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Sample records for submaximal running cost

  1. Variability of Respiration and Metabolism: Responses to Submaximal Cycling and Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Costill, David L.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation examined day-to-day variations in metabolic measurements during submaximal running and cycling. Significant differences were found in the oxygen uptake (VO2) of runners and cyclists and the minute ventilation (VE) of cyclists while running, but blood lactic acid (HLA) did not differ day to day. (Author/MT)

  2. A Submaximal Running Test With Postexercise Cardiac Autonomic and Neuromuscular Function in Monitoring Endurance Training Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari; Laine, Tanja; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-01-01

    Vesterinen, V, Nummela, A, Laine, T, Hynynen, E, Mikkola, J, and Häkkinen, K. A submaximal running test with postexercise cardiac autonomic and neuromuscular function in monitoring endurance training adaptation. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 233-243, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate whether a submaximal running test (SRT) with postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), heart rate variability (HRV), and countermovement jump (CMJ) measurements could be used to monitor endurance training adaptation. Thirty-five endurance-trained men and women completed an 18-week endurance training. Maximal endurance performance and maximal oxygen uptake were measured every 8 weeks. In addition, SRTs with postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ measurements were carried out every 4 weeks. Submaximal running test consisted of two 6-minute stages at 70 and 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) and a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax, followed by a 2-minute recovery stage for measuring postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ test. The highest responders according to the change of maximal endurance performance showed a significant improvement in running speeds during stages 2 and 3 in SRT, whereas no changes were observed in the lowest responders. The strongest correlation was found between the change of maximal endurance performance and running speed during stage 3, whereas no significant relationships were found between the change of maximal endurance performance and the changes of postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ. Running speed at 90% HRmax intensity was the most sensitive variable to monitor adaptation to endurance training. The present submaximal test showed potential to monitor endurance training adaptation. Furthermore, it may serve as a practical tool for athletes and coaches to evaluate weekly the effectiveness of training program without interfering in the normal training habits.

  3. Amputee Locomotion: Ground Reaction Forces During Submaximal Running With Running-Specific Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Brian S; Hobara, Hiroaki; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Shim, Jae Kun

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with lower extremity amputation must adapt the mechanical interactions between the feet and ground to account for musculoskeletal function loss. However, it is currently unknown how individuals with amputation modulate three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRFs) when running. This study aimed to understand how running with running-specific prostheses influences three-dimensional support forces from the ground. Eight individuals with unilateral transtibial amputations and 8 control subjects ran overground at 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 m/s. Ten force plates measured GRFs at 1000 Hz. Peak and average GRFs and impulses in each plane were compared between limbs and groups. Prosthetic limbs generated reduced vertical impulses, braking forces and impulses, and mediolateral forces while generating similar propulsive impulses compared with intact and control limbs. Intact limbs generated greater peak and average vertical forces and average braking forces than control subjects' limbs. These data indicate that the nonamputated limb experiences elevated mechanical loading compared with prosthetic and control limbs. This may place individuals with amputation at greater risk of acute injury or joint degeneration in their intact limb. Individuals with amputation adapted to running-specific prosthesis force production limitations by generating longer periods of positive impulse thus producing propulsive impulses equivalent to intact and control limbs.

  4. Normobaric Hypoxia and Submaximal Exercise Effects on Running Memory and Mood State in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; Gerhart, Hayden D; Stavres, Jon; Fennell, Curtis; Draper, Shane; Glickman, Ellen L

    2017-07-01

    An acute bout of exercise can improve cognitive function in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. However, limited research supports the improvement of cognitive function and mood state in women. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hypoxia and exercise on working memory and mood state in women. There were 15 healthy women (age = 22 ± 2 yr) who completed the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics-4th Edition (ANAM), including the Running Memory Continuous Performance Task (RMCPT) and Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) in normoxia (21% O2), at rest in normoxia and hypoxia (12.5% O2), and during cycling exercise at 60% and 40% Vo2max in hypoxia. RMCPT was not significantly impaired at 30 (100.3 ± 17.2) and 60 (96.6 ± 17.3) min rest in hypoxia compared to baseline in normoxia (97.0 ± 17.0). However, RMCPT was significantly improved during exercise (106.7 ± 20.8) at 60% Vo2max compared to 60 min rest in hypoxia. Following 30 (-89.4 ± 48.3) and 60 min of exposure to hypoxia (-79.8 ± 55.9) at rest, TMD was impaired compared with baseline (-107.1 ± 46.2). TMD was significantly improved during exercise (-108.5 ± 42.7) at 40% Vo2max compared with 30 min rest in hypoxia. Also, RMCPT was significantly improved during exercise (104.0 ± 19.1) at 60% Vo2max compared to 60 min rest in hypoxia (96.6 ± 17.3). Hypoxia and an acute bout of exercise partially influence RMCPT and TMD. Furthermore, a moderate-intensity bout of exercise (60%) may be a more potent stimulant for improving cognitive function than low-intensity (40%) exercise. The present data should be considered by aeromedical personnel performing cognitive tasks in hypoxia.Seo Y, Gerhart HD, Stavres J, Fennell C, Draper S, Glickman EL. Normobaric hypoxia and submaximal exercise effects on running memory and mood state in women. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(7):627-632.

  5. Heavy strength training improves running and cycling performance following prolonged submaximal work in well-trained female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikmoen, Olav; Rønnestad, Bent R; Ellefsen, Stian; Raastad, Truls

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adding heavy strength training to female duathletes' normal endurance training on both cycling and running performance. Nineteen well-trained female duathletes ( V O 2max cycling: 54 ± 3 ml∙kg -1 ∙min -1 , VO 2max running: 53 ± 3 ml∙kg -1 ∙min -1 ) were randomly assigned to either normal endurance training ( E , n  = 8) or normal endurance training combined with strength training ( E+S , n  = 11). The strength training consisted of four lower body exercises [3 × 4-10 repetition maximum (RM)] twice a week for 11 weeks. Running and cycling performance were assessed using 5-min all-out tests, performed immediately after prolonged periods of submaximal work (3 h cycling or 1.5 h running). E+S increased 1RM in half squat (45 ± 22%) and lean mass in the legs (3.1 ± 4.0%) more than E Performance during the 5-min all-out test increased in both cycling (7.0 ± 4.5%) and running (4.7 ± 6.0%) in E+S, whereas no changes occurred in E The changes in running performance were different between groups. E+S reduced oxygen consumption and heart rate during the final 2 h of prolonged cycling, whereas no changes occurred in E No changes occurred during the prolonged running in any group. Adding strength training to normal endurance training in well-trained female duathletes improved both running and cycling performance when tested immediately after prolonged submaximal work. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. Evaluation of the American College of Sports Medicine submaximal treadmill running test for predicting VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Clare E

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM's) submaximal treadmill running test in predicting VO2max. Twenty-one moderately well-trained men aged 18-34 years performed 1 maximal treadmill test to determine maximal oxygen uptake (M VO2max) and 2 submaximal treadmill tests using 4 stages of continuous submaximal exercise. Estimated VO2max was predicted by extrapolation to age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRmax) and calculated in 2 ways: using data from all submaximal stages between 110 b·min(-1) and 85% HRmax (P VO2max-All), and using data from the last 2 stages only (P VO2max-2). The measured VO2max was overestimated by 3% on average for the group but was not significantly different to predicted VO2max (1-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] p = 0.695; M VO2max = 53.01 ± 5.38; P VO2max-All = 54.27 ± 7.16; P VO2max-2 = 54.99 ± 7.69 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), although M VO2max was not overestimated in all the participants--it was underestimated in 30% of observations. Pearson's correlation, standard error of estimate (SEE), and total error (E) between measured and predicted VO2max were r = 0.646, 4.35, 4.08 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P VO2max-All) and r = 0.642, 4.21, 3.98 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P VO2max-2) indicating that the accuracy in prediction (error) was very similar whether using P VO2max-All or P VO2max-2, with up to 70% of the participants predicted scores within 1 SEE (∼4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) of M VO2max. In conclusion, the ACSM equation provides a reasonably good estimation of VO2max with no difference in predictive accuracy between P VO2max-2 and P VO2max-All, and hence, either approach may be equally useful in tracking an individual's aerobic fitness over time. However, if a precise knowledge of VO2max is required, then it is recommended that this be measured directly.

  7. Influence of the world's most challenging mountain ultra-marathon on energy cost and running mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernillo, Gianluca; Savoldelli, Aldo; Zignoli, Andrea; Trabucchi, Pietro; Pellegrini, Barbara; Millet, Grégoire P; Schena, Federico

    2014-05-01

    To examine the effects of the world's most challenging mountain ultra-marathon (Tor des Géants(®) 2012) on the energy cost of three types of locomotion (cycling, level and uphill running) and running kinematics. Before (pre-) and immediately after (post-) the competition, a group of ten male experienced ultra-marathon runners performed in random order three submaximal 4-min exercise trials: cycling at a power of 1.5 W kg(-1) body mass; level running at 9 km h(-1) and uphill running at 6 km h(-1) at an inclination of +15 % on a motorized treadmill. Two video cameras recorded running mechanics at different sampling rates. Between pre- and post-, the uphill-running energy cost decreased by 13.8 % (P = 0.004); no change was noted in the energy cost of level running or cycling (NS). There was an increase in contact time (+10.3 %, P = 0.019) and duty factor (+8.1 %, P = 0.001) and a decrease in swing time (-6.4 %, P = 0.008) in the uphill-running condition. After this extreme mountain ultra-marathon, the subjects modified only their uphill-running patterns for a more economical step mechanics.

  8. Cold exposure enhances fat utilization but not non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol or catecholamines availability during submaximal walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dominique D; Rintamäki, Hannu; Gagnon, Sheila S; Cheung, Stephen S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Porvari, Katja; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Cold exposure modulates the use of carbohydrates (CHOs) and fat during exercise. This phenomenon has mostly been observed in controlled cycling studies, but not during walking and running when core temperature and oxygen consumption are controlled, as both may alter energy metabolism. This study aimed at examining energy substrate availability and utilization during walking and running in the cold when core temperature and oxygen consumption are maintained. Ten lightly clothed male subjects walked or ran for 60-min, at 50% and 70% of maximal oxygen consumption, respectively, in a climatic chamber set at 0°C or 22°C. Thermal, cardiovascular, and oxidative responses were measured every 15-min during exercise. Blood samples for serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), glycerol, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), plasma catecholamines, and serum lipids were collected immediately prior, and at 30- and 60-min of exercise. Skin temperature strongly decreased while core temperature did not change during cold trials. Heart rate (HR) was also lower in cold trials. A rise in fat utilization in the cold was seen through lower respiratory quotient (RQ) (-0.03 ± 0.02), greater fat oxidation (+0.14 ± 0.13 g · min(-1)) and contribution of fat to total energy expenditure (+1.62 ± 1.99 kcal · min(-1)). No differences from cold exposure were observed in blood parameters. During submaximal walking and running, a greater reliance on derived fat sources occurs in the cold, despite the absence of concurrent alterations in NEFAs, glycerol, or catecholamine concentrations. This disparity may suggest a greater reliance on intra-muscular energy sources such as triglycerides during both walking and running.

  9. Cold exposure enhances fat utilization but not non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol or catecholamines availability during submaximal walking and running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Daniel Gagnon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cold exposure modulates the use of carbohydrates and fat during exercise. This phenomenon has mostly been observed in controlled cycling studies, but not during walking and running when core temperature and oxygen consumption are controlled, as both may alter energy metabolism. This study aimed at examining energy substrate availability and utilization during walking and running in the cold when core temperature and oxygen consumption are maintained. Ten lightly clothed male subjects walked or ran for 60-min, at 50% and 70% of maximal oxygen consumption, respectively, in a climatic chamber set at 0°C or 22°C. Thermal, cardiovascular, and oxidative responses were measured every 15-min during exercise. Blood samples for serum non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate, plasma catecholamines, and serum lipids were collected immediately prior, and at 30- and 60-min of exercise. Skin temperature strongly decreased while core temperature did not change during cold trials. Heart rate was also lower in cold trials. A rise in fat utilization in the cold was seen through lower respiratory quotient (-0.03 ± 0.02, greater fat oxidation (+0.14 ± 0.13 g•min-1 and contribution of fat to total energy expenditure (+1.62 ± 1.99 kcal•min-1. No differences from cold exposure were observed in blood parameters. During submaximal walking and running, a greater reliance on derived fat sources occurs in the cold, despite the absence of concurrent alterations in non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol, or catecholamine concentrations. This disparity may suggest a greater reliance on intra-muscular energy sources such as triglycerides during both walking and running.

  10. Applying the cost of generating force hypothesis to uphill running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Hoogkamer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, several different approaches have been applied to explain the metabolic cost of uphill human running. Most of these approaches result in unrealistically high values for the efficiency of performing vertical work during running uphill, or are only valid for running up steep inclines. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the metabolic cost of uphill running, based upon our understanding of level running energetics and ground reaction forces during uphill running. In contrast to the vertical efficiency approach, we propose that during incline running at a certain velocity, the forces (and hence metabolic energy required for braking and propelling the body mass parallel to the running surface are less than during level running. Based on this idea, we propose that the metabolic rate during uphill running can be predicted by a model, which posits that (1 the metabolic cost of perpendicular bouncing remains the same as during level running, (2 the metabolic cost of running parallel to the running surface decreases with incline, (3 the delta efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the COM vertically is constant, independent of incline and running velocity, and (4 the costs of leg and arm swing do not change with incline. To test this approach, we collected ground reaction force (GRF data for eight runners who ran thirty 30-second trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–9°. We also measured the metabolic rates of eight different runners for 17, 7-minute trials (velocity: 2.0–3.0 m/s; incline: 0–8°. During uphill running, parallel braking GRF approached zero for the 9° incline trials. Thus, we modeled the metabolic cost of parallel running as exponentially decreasing with incline. With that assumption, best-fit parameters for the metabolic rate data indicate that the efficiency of producing mechanical power to lift the center of mass vertically was independent of incline and running velocity, with a value of ∼29

  11. Metabolic cost of running is greater on a treadmill with a stiffer running platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A H; McKerrow, Alexander D; Kohn, Tertius A

    2017-08-01

    Exercise testing on motorised treadmills provides valuable information about running performance and metabolism; however, the impact of treadmill type on these tests has not been investigated. This study compared the energy demand of running on two laboratory treadmills: an HP Cosmos (C) and a Quinton (Q) model, with the latter having a 4.5 times stiffer running platform. Twelve experienced runners ran identical bouts on these treadmills at a range of four submaximal velocities (reported data is for the velocity that approximated 75-81% VO 2max ). The stiffer treadmill elicited higher oxygen consumption (C: 46.7 ± 3.8; Q: 50.1 ± 4.3 ml·kg -1 · min -1 ), energy expenditure (C: 16.0 ± 2.5; Q: 17.7 ± 2.9 kcal · min -1 ), carbohydrate oxidation (C: 9.6 ± 3.1; Q: 13.0 ± 3.9 kcal · min -1 ), heart rate (C: 155 ± 16; Q: 163 ± 16 beats · min -1 ) and rating of perceived exertion (C: 13.8 ± 1.2; Q: 14.7 ± 1.2), but lower fat oxidation (C: 6.4 ± 2.3; Q: 4.6 ± 2.5 kcal · min -1 ) (all analysis of variance treadmill comparisons P running depending on the running platform stiffness.

  12. An Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon Decreases the Cost of Uphill Walking and Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernillo, Gianluca; Savoldelli, Aldo; Skafidas, Spyros; Zignoli, Andrea; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Giardini, Guido; Trabucchi, Pietro; Millet, Grégoire P; Schena, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of the world's most challenging mountain ultramarathon (MUM, 330 km, cumulative elevation gain of +24,000 m) on the energy cost and kinematics of different uphill gaits. Methods: Before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) the competition, 19 male athletes performed three submaximal 5-min treadmill exercise trials in a randomized order: walking at 5 km·h(-1), +20%; running at 6 km·h(-1), +15%; and running at 8 km·h(-1), +10%. During the three trials, energy cost was assessed using an indirect calorimetry system and spatiotemporal gait parameters were acquired with a floor-level high-density photoelectric cells system. Results: The average time of the study participants to complete the MUM was 129 h 43 min 48 s (range: 107 h 29 min 24 s to 144 h 21 min 0 s). Energy costs in walking (-11.5 ± 5.5%, P running condition decreased between PRE and POST, with a reduction both in the heart rate (-11.3, -10.0, and -9.3%, respectively) and oxygen uptake only for the walking condition (-6.5%). No consistent and significant changes in the kinematics variables were detected (P-values from 0.10 to 0.96). Conclusion: Though fatigued after completing the MUM, the subjects were still able to maintain their uphill locomotion patterns noted at PRE. The decrease (improvement) in the energy costs was likely due to the prolonged and repetitive walking/running, reflecting a generic improvement in the mechanical efficiency of locomotion after ~130 h of uphill locomotion rather than constraints imposed by the activity on the musculoskeletal structure and function.

  13. An extreme mountain ultra-marathon decreases the cost of uphill walking and running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vernillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To examine the effects of the world’s most challenging mountain ultramarathon (MUM, 330 km, cumulative elevation gain of +24000 m on the energy cost and kinematics of different uphill gaits. Methods: Before (PRE and immediately after (POST the competition, 19 male athletes performed three submaximal 5-min treadmill exercise trials in a randomized order: walking at 5 km·h-1, +20%; running at 6 km·h-1, +15%; and running at 8 km·h-1, +10%. During the three trials, energy cost was assessed using an indirect calorimetry system and spatiotemporal gait parameters were acquired with a floor-level high-density photoelectric cells system. Results: The average time of the study participants to complete the MUM was 129 h 43 min 48 s (range: 107 h 29 min 24 s to 144 h 21 min 0 s. Energy costs in walking (-11.5 ± 5.5%, P < 0.001, as well as in the first (-7.2 ± 3.1%, P = 0.01 and second (-7.0 ± 3.9%, P = 0.02 running condition decreased between PRE and POST, with a reduction both in the heart rate (-11.3%, -10.0%, and -9.3%, respectively and oxygen uptake only for the walking condition (-6.5%. No consistent and significant changes in the kinematics variables were detected (P values from 0.10 to 0.96. Conclusion: Though fatigued after completing the MUM, the subjects were still able to maintain their uphill locomotion patterns noted at PRE. The decrease (improvement in the energy costs was likely due to the prolonged and repetitive walking/running, reflecting a generic improvement in the mechanical efficiency of locomotion after ~130 h of uphill locomotion rather than constraints imposed by the activity on the musculoskeletal structure and function.

  14. The Relationship between Running Velocity and the Energy Cost of Turning during Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yamada, Yosuke; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Ball game players frequently perform changes of direction (CODs) while running; however, there has been little research on the physiological impact of CODs. In particular, the effect of running velocity on the physiological and energy demands of CODs while running has not been clearly determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD and to quantify the energy cost of a 180°COD. Nine male university students (aged 18–22 years) participated in the study. Five shuttle trials were performed in which the subjects were required to run at different velocities (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 km/h). Each trial consisted of four stages with different turn frequencies (13, 18, 24 and 30 per minute), and each stage lasted 3 minutes. Oxygen consumption was measured during the trial. The energy cost of a COD significantly increased with running velocity (except between 7 and 8 km/h, p = 0.110). The relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD is best represented by a quadratic function (y = −0.012+0.066x +0.008x2, [r = 0.994, p = 0.001]), but is also well represented by a linear (y = −0.228+0.152x, [r = 0.991, prunning velocities have relatively high physiological demands if the COD frequency increases, and that running velocities affect the physiological demands of CODs. These results also showed that the energy expenditure of COD can be evaluated using only two data points. These results may be useful for estimating the energy expenditure of players during a match and designing shuttle exercise training programs. PMID:24497913

  15. Stochastic facility location with general long-run costs and convex short-run costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Schütz; L. Stougie (Leen); A. Tomasgard

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper addresses the problem of minimizing the expected cost of locating a number of single product facilities and allocating uncertain customer demand to these facilities. The total costs consist of two components: firstly linear transportation cost and secondly the costs of

  16. Effects of a helium/oxygen mixture on individuals' lung function and metabolic cost during submaximal exercise for participants with obstructive lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussermann, Sabine; Schulze, Anja; Katz, Ira M; Martin, Andrew R; Herpich, Christiane; Hunger, Theresa; Texereau, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Helium/oxygen therapies have been studied as a means to reduce the symptoms of obstructive lung diseases with inconclusive results in clinical trials. To better understand this variability in results, an exploratory physiological study was performed comparing the effects of helium/oxygen mixture (78%/22%) to that of medical air. The gas mixtures were administered to healthy, asthmatic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) participants, both moderate and severe (6 participants in each disease group, a total of 30); at rest and during submaximal cycling exercise with equivalent work rates. Measurements of ventilatory parameters, forced spirometry, and ergospirometry were obtained. There was no statistical difference in ventilatory and cardiac responses to breathing helium/oxygen during submaximal exercise. For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate. However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups. The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications.

  17. Effects of a helium/oxygen mixture on individuals’ lung function and metabolic cost during submaximal exercise for participants with obstructive lung diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussermann, Sabine; Schulze, Anja; Katz, Ira M; Martin, Andrew R; Herpich, Christiane; Hunger, Theresa; Texereau, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Background Helium/oxygen therapies have been studied as a means to reduce the symptoms of obstructive lung diseases with inconclusive results in clinical trials. To better understand this variability in results, an exploratory physiological study was performed comparing the effects of helium/oxygen mixture (78%/22%) to that of medical air. Methods The gas mixtures were administered to healthy, asthmatic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) participants, both moderate and severe (6 participants in each disease group, a total of 30); at rest and during submaximal cycling exercise with equivalent work rates. Measurements of ventilatory parameters, forced spirometry, and ergospirometry were obtained. Results There was no statistical difference in ventilatory and cardiac responses to breathing helium/oxygen during submaximal exercise. For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate. However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups. Conclusion The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications. PMID:26451096

  18. Effects of a helium/oxygen mixture on individuals’ lung function and metabolic cost during submaximal exercise for participants with obstructive lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häussermann S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sabine Häussermann,1 Anja Schulze,1 Ira M Katz,2,3 Andrew R Martin,4 Christiane Herpich,1 Theresa Hunger,1 Joëlle Texereau2 1Inamed GmbH, Gauting, Germany; 2Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, Les Loges-en-Josas, France; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA; 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaBackground: Helium/oxygen therapies have been studied as a means to reduce the symptoms of obstructive lung diseases with inconclusive results in clinical trials. To better understand this variability in results, an exploratory physiological study was performed comparing the effects of helium/oxygen mixture (78%/22% to that of medical air.Methods: The gas mixtures were administered to healthy, asthmatic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD participants, both moderate and severe (6 participants in each disease group, a total of 30; at rest and during submaximal cycling exercise with equivalent work rates. Measurements of ventilatory parameters, forced spirometry, and ergospirometry were obtained.Results: There was no statistical difference in ventilatory and cardiac responses to breathing helium/oxygen during submaximal exercise. For asthmatics, but not for the COPD participants, there was a statistically significant benefit in reduced metabolic cost, determined through measurement of oxygen uptake, for the same exercise work rate. However, the individual data show that there were a mixture of responders and nonresponders to helium/oxygen in all of the groups.Conclusion: The inconsistent response to helium/oxygen between individuals is perhaps the key drawback to the more effective and widespread use of helium/oxygen to increase exercise capacity and for other therapeutic applications. Keywords: helium/oxygen, inspiratory capacity, oxygen uptake, COPD, asthma, obstructive airway diseases, exercise, heliox

  19. Analysis of the traditional vehicle’s running cost and the electric vehicle’s running cost under car-following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Xu, Ke-Wei; Yang, Shi-Chun; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we use car-following theory to study the traditional vehicle’s running cost and the electric vehicle’s running cost. The numerical results illustrate that the traditional vehicle’s running cost is larger than that of the electric vehicle and that the system’s total running cost drops with the increase of the electric vehicle’s proportion, which shows that the electric vehicle is better than the traditional vehicle from the perspective of the running cost.

  20. Optimal footfall patterns for cost minimization in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ross H; Hamill, Joseph

    2015-08-20

    Optimality in footfall pattern use is often studied in relation to running performance and injury risk. The typical variables assessed (metabolic cost, impact force) represent only two of many potential variables runners might want to minimize situationally. Here we used optimal control theory to predict optimal model-based running mechanics with 44 different cost functions. We tallied the frequency of different footfall patterns, then examined which patterns minimized which types of cost functions. When the model wore shoes, rearfoot striking (RFS) was predicted by 57% of the cost functions and was consistently optimal for functions related to whole-body energy expenditure and peak joint contact forces. No other footfall pattern was predicted by more than 25% of the functions. Non-RFS patterns tended to be optimal for functions that gave equal weight to all muscles, avoiding localized muscle fatigue. Non-RFS patterns were also predicted when minimizing average joint contact forces. Similar predictions were seen when the model ran barefoot, where RFS was optimal for 55% of the functions. The results suggest that RFS is the most versatile footfall pattern (optimal for the greatest number of goals), and may explain why RFS is the most common pattern in recreational shod runners. We argue that natural non-RFS runners are not necessarily behaving "sub-optimally", but rather may be optimizing their gaits on factors not tested here (e.g. comfort, which is difficult to quantify). In addition, switching from RFS to non-RFS may reduce the joint load accumulated during a run if speed and step length are maintained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of independently altering body weight and body mass on the metabolic cost of running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Grabowski, A.; Kram, R.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic cost of running is substantial, despite the savings from elastic energy storage and return. Previous studies suggest that generating vertical force to support body weight and horizontal forces to brake and propel body mass are the major determinants of the metabolic cost of running. In

  2. An elite runner with cerebral palsy: cost of running determines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... AL) appears to account for much of the difference in performance compared to able-bodied runners. The results provide both insight into the physiological limitations of runners with CP and support for the Joyner model of competitive running performance. Keywords: biomechanics, athletic training, exercise performance, ...

  3. Assessment of Long-Run Marginal Costing of Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then using typical practical networks as case studies, this paper compares two different methods for the determination of the LRMC of transmission and distribution expansion/reinforcement: the average incremental cost (AIC) methodology and marginal incremental costs (MIC) techniques. Based on the results obtained, it is ...

