detected on the telomeres of pair 10, once it was possible to observe single or double signals. Comparative chromosomal mapping should improve our understanding of bivalve genome organisation.

  11. Economic feasibility of producing oysters using a small-scale Hawaiian fishpond model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Q. Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional fishpond aquaculture in Hawai‘i has declined since global trade provided access to cheaper, imported food. Farming non-native species like the Pacific oyster may prove more profitable than traditional species, and may help maintain the practice of fishpond aquaculture. Little literature exists on the economics of Hawai‘i’s oyster culture or the unique practices involved in fishpond-based production. Based on information supplied by a currently operating farm, we developed an enterprise budget for a model farm in order to 1 assess profitability, 2 determine sensitive input parameters, and 3 use stochastic modeling to determine the likelihood of different economic outcomes. The budget returned a marginally negative profit, with the bulk of operating costs from labor. Decision reversal analysis showed the model farm can be profitable with an increase in market price from US $1.25 to US $1.35 per oyster or a decrease in mortality rate from 50% to 45.9% – both are within reasonable reach in the near future.

  12. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  13. Virucidal efficacy of treatment with photodynamically activated curcumin on murine norovirus bio-accumulated in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Hou, Wei; Cao, Binbin; Zuo, Tao; Xue, Changhu; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Xu, Chuanshan; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2015-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the most important seafood- and water-borne viruses, and is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. In the present study we investigated the effect of curcumin as a sensitizer to photodynamic treatment both in buffer and in oysters against murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate of NoV. MNV-1 cultured in buffer and MNV-1 bio-accumulated in oysters were irradiated with a novel LED light source with a wavelength of 470nm and an energy of 3.6J/cm(2). Inactivation of MNV-1 was investigated by plaque assays. After virus was extracted from the gut of oysters treated over a range of curcumin concentrations, the ultrastructural morphology of the virus was observed using electron microscopy, and the integrity of viral nucleic acids and stability of viral capsid proteins were also determined. Results showed that the infectivity of MNV-1 was significantly inhibited by 1-3logPFU/ml, with significant damage to viral nucleic acids in a curcumin dose-dependent manner after photodynamic activation. Virus morphology was altered after the photodynamic treatment with curcumin, presumably due to the change of the viral capsid protein structures. The data suggest that treatment of oysters with photodynamic activation of curcumin is a potentially efficacious and cost-effective method to inactivate food-borne NoV. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the toxicology of this approach in detail and perform sensory evaluation of the treated product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Study on pollutant pathway of norovirus contamination in oysters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Koichi; Sato, Naoto; Takahashi, Akemi; Tsutsumi, Reiko; Sato, Shigehiro

    2006-07-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) cause human gastroenteritis through person-to-person transmission and via contaminated foods. In food poisoning, a major suspected cause is the consumption of raw oysters. We detected NVs from environmental water and oysters around a closed gulf where oysters are cultivated. We collected oyster and water samples once or twice a month for 30 months from October 2001 to March 2004. We then studied monthly changes in virus occurrence and in genetic relationships among 208 NVs isolated from water and oyster samples and from the feces of children suffering from acute gastroenteritis during the same period in the same region. In the analysis of untreated water flowing into farm sewage, NVs were detected year round. In other water samples -processed sewage, river water, and seawater-, oysters, and children's feces, NVs were detected mainly in winter. A comparison of NV nucleotide sequences showed genetic diversity, but some strains predominated in certain winter seasons. These predominant strains were detected across sample materials. In 2002/03, an identical strain was detected in sewage, river water, seawater, oysters, and feces. We also found that NV genetic types changed at the beginning of the season, in November or December, in both 2001/02 and 2002/03. This study showed a clear relationship between NVs detected in children's feces and those in environmental water and oysters. These results support the idea that NVs are transmitted from the feces of infected persons to oysters by the flow of water through farm sewage, rivers, and the sea, finally accumulating in the mid-gut gland of oysters.

  15. Photosynthetic epibionts and endobionts of Pacific oyster shells from oyster reefs in rocky versus mudflat shores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillé, Laurent; Le Bris, Anthony; Méléder, Vona; Launeau, Patrick; Robin, Marc; Louvrou, Ioanna; Ribeiro, Lourenço

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg), is the main bivalve species cultivated in the world. With global warming enabling its reproduction and larval survival at higher latitudes, this species is now recognized as invasive and creates wild oyster reefs globally. In this study, the spatial distribution of photosynthetic assemblages colonizing the shells of wild C. gigas was investigated on both a large scale (two contrasting types of reefs found in mudflats and rocky areas) and a small scale (within individual shells) using a hyperspectral imager. The microspatial distribution of all phototrophs was obtained by mapping the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Second derivative (δδ) analyses of hyperspectral images at 462, 524, 571 and 647 nm were subsequently applied to map diatoms, cyanobacteria, rhodophytes and chlorophytes, respectively. A concomitant pigment analysis was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and completed by taxonomic observations. This study showed that there was high microalgal diversity associated with wild oyster shells and that there were differences in the structure of the phototropic assemblages depending on the type of reef. Namely, vertically-growing oysters in mudflat areas had a higher biomass of epizoic diatoms (hyperspectral proxy at δδ462 nm) and were mainly colonized by species of the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Hippodonta, which are epipelic or motile epipsammic. The assemblages on the horizontal oysters contained more tychoplanktonic diatoms (e.g. Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. proschkinae and Plagiogrammopsis vanheurckii). Three species of boring cyanobacteria were observed for both types of reef: Mastigocoleus testarum, Leptolyngbya terrebrans, and Hyella caespistosa, but the second derivative analysis at 524 nm showed a significantly higher biomass for the horizontally-growing oysters. There was no biomass difference for the boring chlorophyte assemblages (δδ647 nm), with two species

  16. Photosynthetic epibionts and endobionts of Pacific oyster shells from oyster reefs in rocky versus mudflat shores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Barillé

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, is the main bivalve species cultivated in the world. With global warming enabling its reproduction and larval survival at higher latitudes, this species is now recognized as invasive and creates wild oyster reefs globally. In this study, the spatial distribution of photosynthetic assemblages colonizing the shells of wild C. gigas was investigated on both a large scale (two contrasting types of reefs found in mudflats and rocky areas and a small scale (within individual shells using a hyperspectral imager. The microspatial distribution of all phototrophs was obtained by mapping the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI. Second derivative (δδ analyses of hyperspectral images at 462, 524, 571 and 647 nm were subsequently applied to map diatoms, cyanobacteria, rhodophytes and chlorophytes, respectively. A concomitant pigment analysis was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and completed by taxonomic observations. This study showed that there was high microalgal diversity associated with wild oyster shells and that there were differences in the structure of the phototropic assemblages depending on the type of reef. Namely, vertically-growing oysters in mudflat areas had a higher biomass of epizoic diatoms (hyperspectral proxy at δδ462 nm and were mainly colonized by species of the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Hippodonta, which are epipelic or motile epipsammic. The assemblages on the horizontal oysters contained more tychoplanktonic diatoms (e.g. Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. proschkinae and Plagiogrammopsis vanheurckii. Three species of boring cyanobacteria were observed for both types of reef: Mastigocoleus testarum, Leptolyngbya terrebrans, and Hyella caespistosa, but the second derivative analysis at 524 nm showed a significantly higher biomass for the horizontally-growing oysters. There was no biomass difference for the boring chlorophyte assemblages (δδ647 nm, with

  17. Photosynthetic epibionts and endobionts of Pacific oyster shells from oyster reefs in rocky versus mudflat shores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Anthony; Méléder, Vona; Launeau, Patrick; Robin, Marc; Louvrou, Ioanna; Ribeiro, Lourenço

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg), is the main bivalve species cultivated in the world. With global warming enabling its reproduction and larval survival at higher latitudes, this species is now recognized as invasive and creates wild oyster reefs globally. In this study, the spatial distribution of photosynthetic assemblages colonizing the shells of wild C. gigas was investigated on both a large scale (two contrasting types of reefs found in mudflats and rocky areas) and a small scale (within individual shells) using a hyperspectral imager. The microspatial distribution of all phototrophs was obtained by mapping the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Second derivative (δδ) analyses of hyperspectral images at 462, 524, 571 and 647 nm were subsequently applied to map diatoms, cyanobacteria, rhodophytes and chlorophytes, respectively. A concomitant pigment analysis was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and completed by taxonomic observations. This study showed that there was high microalgal diversity associated with wild oyster shells and that there were differences in the structure of the phototropic assemblages depending on the type of reef. Namely, vertically-growing oysters in mudflat areas had a higher biomass of epizoic diatoms (hyperspectral proxy at δδ462 nm) and were mainly colonized by species of the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Hippodonta, which are epipelic or motile epipsammic. The assemblages on the horizontal oysters contained more tychoplanktonic diatoms (e.g. Thalassiosira pseudonana, T. proschkinae and Plagiogrammopsis vanheurckii). Three species of boring cyanobacteria were observed for both types of reef: Mastigocoleus testarum, Leptolyngbya terrebrans, and Hyella caespistosa, but the second derivative analysis at 524 nm showed a significantly higher biomass for the horizontally-growing oysters. There was no biomass difference for the boring chlorophyte assemblages (δδ647 nm), with two species

  18. Estimating the impact of oyster restoration scenarios on transient fish production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Elizabeth; Borrett, Stuart R.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Peterson, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    Oyster reef restoration projects are increasing in number both to enhance oyster density and to retain valuable ecosystem services provided by oyster reefs. Although some oyster restoration projects have demonstrated success by increasing density and biomass of transient fish, it still remains a challenge to quantify the effects of oyster restoration on transient fish communities. We developed a bioenergetics model to assess the impact of selected oyster reef restoration scenarios on associated transient fish species. We used the model to analyze the impact of changes in (1) oyster population carrying capacity; (2) oyster population growth rate; and (3) diet preference of transient fish on oyster reef development and associated transient fish species. Our model results indicate that resident fish biomass is directly affected by oyster restoration and oyster biomass, and oyster restoration can have cascading impacts on transient fish biomass. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of a favorable oyster population growth rate during early restoration years, as it can lead to rapid increases in mean oyster biomass and biomass of transient fish species. The model also revealed that a transient fish's diet solely dependent on oyster reef-derived prey could limit the biomass of transient fish species, emphasizing the importance of habitat connectivity in estuarine areas to enhance transient fish species biomass. Simple bioenergetics models can be developed to understand the dynamics of a system and make qualitative predictions of management and restoration scenarios.

  19. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  20. Multielement stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes across Yunnan plateau lakes (China)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Wei; Wu, Haoping; Shi, Qiao; Hao, Beibei; Liu, Han; Wang, Zhixiu; Liu, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    .... We predicted that tissue element composition in submerged macrophytes is affected by lake trophic level and taxonomy, and submerged macrophytes have weak stoichiometric homeostasis for all above 16 elements...

  1. Environmental indicators of oyster norovirus outbreaks in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamkhali Chenar, Shima; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an artificial intelligence-based approach to identifying environmental indicators of oyster norovirus outbreaks in coastal waters. It was found that oyster norovirus outbreaks are generally linked to the extreme combination of antecedent environmental conditions characterized by low water temperature, low solar radiation, low gage height, low salinity, strong wind, and heavy precipitation. Among the six environmental indicators, the most important three indicators, including water temperature, solar radiation and gage height, are capable of explaining 77.7% of model-predicted oyster norovirus outbreaks while the extremely low temperature alone may explain 37.2% of oyster norovirus outbreaks. It is, therefore, recommended that water temperature in oyster harvesting areas be monitored in the cold season and particularly the extremely low temperature during a low gage height be used as the primary indicator of oyster norovirus outbreaks. The findings are of profound significance to reducing the public health risk of norovirus outbreaks associated with consumption of oysters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Drought Increases Consumer Pressure on Oyster Reefs in Florida, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna G Garland

    Full Text Available Coastal economies and ecosystems have historically depended on oyster reefs, but this habitat has declined globally by 85% because of anthropogenic activities. In a Florida estuary, we investigated the cause of newly reported losses of oysters. We found that the oyster reefs have deteriorated from north to south and that this deterioration was positively correlated with the abundance of carnivorous conchs and water salinity. In experiments across these gradients, oysters survived regardless of salinity if conchs were excluded. After determining that conchs were the proximal cause of oyster loss, we tested whether elevated water salinity was linked to conch abundance either by increasing conch growth and survivorship or by decreasing the abundance of a predator of conchs. In field experiments across a salinity gradient, we failed to detect spatial variation in predation on conchs or in conch growth and survivorship. A laboratory experiment, however, demonstrated the role of salinity by showing that conch larvae failed to survive at low salinities. Because this estuary's salinity increased in 2006 in response to reduced inputs of freshwater, we concluded that the ultimate cause of oyster decline was an increase in salinity. According to records from 2002 to 2012, oyster harvests have remained steady in the northernmost estuaries of this ecoregion (characterized by high reef biomass, low salinity, and low conch abundance but have declined in the southernmost estuaries (characterized by lower reef biomass, increases in salinity, and increases in conch abundance. Oyster conservation in this ecoregion, which is probably one of the few that still support viable oyster populations, may be undermined by drought-induced increases in salinity causing an increased abundance of carnivorous conchs.

  3. Molecular analysis of an oyster-related norovirus outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenonen, Nancy P; Hannoun, Charles; Olsson, Margareta B; Bergström, Tomas

    2009-06-01

    Contaminated raw oysters were implicated in a severe outbreak of norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis affecting 30 restaurant guests. To define the outbreak source by using molecular methods to characterize NoV strains detected in patient and oyster samples. Molecular epidemiological studies based on nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of patient and oyster NoV strains, and comparison to background dataset. NoV genotype (G) I.1 was detected in the one patient stool analyzed by in-house TaqMan real time RT-PCR and classical nested RT-PCR targeting NoV RNA-dependent polymerase (RdRp, 285 nt), and by nested RT-PCR targeting RdRp-capsid-poly(A)-3' (3085 nt). Patient strain showed >or=99% similarity (285 nt) with three NoV strains detected in two of five oysters examined by classical nested RT-PCR (RdRp). A third oyster tested positive for NoV GII.3. Phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of patient and oyster strains related to this outbreak with GI.1 strains from previous local outbreaks, and mussel studies. Sequence data revealed >or=99% similarity (285 nt) between NoV GI.1 strains detected in patient stool and suspect oysters, linking the contaminated oysters to the outbreak. Identification of human NoV GI and GII strains in oysters indicated contamination of human fecal origin, presumably from inappropriate storage in the harbor. Comparative long-fragment analysis of the patient strain revealed 99% similarity (3085 nt) with NoV GI.1 strains detected in previous outbreaks and environmental mussel studies from West Sweden, 87% with M87661 (Norwalk68) and 96% with L23828 (SRSV-KY-89/89/J). These results indicated considerable genomic stability of NoV GI.1 strains over time.

  4. Oxygen dynamics in submerged rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmer, Timothy D.; Pedersen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Complete submergence of plants prevents direct O2 and CO2 exchange with air. Underwater photosynthesis can result in marked diurnal changes in O2 supply to submerged plants. Dynamics in pO2 had not been measured directly for submerged rice (Oryza sativa), but in an earlier study, radial O2 loss...

  5. Gametogenesis in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a microarrays-based analysis identifies sex and stage specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn M Dheilly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca, Lophotrochozoa is an alternative and irregular protandrous hermaphrodite: most individuals mature first as males and then change sex several times. Little is known about genetic and phenotypic basis of sex differentiation in oysters, and little more about the molecular pathways regulating reproduction. We have recently developed and validated a microarray containing 31,918 oligomers (Dheilly et al., 2011 representing the oyster transcriptome. The application of this microarray to the study of mollusk gametogenesis should provide a better understanding of the key factors involved in sex differentiation and the regulation of oyster reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression was studied in gonads of oysters cultured over a yearly reproductive cycle. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering showed a significant divergence in gene expression patterns of males and females coinciding with the start of gonial mitosis. ANOVA analysis of the data revealed 2,482 genes differentially expressed during the course of males and/or females gametogenesis. The expression of 434 genes could be localized in either germ cells or somatic cells of the gonad by comparing the transcriptome of female gonads to the transcriptome of stripped oocytes and somatic tissues. Analysis of the annotated genes revealed conserved molecular mechanisms between mollusks and mammals: genes involved in chromatin condensation, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and meiosis regulation, transcription, translation and apoptosis were expressed in both male and female gonads. Most interestingly, early expressed male-specific genes included bindin and a dpy-30 homolog and female-specific genes included foxL2, nanos homolog 3, a pancreatic lipase related protein, cd63 and vitellogenin. Further functional analyses are now required in order to investigate their role in sex differentiation in oysters

  6. Development of Genetic Markers for Triploid Verification of the Pacific Oyster,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ha Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The triploid Pacific oyster, which is produced by mating tetraploid and diploid oysters, is favored by the aquaculture industry because of its better flavor and firmer texture, particularly during the summer. However, tetraploid oyster production is not feasible in all oysters; the development of tetraploid oysters is ongoing in some oyster species. Thus, a method for ploidy verification is necessary for this endeavor, in addition to ploidy verification in aquaculture farms and in the natural environment. In this study, a method for ploidy verification of triploid and diploid oysters was developed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR panels containing primers for molecular microsatellite markers. Two microsatellite multiplex PCR panels consisting of three markers each were developed using previously developed microsatellite markers that were optimized for performance. Both panels were able to verify the ploidy levels of 30 triploid oysters with 100% accuracy, illustrating the utility of microsatellite markers as a tool for verifying the ploidy of individual oysters.

  7. Simultaneous α-amylase and protease production by the soil bacterium Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 under submerged culture using whey protein concentrate and corn steep liquor: compatibility of enzymes with commercial detergents

    OpenAIRE

    Corrêa, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; Moutinho, Stella Karla dos Santos; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal; Martins, Marco Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Protease and α-amylase production by a thermophilic Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 cultivated in liquid cultures containing 0.25% (w/v) starch as a carbon source reached a maximum at 18 hours (47 U.mg-1 Protein) and 36 hours (325 U.mg-1 Protein), respectively. Culture medium supplementation with whey protein concentrate (0.1%, w/v) and corn steep liquor (0.3%, w/v) not only improved the production of both enzymes but also enabled them to be produced simultaneously. Under these conditions, α-amylase and ...

  8. Benthic bacterial diversity in submerged sinkhole ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C; Pangborn, Joseph B; Zajack, Heidi A; Kendall, Scott T; Rediske, Richard R; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities.

  9. Topology optimization for submerged buoyant structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary structural topology optimization method for the design of completely submerged buoyant modules with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structure is used to support offshore rig installation and pipeline transportation at all water depths. The

  10. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. La Peyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  11. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T. Andrew; Humphries, Austin T.

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  12. Evaluation of Norfolk Harbor Deepening Project (A Study on Its Possible Impact on Oysters, Hard Clams and Oyster Drills).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-20

    Virginia 23062 DTIC 20 June 1984 ELECTE ~L&JMAR 12 i9BB IA B! ,", Contract No. DACW65-84-M-0056 -Ap’oved to: publicO t01b0 I D)WtbuZidon Unlimited .~Norfolk...impact on the transport of the larval oysters and hard clams during their planktonic stage. Oysters and hard clams are widely tolerant to high salinity...planktonic for about 2 weeks and during this period are transported by currents. This latter aspect will be covered later in our discussion on oysters. ~i

  13. The Edibility and Cultivation of the Oyster Mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, James; Guttman, Mark C.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an enjoyable and fascinating experience that involves the cultivation of oyster mushrooms. By allowing students to participate in this process, the students are able to better understand the biology and utility of fungi. (ZWH)

  14. Length-weight relationship of Giant Oyster, Crassostrea gyphoides (Schlotheim)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Relationship between shell length and total weight, shell weight and meat weight of giant oyster, Crassostrea gryphoides revealed that the growth of these parameters is very fast and significant. It indicates the suitability of the species concerned...

  15. Introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in South Africa: demographic change, genetic diversity and body condition. ... Given the species' considerable socio-economic importance, estuarine and coastal surveillance coupled with aquaculture zoning are required to integrate biodiversity and food security considerations.

  16. Annual Narrative Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Phylogeny and Species Diversity of Gulf of California Oysters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial loci (COI and 16S) used to infer the phylogeny of oysters in the genus Ostrea along the Pacific coast of North...

  18. Aquatic invasive species: oyster thief in Newfoundland and Labrador waters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2013-01-01

    Oyster thief was first reported washed up on shore near Arnold's Cove, Woody Island, and Spanish Room, Newfoundland, in July and August 2012, during Fisheries and Oceans Canada's aquatic invasive species surveys...

  19. The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Strand, Åsa

    A massive invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas , has occurred in Scandinavia during the last decade. The introduction and dispersal was described through collaboration between scientists from Sweden, Denmark and Norway. This work has been followed up by national activities that clear...... presented in this report is based on available scientific literature, expert judgments and data collected during a Nordic collaboration project on Pacific oysters in 2011 – 2013....

  20. Cancer risk assessment for arsenic exposure through oyster consumption.

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, How-Ran

    2002-01-01

    Risk is assessed on the basis of assumptions, but this practice might not be well received by the general public. To avoid miscommunication, the assumptions should be stated clearly in reporting the results. Recently, a report on an assessment of the cancer risk associated with consumption of oysters caused a panic among consumers in Taiwan and produced significant effects on related industries. A group of researchers measured the arsenic content in oysters in the Taiwan area and conducted a ...

  1. Impact of Vessel Noise on Oyster Toadfish (Opsanus tau) Behavior and Implications for Underwater Noise Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahforst, Cecilia S.

    Underwater noise and its impacts on marine life are growing management concerns. This dissertation considers both the ecological and social concerns of underwater noise, using the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) as a model species. Oyster toadfish call for mates using a boatwhistle sound, but increased ambient noise levels from vessels or other anthropogenic activities are likely to influence the ability of males to find mates. If increased ambient noise levels reduce fish fitness then underwater noise can impact socially valued ecosystem services (e.g. fisheries). The following ecological objectives of the impacts of underwater noise on oyster toadfish were investigated: (1) to determine how noise influences male calling behavior; (2) to assess how areas of high vessel activity ("noisy") and low vessel activity ("quiet") influence habitat utilization (fish standard length and occupancy rate); and (3) to discover if fitness (number of clutches and number of embryos per clutch) is lower in "noisy" compared with "quiet" sites. Field experiments were executed in "noisy" and "quiet" areas. Recorded calls by males in response to playback sounds (vessel, predator, and snapping shrimp sounds) and egg deposition by females ("noisy" vs. "quiet" sites) demonstrated that oyster toadfish are impacted by underwater noise. First, males decreased their call rates and called louder in response to increased ambient noise levels. Second, oyster toadfish selected nesting sites in areas with little or no inboard motorboat activity. Third, male oyster toadfish at "noisy" sites either had no egg clutches on their shelters or the number of embryos per clutch was significantly lower than in the "quiet" areas. Underwater noise and disturbance from vessels are influencing the fitness of the oyster toadfish. The social significance of the growing concerns regarding underwater noise was investigated by identifying dominant themes found within two types of texts: four recent underwater noise

  2. Developing a national spat collection program for pearl oysters in the Fiji Islands supporting pearl industry development and livelihoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranesh Kishore

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultured pearl farming in Fiji relies on wild spat collection to supply the oysters used for pearl production. This supply can be inconsistent and a research program was implemented to determine recruitment of pearl oysters to spat collectors at sites throughout Fiji as a basis for developing a national spat collection program to improve reliability of oyster supply to the industry. Twenty-nine sites across Fiji were used in this study. Spat collectors consisted of a 100 m longline from which 310 individual spat collectors were suspended. Spat collectors were deployed for a period of 10–15 months when the number of pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera and Pteria penguin spat attached to each collector was counted and shell size recorded. A total of 5478 P. margaritifera juveniles were collected from all sites with the highest number of recruits (693 and the highest number of recruits per collector (2.10 ± 0.17 occurring at Nacobau (Vanua Levu. The largest mean dorso-ventral measurement (DVM of P. margaritifera at any site was 8.61 ± 0.30 cm while the smallest was 4.26 ± 0.13 cm. Some sites did not record any P. margaritifera recruitment during the study and these were generally sites with relatively turbid water. A total of 4224 Pt. penguin were collected from all sites, with the highest number of recruits (495 recorded from Namarai (Viti Levu. The mean DVM of Pt. penguin ranged from 7.53 cm to 13.62 cm across sites. Results indicate that Pt. penguin have greater tolerance of more turbid inshore sites than P. margaritifera based on greater levels of recruitment at these sites. Results identified sites supporting high levels of pearl oyster recruitment as a basis for an ongoing national spat collection program, and support better targeting of spat collection activities that maximise oyster supply to the Fijian pearl industry. The national spat collection program will generate significant livelihood benefits across

  3. Raw oysters can be a risk for infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes Vieira

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to count and identify sucrose positive and negative vibrios isolated from cultivated Crassostrea rhizophorae oysters during their growing cycle. Every month for 12 months, 10 to 18 oysters were collected for study. Collections occurred at the Center for Studies of Coastal Aquaculture (CSCA, which is associated with the Institute of Marine Science, Labomar, located in Euzebio, Ceará, Brazil. Approximately 150 oysters and their intervalvular liquor were studied. Vibrio Standard Plates Counts (SPC from oyster meat and their intervalvular liquor varied from 25 to 59,000,000 CFU/g. For most of the 12 months of the oysters' life, it was possible to identify Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Vibrio carchariae was identified in four collections. Among other isolated species, the most important, considering public health risks, was V. vulnificus, although only one strain was confirmed. We concluded that retail purchased oysters should never be eaten raw or undercooked because many species of the genus Vibrio are known to be pathogenic to humans and live naturally on and in shellfish throughout their life cycle.

  4. National survey of foodborne viruses in Australian oysters at production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Valeria; Hodgson, Kate; McLeod, Catherine; Tan, Jessica; Malhi, Navreet; Turnbull, Alison

    2018-02-01

    Internationally human enteric viruses, such as norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are frequently associated with shellfish related foodborne disease outbreaks, and it has been suggested that acceptable NoV limits based on end-point testing be established for this high risk food group. Currently, shellfish safety is generally managed through the use of indicators of faecal contamination. Between July 2014 and August 2015, a national prevalence survey for NoV and HAV was done in Australian oysters suitable for harvest. Two sampling rounds were undertaken to determine baseline levels of these viruses. Commercial Australian growing areas, represented by 33 oyster production regions in New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania and Queensland, were included in the survey. A total of 149 and 148 samples were collected during round one and two of sampling, respectively, and tested for NoV and HAV by quantitative RT-PCR. NoV and HAV were not detected in oysters collected in either sampling round, indicating an estimated prevalence for these viruses in Australian oysters of oysters was consistent with epidemiological evidence, with no oyster-related foodborne viral illness reported during the survey period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous α-amylase and protease production by the soil bacterium Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 under submerged culture using whey protein concentrate and corn steep liquor: compatibility of enzymes with commercial detergents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamy Lívia Ribeiro Corrêa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protease and α-amylase production by a thermophilic Bacillus sp. SMIA-2 cultivated in liquid cultures containing 0.25% (w/v starch as a carbon source reached a maximum at 18 hours (47 U.mg-1 Protein and 36 hours (325 U.mg-1 Protein, respectively. Culture medium supplementation with whey protein concentrate (0.1%, w/v and corn steep liquor (0.3%, w/v not only improved the production of both enzymes but also enabled them to be produced simultaneously. Under these conditions, α-amylase and protease production reached a maximum in 18 hours with levels of 401 U.mg-1 protein and 78 U.mg-1 protein, respectively. The compatibility of the enzymes produced with commercial laundry detergent was investigated. In the presence of Campeiro® detergent, α-amylase activity increased while protease activity decreased by about 27%. These enzymes improved the cleaning power of Campeiro® detergent since they were able to remove egg yolk and tomato sauce stains when used in this detergent.

  6. Pump Coastdown with the Submerged Flywheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun-Gi; Seo, KyoungWoo; Kim, Seong Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Many research reactors are generally designed as open pool types in consideration of the heat removal of the nuclear fuels, reactor operation and accessibility. Reactor structure assembly is generally placed at the pool bottom as shown in Fig. 1. Primary cooling system pump circulates the coolant from the reactor structure to the heat exchanger in order to continuously remove the heat generated from the reactor core in the research reactor as shown in Fig. 1. The secondary cooling system releases the transferred heat to the atmosphere by the cooling tower. Coastdown flow rate of the primary cooling system pump with the submerged flywheel are calculated analytically in case of the accident situation. Coastdown flow rate is maintained until almost 80 sec when the pump stops normally. But, coastdown flow rate is rapidly decreased when the flywheel is submerged because of the friction load on the flywheel surface.

  7. Coastline Protection by a Submerged Breakwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B. D.; Hayatdavoodi, M.; Ertekin, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal communities are in danger of the impact caused by storm surge and waves. Storm surge brings the water level to a higher elevation and farther inland. This rise in water level increases the chance of a higher number and larger set of waves approaching shorelines, and it can potentially devastate the coastal infrastructure. In this study, we evaluate the performance of a submerged, horizontal breakwater located near shore. Unlike other types of breakwaters, such as the ones that extend to the surface, either fixed or floating, a submerged horizontal breakwater does not create any visual distraction or limit most of the recreational and commercial activities in the nearshore areas. The Level I Green-Naghdi (GN) nonlinear water wave equations are utilized here to study the wave transformation over a submerged breakwater that is located in shallow water. The GN theory is based on the theory of directed fluid sheets and assumes an incompressible and inviscid fluid; no assumption on the rotationality of the flow is required. In this approach, the nonlinear boundary conditions and the averaged conservation laws are satisfied exactly. The reflection and transmission coefficients due to nonlinear shallow water waves are determined implementing two approaches which use Goda's (1976) and Grue's (1992) methods. The results are compared with the existing laboratory experiments, and close agreement is observed overall. Preliminary results of the performance of the breakwater on dissipating storm waves during Hurricane Ike (2008), approaching the shore of Galveston, Texas, are presented.

  8. Growth of Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuary environments in Brazilian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruschel Lopes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the growth of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuarine environments. Oysters were cultured for 11 months in a longline system in two study sites - São Francisco do Sul and Florianópolis -, in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil. Water chlorophyll-α concentration, temperature, and salinity were measured weekly. The oysters were measured monthly (shell size and weight gain to assess growth. At the end of the culture period, the average wet flesh weight, dry flesh weight, and shell weight were determined, as well as the distribution of oysters per size class. Six nonlinear models (logistic, exponential, Gompertz, Brody, Richards, and Von Bertalanffy were adjusted to the oyster growth data set. Final mean shell sizes were higher in São Francisco do Sul than in Florianópolis. In addition, oysters cultured in São Francisco do Sul were more uniformly distributed in the four size classes than those cultured in Florianópolis. The highest average values of wet flesh weight and shell weight were observed in São Francisco do Sul, whereas dry flesh weight did not differ between the sites. The estuary environment is more promising for the cultivation of oysters.