  4. Partitioning the metabolic cost of human running: a task-by-task approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Christopher J; Kram, Rodger

    2014-12-01

    Compared with other species, humans can be very tractable and thus an ideal "model system" for investigating the metabolic cost of locomotion. Here, we review the biomechanical basis for the metabolic cost of running. Running has been historically modeled as a simple spring-mass system whereby the leg acts as a linear spring, storing, and returning elastic potential energy during stance. However, if running can be modeled as a simple spring-mass system with the underlying assumption of perfect elastic energy storage and return, why does running incur a metabolic cost at all? In 1980, Taylor et al. proposed the "cost of generating force" hypothesis, which was based on the idea that elastic structures allow the muscles to transform metabolic energy into force, and not necessarily mechanical work. In 1990, Kram and Taylor then provided a more explicit and quantitative explanation by demonstrating that the rate of metabolic energy consumption is proportional to body weight and inversely proportional to the time of foot-ground contact for a variety of animals ranging in size and running speed. With a focus on humans, Kram and his colleagues then adopted a task-by-task approach and initially found that the metabolic cost of running could be "individually" partitioned into body weight support (74%), propulsion (37%), and leg-swing (20%). Summing all these biomechanical tasks leads to a paradoxical overestimation of 131%. To further elucidate the possible interactions between these tasks, later studies quantified the reductions in metabolic cost in response to synergistic combinations of body weight support, aiding horizontal forces, and leg-swing-assist forces. This synergistic approach revealed that the interactive nature of body weight support and forward propulsion comprises ∼80% of the net metabolic cost of running. The task of leg-swing at most comprises ∼7% of the net metabolic cost of running and is independent of body weight support and forward propulsion. In

  5. Energy costs & performance of transtibial amputees & non-amputees during walking & running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengelkoch, L J; Kahle, J T; Highsmith, M J

    2014-12-01

    This study compared energy costs and performance differences of walking and running for transtibial amputee (TTA) and matched non-amputee runners. TTA were tested with 3 prosthetic feet: traditional foot, SACH; general purpose, energy storing and return (ESAR) foot, Renegade; running-specific ESAR foot, Nitro. During walking, VO2 and gait efficiency (GE) were similar between prosthetic feet. VO2 was increased (21-33%) and GE was decreased for TTA compared to controls. Self-selected walking speed (SSWS) was slower for SACH (4-6%) compared to Renegade and Nitro but SSWS for TTA was slower (16-22%) than controls. During running, VO2 was increased (8-18%) and GE was decreased using SACH and Renegade, compared to Nitro. During running, VO2 was greater (9-38%), GE was decreased and SSRS was slower (17-30%) for TTA, than controls. VO2 peak was similar for controls and TTA using Nitro, but peak running speed was slower for TTA. In conclusion, during walking energy costs are mostly similar between prosthetic feet, but ESAR feet likely provide faster SSWS for TTA. During running, energy costs and performance are improved for TTA using Nitro. Nonetheless, for all prosthetic feet conditions, TTA demonstrated an energy cost and performance disadvantage during walking and running compared to non-amputee runners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Reduced prosthetic stiffness lowers the metabolic cost of running for athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M

    2017-04-01

    Inspired by the springlike action of biological legs, running-specific prostheses are designed to enable athletes with lower-limb amputations to run. However, manufacturer's recommendations for prosthetic stiffness and height may not optimize running performance. Therefore, we investigated the effects of using different prosthetic configurations on the metabolic cost and biomechanics of running. Five athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations each performed 15 trials on a force-measuring treadmill at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s. Athletes ran using each of 3 different prosthetic models (Freedom Innovations Catapult FX6, Össur Flex-Run, and Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter) with 5 combinations of stiffness categories (manufacturer's recommended and ± 1) and heights (International Paralympic Committee's maximum competition height and ± 2 cm) while we measured metabolic rates and ground reaction forces. Overall, prosthetic stiffness [fixed effect (β) = 0.036; P = 0.008] but not height ( P ≥ 0.089) affected the net metabolic cost of transport; less stiff prostheses reduced metabolic cost. While controlling for prosthetic stiffness (in kilonewtons per meter), using the Flex-Run (β = -0.139; P = 0.044) and 1E90 Sprinter prostheses (β = -0.176; P = 0.009) reduced net metabolic costs by 4.3-4.9% compared with using the Catapult prostheses. The metabolic cost of running improved when athletes used prosthetic configurations that decreased peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces (β = 2.786; P = 0.001), stride frequencies (β = 0.911; P running in athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations is influenced by prosthetic model and stiffness but not height. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We measured the metabolic rates and biomechanics of five athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations while running with different prosthetic configurations. The metabolic cost of running for these athletes is minimized by using an optimal prosthetic model and reducing prosthetic

  7. Quantifying short run cost-effectiveness during a gradual implementation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetering, G. van de; Woertman, W.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Adang, E.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the short run inefficiencies that arise during gradual implementation of a new cost-effective technology in healthcare. These inefficiencies arise when health gains associated with the new technology cannot be obtained immediately because the new technology does not yet supply

  8. Achilles tendon strain energy in distance running: consider the muscle energy cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jared R; MacIntosh, Brian R

    2015-01-15

    The return of tendon strain energy is thought to contribute to reducing the energy cost of running (Erun). However, this may not be consistent with the notion that increased Achilles tendon (AT) stiffness is associated with a lower Erun. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for AT strain energy return relative to Erun for male and female runners of different abilities. A total of 46 long distance runners [18 elite male (EM), 12 trained male (TM), and 16 trained female (TF)] participated in this study. Erun was determined by indirect calorimetry at 75, 85, and 95% of the speed at lactate threshold (sLT), and energy cost per stride at each speed was estimated from previously reported stride length (SL)-speed relationships. AT force during running was estimated from reported vertical ground reaction force (Fz)-speed relationships, assuming an AT:ground reaction force moment arm ratio of 1.5. AT elongation was quantified during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction using ultrasound. Muscle energy cost was conservatively estimated on the basis of AT force and estimated cross-bridge mechanics and energetics. Significant group differences existed in sLT (EM > TM > TF; P TF > EM; P distance running the muscle energy cost is substantially higher than the strain energy release from the AT. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Uchida

    Full Text Available Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2-5 m/s with tendon force-strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2-3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail.

  10. Size, Democracy, and the Economic Costs of Running the Political System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom-Hansen, Jens; Houlberg, Kurt; Serritzlew, Søren

    2014-01-01

    , are amalgamated to harvest scale effects. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the argument on economies of scale in the economic costs of running political systems. Our testing ground is a recent Danish reform. It allows us to avoid endogeneity problems often facing researchers of size reforms. The reform......The search for the optimal size of political systems is one of the most enduring in political thought. Given the validity of arguments for and against small units, one might expect variation in rearrangements of unit sizes. However, the reform trend is uniform: units, often at the local level...... as administrative costs per inhabitant, are considerable....

  11. Running Neuroimaging Applications on Amazon Web Services: How, When, and at What Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Koh, Natalie; Day, Trevor K M; Hernández-Fernández, Moises; Kelley, Austin; Peterson, Daniel J; Rajan, Sabreena; Woelfer, Karl A; Wolf, Jonathan; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is to identify and describe current best practices for using Amazon Web Services (AWS) to execute neuroimaging workflows "in the cloud." Neuroimaging offers a vast set of techniques by which to interrogate the structure and function of the living brain. However, many of the scientists for whom neuroimaging is an extremely important tool have limited training in parallel computation. At the same time, the field is experiencing a surge in computational demands, driven by a combination of data-sharing efforts, improvements in scanner technology that allow acquisition of images with higher image resolution, and by the desire to use statistical techniques that stress processing requirements. Most neuroimaging workflows can be executed as independent parallel jobs and are therefore excellent candidates for running on AWS, but the overhead of learning to do so and determining whether it is worth the cost can be prohibitive. In this paper we describe how to identify neuroimaging workloads that are appropriate for running on AWS, how to benchmark execution time, and how to estimate cost of running on AWS. By benchmarking common neuroimaging applications, we show that cloud computing can be a viable alternative to on-premises hardware. We present guidelines that neuroimaging labs can use to provide a cluster-on-demand type of service that should be familiar to users, and scripts to estimate cost and create such a cluster.

  12. Running Neuroimaging Applications on Amazon Web Services: How, When, and at What Cost?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara M. Madhyastha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper is to identify and describe current best practices for using Amazon Web Services (AWS to execute neuroimaging workflows “in the cloud.” Neuroimaging offers a vast set of techniques by which to interrogate the structure and function of the living brain. However, many of the scientists for whom neuroimaging is an extremely important tool have limited training in parallel computation. At the same time, the field is experiencing a surge in computational demands, driven by a combination of data-sharing efforts, improvements in scanner technology that allow acquisition of images with higher image resolution, and by the desire to use statistical techniques that stress processing requirements. Most neuroimaging workflows can be executed as independent parallel jobs and are therefore excellent candidates for running on AWS, but the overhead of learning to do so and determining whether it is worth the cost can be prohibitive. In this paper we describe how to identify neuroimaging workloads that are appropriate for running on AWS, how to benchmark execution time, and how to estimate cost of running on AWS. By benchmarking common neuroimaging applications, we show that cloud computing can be a viable alternative to on-premises hardware. We present guidelines that neuroimaging labs can use to provide a cluster-on-demand type of service that should be familiar to users, and scripts to estimate cost and create such a cluster.

  13. Effects of the Etna uphill ultramarathon on energy cost and mechanics of running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzer, Stefano; Salvadego, Desy; Taboga, Paolo; Rejc, Enrico; Giovanelli, Nicola; di Prampero, Pietro E

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of an extreme uphill marathon on the mechanical parameters that are likely to affect the energy cost of running (Cr). Eleven runners (27-59 y) participated in the Etna SuperMarathon (43 km, 0-3063 m above sea level). Anthropometric characteristics, maximal explosive power of the lower limb (Pmax), and maximal oxygen uptake were determined before the competition. In addition, before and immediately after the race, Cr, contact (tc) and aerial (ta) times, step frequency (f), and running velocity were measured at constant self-selected speed. Then, peak vertical ground-reaction force (Fmax), vertical downward displacement of the center of mass (Δz), leg-length change (ΔL), and vertical (kvert) and leg (kleg) stiffness were calculated. A direct relationship between Cr, measured before the race, and race time was shown (r=.61, Prunning competition.

  14. Designing Green Networks and Network Operations Saving Run-the-Engine Costs

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the confluence of socio-political trends toward environmental responsibility and the pressing need to reduce Run-the-Engine (RTE) costs has given birth to a nascent discipline of Green IT. A clear and concise introduction to green networks and green network operations, this book examines analytical measures and discusses virtualization, network computing, and web services as approaches for green data centers and networks. It identifies some strategies for green appliance and end devices and examines the methodical steps that can be taken over time to achieve a seamless migratio

  15. The Impact of Dynamic Electricity Tariff on Long-run Incremental Cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yi; Li, Yang; Pineda, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    infrastructure needs to be made in order to cope with this tremendous change in an efficient and effective manner. Long-run incremental cost (LRIC) pricing method is recognized as an economically efficient approach for pricing network charges, which provides forward-looking information for future investment cost......Electricity plays an important role in the future energy framework around the world. The foreseen high penetration of renewable energy resources and electric vehicles (EV) will change the way of understanding and operating power systems. Consequently, significant investment in network....... LRIC evaluation is usually conducted on the basis that demand is passive and uncontrollable. The impact of demand flexibility on LRIC has not been comprehensively studied. In this paper, the effect of dynamic electricity tariff and flexible demand on LRIC and network investment decisions is deeply...

  16. Triathlon wetsuit removal strategy: physiological cost of running with a wetsuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciulei Mihaela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Triathletes exiting the swim portion of an event have to decide on how and when to take a wetsuit off (if worn. The purpose of this study was to determine the physiological cost of running while not using a wetsuit, carrying a wetsuit, wearing a wetsuit halfway down or wearing a wetsuit fully up. Participants (n = 20, 30.9 ± 8.7 yrs, 1.71 ± 0.08 m, 71.6 ± 9.5 kg completed four 5 min running conditions: 1 not wearing the wetsuit, 2 wearing the wetsuit fully up, 3 wearing the wetsuit halfway down, and 4 carrying the wetsuit. A rate of oxygen uptake, a heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and stride frequency were measured and were each influenced by wetsuit condition (p 0.05. The rating of perceived exertion was greater during wearing the wetsuit halfway down vs. carrying the wetsuit (p < 0.05. Stride frequency was lower during not wearing the wetsuit vs. wearing the wetsuit halfway down or fully up (p < 0.05. It was concluded that running with the wetsuit halfway down resulted in the greatest rate of oxygen uptake, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion.

  17. Factors affecting metabolic cost of transport during a multi-stage running race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzer, Stefano; Taboga, Paolo; Salvadego, Desy; Rejc, Enrico; Simunic, Bostjan; Narici, Marco V; Buglione, Antonio; Giovanelli, Nicola; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Grassi, Bruno; Pisot, Rado; di Prampero, Pietro E

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: (1) the role of , the fraction of (F) and the metabolic cost of transport (CoT) in determining performance during an ultra-endurance competition and (2) the effects of the race on several biomechanical and morphological parameters of the lower limbs that are likely to affect CoT. Eleven runners (aged 29-54 years) participated in an ultra-endurance competition consisting of three running stages of 25, 55 and 13 km on three consecutive days. Anthropometric characteristics, body composition, morphological properties of the gastrocnemius medialis, maximal explosive power of the lower limb and were determined before the competition. In addition, biomechanics of running and CoT were determined, before and immediately after each running stage. Performance was directly proportional to (r=0.77) and F (r=0.36), and inversely proportional to CoT (r=-0.30). Low CoT values were significantly related to high maximal power of the lower limbs (r=-0.74) and vertical stiffness (r=-0.65) and low footprint index (FPI, r=0.70), step frequency (r=0.62) and external work (r=0.60). About 50% of the increase in CoT during the stages of the competition was accounted for by changes in FPI, which represents a global evaluation of medio-lateral displacement of the foot during the whole stance phase, which in turn is associated with the myotendinous characteristics of the lower limb. Thus, lower CoT values were related to greater muscular power and lower FPI, suggesting that a better ankle stability is likely to achieve better performance in an ultra-endurance running competition.

  18. Energy costs and performance of transfemoral amputees and non-amputees during walking and running: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengelkoch, Larry J; Kahle, Jason T; Highsmith, M Jason

    2017-10-01

    Limited information is available concerning the effects of prosthetic foot components on energy costs and ambulatory performance for transfemoral amputees. Compare energy costs (VO2; gait economy) and ambulatory performance (self-selected walking speeds, self-selected running speeds, peak running speeds) differences during walking and running for transfemoral amputees and matched, non-amputee runners. Repeated measures. Transfemoral amputees were accommodated and tested with three prosthetic feet: conventional foot, solid-ankle cushioned heel (SACH); energy storing and return foot, Renegade; and running-specific energy storing and return foot, Nitro. During walking, VO2 was similar between transfemoral amputees but was increased compared to controls. Self-selected walking speeds were slower for SACH compared to Renegade and Nitro. For transfemoral amputees, gait economy was decreased and self-selected walking speeds were slower compared to controls. During fixed running speeds, transfemoral amputees ran using Nitro, and VO2 was greater compared to controls. Transfemoral amputees ran at self-selected running speeds using Renegade and Nitro. Self-selected running speeds were slower for Renegade compared to Nitro. For transfemoral amputees, gait economy was decreased and self-selected running speeds were slower compared to controls. VO2 peak was similar between transfemoral amputees and controls, but controls achieved greater peak running speeds and % grade. Energy costs were greater and ambulatory performance was lower for transfemoral amputees compared to matched, non-amputee controls for all prosthetic foot conditions. Clinical relevance Both types of energy storing and return feet may improve walking performance for transfemoral amputees by providing faster self-selected walking speeds. For transfemoral amputees interested in performing vigorous running (exercise and running competition), clinicians should recommend a running-specific energy storing and return

  19. Prosthetic model, but not stiffness or height, affects the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M

    2017-07-01

    Running-specific prostheses enable athletes with lower limb amputations to run by emulating the spring-like function of biological legs. Current prosthetic stiffness and height recommendations aim to mitigate kinematic asymmetries for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations. However, it is unclear how different prosthetic configurations influence the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Consequently, we investigated how prosthetic model, stiffness, and height affect the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Ten athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations each performed 15 running trials at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s while we measured ground reaction forces and metabolic rates. Athletes ran using three different prosthetic models with five different stiffness category and height combinations per model. Use of an Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter prosthesis reduced metabolic cost by 4.3 and 3.4% compared with use of Freedom Innovations Catapult [fixed effect (β) = -0.177; P Run (β = -0.139; P = 0.002) prostheses, respectively. Neither prosthetic stiffness (P ≥ 0.180) nor height (P = 0.062) affected the metabolic cost of running. The metabolic cost of running was related to lower peak (β = 0.649; P = 0.001) and stance average (β = 0.772; P = 0.018) vertical ground reaction forces, prolonged ground contact times (β = -4.349; P = 0.012), and decreased leg stiffness (β = 0.071; P running. Instead, an optimal prosthetic model, which improves overall biomechanics, minimizes the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations depends on prosthetic model and is associated with lower peak and stance average vertical ground reaction forces, longer contact times, and reduced leg stiffness. Metabolic cost is unrelated to prosthetic stiffness, height, and stride kinematic symmetry. Unlike nonamputees who decrease leg stiffness with

  20. Relationship between Achilles tendon length and running performance in well-trained male endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2017-06-28

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) length and running performance, including running economy, in well-trained endurance runners. We also examined the reasonable portion of the AT related to running performance among AT lengths measured in three different portions. The AT lengths at three portions and cross-sectional area (CSA) of 30 endurance runners were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Each AT length was calculated as the distance from the calcaneal tuberosity to the muscle-tendon junction of the soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GMAT ), and gastrocnemius lateralis, respectively. These AT lengths were normalized with shank length. The AT CSA was calculated as the average of 10, 20, and 30 mm above the distal insertion of the AT and normalized with body mass. Running economy was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-minutes submaximal treadmill running trials at 14, 16, and 18 km/h, respectively. Among three AT lengths, only a GMAT correlated significantly with personal best 5000-m race time (r=-.376, P=.046). Furthermore, GMAT correlated significantly with energy cost during submaximal treadmill running trials at 14 km/h and 18 km/h (r=-.446 and -.429, respectively, PGMAT , may be advantageous to achieve superior running performance, with better running economy, in endurance runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Are gait characteristics and ground reaction forces related to energy cost of running in elite Kenyan runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Concejero, J; Tam, N; Coetzee, D R; Oliván, J; Noakes, T D; Tucker, R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether gait cycle characteristics are associated with running economy in elite Kenyan runners. Fifteen elite Kenyan male runners completed two constant-speed running sets on a treadmill (12 km ·h -1 and 20 km ·h -1 ). VO 2 and respiratory exchange ratio values were measured to calculate steady-state oxygen and energy cost of running. Gait cycle characteristics and ground contact forces were measured at each speed. Oxygen cost of running at different velocities was 192.2 ± 14.7 ml· kg -1 · km -1 at 12 km· h -1 and 184.8 ± 9.9 ml· kg -1 · km -1 at 20 km· h -1 , which corresponded to a caloric cost of running of 0.94 ± 0.07 kcal ·kg -1 ·km -1 and 0.93 ± 0.07 kcal· kg -1 · km -1 . We found no significant correlations between oxygen and energy cost of running and biomechanical variables and ground reaction forces at either 12 or 20 km· h -1 . However, ground contact times were ~10.0% shorter (very large effect) than in previously published literature in elite runners at similar speeds, alongside an 8.9% lower oxygen cost (very large effect). These results provide evidence to hypothesise that the short ground contact times may contribute to the exceptional running economy of Kenyan runners.

  2. Impact of a Submaximal Warm-Up on Endurance Performance in Highly Trained and Competitive Male Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourdos, Michael C.; Bazyler, Caleb D.; Jo, Edward; Khamoui, Andy V.; Park, Bong-Sup; Lee, Sang-Rok; Panton, Lynn B.; Kim, Jeong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a submaximal running warm-up on running performance in male endurance athletes (n = 16, M[subscript age] = 21 ± 2 years, M[subscript VO2max] = 69.3 ± 5.1 mL/kg/min). Method: Endurance performance was determined by a 30-min distance trial after control and submaximal running…

  3. The effect of submaximal exercise on fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fras, Zlatko; Keber, Dusan; Chandler, Wayne L

    2004-04-01

    We studied the relationship between sustained submaximal exercise, increased tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels and decreased hepatic clearance of t-PA. Six healthy male volunteers exercised for 35 min while receiving constant rate infusions of either saline or two different doses of recombinant t-PA for 90 min (40 min before, 35 min during and 15 min after exercise). Liver blood flow was estimated simultaneously by constant rate indocyanine green infusion. Since t-PA is cleared rapidly by the liver in direct proportion to liver blood flow, it was expected that a significant decrease in liver blood flow during sustained submaximal exercise would be associated with a proportional increase in plasma t-PA. During submaximal exercise with a saline (placebo) infusion, steady-state t-PA antigen increased from a resting baseline of 6.3 +/- 3.1 to 15.1 +/- 5.1 ng/ml; with a 20 microg/min t-PA infusion, t-PA antigen increased from 33 +/- 12 to 84 +/- 25 ng/ml during exercise; and with a 40 microg/min t-PA infusion, t-PA antigen increased from 77 +/- 38 to 166 +/- 42 ng/ml during exercise. During submaximal exercise, liver blood flow fell on average 71, 68 and 70%, respectively, during the three procedures, while calculated t-PA clearance decreased on average 59, 59 and 53%. t-PA concentration versus time curves, displayed in proportional units, were similar. The comparable relative increases in endogenous and exogenous t-PA with simultaneous proportional decreases in liver blood flow suggests that diminished hepatic t-PA clearance is the major cause of increased t-PA concentration and blood fibrinolytic activity enhancement during sustained submaximal exercise.

  4. Time and cost over-runs of the power projects in Kerala

    OpenAIRE

    N. Vijayamohanan Pillai; K.P. Kannan

    2001-01-01

    Delays in project implementation and the attendant cost overruns have been a regular feature in the electric power sector in Kerala. Almost all the public projects, including the prestigious major hydroelectric project of Idukki, have been the unfortunate victims of time and cost overruns on account of a number of avoidable factors, labour disputes being singled out as the prime villain. In this paper we take up a detailed analysis of the cost of inefficiency involved in the time and cost ove...

  5. The Energy Cost and Heart Rate Response of Trained and Untrained Subjects Walking and Running in Shoes and Boots,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    footwear , athletic shoes of the S subjects’ choice (average weight per pair = 616g), and leather military boots 1 (average weight per pair = 17 76g) at 3...V O2) measured while walking and running on a treadmill. They wore each type of footwear , athletic shoes of the subjects’ choice (average weight per...Also, both these studies demonstrated trends toward increasing energy costs for subjects walking (3.9 km * h- I or more) in footwear of increasing

  6. Eight weeks of intermittent hypoxic training improves submaximal physiological variables in highly trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliss, Ben A; Burden, Richard J; Jones, Andrew M; Pedlar, Charles R

    2014-08-01

    It is unclear whether intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) results in improvements in physiological variables associated with endurance running. Twelve highly trained runners (VO2peak 70.0 ± 3.5 ml·kg-1·min-1) performed incremental treadmill tests to exhaustion in normobaric normoxia and hypoxia (16.0% FIO2) to assess submaximal and maximal physiological variables and the limit of tolerance (T-Lim). Participants then completed 8 weeks of moderate to heavy intensity normoxic training (control [CONT]) or IHT (twice weekly 40 minutes runs, in combination with habitual training), in a single blinded manner, before repeating the treadmill tests. Submaximal heart rate decreased significantly more after IHT (-5 ± 5 b·min-1; p = 0.001) than after CONT ( -1 ± 5 b·min-1; p = 0.021). Changes in submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 were significantly different between groups (p ≤ 0.05); decreasing in the IHT group in hypoxia (-2.6 ± 1.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; p = 0.001) and increasing in the CONT group in normoxia (+1.1 ± 2.1 ml·kg-1·min-1; p = 0.012). There were no VO2peak changes within either group, and while T-Lim improved post-IHT in hypoxia (p = 0.031), there were no significant differences between groups. Intermittent hypoxic training resulted in a degree of enhanced cardiovascular fitness that was evident during submaximal, but not maximal intensity exercise. These results suggest that moderate to heavy intensity IHT provides a mean of improving the capacity for submaximal exercise and may be useful for pre-acclimatization for subsequent exercise in hypoxia, but additional research is required to establish its efficacy for athletic performance at sea level.

  7. A novel method for calculating the energy cost of turning during running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatamoto Y

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoichi Hatamoto,1 Yosuke Yamada,2 Tatsuya Fujii,3 Yasuki Higaki,3 Akira Kiyonaga,3 Hiroaki Tanaka31Graduate School of Sports and Health Science, Fukuoka University, Nanakuma Jonan-ku Fukuoka, Japan; 2The Fukuoka University Institute for Physical Activity, Nanakuma Jonan-ku Fukuoka, Japan; 3Faculty of Sports and Health Science, Fukuoka University, Nanakuma Jonan-ku Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: Although changes of direction are one of the essential locomotor patterns in ball sports, the physiological demand of turning during running has not been previously investigated. We proposed a novel approach by which to evaluate the physiological demand of turning. The purposes of this study were to establish a method of measuring the energy expenditure (EE of a 180° turn during running and to investigate the effect of two different running speeds on the EE of a 180° turn. Eleven young, male participants performed measurement sessions at two different running speeds (4.3 and 5.4 km/hour. Each measurement session consisted of five trials, and each trial had a different frequency of turns. At both running speeds, as the turn frequency increased the gross oxygen consumption (V · O2 also increased linearly (4.3 km/hour, r = 0.973; 5.4 km/hour, r = 0.996. The V · O2 of a turn at 5.4 km/hour (0.55 [SD 0.09] mL/kg was higher than at 4.3 km/hour (0.34 [SD 0.13] mL/kg (P < 0.001. We conclude that the gross V · O2 of running at a fixed speed with turns is proportional to turn frequency and that the EE of a turn is different at different running speeds. The Different Frequency Accumulation Method is a useful tool for assessing the physiological demands of complex locomotor activity.Keywords: energy expenditure, turning, turn frequency, running speed, V · O2, heart rate

  8. Influence of exercise duration on cardiorespiratory responses, energy cost and tissue oxygenation within a 6 hour treadmill run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhervé, Hugo A; McLean, Scott; Birkenhead, Karen; Parr, David; Solomon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms for alterations in oxygen utilization ([Formula: see text]) and the energy cost of running ( C r ) during prolonged running are not completely understood, and could be linked with alterations in muscle and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Eight trained ultramarathon runners (three women; mean ± SD; age 37 ± 7 yr; maximum [Formula: see text] 60 ± 15 mL min -1  kg -1 ) completed a 6 hr treadmill run (6TR), which consisted of four modules, including periods of moderate (3 min at 10 km h -1 , 10-CR) and heavy exercise intensities (6 min at 70% of maximum [Formula: see text], HILL), separated by three, 100 min periods of self-paced running (SP). We measured [Formula: see text], minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), ventilatory efficiency ([Formula: see text]), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), C r , muscle and cerebral tissue saturation index (TSI) during the modules, and heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion (RPE) during the modules and SP. Participants ran 58.3 ± 10.5 km during 6TR. Speed decreased and HR and RPE increased during SP. Across the modules, HR and [Formula: see text] increased (10-CR), and RER decreased (10-CR and HILL). There were no significant changes in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], C r , TSI and RPE across the modules. In the context of positive pacing (decreasing speed), increased cardiac drift and perceived exertion over the 6TR, we observed increased RER and increased HR at moderate and heavy exercise intensity, increased [Formula: see text] at moderate intensity, and no effect of exercise duration on ventilatory efficiency, energy cost of running and tissue oxygenation.

  9. Population-based cost-offset estimation for the treatment of borderline personality disorder: projected costs in a currently running, ideal health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Eva-Maria; Kliem, Sören; Kröger, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is considered one of the most expensive mental disorders in terms of direct and indirect costs. The aim of this study was to carry out a cost-offset estimation of disorder-specific psychotherapy for BPD at the population level. The study investigated whether the possible financial benefits of dialectical behavior therapy outweigh the therapy costs, assuming a currently running, ideal health system, and whether the estimated cost-benefit relationships change depending upon the number of patients willing to be treated. A formula was elaborated that allows the user to calculate cost-benefit relationships for various conservative or progressive scenarios, with different stages of individuals' willingness to be treated (10%-90%). The possible costs and benefits of BPD-related treatment were evaluated using a 12-month, prevalence-based approach. The annual costs for untreated BPD were 8.69 billion EUR annually. The cost-benefit relationship for the treatment remained constant at 1.52 for all scenarios, implying that for each EUR invested, 1.52 EUR can be gained within one year, independent of the willingness to be treated. Additional intangible benefits were calculated with the aid of Quality-Adjusted Life Years. Findings suggest that BPD-related treatment might well be efficient at the population level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulating Ideal Assistive Devices to Reduce the Metabolic Cost of Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Uchida

    Full Text Available Tools have been used for millions of years to augment the capabilities of the human body, allowing us to accomplish tasks that would otherwise be difficult or impossible. Powered exoskeletons and other assistive devices are sophisticated modern tools that have restored bipedal locomotion in individuals with paraplegia and have endowed unimpaired individuals with superhuman strength. Despite these successes, designing assistive devices that reduce energy consumption during running remains a substantial challenge, in part because these devices disrupt the dynamics of a complex, finely tuned biological system. Furthermore, designers have hitherto relied primarily on experiments, which cannot report muscle-level energy consumption and are fraught with practical challenges. In this study, we use OpenSim to generate muscle-driven simulations of 10 human subjects running at 2 and 5 m/s. We then add ideal, massless assistive devices to our simulations and examine the predicted changes in muscle recruitment patterns and metabolic power consumption. Our simulations suggest that an assistive device should not necessarily apply the net joint moment generated by muscles during unassisted running, and an assistive device can reduce the activity of muscles that do not cross the assisted joint. Our results corroborate and suggest biomechanical explanations for similar effects observed by experimentalists, and can be used to form hypotheses for future experimental studies. The models, simulations, and software used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and can provide insight into assistive device design that complements experimental approaches.

  11. Body composition changes affect energy cost of running during 12 months of specific diet and training in amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Giovanna; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Melis, Franco; Angioni, Giuseppina; Sanna, Irene; Loi, Andrea; Pusceddu, Matteo; Pinna, Virginia; Crisafulli, Antonio; Tocco, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Considering the relation between body weight composition and energy cost of running, we tested the hypothesis that by modifying body composition by means of a combined protocol of specific diet and training, the energy cost of motion (Cr) may be reduced. Forty-five healthy and normal-weight subjects were divided into 3 groups that performed a different treatment: the first group attended a dietary protocol (D), the second group participated in a running program (R), and the third group followed both the dietary and running protocols (R&D). Each subject underwent 3 anthropometric and exercise evaluation tests during 1 year (at entry (T0), month 6 (T6), and month 12 (T12)) to assess body composition and Cr adjustments. The mean fat mass (FM) values were reduced in R&D from 12.0 ± 4.0 to 10.4 ± 3.0 kg (p body composition during the year (FM/fat free mass ratio decline), which determined a Cr reduction.

  12. ESTIMATION OF THE RUNNING COSTS OF AUTONOMOUS ENERGY SOURCES IN TROLLEYBUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Hołyszko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the performance characteristics and operating costs of the three types of trolley-buses equipped with alternative energy sources, which are used by the MPK (Municipal Transport Company in Lublin. The selected applications are adapted for driving off traction in emergency mode as well as servicing the regular route. Two of them are based on electrochemical batteries and one uses a system with an electric generator driven by an internal combustion engine.

  13. Effects of marathon running on running economy and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyröläinen, H; Pullinen, T; Candau, R; Avela, J; Huttunen, P; Komi, P V

    2000-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate interactions between running economy and mechanics before, during, and after an individually run marathon. Seven experienced triathletes performed a 5-min submaximal running test on a treadmill at an individual constant marathon speed. Heart rate was monitored and the expired respiratory gas was analyzed. Blood samples were drawn to analyze serum creatine kinase activity (S-CK), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), and blood lactate (B-La). A video analysis was performed (200 frames x s(-1)) to investigate running mechanics. A kinematic arm was used to determine the external work of each subject. The results of the present study demonstrate that after the marathon, a standardized 5-min submaximal running test resulted in an increase in oxygen consumption, ventilation, and heart rate (P marathon, while sTnI and S-CK values increased (P marathon, respectively. With regard to the running kinematics, a minor increase in stride frequency and a similar decrease in stride length were observed (P running economy cannot be explained by changes in running mechanics. Therefore, it is suggested that the increased physiological loading is due to several mechanisms: increased utilization of fat as an energy substrate, increased demands of body temperature regulation, and possible muscle damage.

  14. On the energetics of quadrupedal running: predicting the metabolic cost of transport via a flexible-torso model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qu; Poulakakis, Ioannis

    2015-09-03

    In this paper, the effect of torso flexibility on the energetics of quadrupedal bounding is examined in a template setting. Two reductive sagittal-plane models, one with a rigid, non-deformable torso and one with a flexible, unactuated torso are proposed. Both models feature non-trivial leg mass and inertia to capture the energy associated with repositioning the legs after liftoff as well as the energy lost due to impacts. Bounding motions that minimize the cost of transport are generated for both models via a simple controller that coordinates leg recirculation. Comparisons reveal that torso compliance promotes locomotion efficiency by facilitating leg recirculation in anticipation of touchdown at speeds that are sufficiently high. Furthermore, by considering non-ideal torque generating and compliant elements with biologically reasonable efficiency values, it is shown that the flexible-torso model can predict the metabolic cost of transport for different animals, estimated using measurements of oxygen consumption. This way, the proposed model offers a means for approximating the energetic cost of transport of running quadrupeds in a simple and direct fashion.

  15. Measurements for improvement of running capacity. : Physiological and biomechanical evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Gullstrand, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Running is included in a large number of sports and one of the most well investigated modes of locomotion in both physiology and biomechanics. This thesis focuses on how some new methods from both areas may be used to capture running capacity in mid-distance and distance running from laboratory and field recordings. Measurement of running economy is included and defined as oxygen uptake at a given submaximal velocity in a steady-state condition. Running economy...

  16. Restoration of native Atlantic salmon runs in northern Spain: do costs outweigh benefits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanes F.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atlantic salmon stocks in northern Spain are at the southern range of the species distribution. As such they are likely more vulnerable to environmental change and human disturbance. The Nalon-Narcea River salmon is one such population in Asturias, Spain. The river is dammed throughout the watershed with few fish passage facilities. However, angling data show that salmon returns are consistent although the population is relatively small. We have employed one tributary as a model, the River Trubia. Although some problems of agriculture and industrial pollution have been detected downstream, an upstream habitat evaluation suggests that adequate spawning and juvenile habitat exists. The regional Government has proposed to construct fishways for allowing upstream passage of salmon. This would potentially increase salmon production, but there are also some concerns like increased hybridization of salmon and trout which is already evident downriver and which previous work suggests will increase as salmon colonize new habitat, and potential changes in fishing regulations as salmon distributions shift upriver and away from traditional angling areas. Here, we present an overview of ecological and social aspects of salmon habitat restoration in the River Nalon-Narcea that we hope will provide solutions that balance costs and benefits and may be applicable to other anadromous populations.

  17. Variation in heart rate during submaximal exercise: implications for monitoring training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Robert P; Lemmink, Koen A P M; Durandt, Justin J; Lambert, Michael I

    2004-08-01

    A change in heart rate at a controlled submaximal exercise intensity is used as a marker of training status. However, the standard error of measurement has not been studied systematically, and therefore a change in heart rate, which can be considered relevant, has not been determined. Forty-four subjects (26.5 +/- 5.4 years; mean +/- standard deviation) participated in a submaximal running test at the same time of day for 5 consecutive days. Heart rates were determined during each of the 4 exercise intensities (2 minutes each) of increasing intensity and during the 1-minute recovery period after each stage. The repeatability of the heart rate on a day-to-day basis during the stages and recovery periods were high (intraclass correlation coefficient: 95% confidence interval R = 0.94- 0.99). The lowest variation in heart rate occurred in the fourth stage ( approximately 90% maximum heart rate) with heart rate varying 5 +/- 2 b.min(-1) (95% confidence interval for coefficient of variation = 1.1-1.4%). In conclusion, the standard error of measurement of submaximal heart rate is 1.1-1.4%. This magnitude of measurement error needs to be considered when heart rate is used as a marker of training status.

  18. Economy of running: beyond the measurement of oxygen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jared R; Esau, Shane P; Macintosh, Brian R

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare running economy across three submaximal speeds expressed as both oxygen cost (mlxkg(-1)xkm(-1)) and the energy required to cover a given distance (kcalxkg(-1)xkm(-1)) in a group of trained male distance runners. It was hypothesized that expressing running economy in terms of caloric unit cost would be more sensitive to changes in speed than oxygen cost by accounting for differences associated with substrate utilization. Sixteen highly trained male distance runners [maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) 66.5 +/- 5.6 mlxkg(-1)xmin(-1), body mass 67.9 +/- 7.3 kg, height 177.6 +/- 7.0 cm, age 24.6 +/- 5.0 yr] ran on a motorized treadmill for 5 min with a gradient of 0% at speeds corresponding to 75%, 85%, and 95% of speed at lactate threshold with 5-min rest between stages. Oxygen uptake was measured via open-circuit calorimetry. Average oxygen cost was 221 +/- 19, 217 +/- 15, and 221 +/- 13 mlxkg(-1)xkm(-1), respectively. Caloric unit cost was 1.05 +/- 0.09, 1.07 +/- 0.08, and 1.11 +/- 0.07 kcalxkg(-1)xkm(-1) at the three trial speeds, respectively. There was no difference in oxygen cost with respect to speed (P = 0.657); however, caloric unit cost significantly increased with speed (P < 0.001). It was concluded that expression of running economy in terms of caloric unit cost is more sensitive to changes in speed and is a more valuable expression of running economy than oxygen uptake, even when normalized per distance traveled.

  19. Validated Predictions of Metabolic Energy Consumption for Submaximal Effort Movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A Tsianos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical performance emerges from complex interactions among many physiological systems that are largely driven by the metabolic energy demanded. Quantifying metabolic demand is an essential step for revealing the many mechanisms of physical performance decrement, but accurate predictive models do not exist. The goal of this study was to investigate if a recently developed model of muscle energetics and force could be extended to reproduce the kinematics, kinetics, and metabolic demand of submaximal effort movement. Upright dynamic knee extension against various levels of ergometer load was simulated. Task energetics were estimated by combining the model of muscle contraction with validated models of lower limb musculotendon paths and segment dynamics. A genetic algorithm was used to compute the muscle excitations that reproduced the movement with the lowest energetic cost, which was determined to be an appropriate criterion for this task. Model predictions of oxygen uptake rate (VO2 were well within experimental variability for the range over which the model parameters were confidently known. The model's accurate estimates of metabolic demand make it useful for assessing the likelihood and severity of physical performance decrement for a given task as well as investigating underlying physiologic mechanisms.

  20. The effect of estimation and production procedures on running economy in recreational athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, James A; Woolley, Brandon P; Lambrick, Danielle M

    2012-11-01

    Running economy is an important component in any endurance event. However, the influence of effort perception on running economy has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to assess the oxygen cost of running (running economy) at identical ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) during estimation (EST) and production (PR) procedures, during treadmill exercise. Fourteen, well-trained male participants actively produced (self-regulated) a range of submaximal exercise intensities equating to RPE values 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17, and passively estimated their perception of exertion during an incremental graded-exercise test (GXT). Allometric scaling was used to ensure an appropriate comparison in running economy between conditions. The present study demonstrated that the overall running economy between conditions was statistically similar (p>0.05). A significant interaction was however identified between Conditions and RPE (peconomy significantly improved during PR but remained fairly consistent during EST between moderate and high perceptions of exertion (RPE 11-17). Despite similarities in running economy between conditions, physiological (oxygen uptake, heart rate, minute ventilation and blood lactate) and physical (running velocity) markers of exercise intensity were significantly higher during EST for equivalent perceptions of exertion (all peconomy and enhance athletic performance when compared to identical perceptions of exertion elicited during active production procedures. Athletes, coaches and physical trainers should consider the perceptual procedures utilised during training to ensure that an athlete trains at the most effective training intensity. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. No influence of ischemic preconditioning on running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gungeet; Binger, Megan; Evans, Claire; Trachte, Tiffany; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2017-02-01

    Many of the potential performance-enhancing properties of ischemic preconditioning suggest that the oxygen cost for a given endurance exercise workload will be reduced, thereby improving the economy of locomotion. The aim of this study was to identify whether ischemic preconditioning improves exercise economy in recreational runners. A randomized sham-controlled crossover study was employed in which 18 adults (age 27 ± 7 years; BMI 24.6 ± 3 kg/m2) completed two, incremental submaximal (65-85% VO2max) treadmill running protocols (3 × 5 min stages from 7.2-14.5 km/h) coupled with indirect calorimetry to assess running economy following ischemic preconditioning (3 × 5 min bilateral upper thigh ischemia) and sham control. Running economy was expressed as mlO2/kg/km and as the energy in kilocalories required to cover 1 km of horizontal distance (kcal/kg/km). Ischemic preconditioning did not influence steady-state heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, energy expenditure, and blood lactate. Likewise, running economy was similar (P = 0.647) between the sham (from 201.6 ± 17.7 to 204.0 ± 16.1 mlO2/kg/km) and ischemic preconditioning trials (from 202.8 ± 16.2 to 203.1 ± 15.6 mlO2/kg/km). There was no influence (P = 0.21) of ischemic preconditioning on running economy expressed as the caloric unit cost (from 0.96 ± 0.12 to 1.01 ± 0.11 kcal/kg/km) compared with sham (from 1.00 ± 0.10 to 1.00 ± 0.08 kcal/kg/km). The properties of ischemic preconditioning thought to affect exercise performance at vigorous to severe exercise intensities, which generate more extensive physiological challenge, are ineffective at submaximal workloads and, therefore, do not change running economy.

  2. The influence of a new sole geometry while running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepfli-Lenzin, Claudia; Waech, Jennifer Carole; Gülay, Turgut; Schellenberg, Florian; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Running shoe construction influences the forces experienced by the human body while running. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the new sole architecture of the On running shoe reduces ground reaction forces compared with running barefoot or with a conventional running shoe and whether it changes the physiological parameters of running in shoes. Thirty-seven trained male participants were studied while running at submaximal speeds wearing their conventional running shoe, wearing the On running shoe and while barefoot. Additional biomechanical and physiological values were investigated to determine whether the On running shoe induced any changes in these parameters compared with conventional running shoes. The On exhibited similar ground reaction forces as conventional shoes, and these were different from the forces experienced while running barefoot, showing that the On was more similar to typical shoed running. No difference was observed in running economy between the On and a conventional shoe model. However, a slightly lower heart rate (HR) (≈1.3%) and blood lactate concentration (≈5.5%) were observed during submaximal running with the On running shoe compared with a conventional running shoe, as well as a greater lateral deviation of the centre of pressure mid-stance. The ramifications of the reduced HR and blood lactate concentration for competitive performance are unknown. PMID:24977468

  3. The interval shuttle run test for intermittent sport players : evaluation of reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Visscher, C.; Lambert, M.I.; Lamberts, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of the interval shuttle run test (ISRT) as a submaximal and maximal field test to measure intermittent endurance capacity was examined. During the ISRT, participants alternately run for 30 seconds and walk for 15 seconds. The running speed is increased from 10 km.h(-1) every 90

  4. F-door spaces and F-submaximal spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobna Dridi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Submaximal spaces and door spaces play an enigmatic role in topology. In this paper, reinforcing this role, we are concerned with reaching two main goals: The first one is to characterize topological spaces X such that F(X is a submaximal space (resp., door space for some covariant functor Ff rom the category Top to itself. T0, and FH functors are completely studied. Secondly, our interest is directed towards the characterization of maps f given by a flow (X, f in the category Set, such that (X,P(f is submaximal (resp., door where P(f is a topology on X whose closed sets are exactly the f-invariant sets.

  5. Running Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dieting OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away Print A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  6. The effects of wheel running, a light/dark cycle, and the instrumental cost of food on the intake of food in a closed economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, R A

    1992-12-01

    The effects of wheel running on the food intake of rats, and on the extent to which rats defend their daily food intake against increases in the instrumental cost of food, were studied in a closed economy. Rats lived in cages that were attached to running wheels. Within each cage, water was freely available and lever pressing was required for access to food; a fixed number of presses was required for the delivery of a single food pellet. All cages were located in an environmental chamber where a 12-h light/dark cycle was continuously maintained. During stage I, the entrance to each running wheel was blocked and two series (series 1 and 2) of progressively increasing fixed ratios (FRs) of presses per pellet were imposed. Each FR was used for a single day. During stage II, the entrance to each wheel was unblocked and wheel running and food intake were allowed to stabilize. During stage III, the running wheels remained available and the FR was again increased (series 3). In stage I, increases in the FR reduced food intake proportionally more rapidly during the light than during the dark, and this reduction in the light was greater during series 1 than series 2. During stage II, food intake was transiently reduced during the first week of access to running wheels, but recovered by the end of the second week. During stage III, increases in the FR again reduced food intake proportionally more rapidly during the light than during the dark. Wheel running did not affect the extent to which food intake was reduced within light and dark periods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 12. Preliminary Process Design and Cost Estimate and Production Run Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Sulfolane Process licensed by Universal Oil Products. Referring to Drawings D5571-701A and B the flow is as follows: Stabilized Naphtha from the Naphtha...DTIC FILE COPY AD-A218 507 AFWAL-TR-87-2042 Volume XII PRODUCTION OF JET FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED LIQUIDS VOL XII--PRELIMINARY PROCESS DESIGN AND COST...XII--Preliminary Process Design and Cost Estimate and Production Run Recommendation 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. W. Furlong, J. D. Fox, J. G. Masin 13a

  8. Recruitment of single muscle fibers during submaximal cycling exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, T.M.; Degens, H.; van Mechelen, W.; Sargeant, A.J.; de Haan, A.

    2007-01-01

    In literature, an inconsistency exists in the submaximal exercise intensity at which type II fibers are activated. In the present study, the recruitment of type I and II fibers was investigated from the very beginning and throughout a 45-min cycle exercise at 75% of the maximal oxygen uptake, which

  9. Differential contributions of ankle plantarflexors during submaximal isometric muscle action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of superficial and deep ankle plantarflexors during repetitive submaximal isometric contractions using surface electromyography (SEMG) and positron emission tomography (PET). Myoelectric signals were obtained from twelve....... The findings of this study provide valuable reference for studies where individual muscle contributions are estimated using models and simulations....

  10. Myocardial oxygen consumption at rest and during submaximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    2008-11-26

    Nov 26, 2008 ... Department of Physiology, JSS Medical College, Constituent College of JSS University, Mysore – 570015, ... determine the effect of increased adiposity on myocardial oxygen consumption at rest and during submaximal exercise in ... during exercise suggesting higher hemodynamic stress to the heart.

  11. An Investigation into Submaximal Endurance in Children with Motor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the submaximal endurance levels of children with motor difficulties, using the six-minute walk test (6MWT). A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted. Forty-eight children between ages seven and ten years were enrolled. They came from similar socio-economic backgrounds and attended ...

  12. Myocardial oxygen consumption at rest and during submaximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of increased adiposity on myocardial oxygen consumption at rest and during submaximal exercise in young adults. The study consisted of 85 young adults (18-22years) grouped into 3 based on ...

  13. Influence of menstrual phase on ventilatory response to submaximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine whether an increase in respiratory drive, due to elevated progesterone and oestrogen concentration during various menstrual phases, persists throughout prolonged submaximal exercise and potentially contributes to fatigue. Furthermore, to determine whether the difference in the ventilatory ...

  14. Myocardial oxygen consumption at rest and during submaximal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    2008-11-26

    Nov 26, 2008 ... and myocardial fatty acid utilization has been showed to decrease after weight loss from gastric bypass surgery or diet in obese persons (Fei ho et al., 1995,). During submaximal exercise and immediately after exercise, all three groups showed an increase in. RPP. The percentage increase in RPP was.

  15. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah T. Ridge, Tyler Standifird, Jessica Rivera, A. Wayne Johnson, Ulrike Mitchell, Iain Hunter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group, while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group. All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15% was significant (p = 0.015. Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures.

  16. Analyzing the Effects of the Iranian Energy Subsidy Reform Plan on Short- Run Marginal Generation Cost of Electricity Using Extended Input-Output Price Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Salimian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsidizing energy in Iran has imposed high costs on country's economy. Thus revising energy prices, on the basis of a subsidy reform plan, is a vital remedy to boost up the economy. While the direct consequence of cutting subsidies on electricity generation costs can be determined in a simple way, identifying indirect effects, which reflect higher costs for input factors such as labor, is a challenging problem. In this paper, variables such as compensation of employees and private consumption are endogenized by using extended Input-Output (I-O price model to evaluate direct and indirect effects of electricity and fuel prices increase on economic subsectors. The determination of the short-run marginal generation cost of electricity using I-O technique with taken into account the Iranian targeted subsidy plan's influences is the main goal of this paper. Marginal cost of electricity, in various scenarios of price adjustment of energy, is estimated for three conventional categories of thermal power plants. Our results show that the raising the price of energy leads to an increase in the electricity production costs. Accordingly, the production costs will be higher than 1000 Rials per kWh until 2014 as predicted in the beginning of the reform plan by electricity suppliers.

  17. Institutions, the cost of capital, and long-run economic growth: evidence from the 19th century capital market

    OpenAIRE

    Alquist, Ron; Cha, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Late 19th century investors demanded compensation to invest in countries with poor institutional protection of property rights. Using the monthly stock returns of 1,808 firms located in 43 countries but traded in London between 1866 and 1907, we estimate the country-specific cost of capital. We find a negative relationship between institutions that protect property rights and capital costs. Firms located in countries with weak institutions were charged a premium compared to similarly risky fi...

  18. Strategies to improve running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kyle R; Kilding, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Running economy (RE) represents a complex interplay of physiological and biomechanical factors that is typically defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running and expressed as the submaximal oxygen uptake (VO2) at a given running velocity. This review considered a wide range of acute and chronic interventions that have been investigated with respect to improving economy by augmenting one or more components of the metabolic, cardiorespiratory, biomechanical or neuromuscular systems. Improvements in RE have traditionally been achieved through endurance training. Endurance training in runners leads to a wide range of physiological responses, and it is very likely that these characteristics of running training will influence RE. Training history and training volume have been suggested to be important factors in improving RE, while uphill and level-ground high-intensity interval training represent frequently prescribed forms of training that may elicit further enhancements in economy. More recently, research has demonstrated short-term resistance and plyometric training has resulted in enhanced RE. This improvement in RE has been hypothesized to be a result of enhanced neuromuscular characteristics. Altitude acclimatization results in both central and peripheral adaptations that improve oxygen delivery and utilization, mechanisms that potentially could improve RE. Other strategies, such as stretching should not be discounted as a training modality in order to prevent injuries; however, it appears that there is an optimal degree of flexibility and stiffness required to maximize RE. Several nutritional interventions have also received attention for their effects on reducing oxygen demand during exercise, most notably dietary nitrates and caffeine. It is clear that a range of training and passive interventions may improve RE, and researchers should concentrate their investigative efforts on more fully understanding the types and mechanisms that

  19. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah T.; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A. Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key points Running in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  20. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah T; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key pointsRunning in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  1. Haemodynamic changes induced by submaximal exercise before a dive and its consequences on bubble formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatteau, Jean‐Eric; Boussuges, Alain; Gempp, Emmanuel; Pontier, Jean‐Michel; Castagna, Olivier; Robinet, Claude; Galland, Francois‐Michel; Bourdon, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of a submaximal exercise performed 2 h before a simulated dive on bubble formation and to observe the haemodynamic changes and their influence on bubble formation. Participants and methods 16 trained divers were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 400 kPa for 30 min and decompressed at a rate of 100 kPa/min with a 9 min stop at 130 kPa (French Navy MN90 procedure). Each diver performed two dives 3 days apart, one without exercise and one with exercise before the dive. All participants performed a 40 min constant‐load submaximal and calibrated exercise, which consisted of outdoor running 2 h before the dive. Circulating bubbles were detected with a precordial Doppler at 30, 60 and 90 min after surfacing. Haemodynamic changes were evaluated with Doppler echocardiography. Results A single bout of strenuous exercise 2 h before a simulated dive significantly reduced circulating bubbles. Post‐exercise hypotension (PEH) was observed after exercise with reductions in diastolic and mean blood pressure (DBP and MBP), but total peripheral resistance was unchanged. Stroke volume was reduced, whereas cardiac output was unchanged. Simulated diving caused a similar reduction in cardiac output independent of pre‐dive exercise, suggesting that pre‐dive exercise only changed DBP and MBP caused by reduced stroke volume. Conclusion A single bout of strenuous exercise 2 h before a dive significantly reduced the number of bubbles in the right heart of divers and protected them from decompression sickness. Declining stroke volume and moderate dehydration induced by a pre‐dive exercise might influence inert gas load and bubble formation. PMID:17138641

  2. Effects of a minimalist shoe on running economy and 5-km running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if minimalist shoes improve time trial performance of trained distance runners and if changes in running economy, shoe mass, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were related to any difference in performance. Twenty-six trained runners performed three 6-min sub-maximal treadmill runs at 11, 13 and 15 km·h(-1) in minimalist and conventional shoes while running economy, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were assessed. They then performed a 5-km time trial. In the minimalist shoe, runners completed the trial in less time (effect size 0.20 ± 0.12), were more economical during sub-maximal running (effect size 0.33 ± 0.14) and decreased stride length (effect size 0.22 ± 0.10) and increased stride rate (effect size 0.22 ± 0.11). All but one runner ran with a rearfoot footfall in the minimalist shoe. Improvements in time trial performance were associated with improvements in running economy at 15 km·h(-1) (r = 0.58), with 79% of the improved economy accounted for by reduced shoe mass (P economy and 5-km running performance.