  9. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  10. Effect of storage on the quality of purified live Pacific and Sydney rock oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, P.; Arnold, G.; Holliday, J; Boronovshy, A

    1992-01-01

    In December, 1990, the N.S.W. Minister for Agriculture and Rural Affairs removed the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) from the noxious fish list for the Port Stephens area, permitting it's cultivation. As Port Stephens Pacific oysters are grown intertidally, similar to Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea commercialis) there was a belief that they may have different storage requirements to overseas Pacific oysters which are cultivated in deep water exclusively. Consequently, the keeping quality ...

  11. Evaluating Ecosystem effects of oyster restoration in the Mississippi Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutse, C. K.; Milroy, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    Oyster reefs along the northern Gulf of Mexico are primarily formed by the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and are among the few biogenic natural habitats in the region. The increasing awareness of ecosystem services that habitat-forming bivalves provide, and the decline of the native species' population has led to a myriad of restoration efforts which have yielded varying results. Successful reef restoration efforts requires a deeper understanding of how variations in the timing and scales of environmental stressors control the survival, growth, and recruitment of reef associated species like oysters, shrimps, pelagic and benthic fish species. A modeling approach has been designed for exploring optimal growth conditions for oysters, studying the effect of seasonal trends in environmental stressors on the growth and survival of reef-associated species, and performing scenario testing for alternative restoration plans in the Mississippi Sound. The model uses a carbon budget approach, accounts for different functional groups within the trophic network on the reef, and operates on daily temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate that restoration efforts may maximize benefits from the interactions between different salinity regimes and growth as well as mortality of oysters at three different class sizes of sacks, seeds, and spats. The study also seeks to evaluate the effects of different restoration efforts on promotion and recruitments in oyster populations as well as other reef-associated fishes and invertebrates. The current capabilities of the model can be scaled up to include evaluating changes in ecosystem goods and assessing their contributions to human well-being, the results of which will inform management decisions. Keywords: ecosystem modeling, oyster ecology, ecosystem-based management.

  12. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L−1) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (−38%), diameter (−5%), and sperm velocity (−23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring. PMID:26831072

  13. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to polystyrene microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussarellu, Rossana; Suquet, Marc; Thomas, Yoann; Lambert, Christophe; Fabioux, Caroline; Pernet, Marie Eve Julie; Le Goïc, Nelly; Quillien, Virgile; Mingant, Christian; Epelboin, Yanouk; Corporeau, Charlotte; Guyomarch, Julien; Robbens, Johan; Paul-Pont, Ika; Soudant, Philippe; Huvet, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    Plastics are persistent synthetic polymers that accumulate as waste in the marine environment. Microplastic (MP) particles are derived from the breakdown of larger debris or can enter the environment as microscopic fragments. Because filter-feeder organisms ingest MP while feeding, they are likely to be impacted by MP pollution. To assess the impact of polystyrene microspheres (micro-PS) on the physiology of the Pacific oyster, adult oysters were experimentally exposed to virgin micro-PS (2 and 6 µm in diameter; 0.023 mg·L(-1)) for 2 mo during a reproductive cycle. Effects were investigated on ecophysiological parameters; cellular, transcriptomic, and proteomic responses; fecundity; and offspring development. Oysters preferentially ingested the 6-µm micro-PS over the 2-µm-diameter particles. Consumption of microalgae and absorption efficiency were significantly higher in exposed oysters, suggesting compensatory and physical effects on both digestive parameters. After 2 mo, exposed oysters had significant decreases in oocyte number (-38%), diameter (-5%), and sperm velocity (-23%). The D-larval yield and larval development of offspring derived from exposed parents decreased by 41% and 18%, respectively, compared with control offspring. Dynamic energy budget modeling, supported by transcriptomic profiles, suggested a significant shift of energy allocation from reproduction to structural growth, and elevated maintenance costs in exposed oysters, which is thought to be caused by interference with energy uptake. Molecular signatures of endocrine disruption were also revealed, but no endocrine disruptors were found in the biological samples. This study provides evidence that micro-PS cause feeding modifications and reproductive disruption in oysters, with significant impacts on offspring.

  14. PARASITIC AND SYMBIOTIC FAUNA INHABITING OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) SAMPLED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oysters, Crassostrea virginica, inhabiting 5 sites in the Caloosahatchee River estuary were studied over a 13 month period to determine the suitability of oyster habitat in relation to their health and condition. Histological examination of 650 oysters (10 animals per station per...

  15. First isolation of Nocardia crassostreae from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsma, M.Y.; Roozenburg, I.; Joly, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    In summer 2006 an extensive mortality of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas occurred in Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands. A sample of Pacific oysters was investigated for the presence of shellfish pathogens as potential causes of the mortality. Yellow-green lesions were observed in several oysters

  16. Submerged Conidiation and Product Formation by Aspergillus niger at Low Specific Growth Rates Are Affected in Aerial Developmental Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Arentshorst, Mark

    2011-01-01

    . fwnA encodes the polyketide synthase responsible for melanin biosynthesis during aerial differentiation, and we show that conidial melanin synthesis in submerged retentostat cultures and aurasperone B production are fwnA dependent. The scl-1 and scl-2 strains are two UV mutants generated in the Δfwn...

  17. IODINE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN NON-SUBMERGED AND SUBMERGED SELF-PRIMING VENTURI SCRUBBER

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Majid; CHANGQI, YAN; ZHONGNING, SUN; HAIFENG, GU; JUNLONG, WANG; MEHBOOB, KHURRAM

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this conducted research is to study the iodine removal efficiency in a self-priming venturi scrubber for submerged and non-submerged operating conditions experimentally and theoretically. The alkaline solution is used as an absorbent, which is prepared by dissolving sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3) in water to remove the gaseous iodine (I2) from the gas. Iodine removal efficiency is examined at various gas flow rates and inlet concentrations of iodine...

  18. Molecular and histological identification of Marteilioides infection in Suminoe Oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas on the south coast of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpanont, Yanin; Yanin, Limpanont; Kang, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jeung, Hee-Do; Kim, Bong-Kyu; Le, Thanh Cuong; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    The oyster ovarian parasite Marteilioides chungmuensis has been reported from Korea and Japan, damaging the oyster industries. Recently, Marteilioides-like organisms have been identified in other commercially important marine bivalves. In this study, we surveyed Marteilioides infection in the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, Suminoe oyster Crassostrea ariakensis, and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, using histology and Marteilioides-specific small subunit (SSU) rDNA PCR. The SSU rDNA sequence of M. chungmuensis (1716 bp) isolated from C. gigas in Tongyoung bay was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis reported in Japan. Inclusions of multi-nucleated bodies in the oocytes, typical of Marteilioides infection, were identified for the first time in Suminoe oysters. The SSU rDNA sequence of a Marteilioides-like organism isolated from Suminoe oysters was 99.9% similar to that of M. chungmuensis. Marteilioides sp. was also observed from 7 Manila clams of 1840 individuals examined, and the DNA sequences of which were 98.2% similar to the known sequence of M. chungmuensis. Unlike Marteilioides infection of Pacific oysters, no remarkable pathological symptoms, such as large multiple lumps on the mantle, were observed in infected Suminoe oysters or Manila clams. Distribution of the infected Manila clams, Suminoe oysters and Pacific oysters was limited to small bays on the south coast, suggesting that the southern coast is the enzootic area of Marteilioides infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Submergence tolerance in Hordeum marinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Malik, Al I.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Floodwaters differ markedly in dissolved CO(2), yet the effects of CO(2) on submergence responses of terrestrial plants have rarely been examined. The influence of dissolved CO(2) on underwater photosynthesis and growth was evaluated for three accessions of the wetland plant Hordeum marinum Huds......) movement, would all contribute to submergence tolerance in H. marinum. The present study demonstrates that dissolved CO(2) levels can determine submergence tolerance of terrestrial plants. So, submergence experiments should be conducted with defined CO(2) concentrations and enrichment might be needed...

  20. Protease production during growth and autolysis of submerged Metarhizium anisopliae cultures Produção de protease durante o crescimento e análise de culturas submersas de Metarhizium anisopliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto U.L. Braga

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The growth and autolysis of two strains of the entomopathogenic deuteromycete fungus Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae were evaluated in medium containing casein or glucose as carbon source. Parameters such as economic coefficient and degree of autolysis were determined for each strain. Protease production was determined throughout the growth and autolysis phases of the cultures on medium under conditions of protease induction (in the presence of casein as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The fungus was shown to utilize casein as a carbon/energy source in a more efficient manner than glucose. The autolysis shown by the strains was intense under both types of growth conditions, reaching up to 62.7% of the dry mass produced and started soon after the depletion of the exogenous carbon source. The relationship between the proteolytic activities of the two strains evaluated varied significantly (a maximum of 19.78 on the 5th day and a minimum of 2.03 on the 16th day of growth during the various growth and autolysis phases, clearly showing that the difference between the growth curves and the difference in the kinetics of enzyme production may decisively affect the process of strain selection for protease production.O crescimento e a autólise de duas linhagens do deuteromiceto entomopatogênico Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae foram avaliados em meio contendo caseína ou glicose como fonte de carbono. Foram determinados parâmetros como o coeficiente econômico e o grau de autólise apresentado pelas linhagens. A produção de protease foi determinada durante todas as fases do crescimento e da autólise das culturas, em meio indutor da produção de proteases (meio contendo caseína como única fonte de carbono e de nitrogênio. Pôde-se verificar que o fungo foi capaz de utilizar a caseína como fonte de carbono/energia de maneira mais eficiente do que a glicose. A autólise apresentada pelas linhagens foi intensa em ambas as condi

  1. An efficient method of noroviruses recovery from oysters and clams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deqing; Ma, Liping; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Lin; Su, Laijin; Li, Xinguang

    2013-03-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are widespread causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Outbreaks of NoVs caused diseases are commonly ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. The concentration and RNA extraction of NoVs are crucial steps of detecting NoVs in shellfish. This study aimed to select a simple, rapid and highly efficient recovery method of NoVs detection with real-time RT-PCR. Four methods of recovering GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs from spiked digestive tissues of oysters and clams, respectively, were compared, of them, the method involving proteinase K and PEG 8000 was found the most efficient. With this method, 9.3% and 13.1% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from oysters and 9.6% and 12.3% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from clams, respectively. This method was further used to detect NoVs in 84 oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) and 86 clams ( Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 10 coastal cities in China from Jan. 2011 to Feb. 2012. The NoVs isolation rates were 10.47% of clams (9/86) and 7.14% of oysters (6/84). All the detected NoVs belonged to genotype GII. The NoVs recovery method selected is efficient for NoVs detection in oysters and clams.

  2. Localization of norovirus and poliovirus in Pacific oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C; Hay, B; Grant, C; Greening, G; Day, D

    2009-04-01

    To examine the uptake and tissue distribution of norovirus (NoV) and poliovirus (PV) experimentally bioaccumulated in feeding Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). Pacific oysters were allowed to bioaccumulated either PV or NoV under tidally synchronized feeding conditions in laboratory tanks. Oysters were then either fixed and paraffin wax embedded prior to localizing virus within tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC), or they were dissected into digestive tract (stomach, intestine and digestive diverticula), gill and labial palp tissues, and the viral load determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Both PV and NoV immunoreactivities were predominantly found in the lumen and within cells of the digestive tract tissues; however, PV was also found within cells of nondigestive tract tissues, and in the gills and labial palp. Quantitative RT-PCR of tissue extracts corroborate the immunohistochemical data in that the major site for virus localization is the gut, but significant amounts of viral RNA were identified in the gills and labial palp. The human enteric viruses, PV and NoV, are readily bioaccumulated by feeding Pacific oysters and that some of the virus is internalized within cells of both digestive and nondigestive tissues. Oysters that have been virally contaminated even after depuration (cleaning) in uncontaminated seawater could pose a human health risk if consumed.

  3. [Norovirus outbreak in Majorca (Spain) associated with oyster consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmés Truyols, Antònia; Duran, Jaume Giménez; Riutort, Antonio Nicolau; Cerdá, Gabriel Arbona; Isabel, Catalina Bosch; Arbona, Margarita Portell; Berga, Joana Vanrell

    2011-01-01

    We describe investigation into an outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with oyster consumption. A survey was conducted in 346 exposed persons, 266 of whom were cases. Only 14 feces samples from patients were sent to the National Microbiology Laboratory. Oysters collected at the production site were sent to the National Food Center. The oysters met the microbiological quality standard required before sale, which did not include virus investigation. Epidemiological analysis showed an association between gastroenteritis and consumption of oysters (OR = 60.4; 95% CI: 26.2-139.3) and razor shells (OR = 3.13; 95% CI: 1.4-6.9). Microbiological analysis confirmed norovirus in affected individuals but not in the oysters that had been tested after a longer purification period than those consumed. Food with a special risk of norovirus transmission should be strictly monitored. Investigators should dispose of the necessary laboratory resources to study food-borne norovirus outbreaks. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Calibration of submerged multi-sluice gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to study experimentally and verify empirically the different parameters affecting the discharge through submerged multiple sluice gates (i.e., the expansion ratios, gates operational management, etc.. Using multiple regression analysis of the experimental results, a general equation for discharge coefficient is developed. The results show, that the increase in the expansion ratio and the asymmetric operation of gates, give higher values for the discharge coefficient. The obtained predictions of the discharge coefficient using the developed equations are compared to the experimental data. The present developed equations showed good consistency and high accuracy.

  5. The Mendelian inheritance of rare flesh and shell colour variants in the black-lipped pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ky, Chin-Long; Nakasai, Seiji; Pommier, Steve; Sham Koua, Manaarii; Devaux, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    Pinctada margaritifera is French Polynesia's most economically important aquaculture species. This pearl oyster has the specific ability to produce cultured pearls with a very wide range of colours, depending on the colour phenotypes of donor oysters used. Its aquaculture is still based on natural spat collection from wild stocks. We investigated three rare colour variants of P. margaritifera - orange flesh, and red and white shell colour phenotypes - in comparison with the wild-type black flesh and shell commonly found in this species. The study aimed to assess the geographic distribution and genetic basis of these colour variants. Colour frequencies were evaluated during transfer and graft processes of pearl oyster seed captured at collector stations. Among the collection locations studied, Mangareva Island showed the highest rate of the orange flesh phenotype, whereas Takaroa and Takume atolls had relatively high rates of red and white shell phenotypes respectively. Broodstocks were made of these rare colour variants, and crosses were performed to produce first- and second-generation progenies to investigate segregation. The results were consistent with Mendelian ratios and suggest a distinct model with no co-dominance: (i) a two-allele model for flesh trait, whereby the orange allele is recessive to the black fleshed type, and (ii) a three-allele model for shell trait, whereby the black wild-type allele is dominant to the red coloration, which is dominant to the white shell. Furthermore, the proposed model provides the basis for producing selected donor pearl oyster lines through hatchery propagation. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  6. Symptomatology of fungal competitors on oyster mushroom’s spawn packets and in vitro evaluation using phytoextracts and a fungicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FA Shamoli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to find out the fungal competitors and symptom studies in damaged Oyster Mushroom spawn packets at National Mushroom Development and Extension Center, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total of nine fungal competitors of oyster mushroom were isolated and identified namely- Trichoderma harzianum Rifai, T. viride Pers. (Green strain, T. viride Pers. (Yellow strain, T. koningii Oudem, Mucor hiemalis Wehmer, Papulaspora byssina Hotson, Neurospora sp. Shear and B.O. Dodge., Aspergillus flavus Link., and Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. on the basis of microscopic, morphological and cultural characteristics. To produce oyster mushroom in an eco-friendly manner and to find out their antifungal potency, 23 plant species belonging to 19 families were screened out against isolated nine fungal competitors of oyster mushroom. Among 23 extracts, the maximum (44% mycelial inhibition of T. harzianum was found due to Aegle marmelos whereas Eclipta alba showed the highest mycelial inhibition (62% of T. viride (Green strain; in case of T. viride (Yellow strain, Cassia tora exhibited the highest mycelial inhibition (39%; Diospyros cordifolia showed the maximum mycelial inhibition (48% of T. koningii; Curcuma longa (rhizome gave the maximum mycelial inhibition (90% of Neurospora sp. There were no significant effects found to control of P. byssina, B. theobromae, M. hiemalis and A. flavus due to 23 different types of botanicals tested. Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride (Green strain, T. viride (Yellow strain, T. koningii, A. flavus, Neurospora sp. and P. byssina was successfully inhibited by 30, 50 and 70 ppm of fungicide-Bavistin 50 WP but B. theobromae and M. hiemalis were not affected by Bavistin at mentioned concentration.

  7. Larval connectivity of pearl oyster through biophysical modelling; evidence of food limitation and broodstock effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yoann; Dumas, Franck; Andréfouët, Serge

    2016-12-01

    The black-lip pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera) is cultured extensively to produce black pearls, especially in French Polynesia atoll lagoons. This aquaculture relies on spat collection, a process that experiences spatial and temporal variability and needs to be optimized by understanding which factors influence recruitment. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of P. margaritifera larval dispersal to both physical and biological factors in the lagoon of Ahe atoll. Coupling a validated 3D larval dispersal model, a bioenergetics larval growth model following the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, and a population dynamics model, the variability of lagoon-scale connectivity patterns and recruitment potential is investigated. The relative contribution of reared and wild broodstock to the lagoon-scale recruitment potential is also investigated. Sensitivity analyses pointed out the major effect of the broodstock population structure as well as the sensitivity to larval mortality rate and inter-individual growth variability to larval supply and to the subsequent settlement potential. The application of the growth model clarifies how trophic conditions determine the larval supply and connectivity patterns. These results provide new cues to understand the dynamics of bottom-dwelling populations in atoll lagoons, their recruitment, and discuss how to take advantage of these findings and numerical models for pearl oyster management.

  8. How Does Oyster Shell Immobilize Cadmium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ho; Kim, Sang Yoon; Owens, Vance N; Park, Sungkyun; Kim, Jiwoong; Hong, Chang Oh

    2018-01-01

    The exact mechanism of cadmium (Cd) immobilization by oyster shell (OS) has not been reported. The effect of OS on Cd immobilization and the exact mechanism should be known before applying remediation technology using OS to Cd contaminated soils. Therefore, the objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of Cd immobilization by OS. Three grams of OS (< 0.84 mm) was reacted with 30 mL of 0-3.56 mg Cd L-1 solution at 25 °C for 48 h. Cadmium adsorption increased with increasing initial concentration of Cd in solution. The X-ray diffraction patterns clearly demonstrated that precipitation of CdCO3 did not take place in suspensions of OS after reacting with up to 3.56 mol Cd L-1. Interestingly, we found formation of Ca0.67Cd0.33CO3 crystalline in suspension of OS after reacting with maximum initial Cd concentrations. Precipitation and chemisorption might contribute to Cd immobilization together. However, we feel confident that chemisorption is the major mechanism by which Cd immobilization occurs with OS. In conclusion, OS could be an effective bioadsorbent to immobilize Cd through formation of geochemically stable Cd mineral.

  9. Strain-dependent norovirus bioaccumulation in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalouf, Haifa; Schaeffer, Julien; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Le Pendu, Jacques; Atmar, Robert L; Crawford, Sue E; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2011-05-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the main agents of gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Some NoV strains bind to shellfish tissues by using carbohydrate structures similar to their human ligands, leading to the hypothesis that such ligands may influence bioaccumulation. This study compares the bioaccumulation efficiencies and tissue distributions in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) of three strains from the two principal human norovirus genogroups. Clear differences between strains were observed. The GI.1 strain was the most efficiently concentrated strain. Bioaccumulation specifically occurred in digestive tissues in a dose-dependent manner, and its efficiency paralleled ligand expression, which was highest during the cold months. In comparison, the GII.4 strain was very poorly bioaccumulated and was recovered in almost all tissues without seasonal influence. The GII.3 strain presented an intermediate behavior, without seasonal effect and with less bioaccumulation efficiency than that of the GI.1 strain during the cold months. In addition, the GII.3 strain was transiently concentrated in gills and mantle before being almost specifically accumulated in digestive tissues. Carbohydrate ligand specificities of the strains at least partly explain the strain-dependent bioaccumulation characteristics. In particular, binding to the digestive-tube-specific ligand should contribute to bioaccumulation, whereas we hypothesize that binding to the sialic acid-containing ligand present in all tissues would contribute to retain virus particles in the gills or mantle and lead to rapid destruction.

  10. Polyspermy inhibition in the oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliegro, M C; Wright, D A

    1983-07-01

    Inhibition of polyspermy is a critical response during fertilization which ensures that only one sperm nucleus will fuse with the female pronucleus to restore the diploid state. Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) eggs prevent polyspermy by a process occurring at the cell surface. However, 5 min after fertilization, there are still functional sperm receptor sites available for penetration by supernumerary sperm. Reinsemination experiments indicate that there is no decrease in the number of penetration sites during this interval. Yet, the number of sperm entering eggs is restricted to one per fertilized egg at a sperm:egg ratio of 1000:1. At a sperm:egg ratio of 10(5):1, an average of only six sperm were able to penetrate each egg. Gamete binding experiments indicate that there is a gradual decrease in the number of sperm bound to eggs starting at approximately 75 sec and continuing until all sperm are detached. Since eggs are fertilized within seconds of insemination and this process takes at least 12 min, it is considered an unlikely mechanism for the polyspermy block. There are no ultrastructural correlates to the polyspermy block nor to the unbinding of sperm, such as secretion of cortical granules or fertilization envelope formation. Based on reinsemination experiments, kinetic data, and ultrastructural observations, we suggest a physiological block to polyspermy which prevents fusion of gamete plasma membranes, and is mediated by an inhibitory effect directly upon the sperm.

  11. PROTOPLAST FUSION BETWEEN WHITE AND BROWN OYSTER MUSHROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Djajanegara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic crossing of white oyster mushroom (Pleurotus floridae to introduce longer storage life trait can only be done within individuals in this particular species. However, longer storage life trait is possessed by brown oyster mushroom (Pleurotus cystidiosus. Therefore, a protoplast fusion experiment between white and brown oyster mushrooms was conducted to obtain an oyster mushroom strain showing high productivity and long storage life. The experiment was done at the biology laboratory of the University of Al Azhar Indonesia from May 2008 to August 2009. Protoplast fusion was done by isolating protoplast from 5-day old monokaryotic mycelia grown in potato dextrose broth (PDB. Around 3.15 x 105 protoplasts ml-1 were harvested using mixture of cellulase Onozuka R-10 (1% and macerozyme R-10 (1% from brown oyster mushroom with 80.61% viability. Similarly, 3.71 x 105 protoplasts ml-1 were harvested using lysing enzyme (2% from white oyster mushroom with 83.68% viability. Protoplast fusions were conducted using 40% PEG6000 for 10 minutes. The candidate fusants were then screened using minimum regeneration media (MRM. There were 22 colonies grew on MRM media and four colonies (FS1, FS2, FS3, and FS4 showed clamp connection as well as primordia formation to be chosen as candidate fusants. However, isozyme studies using malate dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase as marker enzymes confirmed that only FS1 and FS2 were the hybridized products. The two colonies showed different mycelia growth patterns and hyphae sizes, fruit body morphology and productivity compared to their parents. These two fusants, however, did not indicate the presence of longer storage life trait as expected despite a higher productivity achieved by FS1. In this study, the protoplast fusion only yielded higher productivity strain of mushroom with different colors without any changes in storage life.

  12. Wave attenuation by oyster reefs in a shallow coastal bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.; Taube, S. R.; Reidenbach, M.; Kremer, M.

    2016-02-01

    Oyster reefs influence local waves and sediment transport in estuarine environments. Because of their potential for attenuating wave energy, building oyster reefs close to eroding intertidal marshes has been considered as a means of slowing or reversing shoreline erosion. Our study was designed to address the effectiveness of fringing oyster reefs to attenuate wave energy in shallow coastal bays. Our primary focus was on 2 well established reefs constructed of shell material and a newly emplaced reef constructed of cement "oyster castles" that were all located near marshes. We measured wave conditions on both sides of the study reefs and at a control site for periods of 3-4 weeks. Differences in wave heights across the reefs were used to quantify the effects of reefs on waves under varying tidal and wind conditions. The reefs reduced wave heights by an average of up to 17% but the reductions were largest at intermediate water depths. At low water depths, waves were small regardless of wind speed and were completely interrupted by the emergent reef. At water depths greater than about 0.3 m above the reef, the reefs in our study area had significantly less impact on wave heights. The pattern of wave height change as a function of water depth and wind speed was very consistent for the three study reefs, despite differences in the material comprising the reefs, their orientation relative to the shoreline, and wind conditions. The waves most likely to drive marsh retreat are those that reach the marsh when the elevation of the water surface is close to the elevation of the marsh edge, therefore marshes with an edge elevation near mean sea level are most likely to benefit from reductions in wave energy associated with oyster reefs like those in our study area. Marshes with a high edge scarp may not experience significant reduction in the wave energy driving marsh retreat from the presence of a fringing oyster reef.

  13. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 µM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, produced 187 mM of GABA.

  14. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Oyster Leases, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_oyster_lease_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) oyster leases data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  15. Damage detection in submerged plates using ultrasonic guided waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suitable ultrasonic guided wave modes with optimum scanning capabilities have been generated and identified in submerged plate system. Finally, the propagation of selected modes through submerged notched plates is investigated. Sensitivity of leaky waves to the notches has been studied. The methodology would help ...

  16. Automating a submerged pump method for operating oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, I.

    1984-01-01

    The basic parameters of wells which operate in a mode of submerged operation are presented. The basic systems for measuring and testing the parameters of submerged operation are described. Worldwide experience in solving this particular problem is analyzed. Romanian (SRR) use of systems for automation, remote signaling and remote management is examined.

  17. Impacts of climate change on submerged and emergent wetland plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick T. Short; Sarian Kosten; Pamela A. Morgan; Sparkle L Malone; Gregg E. Moore

    2016-01-01

    Submerged and emergent wetland plant communities are evaluated for their response to global climate change (GCC), focusing on seagrasses, submerged freshwater plants, tidal marsh plants, freshwater marsh plants and mangroves. Similarities and differences are assessed in plant community responses to temperature increase, CO2increase, greater UV-B exposure, sea...

  18. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... 3Engineering Research Center of Ecology and Agricultural Use of Wetland, Ministry of Education, Yangzte University,. Jingzhou 434025, P.R. .... intolerance to submergence) and M202(Sub1A) by qRT-. PCR. We identified a novel gene responsive to submergence, called RS1. The expression patterns of.

  19. Identification of a novel submergence response gene regulated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our results also show that RS1 is highly expressed under submergence, drought, and NaCl stresses, but not under cold or dehydration stress. Hormone ABA treatment induces, whereas GA treatment decreases, RS1 expression. The RS1 and Sub1A genes are co-regulated under submergence. Overexpression of RS1 in ...

  20. Corncob hydrolysate, an efficient substrate for Monascus pigment production through submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongxin; Yin, Zheng; Hu, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Monascus pigment has traditionally been produced by the fermentation of Monascus using rice powder or glucose as a culture substrate. Submerged fermentation can produce stable Monascus pigment yield and control the accumulation of the by-product, citrinin, which can then be more easily removed. To reduce the cost of Monascus submerged fermentation, the feasibility of corncob hydrolysate as an alternative substrate was investigated. Results showed that, when compared with a conventional glucose medium, the corncob hydrolysate medium produced an equivalent pigment yield without stimulating citrinin accumulation. Furthermore, the corncob hydrolysate medium and cultivation conditions were optimized to enhance pigment production and decrease citrinin synthesis. When Monascus sp. was cultured under dark conditions in the presence of caprylic acid, pigment production was increased to 25.8 ± 0.8 UA500 /mL, which was higher than that achieved in a glucose medium (24.0 ± 0.9 UA500 /mL), and those obtained in previously reported Monascus submerged fermentations using the same yield unit; on the other hand, citrinin accumulation was decreased to 26.2 ± 1.9 µg/L, which was significantly lower than that generated in the glucose control (44.3 ± 2.2 µg/L) and in those previously reported fermentations. Thus, corncob hydrolysate was proved to be an efficient alternative substrate for Monascus pigment production through submerged fermentation, which showed significant advantages over a conventional glucose substrate. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Medicinal and antimicrobial role of the oyster culinary-medicinal mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (higher Basidiomycetes) cultivated on banana agrowastes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjadia, Prashant D; Nagee, Anju; Pandya, Parth Y; Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N; Sanghvi, Gaurav V; Dave, Gaurav S

    2014-01-01

    Oyster mushrooms, species of the genus Pleurotus, are recognized for producing secondary metabolites with important medicinal properties. Investigations were carried out to evaluate the antioxidative and antimicrobial properties of the edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (MTCC142) extracts cultivated on banana agrowastes. Ethanolic extracts showed antimicrobial activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and their in vitro antifungal activities against all fungi tested revealed a promising role. Qualitative phytochemical analysis of Pleurotus grown on yeast dextrose broth and banana agrowaste confirmed the presence of steroids, cardiac glycosides, terpenoids, and alkaloids, whereas ethanolic extract after 40 days exhibited a phenol concentration of 521.67 µg/mL in banana waste compared to 155 µg/mL in yeast dextrose broth. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ethanolic extracts ranged from 19.74 to 56.84 mg/mL and 35.53 to 102.31 mg/mL in solid-state and submerged grown mycelium extracts, respectively, after 40 days. Moreover, banana agrowaste could be a significant economic source for the production of the oyster mushroom P. ostreatus. The nutritive, medicinal, and antimicrobial properties of P. ostreatus can be used to develop a new nutraceutical formulation; it can also be used as an additive to routine and fast food.

  2. Isolation, culture optimization and physico-chemical characterization of laccase enzyme from Pleurotus fossulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P; Hari, R; Chakraborty, B; Mandal, B; Naskar, S; Das, Nirmalendu

    2014-01-15

    Pleurotus fossulatus (Cooke) Sace is member of oyster mushroom can produced extracellular laccase (benzenediol: oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2) in submerged fermentation. To analyze the optimum production for laccase P. fossulatus was cultured both in stationary and shaking condition in different media. Partial purification of laccase was done after 0-80% ammonium sulphate precipitation, followed by DEAE (Diethylaminoethyl) Sephadex (A-50) anion exchange chromatography. Potato-sucrose peptone (PSP) medium and Potato-dextrose (PD) medium showed highest laccase production in shaking and stationary conditions, respectively. Though the time required for optimum laccase production in stationary condition was much more than the shaking condition but the amount of laccase was about 2.75t greater in former condition. The laccase produced in stationary condition was more stable than the enzyme produced in shaking condition. The partially purified enzyme showed highest affinity towards o-dianisidine than guaiacol and ABTS (2,2'-Azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as evidenced by their K(m). The physico-chemical properties of the laccase suggested the significance of this enzyme in industrial applications.

  3. Millennial-scale sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay Native American oyster fishery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Torben C; Reeder-Myers, Leslie A; Hofman, Courtney A; Breitburg, Denise; Lockwood, Rowan; Henkes, Gregory; Kellogg, Lisa; Lowery, Darrin; Luckenbach, Mark W; Mann, Roger; Ogburn, Matthew B; Southworth, Melissa; Wah, John; Wesson, James; Hines, Anson H

    2016-06-07

    Estuaries around the world are in a state of decline following decades or more of overfishing, pollution, and climate change. Oysters (Ostreidae), ecosystem engineers in many estuaries, influence water quality, construct habitat, and provide food for humans and wildlife. In North America's Chesapeake Bay, once-thriving eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations have declined dramatically, making their restoration and conservation extremely challenging. Here we present data on oyster size and human harvest from Chesapeake Bay archaeological sites spanning ∼3,500 y of Native American, colonial, and historical occupation. We compare oysters from archaeological sites with Pleistocene oyster reefs that existed before human harvest, modern oyster reefs, and other records of human oyster harvest from around the world. Native American fisheries were focused on nearshore oysters and were likely harvested at a rate that was sustainable over centuries to millennia, despite changing Holocene climatic conditions and sea-level rise. These data document resilience in oyster populations under long-term Native American harvest, sea-level rise, and climate change; provide context for managing modern oyster fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere around the world; and demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be applied broadly to other fisheries.

  4. Detection of hepatitis A virus and bacterial contamination in raw oysters in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittigul, Leera; Pombubpa, Kannika; Sukonthalux, Suntharee; Rattanatham, Tippawan; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Diraphat, Pornphan

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in raw oysters (Crassostrea belcheri) using a virus concentration method and reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR). A total of 220 oyster samples were collected from oyster farms and local markets in Thailand. HAV was found in three oyster samples. Nested PCR products of HAV detected in oysters were characterized further by DNA sequencing of the VP1/2A region and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. All HAV sequences (168 basepairs) were associated with human HAV subgenotype IB (GIB). Fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli were determined using the multiple tube fermentation method, to assess the microbiological quality of collected oysters. Among oyster samples tested, 65% had fecal coliforms higher than the standard level for raw shellfish [coliforms contained HAV GIB. E. coli was found in all HAV-positive oyster samples. The results suggest a significant presence of HAV and bacterial indicators of fecal contamination in raw oysters, which are a health risk for consumers and a source of gastrointestinal illness. Enteric viruses should also be tested to assess the microbiological quality of oysters.

  5. Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

    2010-03-25

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

  6. Submerged arc welding of heavy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The submerged arc process is particularly suitable for heavy plate welding because of its ability to combine very high deposit rates along with excellent quality. It does these things without the smoke and spatter often accompanying other processes. It is available today in several forms that are pointed to the fabricators of heavy sections with long, short or round about welds. Tandem arc full automatic equipment is particularly suitable for those long heavy welds where speed and deposit rate are of the first order. An attachment called long stick-out which makes use of the IR drop on long electrode extensions can be included on this equipment to increase deposition rates 50% or more.

  7. Modeling tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A. A.; Adcroft, A.; Sergienko, O.; Marques, G.

    2017-08-01

    Large tabular icebergs calved from Antarctic ice shelves have long lifetimes (due to their large size), during which they drift across large distances, altering ambient ocean circulation, bottom-water formation, sea-ice formation, and biological primary productivity in the icebergs' vicinity. However, despite their importance, the current generation of ocean circulation models usually do not represent large tabular icebergs. In this study, we develop a novel framework to model large tabular icebergs submerged in the ocean. In this framework, tabular icebergs are represented by pressure-exerting Lagrangian elements that drift in the ocean. The elements are held together and interact with each other via bonds. A breaking of these bonds allows the model to emulate calving events (i.e., detachment of a tabular iceberg from an ice shelf) and tabular icebergs breaking up into smaller pieces. Idealized simulations of a calving tabular iceberg, its drift, and its breakup demonstrate capabilities of the developed framework.

  8. Crassulacean acid metabolism in submerged aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Sybesme, C.

    1984-01-01

    CO2-fixation in the dark is known to occur in various organs of many plants. However, only in species possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) does dark CO2-fixation contribute substantially to the carbon economy of the plant. Until very recently CAM was known only from terrestrial species, largely drought adapted succulents. The discovery of CAM in the submerged aquatic fern ally Isoetes howellii (Isoetaceae)(Keeley 1981) adds a new dimension to our understanding of crassulacean acid metabolism. In this paper I will summarize 1) the evidence of CAM in Isoetes howellii, 2) the data on the distribution of CAM in aquatic species, and 3) the work to date on the functional significance of CAM in aquatic species.

  9. Fishing activities on the Central Oyster Grounds 2006-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrugge, van J.A.E.; Bartelings, H.; Hamon, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Central Oyster Grounds are generally awarded for their ecological values. The area is especially important for benthos because of their species diversity and density, the total biomass, distribution of species, and the balanced composition of the benthic community' (Ministry of Economic affairs,

  10. Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus) are useful for utilizing lignocellulosic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. ADEBAYO

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... This review shows the biotechnological potential of oyster mushrooms with lignocellulosic biomass. The bioprocessing of plant byproducts using Pleurotus species provides numerous value-added products, such as basidiocarps, animal feed, enzymes, and other useful materials. The biodegradation.

  11. Removal of Arsenic with Oyster Shell: Experimental Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Atiqur Rahman, , and

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Oyster shell has tremendous potential as a remediation material for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. A single arsenic removal system was developed with oyster shell for tube well water containing arsenic. The system removes arsenic from water by adsorption through fine oyster shell. Various conditions that affect the adsorption/desorption of arsenic were investigated. Adsorption column methods showed the removal of As(III under the following conditions: initial As concentration, 100 µg /L; oyster shell amount, 6 g; particle size, <355µm ; treatment flow rate, 1.7 mL/min; and pH 6.5. Arsenic concentration of the treated water were below the Bangladesh drinking water standard of 50 µg/L for As. The desorption efficiencies with 2M of KOH after the treatment of groundwater were in the range of 80-83%. A combination of techniques was used to measure the pH, conductivity, cations and anions. The average concentrations of other inorganic constituents of health concern (Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe in treated water were below their respective WHO guideline for drinking. The present study might provide new avenues to achieve the arsenic concentrations required for drinking water recommended by Bangladesh and the World Health Organization (WHO.

  12. Potential of organic residues in producing oyster mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low mushroom yields are observed when non-supplemented substrates are used for production. The experiments were carried out to evaluate potential benefits of organic supplements in cotton residues, maize stover and wheat straw substrates used for cultivation of oyster mushroom. Mixed formulations at various doses ...

  13. Genotyping and evaluation of Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Hendrickx, P.M.; Sumiati, E.

    2005-01-01

    Oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus) represent one of the most popular mushroom species grown in Indonesia. There is a need for strains that are better adapted to the climate conditions at Java, where most mushrooms in Indonesia are produced. Strains that can produce mushrooms at 22 to 28 oC and

  14. Yield evaluation of Pleurotus pulmonarius (Oyster mushroom) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yield evaluation of Pleurotus pulmonarius (Oyster mushroom) on different agricultural wastes and various grains for spawn production. ... Palm fruit husk was the best performing substrate with the highest total yield harvest (190.0g), biological efficiency (63.3%) and production rate (6.33%); banana leaves gave the lowest ...

  15. Norovirus outbreak associated with undercooked oysters and secondary household transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano-Sobsey, E; Sweat, D; Hall, A; Breedlove, F; Rodriguez, R; Greene, S; Pierce, A; Sobsey, M; Davies, M; Ledford, S L

    2012-02-01

    During December 2009, over 200 individuals reported gastrointestinal symptoms after dining at a North Carolina restaurant. An outbreak investigation included a case-control study of restaurant patrons, a secondary household transmission study, environmental assessment of the restaurant facilities and operations, and laboratory analysis of stool and food samples. Illness was primarily associated with consumption of steamed oysters (odds ratio 12, 95% confidence interval 4·8-28) and 20% (8/41 households) reported secondary cases, with a secondary attack rate of 14% among the 70 susceptible household contacts. Norovirus RNA was detected in 3/5 stool specimens from ill patrons; sequencing of RT-PCR products from two of these specimens identified identical genogroup II genotype 12 sequences. Final cooked temperatures of the steamed oysters were generally inadequate to inactivate norovirus, ranging from 21°C to 74°C. Undercooked contaminated oysters pose a similar risk for norovirus illness as raw oysters and household contacts are at risk for secondary infection.

  16. Heavy metal pollution levels in water and oysters, Saccostrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metal (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead and zinc) concentrations in mangrove forests were investigated in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and oyster samples from the Mzinga Creek and Ras Dege mangrove stands, Tanzania, using Inductively Coupled Plasma–Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

  17. Characterisation of Oyster Shell for Neutralisation of Bio-leached ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation studies of Oyster Shell (Mercenera mercenera) collected from coastal towns of Ghana and its neutralising effect on bio-leached effluent has been studied using XRF, XRD, Zeta Meter, BET and SEM/EDX. The study confirmed that OS contains high calcium equivalent to about 54% CaO. The OS consists ...

  18. Episodic recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata (Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An exceptionally good recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata is reported from the Transkei coast. Prior to 1989 individuals smaller than 20 mm accounted for less than 3% of the population. New recruits now account for between 25% and 48% of standing stock. This single recruitment, which is 6 to 31 times the ...

  19. Episodic recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata (Born ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-10-03

    Oct 3, 1989 ... An exceptionally good recruitment of the rock oyster Saccostrea cucullata is reported from the Transkei coast. Prior to 1989 individuals smaller than 20 mm accounted for less than 3% of the population. New recruits now account for between 25% and 48% of standing stock. This single recruitment, which is 6 ...

  20. Performance of oysters in reciprocal transplants between two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyster spat were reciprocally transplanted between Benya Lagoon at Elmina and Nakwa Lagoon at Nakwa and grown on cultches. Shell growth, dry meat weight, and survival of the transplants were monitored for at least six months and compared with their counterparts at their new locations as well as their places of origin.

  1. Effect of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus ostreatus ) mycelia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on the mycoremediation effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia on petroleum-hydrocarbon-contaminated substrate was carried out in the mushroom unit of the Faculty of Agriculture Demonstration Farm, located in the University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The study aimed at determining ...

  2. Carbon And Nitrogen Requirements For The Cultivation Of Oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon and Nitrogen requirements for the cultivation of (Pleurotus sajor-caju) oyster mushroom were studied. It was found that under these experimental conditions, the carbon compounds supported growth except ribose, starch and dextrin. Cellulose was the most utilized carbon followed by glucose and mannose.

  3. Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation technique using re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-08-31

    Aug 31, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. Alternative re-usable substrate containers for fructification are required because plastic bags currently used suffocate soil biotic entities. They are a cost for mushroom farmers who purchase plastic bags in every oyster mushroom crop and they are left as non-biodegradable wastes, which are ...

  4. Yield performances and nutritional contents of three oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine nutritive value and yield performance of the three types of oyster mushroom; Pleurotus eryngii (Dc. Ex Fr.) quel), Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) Kumm.) and. Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr.) Singer, cultivated on wheat stalk. The total fresh mushroom yields obtained with 100 g material (70% ...

  5. Oyster mushrooms ( Pleurotus ) are useful for utilizing lignocellulosic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review shows the biotechnological potential of oyster mushrooms with lignocellulosic biomass. The bioprocessing of plant byproducts using Pleurotus species provides numerous value-added products, such as basidiocarps, animal feed, enzymes, and other useful materials. The biodegradation and bioconversion of ...

  6. Performance of oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus ostreatus ) in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate different substrates for establishment of yield performance of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). The substrates were prepared from single or mixture of different agricultural waste materials supplemented with lime and water as additive to each substrate. A total of eight ...

  7. experimental spat collecting of the edible oyster, saccost rea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    substrates including man-made structures (e.g. jetties, ship hulls, beacons). According to Lewis (1964) and Hartnoll (1976), these oysters are abundant in the upper eulittoral zone where they grow to a maximum shell length of 65 mm (van Someren and Whitehead 1961) but experience stunting in crowded conditions.

  8. Performance of selected eastern oyster lines across northeastern US estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern oyster production derived from aquaculture has expanded, but growth potential is constrained by losses to disease. Breeding programs supporting industry in the Northeast have targeted resistance to three diseases: MSX, Dermo, and ROD. Selected lines should possess some level of resistance a...

  9. Genetic variation in anti-parasite behavior in oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavioral avoidance of disease-causing parasites provides a first line of defense against the threat of infection, particularly when hosts are exposed to free-living parasite stages in the external environment. We report that suspension-feeding oysters (Crassostrea virginica) respond to the presenc...

  10. From artificial structures to self-sustaining oyster reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, B.; Troost, K.; Van den Ende, D.; Nieuwhof, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Ysebaert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly recognized as essential elements within coastal defence schemes and coastal adaptation. The capacity of coastal ecosystems, like marshes and oyster reefs, to maintain their own habitat and grow with sea-level rise via biophysical feedbacks is seen as an important

  11. From artificial structures to self-sustaining oyster reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walles, B.; Troost, K.; Ende, van den D.; Nieuwhof, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Ysebaert, T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly recognized as essential elements within coastal defence schemes and coastal adaptation. The capacity of coastal ecosystems, like marshes and oyster reefs, to maintain their own habitat and grow with sea-level rise via biophysical feedbacks is seen as an

  12. Bioeconomic analysis of Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The present paper deals with the surplus production models of Verhulst-Schaefer and Gompertz-Fox that are applied to the Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery to investigate the sustainability properties of the stock and management of the fishery.

  13. Workshop on ROVs and deep submergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deep-submergence community has an opportunity on March 6 to participate in a unique teleconferencing demonstration of a state-of-the-art, remotely operated underwater research vehicle known as the Jason-Medea System. Jason-Medea has been developed over the past decade by scientists, engineers, and technicians at the Deep Submergence Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The U.S. Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Research, and the National Science Foundation are sponsoring the workshop to explore the roles that modern computational, communications, and robotics technologies can play in deep-sea oceanographic research.Through the cooperation of Electronic Data Systems, Inc., the Jason Foundation, and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., 2-1/2 hours of air time will be available from 3:00 to 5:30 PM EST on March 6. Twenty-seven satellite downlink sites will link one operating research vessel and the land-based operation with workshop participants in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Bermuda. The research ship Laney Chouest will be in the midst of a 3-week educational/research program in the Sea of Cortez, between Baja California and mainland Mexico. This effort is focused on active hydrothermal vents driven by heat flow from the volcanically active East Pacific Rise, which underlies the sediment-covered Guaymas Basin. The project combines into a single-operation, newly-developed robotic systems, state-of-the-art mapping and sampling tools, fiber-optic data transmission from the seafloor, instantaneous satellite communication from ship to shore, and a sophisticated array of computational and telecommunications networks. During the workshop, land-based scientists will observe and participate directly with their seagoing colleagues as they conduct seafloor research.

  14. Submerged membrane distillation for seawater desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2014-08-11

    A submerged membrane distillation (SMD) process for fresh water production from Red Sea water using commercially available hollow fiber membranes has been successfully employed and compared with the conventional direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. The hollow fiber membranes have been characterized for its morphology using field effect scanning electron microscope. In SMD process, a bunch of hollow fiber membranes are glued together at both ends to get a simplified open membrane module assembly submerged into the coolant tank equipped with a mechanical stirrer. Hot feed stream is allowed to pass through the lumen side of the membrane using a feed pump. Continuous stirring at the coolant side will reduce the temperature and concentration polarization. During the conventional DCMD process, using feed-coolant streams with co-current and counter-current flows has been tested and the results are compared in this study. In SMD process, a water vapor flux of 10.2 kg m-2 h-1 is achieved when using a feed inlet temperature of 80°C and coolant temperature of 20°C. Under the same conditions, during conventional DCMD process, a water vapor flux of 11.6 and 10.1 kg m-2 h-1 were observed during counter-current and co-current flow streams, respectively. Results show that the water production in the SMD process is comparable with the conventional DCMD process, while the feed-coolant flow streams are in the co-current direction. During conventional DCMD operation, a 15% increase in the water production is observed when feed-coolant streams are in the counter-current direction compared to the co-current direction. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral administration of submerged cultivated Grifola frondosa enhances phagocytic activity in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisu; Ha, Choi-Lan; Cheng, Tso-Lin; Cheng, Su-Yun; Lian, Tzi-Wei; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2008-02-01

    Grifola frondosa fruiting body (Maitake) has been used as a dietary supplement due to its antitumour and immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of orally administered submerged cultivated G. frondosa mixture, including both mycelium and culture broth, in a healthy murine model. Composition analyses showed that submerged cultivated G. frondosa mixture contained only 32.48% carbohydrate, which was less than half of fruiting bodies. The content of adenosine, a potential immunomodulatory agent in medicinal mushrooms, was 2.8 mg g(-1). After feeding 8-week-old female BALB/cByJ mice with AIN-93G diet containing 0% (C), 1% (G1), 3% (G3) or 5% (G5) (wt/wt) G. frondosa mixture for 31 days, neither body weight nor the outward appearance of organs showed any significant difference among different diet groups. Splenocyte subpopulation, mitogen-activated cytokine release and splenic NK activity were not affected by G. frondosa administration, either. On the other hand, the phagocytic activity was enhanced in leucocytes of groups G3 and G5, without exerting detectable levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggested that oral administration of submerged cultivated G. frondosa mixture may enhance host innate immunity against foreign pathogens without eliciting adverse inflammatory response.

  16. Development and validation of phytotoxicity tests with emergent and submerged aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.S. [Carolina Ecotox, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Powell, R.L. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Nelson, M.K. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity testing procedures have recently been developed for assessment of contaminant effects on emergent and submerged aquatic macrophytes commonly found in freshwater wetlands. These tests have potential application in risk assessments for contaminated wetlands as well as for new chemical substances. The objective of this study was to evaluate and modify, if necessary, these methods and to validate them, using two benchmark chemicals, in a contract laboratory setting. Oryza sativa (domestic rice) was used as a surrogate emergent vascular plant, while Ceratophylium demersum (coontail) and Myriophyllum heterophyllum (variable-leaf milfoil) were the representative submerged vascular plants. Subsequent to evaluating culturing techniques and testing conditions, toxicity tests were conducted using boron and metribuzin. The test procedure for the emergent plants involves a two-week pro-exposure period followed by a two-week aqueous exposure. Five types of sediment, including both natural and artificial sediments, were evaluated for use with rice. Fresh weight and chlorophyll a content were the selected test endpoints. The submerged plants were exposed for two weeks, and the response variables evaluated included length, weight (fresh and dry), and root number. The sensitivity of these tests were comparable to the results obtained for the same two chemicals using the green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum, and the duckweed, Lemna gibba, with the exception that rice was less sensitive to metribuzin than the other species.

  17. The influence of pearl oyster farming on reef fish abundance and diversity in Ahe, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Laurent E; Carpenter, Kent E

    2014-01-15

    Many cultured pearl farms are located in areas of the Pacific that have thriving, highly diverse fish communities but the impacts of farming on these communities are poorly understood. We studied the effects of pearl oyster farming on shore fish abundance and diversity in the lagoon of Ahe, French Polynesia by adapting roving diver census methods to the coral reef bommies of the lagoon and compared 16 sites with high pearl farming impact to others with no direct impact. Pearl farming has a slightly positive effect on reef fish abundance (N) and no significant impact on fish diversity (H) or community composition. This is important when considering the ecological sustainability of pearl farming in French Polynesia and suggests that a potential synergy between pearl farms and marine conservation should be further explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental infection of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas spat by ostreid herpesvirus 1: demonstration of oyster spat susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schikorski David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2008 and 2009, acute mortalities occurred in France among Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, spat. Different hypothesis including the implication of environmental factors, toxic algae and/or pathogens have been explored. Diagnostic tests indicated that OsHV-1 including a particular genotype, termed OsHV-1 μVar, was detected in most of samples and especially in moribund oysters with the highlighting of virus particles looking like herpes viruses by TEM examination. In this study, an experimental protocol to reproduce OsHV-1 infection in laboratory conditions was developed. This protocol was based on the intramuscular injection of filtered (0.22 μm tissue homogenates prepared from naturally OsHV-1 infected spat collected on French coasts during mortality outbreaks in 2008. Results of the experimental trials showed that mortalities were induced after injection. Moreover, filtered tissue homogenates induced mortalities whereas the same tissue homogenates exposed to an ultraviolet (UV treatment did not induce any mortality suggesting that oyster spat mortalities require the presence of a UV sensitive agent. Furthermore, analysis of injected oyster spat revealed the detection of high amounts of OsHV-1 DNA by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, TEM analysis demonstrated the presence of herpes virus particles. The developed protocol allowed to maintain sources of infective virus which can be useful for the development of further studies concerning the transmission and the development of OsHV-1 infection.

  19. A comparative proteomic study on the effects of metal pollution in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanlan; Ji, Chenglong; Wu, Huifeng; Tan, Qiaoguo; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-15

    The metal pollution has posed great risk on the coastal organisms along the Jiulongjiang Estuary in South China. In this work, two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics was applied to the oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis from metal pollution sites to characterize the proteomic responses to metal pollution. Metal accumulation and proteomic responses indicated that the oysters from BJ site were more severely contaminated than those from FG site. Compared with those oyster samples from the clean site (JZ), metal pollution induced cellular injuries, oxidative and immune stresses in oyster heapatopancreas from both BJ and FG sites via differential metabolic pathways. In addition, metal pollution in BJ site induced disturbance in energy and lipid metabolisms in oysters. Results indicated that cathepsin L and ferritin GF1 might be the biomarkers of As and Fe in oyster C. hongkongensis, respectively. This study demonstrates that proteomics is a useful tool for investigating biological effects induced by metal pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ocean acidification increases the vulnerability of native oysters to predation by invasive snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Eric; Gaylord, Brian; Hettinger, Annaliese; Lenz, Elizabeth A; Meyer, Kirstin; Hill, Tessa M

    2014-03-07

    There is growing concern that global environmental change might exacerbate the ecological impacts of invasive species by increasing their per capita effects on native species. However, the mechanisms underlying such shifts in interaction strength are poorly understood. Here, we test whether ocean acidification, driven by elevated seawater pCO₂, increases the susceptibility of native Olympia oysters to predation by invasive snails. Oysters raised under elevated pCO₂ experienced a 20% increase in drilling predation. When presented alongside control oysters in a choice experiment, 48% more high-CO₂ oysters were consumed. The invasive snails were tolerant of elevated CO₂ with no change in feeding behaviour. Oysters raised under acidified conditions did not have thinner shells, but were 29-40% smaller than control oysters, and these smaller individuals were consumed at disproportionately greater rates. Reduction in prey size is a common response to environmental stress that may drive increasing per capita effects of stress-tolerant invasive predators.

  1. Benthic surveys of the historic pearl oyster beds of Qatar reveal a dramatic ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, D; Al-Maslamani, I; Chatting, M; Giraldes, B

    2016-12-15

    The study aimed to confirm the presence of historic oyster banks of Qatar and code the biotopes present. The research also collated historical records and scientific publications to create a timeline of fishery activity. The oyster banks where once an extremely productive economic resource however, intense overfishing, extreme environmental conditions and anthropogenic impacts caused a fishery collapse. The timeline highlighted the vulnerability of ecosystem engineering bivalves if overexploited. The current status of the oyster banks meant only one site could be described as oyster dominant. This was unexpected as the sites were located in areas which once supported a highly productive oyster fishery. The research revealed the devastating effect that anthropogenic impacts can have on a relatively robust marine habitat like an oyster bed and it is hoped these findings will act as a driver to investigate and map other vulnerable habitats within the region before they too become compromised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pearl oysters Pinctada margaritifera grazing on natural plankton in Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jonathan; Dupuy, Christine; Bouvy, Marc; Couraudon-Réale, Marine; Charpy, Loïc; Pouvreau, Stephane; Le Moullac, Gilles; Le Pennec, Marcel; Cochard, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    In atoll lagoons of French Polynesia, growth and reproduction of pearl oysters are mainly driven by plankton concentration. However, the actual diet of black-lip pearl oysters Pinctada margaritifera in these lagoons is poorly known. To fill this gap, we used the flow through chamber method to measure clearance rates of P. margaritifera in Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia). We found: (i) that pearl oysters cleared plankton at a rate that was positively related to plankton biovolume, (ii) that nanoflagellates were the main source of carbon for the pearl oysters, and (iii) that the quantity and origin of carbon filtrated by pearl oysters was highly dependent on the concentration and composition of plankton. These results provide essential elements for the comprehension of growth and reproduction variability of pearl oysters in atoll lagoons of French Polynesia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel toll-like receptor from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii is induced in response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuyuan; Liang, Haiying; Wang, Zhixin; Lei, Qiannan; Xia, Liqun

    2017-12-01

    Graft rejection due to immune incompatibility is a common occurrence in pearl culture, which often cause death to the host oyster. To improve cultured pearl production, host mortality and bead rejection rates must be reduced. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in innate immunity, and may be related to allograft rejection. Here, we cloned the TLR4 cDNA from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii (PmTLR4). PmTLR4 cDNA was 3138bp, including a 2625bp open reading frame encoding 874 amino acids. The predicted PmTLR4 protein was structurally typical of the TLR family. PmTLR4 had relatively high sequence similarity and identity to the TLR4 of the Cyclina sinensis (48.1% and 27.6%, respectively). Multiple alignment of TLR4 sequences across species indicated that the Toll/interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor domain was conserved among species. PmTLR4 mRNA was expressed in all tissues tested, with the most abundant mRNA expression in hepatopancreas and gill in P. fucata martensii. After being stressed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure or the nucleus insertion operation, PmTLR4 mRNA expression increased significantly in the hemocytes as compared to controls. Peak level of PmTLR4 mRNA was observed 6h after the LPS injection, and 2d after the nucleus insertion operation. These data suggest that PmTLR4 may play a vital role in the induction of innate immunity and is therefore associated with allograft immunity in the pearl oyster P. fucata martensii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Timothy B.; Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele...

  5. The curious case of eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica stock status in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pine III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Apalachicola Bay, Florida, eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica industry has annually produced about 10% of the U.S. oyster harvest. Today's simple individual-operator, hand-tonging, small-vessel fishery is remarkably similar to the one that began in the 1800s. Unprecedented attention is currently being given to the status of oyster resources in Apalachicola Bay because this fishery has become central to the decision making related to multistate water disputes in the southeastern United States, as well as millions of dollars in funding for restoration programs related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The oyster fishery collapsed in 2012, leading to large economic losses and community concerns over the current and future status of oyster resources, ecosystem health, and local economic opportunities. We used best available data to assess what mechanism(s may have led to the collapse of the Apalachicola Bay oyster fishery. We then assessed the efficacy of alternative management strategies (e.g., restoration, fishery closure to accelerate oyster population recovery. Our results suggest that the Apalachicola Bay oyster population is not overfished in the sense that recruitment has been limited by harvest, but that the 2012 collapse was driven by lower-than-average numbers and/or poor survival of juvenile oysters in the years preceding the collapse. This reduction in recruitment not only reduced the biomass of oysters available to harvest, but from a population resilience perspective, likely reduced the amount of dead shell material available as larval settlement area. Although the Apalachicola Bay oyster fishery has proven resilient over its >150-year history to periods of instability, this fishery now seems to be at a crossroads in terms of continued existence and possibly risks an irreversible collapse. How to use the restoration funds available, and which restoration and management practices to follow, are choices that will determine the

  6. Metals in crab, oyster and sediment in two South Carolina estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus and the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica have the ability to concentrate metals from the marine environment. From August 1979 to May 1981, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc concentrations were determined quarterly for crab, oyster, and bottom sediment from two estuarine areas in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina. The results of the analyses indicate that crab muscle and oyster meats obtained from locations nearest domestic and industrial activities have the highest Cu and Zn concentrations.

  7. An outbreak of norovirus caused by consumption of oysters from geographically dispersed harvest sites, British Columbia, Canada, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Samara T; McIntyre, Lorraine; MacDougall, Laura; Kelly, Deirdre; Liem, Sing; Schallié, Klaus; McNabb, Alan; Houde, Alain; Mueller, Peter; Ward, Pierre; Trottier, Yvon-Louis; Brassard, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, an increase in gastrointestinal illness following oyster consumption was reported in British Columbia. An investigation was initiated to explore the association between norovirus infection and consumption of British Columbia oysters and to identify the source of oyster contamination. The outbreak investigation included active surveillance for human cases, two cohort studies, trace-back of oysters, and laboratory testing of oysters and human stools. Enhanced surveillance identified 26 confirmed and 53 clinical cases over 3 months. Oyster consumption was associated with illness in one cohort and suggestive in the other. Oysters were traced to 14 geographically dispersed harvest sites, 18 suppliers, and 45 points of purchase. Norovirus BCCDC03-028 (genotype I.2) was detected in 50% of human specimens. Experimental methods detected norovirus in 12 oyster samples. Sequencing identified mixed clonal patterns in the oysters with one direct sequence match between an oyster sample and the associated human specimen. The consumption of raw oysters led to norovirus infection. The source of oyster contamination remained unidentified. The geographical dispersion of implicated harvest sites was unusual. This outbreak is unlike most shellfish outbreaks that can be traced back to a common source and challenges conventional thinking that all oyster-related norovirus outbreaks of are a result of point source contamination.

  8. Durability performance of submerged concrete structures - phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This project determined that severe corrosion of steel can occur in the submerged : portions of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments. Field studies of decommissioned : pilings from Florida bridges revealed multiple instances of stron...

  9. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  10. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  11. Marine algal flora of submerged Angria Bank (Arabian Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Reddy, C.R.K.; Ambiye, V.

    Submerged Angria Bank was surveyed for the deep water marine algal flora. About 57 species were reported from this bank for the first time. Rhodophyta dominated (30 species) followed by Chlorophyta (18 species) and Phaeophyta (9 species). A few...