  3. Assessment of feasibility of running RSNA's MIRC on a Raspberry Pi: a cost-effective solution for teaching files in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Andre; Atri, Mostafa; Rogalla, Patrik; Huynh, Thien; O'Malley, Martin E

    2015-11-01

    The value of a teaching case repository in radiology training programs is immense. The allocation of resources for putting one together is a complex issue, given the factors that have to be coordinated: hardware, software, infrastructure, administration, and ethics. Costs may be significant and cost-effective solutions are desirable. We chose Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) to build our teaching file. It is offered by RSNA for free. For the hardware, we chose the Raspberry Pi, developed by the Raspberry Foundation: a small control board developed as a low cost computer for schools also used in alternative projects such as robotics and environmental data collection. Its performance and reliability as a file server were unknown to us. For the operational system, we chose Raspbian, a variant of Debian Linux, along with Apache (web server), MySql (database server) and PHP, which enhance the functionality of the server. A USB hub and an external hard drive completed the setup. Installation of software was smooth. The Raspberry Pi was able to handle very well the task of hosting the teaching file repository for our division. Uptime was logged at 100 %, and loading times were similar to other MIRC sites available online. We setup two servers (one for backup), each costing just below $200.00 including external storage and USB hub. It is feasible to run RSNA's MIRC off a low-cost control board (Raspberry Pi). Performance and reliability are comparable to full-size servers for the intended purpose of hosting a teaching file within an intranet environment.

  4. Optimization of green infrastructure network at semi-urbanized watersheds to manage stormwater volume, peak flow and life cycle cost: Case study of Dead Run watershed in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Haratmeh, B.; Rai, A.; Minsker, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Green Infrastructure (GI) has become widely known as a sustainable solution for stormwater management in urban environments. Despite more recognition and acknowledgment, researchers and practitioners lack clear and explicit guidelines on how GI practices should be implemented in urban settings. This study is developing a noisy-based multi-objective, multi-scaled genetic algorithm that determines optimal GI networks for environmental, economic and social objectives. The methodology accounts for uncertainty in modeling results and is designed to perform at sub-watershed as well as patch scale using two different simulation models, SWMM and RHESSys, in a Cloud-based implementation using a Web interface. As an initial case study, a semi-urbanized watershed— DeadRun 5— in Baltimore County, Maryland, is selected. The objective of the study is to minimize life cycle cost, maximize human preference for human well-being and the difference between pre-development hydrographs generated from current rainfall events and design storms, as well as those that result from proposed GI scenarios. Initial results for DeadRun5 watershed suggest that placing GI in the proximity of the watershed outlet optimizes life cycle cost, stormwater volume, and peak flow capture. The framework can easily present outcomes of GI design scenarios to both designers and local stakeholders, and future plans include receiving feedback from users on candidate designs, and interactively updating optimal GI network designs in a crowd-sourced design process. This approach can also be helpful in deriving design guidelines that better meet stakeholder needs.

  5. Different types of compression clothing do not increase sub-maximal and maximal endurance performance in well-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Billy; Haegele, Matthias; Achtzehn, Silvia; Linville, John; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Mester, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Three textiles with increasing compressive surface were compared with non-compressive conventional clothing on physiological and perceptual variables during sub-maximal and maximal running. Fifteen well-trained endurance athletes (mean+/-s: age 27.1+/-4.8 years, VO(2max) 63.7+/-4.9 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)) performed four sub-maximal (approximately 70% VO(2max)) and maximal tests with and without different compression stockings, tights, and whole-body compression suits. Arterial lactate concentration, oxygen saturation and partial pressure, pH, oxygen uptake, and ratings of muscle soreness were recorded before, during, and after all tests. In addition, we assessed time to exhaustion. Sub-maximal (P=0.22) and maximal oxygen uptake (P=0.26), arterial lactate concentration (P=0.16; 0.20), pH (P=0.23; 0.46), oxygen saturation (P=0.13; 0.26), and oxygen partial pressure (P=0.09; 0.20) did not differ between the types of clothing (effect sizes=0.00-0.45). Ratings of perceived exertion (P=0.10; 0.15), muscle soreness (P=0.09; 0.10) and time to exhaustion (P=0.16) were also unaffected by the different clothing (effect sizes=0.28-0.85). This was the first study to evaluate the effect on endurance performance of different types of compression clothing with increasing amounts of compressive surface. Overall, there were no performance benefits when using the compression garments.

  6. A Two-Stage Simulated Annealing Algorithm for the Many-to-Many Milk-Run Routing Problem with Pipeline Inventory Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, logistics systems with multiple suppliers and plants in neighboring regions have been flourishing worldwide. However, high logistics costs remain a problem for such systems due to lack of information sharing and cooperation. This paper proposes an extended mathematical model that minimizes transportation and pipeline inventory costs via the many-to-many Milk-run routing mode. Because the problem is NP hard, a two-stage heuristic algorithm is developed by comprehensively considering its characteristics. More specifically, an initial satisfactory solution is generated in the first stage through a greedy heuristic algorithm to minimize the total number of vehicle service nodes and the best insertion heuristic algorithm to determine each vehicle’s route. Then, a simulated annealing algorithm (SA with limited search scope is used to improve the initial satisfactory solution. Thirty numerical examples are employed to test the proposed algorithms. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm. Further, the superiority of the many-to-many transportation mode over other modes is demonstrated via two case studies.

  7. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  8. Is energy expenditure taken into account in human sub-maximal jumping? - a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanrenterghem, J.; Bobbert, M.F.; Casius, L.J.R.; de Clercq, D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation study that was conducted to investigate whether the stereotyped motion pattern observed in human sub-maximal jumping can be interpreted from the perspective of energy expenditure. Human sub-maximal vertical countermovement jumps were compared to jumps simulated with

  9. A New Submaximal Rowing Test to Predict 2,000-m Rowing Ergometer Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, Ruby T. A.; Brink, Michel S.; Lamberts, Robert P.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    Otter, RTA, Brink, MS, Lamberts, RP, and Lemmink, KAPM. A new submaximal rowing test to predict 2,000-m rowing ergometer performance. J Strength Cond Res 29(9): 2426-2433, 2015-The purpose of this study was to assess predictive value of a new submaximal rowing test (SmRT) on 2,000-m ergometer rowing

  10. Effect of the Canadian Air Force training programme on a submaximal exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappagoda, C T; Linden, R J; Newell, J P

    1979-07-01

    Validation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship as an index of 'cardiorespiratory fitness' requires the demonstration of systematic alterations in this relationship concomitant with interventions designed to alter physical fitness. To fulfil those criteria a longitudinal training/de-training study was undertaken. Previously sedentary adult subjects undertook the Canadian Airforce 5BX-XBX exercise programme. Submaximal exercise tests were performed before and after training, and following several weeks cessation of training. A regression line of submaximal heart rate on submaximal oxygen consumption was calculated from the data of each submaximal exercise test. Alterations in the regression lines were examined for each subject individually by testing statistically for difference in slope and elevation between any pair of lines. Subjects who undertook the training/de-training study demonstrated significant systematic alterations in the elevation of the regression lines concomitant with periods of training and de-training. The reproducibility of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship was examined in two additional groups of subjects. Group A repeated a submaximal test on 3 or 4 successive days; Group B were tested before and after 16 weeks of normal activity. Subjects in Group A demonstrated non significant, random alterations in the regression lines on repeated testing and subjects in Group B demonstrated random, though on occasion significant, alterations in the regression lines. The elevation of the submaximal heart rate/oxygen consumption relationship is therefore a valid index for detecting sequential changes in 'cardiorespiratory fitness' in individual subjects.

  11. Warm-up with a weighted vest improves running performance via leg stiffness and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K R; Hopkins, W G; McGuigan, M R; Kilding, A E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of "strides" with a weighted-vest during a warm-up on endurance performance and its potential neuromuscular and metabolic mediators. A bout of resistance exercise can enhance subsequent high-intensity performance, but little is known about such priming exercise for endurance performance. A crossover with 5-7 days between an experimental and control trial was performed by 11 well-trained distance runners. Each trial was preceded by a warm-up consisting of a 10-min self-paced jog, a 5-min submaximal run to determine running economy, and six 10-s strides with or without a weighted-vest (20% of body mass). After a 10-min recovery period, runners performed a series of jumps to determine leg stiffness and other neuromuscular characteristics, another 5-min submaximal run, and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak running speed. Clinical and non-clinical forms of magnitude-based inference were used to assess outcomes. Correlations and linear regression were used to assess relationships between performance and underlying measures. The weighted-vest condition resulted in a very-large enhancement of peak running speed (2.9%; 90% confidence limits ±0.8%), a moderate increase in leg stiffness (20.4%; ±4.2%) and a large improvement in running economy (6.0%; ±1.6%); there were also small-moderate clear reductions in cardiorespiratory measures. Relationships between change scores showed that changes in leg stiffness could explain all the improvements in performance and economy. Strides with a weighted-vest have a priming effect on leg stiffness and running economy. It is postulated the associated major effect on peak treadmill running speed will translate into enhancement of competitive endurance performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-07-25

    Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors' accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running.

  13. Reliability of oscillometric central blood pressure responses to submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Weijie; Faulkner, James; Lambrick, Danielle; Stoner, Lee

    2016-06-01

    Central blood pressure responses to exercise may provide clinicians with a superior diagnostic and prognostic tool. However, to be of value in a clinical setting these assessments must be simple to conduct and reliable. Using oscillometric pulse wave analysis (PWA), determine the upper limit for between-day reliability of central SBP (cSBP) and central pressure augmentation (AIx) responses to three progressive stages of submaximal exercise in a cohort of young, healthy participants. Fifteen healthy males [25.8 years (SD 5.7), 23.9 kg/m (SD 2.5)] were tested on three different mornings in a fasted state, separated by a maximum of 14 days. Central hemodynamic variables were assessed on the left upper arm. Participants underwent three progressive stages of submaximal cycling at 50 W (low), 100 W (moderate) and 150 W (moderate-hard). During low and moderate-intensity exercise the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) values for cSBP (0.79-0.80) and AIx (0.81-0.85) indicated excellent reliability (ICC > 0.75). For the moderate-hard intensity AIx could not be computed, and the ICC for cSBP was adequate (0.72). Findings from this study suggest that, at least in a young, healthy cohort, oscillometric PWA can be used to reliably assess central blood pressure measurements during exercise, up to a moderate intensity. Although further work is required to verify these findings in clinical cohorts, these measurements may potentially provide clinicians with a practical option for obtaining important hemodynamic information beyond that provided by resting peripheral blood pressure.

  14. Which factors determine the freely chosen cadence during submaximal cycling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruyssen, Fabrice; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2010-03-01

    The present review of cycling science focuses on the identification of criteria that affect the freely chosen cadence (FCC) during submaximal exercise of short and prolonged durations. Cadence selection during submaximal cycling constitutes a potential parameter affecting the endurance performance in subjects of varying aerobic fitness level and experience. The activity constraints such as specificity (e.g. cycle bout of triathlon) and exercise duration may play an important role in the selection of cadence and must be taken into consideration in the task description. The 'holistic' approach of this review is based on a multifactorial analysis considering the cycling constraints, and the physiological and biomechanical factors of cadence selection so as to establish any interrelationships between these factors. During cycle bouts of short duration (<15 min), it has been well argued that experienced cyclists, trained runners and triathletes adopt high cadences (80-100 rpm) systematically above the energetically optimal cadence (EOC) at which the oxygen uptake is minimal (55-65 rpm). The choice of a high cadence has been shown to be dependent upon several factors, such as the aerobic fitness level, the reduction in forces applied to the cranks, the lower extremity net joint moments and minimal neuromuscular fatigue. However, with increasing exercise duration the FCC has been reported to be close to the EOC exclusively in endurance athletes practising a variety of activities, suggesting an impact of training mode on the muscular adaptations and the organisation of the movement pattern. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reliability and Seasonal Changes of Submaximal Variables to Evaluate Professional Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose A; Pernía, Raúl; Villa, José G; Foster, Carl

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of several submaximal variables that can be easily obtained by monitoring cyclists' performances. Eighteen professional cyclists participated in this study. In a first part (n = 15) the test-retest reliability of heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during a progressive maximal test was measured. Derived submaximal variables based on HR, RPE, and power output (PO) responses were analyzed. In a second part (n = 7) the pattern of the submaximal variables according to cyclists' training status was analyzed. Cyclists were assessed 3 times during the season: at the beginning of the season, before the Vuelta a España, and the day after this Grand Tour. Part 1: No significant differences in maximal and submaximal variables between test-retest were found. Excellent ICCs (0.81-0.98) were obtained in all variables. Part 2: The HR and RPE showed a rightward shift from early to peak season. In addition, RPE showed a left shift after the Vuelta a España. Submaximal variables based on RPE had the best relationship with both performance and changes in performance. The present study showed the reliability of different maximal and submaximal variables used to assess cyclists' performances. Submaximal variables based on RPE seem to be the best to monitor changes in training status over a season.

  16. A Systematic Review of Submaximal Cycle Tests to Predict, Monitor, and Optimize Cycling Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capostagno, Benoit; Lambert, Michael I; Lamberts, Robert P

    2016-09-01

    Finding the optimal balance between high training loads and recovery is a constant challenge for cyclists and their coaches. Monitoring improvements in performance and levels of fatigue is recommended to correctly adjust training to ensure optimal adaptation. However, many performance tests require a maximal or exhaustive effort, which reduces their real-world application. The purpose of this review was to investigate the development and use of submaximal cycling tests that can be used to predict and monitor cycling performance and training status. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, and 3 separate submaximal cycling tests were identified from within those 12. Submaximal variables including gross mechanical efficiency, oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate, lactate, predicted time to exhaustion (pTE), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), power output, and heart-rate recovery (HRR) were the components of the 3 tests. pTE, submaximal power output, RPE, and HRR appear to have the most value for monitoring improvements in performance and indicate a state of fatigue. This literature review shows that several submaximal cycle tests have been developed over the last decade with the aim to predict, monitor, and optimize cycling performance. To be able to conduct a submaximal test on a regular basis, the test needs to be short in duration and as noninvasive as possible. In addition, a test should capture multiple variables and use multivariate analyses to interpret the submaximal outcomes correctly and alter training prescription if needed.

  17. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  18. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  19. Acclimatization improves submaximal exercise economy at 5533 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latshang, T D; Turk, A J; Hess, T; Schoch, O D; Bosch, M M; Barthelmes, D; Merz, T M; Hefti, U; Hefti, J Pichler; Maggiorini, M; Bloch, K E

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether the better subjective exercise tolerance perceived by mountaineers after altitude acclimatization relates to enhanced exercise economy. Thirty-two mountaineers performed progressive bicycle exercise to exhaustion at 490 m and twice at 5533 m (days 6-7 and day 11), respectively, during an expedition to Mt. Muztagh Ata. Maximal work rate (W(max)) decreased from mean ± SD 356 ± 73 watts at 490 m to 191 ± 49 watts and 193 ± 45 watts at 5533 m, days 6-7 and day 11, respectively; corresponding maximal oxygen uptakes (VO2max ) were 50.7 ± 9.5, 26.3 ± 5.6, 24.7 ± 7.0 mL/min/kg (P = 0.0001 5533 m vs 490 m). On days 6-7 (5533 m), VO(2) at 75% W(max) (152 ± 37 watts) was 1.75 ± 0.45 L/min, oxygen saturation 68 ± 8%. On day 11 (5533 m), at the same submaximal work rate, VO(2) was lower (1.61 ± 0.47 L/min, P scale 50 ± 15 vs 57 ± 20, P = 0.006) and reduced symptoms of acute mountain sickness. We conclude that the better performance and subjective exercise tolerance after acclimatization were related to regression of acute mountain sickness and improved submaximal exercise economy because of lower metabolic demands for non-external work-performing functions. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cardiovascular responses during a submaximal exercise test in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Arlène D; Groothuis, Jan T; van Nimwegen, Marlies; van der Scheer, Ellis S; Borm, George F; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Hopman, Maria T E; Munneke, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are physically less active than controls, and autonomic dysfunction may contribute to this sedentary lifestyle. Specifically, an altered cardiovascular response to physical effort may restrict physical activities. To assess the cardiovascular responses to a submaximal exercise test in PD patients and controls, 546 sedentary PD patients and 29 sedentary healthy controls performed the Åstrand-Rhyming submaximal cycle exercise test. Average heart rate was used to estimate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Variables that may affect submaximal activity in PD patients, including disease severity, fatigue, and level of physical activity in daily life, were recorded. Fewer PD patients (46%) completed the submaximal exercise test successfully than the controls (86%). The estimated VO2max of patients with a successful test was 34% lower than the controls (p physical activities further.

  1. Kinesiological Analysis of Stationary Running Performed in Aquatic and Dry Land Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Alberton Cristine

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG signals of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus lateralis (VL, semitendinosus (ST and short head of the biceps femoris (BF during the performance of stationary running at different intensities in aquatic and dry land environments. The sample consisted of 12 female volunteers who performed the stationary running exercise in aquatic and dry land environments at a submaximal cadence (80 beats·min-1 controlled by a metronome and at maximal velocity, with EMG signal measurements from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles. The results showed a distinct pattern between environments for each muscle examined. For the submaximal cadence of 80 beats·min-1, there was a reduced magnitude of the EMG signal in the aquatic environment, except for the ST muscle, the pattern of which was similar in both environments. In contrast to the submaximal cadence, the pattern of the EMG signal from all of the muscles showed similar magnitudes for both environments and phases of movement at maximal velocity, except for the VL muscle. Therefore, the EMG signals from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles of women during stationary running had different patterns of activation over the range of motion between aquatic and dry land environments for different intensities. Moreover, the neuromuscular responses of the lower limbs were optimized by an increase in intensity from submaximal cadence to maximal velocity.

  2. Effects of music tempo upon submaximal cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, J; Hudson, P; Edwards, B

    2010-08-01

    In an in vivo laboratory controlled study, 12 healthy male students cycled at self-chosen work-rates while listening to a program of six popular music tracks of different tempi. The program lasted about 25 min and was performed on three occasions--unknown to the participants, its tempo was normal, increased by 10% or decreased by 10%. Work done, distance covered and cadence were measured at the end of each track, as were heart rate and subjective measures of exertion, thermal comfort and how much the music was liked. Speeding up the music program increased distance covered/unit time, power and pedal cadence by 2.1%, 3.5% and 0.7%, respectively; slowing the program produced falls of 3.8%, 9.8% and 5.9%. Average heart rate changes were +0.1% (faster program) and -2.2% (slower program). Perceived exertion and how much the music was liked increased (faster program) by 2.4% and 1.3%, respectively, and decreased (slower program) by 3.6% and 35.4%. That is, healthy individuals performing submaximal exercise not only worked harder with faster music but also chose to do so and enjoyed the music more when it was played at a faster tempo. Implications of these findings for improving training regimens are discussed.

  3. Neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle during isometric maximal, submaximal and submaximal fatiguing voluntary contractions in knee osteoarthrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Mau-Moeller

    and neuromuscular activation, but also with an impaired position and torque control at submaximal torque levels, an altered EMG-torque relationship and a higher performance fatigability of the quadriceps muscle. It is recommended that the rehabilitation includes strengthening and fatiguing exercises at maximal and submaximal force levels.

  4. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  5. Running Club

    CERN Document Server

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  6. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  7. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  8. Actual Versus Predicted Cardiovascular Demands in Submaximal Cycle Ergometer Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Amanda M; Mullenbach, Megan J; Fountaine, Charles J

    The Astrand-Rhyming cycle ergometer test (ARCET) is a commonly administered submaximal test for estimating aerobic capacity. Whereas typically utilized in clinical populations, the validity of the ARCET to predict VO 2max in a non-clinical population, especially female, is less clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ARCET in a sample of healthy and physically active college students. Subjects (13 females, 10 males) performed a maximal cycle ergometer test to volitional exhaustion to determine VO 2max . At least 48 hours later, subjects performed the ARCET protocol. Predicted VO 2max was calculated following the ARCET format using the age corrected factor. There was no significant difference (p=.045) between actual (41.0±7.97 ml/kg/min) and predicted VO 2max (40.3±7.58 ml/kg/min). When split for gender there was a significant difference between actual and predicted VO 2 for males, (45.1±7.74 vs. 42.7±8.26 ml/kg/min, p=0.029) but no significant difference observed for females, (37.9±6.9 vs. 38.5±6.77 ml/kg/min, p=0.675). The correlation between actual and predicted VO 2 was r=0.84, phealthy college population of both male and female subjects. Implications of this study suggest the ARCET can be used to assess aerobic capacity in both fitness and clinical settings where measurement via open-circuit spirometry is either unavailable or impractical.

  9. Interaction effects of time of day and sub-maximal treadmill exercise on the main determinants of blood fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Bassami, Minoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of time of day on responses of the main determinants of blood rheology to acute endurance exercise. Ten healthy male subjects (age, 26.9 +/- 5.5 yr) performed two bouts of running at 65% of VO2peak for 45 min on a motorised treadmill in the morning (08:00 h) and evening (20:00 h), which were followed by 30 min recovery. The two exercise trials were performed in two separate days with 7 days intervening. Haemorheological variables were measured before, immediately after exercise and after recovery. Haematocrit, haemoglobin and RBC count were increased significantly (p evening trials and normalised following recovery, irrespective of time of day. Plasma viscosity increased significantly (F2,18 = 12.4, p exercise in both trials and returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Baseline values (p exercise were significantly affected by time of day. Neither a significant main effect of exercise nor a significant (p > 0.05) time-of-day effect was found for plasma proteins. It was concluded that sub-maximal running at 08:00 or 20:00 h does not induce different responses in the main determinant of blood rheology.

  10. Assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness using submaximal protocol in older adults with mood disorder and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Alves de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence has shown benefits for mental health through aerobic training oriented in percentage of VO2max, indicating the importance of this variable for clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To validate a method for estimating VO2max using a submaximal protocol in elderly patients with clinically diagnosis as major depressive disorder (MDD and Parkinson's disease (PD. METHODS: The sample comprised 18 patients (64.22 ± 9.92 years with MDD (n = 7 and with PD (n = 11. Three evaluations were performed: I disease staging, II direct measurement of VO2max and III submaximal exercise test. Linear regression was performed to verify the accuracy of estimation in VO2max established in ergospirometry and the predicted VO2max from the submaximal test measurement. We also analyzed the correlation between the Bland-Altman procedures. RESULTS: The regression analysis showed that VO2max values estimated by submaximal protocol associated with the VO2max measured, both in absolute values (R² = 0.65; SEE = 0.26; p < 0.001 and the relative (R² = 0.56; SEE = 3.70; p < 0.001. The Bland-Altman plots for analysis of agreement of showed a good correlation between the two measures. DISCUSSION: The VO2max predicted by submaximal protocol demonstrated satisfactory criterion validity and simple execution compared to ergospirometry.

  11. Running Club

    CERN Document Server

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  12. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  13. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  14. Kenyan dominance in distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Henrik B

    2003-09-01

    Critical physiological factors for performance in running are maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), fractional VO(2max) utilization and running economy. While Kenyan and Caucasian elite runners are able to reach very high, but similar maximal oxygen uptake levels, the VO(2max) of black South African elite runners seems to be slightly lower. Moreover, the studies of black and white South African runners indicate that the former are able to sustain the highest fraction of VO(2max) during long distance running. Results on adolescent Kenyan and Caucasian boys show that these boys are running at a similar percentage of VO(2max) during competition. Kenyan elite runners, however, appear to be able to run at a high % of VO(2max) which must then have been achieved by training. A lower energy cost of running has been demonstrated in Kenyan elite runners and in untrained adolescent Kenyan boys compared to their Caucasian counterparts. In agreement with this are the results from studies on black South African elite runners who have shown similar low energy costs during running as the Kenyan elite runners. The good running economy cannot be explained by differences in muscle fibre type as they are the same in Kenyan and Caucasian runners. The same is true when comparing untrained adolescent Kenyan boys with their Caucasian counterparts. A difference exists in BMI and body shape, and the Kenyans long, slender legs could be advantageous when running as the energy cost when running is a function of leg mass. Studies comparing the response to training of Kenyans and Caucasians have shown similar trainability with respect to VO(2max), running economy and oxidative enzymes. Taken all these data together it appears that running at a high fractional VO(2max) and having a good running economy may be the primary factors favouring the good performance of endurance athletes rather than them having a higher VO(2max) than other elite runners. In addition to having the proper genes to shape

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF OBESITY AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND OXIDATIVE RESPONSES TO SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, N.; Kim, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological responses and markers of oxidative stress to submaximal exercise in obese and lean people. Sixteen healthy males were divided into an obese group (n=8, %fat: 27.00±3.00%) and a lean group (n=8, %fat: 13.85±2.45%). Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C) and a cold (4±1°C) environment. Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum lev...

  16. The interval shuttle run test for intermittent sport players: evaluation of reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmink, Koen A P M; Visscher, Chris; Lambert, Michael I; Lamberts, Robert P

    2004-11-01

    The reliability of the interval shuttle run test (ISRT) as a submaximal and maximal field test to measure intermittent endurance capacity was examined. During the ISRT, participants alternately run for 30 seconds and walk for 15 seconds. The running speed is increased from 10 km.h(-1) every 90 seconds until exhaustion. Within a 2-week period, 17 intermittent sport players (i.e., 10 men and 7 women) performed the ISRT twice in a sports hall under well-standardized conditions. Heart rates per speed and total number of runs were assessed as submaximal and maximal performance measures. With the exception of the heart rates at 10.0 km.h(-1) for men and 10.0, 12.0, and 13.5 km.h(-1) for women, zero lay within the 95% confidence interval of the mean differences, indicating that no bias existed between the outcome measures at the 2 test sessions (absolute reliability). The results illustrate that it is important to control for heart rate before the start of the ISRT. Relative reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient > or = 0.86). We conclude that the reliability of the ISRT as a submaximal and maximal field test for intermittent sport players is supported by the results.

  17. Submaximal arm crank ergometry : Effects of crank axis positioning on mechanical efficiency, physiological strain and perceived discomfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drongelen, S; Maas, J C; Scheel-Sailer, A; Van Der Woude, L H V

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of the spatial orientation of the crank axis on mechanical efficiency, physiological strain and perceived discomfort in submaximal synchronous arm crank ergometry. METHODS: Twelve able-bodied individuals performed 12 submaximal exercise bouts of 3 minutes (women: 20

  18. Changes in tendon stiffness and running economy in highly trained distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jared R; Esau, Shane P; MacIntosh, Brian R

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in triceps-surae tendon stiffness (TST K) could affect running economy (RE) in highly trained distance runners. The intent was to induce increased TST K in a subgroup of runners by an added isometric training program. If TST K is a primary determinant of RE, then the energy cost of running (EC) should decrease in the trained subjects. EC was measured via open-circuit spirometry in 12 highly trained male distance runners, and TST K was measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry. Runners were randomly assigned to either a training or control group. The training group performed 4 × 20 s isometric contractions at 80% of maximum voluntary plantarflexion moment three times per week for 8 weeks. All subjects (V(O)₂(max)) = 67.4 ± 4.6 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) continued their usual training for running. TST K was measured every 2 weeks. EC was measured in both training and control groups before and after the 8 weeks at three submaximal velocities, corresponding to 75, 85 and 95% of the speed at lactate threshold (sLT). Isometric training did neither result in a mean increase in TST K (0.9 ± 25.8%) nor a mean improvement in RE (0.1 ± 3.6%); however, there was a significant relationship (r(2) = 0.43, p = 0.02) between the change in TST K and change in EC, regardless of the assigned group. It was concluded that TST K and EC are somewhat labile and change together.