  12. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  13. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  14. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  15. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic). American Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OYSTERS, *MARINE BIOLOGY , COASTAL REGIONS, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTS, REQUIREMENTS, LIFE CYCLES, BIOLOGY , AQUATIC ORGANISMS, FISHES, INVERTEBRATES ...HISTORY, LIFE( BIOLOGY ), POPULATION, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY), SALINITY, FEEDING, ESTUARIES, TAXONOMY

  16. Bioaccumulation and metabolomics responses in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis impacted by different levels of metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    Jiulong River Estuary, located in southern China, was heavily contaminated by metal pollution. In this study, the estuarine oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis were transplanted to two sites with similar hydrological conditions but different levels of metal pollution in Jiulong River Estuary over a six-month period. We characterized the time-series change of metal bioaccumulation and final metabolomics responses of oysters. Following transplantation, all metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in the oyster digestive glands had elevated concentrations over time. By the end of six-month exposure, Cu, Zn and Cd were the main metals significantly differentiating the two sites. Using (1)H NMR metabolite approach, we further demonstrated the disturbance in osmotic regulation, energy metabolism, and glycerophospholipid metabolism induced by metal contaminations. Six months later, the oysters transplanted in the two sites showed a similar metabolite variation pattern when compared with the initial oysters regardless of different metal levels in the tissues. Interestingly, by comparing the oysters from two sites, the more severely polluted oysters accumulated significantly higher amounts of osmolytes (betaine and homarine) and lower energy storage compounds (glycogen) than the less polluted oysters; these changes could be the potential biomarkers for different levels of metal pollution. Our study demonstrated the complexity of biological effects under field conditions, and NMR metabolomics provides an important approach to detect sensitive variation of oyster inner status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Suitability of oyster restoration sites along the Louisiana coast: Examining site and stock × site interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting Miller, Lindsay; La Peyre, Jerome F.; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of the global loss of subtidal oyster reefs has led to a rise in reef restoration efforts, including in the Gulf of Mexico. Created reef success depends entirely on selecting a location that supports long-term oyster growth and survival, including the recruitment and survival of on-reef oysters. Significant changes in estuarine salinity through management of freshwater inflows and through changed precipitation patterns may significantly impact the locations of optimal oyster restoration sites. These rapid shifts in conditions necessitate a need to better understand both impacts to on-reef oyster growth and population development, and variation in oyster stock performance. Oyster growth, mortality, condition, and disease prevalence were examined in three different stocks of oysters located in protected cages, as well as oyster recruitment and mortality on experimental reef units in three different locations representing a salinity gradient, along the Louisiana Gulf coast in 2011 and 2012. Over a 2-y period, the high-salinity site had highest oyster growth rate in protected cages but demonstrated the least likelihood for reef development based on on-reef oyster population failure, likely because of predation-related mortality (high recruitment and 100% mortality). In contrast, the midsalinity site with moderate oyster growth and on-reef recruitment and low mortality demonstrated a higher likelihood for reef development. The lowest salinity site exhibited extreme variability in all oyster responses between years because of extreme variation in environmental conditions during the study, indicating a low likelihood of long-term reef development. Whereas limited differences in stock performance between sites were found, the range of site environmental conditions tested was ultimately much lower than expected and may not have provided a wide enough range of conditions. In areas with limited, low recruitment, or rapidly changing environmental conditions

  18. Modeling and Prediction of Oyster Norovirus Outbreaks along Gulf of Mexico Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Oyster norovirus outbreaks often pose high risks to human health. However, little is known about environmental factors controlling the outbreaks, and little can be done to prevent the outbreaks because they are generally considered to be unpredictable. We sought to develop a mathematical model for predicting risks of oyster norovirus outbreaks using environmental predictors. We developed a novel probability-based Artificial Neural Network model, called NORF model, using 21 years of environmental and norovirus outbreak data collected from Louisiana oyster harvesting areas along the Gulf of Mexico coast, USA. The NORF model involves six input variables that were selected through stepwise regression analysis and sensitivity analysis. We found that the model-based probability of norovirus outbreaks was most sensitive to gage height (the depth of water in an oyster bed) and water temperature, followed by wind, rainfall, and salinity, respectively. The NORF model predicted all historical oyster norovirus outbreaks from 1994 through 2014. Specifically, norovirus outbreaks occurred when the NORF model probability estimate was > 0.6, whereas no outbreaks occurred when the estimated probability was oyster norovirus outbreaks may be predictable using the NORF model. The ability to predict oyster norovirus outbreaks at their onset may make it possible to prevent or at least reduce the risk of norovirus outbreaks by closing potentially affected oyster beds. Wang J, Deng Z. 2016. Modeling and prediction of oyster norovirus outbreaks along Gulf of Mexico coast. Environ Health Perspect 124:627-633; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509764.

  19. Production and partial characterization of alkaline feruloyl esterases by Fusarium oxysporum during submerged batch cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Production of feruloyl esterases (FAEs) by Fusarium oxysporum was enhanced by optimization of initial pH of the culture medium, the type and concentration of nitrogen and carbon source. Submerged batch cultivation in a laboratory bioreactor (17 1) produced activity at 82 nkat g(-1) dry substrate...... (corn cobs) which compared favorably to those reported for the other microorganisms. Use of de-esterified corn cobs as carbon source decreased FAE production by 5.5-fold compared to untreated corn cobs even though ferulic acid (FA) was added to the concentration found in alkali-extracts of corn cobs...

  20. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  1. Incipient motion of sediment in presence of submerged flexible vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hao; Tang, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Han-Qing; Xuan-yu ZHAO; Lü, Sheng-qi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of submerged vegetation on river beds can change the water flow structure and alter the state of sediment motion. In this study, the incipient motion of sediment in the presence of submerged flexible vegetation in open channels was investigated in a laboratory experiment. The vegetation was simulated with flexible rubber cylinders arranged in parallel arrays. The effect of the vegetation density, water depth, and sediment grain size on the incipient motion was investigated. The e...

  2. Influence of plankton concentration on gametogenesis and spawning of the black lip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera in Ahe atoll lagoon (Tuamotu Archipelago, French polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jonathan; Levesque, Emmanuelle; Pouvreau, Stephane; Le Pennec, Marcel; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Pearl culture industry represents one of the dominant business sector of French Polynesia. However, it still entirely relies on unpredictable spat collection success. Our aim was to assess the influence of natural plankton concentration fluctuations on maturation and spawning of the black lip pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera, during a 4 months survey conducted in Ahe atoll lagoon. Plankton concentration was assessed by chlorophyll a extraction and by microscope counts while gonadic index, gonado-visceral dry weights and histology were used to measure pearl oysters reproduction activity. We found that (i) plankton concentration fluctuations were mainly related to wind regime, (ii) gametogenesis rate was mainly related to plankton concentration, (iii) spawning occurred when maximal gonad storage was reached, (iv) plankton concentration was the main spawning synchronizing factor. These results contribute explaining P. margaritifera spat collection variability in French Polynesian atoll lagoon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Heat transfer model for quenching by submerging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarella, D N; Varas, F [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada II, E.T.S. de Ing. de Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); MartIn, E B, E-mail: diego@dma.uvigo.es, E-mail: fvaras@uvigo.es, E-mail: emortega@uvigo.es [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, E.T.S. de Ing. Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In quenching by submerging the workpiece is cooled due to vaporization, convective flow and interaction of both mechanisms. The dynamics of these phenomena is very complex and the corresponding heat fluxes are strongly dependent on local flow variables such as velocity of fluid and vapor fraction. This local dependence may produce very different cooling rates along the piece, responsible for inappropriate metallurgical transformations, variability of material properties and residual stresses. In order to obtain an accurate description of cooling during quenching, a mathematical model of heat transfer is presented here. The model is based on the drift-flux mixture-model for multiphase flows, including an equation of conservation of energy for the liquid phase and specific boundary conditions that account for evaporation and presence of vapor phase on the surface of the piece. The model was implemented on Comsol Multiphysics software. Generation of appropriate initial and boundary conditions, as well as numerical resolution details, is briefly discussed. To test the model, a simple flow condition was analyzed. The effect of vapor fraction on heat transfer is assessed. The presence of the typical vapor blanket and its collapse can be recovered by the model, and its effect on the cooling rates on different parts of the piece is analyzed. Comparisons between numerical results and data from literature are made.

  4. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Coulangeon, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Il n’est sans doute pas de notion aussi vaste et aussi polysémique en sciences sociales que la notion de culture, qui renvoie alternativement à l’ensemble des symboles, des significations, des valeurs et des manières de faire propres à un groupe et au domaine spécialisé des activités expressives, savantes et populaires. La notion de culture est ainsi tout autant mobilisée dans l’exploration des grandes thématiques de la sociologie (stratification, inégalités, institutions, mouvements sociaux)...

  5. Habitat use by Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa): Experiments with oyster racks and reefs on the beach and intertidal of Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Niles, Lawrence J.

    2017-07-01

    Sea level rise and increasing human activities have decreased intertidal habitat in many places in the world. The expansion of aquaculture in intertidal areas may impact birds and other organisms using these habitats, leading to questions of sustainability of both aquaculture and functioning estuarine ecosystems. Understanding the effect of oyster culture on shorebird activity, particularly on Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa), a species on the U.S. Threatened List, is important for adaptive management and the expansion of oyster culture. In May 2013 we experimentally compared Red Knot and shorebird use of a beach section with racks and a control, and in 2016 we compared the use of sections with artificial reefs, oyster racks, and control on Delaware Bay, New Jersey (USA). The data included only times when no workers or other people were present. Censuses, conducted every 30 min throughout the day (279 censuses in 2013, 231 censuses in 2016), included the number of Red Knots and other shorebirds in each treatment section. In 2013, the total number of shorebirds was significantly higher in the rack section than in the control section, except for Red Knots and Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres) that occurred in higher numbers in the control than in the rack section. In 2016 Red Knot numbers were also significantly lower in the rack section. In 2013, the mean number of Red Knots/census was 13 for racks vs 59 for the control (P treatments (P Treatment, date, and number of non-Knot shorebirds explained 60% (2013) and 69% (2016) of the variation in Red Knot numbers. Red Knots avoided the sections with racks while both foraging and roosting, suggesting that caution should be used before placing oyster racks in areas used for foraging by Red Knots.

  6. Utilisation of vegetable oils in the production of lovastatin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542 in submerged cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Pattana Sripalakit

    2011-01-01

    The effect of vegetable oils as a supplementary carbon source during the production of lovastatin by Aspergillus terreus ATCC 20542 in submerged culture was investigated. The six vegetable oils tested were sesame oil, sunflower oil, soya bean oil, corn oil, palm oil and olive oil. Lovastatin concentration and biomass were measured. Lovastatin production was higher in several oil-containing media compared to control medium. In particular, palm oil and soya bean oil significantly improved lovas...

  7. Management of health risks associated with oysters harvested from a norovirus contaminated area, Ireland, February-March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, B; Keaveney, S; Flannery, J; Rajko-Nenow, P

    2010-05-13

    Oysters from a harvesting area responsible for outbreaks of gastroenteritis were relaid at a clean seawater site and subsequently depurated in tanks of purified seawater at elevated temperatures. This combined treatment reduced norovirus levels to those detected prior to the outbreak. On the basis of norovirus monitoring the sale of treated oysters was permitted although the harvest area remained closed for direct sale of oysters. No reports of illness have been associated with the consumption of treated oysters.

  8. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  9. An outbreak of norovirus linked to oysters in Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodo, Kerryn L; Veitch, Mark G K; Green, Michelle L

    2014-03-31

    Norovirus is the most commonly reported virus in shellfish related gastroenteritis outbreaks. In March 2013 an investigation was conducted following the receipt of reports of gastroenteritis after the consumption of oysters at private functions in Tasmania. Cases were ascertained through general practitioners, emergency departments, media releases and self-reporting. Of the 306 cases identified in Tasmania, ten faecal specimens were collected for laboratory testing and eight were positive for norovirus (GII.g). The most common symptoms were vomiting (87%), diarrhoea (85%), myalgia (82%) and fever (56%). The implicated oysters were traced to a single lease from which they were harvested and distributed locally and interstate. Nationally 525 cases were identified from Tasmania (306), Victoria (209), New South Wales (8) and Queensland (2). This report highlights the consequences of norovirus outbreaks in shellfish, even with rapid identification, trace back and removal of the implicated product from the market. copyright@health.gov.au

  10. Infectious diseases in oyster aquaculture require a new integrated approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pernet, Fabrice; Lupo, Coralie; Bacher, C?dric; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging diseases pose a recurrent threat to bivalve aquaculture. Recently, massive mortality events in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas associated with the detection of a microvariant of the ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 µVar) have been reported in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Although the spread of disease is often viewed as a governance failure, we suggest that the development of protective measures for bivalve farming is presently held back by the lack of key scientific knowledg...

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cristispira Species in Chesapeake Bay Oysters

    OpenAIRE

    Tall, Ben D.; Nauman, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe the physical interactions between Cristispira spp. and the crystalline style of the Chesapeake Bay oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin 1791). Cristispira organisms were found associated with both the inner and outer layers of the posterior two-thirds of the style. The spirochetes possessed blunt-tipped ends, a cell diameter range of 0.6 to 0.8 μm, and distended spirochetal envelopes which followed the contour of the cells. Transmission ele...

  12. 46 CFR 2.01-50 - Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Persons other than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels. 2.01-50 Section 2.01-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES... than crew on towing, oyster, or fishing steam vessels. (a) A steam vessel engaged in towing, oyster...

  13. 75 FR 65373 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit/Environmental Impact Statement, Point... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit... Statement (EIS) for the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special Use Permit, Point Reyes National Seashore...

  14. 76 FR 59423 - Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Point Reyes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... National Park Service Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-Use Permit, Draft Environmental Impact Statement... statement to consider the Drakes Bay Oyster Company Special-use permit in Drakes Estero, Point Reyes... National Seashore Web site, at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/pore (click on the Drakes Bay Oyster Company...

  15. Electrical stimulation in white oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshita, I.; Nurfazira, K. M. P.; Fern, C. Shi; Ain, M. S. Nur

    2017-09-01

    White oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida) is an edible mushroom that gained popularity due to its nutritional values, low production cost and ease of cultivation. There are several research reported on the mushroom fruiting bodies which were actively developed when applying electrical shock treatment. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of different electrical voltages on the growth and yield of white oyster mushroom (Pleurotus florida). Five different electrical voltages had been applied during spawning period which were 6V, 9V, 12V, 15V and mushroom bags without any treatment served as control. Treatment at 6V showed the highest rate for mycelium growth while 15V took the shortest time for fruiting body formation. However, no significant different (P>0.05) among all the treatments was observed for the time taken for the mycelium to fill-up the bag and pinhead emergence. The total fresh weight and percentage of biological efficiency for treatment at 9V showed higher values compared to control. Treatment at 9V also showed the largest pileus diameter and the most firm in the pileus texture. Meanwhile, treatment at 6V showed the highest a* value (redness). In addition, different electrical voltage treatments applied did not show any significant effect on substrate utilization efficiency, colour L* and b* values. In conclusion, among all the electrical treatments applied, 9V could be considered as the best treatment to enhance the yield of white oyster mushroom.

  16. Identification of the Molecular Clockwork of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickael Perrigault

    Full Text Available Molecular clock system constitutes the origin of biological rhythms that allow organisms to anticipate cyclic environmental changes and adapt their behavior and physiology. Components of the molecular clock are largely conserved across a broad range of species but appreciable diversity in clock structure and function is also present especially in invertebrates. The present work aimed at identify and characterize molecular clockwork components in relationship with the monitoring of valve activity behavior in the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Results provided the characterization of most of canonical clock gene including clock, bmal/cycle, period, timeless, vertebrate-type cry, rev-erb, ror as well as other members of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (plant-like cry, 6-4 photolyase. Analyses of transcriptional variations of clock candidates in oysters exposed to light / dark regime and to constant darkness led to the generation of a putative and original clockwork model in C. gigas, intermediate of described systems in vertebrates and insects. This study is the first characterization of a mollusk clockwork. It constitutes essential bases to understand interactions of the different components of the molecular clock in C. gigas as well as the global mechanisms associated to the generation and the synchronization of biological rhythms in oysters.

  17. Identification of irradiated oysters by EPR measurements on shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Monaca, S., E-mail: sara.dellamonaca@iss.it [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena, 299 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, P.; Boniglia, C.; Gargiulo, R.; Bortolin, E. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, viale Regina Elena, 299 Rome (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper the EPR spectra of the radicals induced in oyster shells after irradiation to (0.5-2) kGy ionizing radiation doses are analyzed. EPR spectra of irradiated shells showed the complex radical composition of biocarbonates, characterized by the presence of SO{sub 2}{sup -}, SO{sub 3}{sup -} and CO{sub 2}{sup -} radicals with different symmetries. In particular, the radiation-induced line at g = 2.0038, due to the g{sub x} component of the orthorhombic SO{sub 3}{sup -}, was well distinguishable from the rest of the spectrum. The g{sub x} component of the orthorhombic SO{sub 3}{sup -} was found to be intense and stable enough to allow the identification at least for the whole shelf life of the oyster. Furthermore, it is still well visible at low microwave powers for which the other signals are weak or non-visible and has a linear dose response in the (0.5-2) kGy range. A possible procedure protocol for the identification of irradiated oysters, can be based on acquisitions of the spectrum at low microwave power values (tenths of milliWatt) and low modulation amplitude values (0.03-0.05 mT) and on the identification of the g = 2.0038 signal as a proof of the ionizing radiation treatment performed on the sample.

  18. Molecular characterisation of TNF, AIF, dermatopontin and VAMP genes of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis and analysis of their modulation by diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Laura; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J; Abollo, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Bonamiosis and disseminated neoplasia (DN) are the most important diseases affecting cultured flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) in Galicia (NW Spain). Previous research of the response of O. edulis against bonamiosis by suppression subtractive hybridisation yielded a partial expressed sequence tag of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and allograft inflammatory factor (AIF), as well as the whole open reading frame for dermatopontin and vesicle-associated membrane (VAMP). Herein, the complete open reading frames of TNF and AIF genes were determined by the rapid amplification of cDNA, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the four genes were characterised. Phylogenetic relationships for each gene were studied using maximum likelihood parameters. Quantitative-PCR assays were also performed in order to analyse the modulation of the expression of these genes by bonamiosis and disseminated neoplasia. Gene expression profiles were studied in haemolymph cells and in various organs (gill, gonad, mantle and digestive gland) of oysters affected by bonamiosis, DN, and both diseases with regard to non-affected oysters (control). TNF expression in haemolymph cells was up-regulated at heavy stage of bonamiosis but its expression was not affected by DN. AIF expression was up-regulated at heavy stage of bonamiosis in haemolymph cells and mantle, which is associated with heavy inflammatory response, and in haemolymph cells of oysters affected by DN. AIF expression was, however, down-regulated in other organs as gills and gonads. Dermatopontin expression was down-regulated in haemolymph cells and digestive gland of oysters affected by bonamiosis, but DN had no significant effect on its expression. Gills and gonads showed up-regulation of dermatopontin expression associated with bonamiosis. There were significant differences in the expression of TNF and VAMP depending on the bonamiosis intensity stage whereas no significant differences were detected between light and heavy severity degrees of

  19. Larval dispersal modeling of pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera following realistic environmental and biological forcing in Ahe atoll lagoon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoann Thomas

    Full Text Available Studying the larval dispersal of bottom-dwelling species is necessary to understand their population dynamics and optimize their management. The black-lip pearl oyster (Pinctada margaritifera is cultured extensively to produce black pearls, especially in French Polynesia's atoll lagoons. This aquaculture relies on spat collection, a process that can be optimized by understanding which factors influence larval dispersal. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of P. margaritifera larval dispersal kernel to both physical and biological factors in the lagoon of Ahe atoll. Specifically, using a validated 3D larval dispersal model, the variability of lagoon-scale connectivity is investigated against wind forcing, depth and location of larval release, destination location, vertical swimming behavior and pelagic larval duration (PLD factors. The potential connectivity was spatially weighted according to both the natural and cultivated broodstock densities to provide a realistic view of connectivity. We found that the mean pattern of potential connectivity was driven by the southwest and northeast main barotropic circulation structures, with high retention levels in both. Destination locations, spawning sites and PLD were the main drivers of potential connectivity, explaining respectively 26%, 59% and 5% of the variance. Differences between potential and realistic connectivity showed the significant contribution of the pearl oyster broodstock location to its own dynamics. Realistic connectivity showed larger larval supply in the western destination locations, which are preferentially used by farmers for spat collection. In addition, larval supply in the same sectors was enhanced during summer wind conditions. These results provide new cues to understanding the dynamics of bottom-dwelling populations in atoll lagoons, and show how to take advantage of numerical models for pearl oyster management.

  20. Bioaccumulation of trace metals in farmed pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas from SW Gulf of California coast, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, M P; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P; Góngora-Gómez, Andrés Martin; Luna Varela, Raquel Gabriela; Sujitha, S B; Escobedo-Urías, D C; Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Campos Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioavailability of trace metals (Chromium, Copper, Nickel, Lead, Zinc, Cadmium, Arsenic, and Mercury) in the commercially consumed Crassostrea gigas oysters collected over a 12-month growth period (2011-12) from an experimental cultivation farm in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa State, Mexico. Sediment and water samples were also collected from four different zones adjacent to the cultivation area to identify the concentration patterns of metals. The results revealed that sewage disposals, fertilizers used for agricultural practices and shrimp culture are the major sources for the enrichment of certain toxic metals. The metal concentrations in oysters presented a decreasing order of abundance (all values in mg Kg-1): Zn (278.91 ± 93.03) > Cu (63.13 ± 31.72) > Cr (22.29 ± 30.23) > Cd (14.54 ± 4.28) > Ni (9.41 ± 11.33) > Pb (2.22 ± 1.33) > As (0.58 ± 0.91) > Hg (0.04 ± 0.06). Bioconcentration Factor (BCF) and Biota Sediment Accumulation Factor (BSAF) exhibited that C. gigas in the region are strong accumulators for Zn and Cd respectively. Thus, the present study proves to fulfill the gap in understanding the rate of bioaccumulation of metals in C. gigas which is regarded as the most sought after oyster species globally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  2. Oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau boatwhistle call detection and patterns within a large-scale oyster restoration site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon W Ricci

    Full Text Available During May 2015, passive acoustic recorders were deployed at eight subtidal oyster reefs within Harris Creek Oyster Sanctuary in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland USA. These sites were selected to represent both restored and unrestored habitats having a range of oyster densities. Throughout the survey, the soundscape within Harris Creek was dominated by the boatwhistle calls of the oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau. A novel, multi-kernel spectral correlation approach was developed to automatically detect these boatwhistle calls using their two lowest harmonic bands. The results provided quantitative information on how call rate and call frequency varied in space and time. Toadfish boatwhistle fundamental frequency ranged from 140 Hz to 260 Hz and was well correlated (r = 0.94 with changes in water temperature, with the fundamental frequency increasing by ~11 Hz for every 1°C increase in temperature. The boatwhistle call rate increased from just a few calls per minute at the start of monitoring on May 7th to ~100 calls/min on May 10th and remained elevated throughout the survey. As male toadfish are known to generate boatwhistles to attract mates, this rapid increase in call rate was interpreted to mark the onset of spring spawning behavior. Call rate was not modulated by water temperature, but showed a consistent diurnal pattern, with a sharp decrease in rate just before sunrise and a peak just after sunset. There was a significant difference in call rate between restored and unrestored reefs, with restored sites having nearly twice the call rate as unrestored sites. This work highlights the benefits of using automated detection techniques that provide quantitative information on species-specific call characteristics and patterns. This type of non-invasive acoustic monitoring provides long-term, semi-continuous information on animal behavior and abundance, and operates effectively in settings that are otherwise difficult to sample.

  3. Growth, morphometrics and nutrient content of farmed eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin), in New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    When harvested, oysters represent a removal from the ecosystem of nutrients such as nitrogen (N)and carbon (C). A number of factors potentially affect nutrient content, but a quantitative understanding across the geographical range of the eastern oysters is lacking. This study wa...

  4. Kl-impregnated Oyster Shells as a Solid Catalyst for Soybean Oil Transesterificaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on inexpensive and green catalysts is needed for economical production of biodiesel. The goal of the research was to test KI-impregnated oyster shell as a solid catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil. Specific objectives were to characterize KI-impregnated oyster shell, determine t...

  5. On the Half Shell: An Introduction to Oysters and Their Unique Structures and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. Adam; Haines, Sarah; Romano, Christina; Takacs, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    The eastern oyster, "Crassostrea virginica," is an ecologically and economically important species in Chesapeake Bay. Oysters are ecologically unique in the Chesapeake Bay because they build a structure known as a bar or reef by attaching to one another over a 45 long period of time. They have been coined the "Ecological Engineers…

  6. The Potential Use of Electricity to Control Burrowing Shrimp in Oyster Aquaculture Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalassinid shrimp cause significant problems for oyster aquaculture in the Pacific Northwest (USA) where oysters succumb to the physical disruption of the sediment by the burrowing activity of these animals. While electrofishing is a commonly used technique to capture fish and some invertebrates i...

  7. Digital PCR for Quantifying Norovirus in Oysters Implicated in Outbreaks, France

    OpenAIRE

    Polo, David; Schaeffer, Julien; Fournet, Nelly; Le Saux, Jean-claude; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Mcleod, Catherine; Le Guyader, Soizick

    2016-01-01

    Using samples from oysters clearly implicated in human disease, we quantified norovirus levels by using digital PCR. Concentrations varied from 43 to 1,170 RNA copies/oyster. The analysis of frozen samples from the production area showed the presence of norovirus 2 weeks before consumption.

  8. A norovirus outbreak associated with consumption of NSW oysters: implications for quality assurance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppatz, Clare; Munnoch, Sally A; Worgan, Tory; Merritt, Tony D; Dalton, Craig; Kelly, Paul M; Durrheim, David N

    2008-03-01

    Norovirus is a common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with raw shellfish consumption. In Australia there have been several reports of norovirus outbreaks associated with oysters despite the application of regulatory measures recommended by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. This study describes an outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis following the consumption of New South Wales oysters. In September 2007, OzFoodNet conducted a cohort study of a gastroenteritis outbreak amongst people that had dined at a Port Macquarie restaurant. Illness was strongly associated with oyster consumption, with all cases having eaten oysters from the same lease (RR undefined, p Norovirus was detected in a faecal specimen. Although no pathogen was identified during the environmental investigation, the source oyster lease had been closed just prior to harvesting due to sewage contamination. Australian quality assurance programs do not routinely test oysters for viral contamination that pose a risk to human health. It is recommended that the feasibility of testing oysters for norovirus, particularly after known faecal contamination of oyster leases, be assessed.

  9. Digital PCR for Quantifying Norovirus in Oysters Implicated in Outbreaks, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, David; Schaeffer, Julien; Fournet, Nelly; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; McLeod, Catherine; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2016-12-01

    Using samples from oysters clearly implicated in human disease, we quantified norovirus levels by using digital PCR. Concentrations varied from 43 to 1,170 RNA copies/oyster. The analysis of frozen samples from the production area showed the presence of norovirus 2 weeks before consumption.

  10. Genotyping and quantitation of noroviruses in oysters from two distinct sea areas in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tomoko; Nishio, Osamu; Kato, Masahiko; Chuma, Takehisa; Kato, Hirotomo; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Norovirus (NV) is a causative agent of acute gastroenteritis in humans, and shellfishes including oysters act as major vehicles of the virus. To investigate the genetic characteristics of NVs, we collected 1,512 oysters for raw consumption between October 2002 and March 2005 from two distinct areas (area A: the Sanriku Sea area; area B: the Setouchi Sea area). We detected the capsid gene and subjected it to phylogenetic analysis. By further quantification of the copy number of the genome by using real-time PCR, the NV capcid gene was detected in approximately 5% of the oysters, and they showed wide diversity. Two percent of the oysters from area B showed relatively large number of NVs, i.e., over 100 copies of capsid gene/oyster, whereas this was not observed in area A. Most of the detected NVs from oysters and humans were genetically related when the capsid region was compared. These results suggested that NVs obtained from humans and those obtained from oysters showed a potential relationship to each other and that some populations of Japanese oysters accumulated a relatively large number of NVs.

  11. Temperature-dependent persistence of human norovirus within oysters (Crassotrea virginica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study characterizes the persistence of human norovirus in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) held at different seawater temperatures. Oysters were contaminated with human norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk strain 8fIIa) by exposing them to virus contaminated water at 15 degrees C, and subsequently ho...

  12. High pressure processing with hot sauce flavoring enhances sensory quality for raw oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the feasibility of flavoring raw oysters by placing them under pressure in the presence of selected flavorings. Hand-shucked raw oysters were processed at high pressure (600 MPa), in the presence or absence of (Sriracha®) flavoring, and evaluated by a trained sensory panel 3 an...

  13. Impact of an icy winter on the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793) populations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Åsa; Blanda, Elisa; Bodvin, Torjan

    2012-01-01

    at the sampling sites of oyster populations. Despite the severe winter conditions of 2009/2010 causing high mortality, the Pacific oyster still exists in large numbers in Scandinavia. The present investigation indicates that extreme winter conditions may result in a temporary reduction of the density...

  14. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196). The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  15. The eastern oyster genome: A resource for comparative genomics in shellfish aquaculture species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyster aquaculture is an important sector of world food production. As such, it is imperative to develop a high quality reference genome for the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of commercially important traits. All genetic, gene expression and...

  16. The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guofan; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Ximing

    2012-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress re...

  17. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES, POTENTIAL VIRULENT FACTORS, IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, is one of the two important parasites causing severe mortality in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on the US east coast. Our recent study suggests that P. marinus cells and its extracellular products (ECP) could scaveng...

  18. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Le découpage des spécialités sociologiques hésite habituellement entre une répartition thématique par domaines empiriquement distingués et un partage conceptuel reposant sur des orientations de recherche. La sociologie de la culture n'échappe pas à cette oscillation. De prime abord, elle couvre un secteur plus ou moins clairement délimité, qui englobe la sociologie de l'art et ce qui est socialement désigné comme relevant de la « vie culturelle ». Elle regroupe alors un ensemble de subdivisio...

  19. Application of Reflectance Transformation Imaging Technique to Improve Automated Edge Detection in a Fossilized Oyster Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, Ana; Puttonen, Eetu; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Mandic, Oleg; Nothegger, Clemens; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The world's largest fossilized oyster reef is located in Stetten, Lower Austria excavated during field campaigns of the Natural History Museum Vienna between 2005 and 2008. It is studied in paleontology to learn about change in climate from past events. In order to support this study, a laser scanning and photogrammetric campaign was organized in 2014 for 3D documentation of the large and complex site. The 3D point clouds and high resolution images from this field campaign are visualized by photogrammetric methods in form of digital surface models (DSM, 1 mm resolution) and orthophoto (0.5 mm resolution) to help paleontological interpretation of data. Due to size of the reef, automated analysis techniques are needed to interpret all digital data obtained from the field. One of the key components in successful automation is detection of oyster shell edges. We have tested Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) to visualize the reef data sets for end-users through a cultural heritage viewing interface (RTIViewer). The implementation includes a Lambert shading method to visualize DSMs derived from terrestrial laser scanning using scientific software OPALS. In contrast to shaded RTI no devices consisting of a hardware system with LED lights, or a body to rotate the light source around the object are needed. The gray value for a given shaded pixel is related to the angle between light source and the normal at that position. Brighter values correspond to the slope surfaces facing the light source. Increasing of zenith angle results in internal shading all over the reef surface. In total, oyster reef surface contains 81 DSMs with 3 m x 2 m each. Their surface was illuminated by moving the virtual sun every 30 degrees (12 azimuth angles from 20-350) and every 20 degrees (4 zenith angles from 20-80). This technique provides paleontologists an interactive approach to virtually inspect the oyster reef, and to interpret the shell surface by changing the light source direction

  20. An outbreak of norovirus infection associated with fermented oyster consumption in South Korea, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H G; Lee, S G; Lee, M Y; Hur, E S; Lee, J S; Park, P H; Park, Y B; Yoon, M H; Paik, S Y

    2016-10-01

    An acute gastroenteritis (AGE) outbreak was reported in May 2013 in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. Eight students who had eaten breakfast on 21 May 2013 at a high-school restaurant exhibited AGE symptoms. Our case-control study showed that a strong association was observed between AGE symptoms and fermented oyster consumption. Virological studies also indicated that noroviruses (NoVs) were detected from both clinical samples and fermented oyster samples, and multiple different genotypes (genogroups GII.4, GII.11 and GII.14) of NoVs were present in both samples. The nucleotide sequence similarity between the strains found in the clinical samples and those in the fermented oysters was more than 99·5%. Therefore, to prevent further outbreaks, proper management of raw oysters is necessary and the food industry should be aware of the risk of viral gastroenteritis posed by fermented oysters contaminated with NoVs.

  1. [Comparison of two nucleic acid extraction methods for norovirus in oysters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiao; Li, Hui; Deng, Xiaoling; Mo, Yanling; Fang, Ling; Ke, Changwen

    2013-04-01

    To explore a convenient and effective method for norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters suitable for long-term viral surveillance. Two methods, namely method A (glycine washing and polyethylene glycol precipitation of the virus followed by silica gel centrifugal column) and method B (protease K digestion followed by application of paramagnetic silicon) were compared for their performance in norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect norovirus in naturally infected oysters and in oysters with induced infection. The two methods yielded comparable positive detection rates for the samples, but the recovery rate of the virus was higher with method B than with method A. Method B is a more convenient and rapid method for norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters and suitable for long-term surveillance of norovirus.

  2. The optimization of Marasmius androsaceus submerged fermentation conditions in five-liter fermentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanxin; Xing, Gaoyang; Li, Yutong; Song, Jia; Wang, Yanzhen; Meng, Qingfan; Lu, Jiahui; Zhou, Yulin; Liu, Yan; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2016-01-01

    Using desirability function, four indexes including mycelium dry weight, intracellular polysaccharide, adenosine and mannitol yield were uniformed into one expected value (Da) which further served as the assessment criteria. In our present study, Plackett-Burman design was applied to evaluate the effects of eight variables including initial pH, rotating speed, culture temperature, inoculum size, ventilation volume, culture time, inoculum age and loading volume on Da value during Marasmius androsaceus submerged fermentation via a five-liter fermentor. Culture time, initial pH and rotating speed were found to influence Da value significantly and were further optimized by Box-Behnken design. Results obtained from Box-Behnken design were analyzed by both response surface regression (Design-Expert.V8.0.6.1 software) and artificial neural network combining the genetic algorithm method (Matlab2012a software). After comparison, the optimum M. androsaceus submerged fermentation conditions via a five-liter fermentor were obtained as follows: initial pH of 6.14, rotating speed of 289.3 rpm, culture time of 6.285 days, culture temperature of 26 °C, inoculum size of 5%, ventilation volume of 200 L/h, inoculum age of 4 days, and loading volume of 3.5 L/5 L. The predicted Da value of the optimum model was 0.4884 and the average experimental Da value was 0.4760. The model possesses well fitness and predictive ability.

  3. The use of a-methyl-D-glucoside, a synthetic analogue of maltose, as inducer of amylase by Aspergillus sp in solid-state and submerged fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Fabiana G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of a methyl-D-glucoside (alphaMG, a synthetic analogue of maltose, as carbon source and inducer of amylase synthesis to several species of Aspergillus was studied in submerged and solid-state fermentations. Among a group of ten species, A. tamarii, A. fumigatus and A. flavus were able to produce biomass and high specific amylolytic activity in submerged cultures containing alphaMG as the only carbon source. In solid state fermentation, the enrichment of basal wheat bran or corn cob medium with alphaMG increased up to 3 times the production of amylases. In both submerged and solid state fermentations, alphaMG was more effective inducer of amylases than maltose and starch.

  4. Intertidal oysters reach their physiological limit in a future high-CO2 world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanes, Elliot; Parker, Laura M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Stapp, Laura S; Ross, Pauline M

    2017-03-01

    Sessile marine molluscs living in the intertidal zone experience periods of internal acidosis when exposed to air (emersion) during low tide. Relative to other marine organisms, molluscs have been identified as vulnerable to future ocean acidification; however, paradoxically it has also been shown that molluscs exposed to high CO2 environments are more resilient compared with those molluscs naive to CO2 exposure. Two competing hypotheses were tested using a novel experimental design incorporating tidal simulations to predict the future intertidal limit of oysters in a high-CO2 world; either high-shore oysters will be more tolerant of elevated PCO2 because of their regular acidosis, or elevated PCO2  will cause high-shore oysters to reach their limit. Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata, were collected from the high-intertidal and subtidal areas of the shore and exposed in an orthogonal design to either an intertidal or a subtidal treatment at ambient or elevated PCO2 , and physiological variables were measured. The combined treatment of tidal emersion and elevated PCO2  interacted synergistically to reduce the haemolymph pH (pHe) of oysters, and increase the PCO2  in the haemolymph (Pe,CO2 ) and standard metabolic rate. Oysters in the intertidal treatment also had lower condition and growth. Oysters showed a high degree of plasticity, and little evidence was found that intertidal oysters were more resilient than subtidal oysters. It is concluded that in a high-CO2 world the upper vertical limit of oyster distribution on the shore may be reduced. These results suggest that previous studies on intertidal organisms that lacked tidal simulations may have underestimated the effects of elevated PCO2. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Boas, Franz

    2003-01-01

    L’un des objets de l’enquête anthropologique, pour laquelle des éléments peuvent être obtenus par l’étude des sociétés existantes, est l’inter-dépendance des phénomènes culturels. Alors que dans l’étude des processus de diffusion et de développement parallèle les caractères et la distribution de traits singuliers sont communément les objets de l’analyse, nous sommes conduits, ici, à considérer la culture, dans toutes ses manifestations, comme un tout. Les inventions, la vie économique, la str...

  6. Rice SUB1A constrains remodelling of the transcriptome and metabolome during submergence to facilitate post-submergence recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Anna M; Barding, Gregory A; Sathnur, Sumukh; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2017-11-02

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) ethylene-responsive transcription factor gene SUB1A-1 confers tolerance to prolonged, complete submergence by limiting underwater elongation growth. Upon desubmergence, SUB1A-1 genotypes rapidly recover photosynthetic function and recommence development towards flowering. The underpinnings of the transition from stress amelioration to the return to homeostasis are not well known. Here, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were conducted to identify mechanisms by which SUB1A improves physiological function over the 24 hr following a sublethal submergence event. Evaluation of near-isogenic genotypes after submergence and over a day of reaeration demonstrated that SUB1A transiently constrains the remodelling of cellular activities associated with growth. SUB1A influenced the abundance of ca. 1,400 transcripts and had a continued impact on metabolite content, particularly free amino acids, glucose, and sucrose, throughout the recovery period. SUB1A promoted recovery of metabolic homeostasis but had limited influence on mRNAs associated with growth processes and photosynthesis. The involvement of low energy sensing during submergence and recovery was supported by dynamics in trehalose-6-phosphate and mRNAs encoding key enzymes and signalling proteins, which were modulated by SUB1A. This study provides new evidence of convergent signalling pathways critical to the rapidly reversible management of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in submergence resilient rice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Peculiarities of thermal dissociation of oxides during submerged arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Zhdanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of settlement of the process of thermal dissociation of oxides in reaction zone during the submerged arc welding and welding deposition is presented. Combined non-linear equations for definition of gas-vapour mixture composition were developed. They describe the dissociation of MeO, MeO2 and Me2O3 types of oxides. Calculations of the processes of oxide dissociation were performed for the oxides that are commonly included into welding fluxes. Their results and analysis are presented. The method proposed appeared to be adequate and applicable for analysis of processes during submerged arc operation that run in the gas phase.

  8. EAARL-B Submerged Topography—Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography digital elevation model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  9. EAARL-B Submerged Topography--Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A submerged topography Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic for a portion of the submerged environs of Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, was produced from remotely...

  10. Long-term allelopathic control of phytoplankton by the submerged macrophyte Elodea nuttallii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderstukken, M.; Declerck, S.A.J.; Decaestecker, E.; Muylaert, K.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: allelochemicals; chemical ecology; competition; nutrient limitation; shallow lakes Summary 1.It is well known that submerged macrophytes can suppress phytoplankton blooms in lakes and thus promote water quality and biodiversity. One of the possible mechanisms through which submerged

  11. Invasive Crayfish Threaten the Development of Submerged Macrophytes in Lake Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.K.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts Van Kessel, J.M.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  12. Invasive crayfish threaten the development of submerged macrophytes in lake restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wal, J.E.M.; Dorenbosch, M.; Immers, A.; Vidal Forteza, C.; Geurts, J.J.M.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koese, B.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes enhance water transparency and aquatic biodiversity in shallow water ecosystems. Therefore, the return of submerged macrophytes is the target of many lake restoration projects. However, at present, north-western European aquatic ecosystems are increasingly invaded by omnivorous

  13. Through-flow of water in leaves of a submerged plant is influenced by the apical opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity......Submerged plant, apical opening, hydathode, Sparganium, hydraulic architecture, leaf specific conductivity...

  14. 3D CENTRAL LINE EXTRACTION OF FOSSIL OYSTER SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Djuricic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetry provides a powerful tool to digitally document protected, inaccessible, and rare fossils. This saves manpower in relation to current documentation practice and makes the fragile specimens more available for paleontological analysis and public education. In this study, high resolution orthophoto (0.5 mm and digital surface models (1 mm are used to define fossil boundaries that are then used as an input to automatically extract fossil length information via central lines. In general, central lines are widely used in geosciences as they ease observation, monitoring and evaluation of object dimensions. Here, the 3D central lines are used in a novel paleontological context to study fossilized oyster shells with photogrammetric and LiDAR-obtained 3D point cloud data. 3D central lines of 1121 Crassostrea gryphoides oysters of various shapes and sizes were computed in the study. Central line calculation included: i Delaunay triangulation between the fossil shell boundary points and formation of the Voronoi diagram; ii extraction of Voronoi vertices and construction of a connected graph tree from them; iii reduction of the graph to the longest possible central line via Dijkstra’s algorithm; iv extension of longest central line to the shell boundary and smoothing by an adjustment of cubic spline curve; and v integration of the central line into the corresponding 3D point cloud. The resulting longest path estimate for the 3D central line is a size parameter that can be applied in oyster shell age determination both in paleontological and biological applications. Our investigation evaluates ability and performance of the central line method to measure shell sizes accurately by comparing automatically extracted central lines with manually collected reference data used in paleontological analysis. Our results show that the automatically obtained central line length overestimated the manually collected reference by 1.5% in the test set, which

  15. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  16. Biofiltration, growth and body composition of oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in effluents from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use oyster as biofilter to improve the quality of effluent from shrimp farming and to assess its growth performance and body composition. It was distributed 1,080 oysters into lanterns in fiberglass tanks (170 L in a completely randomized design with three treatments (0, 60 and 120 oysters and six replicates. It was used the effluent from the sedimentation tank. It was measured weekly: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, and it was analyzed ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N, orthophosphate-P, suspended solids and chlorophyll-α of the input effluent. The control tanks (without oysters were more efficient at removing ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N and orthophosphate-P. The tanks containing oysters were more efficient at removing suspended solids and chlorophyll-α. Stocking density influenced the height growth of oysters, but not width. Wet and daily weight, condition and yield index were not affected by stocking density, and a significant increase in comparison to the initials values was observed. Body composition was not affected by stocking density, and a significant difference (p0.05. Under the conditions evaluated, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae improves water quality and presents growth rates and body composition similar to those obtained in traditional crops.

  17. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-01-01

    We used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. A comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish. PMID:23251548

  18. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Physical, Microbial, and Chemical Attributes of Oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingham, Talaysha; Ye, Mu; Chen, Haiqiang; Chintapenta, Lathadevi Karuna; Handy, Eunice; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Changqing; Ozbay, Gulnihal

    2016-05-01

    The change in the quality attributes (physical, microbial, and chemical) of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment at 300 MPa at room temperature (RT, 25 °C) 300, 450, and 500 MPa at 0 °C for 2 min and control oysters without treatment were evaluated over 3 wk. The texture and tissue yield percentages of oysters HHP treated at 300 MPa, RT increased significantly (P control. Aerobic and psychrotrophic bacteria in control oysters reached the spoilage point of 7 log CFU/g after 15 d. Coliform counts (log MPN/g) were low during storage with total and fecal coliforms less than 3.5 and 1.0. High pressure treated oysters at 500 MPa at 0 °C were significantly higher (P control. The glycogen content of control oysters at 3 wk was significantly higher (P control. Based on our results, HHP prolongs the physical, microbial, and chemical quality of oysters. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Effects of oyster harvest activities on Louisiana reef habitat and resident nekton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Steve; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Oysters are often cited as “ecosystem engineers” because they modify their environment. Coastal Louisiana contains extensive oyster reef areas that have been harvested for decades, and whether differences in habitat functions exist between those areas and nonharvested reefs is unclear. We compared reef physical structure and resident community metrics between these 2 subtidal reef types. Harvested reefs were more fragmented and had lower densities of live eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hooked mussels (Ischadium recurvum) than the nonharvested reefs. Stable isotope values (13C and 15N) of dominant nekton species and basal food sources were used to compare food web characteristics. Nonpelagic source contributions and trophic positions of dominant species were slightly elevated at harvested sites. Oyster harvesting appeared to have decreased the number of large oysters and to have increased the percentage of reefs that were nonliving by decreasing water column filtration and benthopelagic coupling. The differences in reef matrix composition, however, had little effect on resident nekton communities. Understanding the thresholds of reef habitat areas, the oyster density or oyster size distribution below which ecosystem services may be compromised, remains key to sustainable management.

  20. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Derived from Cross-Linked Oyster Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Liang Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension.

  1. Persistence, seasonal dynamics and pathogenic potential of Vibrio communities from Pacific oyster hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C; Batista, Frederico M; Wegner, K Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods.

  2. Let the oyster reefs tell their story- a novel approach to reconstructing coastal environmental histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalowska, A. M.; McKee, B. A.; Rodriguez, A. B.; Ridge, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Intertidal oyster reefs (Crassostrea virginica) are a vital part of coastal ecosystems around the world, providing habitat for marine life and improving water quality. These integral parts of coastal landscapes also dissipate wave energy, reducing estuarine shoreline erosion. Within the last century, oyster reefs across the world have decreased in abundance and areal extent due to anthropogenic and environmental changes, such as harvesting, pollution, climate change and disease. However, previous studies of restored oyster reefs—based on direct measurements of oyster-reef growth over a decade—have shown the ability of intertidal reefs to outpace sea-level rise via vertical accretion. In this study we present a novel application of 210Pb geochronology (Constant Rate of Supply Model) combined with radiocarbon dating applied to two natural intertidal oyster reefs in North Carolina, USA. Our findings show that within the last 560 years, the oyster reef located on an open mudflat consistently grew at the rate of sea-level rise (SLR). The second examined reef was located in a sandy tidal channel and initially formed around 700 years ago. Reef sediments recorded a disturbance associated with a large storm event, Hurricane Barbara (1953). Our new application of the 210Pb geochronology method, combined with radiocarbon dating, analyses of shell condition and size, and grain size, opens the possibilities to explore the historical record of oyster-reef health and growth rate to evaluate its sensitivity or resilience to sea-level rise, sediment supply, storms and anthropogenic disturbances. Identifying periods and conditions of optimal growth for oyster-reef habitats will provide vital information for restoration efforts. Additionally, oyster reefs may contain a detailed and well-preserved record of local sea level in their sediments.

  3. Overcoming restoration paradigms: value of the historical record and metapopulation dynamics in native oyster restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald N. Lipcius

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Restoration strategies for native oyster populations rely on multiple sources of information, which often conflict due to time- and space-varying patterns in abundance and distribution. For instance, strategies based on population connectivity and disease resistance can differ, and extant and historical records of abundance and distribution are often at odds, such that the optimal strategy is unclear and valuable restoration sites may be excluded from consideration. This was the case for the Lynnhaven River subestuary of lower Chesapeake Bay, which was deemed unsuitable for Eastern Oyster restoration based on physical conditions, disease challenge, and extant oyster abundance. Consequently, we (i evaluated previously unknown historical data from the 1800s, (ii quantified extant oyster recruitment and abundance, physical conditions, and disease presence on constructed restoration reefs and alternative substrates, and (iii assessed simulations from biophysical models to identify potential restoration sites in the metapopulation. The collective data distinguished numerous restoration sites (i in the polyhaline zone (salinity 18.4-22.2 where disease resistance is evolving, (ii where oysters were abundant in the late 1800s-early 1900s, (iii of recent high recruitment, abundance and survival, despite consistent and elevated disease challenge, and (iv interconnected as a metapopulation via larval dispersal. Moreover, a network of constructed restoration reefs met size structure, abundance and biomass standards of restoration success. These findings demonstrate that assumptions about the suitability of sites for oyster restoration based on individual processes can be severely flawed, and that in-depth examination of multiple processes and sources of information are required for oyster reef restoration plans to maximize success. We use these findings and previous information to recommend a strategy for successful restoration of subtidal oyster reefs

  4. Evaluation of some biotechnological parameters influencing the Pleurotus ostreatus biomass production by submerged cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicenţiu-Bogdan HORINCAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The submerged culture of mushrooms represents a future for biotechnological processes at industrial level, in order to obtain biomass with economical value (food and ingredients, nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Pleurotus ostreatus is well known worldwide for its culinary and medicinal value. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the most important biotechnological parameters that have influence on the biomass production of P. ostreatus, by cultivation in submerged conditions. Applying the Plackett-Burman experimental design, the significant parameters influencing the P. ostreatus biomass production were found to be the concentration of dextrose and yeast extract and time of cultivation. The best results in terms of maximising the biomass production (25.71 g·L-1 were obtained when the “+1” level of each independent variables was used in the Plackett-Burman experimental design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA exhibited a high correlation coefficient (R2 value of 0.9908, which certifies that the mathematical model was relevant for the biotechnological process.

  5. Cellulase and Xylanase Production by Penicillium echinulatum in Submerged Media Containing Cellulose Amended with Sorbitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Eliana Todero Ritter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigated the use of sorbitol as a soluble carbon source, in association with cellulose, to produce cellulases and xylanases in submerged cultures of Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1. Because cellulose is an insoluble carbon source, in cellulase production, there are some problems with rheology and oxygen transfer. The submerged fermentations containing media composed of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1% (w/v sorbitol and cellulose that were added at different times during the cultivation; 0.2% (w/v soy bran; 0.1% (w/v wheat bran; and a solution of salts. The highest filter paper activity (FPA ( IU·mL−1 was obtained on the seventh day in the medium containing 0.5% (w/v sorbitol and 0.5% (w/v cellulose added 24 h after the start of cultivation. However, the CMCases showed an activity peak on the sixth day ( IU·mL−1 in the medium containing 0.75% (w/v sorbitol and 0.75% (w/v cellulose added after 12 h of cultivation. The xylanases showed the highest activity in the medium with 0.75% (w/v sorbitol and 0.25% (w/v cellulose added 36 h after the start of cultivation. This strategy enables the reduction of the cellulose concentration, which in high concentrations can cause rheological and oxygen transfer problems.

  6. Proposed gas generation assembly would recover deeply submerged objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, C. W.

    1968-01-01

    Gas generation system, used for recovery of submerged objects, generates hydrogen gas by the reaction of sodium with sea water. The assembly consists of flooded flotation tanks cabled together, equipped with relief valves to equalize pressure as the array ascends and hydrostatic pressure diminishes, and carrying remotely activated welding units.

  7. Implementation of Submerged Arc Welding Training. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Earl; Todd, John

    A unit on submerged arc welding (SAW) was developed and integrated into the welding program at Seattle Central Community College (Washington) during the period December 1983 through May 1984. During this time, 10 major users of SAW in the area were contacted and mailed questionnaires. Follow up consisted of telephone calls and personal contact as…

  8. Benthic Bacterial Diversity in Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystems▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, Stephen C.; Pangborn, Joseph B.; Zajack, Heidi A.; Kendall, Scott T.; Rediske, Richard R.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2010-01-01

    Physicochemical characterization, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) community profiling, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches were used to study bacterial communities inhabiting submerged Lake Huron sinkholes inundated with hypoxic, sulfate-rich groundwater. Photosynthetic cyanobacterial mats on the sediment surface were dominated by Phormidium autumnale, while deeper, organically rich sediments contained diverse and active bacterial communities. PMID:19880643

  9. Effects of submerged and anaerobic fermentations on cassava flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oke Oluwatoyin Victoria

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... Cassava tubers for processing into cassava flour, Lafun a Nigerian locally fermented product was subjected to two different types of fermentations: submerged and anaerobic fermentation for 72 h. Physicochemical changes that occurred during fermentation and their influence on the functional, rheological ...

  10. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka eSteffens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism and nonenzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS.

  11. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically and...

  12. Effects of prolonged elevated water salinity on submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental change, global warming. * To whom all correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: ian.russell@sanparks.org. Received 9 March 2017; accepted in revised form 10 October 2017. INTRODUCTION. Estuarine submerged macrophyte communities can be highly variable at both spatial and temporal scales, ...

  13. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... Key words: Cassava peel, Trichoderma viride, enzyme, submerged fermentation, protein, amino acids. INTRODUCTION. Protein-energy malnutrition remains a major public health problem in many developing countries and there is the need to increase daily intake of protein, especially animal protein, using ...

  14. Relationships between the biomass of waterfowl and submerged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Wilderness Lakes system, comprising three estuarine lakes (Eilandvlei, Langvlei and Rondevlei), supports a diverse waterbird community, which includes 12 duck species and the abundant Red-knobbed Coot Fulica cristata. Biannual counts of waterfowl (ducks and Red-knobbed Coot) and assessments of submerged ...

  15. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with Trichoderma viride (ATCC 36316). OO Ezekiel, OC Aworh, HP Blaschek, TC Ezeji. Abstract. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peel is one of the solid wastes produced as a consequence of cassava processing. It is low in protein but contains a large ...

  16. Nitrification in a submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A laboratory-scale submerged attached growth bioreactor using Luffa cylindrica as support material for the immobilization of nitrifying bacteria was applied for polishing the effluent of an UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater under the tropical conditions of northeast Brazil, in the City of Campina Grande (7o 13' 11” ...

  17. Effects of submerged vegetation on water clarity across climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosten, S.; Lacerot, G.; Jeppesen, E.; Motta Marques, D.M.L.; Nes, van E.H.; Mazzeo, N.; Scheffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    A positive feedback between submerged vegetation and water clarity forms the backbone of the alternative state theory in shallow lakes. The water clearing effect of aquatic vegetation may be caused by different physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms and has been studied mainly in temperate

  18. Organic Stable Isotopes in Ancient Oyster Shell Trace Pre-colonial Nitrogen Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, E. S.; Carmichael, R. H.; Andrus, C. F. T.; Jackson, H. E.

    2016-02-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were an important food resource for native peoples of the northern Gulf of Mexico, who harvested oysters and deposited waste shell and other artifacts in middens. Shell δ15N is a proxy for oyster tissue δ15N that reflects nitrogen (N) in food sources of bivalves. We tested the use of shell δ15N as a paleo proxy of ancient N sources, which to our knowledge has not been previously done for archeological bivalve specimens. To determine δ15N of the very low-N and high-carbonate ancient specimens, we tested established and modified acidification techniques developed for modern clams and oysters to decalcify organic shell matrix and extract sufficient N for analyses. Centrifugation following acidification better concentrated N from ancient shells for stable isotope analysis. Careful screening was required to detect effects of diagenesis, incomplete acidification, and sample contamination. Modern oyster shells did not require acidification and bulk shell material was directly analyzed for δ15N using an EA-IRMS coupled to a CO2 trap. δ15N values in ancient oyster shells did not differ from modern oyster shells from the same sites, but %N and % organic carbon (C) were lower in ancient than in modern shells. Organic δ13C in ancient shells had a significant negative relationship with shell age, possibly due to an effect of sea level rise increasing marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) sources to oysters. In modern oysters, δ15N had a significant relationship with soft tissue δ15N, and predicted by SPM δ15N, water column nitrate, and water column dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations, demonstrating the effectiveness of oyster shell δ15N to identify N sources to bivalves such as oysters. Our study has demonstrated the usefulness of δ15N from midden oyster shells as a proxy for N sources in an estuary that has undergone relatively light impacts from human land-use change through the past 2000 years.

  19. Perkinsus sp. infecting oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae (Guilding, 1828) on the coast of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Rosana Pinho; Boehs, Guisla; Sabry, Rachel Costa; Ceuta, Liliane Oliveira; Luz, Mariane Dos Santos Aguiar; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; da Silva, Patrícia Mirella

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of the protozoan Perkinsus in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on the coast of Bahia State, Brazil. The oysters (n = 900) were collected in February-March and July-August 2010. The Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) analysis of gills and rectum revealed hypnospores of Perkinsus sp. with a high mean prevalence (63%). The infection intensity varied from very light to advanced. The polymerase chain reaction confirmed Perkinsus in 87.2% of the RFTM-positive oysters. Histological analysis showed trophozoites and schizonts phagocytized by hemocytes, mainly in the intestine and the stomach epithelium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [History of oyster as drug from the origin to the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Since Antiquity, oyster is a subject of interest and medical use, as indicated by Oribiase and Galien. From the 17th century, this unique drug was proposed by physicians for various diseases, and more often for (la rage). One could think that that drug disappeared at the 20th and 21st centuries. But we can observe that it was still recommended by several authors as drug. Still today, companies offer oyster under various forms for allopathic and homeopathic treatments, as well as for food supplement. Research are ongoing to discover active substances within oyster and their potential medical interests.

  1. Ingestion of Nanoplastics and Microplastics by Pacific Oyster Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-12-15

    Plastic debris is a prolific contaminant effecting freshwater and marine ecosystems across the globe. Of growing environmental concern are "microplastics"and "nanoplastics" encompassing tiny particles of plastic derived from manufacturing and macroplastic fragmentation. Pelagic zooplankton are susceptible to consuming microplastics, however the threat posed to larvae of commercially important bivalves is currently unknown. We exposed Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae (3-24 d.p.f.) to polystyrene particles spanning 70 nm-20 μm in size, including plastics with differing surface properties, and tested the impact of microplastics on larval feeding and growth. The frequency and magnitude of plastic ingestion over 24 h varied by larval age and size of polystyrene particle (ANOVA, P plastic, with aminated particles ingested and retained more frequently (ANOVA, P plastic consumption and plastic load per organism was identified (Spearmans, r = 0.95, P micro- and nanoplastics were readily ingested by oyster larvae, exposure to plastic concentrations exceeding those observed in the marine environment resulted in no measurable effects on the development or feeding capacity of the larvae over the duration of the study.

  2. Using indicators and models for an ecosystem approach to fisheries and aquaculture management: the anchovy fishery and Pacific oyster culture in Chile: case studies Aplicación de indicadores y modelos para un enfoque ecosistémico de la pesca y la acuicultura: pesquería de anchoveta y cultivo de ostra del Pacífico en Chile: casos de estudio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Silva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrate the use of indicators and models to support the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries and Aquaculture management using two case studies in Chile: prediction of environmental variability effects upon anchovy (Engraulis ringens fishery of northern Chile and prediction of suitable sites and carrying capacity of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas culture using FARM and geographic information system (GIS models in the Valdivia estuary. A three stage approach was applied: Stage 1 considers spatiotemporal ecosystem indicators (fisheries, aquaculture, environmental, and regulatory, Stage 2 uses statistical relationships between indicators, GIS, and other simulation models (e.g., artificial neural networks and FARM of environment-resources interaction, and Stage 3 is the analysis and validation of models outputs. The methodology illustrates how indicators and models may be used to assist decision-makers in developing an ecosystem approach to fisheries and aquaculture. The application of these approaches provides an integrative methodology for abundance prediction of anchovy and site selection for shellfish aquaculture, despite limitations in the available data.Este trabajo muestra el uso de indicadores y modelos para apoyar la aplicación del enfoque ecosistémico en la gestión de la pesca y la acuicultura, mediante dos casos de estudios en Chile: predicción de los efectos de la variabilidad ambiental en la pesquería de anchoveta (Engraulis ringens en la zona norte de Chile y la predicción de sitios aptos y capacidad de carga para el cultivo de la ostra del Pacífico (Crassostrea gigas en el estuario de Valdivia. Se aplicó un enfoque metodológico de tres etapas: etapa 1 considera indicadores espacio-temporales del ecosistema (pesca, acuicultura, medio ambiente y legislación; etapa 2 utiliza relaciones estadísticas entre los indicadores, funciones de SIG (Sistemas de Información Geográfica, y otros modelos de simulación (Redes

  3. Differential response of oyster shell powder on enzyme profile and nutritional value of oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida PF05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraian, Ram; Narayan, Om Prakash; Srivastava, Jatin

    2014-01-01

    Oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida was cultivated on different combinations of wheat straw (WS) as basal substrate and oyster shell powder (OSP) supplement. The OSP supplementation considerably responded to different cultivation phases. The mycelium grew fast and showed rapid growth rate (8.91 mmd(-1)) in WS + OSP (97 + 3) combination while WS + OSP (92 + 8) showed maximum laccase (3.133 U/g) and Mn peroxidase (MnP) activities (0.091 U/g). The climax level of laccase (5.433 U/g) and MnP (0.097 U/g) was recorded during fruit body initiation in WS + OSP (97 + 3) and WS + OSP (98 + 2) combinations, respectively. The WS + OSP (97 + 3) combination represented the best condition for mushroom cultivation and produced the highest biological efficiency (147%). In addition, protein and lipid contents in fruit bodies were slightly improved in response to OSP. The carbohydrate was significantly increased by raising concentration of OSP. The highest values of protein, carbohydrate, and lipid noted were 31.3 μg/g, 0.0639 (g/g), and 0.373 (g/g) correspondingly. Conclusively it was evident that lower concentrations of OSP acted positively and relatively to higher concentrations and improved nutritional content which may suitably be used to enhance both yield and nutritional values of mushroom.

  4. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  5. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nutrient cycling within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for other organisms. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via benthic denitrification. However, this has not been exam...

  6. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nitrogen removal within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for ecosystem functioning. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via assimilation, burial, or benthic denitrification. Stu...