  19. Intensity-dependent EMG response for the biceps brachii during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joshua C; Beck, Travis W; Ye, Xin; Wages, Nathan P

    2016-09-01

    There have been recent attempts to characterize the mechanisms associated with fatigue-induced task failure. We compared the time to failure and the corresponding changes in the surface electromyogram (EMG) during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric force tasks. EMG activity was measured from the biceps brachii of 18 male participants as they sustained either a maximal or submaximal (60 % MVC) isometric contraction of the dominant elbow flexors until force could not be maintained above 55 % MVC. Intensity-dependent patterns of change were observed for EMG amplitude and mean power frequency (MNF) between the two force tasks. Interestingly, the only significant predictor of failure time was the rate of change in EMG MNF during the submaximal task (r (2) = 0.304). In addition, EMG amplitude at submaximal failure was significantly lower (p EMG response emphasize the basis of neuromuscular fatigue and task dependency. Additionally, our data suggest that the EMG MNF should be used when monitoring the progression of local muscle fatigue.

  20. Variation in heart rate during submaximal exercise: Implications for monitoring training : Implications for monitoring training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R.P.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Durandt, J.J.; Lambert, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A change in heart rate at a controlled submaximal exercise intensity is used as a marker of training status. However, the standard error of measurement has not been studied systematically, and therefore a change in heart rate, which can be considered relevant, has not been determined. Forty-four

  1. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  2. Calibration of EMG to force for knee muscles is applicable with submaximal voluntary contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Joosten, A.; Harlaar, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the influence of using submaximal isokinetic contractions about the knee compared to maximal voluntary contractions as input to obtain the calibration of an EMG-force model for knee muscles is investigated. Methods: Isokinetic knee flexion and extension contractions were

  3. Is an elevated submaximal heart rate associated with psychomotor slowness in young elite soccer players?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Michel S.; Visscher, Chris; Schmikli, Sandor L.; Nederhof, E.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find early markers for overreaching that are applicable in sport practice. In a group of elite soccer players aged 1518, the stressrecovery balance and reaction times before and after exercise were assessed. Overreaching was indicated by an elevated submaximal

  4. Systolic blood pressure reactivity during submaximal exercise and acute psychological stress in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Studies in youth show an association between systolic blood-pressure (SBP) reactivity to acute psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). However, it has not yet been determined whether SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise is also associated with CIMT i...

  5. Variation in the aerobic demand of running among trained and untrained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D W; Bransford, D R; Costill, D L; Daniels, J T; Howley, E T; Krahenbuhl, G S

    1995-03-01

    Variation in the aerobic demand (VO2) of submaximal running was quantified among trained and untrained subjects stratified by performance capability. Based on a retrospective analysis of seven published studies, maximal aerobic power (VO2max), and submaximal VO2 values were analyzed in three groups of trained distance runners (Category 1 (C1) (elite runners; N = 22), Category 2 (C2) (sub-elite runners; N = 41), and Category 3 (C3) (good runners; N = 16), and one group (N = 10) of untrained subjects (Category 4; C4). Results indicated that VO2max differed significantly (P C2 > C3 > C4. Analysis of submaximal VO2 data also revealed that C4 was more uneconomical than C1, C2, and C3 and that C2 and C3 were less economical than C1. Average within-group variability in submaximal VO2 was similar across categories and a marked overlap of minimum, mean and maximal economy values existed across categories. These data suggest that 1) trained subjects are more economical than untrained subjects, 2) elite runners display better economy compared to less-talented counterparts, and 3) economical and uneconomical runners can be found in all performance categories.

  6. The Effect of Lower-Body Positive Pressure on the Cardiorespiratory Response at Rest and during Submaximal Running Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Stucky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-gravity treadmills facilitate locomotion by lower-body positive pressure (LBPP. Effects on cardiorespiratory regulation are unknown. Healthy men (30 ± 8 y, 178.3 ± 5.7 cm, 70.3 ± 8.0 kg; mean ± SD stood upright (n = 10 or ran (n = 9 at 9, 11, 13, and 15 km.h−1 (5 min stages with LBPP (0, 15, 40 mmHg. Cardiac output (CO, stroke volume (SV, heart rate (HR, blood pressure (BP, peripheral resistance (PR, and oxygen uptake (VO2 were monitored continuously. During standing, LBPP increased SV [by +29 ± 13 (+41% and +42 ± 15 (+60% ml, at 15 and 40 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.05] and decreased HR [by −15 ± 6 (−20% and −22 ± 9 (−29% bpm (p < 0.05] resulting in a transitory increase in CO [by +1.6 ± 1.0 (+32% and +2.0 ± 1.0 (+39% l.min−1 (p < 0.05] within the first seconds of LBPP. This was accompanied by a transitory decrease in end-tidal PO2 [by −5 ± 3 (−5% and −10 ± 4 (−10% mmHg (p < 0.05] and increase in VO2 [by +66 ± 53 (+26% and +116 ± 64 (+46% ml.min−1 (p < 0.05], suggesting increased venous return and pulmonary blood flow. The application of LBPP increased baroreflex sensitivity (BRS [by +1.8 ± 1.6 (+18% and +4.6 ± 3.7 (+47% at 15 and 40 mmHg LBPP, respectively P < 0.05]. After reaching steady-state exercise CO vs. VO2 relationships remained linear with similar slope and intercept for each participant (mean R2 = 0.84 ± 0.13 while MAP remained unchanged. It follows that (1 LBPP affects cardiorespiratory integration at the onset of exercise; (2 at a given LBPP, once reaching steady-state exercise, the cardiorespiratory load is reduced proportionally to the lower metabolic demand resulting from the body weight support; (3 the balance between cardiovascular response, oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles and blood pressure regulation is maintained at exercise steady-state; and (4 changes in baroreflex sensitivity may be involved in the regulation of cardiovascular parameters during LBPP.

  7. Effects of Ramadan intermittent fasting on middle-distance running performance in well-trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Bouhlel, Ezzedine; Falola, Jean Marie; Abbiss, Christopher R; Vallier, Jean Marc; Hausswirth, Christophe; Hauswirth, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    To assess whether Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) affects 5000-m running performance and physiological parameters classically associated with middle-distance performance. Two experimental groups (Ramadan fasting, n = 9, vs control, n = 9) participated in 2 experimental sessions, one before RIF and the other at the last week of fasting. For each session, subjects completed 4 tests in the same order: a maximal running test, a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extensor, 2 rectangular submaximal exercises on treadmill for 6 minutes at an intensity corresponding to the first ventilatory threshold (VT1), and a running performance test (5000 m). Eighteen, well-trained, middle-distance runners. Maximal oxygen consumption, MVC, running performance, running efficiency, submaximal VO(2) kinetics parameters (VO(2), VO(2)b, time constant τ, and amplitude A1) and anthropometric parameters were recorded or calculated. At the end of Ramadan fasting, a decrease in MVC was observed (-3.2%; P < 0.00001; η, 0.80), associated with an increase in the time constant of oxygen kinetics (+51%; P < 0.00007; η, 0.72) and a decrease in performance (-5%; P < 0.0007; η, 0.51). No effect was observed on running efficiency or maximal aerobic power. These results suggest that Ramadan changes in muscular performance and oxygen kinetics could affect performance during middle-distance events and need to be considered to choose training protocols during RIF.

  8. Prolonged administration of recombinant human erythropoietin increases submaximal performance more than maximal aerobic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L; Robach, P

    2007-01-01

    The effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment on aerobic power (VO2max) are well documented, but little is known about the effects of rHuEpo on submaximal exercise performance. The present study investigated the effect on performance (ergometer cycling, 20-30 min at 80......HuEpo treatment VO2max increased (PVO2max) was increased by 54.0 and 54.3% (P... week 11), TTE was decreased by 26.8% as compared to pre rHuEpo administration. In conclusion, in healthy non-athlete subjects rHuEpo administration prolongs submaximal exercise performance by about 54% independently of the approximately 12% increase in VO2max....

  9. Racing Skiers and Swimmers’ Heart Electric Field during Ventricular Depolarization at Recovery Period after Moderate and Submaximal Physical Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Strelnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of cardioelectrotopographic investigation of racing skiers and swimmers’ heart electric activity during ventricular depolarization at recovery period after moderate and submaximal physical load. Changes in ventricular depolarization time and ventricular depolarization phases ratio due to longer duration of the first and second cardioelectric potential inversions on the chest surface in racing skiers and less duration of the depolarization initial phase in swimmers were detected after moderate and submaximal load

  10. Iron Status in Chronic Heart Failure: Impact on Symptoms, Functional Class and Submaximal Exercise Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjuanes, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi; Grau, María; Cladellas, Mercé; Gonzalez, Gina; Meroño, Oona; Moliner-Borja, Pedro; Verdú, José M; Farré, Nuria; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency and anemia on submaximal exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure. We undertook a single-center cross-sectional study in a group of stable patients with chronic heart failure. At recruitment, patients provided baseline information and completed a 6-minute walk test to evaluate submaximal exercise capacity and exercise-induced symptoms. At the same time, blood samples were taken for serological evaluation. Iron deficiency was defined as ferritin < 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation < 20% when ferritin is < 800 ng/mL. Additional markers of iron status were also measured. A total of 538 heart failure patients were eligible for inclusion, with an average age of 71 years and 33% were in New York Heart Association class III/IV. The mean distance walked in the test was 285 ± 101 meters among those with impaired iron status, vs 322 ± 113 meters (P=.002). Symptoms during the test were more frequent in iron deficiency patients (35% vs 27%; P=.028) and the most common symptom reported was fatigue. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that increased levels of soluble transferrin receptor indicating abnormal iron status were independently associated with advanced New York Heart Association class (P < .05). Multivariable analysis using generalized additive models, soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index, both biomarkers measuring iron status, showed a significant, independent and linear association with submaximal exercise capacity (P=.03 for both). In contrast, hemoglobin levels were not significantly associated with 6-minute walk test distance in the multivariable analysis. In patients with chronic heart failure, iron deficiency but not anemia was associated with impaired submaximal exercise capacity and symptomatic functional limitation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of inspiratory muscle warm-up on submaximal rowing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Mati; Mäestu, Jarek; Kivastik, Jana; Rämson, Raul; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2015-01-01

    Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters. Ten competitive male rowers aged between 19 and 27 years (age, 23.1 ± 3.8 years; height, 188.1 ± 6.3 cm; body mass, 85.6 ± 6.6 kg) were tested 3 times. During the first visit, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) assessment and the incremental rowing test were performed to measure maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (Pamax). A submaximal intensity (90% Pamax) rowing test was performed twice with the standard rowing warm-up as test 1 and with the standard rowing warm-up and specific inspiratory muscle warm-up as test 2. During the 2 experimental tests, distance, duration, heart rate, breathing frequency, ventilation, peak oxygen consumption, and blood lactate concentration were measured. The only value that showed a significant difference between the test 1 and test 2 was breathing frequency (52.2 ± 6.8 vs. 53.1 ± 6.8, respectively). Heart rate and ventilation showed a tendency to decrease and increase, respectively, after the inspiratory muscle warm-up (p < 0.1). Despite some changes in respiratory parameters, the use of 40% MIP intensity warm-up is not suggested if the mean intensity of the competition is at submaximal level (at approximately 90% maximal oxygen consumption). In conclusion, the warm-up protocol of the respiratory muscles used in this study does not have a significant influence on submaximal endurance performance in highly trained male rowers.

  12. The Influence of Pole Length on Performance, O2 Cost, and Kinematics in Double Poling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, Thomas; Myklebust, Håvard; Skattebo, Øyvind; Stadheim, Hans Kristian; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Hallén, Jostein

    2017-02-01

    In the double-poling (DP) cross-country-skiing technique, propulsive forces are transferred solely through the poles. The aim of the current study was to investigate how pole length influences DP performance, O2 cost, and kinematics during treadmill roller skiing. Nine male competitive cross-country skiers (24 ± 3 y, 180 ± 5 cm, 72 ± 5 kg, VO2max running 76 ± 6 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) completed 2 identical test protocols using self-selected (84% ± 1% of body height) and long poles (self-selected + 7.5 cm; 88% ± 1% of body height) in a counterbalanced fashion. Each test protocol included a 5-min warm-up (2.5 m/s; 2.5°) and three 5-min submaximal sessions (3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 m/s; 2.5°) for assessment of O2 cost, followed by a selfpaced 1000-m time trial (~3 min, >5.0 m/s; 2.5°). Temporal patterns and kinematics were assessed using accelerometers and 2D video. Long poles reduced 1000-m time (mean ± 90% confidence interval; -1.0% ± 0.7%, P = .054) and submaximal O2 cost (-2.7% ± 1.0%, P = .002) compared with self-selected poles. The center-of-mass (CoM) vertical range of displacement tended to be smaller for long than for self-selected poles (23.3 ± 3.0 vs 24.3 ± 3.0 cm, P = .07). Cycle and reposition time did not differ between pole lengths at any speeds tested, whereas poling time tended to be shorter for self-selected than for long poles at the lower speeds (≤3.5 m/s, P ≤ .10) but not at the higher speeds (≥4.0 m/s, P ≥ .23). DP 1000-m time, submaximal O2 cost, and CoM vertical range of displacement were reduced in competitive cross-country skiers using poles 7.5 cm longer than self-selected ones.

  13. Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test As A Procedure To Evaluate Anaerobic Power

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade; V. L.; Zagatto; A. M.; Kalva-Filho; C. A.; Mendes; O. C.; Gobatto; C. A.; Campos; E. Z.; Papoti; M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the running anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a predictor of anaerobic capacity, compare it to the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and to compare the RAST's parameters with the parameters of 30-s all-out tethered running on a treadmill. 39 (17.0+/-1.4 years) soccer players participated in this study. The participants underwent an incremental test, 10 submaximal efforts [50-95% of velocity correspondent to VO2MAX (vVO(2MAX))] and one sup...

  14. Characterization of Symmetry Properties of First Integrals for Submaximal Linearizable Third-Order ODEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Mahomed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between first integrals of submaximal linearizable third-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs and their symmetries is investigated. We obtain the classifying relations between the symmetries and the first integral for submaximal cases of linear third-order ODEs. It is known that the maximum Lie algebra of the first integral is achieved for the simplest equation and is four-dimensional. We show that for the other two classes they are not unique. We also obtain counting theorems of the symmetry properties of the first integrals for these classes of linear third-order ODEs. For the 5 symmetry class of linear third-order ODEs, the first integrals can have 0, 1, 2, and 3 symmetries, and for the 4 symmetry class of linear third-order ODEs, they are 0, 1, and 2 symmetries, respectively. In the case of submaximal linear higher-order ODEs, we show that their full Lie algebras can be generated by the subalgebras of certain basic integrals.

  15. The Usefulness of Submaximal Exercise Gas Exchange in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Case Series

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    Paul R. Woods

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Submaximal exercise gas exchange may be a useful tool to track responses to therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH patients. Methods Three patients diagnosed with idiopathic PAH, on differing therapies, were included. Standard clinical tests (echocardiography; 6 minute walk were performed pre and 3-5 months after treatment. Gas exchange was measured during 3 minutes of step exercise at both time points. Results Gas exchange variables, end tidal CO 2 (P ET CO 2 and the ratio of ventilation to CO 2 production (V E /VCO 2 , during submaximal exercise were able to track patient responses to therapy over a 3-5 month period. Two patients demonstrated positive improvements, with an increased P ET CO 2 and decreased V E /VCO 2 during light exercise, in response to an altered therapeutic regime. The third patient had a worsening of gas exchange (decreased P ET CO 2 and increased V E /VCO 2 following no changes in the medical regime from the baseline visit. Conclusion Gas exchange variables measured during light submaximal exercise, such as P ET CO 2 and V E /VCO 2 , may be able to better detect small changes in functional status following treatment and could, therefore, be a useful tool to track disease severity in PAH patients. Further study is required to determine the clinical usefulness of these gas exchange variables.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF OBESITY AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND OXIDATIVE RESPONSES TO SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE

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    N. Ahn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of obesity and ambient temperature on physiological responses and markers of oxidative stress to submaximal exercise in obese and lean people. Sixteen healthy males were divided into an obese group (n=8, %fat: 27.00±3.00% and a lean group (n=8, %fat: 13.85±2.45%. Study variables were measured during a 60 min submaximal exercise test at 60% VO2max in a neutral (21±1°C and a cold (4±1°C environment. Heart rate, blood lactate, rectal temperature, serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured at rest, during exercise and in recovery. Heart rate of both groups was significantly lower (P<0.05 in the cold than the warm environment, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Serum SOD activity increased to a significantly greater extent (P<0.05 in the cold than the neutral environment, and remained elevated for longer during exercise in the obese group than the lean group. Serum MDA level during submaximal exercise was not significantly different between conditions or groups. Cold stress in exercise may challenge antioxidant defence mechanisms in obese subjects, but lipid peroxidation remains unchanged.

  17. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

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    Cláudio de Oliveira Assumpção

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Running economy (RE, defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days, have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max. However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max. Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE.

  18. Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage and Running Economy in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Cláudio de Oliveira; Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Running economy (RE), defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, has been identified as a critical factor of overall distance running performance. Plyometric and resistance trainings, performed during a relatively short period of time (~15–30 days), have been successfully used to improve RE in trained athletes. However, these exercise types, particularly when they are unaccustomed activities for the individuals, may cause delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, and reduced muscle strength. Some studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced muscle damage has a negative impact on endurance running performance. Specifically, the muscular damage induced by an acute bout of downhill running has been shown to reduce RE during subsequent moderate and high-intensity exercise (>65% VO2max). However, strength exercise (i.e., jumps, isoinertial and isokinetic eccentric exercises) seems to impair RE only for subsequent high-intensity exercise (~90% VO2max). Finally, a single session of resistance exercise or downhill running (i.e., repeated bout effect) attenuates changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and blunts changes in RE. PMID:23431253

  19. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  20. Economic barriers to implementation of innovations in health care: is the long run-short run efficiency discrepancy a paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adang, Eddy M M; Wensing, Michel

    2008-12-01

    Favourable cost-effectiveness of innovative technologies is more and more a necessary condition for implementation in clinical practice. But proven cost-effectiveness itself does not guarantee successful implementation. The reason for this is a potential discrepancy between long run efficiency, on which cost-effectiveness is based, and short run efficiency. Long run and short run efficiency is dependent upon economies of scale. This paper addresses the potential discrepancy between long run and short run efficiency of innovative technologies in healthcare, explores diseconomies of scale in Dutch hospitals and suggests what strategies might help to overcome hurdles to implement innovations due to that discrepancy.

  1. [Comparison of submaximal front crawl and breast stroke swimming in relation to energy expenditure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, K; Katamoto, S

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the energy expenditure during submaximal front crawl (Fr) and breast stroke (Br) swimming. Six male college swimmers performed submaximal and maximal exercise tests in both styles in a swimming flume. In submaximal exercise tests, they swam at the following given velocities for 5 min, Br: 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m/sec; Fr: 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 m/sec. In maximal exercise tests, following submaximal swimming at 0.9 m/sec in Br and 1.1 m/sec in Fr, swimming velocity was increased progressively by 0.1 m/sec every 1 min until the subjects reached to voluntary exhaustion. VO2max obtained from the maximal swimming tests in Br and Fr were 4.27 and 4.18 l/min, respectively. And there was no significant difference between these two values. VO2 during Br and Fr swimming at four and five submaximal velocities were 1.06, 1.30, 1.79, 2.65 l/min and 1.17, 1.34, 1.63, 2.04, 3.05 l/min, respectively. And, it was found that VO2 at 0.3 and 0.9 m/sec were significantly different (p styles curvilinearly increased with swimming velocity, and these relationships were well fitted for the regression equation of the second order (Br: y = 3.84625x2 - 1.95914x + 1.310463,r2 = 0.999 (p < 0.05), Fr: y = 3.233446x2 - 2.28136x + 1.611524, r2 = 0.979 (p < 0.05)). It was calculated that the two curves crossed at a point on 0.49 m/sec, and that VO2 at this point was 1.27 l/min. This value equivalented to 30.4% VO2max in Br and 29.7% VO2max in Fr.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A new approach to the energetics of uphill running

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kram, Rodger

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic cost of uphill running is not simply equal to the sum of the cost of level running and the cost of performing work to lift the body mass against gravity. We calculated the center of mass (COM) kinetic energy fluctuations from our measurements of parallel ground reaction forces. Based on the COM kinetic energy fluctuations, observed to decrease with incline, we developed a model with the metabolic cost of parallel running exponentially decreasing with incline and calculated the e...

  3. Effects of submaximal exercise and noise exposure on hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, H M; Hutchinson, K M

    1991-12-01

    A recent Scandinavian study reported that persons cycling at moderate intensity for 10 min suffered hearing loss when the exercise was accompanied by noise. The noise consisted of a 1/3 octave band-filtered noise with a 2000 Hz center frequency at 104 dB SPL. In the present study, adults cycled at 50 rev.min-1 against a force that elicited an oxygen cost equal to 70% of VO2max--an intensity frequently recommended in exercise prescriptions--with and without noise administered via headphones. Repeated measures ANOVA with three factors revealed that although a temporary hearing loss occurred following exercise-and-noise, a similar and slightly greater hearing loss occurred following noise-only. Hearing sensitivity was not significantly altered by exercise-only (p greater than .05). In general, hearing loss values were greatest between 3000 and 4000 Hz. In conclusion, temporary hearing loss was driven by noise exposure, not exercise. However, persons who choose to exercise with personal headphones or in a noisy environment should be aware of potential premature hearing loss.

  4. The physiology of submaximal exercise: The steady state concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Guido; Fagoni, Nazzareno; Taboni, Anna; Bruseghini, Paolo; Vinetti, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    The steady state concept implies that the oxygen flow is invariant and equal at each level along the respiratory system. The same is the case with the carbon dioxide flow. This condition has several physiological consequences, which are analysed. First, we briefly discuss the mechanical efficiency of exercise and the energy cost of human locomotion, as well as the roles played by aerodynamic work and frictional work. Then we analyse the equations describing the oxygen flow in lungs and in blood, the effects of ventilation and of the ventilation - perfusion inequality, and the interaction between diffusion and perfusion in the lungs. The cardiovascular responses sustaining gas flow increase in blood are finally presented. An equation linking ventilation, circulation and metabolism is developed, on the hypothesis of constant oxygen flow in mixed venous blood. This equation tells that, if the pulmonary respiratory quotient stays invariant, any increase in metabolic rate is matched by a proportional increase in ventilation, but by a less than proportional increase in cardiac output. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A longitudinal assessment of running economy and tendon properties in long-distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Tabata, Tomonori; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Igarashi, Katsumi; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in tendon properties and running economy of long-distance runners (LDRs) in the preparatory periods of track season (TS) and road season (RS). Eleven well-trained LDRs and 6 untrained subjects participated in the present study. In each period, muscle strength, neural activation level, and tendon elongation for both knee extensors and plantar flexors, jump performances, and oxygen consumption during submaximal running velocities were measured. No significant differences observed in any measured variables between the 2 seasons for untrained subjects. For LDRs, the total running distance during 1 month preceding RS (832 +/- 95 km) was significantly longer than that during 1 month preceding TS (718 +/- 80 km). No significant differences in the muscle strength, neural activation level, and jump performances were found between TS and RS. The stiffness of tendon structures in RS was significantly lower than those in TS for both knee extensors (-14.4%, p = 0.023) and plantar flexors (-16.6%, p = 0.040). At 3 running velocities, the oxygen consumptions in RS were significantly lower than those in TS. These results suggested that the lower oxygen consumption during submaximal running velocities observed in the preparatory period of RS may be attributable to the more compliant tendon structures but not in the neuromuscular characteristics.