  7. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  8. Nekton use of oyster occupied habitats in two coastal ponds in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restoration of oyster habitat aims to expand or preserve ecosystem services including increased secondary production of the community. We compare density, biomass, and average standing stock of nitrogen and carbon in seasonal fish and invertebrate collections in Ninigret and Gree...

  9. Remodeling of the cycling transcriptome of the oyster Crassostrea gigas by the harmful algae Alexandrium minutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Hoede, Claire; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Sow, Mohamedou; Huvet, Arnaud; Boullot, Floriane; Fabioux, Caroline; Hegaret, Hélène; Tran, Damien

    2017-06-14

    As a marine organism, the oyster Crassostrea gigas inhabits a complex biotope governed by interactions between the moon and the sun cycles. We used next-generation sequencing to investigate temporal regulation of oysters under light/dark entrainment and the impact of harmful algal exposure. We found that ≈6% of the gills' transcriptome exhibits circadian expression, characterized by a nocturnal and bimodal pattern. Surprisingly, a higher number of ultradian transcripts were also detected under solely circadian entrainment. The results showed that a bloom of Alexandrium minutum generated a remodeling of the bivalve's temporal structure, characterized by a loss of oscillations, a genesis of de novo oscillating transcripts, and a switch in the period of oscillations. These findings provide unprecedented insights into the diurnal landscape of the oyster's transcriptome and pleiotropic remodeling due to toxic algae exposure, revealing the intrinsic plasticity of the cycling transcriptome in oysters.

  10. Concentrations of heavy metals in commercially important Oysters from Goa, Central-West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, P.S.; Gauns, M.; Ansari, Z.A.

    . The high concentrations of Cd and Cu in tissues of edible oyster pose a threat to human health. Therefore, continuous monitoring, people awareness and a stringent government policy should be implemented to mitigate the metal pollution along the studied...

  11. Evaluation of waste concrete road materials for use in oyster aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the suitability of recycled concrete : aggregate (RCA) from road projects as bottom conditioning material for on-bottom oyster : aquaculture in the Chesapeake Bay. The testing was designed to (1) e...

  12. Phase II evaluation of waste concrete road materials for use in oyster aquaculture - field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the suitability of recycled concrete aggregate : (RCA) from road projects as bottom conditioning material for on-bottom oyster aquaculture in the : Chesapeake Bay. During this Phase of the study, t...

  13. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  14. The biology of environmental stress: molecular biomarkers in Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftos, D A; Melwani, A R; Haynes, P A; Muralidharan, S; Birch, G F; Amaral, V; Thompson, E L; Taylor, D A

    2016-09-14

    This review describes our recent work on environmental stress in Sydney rock oysters, focusing on the identification of molecular biomarkers for ecotoxicological analysis. We begin by describing the environmental pressures facing coastal estuaries in Australia, with particular reference to Sydney Harbour. After providing that context, we summarise our transcriptional and proteomic analyses of Sydney rock oysters responding to chemical contamination and other forms of environmental stress. This work has shown that the intracellular processes of oysters are highly responsive to environmental threats. Our data agree with the broader literature, which suggests that there is a highly conserved intracellular stress response in oysters involving a limited number of biological processes. We conclude that many effective molecular markers for environmental biomonitoring are likely to lie within these biological pathways.

  15. Applying the seedling-emergence method under waterlogged conditions to detect the seed bank of aquatic plants in submerged sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; ter Heerdt, GNJ; Bakker, JP

    Seed bank studies focused on submerged aquatic plants are generally performed under submerged conditions, using the seedling-emergence method. However, if a study targets at both submerged species and helophytes, submerged conditions are generally not suitable. We tested the emergence of seedlings

  16. Coconut oil induced production of a surfactant-compatible lipase from Aspergillus tamarii under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arijit; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Shivakumar, Srividya; Shakya, Sujina; Sogane, Swathi Shankar

    2017-02-01

    Filamentous fungi are efficient producers of lipases. The present study focuses on identification of a potent lipolytic fungus and enhancement of lipase production through optimization of nutritional and cultural conditions under submerged fermentation. Molecular characterization of the fungus by 18S rDNA sequencing revealed its identity as Aspergillus tamarii with 98% homology. Maximum lipase production was noted in mineral salts medium supplemented with coconut oil (2.5%, v/v). A combination of ammonium chloride (2%, w/v) and tryptone (2%, w/v) facilitated maximum lipase production at pH 5 of the production medium. A carbon: nitrogen ratio of 1:4 led to significant (p oil stain removal activity of a commercially available detergent by 2.2-fold. The current findings suggest the potentiality of this fungal lipase to be used in detergent formulation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of substrate quantity and shelf position on yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor caju).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zireva, D T; Fanadzo, M; Mashingaidze, A B

    2007-10-01

    An experiment was conducted in Harare (Zimbabwe) in 2004 to investigate the effect of substrate (wheat straw) quantity and shelf position on yield of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju) using plastic tray culture. The experiment was laid out as a 2-way factorial in a randomized block design with five substrate quantities (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kg of wheat straw per tray) and two shelf positions (0.5 and 1.2 m above ground). Mushroom yield increased with an increased substrate quantity of up to 6 kg and thereafter remained constant. Shelf position had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on mushroom yield and there was no interaction (p > 0.05) between substrate quantity and shelf position on yield. Biological efficiency decreased with an increase in substrate quantity per tray. It was concluded that 6 kg of substrate per tray (50x35 and 20 cm deep) would result in optimal yields. The height above the ground at which trays are placed in the growing room does not affect mushroom yields.

  18. A hemocyte gene expression signature correlated with predictive capacity of oysters to survive Vibrio infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rafael

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex balance between environmental and host factors is an important determinant of susceptibility to infection. Disturbances of this equilibrium may result in multifactorial diseases as illustrated by the summer mortality syndrome, a worldwide and complex phenomenon that affects the oysters, Crassostrea gigas. The summer mortality syndrome reveals a physiological intolerance making this oyster species susceptible to diseases. Exploration of genetic basis governing the oyster resistance or susceptibility to infections is thus a major goal for understanding field mortality events. In this context, we used high-throughput genomic approaches to identify genetic traits that may characterize inherent survival capacities in C. gigas. Results Using digital gene expression (DGE, we analyzed the transcriptomes of hemocytes (immunocompetent cells of oysters able or not able to survive infections by Vibrio species shown to be involved in summer mortalities. Hemocytes were nonlethally collected from oysters before Vibrio experimental infection, and two DGE libraries were generated from individuals that survived or did not survive. Exploration of DGE data and microfluidic qPCR analyses at individual level showed an extraordinary polymorphism in gene expressions, but also a set of hemocyte-expressed genes whose basal mRNA levels discriminate oyster capacity to survive infections by the pathogenic V. splendidus LGP32. Finally, we identified a signature of 14 genes that predicted oyster survival capacity. Their expressions are likely driven by distinct transcriptional regulation processes associated or not associated to gene copy number variation (CNV. Conclusions We provide here for the first time in oyster a gene expression survival signature that represents a useful tool for understanding mortality events and for assessing genetic traits of interest for disease resistance selection programs.

  19. Temporal variation in development of ecosystem services from oyster reef restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Humphries, Austin T.; Casas, Sandra M.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration ecology relies heavily on ecosystem development theories that generally assume development of fully functioning natural systems over time, but often fail to identify the time-frame required for provision of desired functions, or acknowledge different pathways of functional development. In estuaries, a decline of overall habitat quality and functioning has led to significant efforts to restore critical ecosystem services, recently through the creation and restoration of oyster reefs. Oyster reef restoration generally occurs with goals of (1) increasing water quality via filtration through sustainable oyster recruitment, (2) stabilizing shorelines, and (3) creating and enhancing critical estuarine habitat for fish and invertebrates. We restored over 260 m2 of oyster reef habitat in coastal Louisiana and followed the development and provision of these ecosystem services from 2009 through 2012. Oysters recruited to reefs immediately, with densities of oysters greater than 75 mm exceeding 80 ind m−2 after 3 years, and provision of filtration rates of 1002 ± 187 L h−1 m−2; shoreline stabilization effects of the created reefs were minimal over the three years of monitoring, with some evidence of positive shoreline stabilization during higher wind/energy events only; increased nekton abundance of resident, but not larger transient fish was immediately measurable at the reefs, however, this failed to increase through time. Our results provide critical insights into the development trajectories of ecosystem services provided by restored oyster reefs, as well as the mechanisms mediating these changes. This is critical both ecologically to understand how and where a reef thrives, and for policy and management to guide decision-making related to oyster reef restoration and the crediting and accounting of ecosystem services.

  20. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York

    OpenAIRE

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival....

  1. Seasonal tracking of histo-blood group antigen expression and norovirus binding in oyster gastrointestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Engelbrektson, Anna L; Mandrell, Robert E

    2008-08-01

    Noroviruses (NORs) are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. Outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of contaminated oysters and generally occur between the months of November and March, when oysters produce the highest levels of glycogen. Oyster glycogen has been proposed as playing a role in NOR accumulation. Recent research indicates that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) function as viral receptors on human gastrointestinal cells. In this study, oyster glycogen was tested to determine whether it contains HBGA-like molecules and whether it plays a role in NOR binding. The correlation between the amount of HBGA expression and NOR binding also was measured. We also tested whether seasonal changes affected HBGA expression and binding of recombinant NORs. The results indicate that recombinant NOR binding is highly correlated with HBGA expression in Virginica (Crassostrea virginica), Pacific (Crassostrea gigas), and Kumamato (Crassostrea sikamea) oysters, but the association does not have a seasonal pattern. No obvious trend in either HBGA expression or recombinant NOR binding by month was noted. A significant increase in recombinant NOR binding was observed in Virginica and Pacific oysters in a season not generally associated with NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks. A significant increase in HBGA expression also was observed for Pacific and Virginica oysters in the same season. Paradoxically, HBGA expression and NOR binding both were higher in oysters produced in the non-NOR gastroenteritis season (April through October) than in those produced in the NOR gastroenteritis season (November through March), suggesting that seasonal NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks are not associated with high levels of HBGA expression or NOR binding.

  2. An outbreak of norovirus genogroup II associated with New South Wales oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Tove L; Merritt, Tony D; Zammit, Anthony; McLeod, Catherine; Landinez, Lina M; White, Peter A; Munnoch, Sally A; Durrheim, David N

    2014-03-31

    Currently available antigen tests for norovirus (NoV) have excellent specificity but negative results do not always rule out infection. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a useful method for detecting and genotyping NoV in humans and oysters. An outbreak of NoV associated with oyster consumption in northern New South Wales confirmed the value of real-time RT-PCR where immunochromatography (ICT) tests were negative. Eight cases of gastrointestinal illness in northern NSW, clinically suggestive of NoV infection, were associated with consumption of oysters. A joint environmental investigation was conducted by the New South Wales Food Authority and local council. One human sample was collected and tested for NoV using ICT and real-time RT-PCR. Oyster samples were tested for NoV utilising real-time RT-PCR. The patient with a stool sample had NoV genogroup II (GII) confirmed by real-time RT-PCR after testing negative by ICT. Illness in all cases was consistent with NoV with median incubation and duration of 36 and 50.5 hours respectively. All cases consumed oysters that were harvested from the same area. Three oyster samples from the harvest area were also positive for NoV GII. A nearby leaking sewer line was identified as the likely source of the contamination with hydrological studies confirming its potential to contaminate implicated oyster leases. This investigation confirmed the value of real-time RT-PCR testing of human specimens where ICT tests are negative and clinical illness is suggestive of NoV infection. NoV real-time RT-PCR and epidemiological evidence effectively linked human infection with oyster contamination to motivate a thorough environmental investigation and appropriate action to mitigate further public health risk. copyright@health.gov.au

  3. Multiple clusters of norovirus among shellfish consumers linked to symptomatic oyster harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Galanis, Eleni; Mattison, Kirsten; Mykytczuk, Oksana; Buenaventura, Enrico; Wong, Julie; Prystajecky, Natalie; Ritson, Mark; Stone, Jason; Moreau, Dan; Youssef, André

    2012-09-01

    We describe the investigation of a norovirus outbreak associated with raw oyster consumption affecting 36 people in British Columbia, Canada, in 2010. Several genotypes were found in oysters, including an exact sequence match to clinical samples in regions B and C of the norovirus genome (genogroup I genotype 4). Traceback implicated a single remotely located harvest site probably contaminated by ill shellfish workers during harvesting activities. This outbreak resulted in three recalls, one public advisory, and closure of the harvest site.

  4. Modeling and Mapping Oyster Norovirus Outbreak Risks in Gulf of Mexico Using NASA MODIS Aqua Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Norovirus is a highly infectious virus and the leading cause of foodborne disease outbreaks such as oyster norovirus outbreaks. Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent norovirus infection and no drug to treat it. This paper presents an integrated modeling and mapping framework for predicting the risk of norovirus outbreaks in oyster harvesting waters in the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. The framework involves (1) the construction of three novel remote sensing algorithms for the retrieval of sea surface salinity, sea surface temperature, and gage height (tide level) using NASA MODIS Aqua data; (2) the development of probability-based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the prediction of oyster norovirus outbreak risk, and (3) the application of the Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) for mapping norovirus outbreak risks in oyster harvesting areas in the Northern Gulf of Mexico using the remotely sensed NASA data, retrieved data from the three remote sensing algorithms, and the ANN model predictions. The three remote sensing algorithms are able to correctly retrieve 94.1% of sea surface salinity, 94.0% of sea surface temperature, and 77.8% of gage height observed along the US coast, including the Pacific coast, the Gulf of Mexico coast, and the Atlantic coast. The gage height, temperature, and salinity are the three most important explanatory variables of the ANN model in terms of spatially distributed input variables. The ANN model is capable of hindcasting/predicting all oyster norovirus outbreaks occurred in oyster growing areas along the Gulf of Mexico coast where environmental data are available. The integrated modeling and mapping framework makes it possible to map daily risks of norovirus outbreaks in all oyster harvesting waters and particularly the oyster growing areas where no in-situ environmental data are available, greatly improving the safety of seafood and reducing outbreaks of foodborne disease.

  5. Management of health risks associated with oysters harvested from a norovirus contaminated area, Ireland, February–March 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Doré, B.; Keaveney, S.; Flannery, J.; Rajko-Nenow, P.

    2010-01-01

    Oysters from a harvesting area responsible for outbreaks of gastroenteritis were relaid at a clean seawater site and subsequently depurated in tanks of purified seawater at elevated temperatures. This combined treatment reduced norovirus levels to those detected prior to the outbreak. On the basis of norovirus monitoring the sale of treated oysters was permitted although the harvest area remained closed for direct sale of oysters. No reports of illness have been associated with the consumptio...

  6. Optimization and application of spray-drying process on oyster cooking soup byproduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibin CHEN

    Full Text Available Abstract Oyster drying processes have produced a large amount of cooking soup byproducts. In this study, oyster cooking soup byproduct was concentrated and spray-dried after enzymatic hydrolysis to produce seasoning powder. Response surface methodology (RSM was performed on the basis of single-factor studies to optimize the feeding temperature, hot air temperature, atomization pressure, and total solid content of oyster drying. Results revealed the following optimized parameters of this process: feeding temperature of 60 °C, total solid content of 30%, hot air temperature of 197 °C, and atomization pressure of 92 MPa. Under these conditions, the oyster powder yield was 63.7% ± 0.7% and the moisture content was 4.1% ± 0.1%. Our pilot trial also obtained 63.1% yield and 4.0% moisture content. The enzyme hydrolysis of cooking soup byproduct further enhanced the antioxidant activity of the produced oyster seasoning powder to some extent. Spray drying process optimized by RSM can provide a reference for high-valued applications of oyster cooking soup byproducts.

  7. Detection, quantification and genotyping of noroviruses in oysters implicated in disease outbreaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefeli, Deborah; Gantenbein-Demarchi, Corinne; Böttiger, Blenda

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a major cause of foodborne outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Transmission of NoV is commonly linked to the consumption of oysters as they accumulate viruses through filter feeding in faecal-contaminated water. The NoV genogroups (G)I, GII and GIV infect humans....... While GI and GII have often been verified as causative agents of oyster-transmitted illness, GIV is rarely detected and has so far not been confirmed in outbreaks related to oysters. The aim of this study was to determine whether NoVs from oysters implicated in a disease outbreak were linked to the GI......, GII and GIV found in the stool samples from infected patients. NoVs were quantified in the oyster samples using Taqman real-time RT-PCR and characterised by sequencing of the partial capsid region. The results confirmed the presence of GI, GII and GIV in the oysters in levels between 101 - 103...

  8. Rice straw addition as sawdust substitution in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) planted media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Christine Pamardining; Susilawati, Puspita Ratna

    2017-08-01

    Oyster mushroom is favorite by the people because of the high nutrients. The oyster mushroom cultivation usually using sawdust. The availability of sawdust become difficult to find. It makes difficulties of mushroom cultivation. Rice straw as an agricultural waste can be used as planted media of oyster mushroom because they contain much nutrition needed to the mushroom growth. The aims of this research were to analysis the influence of rice straw addition in a baglog as planted media and to analysis the concentration of rice straw addition which can substitute sawdust in planted media of oyster mushroom. This research used 4 treatment of sawdust and rice straw ratio K = 75 % : 0 %, P1 = 60 % : 15 %, P2 = 40 % : 35 %, P3 = 15 % : 60 %. The same material composition of all baglog was bran 20%, chalk 5%, and water 70%. The parameters used in this research were wet weight, dry weight, moisture content and number of the mushroom fruit body. Data analysis was used ANOVA test with 1 factorial. The results of this research based on statistical analysis showed that there was no influence of rice straw addition in a planted media on the oyster mushroomgrowth. 15% : 60% was the concentrationof rice straw additionwhich can substitute the sawdust in planted media of oyster mushroom.

  9. The modulation role of serotonin in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in response to air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjing; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiudan; Li, Yiqun; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a critical neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network and involved in regulation of the stress response in vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, serotonin was found to be widely distributed in the tissues of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, including haemolymph, gonad, visceral ganglion, mantle, gill, labial palps and hepatopancreas, and its concentration increased significantly in haemolymph and mantle after the oysters were exposed to air for 1 d. The apoptosis rate of haemocytes was significantly declined after the oysters received an injection of extra serotonin, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in haemolymph increased significantly. After the stimulation of serotonin during air exposure, the apoptosis rate of oyster haemocytes and the concentration of H2O2 in haemolymph were significantly decreased, while the SOD activity was significantly elevated. Furthermore, the survival rate of oysters from 4(th) to 6(th) d after injection of serotonin was higher than that of FSSW group and air exposure group. The results clearly indicated that serotonin could modulate apoptotic effect and redox during air exposure to protect oysters from stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative and quantitative proteomics reveal the adaptive strategies of oyster larvae to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R.

    2015-10-28

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Decreasing pH due to anthropogenic CO2 inputs, called ocean acidification (OA), can make coastal environments unfavorable for oysters. This is a serious socioeconomical issue for China which supplies >70% of the world\\'s edible oysters. Here, we present an iTRAQ-based protein profiling approach for the detection and quantification of proteome changes under OA in the early life stage of a commercially important oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis. Availability of complete genome sequence for the pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) enabled us to confidently quantify over 1500 proteins in larval oysters. Over 7% of the proteome was altered in response to OA at pHNBS 7.6. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins and their associated functional pathways showed an upregulation of proteins involved in calcification, metabolic processes, and oxidative stress, each of which may be important in physiological adaptation of this species to OA. The downregulation of cytoskeletal and signal transduction proteins, on the other hand, might have impaired cellular dynamics and organelle development under OA. However, there were no significant detrimental effects in developmental processes such as metamorphic success. Implications of the differentially expressed proteins and metabolic pathways in the development of OA resistance in oyster larvae are discussed. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD002138 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002138).

  11. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival. Oysters placed in Jamaica Bay grew well when housed in protective containers and growth was influenced by placement near the sediment as compared to the surface. Oysters placed 1 foot above the sediment grew larger that those suspended 1 foot below the surface. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, conductivity, chlorophyll-a and dissolved O2 were taken to compare water quality at each site. To study growth and survival in a more natural condition, oyster seed and adults were placed just off the bottom in unprotected containers and photographed. After 1 year they are growing and surviving well and there has been evidence of reproduction. Thus far there are no serious signs of predation by crabs or starfish. The study shows that Jamaica Bay water quality is suitable for oyster growth under the various conditions of our experiments.

  12. Temperature-Dependent Persistence of Human Norovirus Within Oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changsun; Kingsley, David H

    2016-06-01

    This study characterizes the persistence of human norovirus in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) held at different seawater temperatures. Oysters were contaminated with human norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk strain 8FIIa) by exposing them to virus-contaminated water at 15 °C, and subsequently holding them at 7, 15, and 25 °C for up to 6 weeks. Viral RNA was extracted from oyster tissue and hemocytes and quantitated by RT-qPCR. Norovirus was detected in hemocytes and oysters held at 7 and 15 °C for 6 weeks and in hemocytes and oysters held at 25 °C for up to 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Results confirm that NoV is quite persistent within oysters and demonstrate that cooler water temperatures extend norovirus clearance times. This study suggests a need for substantial relay times to remove norovirus from contaminated shellfish and suggests that regulatory authorities should consider the effects of water temperature after a suspected episodic norovirus-contamination event.

  13. A survey of Australian oysters for the presence of human noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Felicity; Ross, Tom; Holds, Geoffrey; Kiermeier, Andreas; McLeod, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Impending international policies for norovirus in oysters and the lack of Australian data suggested there was a need to undertake a national survey of norovirus in oysters. Two geographically distinct oyster-growing areas from each of three Australian states were sampled on 4 occasions during 2010 and 2011. The sites selected were considered by state shellfish authorities to be the most compromised with respect to the potential for human faecal contamination as identified by shoreline surveys. The oysters were tested for norovirus GI, GII and Escherichia coli. Norovirus GII was detected in two of 120 (1.7%) samples and norovirus GI was not detected. One of the norovirus positive samples was cloned and sequenced as GII.3. Five of 120 (4.2%) samples were found to have more than the guidance concentration of 230 E. coli per 100 g of shellfish but these samples did not contain detectable concentrations of norovirus. The apparently low prevalence of norovirus in oysters from Australian growing areas supports epidemiological data that suggests norovirus contamination of Australian oysters is rare. The results from this study emphasise the need for future norovirus control measures for shellfish to be commensurate with the risk associated with the growing area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oyster-based national mapping of trace metals pollution in the Chinese coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Yuan; Ke, Cai-Huan; Zhu, Aijia; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the distribution and variability of trace metal pollution in the Chinese coastal waters, over 1000 adult oyster individuals were collected from 31 sites along the entire coastline, spanning from temperate to tropical regions (Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea), between August and September 2015. Concentrations of macroelements [sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P)] and trace elements [cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), silver (Ag), and titanium (Ti)] in these oysters were concurrently measured and analyzed. The results showed high Ti, Zn and Cu bioaccumulation in oysters from Guangdong (South China Sea) and Zhejiang (East China Sea). Oysters at Nanji Island (Wenzhou) and Daya Bay (Huizhou) accumulated significantly high concentrations of Ni and Cr. The elements in these oysters were several times higher than the national food safety limits of China. On the other hand, the present study found that normalization of metals by salinity (Na) and nutrient (P) could reflect more details of metal pollution in the oysters. Biomonitoring of metal pollution could benefit from incorporating the macroelement calibration instead of focusing only on the total metal concentrations. Overall, simultaneous measurement of macroelements and trace metals coupled with non-linear analysis provide a new perspective for revealing the underlying mechanism of trace metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation in marine organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery E. Scherer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging.

  16. Fluxomics of the Eastern Oyster for Environmental Stress Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey P. Tikunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of 2-13C/15N-glycine and U-13C-glucose was determined in four tissue blocks (adductor muscle, stomach and digestive gland, mantle, and gills of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica using proton (1H and carbon-13 (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The oysters were treated in aerated seawater with three treatments (5.5 mM U-13C-glucose, 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine, and 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine and the relative mass balance and 13C fractional enrichments were determined in the four tissue blocks. In all tissues, glycine was metabolized by the glycine cycle forming serine exclusively in the mitochondria by the glycine cleavage system forming 2,3-13C-serine. In muscle, a minor amount of serine-derived pyruvate entered the Krebs cycle as substantiated by detection of a trace of 2,3-13C-aspartate. In all tissues, U-13C-glucose formed glycogen by glycogen synthesis, alanine by glycolysis, and glutamate and aspartate through the Krebs cycle. Alanine was formed exclusively from glucose via alanine transaminase and not glycine via alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. Based on isotopomer analysis, pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase appeared to be equal points for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle. In the 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine emergence treatment used to simulate 12 h of “low tide”, oysters accumulated more 13C-labeled metabolites, including both anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic Krebs cycle intermediates. The aerobic metabolites could be the biochemical result of the gaping behavior of mollusks during emergence. The change in tissue distribution and mass balance of 13C-labeled nutrients (U-13C-glucose and 2-13C/15N-glycine provides the basis for a new quantitative fluxomic method for elucidating sub-lethal environmental effects in marine organisms called whole body mass balance phenotyping (WoMBaP.

  17. Methods for geothermal reservoir detection emphasizing submerged environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C.W.; Wilde, P.

    1976-05-21

    This report has been prepared for the California State Lands Commission to aid them in evaluating exploration programs for geothermal reservoirs, particularly in submerged land environments. Three charts show: (1) a logical progression of specific geologic, geochemical, and geophysical exploration techniques for detecting geothermal reservoirs in various geologic environments with emphasis on submerged lands, (2) various exploration techniques which can be used to develop specific information in geothermal areas, and (3) if various techniques will apply to geothermal exploration according to a detailed geologic classification. A narrative in semi-outline form supplements these charts, providing for each technique; a brief description, advantages, disadvantages, special geologic considerations, and specific references. The specific geologic situation will control the exploration criterion to be used for reservoir detection. General guidelines are established which may be of use in evaluating such a program, but the optimum approach will vary with each situation.

  18. Microbiological quality and bacterial diversity of the tropical oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in a monitored farming system and from natural stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neta, M T; Maciel, B M; Lopes, A T S; Marques, E L S; Rezende, R P; Boehs, G

    2015-12-02

    Microbiological evaluation is one of the most important parameters for analyzing the viability of an oyster farming system, which addresses public health and ecological concerns. Here, the microbiological quality of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivated in a monitored environment and from natural beds in Bahia, northeastern Brazil, was determined. Bacterial diversity in oysters was measured by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Sequence analysis revealed that most bacterial species showed similarity with uncultured or unidentified bacteria from environmental samples, and were clustered into the phylum Proteobacteria. Diverse bacteria from cultivated (monitored) oyster samples were grouped in the same cluster with a high similarity index (above 79%). Microbiological analyses revealed that these oysters did not contain pathogens. These results reflect the natural balance of the microbial communities essential to the maintenance of health and in inhibiting pathogen colonization in the oyster. On the other hand, bacterial diversity of samples from native stocks in extractive areas displayed a similarity index varying between 55 and 77%, and all samples were clustered separately from each other and from the cluster of samples derived from the cultivation area. Microbiological analyses showed that oysters from the extractive area were not fit for human consumption. This reflected a different composition of the microbial community in this area, probably resulting from anthropic impact. Our study also demonstrated that low temperatures and high rainfall limits the bacterial concentration in tropical oysters. This is the first study analyzing the total bacterial community profiles of the oyster C. rhizophorae.

  19. Role and value of nitrogen regulation provided by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beseres Pollack, Jennifer; Yoskowitz, David; Kim, Hae-Cheol; Montagna, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Suspension-feeding activities of oysters impart a potentially significant benefit to estuarine ecosystems via reduction of water column nutrients, plankton and seston biomass, and primary productivity...

  20. Antitumor activity of submerged biomass of Hericium erinaceus

    OpenAIRE

    Avtonomova, A.; Bakanov, A.; Vinokurov, V.; Bukhman, V.; Krasnopolskaya, L.

    2011-01-01

    Submerged cultivation of Hericium erinaceus in various media has been studied. The yield of biomass was shown to depend mainly on the carbon source, whereas the content of watersoluble polysaccharides depended primarily on the nitrogen source. Using optimal medium composition, the biomass yield of 22-23 g/l in 7 days was achieved. The antitumor activity was studied in vivo with using 2 tumor strains. The inhibition ratio of tumor in these experience reached 86%. An exposure of mice with tumor...

  1. Submerged beachrock preservation in the context of wave ravinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Lauren; Green, Andrew N.; Andrew Cooper, J.

    2018-02-01

    This study examines a Holocene-aged submerged shoreline, Limestone Reef, located in the shallow subtidal zone of South Africa's east coast. It comprises an elongate, coast-oblique, slab-like outcrop of beachrock situated above the contemporary fair-weather wave base. It is currently undergoing mechanical disintegration. Its unique and rare preservation in a high-energy setting affords an opportunity to examine the mechanical processes occurring during wave ravinement associated with rising sea level. The submerged shoreline and the adjacent shoreface were examined using high-resolution seismic reflection, side-scan sonar and shallow-water multibeam echosounding techniques. Limestone Reef rests on top of unconsolidated Holocene deposits. The structure's surface is characterised by reef-perpendicular gullies with rubble derived from the slab fringing its seaward edge. Limestone Reef slopes gently seawards and has a steep landward-facing edge where gullies are most prominently developed. Teardrop-shaped rippled scour depressions, marked by high backscatter, are located seawards of the submerged shoreline. These elongate in a seaward direction and are filled with bioclastic gravels and residual rubble from Limestone Reef. The gullies in the upstanding structure are indicative of wave plucking and abrasion of the shoreline. The material exposed by the rippled scour depressions is identical to that comprising the postglacial ravinement surface identified in the offshore stratigraphy. These deposits are considered to represent the contemporary, actively forming wave ravinement surface. The results suggest that wave ravinement of submerged shorelines is a discontinuous process dominated by the seaward entrainment of material from its landward edge controlled by high-energy drawback during storm surges. The ravinement process appears to operate at the seasonal scale and averages out over the long-term millennial scale for the continuous surface.

  2. Submerged Pagodas of Mahabalipuram - Study based on underwater investigations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Rao, K.M.

    - gested that this place could have served as an ancient port (Dayalan, 1992). Mahabalipuram was well known to earlier mariners as 'Seven Pagodas' since the 1 7h century AD. it is generally believed that out of 7 temples originally con- structed, all... based on the local traditions and available literature. The local tradition and the people of Mahabalipuram believe that five temples similar to the Shore Temple have been submerged in the sea. On the basis of local traditions Ancient Tamil...

  3. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Durán Pinzón, Freddy; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; Ferrer, J.

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON® , Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the follo...