  6. Effects of Pedal Speed and Crank Length on Pedaling Mechanics during Submaximal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRATT, PAUL RICHARD; MARTIN, JAMES C.; ELMER, STEVE J.; KORFF, THOMAS

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During submaximal cycling, the neuromuscular system has the freedom to select different intermuscular coordination strategies. From both a basic science and an applied perspective, it is important to understand how the central nervous system adjusts pedaling mechanics in response to changes in pedaling conditions. Purpose To determine the effect of changes in pedal speed (a marker of muscle shortening velocity) and crank length (a marker of muscle length) on pedaling mechanics during submaximal cycling. Methods Fifteen trained cyclists performed submaximal isokinetic cycling trials (90 rpm, 240 W) using pedal speeds of 1.41 to 1.61 m·s−1 and crank lengths of 150 to 190 mm. Joint powers were calculated using inverse dynamics. Results Increases in pedal speed and crank length caused large increases knee and hip angular excursions and velocities (P 0.05). Joint moments and joint powers were less affected by changes in the independent variables, but some interesting effects and trends were observed. Most noteworthy, knee extension moments and powers tended to decrease, whereas hip extension power tended to increase with an increase in crank length. Conclusions The distribution of joint moments and powers is largely maintained across a range of pedaling conditions. The crank length induced differences in knee extension moments, and powers may represent a trade-off between the central nervous system’s attempts to simultaneously minimize muscle metabolic and mechanical stresses. These results increase our understanding of the neural and mechanical mechanisms underlying multi-joint task performance, and they have practical relevance to coaches, athletes, and clinicians. PMID:26559455

  7. [Submaximal exercise capacity and quality of life in exclusive water-pipe smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, H; Babba, M; Boukamcha, R; Latiri, I; Knani, J; Slama, R; Bougmiza, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress is increased significantly by regular water-pipe smoking (WPS). This could lead to muscle dysfunction and thus to impairments of exercise and quality of life (QOL). Considering the impressive number of WP smokers, we intend to investigate the potential effect of WPS on submaximal exercise capacity and QOL. (1). To evaluate the submaximal exercise capacity by the 6-minutes walking test (6-MWT). (2). To compare the deficiency, incapacity and QOL data of exclusive WPS with those of two control groups (never smokers and exclusive cigarette smokers). (3). To determine the factors influencing the 6-minutes walk distance (6-MWD) of WPS subjects. A multicentre study including 180 exclusive WPS [> or =5 WP-year] men aged > or =40 years. Cigar or cigarette smoking, contraindications to the 6-MWT or cortico-steroid therapy will be exclusion criteria. QOL evaluation, spirometry, electrocardiogram and two 6-MWT will be performed. Signs of exercise impairment will be: 6-MWD or =5/10, haemoglobin saturation fall > or =5 points. Data from WPS subjects will be compared with those from 90 never smoking subjects and 90 exclusives cigarettes smokers. (1). WPS will affect significantly the submaximal exercise capacity. (2). Resting spirometric, 6-MWT and QOL data of exclusive WPS subjects will be significantly reduced compared to never smoking subjects. (3). The 6-MWD's of exclusive WPS subjects will be significantly influenced by cumulative WP consumption, by resting spirometric data, by obesity and by physical activity score. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of a Submaximal Level of Exercise on Balance Performance in Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a submaximal level of exercise on balance performance under a variety of conditions. Material and Method. Thirteen community-dwelling older persons with intact foot sensation (age = 66.69 ± 8.17 years, BMI = 24.65 ± 4.08 kg/m2, female, n = 6) volunteered to participate. Subjects' balance performances were measured using the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Integration of Balance (mCTSIB) at baseline and after test, under four conditions of stance: (1) eyes-opened firm-surface (EOF), (2) eyes-closed firm-surface (ECF), (3) eyes-opened soft-surface (EOS), and (4) eyes-closed soft-surface (ECS). The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) protocol was used to induce the submaximal level of exercise. Data was analyzed using the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test. Results. Balance changes during EOF (z = 0.00, P = 1.00) and ECF (z = −1.342, P = 0.180) were not significant. However, balance changes during EOS (z = −2.314, P = 0.021) and ECS (z = −3.089, P = 0.02) were significantly dropped after the 6MWT. Conclusion. A submaximal level of exercise may influence sensory integration that in turn affects balance performance, particularly on an unstable surface. Rehabilitation should focus on designing intervention that may improve sensory integration among older individuals with balance deterioration in order to encourage functional activities. PMID:25383386

  9. Effects of submaximal and supramaximal interval training on determinants of endurance performance in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, M; Le Blanc, O; Lucas, S J E; Thibault, G; Bailey, D M; Brassard, P

    2017-03-01

    We compared the effects of submaximal and supramaximal cycling interval training on determinants of exercise performance in moderately endurance-trained men. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max ), peak power output (Ppeak ), and peak and mean anaerobic power were measured before and after 6 weeks (3 sessions/week) of submaximal (85% maximal aerobic power [MP], HIIT85 , n = 8) or supramaximal (115% MP, HIIT115 , n = 9) interval training to exhaustion in moderately endurance-trained men. High-intensity training volume was 47% lower in HIIT115 vs HIIT85 (304 ± 77 vs 571 ± 200 min; P training was generally associated with increased VO2max (HIIT85 : +3.3 ± 3.1 mL/kg/min; HIIT115 : +3.3 ± 3.6 ml/kg/min; Time effect P = 0.002; Group effect: P = 0.95), Ppeak (HIIT85 : +18 ± 9 W; HIIT115 : +16 ± 27 W; Time effect P = 0.045; Group effect: P = 0.49), and mean anaerobic power (HIIT85 : +0.42 ± 0.69 W/kg; HIIT115 : +0.55 ± 0.65 W/kg; Time effect P = 0.01; Group effect: P = 0.18). Six weeks of submaximal and supramaximal interval training performed to exhaustion seems to equally improve VO2max and anaerobic power in endurance-trained men, despite half the accumulated time spent at the target intensity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hypotension and heart rate variability after resistance exercise performed maximal and submaximal order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gonçalves Corrêa Neto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was verified the blood pressure responses and the cardiac autonomic modulation after the strength exercise in two different conditions (maximal and submaximal. The subjects were divided in three groups, such as: maximal repetitions (age: 20.5 ± 0.6 years, weight: 63.7 ± 14.8, height: 1.7 ± 0.1, body mass index: 22.8 ± 4.5 Kilogram per square meter (kg/m², submaximal repetitions (age: 25 ± 4.1 years, weight: 69.1 ± 12.8, height: 1.8 ± 0.1, body mass index: 22.2 ± 1.7 (kg/m²  and a control group (age: 23.7 ± 3.8 years, weight: 64.2 ± 15, height: 1.7 ± 0.1, body mass index: 21.8 ± 1.9 (kg/m². The blood pressure and the Heart Rate R-R intervals were measured before and during one hour after the session, with 10-minutes intervals length between measurements. The analyze of variance did not showed significant differences between experimental protocols to blood pressure (p > 0.05. However, the effect size was able to show that the most intense training caused a reduction in systolic blood pressure at times. Regarding cardiac autonomic response, the group that exercised the submaximal form exhibited a significant increase in LF / HF (p = 0.022 when 20 minutes’ post-exercise. There was a not significant difference in cardiac autonomic modulation between protocols. The high intensity protocol has caused blood pressure reductions in more moments and it was over safer in relation to cardiac autonomic modulation, since it did not cause increased sympathetic activity during recovery.

  11. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Fletcher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics.

  12. Effects of wheel and hand-rim size on submaximal propulsion in wheelchair athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barry S; Van Der Woude, Lucas H V; Tolfrey, Keith; Lenton, John P; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of fixed gear ratio wheel sizes on the physiological and biomechanical responses to submaximal wheelchair propulsion. Highly trained wheelchair basketball players (N = 13) propelled an adjustable sports wheelchair in three different wheel sizes (24, 25, and 26 inches) on a motor-driven treadmill. Each wheel was equipped with force-sensing hand-rims (SMARTWheel), which collected kinetic and temporal data. Oxygen uptake (V˙O2) and HR responses were measured with high-speed video footage collected to determine three-dimensional upper body joint kinematics. Mean power output and work per cycle decreased progressively with increasing wheel size (P wheelchair propulsion.

  13. Comparison of the YMCA and a Custom Submaximal Exercise Test for Determining VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamnick, Nicholas A; By, Savanny; Pettitt, Cherie D; Pettitt, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    The maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is deemed the highest predictor for all-cause mortality, and therefore, an ability to assess VO2max is important. The YMCA submaximal test is one of the most widely used tests to estimate VO2max; however, it has questionable validity. We validated a customized submaximal test that accounts for the nonlinear rise in VO2 relative to power output and compared its accuracy against the YMCA protocol. Fifty-six men and women performed a graded exercise test with a subsequent exhaustive, square wave bout for the verification of "true" VO2max. In counterbalanced order, subjects then completed the YMCA test and our new Mankato submaximal exercise test (MSET). The MSET consisted of a 3-min stage estimated at 35% VO2max and a second 3-min stage estimated at either 65% or 70% VO2max, where VO2max was estimated with a regression equation using sex, body mass index, age, and self-reported PA-R. VO2 values from the graded exercise test and square wave verification bout did not differ with the highest value used to identify "true" VO2max (45.1 ± 8.89 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)). The MSET (43.6 ± 8.6 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) did not differ from "true" VO2max, whereas the YMCA test (41.1 ± 9.6 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) yielded an underestimation (P = 0.002). The MSET was moderately correlated with "true" VO2max (ICC = 0.73, CV of 11.3%). The YMCA test was poorly correlated with "true" VO2max (ICC = 0.29, CV of 15.1%). To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine submaximal exercise protocols versus a verified VO2max protocol. The MSET yielded better estimates of VO2max because of the protocol including a stage exceeding gas exchange threshold.

  14. Low doses of caffeine reduce heart rate during submaximal cycle ergometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetter Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular effects of two low-levels of caffeine ingestion in non habitual caffeine users at various submaximal and maximal exercise intensities. Methods Nine male subjects (19–25 yr; 83.3 ± 3.1 kg; 184 ± 2 cm, underwent three testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects were provided 4 oz of water and a gelatin capsule containing a placebo, 1.5 mg/kg caffeine, or 3.0 mg/kg caffeine. After thirty minutes of rest, a warm-up (30 Watts for 2 min the pedal rate of 60 rpm was maintained at a steady-state output of 60 watts for five minutes; increased to 120 watts for five minutes and to 180 watts for five minutes. After a 2 min rest the workload was 180 watts for one minute and increased by 30 watts every minute until exhaustion. Heart rate (HR was measured during the last 15-seconds of each minute of submaximal exercise. Systolic blood pressure (BP was measured at rest and during each of the three sub-maximal steady state power outputs. Minute ventilation (VE, Tidal volume (VT, Breathing frequency (Bf, Rating of perceived exertion (RPE, Respiratory exchange ratio (RER, and Oxygen consumption (VO2 were measured at rest and during each minute of exercise. Results Caffeine at 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg body weight significantly lowered (p E, VT, VO2, RPE, maximal power output or time to exhaustion. Conclusion In non habitual caffeine users it appears that consuming a caffeine pill (1.5 & 3.0 mg/kg at a dose comparable to 1–3 cups of coffee lowers heart rate during submaximal exercise but not at near maximal and maximal exercise. In addition, this caffeine dose also only appears to affect systolic blood pressure at rest but not during cycling exercise.

  15. 10 km running performance predicted by a multiple linear regression model with allometrically adjusted variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Cesar C C; Barros, Ronaldo V; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Gagliardi, João F L; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Lambert, Mike I; Pires, Flavio O

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the power of VO 2max , peak treadmill running velocity (PTV), and running economy (RE), unadjusted or allometrically adjusted, in predicting 10 km running performance. Eighteen male endurance runners performed: 1) an incremental test to exhaustion to determine VO 2max and PTV; 2) a constant submaximal run at 12 km·h -1 on an outdoor track for RE determination; and 3) a 10 km running race. Unadjusted (VO 2max , PTV and RE) and adjusted variables (VO 2max 0.72 , PTV 0.72 and RE 0.60 ) were investigated through independent multiple regression models to predict 10 km running race time. There were no significant correlations between 10 km running time and either the adjusted or unadjusted VO 2max . Significant correlations (p 0.84 and power > 0.88. The allometrically adjusted predictive model was composed of PTV 0.72 and RE 0.60 and explained 83% of the variance in 10 km running time with a standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 1.5 min. The unadjusted model composed of a single PVT accounted for 72% of the variance in 10 km running time (SEE of 1.9 min). Both regression models provided powerful estimates of 10 km running time; however, the unadjusted PTV may provide an uncomplicated estimation.

  16. Cognitive Performance Enhancement Induced by Caffeine, Carbohydrate and Guarana Mouth Rinsing during Submaximal Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pomportes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of serial mouth rinsing (MR with nutritional supplements on cognitive performance (i.e., cognitive control and time perception during a 40-min submaximal exercise. Twenty-four participants completed 4 counterbalanced experimental sessions, during which they performed MR with either placebo (PL, carbohydrate (CHO: 1.6 g/25 mL, guarana complex (GUAc: 0.4 g/25 mL or caffeine (CAF: 67 mg/25 mL before and twice during exercise. The present study provided some important new insights regarding the specific changes in cognitive performance induced by nutritional supplements. The main results were: (1 CHO, CAF and GUA MR likely led participants to improve temporal performance; (2 CAF MR likely improved cognitive control; and (3 CHO MR led to a likely decrease in subjective perception of effort at the end of the exercise compared to PL, GUA and CAF. Moreover, results have shown that performing 40-min submaximal exercise enhances information processing in terms of both speed and accuracy, improves temporal performance and does not alter cognitive control. The present study opens up new perspectives regarding the use of MR to optimize cognitive performance during physical exercise.

  17. Achilles tendinopathy alters stretch shortening cycle behaviour during a sub-maximal hopping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenham, James R; Travers, Mervyn J; Gibson, William; Campbell, Amity; Allison, Garry T

    2016-01-01

    To describe stretch shortening cycle behaviour of the ankle and lower limb in patients with Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and establish differences with healthy volunteers. Between-subjects case-controlled. Fifteen patients with AT (mean age 41.2±12.7 years) and 11 healthy volunteers (CON) (mean age 23.2±6.7 years) performed sub-maximal single-limb hopping on a custom built sledge-jump system. Using 3D motion analysis and surface EMG, temporal kinematic (lower limb stiffness, ankle angle at 80ms pre-contact, ankle angle at contact, peak ankle angle, ankle stretch amplitude) and EMG measures (onset, offset and peak times relative to contact) were captured. Data between AT and CON were compared statistically using a linear mixed model. Patients with AT exhibited significantly increased lower limb stiffness when compared to healthy volunteers (pbehaviour during sub-maximal hopping when compared with healthy volunteers. Patients with AT hop with greater lower limb stiffness, in a greater degree of ankle dorsiflexion and have a greater stretch amplitude. Likewise, delayed muscle activity is evident. These findings have implications in terms of informing the understanding of the pathoaetiology and management of AT. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of heart rate variability threshold and parasympathetic reactivation after a submaximal exercise test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Janssen Gomes da Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate reproducibility of heart rate variability threshold (HRVT and parasympathetic reactivation in physically active men (n= 16, 24.3 ± 5.1 years. During the test, HRVT was assessed by SD1 and r-MSSD dynamics. Immediately after exercise, r-MSSD was analyzed in segments of 60 seconds for a period of five minutes. High absolute and relatively reproducible analysis of HRVT were observed, as assessed by SD1 and r-MSSD dynamics (ICC = 0.92, CV = 10.8, SEM = 5.8. During the recovery phase, a moderate to high reproducibility was observed for r-MSSD from the first to the fifth minute (ICC = 0.69-0.95, CV = 7.5-14.2, SEM = 0.07-1.35. We conclude that HRVT and r-MSSD analysis after a submaximal stress test are highly reproducible measures that might be used to assess the acute and chronic effects of exercise training on cardiac autonomic modulation during and/or after a submaximal stress test.

  19. VO2@RER1.0: a novel submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Clifford; Kazmucha, Jeffrey; Kim, Nancy; Suryani, Reny; Olson, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is the "gold standard" by which to assess functional capacity; however, it is effort dependent. VO2@RER1.0 is defined when VO2 = VCO2. Between December 22, 1997 and November 9, 2004, 305 pediatric subjects underwent cycle ergometer cardiopulmonary exercise testing, exercised to exhaustion, and reached a peak respiratory exchange ratio > or = 1.10. Group 1 subjects achieved a peak VO2 > or = 80% of predicted VO2max; group 2 subjects achieved a peak VO2 subjects achieved a peak VO2 between 61 and 79% of predicted VO2max. Linear regression analysis was performed for VO2@RER1.0 as a function of predicted VO2 for group 1 subjects. A -2 SD regression line and equation was created. VO2@RER1.0 data from groups 2 and 3 were plotted onto the normative graph. Contingency table and relative-risk analysis showed that an abnormal VO2@RER1.0 predicted an abnormal peak VO2(positive-predictive value 83%, negative-predictive value 85%, sensitivity 84%, and specificity 84%). VO2@RER1.0 is a highly sensitive, specific, and predictive submaximal index of functional capacity. This submaximal index is easy to identify without subjectivity. This index may aid in the evaluation of subjects who cannot exercise to maximal parameters.

  20. [Sub-maximal aerobic capacity and quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lataoui, S; Belghali, S; Zeglaoui, H; Bouajina, E; Ben Saad, H

    2017-01-01

    Studies about sub-maximal aerobic capacity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are scarce. To assess the sub-maximal aerobic capacity of these patients through the 6-min walk test, estimated age of the "muscular and cardiorespiratory" chain. Thirty-seven consecutive patients (aged 20 to 60 years) with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis will be included. Non-inclusion criteria will be: use of drugs (e.g.; methotrexate, beta-blockers), orthopaedic or rheumatologic conditions (other than rheumatoid arthritis) that may alter walking ability and recent infections. Exclusion criteria will be: 6-min walking test contra-indications and imperfect performance of the required lung function and walking maneuvers. Signs of walking intolerance will be: test interruption, distance ≤lower limit of normal, dyspnea score ≥5/10 (visual analogue scale) at the end of the test, haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) drop ≥5%, cardiac frequency at the end of the test ≤60% of maximum predicted. An estimated "muscular and cardiorespiratory chain" age higher than the chronological one will be considered as a sign of accelerated ageing. A high percentage of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis would show evidences of walking limitation and accelerated "muscular and cardiorespiratory chain" ageing. There would be a significant correlation between the walking test and clinical, biological, radiological and pulmonary function data and the patients' quality-of-life status. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of Sub-maximal exercise-rehabilitation program on cardio-respiratory endurance indexes and oxygen pulse in patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Izadi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical or cardio-respiratory fitness are of the best important physiological variables in children with cerebral palsy (CP, but the researches on exercise response of individuals with CP are limited. Our aim was to determine the effect of sub-maximal rehabilitation program (aerobic exercise on maximal oxygen uptake, oxygen pulse and cardio- respiratory physiological variables of children with moderate to severe spastic cerebral palsy diplegia and compare with able-bodied children. Methods: In a controlled clinical trial study, 15 children with diplegia spastic cerebral palsy, were recruited on a voluntarily basis (experimental group and 18 subjects without neurological impairments selected as control group. In CP group, aerobic exercise program performed on the average of exercise intensity (144 beat per minute of heart rate, 3 times a week for 3 months. The time of each exercise session was 20-25 minutes. Dependent variables were measured in before (pretest and after (post test of rehabilitation program through Mac Master Protocol on Tantories cycle ergometer in CP group and compared with the control group. Results: The oxygen pulse (VO2/HR during ergometery protocol was significantly lower in CP group than normal group (P<0.05. No significant statistical difference in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max was found between groups. The rehabilitation program leads to little increase of this variable in CP group. After sub-maximal exercise in pretest and post test, the heart rate of patient group was greater than control group, and aerobic exercise leads to significant decrease in heart rate in CP patients(P<0.05. Conclusion: The patients with spastic cerebral palsy, because of high muscle tone, severe spasticity and involuntarily movements have higher energy cost and lower aerobic fitness than normal people. The rehabilitation exercise program can improve physiological function of muscle and cardio-respiratory endurance in these

  2. Using Integration and Autonomy to Teach an Elementary Running Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, J. Brandon; Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is an important aspect of overall fitness, health, and wellness, and running can be an excellent lifetime physical activity. One of the most simple and effective means of exercise, running raises heart rate in a short amount of time and can be done with little to no cost for equipment. There are many benefits to running,…

  3. Blunted Maximal and Submaximal Responses to Cardiopulmonary Exercise Tests in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegusuku, Hélcio; Silva-Batista, Carla; Peçanha, Tiago; Nieuwboer, Alice; Silva, Natan D; Costa, Luiz A; de Mello, Marco T; Piemonte, Maria E; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Forjaz, Cláudia L

    2016-05-01

    To investigate submaximal and maximal responses during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests in subjects with Parkinson disease (PD). Cross-sectional. A PD association. A sample (N=68) of subjects with PD (n=48; mean age, 66±8y; modified Hoehn and Yahr stage between 2 and 3; "on" state of medication) and age-matched controls without PD (n=20; mean age, 64±9y). Maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Oxygen uptake (V˙o2), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and heart rate assessed at rest, submaximal intensities (ie, anaerobic threshold [AT] and respiratory compensation point), and maximal intensity (peak exercise). Compared with control subjects, subjects with PD had lower V˙o2, heart rate, and SBP at respiratory compensation point and peak exercise (V˙o2: 14.6±3.6mL⋅kg⋅min vs 17.9±5.5mL⋅kg⋅min and 17.7±4.8mL⋅kg⋅min vs 21.5±6.6mL⋅kg⋅min; heart rate: 119±17beats/min vs 139±12beats/min and 132±20beats/min vs 158±13beats/min; SBP: 151±17mmHg vs 172±20mmHg and 166±21mmHg vs 187±24mmHg; P≤.05). They also had lower heart rate at AT (102±14beats/min vs 110±13beats/min; P≤.05), whereas V˙o2 and SBP at this intensity were similar to those of control subjects. Subjects with PD demonstrated blunted metabolic and cardiovascular responses to submaximal and maximal exercise tests, especially at intensities above AT, which are in line with autonomic disturbances present in patients with PD. Future studies need to determine how this affects performance, participation, and responses of these patients to exercise training at different intensities. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aerobic interval training reduces vascular resistances during submaximal exercise in obese metabolic syndrome individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Fernandez-Elias, V E; Morales-Palomo, F; Pallares, J G; Ramirez-Jimenez, M; Ortega, J F

    2017-08-12

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training (AIT) on exercise hemodynamics in metabolic syndrome (MetS) volunteers. Thirty-eight, MetS participants were randomly assigned to a training (TRAIN) or to a non-training control (CONT) group. TRAIN consisted of stationary interval cycling alternating bouts at 70-90% of maximal heart rate during 45 min day(-1) for 6 months. CONT maintained baseline physical activity and no changes in cardiovascular function or MetS factors were detected. In contrast, TRAIN increased cardiorespiratory fitness (14% in VO2PEAK; 95% CI 9-18%) and improved metabolic syndrome (-42% in Z score; 95% CI 83-1%). After TRAIN, the workload that elicited a VO2 of 1500 ml min(-1) increased 15% (95% CI 5-25%; P < 0.001). After TRAIN when subjects pedaled at an identical submaximal rate of oxygen consumption, cardiac output increased by 8% (95% CI 4-11%; P < 0.01) and stroke volume by 10% (95% CI, 6-14%; P < 0.005) being above the CONT group values at that time point. TRAIN reduced submaximal exercise heart rate (109 ± 15-106 ± 13 beats min(-1); P < 0.05), diastolic blood pressure (83 ± 8-75 ± 8 mmHg; P < 0.001) and systemic vascular resistances (P < 0.01) below CONT values. Double product was reduced only after TRAIN (18.2 ± 3.2-17.4 ± 2.4 bt min(-1) mmHg 10(-3); P < 0.05). The data suggest that intense aerobic interval training improves hemodynamics during submaximal exercise in MetS patients. Specifically, it reduces diastolic blood pressure, systemic vascular resistances, and the double product. The reduction in double product, suggests decreased myocardial oxygen demands which could prevent the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events during exercise in this population. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT03019796.

  5. 'Outrunning' the running ear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    Children in day-care centres are at a higher risk. • Breast-feeding less than 3 months. Other conditions which may mimic acute purulent otitis media should be considered when evaluating a patient with a running ear.These are listed in Table I. To outrun the running ear all these facts should be kept in mind when evaluating ...

  6. RUNNING INJURY DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karen Krogh; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. PURPOSE: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runne...

  7. Running Injury Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Johansen, Karen; Hulme, Adam; Damsted, Camma

    2017-01-01

    Background: Behavioral science methods have rarely been used in running injury research. Therefore, the attitudes amongst runners and their coaches regarding factors leading to running injuries warrants formal investigation. Purpose: To investigate the attitudes of middle- and long-distance runne...

  8. Overuse injuries in running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Sten; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2016-01-01

    What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence.......What is an overuse injury in running? This question is a corner stone of clinical documentation and research based evidence....

  9. Prognostic value of treadmill stress echocardiography at extremes of exercise performance: submaximal high exercise capacity ≥ 10 metabolic equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Siu-Sun; Agarwal, Vikram; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2014-03-01

    Submaximal stress testing or achieving High exercise capacity (≥ 10 metabolic equivalents, METS) is a predictor of favorable prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of submaximal or high exercise capacity stress echocardiography. We evaluated 1781 patients (55 ± 13 years; 59% male) undergoing treadmill stress echocardiography divided into 811 patients with submaximal (high exercise capacity (≥ 10 METS). Resting left ventricular ejection fraction and regional wall motion were assessed. The left ventricle was divided into 16 segments and scored on 5-point scale of wall motion. Abnormal stress echocardiography was defined as stress-induced ischemia (wall-motion score of ≥ 1 grade). Follow-up (3.3 ± 1.5 years) for nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 40) and cardiac death (n = 52) were obtained. By univariate analysis, echocardiographic variables of ejection fraction, peak wall-motion score index (WMSI) and number of new ischemic wall-motion abnormalities were significant predictors of cardiac events. Cumulative survival was significantly worse in patients with abnormal (ischemic) versus normal (nonischemic) stress echocardiography in submaximal (4.4%/year vs. 1.3%/year, P high exercise capacity (1.5%/year vs. 0.2%/year, P high exercise capacity studies. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Natural versus commercial carbohydrate supplementation and endurance running performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Too Brandon W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the metabolic, performance and gastrointestinal (GI effects of supplementation with a natural food product (raisins compared to a commercial product (sport chews. Methods Eleven male (29.3 ± 7.9 yrs; mean and SD runners completed three randomized trials (raisins, chews and water only separated by seven days. Each trial consisted of 80-min (75%VO2max treadmill running followed by a 5-km time trial (TT. Heart rate (HR, respiratory exchange ratio (RER, blood lactate, serum free fatty acids (FFA, glycerol and insulin, plasma glucose and creatine kinase, GI symptoms and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded every 20-min. We employed a within-subject two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA for repeated measures with a Fisher’s post hoc analysis to determine significant differences. Results VO2, HR, lactate, glycerol and RPE did not differ due to treatment. Average plasma glucose was maintained at resting levels (5.3 ± 0.4 mmol·L-1 during the sub-maximal exercise bout (5.9 ± 0.6, 5.7 ± 0.6 and 5.5 ± 0.5 mmol·L-1 for chews, raisins and water respectively, and was significantly higher with chews than water only. RER and % of non-protein macronutrient oxidation derived from carbohydrate was highest with chews, followed by raisins and water was the lowest (74.4 ± 6.4, 70.0 ± 7.0 and 65.1 ± 8.7% for chews, raisins and water respectively during the sub-maximal exercise period. Serum FFA was higher in the water treatment versus both raisins and chews at 80 min of sub-maximal exercise. Serum insulin was higher with the chews than both raisins and water (5.1 ± 2.0, 3.1 ± 0.8, 1.9 ± 0.6 uU·ml-1 for chews, raisins and water respectively. Plasma creatine kinase, corrected for baseline values, for the last 40 min of the sub-maximal exercise bout, was higher with raisins compared to other treatments. The TT was faster for both carbohydrate supplements (20.6

  11. Injury-free running - a utopia? Risk factors of running-related injuries in men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worp, M.P. van der

    2016-01-01

    Running is a popular sport worldwide and has a positive effect on health and well-being. However, the rate of running-related injuries and the associated costs are high. Van der Worp performed a systematic review to examine which factors increase the risk of running injuries, and whether this is the

  12. Cycling on rollers: Kreitler fan resistance at submaximal levels of effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, R F; Hart, C R

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize the commercially available fan unit for the KreitlerAlloy rollers at submaximal levels of effort (cyclist rode six times at each of three fan inlet settings (closed, half, and full open) and five fan speeds (900, 1800, 2700, 3600, and 4500 rpm). Fan power requirements were isolated by subtracting roller resistance from separate trials. Power requirements relative to fan inlet and fan speed possessed a significant interaction with the main effects for each also significant (all p or = 0.997). Fan resistance was virtually non existent at 900 rpm. Fan resistance then significantly increased with increasing fan speed and inlet opening. At 4500 rpm power requirements of the fan reached 269 +/- 6, 352 +/- 7, and 406 +/- 9 W with the inlet closed, half, and fully open, respectively (p training and testing environments.

  13. Brief note about plasma catecholamines kinetics and submaximal exercise in untrained standardbreds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Baragli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Four untrained standardbred horses performed a standardized exercise test on the treadmill and an automated blood collection system programmed to obtain blood samples every 15 s was used for blood collection in order to evaluate the kinetics of adrenaline and noradrenaline. The highest average values obtained for adrenaline and noradrenaline were 15.0 ± 3.0 and 15.8 ± 2.8 nmol/l respectively, with exponential accumulation of adrenaline (r = 0.977 and noradrenaline (r = 0.976 during the test. Analysis of the correlation between noradrenaline and adrenaline for each phase of the test shows that correlation coefficient decreases as the intensity of exercise increases (from r = 0.909 to r = 0.788. This suggests that during submaximal exercise, the process for release, distribution and clearance of adrenaline into blood circulation differs from that of noradrenaline.