  4. On the submerging of a spherical intruder into granular beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan-Yu; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Lan

    2017-06-01

    Granular materials are complex systems and their mechanical behaviours are determined by the material properties of individual particles, the interaction between particles and the surrounding media, which are still incompletely understood. Using an advanced discrete element method (DEM), we simulate the submerging process of a spherical projectile (an intruder) into granular materials of various properties with a zero penetration velocity (i.e. the intruder is touching the top surface of the granular bed and released from stationary) and examine its settling behaviour. By systematically changing the density and size of the intruder and the particle density (i.e. the density of the particles in the granular bed), we find that the intruder can sink deep into the granular bed even with a zero penetration velocity. Furthermore, we confirm that under certain conditions the granular bed can behave like a Newtonian liquid and the submerging intruder can reach a constant velocity, i.e. the terminal velocity, identical to the settling of a sphere in a liquid, as observed experimentally. A mathematical model is also developed to predict the maximum penetration depth of the intruder. The model predictions are compared with experimental data reported in the literature,good agreement was obtained, demonstrating the model can accurately predict the submerging behaviour of the intruder in the granular media.

  5. Research efforts for detection and recovery of submerged oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K. [United States Coast Guard, Groton, CT (United States). Research and Development Center

    2009-07-01

    Submerged oil can sink and destroy shellfish and other marine populations in addition to causing closure of water intakes at industrial facilities and power plants. However, current methods to find and recover oil from spills involving submerged oil are inadequate. The underwater environment presents major challenges such as poor visibility, difficulty in tracking oil spill movement, colder temperatures, inadequate containment methods and problems with the equipment's interaction with water. This paper reported on a multi-year project launched by the Research and Development Center of the United States Coast Guard to develop a complete approach for spills of submerged oil. The project involved detection technologies and recovery methods for oil on the bottom of any body of water. Proof of concept (POC) and prototype tests of potential detection technologies were evaluated during tests at the Ohmsett facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. The technologies included sonar, laser fluorometry, real-time mass spectrometry and in-situ fluorometry. This paper described the development of a complete specification for an integrated recovery system along with a plan for future development. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  6. Measurement of Submerged Oil/Gas Leaks using ROV Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin; de Vera, Giorgio; Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Ömer

    2013-11-01

    Drilling for oil or gas in the Gulf of Mexico is increasing rapidly at depths up to three miles. The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak concluded that inaccurate estimates of the leak rate from the Deepwater Horizon caused an inadequate response and attempts to cap the leak to fail. The first response to a submerged oil/gas leak will be to send a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) down to view the leak. During the response to the Deepwater Horizon crisis, the authors Savas and Shaffer were members of the Flow Rate Technical Group's Plume Team who used ROV video to develop the FRTG's first official estimates of the oil leak rate. Savas and Shaffer developed an approach using the larger, faster jet features (e.g., turbulent eddies, vortices, entrained particles) in the near-field developing zone to measure discharge rates. The authors have since used the Berkeley Tow Tank to test this approach on submerged dye-colored water jets and compressed air jets. Image Correlation Velocimetry has been applied to measure the velocity of visible features. Results from tests in the Berkeley Tow Tank and submerged oil jets in the OHMSETT facility will be presented.

  7. Production of Alpha Amylase by Bacillus cereus in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H. Raplong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have the ability to secrete enzymes when they are grown in the presence of certain substrates. Amylases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in biotechnological studies. Bacteria belonging to the genus Bacillus were isolated using mannitol egg yolk polymyxin B (MYP agar a highly selective media for Bacillus cereus isolation. The isolates were tested for α-amylase production on nutrient agar supplemented with starch and in submerged fermentation. The bacteria isolated and identified (using the Microgen Bacillus identification kit were all Bacillus cereus and SB2 had the largest zone of hydrolysis of 12mm on nutrient agar supplemented with starch as well as the highest enzyme activity of 1.62U/ml. Amylase activity of 2.56U/ml was obtained after 24 hours incubation in submerged fermentation. When amylase enzyme production parameters where optimized, maximum amylase activity was obtained at a pH of 6.5, temperature of 350C, incubation time of 24 hours and 4% inoculums concentration. Bacillus cereus SB2 is a potential isolate for alpha-amylase production with soluble starch as the sole carbon source in submerged fermentation.

  8. On the submerging of a spherical intruder into granular beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chuan-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular materials are complex systems and their mechanical behaviours are determined by the material properties of individual particles, the interaction between particles and the surrounding media, which are still incompletely understood. Using an advanced discrete element method (DEM, we simulate the submerging process of a spherical projectile (an intruder into granular materials of various properties with a zero penetration velocity (i.e. the intruder is touching the top surface of the granular bed and released from stationary and examine its settling behaviour. By systematically changing the density and size of the intruder and the particle density (i.e. the density of the particles in the granular bed, we find that the intruder can sink deep into the granular bed even with a zero penetration velocity. Furthermore, we confirm that under certain conditions the granular bed can behave like a Newtonian liquid and the submerging intruder can reach a constant velocity, i.e. the terminal velocity, identical to the settling of a sphere in a liquid, as observed experimentally. A mathematical model is also developed to predict the maximum penetration depth of the intruder. The model predictions are compared with experimental data reported in the literature,good agreement was obtained, demonstrating the model can accurately predict the submerging behaviour of the intruder in the granular media.

  9. Control of nacre biomineralization by Pif80 in pearl oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, So Yeong; Jo, Byung Hoon; Choi, Yoo Seong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2017-08-01

    Molluscan nacre is a fascinating biomineral consisting of a highly organized calcium carbonate composite that provides unique fracture toughness and an iridescent color. Organisms elaborately control biomineralization using organic macromolecules. We propose the involvement of the matrix protein Pif80 from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata in the development of the inorganic phase during nacre biomineralization, based on experiments using the recombinant form of Pif80. Through interactions with calcium ions, Pif80 participates in the formation of polymer-induced liquid precursor-like amorphous calcium carbonate granules and stabilizes these granules by forming calcium ion-induced coacervates. At the calcification site, the disruption of Pif80 coacervates destabilizes the amorphous mineral precursors, resulting in the growth of a crystalline structure. The redissolved Pif80 controls the growth of aragonite on the polysaccharide substrate, which contributes to the formation of polygonal tablet structure of nacre. Our findings provide insight into the use of organic macromolecules by living organisms in biomineralization.

  10. Functional characterisation of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrates lack canonical adaptive immunity and mainly rely on innate immune system to fight against pathogens. The phagocytes, which could engulf and kill microbial pathogens, are likely to be of great importance and have to undertake significant roles in invertebrate immune defense. In the present study, flow cytometry combined with histological and lectin staining was employed to characterise functional features of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Based on the cell size and cellular contents, haemocytes were categorised into three cell types, i.e., granulocytes, semigranulocytes and agranulocytes. Agranulocytes with smaller cell volume and lower cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio did not show phagocytic activity, while semigranulocytes and agranulocytes exhibited larger cell volume, higher cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio and phagocytic activity. In addition, granulocytes with higher side scatter (SSC exhibited higher phagocytic activity than that of semigranulocytes. When β-integrin and lectin-like receptors were blocked by RGD tripeptide and carbohydrates, respectively, the phagocytic activity of both granulocytes and semigranulocytes was significantly inhibited, indicating that β-integrin and certain lectin-like receptors were involved in phagocytosis towards microbes. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide but not peptidylglycan could enhance phagocytic activity of granulocytes and semigranulocytes towards Vibrio splendidus and Staphylococcus aureus. Lectin staining analysis revealed that Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL, binding the epitope polylactosamine, was highly distributed on the extracellular cell surface of phagocytes, and could be utilized as a potential molecular marker to differentiate phagocytes from non-phagocytic haemocytes. The results, collectively, provide knowledge on the functional characters of oyster phagocytes, which would contribute to deep investigation of cell typing and cellular immunity in bivalves.

  11. Generation and analysis of ESTs from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin and identification of microsatellite and SNP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Richard

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin 1791, is an economically important species cultured in many areas in North America. It is also ecologically important because of the impact of its filter feeding behaviour on water quality. Populations of C. virginica have been threatened by overfishing, habitat degradation, and diseases. Through genome research, strategies are being developed to reverse its population decline. However, large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST resources have been lacking for this species. Efficient generation of EST resources from this species has been hindered by a high redundancy of transcripts. The objectives of this study were to construct a normalized cDNA library for efficient EST analysis, to generate thousands of ESTs, and to analyze the ESTs for microsatellites and potential single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Results A normalized and subtracted C. virginica cDNA library was constructed from pooled RNA isolated from hemocytes, mantle, gill, gonad and digestive tract, muscle, and a whole juvenile oyster. A total of 6,528 clones were sequenced from this library generating 5,542 high-quality EST sequences. Cluster analysis indicated the presence of 635 contigs and 4,053 singletons, generating a total of 4,688 unique sequences. About 46% (2,174 of the unique ESTs had significant hits (E-value ≤ 1e-05 to the non-redundant protein database; 1,104 of which were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO terms. A total of 35 microsatellites were identified from the ESTs, with 18 having sufficient flanking sequences for primer design. A total of 6,533 putative SNPs were also identified using all existing and the newly generated EST resources of the eastern oysters. Conclusion A high quality normalized cDNA library was constructed. A total of 5,542 ESTs were generated representing 4,688 unique sequences. Putative microsatellite and SNP markers were identified. These genome resources provide the

  12. Enhanced Detection of Vibrio Cholerae in Oyster Homogenate Based on Centrifugal Removal of Inhibitory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Donita; DePaola, Angelo; Young, Ronald B.

    1998-01-01

    The disease cholera, caused by Vibrio cholerae, has been associated with consumption of contaminated seafood, including raw oysters. Detection of V. cholerae in foods typically involves blending the oysters, diluting the homogenate in alkaline peptone water (APW), overnight enrichment, and isolation on selective agar. Unfortunately, the oyster homogenate must be diluted to large volumes because lower dilutions inhibit the growth of V. cholerae. The goals of this study were to develop an alternative to large dilutions and to evaluate the basis for the inhibition observed in lower dilutions of oyster homogenates. Centrifugation of oyster homogenates at 10,000 x g for 15 min, followed by enrichment of the resulting pellet in APW, was found to eliminate the inhibition of V. cholerae growth. Inhibition appears not to be due to competing microflora but to a component(s) released when V. cholerae grows in the presence of oyster homogenate. The inhibitory component(s) kills the V. cholerae after the cell concentration reaches > 10(exp 8) cells/mL, rather than initially preventing their growth. The pH also declines from 8.0 to 5.5 during this period; however, the pH decline by itself appears not to cause V. cholerae death. Seven strains of V. cholerae (01 and non-01) and two strains of V. vulnificus were susceptible to the inhibitory agent(s). However, other Vibrio and non-Vibrio species tested were not inhibited by the oyster homogenates. Based on digestion of oyster homogenates with pronase, trypsin and lipase, the inhibitory reaction involves a protein(s). In a preliminary trial with oyster homogenate seeded with 1 cfu/g of V. cholerae, the modified centrifugation technique detected a slightly higher percentage of samples at a 1:10 dilution than the standard FDA Bacteriological Analytical Method (BAM) detected in uncentrifuged oyster homogenate at a 1:100 dilution. V. cholerae in seeded samples could also be detected more frequently by the modified centrifugation method

  13. Rapid transcriptional acclimation following transgenerational exposure of oysters to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Anderson, Kelli; Thompson, Emma L; Melwani, Aroon; Parker, Laura M; Ross, Pauline M; Raftos, David A

    2016-10-01

    Marine organisms need to adapt in order to cope with the adverse effects of ocean acidification and warming. Transgenerational exposure to CO2 stress has been shown to enhance resilience to ocean acidification in offspring from a number of species. However, the molecular basis underlying such adaptive responses is currently unknown. Here, we compared the transcriptional profiles of two genetically distinct oyster breeding lines following transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 in order to explore the molecular basis of acclimation or adaptation to ocean acidification in these organisms. The expression of key target genes associated with antioxidant defence, metabolism and the cytoskeleton was assessed in oysters exposed to elevated CO2 over three consecutive generations. This set of target genes was chosen specifically to test whether altered responsiveness of intracellular stress mechanisms contributes to the differential acclimation of oyster populations to climate stressors. Transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 resulted in changes to both basal and inducible expression of those key target genes (e.g. ecSOD, catalase and peroxiredoxin 6), particularly in oysters derived from the disease-resistant, fast-growing B2 line. Exposure to CO2 stress over consecutive generations produced opposite and less evident effects on transcription in a second population that was derived from wild-type (nonselected) oysters. The analysis of key target genes revealed that the acute responses of oysters to CO2 stress appear to be affected by population-specific genetic and/or phenotypic traits and by the CO2 conditions to which their parents had been exposed. This supports the contention that the capacity for heritable change in response to ocean acidification varies between oyster breeding lines and is mediated by parental conditioning. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Construction and evaluation of a high-density SNP array for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigang Qi

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are widely used in genetics and genomics research. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas is an economically and ecologically important marine bivalve, and it possesses one of the highest levels of genomic DNA variation among animal species. Pacific oyster SNPs have been extensively investigated; however, the mechanisms by which these SNPs may be used in a high-throughput, transferable, and economical manner remain to be elucidated. Here, we constructed an oyster 190K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. We designed 190,420 SNPs on the chip; these SNPs were selected from 54 million SNPs identified through re-sequencing of 472 Pacific oysters collected in China, Japan, Korea, and Canada. Our genotyping results indicated that 133,984 (70.4% SNPs were polymorphic and successfully converted on the chip. The SNPs were distributed evenly throughout the oyster genome, located in 3,595 scaffolds with a length of ~509.4 million; the average interval spacing was 4,210 bp. In addition, 111,158 SNPs were distributed in 21,050 coding genes, with an average of 5.3 SNPs per gene. In comparison with genotypes obtained through re-sequencing, ~69% of the converted SNPs had a concordance rate of >0.971; the mean concordance rate was 0.966. Evaluation based on genotypes of full-sib family individuals revealed that the average genotyping accuracy rate was 0.975. Carrying 133 K polymorphic SNPs, our oyster 190K SNP array is the first commercially available high-density SNP chip for mollusks, with the highest throughput. It represents a valuable tool for oyster genome-wide association studies, fine linkage mapping, and population genetics.

  15. Detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus is a highly infectious pathogen that is commonly found in oysters growing in fecally contaminated waters. Norovirus outbreaks can cause the closure of oyster harvesting waters and acute gastroenteritis in humans associated with consumption of contaminated raw oysters. Extensive efforts and progresses have been made in detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks over the past decades. The main objective of this paper is to provide a literature review of methods and techniques for detecting and forecasting oyster norovirus outbreaks and thereby to identify the future directions for improving the detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks. It is found that (1) norovirus outbreaks display strong seasonality with the outbreak peak occurring commonly in December-March in the U.S. and April-May in the Europe; (2) norovirus outbreaks are affected by multiple environmental factors, including but not limited to precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, wind, and salinity; (3) various modeling approaches may be employed to forecast norovirus outbreaks, including Bayesian models, regression models, Artificial Neural Networks, and process-based models; and (4) diverse techniques are available for near real-time detection of norovirus outbreaks, including multiplex PCR, seminested PCR, real-time PCR, quantitative PCR, and satellite remote sensing. The findings are important to the management of oyster growing waters and to future investigations into norovirus outbreaks. It is recommended that a combined approach of sensor-assisted real time monitoring and modeling-based forecasting should be utilized for an efficient and effective detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks caused by consumption of contaminated oysters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Norovirus contamination and the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis pathway in Pacific oyster: A transcriptomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Su, Laijin; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Deqing; Duan, Delin

    2017-07-01

    Noroviruses are the primary pathogens associated with shellfish-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks. These viruses remain stable in oysters, suggesting an active mechanism for virus concentration. In this study, a deep RNA sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptome profiles of Pacific oysters at different time points after inoculation with norovirus (GII.4). We obtained a maximum of 65, 294, 698 clean sample reads. When aligned to the reference genome, the average mapping ratio of clean data was approximately 65%. In the samples harvested at 12, 24, and 48 h after contamination, 2,223, 2,990, and 2020 genes, respectively, were differentially expressed in contaminated and non-contaminated oyster digestive tissues, including 500, 1748, and 1039 up-regulated and 1723, 1242, and 981 down-regulated genes, respectively. In particular, FUT2 and B3GNT4, genes encoding the signaling components of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, were significantly up-regulated in contaminated samples. In addition, we found up-regulation of some immune- and disease-related genes in the MHC I pathway (PA28, HSP 70, HSP90, CANX, BRp57, and CALR) and MHC II pathway (GILT, CTSBLS, RFX, and NFY), although NoVs did not cause diseases in the oysters. We detected two types of HBGA-like molecules with positive-to-negative ratios similar to type A and H1 HBGA-like molecules in digestive tissues that were significantly higher in norovirus-contaminated than in non-contaminated oysters. Thus, our transcriptome data analysis indicated that a human pathogen (GII.4 Norovirus) was likely concentrated in the digestive tissues of oysters via HBGA-like molecules that were synthesized by the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis pathway. The identified differentially expressed genes also provide potential candidates for functional analysis to identify genes involved in the accumulation of noroviruses in oysters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing methods for assessing abundance and distribution of European oysters (Ostrea edulis using towed video.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Thorngren

    Full Text Available Due to large-scale habitat losses and increasing pressures, benthic habitats in general, and perhaps oyster beds in particular, are commonly in decline and severely threatened on regional and global scales. Appropriate and cost-efficient methods for mapping and monitoring of the distribution, abundance and quality of remaining oyster populations are fundamental for sustainable management and conservation of these habitats and their associated values. Towed video has emerged as a promising method for surveying benthic communities in a both non-destructive and cost-efficient way. Here we examine its use as a tool for quantification and monitoring of oyster populations by (i analysing how well abundances can be estimated and how living Ostrea edulis individuals can be distinguished from dead ones, (ii estimating the variability within and among observers as well as the spatial variability at a number of scales, and finally (iii evaluating the precision of estimated abundances under different scenarios for monitoring. Overall, the results show that the can be used to quantify abundance and occurrence of Ostrea edulis in heterogeneous environments. There was a strong correlation between abundances determined in the field and abundances estimated by video-analyses (r2 = 0.93, even though video analyses underestimated the total abundance of living oysters by 20%. Additionally, the method was largely repeatable within and among observers and revealed no evident bias in identification of living and dead oysters. We also concluded that the spatial variability was an order of magnitude larger than that due to observer errors. Subsequent modelling of precision showed that the total area sampled was the main determinant of precision and provided general method for determining precision. This study provides a thorough validation of the application of towed video on quantitative estimations of live oysters. The results suggest that the method can indeed be

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of the Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata: Insights into Molluscan Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole G Ertl

    Full Text Available Oysters have important ecological functions in their natural environment, acting as global carbon sinks and improving water quality by removing excess nutrients from the water column. During their life-time oysters are exposed to a variety of pathogens that can cause severe mortality in a range of oyster species. Environmental stressors encountered in their habitat can increase the susceptibility of oysters to these pathogens and in general have been shown to impact on oyster immunity, making immune parameters expressed in these marine animals an important research topic.Paired-end Illumina high throughput sequencing of six S. glomerata tissues exposed to different environmental stressors resulted in a total of 484,121,702 paired-end reads. When reads and assembled transcripts were compared to the C. gigas genome, an overall low level of similarity at the nucleotide level, but a relatively high similarity at the protein level was observed. Examination of the tissue expression pattern showed that some transcripts coding for cathepsins, heat shock proteins and antioxidant proteins were exclusively expressed in the haemolymph of S. glomerata, suggesting a role in innate immunity. Furthermore, analysis of the S. glomerata ORFs showed a wide range of genes potentially involved in innate immunity, from pattern recognition receptors, components of the Toll-like signalling and apoptosis pathways to a complex antioxidant defence mechanism.This is the first large scale RNA-Seq study carried out in S. glomerata, showing the complex network of innate immune components that exist in this species. The results confirmed that many of the innate immune system components observed in mammals are also conserved in oysters; however, some, such as the TLR adaptors MAL, TRIF and TRAM are either missing or have been modified significantly. The components identified in this study could help explain the oysters' natural resilience against pathogenic microorganisms

  19. Availability of pearl producing marine bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ataur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted during September 2014 to July 2015 to identify the pearl bearing bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities of marine oyster in captivity based on field investigation. A total of 7 pearl bearing bivalve species were identified in the coast with a salinity of 18-34 ppt, pH 8.1-8.3 and water depth ranged 0.2-2.0 meter in their habitat. From the collected bivalves, most abundant oyster species windowpane oyster, Placuna placenta (Linnaeus, 1758 was reared in fiber glass tanks with seawater for a period of 6 months. During rearing highest survival rate of 88% was observed in T1 with sandy and gravel substratum and lowest survival rate of 78% was found in T2 with muddy substratum. Average temperature and salinity were varied between 24 °C-25 °C and 21-26 ppt respectively. From the reared oyster, highest 54 nos. small pearls in the month of April and lowest 7 pearls in December from a single P. placenta were obtained. The study proved that pearls can be obtained from the marine oysters in captivity in Bangladesh, and this offers large scale culture potentialities in our coast.

  20. Enhanced effects of biotic interactions on predicting multispecies spatial distribution of submerged macrophytes after eutrophication

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Kun; Cui, Yichong; Zhang, Xijin; Pan, Yingji; Xu, Junli; Xu, Kaiqin; Da, Liangjun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Water eutrophication creates unfavorable environmental conditions for submerged macrophytes. In these situations, biotic interactions may be particularly important for explaining and predicting the submerged macrophytes occurrence. Here, we evaluate the roles of biotic interactions in predicting spatial occurrence of submerged macrophytes in 1959 and 2009 for Dianshan Lake in eastern China, which became eutrophic since the 1980s. For the four common species occurred in 1959 and 2009,...

  1. Sensitivity of hepatitis A and murine norovirus to electron beam irradiation in oyster homogenates and whole oysters - quantifying the reduction in potential infection risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite worldwide regulations and advisories restricting shellfish harvest to approved locations, consumption of raw oysters continues to be an exposure route for human norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Therefore, a technology that can reduce the public health risks is needed. The focus...

  2. GigaUnit Transplant System: A New Mechanical Tool for Transplanting Submerged Aquatic Vegetation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shafer, Deborah J

    2008-01-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) performs many important ecosystem functions, including wave attenuation and sediment stabilization, water quality improvement, primary production, food web support for secondary consumers...

  3. Top-down control of phytoplankton by oysters in Chesapeake Bay, USA: Comment on Pomeroy et al. (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy et al. (2006) proposed that temporal and spatial mismatches between eastern oyster filtration and phytoplankton abundance will preclude restored stocks of eastern oysters from reducing the severity of hypoxia in the deep channel of central Chesapeake Bay. We refute this c...

  4. Trade-off between increased survival and reduced growth for blue mussels living on Pacific oyster reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Christensen, Helle Torp

    2011-01-01

    22days. Shell growth was significantly reduced for mussels placed on the bottom compared to mussels at the top of an oyster reef. Condition index was lower for mussels on the bottom of the reef irrespective of whether placed between dead or living oysters. We conclude that mussels experience a trade...

  5. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Abi-Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France, we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs, was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events.

  6. Effect of High-Pressure Processing on Human Noroviruses in Laboratory-Contaminated Oysters by Bio-Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Saiki; Kanezashi, Hiromi; Goshima, Tomoko; Suto, Atsushi; Ueki, You; Sugawara, Naoko; Ito, Hiroshi; Zou, Bizhen; Uema, Masashi; Noda, Mamoru; Akimoto, Keiko

    2017-09-01

    The contamination of oysters with human noroviruses poses a human health risk, since oysters are often consumed raw. In this study, human norovirus genogroup II was allowed to bio-accumulate in oysters, and then the effect of high-pressure processing (HPP) on human noroviruses in oysters was determined through a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method with enzymatic pretreatment to distinguish infectious noroviruses. As a result, oysters could be artificially contaminated to a detectable level of norovirus genome by the reverse transcription-PCR. Concentrations of norovirus genome in laboratory-contaminated oysters were log normally distributed, as determined by the real-time PCR, suggesting that artificial contamination by bio-accumulation was successful. In two independent HPP trials, a 1.87 log10 and 1.99 log10 reduction of norovirus GII.17 genome concentration was observed after HPP at 400 MPa for 5 min at 25°C. These data suggest that HPP is a promising process of inactivation of infectious human noroviruses in oysters. To our knowledge, this is the first report to investigate the effect of HPP on laboratory-contaminated noroviruses in oysters.

  7. Effects of High-Hydrostatic Pressure on Inactivation of Human Norovirus and Physical and Sensory Characteristics of Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mu; Lingham, Talaysha; Huang, Yaoxin; Ozbay, Gulnihal; Ji, Lin; Karwe, Mukund; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV) in oysters and to evaluate organoleptic characteristics of oysters treated at pressure levels required for HuNoV inactivation. Genogroup I.1 (GI.1) or Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) HuNoV was inoculated into oysters and treated at 300 to 600 MPa at 25 and 0 °C for 2 min. After HHP, viral particles were extracted by porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MBs) and viral RNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Lower initial temperature (0 °C) significantly enhanced HHP inactivation of HuNoV compared to ambient temperature (25 °C; P oysters, respectively. HHP treatments did not significantly change color or texture of oyster tissue. A 1- to 5-scale hedonic sensory evaluation on appearance, aroma, color, and overall acceptability showed that pressure-treated oysters received significantly higher quality scores than the untreated control (P oysters. Oysters treated at 0 °C had slightly lower acceptability than the group treated at room temperature on day 1 (P 0.05). © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Norovirus and E. coli in Sydney Rock Oysters Following a Sewage Overflow into an Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Felicity; Kiermeier, Andreas; Ross, Tom; Holds, Geoffrey; Landinez, Lina; McLeod, Catherine

    2017-07-06

    This paper reports a study of norovirus (NoV) GII distribution and persistence in Sydney rock oysters (SRO) (Saccostrea glomerata) located in an estuary after a pump station sewage overflow. SRO were strategically placed at six sites spanning the length of the estuary from the pump station to the sea. The spatial and temporal distribution of NoV, hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in oysters was mapped after the contamination event. NoV GI and GII, HAV and E. coli were quantified for up to 48 days in oysters placed at six sites ranging from 0.05 to 8.20 km from the sewage overflow. NoV GII was detected up to 5.29 km downstream and persisted in oysters for 42 days at the site closest to the overflow. NoV GII concentrations decreased significantly over time; a reduction rate of 8.5% per day was observed in oysters (p oysters over time, as observed in this study and other published research, collectively suggest that GII reduction rates from oysters may be broadly similar, regardless of environmental conditions, oyster species and genotype.

  9. Condition and Extent of the Natural Oyster Beds and Barren Bottoms in the Vicinity of Apalachicola, Fla.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of oyster beds in the vicinity of Apalachicola, FL was conducted in 1915. The area of the oyster beds is 7,135 acres, or 11.1 square miles, of which...

  10. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-15

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events.

  11. Development of genetic programming-based model for predicting oyster norovirus outbreak risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenar, Shima Shamkhali; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2018-01-01

    Oyster norovirus outbreaks pose increasing risks to human health and seafood industry worldwide but exact causes of the outbreaks are rarely identified, making it highly unlikely to reduce the risks. This paper presents a genetic programming (GP) based approach to identifying the primary cause of oyster norovirus outbreaks and predicting oyster norovirus outbreaks in order to reduce the risks. In terms of the primary cause, it was found that oyster norovirus outbreaks were controlled by cumulative effects of antecedent environmental conditions characterized by low solar radiation, low water temperature, low gage height (the height of water above a gage datum), low salinity, heavy rainfall, and strong offshore wind. The six environmental variables were determined by using Random Forest (RF) and Binary Logistic Regression (BLR) methods within the framework of the GP approach. In terms of predicting norovirus outbreaks, a risk-based GP model was developed using the six environmental variables and various combinations of the variables with different time lags. The results of local and global sensitivity analyses showed that gage height, temperature, and solar radiation were by far the three most important environmental predictors for oyster norovirus outbreaks, though other variables were also important. Specifically, very low temperature and gage height significantly increased the risk of norovirus outbreaks while high solar radiation markedly reduced the risk, suggesting that low temperature and gage height were associated with the norovirus source while solar radiation was the primary sink of norovirus. The GP model was utilized to hindcast daily risks of oyster norovirus outbreaks along the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. The daily hindcasting results indicated that the GP model was capable of hindcasting all historical oyster norovirus outbreaks from January 2002 to June 2014 in the Gulf of Mexico with only two false positive outbreaks for the 12.5-year period. The

  12. Annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po from sea food origin (Oysters and Mussels) in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bo Eum; Hong, Gi Hoon; Kim, Suk Hyun; Lee, Hyun Mi [Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ingestion of {sup 210}Po laden seafood accounts for a substantial amount of the effective dose of {sup 210}Po. Among seafood items, mollusks, especially domestically produced oysters and mussels, are highly enriched in {sup 210}Po and are consumed in large quantities in Korea. Oysters and mussels around the Korean coasts were collected from major farm areas in November 2013. Samples were spiked with an aliquot of {sup 210}Po as a yield tracer, and they were digested with 6 mol·L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The {sup 210}Po and {sup 209}Po were spontaneously deposited onto a silver disc in an acidic solution of 0.5 mol·L{sup -1} HCl and measured using an alpha spectrometer. The activity concentrations of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were decay corrected to the sampling date, accounting for the possible in-growth and decay of {sup 210}Po. {sup 210}Po activity concentrations in oysters were in a range from 41.3 to 206 Bq·(kg-ww{sup -1} and mussels in a range from 42.9 to 46.7 Bq·(kg-ww){sup -1}. The {sup 210}Po activity concentration of oysters in the turbid Western coast was higher than the Southern coast. The {sup 210}Po activity concentration of the oysters was positively correlated (R2=0.89) with those of the suspended particulate matter in the surface water. The calculated annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po from oysters and mussels consumed by the Korean population was 21-104 and 5.01-5.46 μSv·y{sup -1}. The combined effective dose due to the consumption of oysters and mussels appears to account for about 35±19% of that arising from seafood consumption in the Korean population. The annual effective dose of {sup 210}Po for oysters in the Korean population was found to be higher than other countries. The total annual effective dose of 210Po{sup 210}Po due to consumption of oysters and mussels consumed in Korea was found to be 76±42 μSv·y{sup -1}, accounting for 28±16% of the total effective dose of {sup 210}Po from food in Korea.