  14. The validity of submaximal ratings of perceived exertion to predict one repetition maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eston, Roger; Evans, Harrison James Llewelyn

    2009-01-01

    The One Repetition Maximum (1-RM) test is commonly used to assess strength. However, direct assessments of 1-RM are time consuming and unsafe for novice lifters. Whilst various equations exist to predict 1-RM, there is limited research on the validity of these equations. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of using sub-maximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) to predict 1-RM in young adults, using the Borg 6-20 RPE Scale. Twenty healthy participants (ten male (Mean ± SD, 20.8 ± 0.6 y, 75.7 ± 9.3 kg, 1.8 ± 0.07 m) and ten female (20.3 ± 0.7 y, 68.4 ± 10.0 kg, 1.68 ± 0.03 m)) completed two trials involving resistance exercises for both the upper and lower body. In the first trial the 1-RM for the bilateral biceps curl (BC) and the bilateral knee extension (KE) were determined for each participant. In the second trial, participants performed blinded repetitions which were equivalent to 20, 40 and 60 % of 1-RM for both exercises. The RPE was recorded immediately after two repetitions had been completed at each intensity. The order of intensity of the repetitions was randomly assigned with participants wearing blindfolds to exclude the possibility of pre-determined judgments about load and RPE. Individual RPE recorded at each intensity was subjected to linear regression analysis and the line of best fit was extrapolated to RPE 20 to predict 1-RM in both exercises. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the 1-RM predicted from RPE 20 and measured 1-RM for both exercises for the men and women. Measured and predicted values for men were 46.0 ± 4.6 and 45.2 ± 6. 1 kg for biceps curl, and 46.3 ± 3.8 and 43.0 ± 7.1 kg for knee extension, respectively. Measured and predicted values for women were 18.6 ± 5.7 and 19.3 ± 5.6 kg for biceps curl, and 25.5 ± 9.6 and 27.2 ± 12.6 kg for knee extension, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between actual and predicted 1-RM for the BC and KE were 0.97 and 0

  15. A new submaximal cycle ergometer test for prediction of VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblom-Bak, E; Björkman, F; Hellenius, M-L; Ekblom, B

    2014-04-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is an important, independent predictor of cardiovascular health and mortality. Despite this, it is rarely measured in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a submaximal cycle ergometry test based on change in heart rate (HR) between a lower standard work rate and an individually chosen higher work rate. In a mixed population (n = 143) with regard to sex (55% women), age (21-65 years), and activity status (inactive to highly active), a model included change in HR per unit change in power, sex, and age for the best estimate of VO2max. The association between estimated and observed VO2max for the mixed sample was r = 0.91, standard error of estimate = 0.302 L/min, and mean measured VO2max = 3.23 L/min. The corresponding coefficient of variation was 9.3%, a significantly improved precision compared with one of the most commonly used submaximal exercise tests, the Åstrand test, which in the present study was estimated to be 18.1%. Test-retest reliability analysis over 1 week revealed no mean difference in the estimated VO2max (-0.02 L/min, 95% confidence interval: -0.07-0.03). The new test is low-risk, easily administered, and valid for a wide capacity range, and is therefore suitable in situations as health evaluations in the general population. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Muscle vibration sustains motor unit firing rate during submaximal isometric fatigue in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, L; Garland, S J; Ivanova, T; Gossen, E R

    2001-09-15

    1. In keeping with the 'muscular wisdom hypothesis', many studies have documented that the firing rate of the majority of motor units decreased during fatiguing isometric contractions. The present study investigated whether the application of periodic muscle vibration, which strongly activates muscle spindles, would alter the modulation of motor unit firing rate during submaximal fatiguing isometric contractions. 2. Thirty-three motor units from the lateral head of the triceps brachii muscle were recorded from 10 subjects during a sustained isometric 20 % maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the elbow extensors. Vibration was interposed on the contraction for 2 s every 10 s. Twenty-two motor units were recorded from the beginning of the fatigue task. The discharge rate of the majority of motor units remained constant (12/22) or increased (4/22) with fatigue. Six motor units demonstrated a reduction in discharge rate that later returned toward initial values; these motor units had higher initial discharge rates than the other 16 motor units. 3. In a second series of experiments, four subjects held a sustained isometric 20 % MVC for 2 min and then vibration was applied as above for the remainder of the contraction. In this case, motor units initially demonstrated a decrease in firing rate that increased after the vibration was applied. Thus muscle spindle disfacilitation of the motoneurone pool may be associated with the decline of motor unit discharge rate observed during the first 2 min of the contraction. 4. In a third set of experiments, seven subjects performed the main experiment on one occasion and repeated the fatigue task without vibration on a second occasion. Neither the endurance time of the fatiguing contraction nor the MVC torque following fatigue was affected by the application of vibration. This finding calls into question the applicability of the muscular wisdom hypothesis to submaximal contractions.

  17. Cost-Estimation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    COSTIT computer program estimates cost of electronic design by reading item-list file and file containing cost for each item. Accuracy of cost estimate based on accuracy of cost-list file. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The Sun version (NPO-19587). PC version (NPO-19157).

  18. The relationship between negative addiction to running and running ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between negative addiction to running and running enjoyment amongst black Zulu-speaking South African runners: an exploratory study. ... running history and the importance placed by the participant on the running activity were shown to play a role in both running dependence and enjoyment processes.

  19. Lower-leg compression, running mechanics, and economy in trained distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickford, Abigail S; Chapman, Robert F; Johnston, Jeanne D; Stager, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of and mechanisms behind the widespread use of lower-leg compression as an ergogenic aid to improve running performance are unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine whether wearing graduated lower-leg compression sleeves during exercise evokes changes in running economy (RE), perhaps due to altered gait mechanics. Sixteen highly trained male distance runners completed 2 separate RE tests during a single laboratory session, including a randomized-treatment trial of graduated calf-compression sleeves (CS; 15-20 mm Hg) and a control trial (CON) without compression sleeves. RE was determined by measuring oxygen consumption at 3 constant submaximal speeds of 233, 268, and 300 m/min on a treadmill. Running mechanics were measured during the last 30 s of each 4-min stage of the RE test via wireless triaxial 10-g accelerometer devices attached to the top of each shoe. Ground-contact time, swing time, step frequency, and step length were determined from accelerometric output corresponding to foot-strike and toe-off events. Gait variability was calculated as the standard deviation of a given gait variable for an individual during the last 30 s of each stage. There were no differences in VO2 or kinematic variables between CON and CS trials at any of the speeds. Wearing lower-leg compression does not alter the energetics of running at submaximal speeds through changes in running mechanics or other means. However, it appears that the individual response to wearing lower-leg compression varies greatly and warrants further examination.

  20. THE VALIDITY OF SUBMAXIMAL RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION TO PREDICT ONE REPETITION MAXIMUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison James Llewelyn Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The One Repetition Maximum (1-RM test is commonly used to assess strength. However, direct assessments of 1-RM are time consuming and unsafe for novice lifters. Whilst various equations exist to predict 1-RM, there is limited research on the validity of these equations. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of using sub-maximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE to predict 1-RM in young adults, using the Borg 6-20 RPE Scale. Twenty healthy participants (ten male (Mean ± SD, 20.8 ± 0.6 y, 75.7 ± 9.3 kg, 1.8 ± 0.07 m and ten female (20.3 ± 0.7 y, 68.4 ± 10.0 kg, 1.68 ± 0.03 m completed two trials involving resistance exercises for both the upper and lower body. In the first trial the 1-RM for the bilateral biceps curl (BC and the bilateral knee extension (KE were determined for each participant. In the second trial, participants performed blinded repetitions which were equivalent to 20, 40 and 60 % of 1-RM for both exercises. The RPE was recorded immediately after two repetitions had been completed at each intensity. The order of intensity of the repetitions was randomly assigned with participants wearing blindfolds to exclude the possibility of pre-determined judgments about load and RPE. Individual RPE recorded at each intensity was subjected to linear regression analysis and the line of best fit was extrapolated to RPE 20 to predict 1-RM in both exercises. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 between the 1-RM predicted from RPE 20 and measured 1-RM for both exercises for the men and women. Measured and predicted values for men were 46.0 ± 4.6 and 45.2 ± 6. 1 kg for biceps curl, and 46.3 ± 3.8 and 43.0 ± 7.1 kg for knee extension, respectively. Measured and predicted values for women were 18.6 ± 5.7 and 19.3 ± 5.6 kg for biceps curl, and 25.5 ± 9.6 and 27.2 ± 12.6 kg for knee extension, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between actual and predicted 1-RM for the BC and KE were 0

  1. The Effects of Caffeine Supplementation on Physiological Responses to Submaximal Exercise in Endurance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Mark; Williams, Benjamin Henley; Muniz-Pumares, Daniel; Balsalobre-Fernández, Carlos; Foley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on physiological responses to submaximal exercise, with a focus on blood lactate concentration ([BLa]). Using a randomised, single-blind, crossover design; 16 endurance-trained, male cyclists (age: 38 ± 8 years; height: 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 76.6 ± 7.8 kg; [Formula: see text]: 4.3 ± 0.6 L∙min-1) completed four trials on an electromagnetically-braked cycle ergometer. Each trial consisted of a six-stage incremental test (3 minute stages) followed by 30 minutes of passive recovery. One hour before trials 2-4, participants ingested a capsule containing 5 mg∙kg-1 of either caffeine or placebo (maltodextrin). Trials 2 and 3 were designed to evaluate the effects of caffeine on various physiological responses during exercise and recovery. In contrast, Trial 4 was designed to evaluate the effects of caffeine on [BLa] during passive recovery from an end-exercise concentration of 4 mmol∙L-1. Relative to placebo, caffeine increased [BLa] during exercise, independent of exercise intensity (mean difference: 0.33 ± 0.41 mmol∙L-1; 95% likely range: 0.11 to 0.55 mmol∙L-1), but did not affect the time-course of [BLa] during recovery (p = 0.604). Caffeine reduced ratings of perceived exertion (mean difference: 0.5 ± 0.7; 95% likely range: 0.1 to 0.9) and heart rate (mean difference: 3.6 ± 4.2 b∙min-1; 95% likely range: 1.3 to 5.8 b∙min-1) during exercise, with the effect on the latter dissipating as exercise intensity increased. Supplement × exercise intensity interactions were observed for respiratory exchange ratio (p = 0.004) and minute ventilation (p = 0.034). The results of the present study illustrate the clear, though often subtle, effects of caffeine on physiological responses to submaximal exercise. Researchers should be aware of these responses, particularly when evaluating the physiological effects of various experimental interventions.

  2. A New Submaximal Rowing Test to Predict 2,000-m Rowing Ergometer Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, Ruby T A; Brink, Michel S; Lamberts, Robert P; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess predictive value of a new submaximal rowing test (SmRT) on 2,000-m ergometer rowing time-trial performance in competitive rowers. In addition, the reliability of the SmRT was investigated. Twenty-four competitive male rowers participated in this study. After determining individual HRmax, all rowers performed an SmRT followed by a 2,000-m rowing ergometer time trial. In addition, the SmRT was performed 4 times (2 days in between) to determine the reliability. The SmRT consists of two 6-minute stages of rowing at 70 and 80% HRmax, followed by a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax. Power was captured during the 3 stages, and 60 seconds of heart rate recovery (HRR60s) was measured directly after the third stage. Results showed that predictive value of power during the SmRT on 2,000-m rowing time also increased with stages. CVTEE% is 2.4, 1.9, and 1.3%. Pearson correlations (95% confidence interval [95% CI]) were -0.73 (-0.88 to -0.45), -0.80 (-0.94 to -0.67), and -0.93 (-0.97 to -0.84). 2,000-m rowing time and HRR60s showed no relationship. Reliability of power during the SmRT improved with the increasing intensity of the stages. The coefficient of variation (CVTEM%) was 9.2, 5.6, and 0.4%. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and 95% CI were 0.91 (0.78-0.97), 0.92 (0.81-0.97), and 0.99 (0.97-1.00). The CVTEM% and ICC of HRR60s were 8.1% and 0.93 (0.82-0.98). In conclusion, the data of this study shows that the SmRT is a reliable test that it is able to accurately predict 2,000-m rowing time on an ergometer. The SmRT is a practical and valuable submaximal test for rowers, which can potentially assist with monitoring, fine-tuning and optimizing training prescription in rowers.

  3. Running Boot Camp

    CERN Document Server

    Toporek, Chuck

    2008-01-01

    When Steve Jobs jumped on stage at Macworld San Francisco 2006 and announced the new Intel-based Macs, the question wasn't if, but when someone would figure out a hack to get Windows XP running on these new "Mactels." Enter Boot Camp, a new system utility that helps you partition and install Windows XP on your Intel Mac. Boot Camp does all the heavy lifting for you. You won't need to open the Terminal and hack on system files or wave a chicken bone over your iMac to get XP running. This free program makes it easy for anyone to turn their Mac into a dual-boot Windows/OS X machine. Running Bo

  4. Several submaximal exercise tests are reliable, valid and acceptable in people with chronic pain, fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ratter

    2014-09-01

    [Ratter J, Radlinger L, Lucas C (2014 Several submaximal exercise tests are reliable, valid and acceptable in people with chronic pain, fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 144–150

  5. EMBL rescue package keeps bioinformatics centre running

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    1999-01-01

    The threat to the EBI arising from the EC refusal to fund its running costs seems to have been temporarily lifted. At a meeting in EMBL, Heidelberg, delegates agreed in principle to make up the shortfall of 5 million euros. A final decision will be taken at a special meeting of the EMBL council in March (1 page).

  6. Evaluation of Exercise Response in a Young, High Risk Population: Submaximal Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (ICPET) in Active Duty Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-17

    Submaximal Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing iCPET in AD Soldiers presented at/published to American College of Cardiology’s 661h Annual...disclaimer statement for research involving animals . as required by AFMAN 40-401 IP : " The experiments reported herein were conducted according to the...principles set forth in the National Institute of Health Publication No. 80-23, Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the Animal

  7. Application of "living high-training low" enhances cardiac function and skeletal muscle oxygenation during submaximal exercises in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hun-Young; Nam, Sang-Seok

    2017-03-31

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of the application of living high-training low (LHTL) on cardiac function and skeletal muscle oxygenation during submaximal exercises compared with that of living low-training low (LLTL) in athletes. Male middle- and long-distance runners (n = 20) were randomly assigned into the LLTL group (n = 10, living at 1000-m altitude and training at 700-1330-m altitude) and the LHTL group (n = 10, living at simulated 3000-m altitude and training at 700-1330-m altitude). Their cardiac function and skeletal muscle oxygenation during submaximal exercises at sea level before and after training at each environmental condition were evaluated. There was a significant interaction only in the stroke volume (SV); however, the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) showed significant main effects within time; HR and SV significantly increased during training in the LHTL group compared with those in the LLTL group. EDV also significantly increased during training in both groups; however, the LHTL group had a higher increase than the LLTL group. ESV significantly increased during training in the LLTL group. There was no significant difference in the ejection fraction and cardiac output. The skeletal muscle oxygen profiles had no significant differences but improved in the LHTL group compared with those in the LLTL group. LHTL can yield favorable effects on cardiac function by improving the HR, SV, EDV, and ESV during submaximal exercises compared with LLTL in athletes.

  8. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older heart failure (HF patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (aged 68 ± 10 years without large (aorta or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2, b physical function, c cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min (p = 0.01. Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p p ≤ 0.03. Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow.

  9. Running Like Crazy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rushin, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-seven years and four wives later, [Jerry Dunn] is still running. On Jan. 8,1995, Dunn paused near the nine-mile mark of the Walt Disney World Marathon in Orlando to marry, in front of Cinderella's Castle, fellow runner Elaine Doll...

  10. Running the rat race

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SASA Refresher Course Texts: Running the rat race. 74. 2014;20(1) ... and feelings of existential despair which characterise the human condition, to emerge as they are today: whole, satisfied, well .... Pure efficiency only exists on paper. In the ...

  11. Optimizing Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widule, Carol J.

    1989-01-01

    The optimization of step length and step rate (frequency) is essential for sprinters. This article analyzes data that compare step rate and step length to height, as a function of running speed, for ten elite runners. How results of such analyses can be used in training runners is also discussed. (IAH)

  12. Effects of Submaximal Endurance Training and Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Pain Threshold in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jalal Taherabadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to beneficial effects of endurance training and vitamin D3 in diabetes mellitus, purpose of this study is effects submaximal endurance training and vitamin D3 supplementation on pain threshold in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats (250±20 g, N=40 were made diabetic by streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, subcutaneously. 72 h after injection diabetes induction was confirmed by tail vein blood glucose concentration (>300 mg/dl. Then animals were divided to five groups: diabetic control (DC, diabetic trained (DT, diabetic -vitamin D (DD, diabetic trained and vitamin D (DTD, and control (C. Animals were submitted to endurance training by treadmill and vitamin D3 treatment (twice aweek, intrapretonally for 4 weeks. 48 h after at the end of exercise and treatment protocol, we used tail-flick to assess the effects of training and vitamin D3 on thermal pain threshold. We used one way ANOVA statistical analysis to compare differences between groups, significance level of p<0.05 was considered.Results: Diabetic induced hyperalgesia were decreased significantly by vitamin D but not 4 weeks endurance exercise training. Concurrent effects of training and vitamin D on thermal pain threshold were not significantly higher than vitamin D effects alone.Conclusion: It is concluded that vitamin D administration given at the time of diabetes induction may be able to restore thermal hyperalgesia. But effects of endurance exercise training needs to more investigation in diabetic rats.

  13. "Tailored" submaximal step test for VO2max prediction in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bellotti, Cecilia; Paterson, Donald H

    2014-04-01

    The authors developed and validated a "tailored" version of the Astrand-Rhyming step test (tA-R) and a new equation for VO2max prediction in older adults (OA). Sixty subjects (age 68 ± 4 yr, 30 male, 30 female) performed their tA-R step test (5-min, 30-cm step, tailored stepping rate) and an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. VO2max was (a) predicted using the standard A-R equation (predicted VO2max), (b) predicted based on the authors' new multiple linear equation (equation VO2max), and (c) directly measured by incremental cycling test (direct VO2max). Agreement among values of VO2max was evaluated by Bland-Altman analysis. The predicted VO2max was not significantly different from the direct VO2max, yet with relatively large imprecision. The equation VO2max allowed more precise as well as accurate predictions of VO2max compared with standard A-R prediction. The "tailored" version of the Astrand-Rhyming step test and the new prediction equation appear suitable for a rapid (5-min), safe (submaximal), accurate, and precise VO2max prediction in healthy OA.

  14. Predictability of maximum voluntary isometric knee extension force from submaximal contractions in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Scott K; Stevens, Jennifer E; Johnson, Christopher D; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop and test a model describing the relationship between the central activation ratio (CAR; a measure of voluntary muscle activation) and percent maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) force for old adults and to provide a method for more accurate determination of voluntary muscle activation failure. Twenty-one adults (ages 64-81) performed isometric testing of the quadriceps at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% MVC. During each contraction, a 100-HZ, 120-ms train of electrical pulses was delivered to the quadriceps muscle to quantify voluntary muscle activation. Similar to a young, healthy population (ages 20-35), a curvilinear relationship existed between the CAR and %MVC force for older adults. Predictions of subjects' MVCs using the linear model of CAR-%MVC force relationship generally demonstrated poor agreement with actual MVCs. Predictions of MVC from submaximal contractions (25%, 50%, and 75%) using a previously identified curvilinear young adult CAR-%MVC relationship were good [ICC (2,1): 0.81, 0.96, and 0.82, respectively]. Similar agreement was obtained from the curvilinear older adult CAR-%MVC relationship. These data suggest that the CAR-%MVC relationship is similar in young and older adult subjects and that curvilinear models of this relationship can predict MVC forces in older adults more accurately. Reexamination of the relationship between the CAR and %MVC force may allow a more accurate determination of how failure of voluntary muscle activation contributes to weakness in old adults.

  15. Live high:train low increases muscle buffer capacity and submaximal cycling efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, C J; Hahn, A G; Aughey, R J; Martin, D T; Ashenden, M J; Clark, S A; Garnham, A P; Roberts, A D; Slater, G J; McKenna, M J

    2001-11-01

    This study investigated whether hypoxic exposure increased muscle buffer capacity (beta(m)) and mechanical efficiency during exercise in male athletes. A control (CON, n=7) and a live high:train low group (LHTL, n=6) trained at near sea level (600 m), with the LHTL group sleeping for 23 nights in simulated moderate altitude (3000 m). Whole body oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured under normoxia before, during and after 23 nights of sleeping in hypoxia, during cycle ergometry comprising 4 x 4-min submaximal stages, 2-min at 5.6 +/- 0.4 W kg(-1), and 2-min 'all-out' to determine total work and VO(2peak). A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was taken at rest and after a standardized 2-min 5.6 +/- 0.4 W kg(-1) bout, before and after LHTL, and analysed for beta(m) and metabolites. After LHTL, beta(m) was increased (18%, P buffer capacity. Further, reduced VO2 during normoxic exercise after LHTL suggests that improved exercise efficiency is a fundamental adaptation to LHTL.

  16. Relationship between the Pedaling Biomechanics and Strain of Bicycle Frame during Submaximal Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneliya V. Manolova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of forces applied to pedals and cranks on the strain imposed to an instrumented bicycle motocross (BMX frame. Using results from a finite element analysis to determine the localisation of highest stress, eight strain gauges were located on the down tube, the seat tube and the right chain stay. Before the pedaling tests, static loads were applied to the frame during bench tests. Two pedaling conditions have been analysed. In the first, the rider was in static standing position on the pedals and applied maximal muscular isometric force to the right pedal. The second pedaling condition corresponds to three pedaling sprint tests at submaximal intensities at 150, 300 and 550 W on a cycle-trainer. The results showed that smaller strain was observed in the pedaling condition than in the rider static standing position condition. The highest strains were located in the seat tube and the right chain stay near the bottom bracket area. The maximum stress observed through all conditions was 41 MPa on the right chain stay. This stress was 11 times lower than the yield stress of the frame material (460 MPa. This protocol could help to adapt the frame design to the riders as a function of their force and mechanical power output. These results could also help design BMX frames for specific populations (females and rider morphology.

  17. Stability Ball Sitting versus Chair Sitting During Sub-maximal Arm Ergometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Charles R C; Hylland, Kristina E; Terrell, Jacob

    It was predicted that sitting on a stability ball during arm ergometry would elevate cardiovascular parameters when compared to sitting on a chair and that this would be associated with greater recruitment of trunk and leg skeletal muscles. Open-circuit spirometry, videotaping, blood pressure, heart rate, and EMG were conducted during rest and four minute stages of 15 W, 30 W, and 45 W using a Monark arm ergometer. Twenty-six apparently healthy adults exercised twice, once sitting on a stability ball and the other sitting on a chair (order randomized), with 45 to 60 minutes of rest between. ANOVA for repeated measures and paired-t testing were used for analysis. Oxygen consumption was significantly 10 to 16% higher during exercise while sitting on the stability ball. There were no significant differences between sitting modes for heart rate, SBP, and DBP. Also, resting and exercise rectus femoris and 45 W external oblique EMGs were significantly higher on the stability ball. Finally, the knee was significantly more extended with the feet farther apart and more forward on the stability ball. The stability ball significantly elevates oxygen consumption during sub-maximal arm cranking without significantly increasing heart rate or blood pressure and this is associated with increased thigh muscle activation and lower leg repositioning.

  18. Is the ventilatory threshold coincident with maximal fat oxidation during submaximal exercise in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, T A

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the fraction of peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) that elicits maximal rates of fat oxidation during submaximal treadmill exercise. It was hypothesized that this point would appear at a work rate just below the ventilatory threshold. subjects completed a protocol requiring them to exercise for 15 min on a treadmill at six different workloads, 25, 40, 55, 65, 75, and 85% VO2peak, over two separate visits. nine healthy, moderately-trained eumenorrheic females (age = 28.8+/-5.99 yrs, VO2peak = 47.20 +/-2.57 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered for the study. a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to test for differences across exercise intensities in the metabolic variables (i.e. substrate oxidation, blood lactate concentration ([La-]), RER, and the contribution of fat to total energy expenditure). Following significant F ratios, post-hoc tests were used to detect differences between the means for various exercise intensities. Exercise at 75% VO2peak elicited the greatest rate of fat oxidation (4.75+/-0.49 kcal x min(-1)), and this intensity was coincident with the ventilatory threshold (76+/-7.41% VO2peak). Moreover, a significant difference (t(8) = -3.98, ppopulation has application in exercise prescription and refutes the belief that low-intensity exercise is preferred for fat metabolism.

  19. Effects of synchronous music on treadmill running among elite triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Peter C; Karageorghis, Costas I; Saha, Alessandra Mecozzi; D'Auria, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    Music can provide ergogenic, psychological, and psychophysical benefits during physical activity, especially when movements are performed synchronously with music. The present study developed the train of research on synchronous music and extended it to elite athletes. Repeated-measures laboratory experiment. Elite triathletes (n=11) ran in time to self-selected motivational music, a neutral equivalent and a no-music control during submaximal and exhaustive treadmill running. Measured variables were time-to-exhaustion, mood responses, feeling states, RPE, blood lactate concentration, oxygen consumption and running economy. Time-to-exhaustion was 18.1% and 19.7% longer, respectively, when running in time to motivational and neutral music, compared to no music. Mood responses and feeling states were more positive with motivational music compared to either neutral music or no music. RPE was lowest for neutral music and highest for the no-music control. Blood lactate concentrations were lowest for motivational music. Oxygen consumption was lower with music by 1.0%-.7%. Both music conditions were associated with better running economy than the no-music control. Although neutral music did not produce the same level of psychological benefits as motivational music, it proved equally beneficial in terms of time-to-exhaustion and oxygen consumption. In functional terms, the motivational qualities of music may be less important than the prominence of its beat and the degree to which participants are able to synchronise their movements to its tempo. Music provided ergogenic, psychological and physiological benefits in a laboratory study and its judicious use during triathlon training should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  20. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Addiction? » Does Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_ ... English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz Matt's ...

  1. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  2. Stroller running: Energetic and kinematic changes across pushing methods

    OpenAIRE

    Alcantara, Ryan S.; Wall-Scheffler, Cara M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Running with a stroller provides an opportunity for parents to exercise near their child and counteract health declines experienced during early parenthood. Understanding biomechanical and physiological changes that occur when stroller running is needed to evaluate its health impact, yet the effects of stroller running have not been clearly presented. Here, three commonly used stroller pushing methods were investigated to detect potential changes in energetic cost and lower-limb kin...