  13. Occurrence of marine algal toxins in oyster and phytoplankton samples in Daya Bay, South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Li, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Tan, Zhijun; Wu, Haiyan; Jiang, Tianjiu; Lu, Songhui

    2017-09-01

    The occurrence and seasonal variations of marine algal toxins in phytoplankton and oyster samples in Daya Bay (DYB), South China Sea were investigated. Two Dinophysis species, namely, D. caudata and D. acuminata complex, were identified as Okadaic acid (OA)/pectenotoxin (PTX) related species. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated that 2.04-14.47 pg PTX2 per cell was the predominant toxin in single-cell isolates of D. caudata. D. acuminata was not subjected to toxin analysis. The occurrence of OAs in phytoplankton concentrates of net-haul sample coincided with the presence of D. accuminata complex, suggesting that this species is most likely an OA producer in this sea area. OA, dinophysistoxins-1 (DTX1), PTX2, PTX2sa, gymnodimine (GYM), homoyessotoxin (homoYTX), and domoic acid (DA) demonstrated positive results in net haul samples. To our best knowledge, this paper is the first to report the detection of GYM, DA, and homoYTX in phytoplankton samples in Chinese coastal waters. Among the algal toxins, GYM demonstrated the highest frequency of positive detections in phytoplankton concentrates (13/17). Five compounds of algal toxins, including OA, DTX1, PTX2, PTX2sa, and GYM, were detected in oyster samples. DA and homoYTX were not detected in oysters despite of positive detections for both in the phytoplankton concentrates. However, neither the presence nor absence of DA in oysters can be determined because extraction conditions with 100% methanol used to isolate toxins from oysters (recommended by the EU-Harmonised Standard Operating Procedure, 2015) would likely be unsuitable for this water-soluble toxin. In addition, transformation of DA during the digestion process of oysters may also be involved in the negative detections of this toxin. GYM exhibited the highest frequency of positive results in oysters (14/17). OAs were only detected in the hydrolyzed oyster samples. The detection rates of PTX and PTX2sa in

  14. Microarray analysis highlights immune response of pacific oysters as a determinant of resistance to summer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Elodie; Huvet, Arnaud

    2012-04-01

    Summer mortality of Crassostrea gigas is the result of a complex interaction between oysters, their environment, and pathogens. A high heritability was estimated for resistance to summer mortality, which provided an opportunity to develop lines of oysters that were resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to summer mortality. Previous genome-wide expression profiling study of R and S oyster gonads highlighted reproduction and antioxidant defense as constitutive pathways that operate differentially between these two lines. Here, we show that signaling in innate immunity also operates differentially between these lines, and we hypothesize that this is at the main determinant of their difference in survival in the field. A reanalysis of our published microarray data using separate ANOVAs at each sampling date revealed a specific "immune" profile at the date preceding the mortality. In addition, we conducted additional microarray profiling of two other tissues, gills, and muscle, and both showed an overrepresentation of immune genes (46%) among those that are differentially expressed between the two lines. Eleven genes were pinpointed to be simultaneously differentially expressed between R and S lines in the three tissues. Among them, ten are related to "Immune Response." For these genes, the kinetics of R mRNA levels between sampling dates appeared different just before the morality peak and suggests that under field conditions, R oysters had the capacity to modulate signaling in innate immunity whereas S oysters did not. This study enhances our understanding of the complex summer mortality syndrome and provides candidates of interest for further functional and genetics studies.

  15. Evaluation of damage in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) spermatozoa before and after cryopreservation using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo, Jin-Chywan; Wu, Chen-Yen; Chang, Wu-Shu Peter; Cheng, Hsien-Yu

    2003-01-01

    We examined the applicability of the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) to estimate the quality of frozen-thawed Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) spermatozoa. Comet assay was performed on semen before and after cryopreservation followed by fluorescent staining with propidium iodide to assess DNA integrity. After cryopreservation, the percentage of spermatozoa with damaged DNA significantly increased, while only about half of the cells displayed intact DNA, even when protected with 10 percent DMSO. All the considered parameters (head length, head area, head intensity, total length, total area, total intensity, tail length percent, tail area percent, and tail intensity percent) were higher than the oyster sperm protected with 10 percent DMSO-artificial sea water after freezing and thawing. Only tail length percent, tail area percent, and tail intensity percent were increased significantly after cryopreservation. The tail length percent was found to be the most sensitive indicator of the cryopreservation-induced DNA damage. Our freeze-thawing procedure significantly affected oyster sperm DNA, as indicated by the reduced fertilization rate when frozen-thawed oyster sperm are used. Irreversible alteration of the genome may prevent fertilization or alter normal embryonic development. This study is the first to demonstrate that the comet assay is an inexpensive, rapid and sensitive method for determining DNA damage in Pacific oyster sperm quality assessments.

  16. Measuring Macrobenthos Biodiversity at Oyster Aquaculture Sites in the Delaware Inland Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, M. J.; Ozbay, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Delaware Inland Bays consists of three shallow coastal bays located in the southern portion of Delaware. Anthropogenic activities have led to the degradation of water quality, because the bays are surrounded by highly developed areas and have low flushing rates. This results in loss of biodiversity and abundance of organisms. Ongoing degradation of the bays has led to a dramatic decline in local oyster populations since the late 1800s. Oysters are keystone species, which provide habitats for organisms and help to improve water quality. This study aims to find if the introduction of oyster aquaculture improves local biodiversity and abundance of macrobenthos. The study was conducted in Rehoboth Bay, Indian River Bay and Little Assawoman Bay. Aquaculture gear was placed at one location in each of the bays and 24 sediment core samples were taken once a month. From these core samples all worms were fixed and stained in a 10% Formalin Rose Bengal solution and preserved in 70% Ethanol for later identification. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of oyster tissue will also be performed to assess the health of the bay. The goals of this research are to better understand the role of oyster aquaculture in restoring the viability and health of the Delaware Inland Bays.

  17. Microplastics in oysters Saccostrea cucullata along the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-Xiang; Ma, Li-Sha; Lin, Lang; Ni, Zhi-Xin; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Shi, Hua-Hong; Yan, Yan; Zheng, Guang-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2018-02-09

    As a transitional zone between riverine and marine environments, an estuary plays an important role for the sources, accumulation and transport of microplastics. Although estuarine environments are hotspots of microplastic pollution, the correlation between microplastic pollution and aquatic organisms is less known. Here we investigated microplastic pollution in wild oysters Saccostrea cucullata from 11 sampling sites along the Pearl River Estuary in South China. The microplastic abundances in oysters ranged from 1.4 to 7.0 items per individual or from 1.5 to 7.2 items per gram tissue wet weight, which were positively related to those in surrounding waters. The oysters near urban areas contained significantly more microplastics than those near rural areas. Fibers accounted for 69.4% of the total microplastics in oysters. Microplastic sizes varied from 20 to 5000 μm and 83.9% of which were less than 100 μm. Light color microplastics were significantly more common than dark color ones. Based on the results, oysters are recommended as a biomonitor for the microplastic pollution in estuaries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective preservation techniques to prolong the shelf life of ready-to-eat oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cristina; Conte, Amalia; Del Nobile, Matteo Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Oysters have a high commercial value but owing to their short shelf life are generally commercialized as raw material within very restricted market borders. A step-by-step optimization approach was used in this work to design ready-to-eat oyster packaging. In particular, six different steps were carried out in order to extend their shelf life. The concentration of sodium alginate to realize a coating that was effective in terms of easy peeling and ability in preventing product dehydration was optimized. Coated oysters were packaged under different modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions to find the best MAP. Subsequently, to further promote product preservation, sodium acetate was selected as an effective antimicrobial agent to be applied by dipping treatment prior to coating. All preservation strategies singly tested were finally combined to assess the shelf life prolongation of ready-to-eat oysters. Dipping in sodium acetate (10 g L⁻¹), coating with sodium alginate (40 g L⁻¹) and packaging under MAP (0:75 O₂:CO₂) represent the best conditions to guarantee a significant shelf life extension to about 160 h compared with 57 h for unpackaged oysters. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Internationally distributed frozen oyster meat causing multiple outbreaks of norovirus infection in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webby, R J; Carville, K S; Kirk, M D; Greening, G; Ratcliff, R M; Crerar, S K; Dempsey, K; Sarna, M; Stafford, R; Patel, M; Hall, G

    2007-04-15

    Between November 2003 and January 2004, outbreaks of norovirus in 3 Australian jurisdictions involving 83 cases of illness were associated with imported oyster meat. Cohort studies were conducted in 2 jurisdictions to identify relative risks of illness for the consumption of oysters. A case series was conducted in the third jurisdiction. The cohort studies conducted in the first 2 jurisdictions identified relative risks of illness of 17 (95% confidence interval, 5-51) and 35 (95% confidence interval, 5-243), respectively, for the consumption of oysters. Multiple strains of norovirus were detected in fecal specimens from 8 of 14 patients and in 1 of the 3 batches of implicated oyster meat using seminested reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods. Traceback investigations revealed that all oyster meat was harvested from the same estuary system in Japan within the same month. These outbreaks demonstrate the potential of foodborne disease to spread internationally and the need for national and international collaboration to investigate such outbreaks. Foodborne illness related to norovirus is underestimated because of underreporting of human cases and challenges in laboratory detection of viruses in foods, both of which can delay public health action.

  20. Two New Zealand outbreaks of norovirus gastroenteritis linked to commercially farmed oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Richard; Dymond, Nicky; Bell, Anita; Thornley, Craig; Buik, Hans; Cumming, David; Petersen, Nicole

    2011-12-16

    We report on the investigations of two gastroenteritis outbreaks, which were linked to a common source. Retrospective cohort studies were conducted for two gastroenteritis outbreaks which occurred in Auckland and in Waikato. Faecal samples and samples of oyster meat were analysed. Environmental surveys of implicated areas were conducted. 10 out of 16 people who had eaten at a catered event in Auckland, and 3 out of 15 people who had eaten at a Waikato restaurant, experienced gastroenteritis. The symptoms, duration of illness and incubation periods were consistent with norovirus gastroenteritis in both outbreaks. The consumption of oysters was strongly associated with an increased risk of illness. Faecal samples were positive for norovirus. Oysters from both outbreaks were traced back to the same growing area. Samples of oyster meat from one of the restaurants and from the growing area were positive for norovirus. The growing area was closed for further investigation. A pipe from a waste water treatment plant was later found to be leaking partially treated effluent into a stream discharging near the implicated growing area. Investigation of these two outbreaks led to the discovery of a common source of norovirus at a commercial oyster growing area.

  1. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  2. Bovine norovirus: carbohydrate ligand, environmental contamination, and potential cross-species transmission via oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans.

  3. New target tissue for food-borne virus detection in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Wu, Q; Yao, L; Wei, M; Kou, X; Zhang, J

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the different tissues of naturally contaminated oyster for food-borne virus detection. The different tissues of 136 field oyster samples were analysed for norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and rotavirus (RV) by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and were confirmed by sequencing. These viruses were detected in 20 samples (14.71%), showing positivity for NV (1.47%), HAV (5.15%) and RV (8.82%). Furthermore, among different tissues, the highest positive rate of the food-borne viruses was found in the gills (14.71%), followed by the stomach (13.97%) and the digestive diverticula (13.24%). The food-borne viruses were detected in the gills, stomach, digestive diverticula and the cilia of the mantle. In addition, the results showed that the gills are one of the appropriate tissues for viral detection in oysters by nucleic acid assay. This is the first paper to report on the presence of food-borne viruses in the gills and the cilia of the mantle of naturally contaminated oysters. The research team hopes that the results of the study will be of help in sampling the appropriate tissues for the detection of food-borne viruses in commercial oysters.

  4. Chronic or accidental exposure of oysters to norovirus: is there any difference in contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrone, Iole; Schaeffer, Julien; Ollivier, Joanna; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Pepe, Tiziana; Le Pendu, Jacques; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-03-01

    Bivalve molluscan shellfish such as oysters may be contaminated by human pathogens. Currently, the primary pathogens associated with shellfish-related outbreaks are noroviruses. This study was conducted to improve understanding of oyster bioaccumulation when oysters were exposed to daily contamination or one accidental contamination event, i.e., different modes of contamination. Oysters were contaminated with two representative strains of norovirus (GI.1 and GII.3) and then analyzed with real-time reverse transcription PCR. Exposure to a repeated virus dose for 9 days (mimicking a growing area subjected to frequent sewage contamination) led to an additive accumulation that was not significantly different from that obtained when the same total dose of virus was added all at once (as may happen after accidental sewage discharge). Similarly, bioaccumulation tests performed with mixed strains revealed additive accumulation of both viruses. Depuration may not be efficient for eliminating viruses; therefore, to prevent contaminated shellfish from being put onto the market, continuous sanitary monitoring must be considered. All climatic events or sewage failures occurring in production areas must be recorded, because repeated low-dose exposure or abrupt events may lead to similar levels of accumulation. This study contributes to an understanding of norovirus accumulation in oysters and provides suggestions for risk management strategies.

  5. Norovirus genotypes implicated in two oyster-related illness outbreaks in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajko-Nenow, P; Keaveney, S; Flannery, J; McINTYRE, A; Doré, W

    2014-10-01

    We investigated norovirus (NoV) concentrations and genotypes in oyster and faecal samples associated with two separate oyster-related outbreaks of gastroenteritis in Ireland. Quantitative analysis was performed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis was conducted to establish the NoV genotypes present. For both outbreaks, the NoV concentration in oysters was >1000 genome copies/g digestive tissue and multiple genotypes were identified. In faecal samples, GII.13 was the only genotype detected for outbreak 1, whereas multiple genotypes were detected in outbreak 2 following the application of cloning procedures. While various genotypes were identified in oyster samples, not all were successful in causing infection in consumers. In outbreak 2 NoV GII.1 was identified in all four faecal samples analysed and NoV GII concentrations in faecal samples were >108 copies/g. This study demonstrates that a range of NoV genotypes can be present in highly contaminated oysters responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  6. Testing the effect of habitat structure and complexity on nekton assemblages using experimental oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Austin T.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Kimball, Matthew E.; Rozas, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    Structurally complex habitats are often associated with more diverse and abundant species assemblages in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Biogenic reefs formed by the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) are complex in nature and are recognized for their potential habitat value in estuarine systems along the US Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Few studies, however, have examined the response of nekton to structural complexity within oyster reefs. We used a quantitative sampling technique to examine how the presence and complexity of experimental oyster reefs influence the abundance, biomass, and distribution of nekton by sampling reefs 4 months and 16 months post-construction. Experimental oyster reefs were colonized immediately by resident fishes and decapod crustaceans, and reefs supported a distinct nekton assemblage compared to mud-bottom habitat. Neither increased reef complexity, nor age of the experimental reef resulted in further changes in nekton assemblages or increases in nekton abundance or diversity. The presence of oyster reefs per se was the most important factor determining nekton usage.

  7. Changes in the microbiological quality of mangrove oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) during different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanhini, Maike Taís Maziero; Montanhini Neto, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of temperature and period of postharvest storage on the microbiological quality and shelf life of raw mangrove oysters, Crassostrea brasiliana. A total of 150 dozen oysters were collected directly from the points of extraction or cultivation in southern Brazil, and in the laboratory, they were stored raw at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C for 1, 4, 8, 11, and 15 days. On each of these days, the oysters were subjected to microbiological analyses of aerobic mesophilic count, total coliforms, enterococci, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella. None of the tested samples under any storage condition showed contamination levels above those allowed by Brazilian legislation for E. coli, S. aureus, and Salmonella, and there was no change (P > 0.05) in the counts of these microorganisms due to the temperature and/or period of oyster storage. Counts of enterococci and total coliforms showed a tendency to increase (P < 0.05) among the different temperatures tested. Raw mangrove oysters remain in safe microbiological conditions for consumption up to 8 days after harvesting, regardless of temperature, and their shelf life may be extended to 15 days if they are stored at temperatures not exceeding 15°C.

  8. Characterization of Dredged Oyster Shell Deposits at Mobile Bay, Alabama Using Geophysical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C. Nwokebuihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for disposing materials dredged from ship channels is a common problem in bays and lagoons. This study is aimed at investigating the suitability of scour features produced by dredging oyster shell deposits in Mobile Bay, Alabama, to dispose excavated channel material. A study area approximately 740 by 280 m lying about 5 km east of Gaillard Island was surveyed using underwater electrical resistivity tomography (UWERT and continuous electrical resistivity profiling (CERP tools. The geophysical survey was conducted with the intent to map scour features created by oyster shell dredging activities in the bay between 1947 and 1982. The geoelectrical surveys show that oyster beds are characterized by high resistivity values greater than 1.1 ohm.m while infilled dredge cuts show lower resistivity, generally from 0.6 to 1.1 ohm.m. The difference in resistivity mainly reflects the lithology and the consolidation of the shallow sediments: consolidated silty clay and sandy sediments rich in oyster shell deposits (with less clay content overlying unconsolidated clayey materials infilling the scours. Results show that most of the infilled dredge cuts are mostly distributed in the north-south direction. Considering that the scours are generally up to 6 m deep across the survey location, it is estimated that about 0.8 million cubic meters of oyster shells and overlying strata were dredged from the survey location.

  9. Restoring Ecological Function to a Submerged Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2010-01-01

    Impacts of global climate change, such as sea level rise and severe drought, have altered the hydrology of coastal salt marshes resulting in submergence and subsequent degradation of ecosystem function. A potential method of rehabilitating these systems is the addition of sediment-slurries to increase marsh surface elevation, thus ameliorating effects of excessive inundation. Although this technique is growing in popularity, the restoration of ecological function after sediment addition has received little attention. To determine if sediment subsidized salt marshes are functionally equivalent to natural marshes, we examined above- and belowground primary production in replicated restored marshes receiving four levels of sediment addition (29-42 cm North American Vertical Datum of 1988 [NAVD 88]) and in degraded and natural ambient marshes (4-22 cm NAVD 88). Moderate intensities of sediment-slurry addition, resulting in elevations at the mid to high intertidal zone (29-36 cm NAVD 88), restored ecological function to degraded salt marshes. Sediment additions significantly decreased flood duration and frequency and increased bulk density, resulting in greater soil drainage and redox potential and significantly lower phytotoxic sulfide concentrations. However, ecological function in the restored salt marsh showed a sediment addition threshold that was characterized by a decline in primary productivity in areas of excessive sediment addition and high elevation (>36 cm NAVD 88). Hence, the addition of intermediate levels of sediment to submerging salt marshes increased marsh surface elevation, ameliorated impacts of prolonged inundation, and increased primary productivity. However, too much sediment resulted in diminished ecological function that was equivalent to the submerged or degraded system. ?? 2010 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  10. Enhanced Sorbitol Production under Submerged Fermentation using Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Nadiya Jan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Sorbitol is a non-toxic and slightly hygroscopic compound with different applications. Zymomonas mobiles produces sorbitol from sucrose or mixtures of glucose and fructose (formation is coupled with the dehydrogenation of glucose to glucono-δ- lactone. Recombinant Zymomonas mobilis may produce sorbitol and gluconic acid from glucose and fructose using different divalent metal ions with reduced the ethanol yield andsignificantly increased yield of sorbitol. Current study envisaged to alter the media components, physical process parameters and supplementation of amino acids for enhanced sorbitol production.Material and Methods: Several process variables were evaluated on sorbitol production including carbon sources (glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, carbon concentrations (5, 10, 20 and 25 g l-1, nitrogen sources (peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract and organic nitrogen mix, temperatures (25, 29, 33, 37, 41°C, pH (6, 6.5, 7 , 7.5 ,8, agitation rate (50, 100, 150, 200 rpm and amino acids (cysteine, cystine, tryptophanin batch cultivation ofLactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2912. Shake flask cultivation performed under optimum conditions like temperature 37°C, pH 7.0 and agitation rate of 150 rpm, resulted in enhanced sorbitol production. Comparative study of sorbitol production in solid state fermentation and submerged fermentation was also evaluated.Results and Conclusion: Batch cultivation under submerged conditions further performed in 7.5-l lab scale bioreactor (working volume 3.0-l under optimized conditions resulted in maximum cell biomass of 8.95±0.03 g g-1 and a sorbitol content of 9.78±0.04 g l-1 after 42.0 h of fermentation. Scale up study on bioreactor resulted in maximum sorbitol yield (Yp/x and productivity of 1.11 g g-1 and 0.50 g l-1 h under submerged fermentation, respectively.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  11. [Genetic algorithm for fermentation kinetics of submerged fermentation by Morchella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Piao, Meizi; Sun, Yonghai

    2008-08-01

    Fermentation kinetics is important for optimizing control and up-scaling fermentation process. We studied submerged fermentation kinetics of Morchella. Applying the genetic Algorithm in the Matlab software platform, we compared suitability of the Monod and Logistic models, both are commonly used in process of fungal growth, to describe Morchella growth kinetics. Meanwhile, we evaluated parameters involved in the models for Morchella growth, EPS production and substrate consumption. The results indicated that Logistic model fit better with the experimental data. The average error of this model was 5.8%. This kinetics model can be useful for optimizing and up-scaling fungal fermentation process.

  12. Liquid Film Diffusion on Reaction Rate in Submerged Biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Pia; Hollesen, Line; Harremoës, Poul

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate in a submerged biofilter with denitrification and in order to compare with a theoretical study of the mass transfer coefficient. The experiments were carried out with varied flow, identified...... by the empty bed velocity of inflow and recirculation, respectively 1.3, 2.8, 5.6 and 10.9 m/h. The filter material consisted of 3 mm biostyren spheres. The results indicate that the influence of liquid film diffusion on reaction rate can be ignored....

  13. Slag Metal Reactions during Submerged Arc Welding of Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    The transfer of Cr, Si, Mn, P, S, C, Ni, and Mo between the slag and the weld pool has been studied for submerged arc welds made with calcium silicate and manganese silicate fluxes. The results show a strong interaction between Cr and Si transfer but no interaction with Mn. The manganese silicate flux produces lower residual sulfur while the calcium silicate fluxes are more effective for removal of phosphorus. The effective oxygen reaction temperature lies between 1700 and 2000 °C for all elements studied. Evidence of Cr and Mn loss by metal vaporization is also presented.

  14. Cellular and biochemical responses of the oyster Crassostrea gigas to controlled exposures to metals and Alexandrium minutum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, Hansy; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Quéré, Claudie [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Laboratoire de Physiologie des Invertébrés, Unité Physiologie Fonctionnelle des Organismes Marins, BP 70, 29280 Plouzané (France); Bruneau, Audrey; Riso, Ricardo; Auffret, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France); Soudant, Philippe, E-mail: Philippe.Soudant@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences de l‘Environnement Marin, UMR 6539, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Copernic, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané (France)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •Oysters, C. gigas, were exposed to both metals and PST-producer A. minutum. •Oysters exposed to metals accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs. •Exposure to both metals and A. minutum induced antagonistic or synergetic effects. -- Abstract: Effects of simultaneous exposure of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to both a harmful dinoflagellate that produces Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST), Alexandrium minutum, and cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu), were assessed. Oysters were exposed to a mix of Cd–Cu with two different diets (i.e. A. minutum or Tisochrysis lutea) and compared to control oysters fed A. minutum or T. lutea, respectively, without metal addition. Metals and PST accumulations, digestive gland lipid composition, and cellular and biochemical hemolymph variables were measured after 4 days of exposure. Oysters exposed to Cd–Cu accumulated about thirty-six times less PSTs than oysters exposed to A. minutum alone. Exposure to Cd–Cu induced significant changes in neutral lipids (increase in diacylglycerol – DAG – and decrease in sterols) and phospholipids (decreases in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and ceramide aminoethylphosphonate) of digestive gland suggesting that lipid metabolism disruptions and/or lipid peroxidation have occurred. Simultaneously, concentrations, percentages of dead cells and phenoloxidase activity of hemocytes increased in oysters exposed to metals while reactive oxygen species production of hemocytes decreased. Feeding on the harmful dinoflagellate A. minutum resulted in significant decreases in monoacylglycerol (MAG) and DAG and ether glycerides (EG), as well as significant increases in hemocyte concentration and phagocytic activity as compared to oysters fed T. lutea. Finally, the present study revealed that short-term, simultaneous exposure to Cd–Cu and A. minutum may induce antagonistic (i.e. hemocyte concentration and phagocytosis) or synergic (i.e. DAG content in

  15. A restoration suitability index model for the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica in the Mission-Aransas Estuary, TX, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Beseres Pollack

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs are one of the most threatened marine habitats on earth, with habitat loss resulting from water quality degradation, coastal development, destructive fishing practices, overfishing, and storm impacts. For successful and sustainable oyster reef restoration efforts, it is necessary to choose sites that support long-term growth and survival of oysters. Selection of suitable sites is critically important as it can greatly influence mortality factors and may largely determine the ultimate success of the restoration project. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS provides an effective methodology for identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration and removes much of the uncertainty involved in the sometimes trial and error selection process. This approach also provides an objective and quantitative tool for planning future oyster reef restoration efforts. The aim of this study was to develop a restoration suitability index model and reef quality index model to characterize locations based on their potential for successful reef restoration within the Mission-Aransas Estuary, Texas, USA. The restoration suitability index model focuses on salinity, temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and depth, while the reef quality index model focuses on abundance of live oysters, dead shell, and spat. Size-specific Perkinsus marinus infection levels were mapped to illustrate general disease trends. This application was effective in identifying suitable sites for oyster reef restoration, is flexible in its use, and provides a mechanism for considering alternative approaches. The end product is a practical decision-support tool that can be used by coastal resource managers to improve oyster restoration efforts. As oyster reef restoration activities continue at small and large-scales, site selection criteria are critical for assisting stakeholders and managers and for maximizing long-term sustainability of oyster resources.

  16. Control of Polychaetes by Dipping Infected Pearl Oyster on Different Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Hadiroseyani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dip treatment on pearl oysters (Pinctada maxima was conducted in different concentrations of saline water to eliminate boring polychaetes. Results shows that polychaetes leave the osyters which treated on saline water at 0 ppt, 45 ppt, and 60 ppt as long as 15 minutes each. It also shows that the oysters got high survival rate 7 days after the treatment. Key words : Polychaetes, pearl oyster, dipping, salinity   ABSTRAK Pengendalian polikaeta pengebor dengan menggunakan berbagai konsentrasi larutan garam telah dilakukan pada tiram mutiara (Pinctada maxima. Berdasarkan jumlah polikaeta yang keluar, hasil percobaan ini menunjukkan bahwa perendaman dengan konsentrasi garam 0 ppt. 45 ppt, dan 60 ppt selama 15 menit lebih efektif dibandingkan pada konsentrasi 15 dan 30 ppt. Tingkat kelangsungan hidup tiram mutiara yang diamati 7 hari setelah perendaman dalam larutan garam mencapai 100%. Kata kunci : Polikaeta. tiram mutiara, perendaman. salinitas

  17. Evaluation of hollocelulase production by Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegler during the submerged fermentation growth using RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Chicatto

    Full Text Available The cellulase proteins have a great importance in the enzymatic hydrolysis of woody biomass. Despite of costs being a major concern, it has been a stimulus to study basidiomycetes biochemical properties which degrade lignocellulosic material and have prompted the processes' study for obtaining cellulolytic enzymes in fungi. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the initial nitrogen content on (ammonium sulfate and on sugar cane bagasse, which hereby, acts as an inducer of hydrolytic enzymes to produce cellulases and xylanases, using three Lentinula edodes (Berk. Pegler strains as a transformation agent. A factorial design with 22 replications in the central point was conducted, varying concentrations of ammonium sulfate and sugar cane bagasse. The submerged cultures carried out in synthetic culture medium and incubated at 25°C for 7 days on an orbital shaker at 150 rpm. The total protein and cellulase activity as endoglucanase, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase and the xylanase was also determined. The results showed that the production of hydrolytic enzymes was stimulated by the presence of high concentrations of sugar cane bagasse (30g/L, characterizing it as an inducer due to the demonstrated proportional relationship. Thus, ammonium sulfate acted as a reducing agent in the synthesis of enzymes, being the low concentrations (0.1g/L indicated for the enzyme production system under study. Among the studied strains, the EF52 showed higher activity for xylanase, endoglucanases, β-glucosidase and also protein.

  18. Submerged Production and Characterization of Grifola frondosa Polysaccharides – A New Application to Cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Grifola frondosa (maitake is traditionally called 'the king of mushrooms' and 'the hen of the woods'. Both the fruiting bodies and the mycelium of maitake have been reported to have antitumor and antiviral activities. Recently, submerged culture processes have been developed, with the intention of providing opportunities for increased economic exploitation of maitake. Commonly the aim of these processes is to produce extracellular polysaccharides (EPS, mostly glucans, and to explore their applications, particularly in the cosmetic industry. A wide variety of EPS with different molecular chain length and chemical compositions are produced under different culture conditions. In this article, various biological and physicochemical properties of the EPS of G. frondosa (GF-EPS are described, with a view to applications in the area of functional cosmeceuticals. The GF-EPS, together with GF mycelial extract (GF-MPS, showed antioxidative activity, stimulation of collagen biosynthetic activity, cell proliferation activity, and inhibitory activity of melanogenesis, without significant cytotoxicity. These diverse functionalities suggest that both GF-EPS and GF-MPS can be promising cosmetic ingredients.

  19. Heavy metal concentrations in diploid and triploid oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from three farms on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Sevilla, Norma Patricia; Villanueva-Fonseca, Brenda Paulina; Góngora-Gómez, Andrés Martin; García-Ulloa, Manuel; Domínguez-Orozco, Ana Laura; Ortega-Izaguirre, Rogelio; Campos Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth

    2017-10-03

    The concentrations of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Hg in diploid and triploid oysters from three farms (Guasave, Ahome, and Navolato) on the north-central coast of Sinaloa, Mexico, were assessed based on samples recovered during a single culture cycle 2013-2014. Metal burdens were more strongly correlated (p  Cu > Cd > Pb > Hg. For all three farms, the mean concentrations of Cd and Pb in Crassostrea gigas were high, ranging from 2.52 to 7.98 μg/g wet weight for Cd and from 0.91 to 2.83 μg/g wet weight for Pb. Diploid and triploid oysters from the Guasave farm contained high levels of Cu (76.41 and 68.97 μg/g wet weight, respectively). Cu, Cd, and Zn were highly correlated (p < 0.05), and their concentrations may be influenced by agrochemical inputs. The mean levels of Cu for the Guasave farm and of Cd and Pb for all three farms exceeded permissible limits and represented a threat to human health during the sampling period (July 2014 to July 2014).

  20. Cathodic disbonding of organic coatings on submerged steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Ole oeystein

    1998-12-31

    In offshore oil production, submerged steel structures are commonly protected by an organic coating in combination with cathodic protection. The main advantage is that the coating decreases the current demand for cathodic protection. But the coating degrades with time. This thesis studies one of the most important mechanisms for coating degradation in seawater, cathodic disbonding. Seven commercial coatings and two model coatings with various pigmentations have been studied. Parameter studies, microscopy and studies of free films were used in the mechanism investigations. Exposure to simulated North Sea conditions was used in the performance studies. The effect of aluminium and glass barrier pigments on cathodic disbonding was investigated. The mechanism for the effect of the aluminium pigments on cathodic disbonding was also investigated. The transport of charge and oxygen to the steel/coating interface during cathodic disbonding was studied for two epoxy coatings. Cathodic disbonding, blistering and current demand for cathodic protection was measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures, using the ASTM-G8 standard test and a long term test under simulated North Sea conditions. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated. 171 refs., 40 figs., 6 tabs.