  3. Running Training, Instruction on Running Technique, and Running Economy in 10-year-old Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petray, Clayre K.; Krahenbuhl, Gary S.

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the effects of running training, instruction on running techniques, or a combination of instruction and training on the running economy of 10-year-old children. No significant alterations in running economy or technique were produced as a result of the various regimens. (Author/MT)

  4. The Full Cost of Intercity Highway Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    David Levinson; David Gillen

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we review the theoretical and empirical literature on the cost structure of the provision of intercity highway transportation and specify and estimate our own cost functions . We develop a full cost model which identifies the key cost components and then estimate costs component by component: user costs, infrastructure costs, time and congestion costs, noise costs, accident costs, and pollution costs. The total long run average cost is $0.34 per vehicle kilometer traveled. The s...

  5. Acute Warm-up Effects in Submaximal Athletes: An EMG Study of Skilled Violinists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrary, J Matt; Halaki, Mark; Sorkin, Evgeny; Ackermann, Bronwen J

    2016-02-01

    Warm-up is commonly recommended for injury prevention and performance enhancement across all activities, yet this recommendation is not supported by evidence for repetitive submaximal activities such as instrumental music performance. The objective of this study is to quantify the effects of cardiovascular, core muscle, and musical warm-ups on muscle activity levels, musical performance, and subjective experience in skilled violinists. Fifty-five undergraduate, postgraduate, or professional violinists performed five randomly ordered 45-s musical excerpts of varying physical demands both before and after a randomly assigned 15-min, moderate-intensity cardiovascular, core muscle, musical (technical violin exercises), or inactive control warm-up protocol. Surface EMG data were obtained for 16 muscles of the trunk, shoulders, and right arm during each musical performance. Sound recording and perceived exertion (RPE) data were also obtained. Sound recordings were randomly ordered and rated for performance quality by blinded adjudicators. Questionnaire data regarding participant pain sites and fitness levels were used to stratify participants according to pain and fitness levels. Data were analyzed using two- and three-factor ANCOVA (surface EMG and sound recording) and Wilcoxon matched pairs tests (RPE). None of the three warm-up protocols had significant effects on muscle activity levels (P ≥ 0.10). Performance quality did not significantly increase (P ≥ 0.21). RPE significantly decreased (P 0.23). Acute physiological and musical benefits from cardiovascular, core muscle, and musical warm-ups in skilled violinists are limited to decreases in RPE. This investigation provides data from the performing arts in support of sports medical evidence suggesting that warm-up only effectively enhances maximal strength and power performance.

  6. Cortical and spinal mechanisms of task failure of sustained submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra S Williams

    Full Text Available In this and the subsequent companion paper, results are presented that collectively seek to delineate the contribution that supraspinal circuits have in determining the time to task failure (TTF of sustained submaximal contractions. The purpose of this study was to compare adjustments in supraspinal and spinal excitability taken concurrently throughout the performance of two different fatigue tasks with identical mechanical demands but different TTF (i.e., force-matching and position-matching tasks. On separate visits, ten healthy volunteers performed the force-matching or position-matching task at 15% of maximum strength with the elbow flexors to task failure. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, paired-pulse TMS, paired cortico-cervicomedullary stimulation, and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were delivered in a 6-stimuli sequence at baseline and every 2-3 minutes throughout fatigue-task performance. Contrary to expectations, the force-matching task TTF was 42% shorter (17.5 ± 7.9 min than the position-matching task (26.9 ± 15.11 min; p0.05. Therefore, failure occurred after a similar mean decline in motorneuron excitability developed (p0.10 and an index of upstream excitation of the motor cortex remained constant (p>0.40. Together, these results suggest that as fatigue develops prior to task failure, the increase in corticospinal excitability observed in relationship to the decrease in spinal excitability results from a combination of decreasing intracortical inhibition with constant levels of intracortical facilitation and upstream excitability that together eventually fail to provide the input to the motor cortex necessary for descending drive to overcome the spinal cord resistance, thereby contributing to task failure.

  7. Cortical and Spinal Mechanisms of Task Failure of Sustained Submaximal Fatiguing Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Petra S.; Hoffman, Richard L.; Clark, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    In this and the subsequent companion paper, results are presented that collectively seek to delineate the contribution that supraspinal circuits have in determining the time to task failure (TTF) of sustained submaximal contractions. The purpose of this study was to compare adjustments in supraspinal and spinal excitability taken concurrently throughout the performance of two different fatigue tasks with identical mechanical demands but different TTF (i.e., force-matching and position-matching tasks). On separate visits, ten healthy volunteers performed the force-matching or position-matching task at 15% of maximum strength with the elbow flexors to task failure. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), paired-pulse TMS, paired cortico-cervicomedullary stimulation, and brachial plexus electrical stimulation were delivered in a 6-stimuli sequence at baseline and every 2–3 minutes throughout fatigue-task performance. Contrary to expectations, the force-matching task TTF was 42% shorter (17.5±7.9 min) than the position-matching task (26.9±15.11 min; pmuscle fatigue (p = 0.59). There were no task-specific differences for the total amount or rate of change in the neurophysiologic outcome variables over time (p>0.05). Therefore, failure occurred after a similar mean decline in motorneuron excitability developed (p0.10) and an index of upstream excitation of the motor cortex remained constant (p>0.40). Together, these results suggest that as fatigue develops prior to task failure, the increase in corticospinal excitability observed in relationship to the decrease in spinal excitability results from a combination of decreasing intracortical inhibition with constant levels of intracortical facilitation and upstream excitability that together eventually fail to provide the input to the motor cortex necessary for descending drive to overcome the spinal cord resistance, thereby contributing to task failure. PMID:24667484

  8. TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY OF THE AEROBIC POWER INDEX SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE TEST IN CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie J. Furzer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of the Aerobic Power Index (API submaximal cardiorespiratory exercise test, as well as associated variables of oxygen uptake (ml·kg-1·min-1 and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE in cancer patients who are generally unable to complete maximal or lengthy aerobic fitness tests. Twenty male and female participants (11 male; 9 female aged between 18 and 70 y (mean = 53.28 ± 11. 82 y were recruited with medical consent within 4 weeks of completing chemotherapy treatment for a lymphohaematopoietic cancer (LHC. Of the twenty recruited participants' 2 were excluded from analysis due to disease relapse or complications unrelated to testing occurring within the month following testing. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC scores for power output (W·kg-1 and oxygen uptake (ml·kg-1·min-1 were highly reliable (R1 = 0.96 and 0.96, respectively and the ICC for RPE was moderately reliable (R1 = 0.83. Technical error of measurement results for power output (W·kg-1, oxygen uptake (ml·kg-1·min-1 and RPE were 0.11W·kg-1, 1.18 ml·kg-1·min-1 and 1.0 respectively. A Pearson's product-moment correlation demonstrated a strong relationship between power output (W·kg-1 and oxygen uptake (ml·kg-1·min-1 for both trials (r = 0.93 and 0.89, respectively. Results demonstrate that the API test is a highly reliable protocol for use with a LHC population and can be considered a clinically feasible, safe and tolerable exercise test

  9. A submaximal test for the assessment of knee extensor endurance capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruiter, Cornelis J; Mallee, Max I P; Leloup, Lara E C; De Haan, Arnold

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to develop an undemanding test for endurance capacity of the knee extensor muscles, which can also be applied to frail participants. We hypothesized 1) that the first objective indications for peripheral fatigue during incremental unilateral repetitive isometric knee extensor contractions could be used to assess a fatigue threshold (FT), 2) that torque at FT would depend on training status, and 3) that this torque could easily be sustained for 30 min. Five trained and five untrained participants performed 5-min bouts of 60 repetitive contractions (3-s on and 2-s off). Torque, set at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), was increased by 5% MVC in subsequent bouts. The highest torque for which rectified surface EMG remained stable during the bout was defined as the FT. On separate occasions, 30-min bouts were performed at and above the FT to assess sustainable torque. Changes in gas exchange parameters, HR, and RPE were monitored to corroborate FT. At FT (RPE = 5.7 ± 1.7), torque was higher (P MVC) than in untrained participants (30.5% ± 1.8% MVC). Sustainable torque was ∼4% higher than (P MVC, significant increases in rectified surface EMG and V˙O2 were found. During incremental knee extensor contractions, FT could be assessed at a submaximal exercise intensity. FT was higher in trained than in untrained participants and was related to exercise sustainability. With the use of FT, changes in endurance capacity of single muscle groups can potentially also be determined in frail participants for whom exercise performed until exhaustion is unwarranted.

  10. The Effect of Acute Sub-Maximal Endurance Exercise on Serum Angiogenic Indices in Sedentary Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Ranjbar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endurance training increases capillary density of skeletal muscle, but the molecular mechanism of this process is not yet clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute sub maximal endurance exercise on serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and matrix metaloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in sedentary men. Materials and Methods: Twelve healthy men (22.37±2.30 years, BMI=23.16 ±2.61 kg/mP 2 P participated in this study. Subjects exercised for 1h at 70% of VOR2R max, 3 days after the VOR2R max determination. Antecubital vein blood was collected at rest, immediately and 2h after the exercise. Serum VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were measured by ELISA methods5T. Results: Serum levels of VEGF and MMP-2 decreased immediately after the exercise. 2 hours after the exercise, serum levels of VEGF remained at a lower level but serum MMP-2 returned to its basal level. Also, serum levels of MMP-9 did not change significantly in response to exercise5T. Conclusion: Acute sub-maximal endurance exercise decreased the main factors involved in development of capillary density in sedentary men. This might to due to the fact that, sub maximal exercise could not provide the two main stimulating factors of angiogenesis, i.e. Shear stress and hypoxia. It could also be explained by the fact that the mechanism of development of capillary network following regular endurance training is different from that following an acute exercise5T.5T

  11. Prediction of Maximum Oxygen Consumption from Walking, Jogging, or Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gary E.; George, James D.; Alexander, Jeffrey L.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; Aldana, Steve G.; Parcell, Allen C.

    2002-01-01

    Developed a cardiorespiratory endurance test that retained the inherent advantages of submaximal testing while eliminating reliance on heart rate measurement in predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). College students completed three exercise tests. The 1.5-mile endurance test predicted VO2max from submaximal exercise without requiring heart…

  12. Ubuntu Up and Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Ubuntu for everyone! This popular Linux-based operating system is perfect for people with little technical background. It's simple to install, and easy to use -- with a strong focus on security. Ubuntu: Up and Running shows you the ins and outs of this system with a complete hands-on tour. You'll learn how Ubuntu works, how to quickly configure and maintain Ubuntu 10.04, and how to use this unique operating system for networking, business, and home entertainment. This book includes a DVD with the complete Ubuntu system and several specialized editions -- including the Mythbuntu multimedia re

  13. PDU Run 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  14. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  15. Comparing the Effects of Rest and Massage on Return to Homeostasis Following Submaximal Aerobic Exercise: a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Portia B

    2016-03-01

    Postexercise massage can be used to help promote recovery from exercise on the cellular level, as well as systemically by increasing parasympathetic activity. No studies to date have been done to assess the effects of massage on postexercise metabolic changes, including excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of massage recovery and resting recovery on a subject's heart rate variability and selected metabolic effects following a submaximal treadmill exercise session. One healthy 24-year-old female subject performed 30 minutes of submaximal treadmill exercise prior to resting or massage recovery sessions. Metabolic data were collected throughout the exercise sessions and at three 10 minute intervals postexercise. Heart rate variability was evaluated for 10 minutes after each of two 30-minute recovery sessions, either resting or massage. Heart rate returned to below resting levels (73 bpm) with 30 and 60 minutes of massage recovery (72 bpm and 63 bpm, respectively) compared to 30 and 60 minutes of resting recovery (77 bpm and 74 bpm, respectively). Heart rate variability data showed a more immediate shift to the parasympathetic state following 30 minutes of massage (1.152 LF/HF ratio) versus the 30-minute resting recovery (6.91 LF/HF ratio). It took 60 minutes of resting recovery to reach similar heart rate variability levels (1.216 LF/HF) found after 30 minutes of massage. Ventilations after 30 minutes of massage recovery averaged 7.1 bpm compared to 17.9 bpm after 30 minutes of resting recovery. No differences in EPOC were observed through either the resting or massage recovery based on the metabolic data collected. Massage was used to help the subject shift into parasympathetic activity more quickly than rest alone following a submaximal exercise session.

  16. Comparing the Effects of Rest and Massage on Return to Homeostasis Following Submaximal Aerobic Exercise: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Portia B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postexercise massage can be used to help promote recovery from exercise on the cellular level, as well as systemically by increasing parasympathetic activity. No studies to date have been done to assess the effects of massage on postexercise metabolic changes, including excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of massage recovery and resting recovery on a subject’s heart rate variability and selected metabolic effects following a submaximal treadmill exercise session. Methods One healthy 24-year-old female subject performed 30 minutes of submaximal treadmill exercise prior to resting or massage recovery sessions. Metabolic data were collected throughout the exercise sessions and at three 10 minute intervals postexercise. Heart rate variability was evaluated for 10 minutes after each of two 30-minute recovery sessions, either resting or massage. Results Heart rate returned to below resting levels (73 bpm) with 30 and 60 minutes of massage recovery (72 bpm and 63 bpm, respectively) compared to 30 and 60 minutes of resting recovery (77 bpm and 74 bpm, respectively). Heart rate variability data showed a more immediate shift to the parasympathetic state following 30 minutes of massage (1.152 LF/HF ratio) versus the 30-minute resting recovery (6.91 LF/HF ratio). It took 60 minutes of resting recovery to reach similar heart rate variability levels (1.216 LF/HF) found after 30 minutes of massage. Ventilations after 30 minutes of massage recovery averaged 7.1 bpm compared to 17.9 bpm after 30 minutes of resting recovery. Conclusions No differences in EPOC were observed through either the resting or massage recovery based on the metabolic data collected. Massage was used to help the subject shift into parasympathetic activity more quickly than rest alone following a submaximal exercise session. PMID:26977215

  17. The effect of menstruation on chosen physiological and biochemical reactions caused by the physical effort with the submaximal intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Zieliński

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the influence of the menstruation phase on changes of respective indicators of the gas exchange and on biochemical parameters of blood during physical efforts with the sub-maximal intensity. Fifteen female students of the Academy of Physical Education took part in the study. Girls were aged from 19 to 22 years old and did not practice sports. The effort tests were conducted in the follicular and luteal phase of two succeeding menstrual cycles. As far the aerobic capacity determination is concerned, one cyclo-ergometric test with graded effort was conducted and it was performed till the “refusal”. It allowed to mark a threshold (TDMA and a maximal level of physiological and biochemical indicators. Basing on the results of the graded test individual loads were determined for every next effort trial (repeated 4 times in every phase of the two succeeding menstrual cycles. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the reaction of women’s constitution on work with the sub-maximal intensity. The above trial consisted on two 10 min efforts divided with the 2 min pause (the first effort with the intensity of 80% of the TDMA threshold, second with the intensity bigger about 30-40% of difference between TDMA and a maximal load established by the graded test. The research did not reveal statistically significant differentiation as considering effort changes of basic physiological and biochemical indicators, determining reaction of women’s organisms on work with the sub- and over- threshold intensity (TDMA. It showed that menstruation has not significant effect on the level of changes of analysed parameters caused by the physical effort with the sub-maximal intensity.

  18. Prophylactic ankle taping: influence on treadmill-running kinematics and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Sally; Braun, William A

    2014-02-01

    Prophylactic ankle taping (PAT) is commonly used in sport. Prophylactic ankle taping may restrict ankle motion, which would affect the kinetic chain and alter gait. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PAT on lower extremity (LE) kinematics and running economy during treadmill running. Twelve recreational runners (9 women, 3 men; M ± SD age = 31.33 ± 8.04 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.81 m, mass = 61.84 ± 9.38 kg) completed two 20-minute running sessions (PAT and no tape: control [CON]) at a self-selected pace. Before each run, reflective markers were placed along the right side of the body. Sagittal plane kinematic data (60 Hz) were captured 4 times, and expired gases were measured for 2-minute after each video capture during both trials. Stride frequency, stride length, LE kinematic variables at initial contact and end contact (EC) were calculated. Cardiorespiratory variables and heart rate were also measured. Running economy was normalized to oxygen uptake per unit body mass per kilometer (milliliter per kilogram per kilometer) as running speeds varied. At EC, the PAT hip angle significantly decreased (p = 0.01) by 3.82°, whereas CON decreased by 0.85°. The range of motion tended to decrease over the 20-minute run (p = 0.08). Heart rate significantly increased over time (6.7%) but was not different between conditions. Prophylactic ankle taping did not significantly affect the physiological measures associated with the metabolic cost of treadmill running or the other kinematic variables. These findings suggest that the hip angle continued to decrease during the PAT condition at push-off in recreational runners without impacting the metabolic cost of transport.

  19. Submaximal cardiopulmonary thresholds on a robotics-assisted tilt table, a cycle and a treadmill: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengsuwan, Jittima; Nef, Tobias; Laubacher, Marco; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-11-10

    The robotics-assisted tilt table (RATT), including actuators for tilting and cyclical leg movement, is used for rehabilitation of severely disabled neurological patients. Following further engineering development of the system, i.e. the addition of force sensors and visual bio-feedback, patients can actively participate in exercise testing and training on the device. Peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters were previously investigated, but it also important to compare submaximal parameters with standard devices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the RATT for estimation of submaximal exercise thresholds by comparison with a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 17 healthy subjects randomly performed six maximal individualized incremental exercise tests, with two tests on each of the three exercise modalities. The ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) were determined from breath-by-breath data. VAT and RCP on the RATT were lower than the cycle ergometer and the treadmill: oxygen uptake (V'O2) at VAT was [mean (SD)] 1.2 (0.3), 1.5 (0.4) and 1.6 (0.5) L/min, respectively (p < 0.001); V'O2 at RCP was 1.7 (0.4), 2.3 (0.8) and 2.6 (0.9) L/min, respectively (p = 0.001). High correlations for VAT and RCP were found between the RATT vs the cycle ergometer and RATT vs the treadmill (R on the range 0.69-0.80). VAT and RCP demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability for all three devices (ICC from 0.81 to 0.98). Mean differences between the test and retest values on each device were close to zero. The ventilatory equivalent for O2 at VAT for the RATT and cycle ergometer were similar and both were higher than the treadmill. The ventilatory equivalent for CO2 at RCP was similar for all devices. Ventilatory equivalent parameters demonstrated fair-to-excellent reliability and repeatability. It is feasible to use the RATT for estimation of submaximal exercise thresholds: VAT and RCP on the RATT were lower than the

  20. Substrate utilization during submaximal exercise in children with a severely obese parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaves Audrey D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported a reduction in fatty acid oxidation (FAO at the whole-body level and in skeletal muscle in severely obese (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 individuals; this defect is retained in cell culture suggesting an inherent component. The purpose of the current study was to determine if an impairment in whole-body fatty acid oxidation (FAO was also evident in children with a severely obese parent. Methods Substrate utilization during submaximal exercise (cycle ergometer was determined in children ages 8–12 y with a severely obese parent (OP, n = 13 or two lean/non-obese (BMI range of 18 to 28 kg/m2 parents (LP, n = 13. A subgroup of subjects (n = 3/group performed 4 weeks of exercise training with substrate utilization measured after the intervention. Results The children did not differ in age (LP vs. OP, respectively (10.7 ± 0.5 vs. 10.2 ± 0.5 y, BMI percentile (65.3 ± 5.2 vs. 75.9 ± 7, Tanner Stage (1.4 ± 0.2 vs. 1.5 ± 0.2, VO2peak (40.3 ± 2.7 vs. 35.6 ± 2.6 ml/kg/min or physical activity levels (accelerometer. At the same absolute workload of 15 W (~38% VO2peak, RER was significantly (P ≤ 0.05 lower in LP vs. OP (0.83 ± 0.02 vs. 0.87 ± 0.01 which was reflected in a reduced reliance on FAO for energy production in the OP group (58.6 ± 5.1 vs. 43.1 ± 4.0% of energy needs during exercise from FAO. At a higher exercise intensity (~65% VO2peak there were no differences in substrate utilization between LP and OP. After exercise training RER tended to decrease (P = 0.06 at the 15 W workload, suggesting an increased reliance on FAO regardless of group. Conclusions These findings suggest that the decrement in FAO with severe obesity has an inherent component that may be overcome with exercise training.

  1. Analysing visual pattern of skin temperature during submaximal and maximal exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Gorkem Aybars; Basaran, Tahsin; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study were to examine our hypotheses assuming that (a) skin temperature patterns would differ between submaximal exercise (SE) and graded maximal exercise test (GXT) and (b) thermal kinetics of Tskin occurring in SE and GXT might be similar in a homogenous cohort. Core temperature (Tcore) also observed in order to evaluate thermoregulatory responses to SE and GXT. Eleven moderately to well-trained male athletes were volunteered for the study (age: 22.2 ± 3.7 years; body mass: 73.8 ± 6.9 kg; height: 181 ± 6.3 cm; body surface area 1.93 ± 0.1 m2; body fat: 12.6% ± 4.2%; V ˙ O2max: 54 ± 9.9 mL min-1 kg-1). Under stabilized environmental conditions in climatic chamber, GXT to volitional exhaustion and 20-min SE at 60% of VO2max were performed on cycle ergometer. Thermal analyses were conducted in 2-min intervals throughout exercise tests. Tskin was monitored by a thermal camera, while Tcore was recorded via an ingestible telemetric temperature sensor. Thermal kinetic analyses showed that Tskin gradually decreased till the 7.58 ± 1.03th minutes, and then initiated to increase till the end of SE (Rsqr = 0.97), while Tskin gradually decreased throughout the GXT (Rsqr = 0.89). Decrease in the level of Tskin during the GXT was significantly below from the SE [F (4, 40) = 2.67, p = 0.07, ηp2 = 0.211]. In the meantime, Tcore continuously increased throughout the SE and GXT (p 0.05). However, total heat energies were calculated as 261.5 kJ/m2 and 416 kJ/m2 for GXT and SE, respectively (p exercises as expected. Tskin curves patterns found to be associated amongst participants at both GXT and SE. Therefore, Tskin kinetics may ensure an important data for monitoring thermoregulation in exercise.

  2. Gender differences in substrate utilization during submaximal exercise in endurance-trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Steffensen, Charlotte H; Madsen, Marianne; Stallknecht, Bente; Kanstrup, Inge-Lis; Richter, Erik A; Kiens, Bente

    2002-02-01

    Substrate utilization across the leg during 90 min of bicycle exercise at 58% of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)) was studied in seven endurance-trained males and seven endurance-trained, eumenorrheic females by applying arteriovenous catheterization, stable isotopes, and muscle biopsies. The female and male groups were matched according to VO(2 peak) per kilogram of lean body mass, physical activity level, and training history of the subjects. All subjects consumed the same diet, well controlled in terms of nutrient composition as well as energy content, for 8 days preceding the experiment, and all females were tested in the midfollicular phase of the menstrual cycle. During exercise, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and leg respiratory quotient (RQ) were similar in females and males. Myocellular triacylglycerol (TG) degradation was negligible in males but amounted to 12.4 +/- 3.2 mmol/kg dry wt in females and corresponded to 25.0 +/- 6.0 and 5.0 +/- 7.3% of total oxygen uptake in females and males, respectively (P < 0.05). Utilization of plasma fatty acids (12.0 +/- 2.5 and 9.6 +/- 1.5%), blood glucose (13.6 +/- 1.5 and 14.3 +/- 1.5%), and glycogen (48.5 +/- 4.9 and 42.8 +/- 2.1%) were similar in females and males. Thus, in females, measured substrate oxidation accounted for 99% of the leg oxygen uptake, whereas in males 28% of leg oxygen uptake was unaccounted for in terms of measured oxidized lipid substrates. These findings may indicate that males utilized additional lipid sources, presumably very low density lipoprotein-TG or TG located between muscle fibers. On the basis of RER and leg RQ, it is concluded that no gender difference existed in the relative contribution from carbohydrate and lipids to the oxidative metabolism across the leg during submaximal exercise at the same relative workload. However, an effect of gender appears to occur in the utilization of the different lipid sources.

  3. Effect of post-exercise hydrotherapy water temperature on subsequent exhaustive running performance in normothermic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Alan; Crampton, David; Egaña, Mikel

    2013-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of cold water immersion (CWI) in normothermic conditions, little data is available on its effect on subsequent endurance performance. This study examined the effect of CWI as a recovery strategy on subsequent running performance in normothermic ambient conditions (∼22°C). Nine endurance-trained men completed two submaximal exhaustive running bouts on three separate occasions. The running bouts (Ex1 and Ex2) were separated by 15min of un-immersed seated rest (CON), hip-level CWI at 8°C (CWI-8) or hip-level CWI at 15°C (CWI-15). Intestinal temperature, blood lactate and heart rate were recorded throughout and V˙O2, running economy and exercise times were recorded during the running sessions. Running time to failure (min) during Ex2 was significantly (p<0.05, ES=0.7) longer following CWI-8 (27.7±6.3) than CON (23.3±5) but not different between CWI-15 (26.3±3.4) and CON (p=0.06, ES=0.7) or CWI-8 and CWI-15 (p=0.4, ES=0.2). Qualitative analyses showed a 95% and 89% likely beneficial effect of CWI-8 and CWI-15 during Ex2 compared with CON, respectively. Time to failure during Ex2 was significantly shorter than Ex1 only during the CON condition. Intestinal temperature and HR were significantly lower for most of Ex2 during CWI-8 and CWI-15 compared with CON but they were similar at failure for the three conditions. Blood lactate, running economy and V˙O2 were not altered by CWI. These data indicate that a 15min period of cold water immersion applied between repeated exhaustive exercise bouts significantly reduces intestinal temperature and enhances post-immersion running performance in normothermic conditions. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Test retest reliability and minimal detectable change of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James D; Bandy, William D; Whittemore, Joe D

    2011-05-01

    Measurement of graded exercise test duration is clinically important and can be assessed by maximal graded exercise testing. Yet, limitations of maximal graded exercise testing exist. An alternative to maximal graded exercise testing is submaximal graded exercise testing. However, no studies have investigated the reliability of a submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. The purpose of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) of a novel submaximal graded exercise test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration. Fifteen people (4 men, 11 women) with a mean age of 26.20 years (SD = 9.04) participated in this study. A novel submaximal graded exercise test was used to measure graded exercise test duration for each participant. Endpoints of the test were either 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate or voluntarily stopping the test, whichever endpoint occurred first. Heart rate and graded exercise test duration were constantly measured throughout the test. Graded exercise test duration was defined as the total duration (minutes) of the test. For all participants, the submaximal graded exercise test was conducted at baseline and 48-72 hours thereafter. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the test-retest reliability of the test in determining graded exercise test duration was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.83-0.98). The MDC of the test in the measurement of graded exercise test duration was 0.86 minutes. The results suggest that clinicians can use this novel submaximal graded exercise test to reliably measure graded exercise test duration with a measurement error, as expressed by the MDC, of 0.86 minutes.

  5. Isokinetic performance capacity of trunk muscles. Part II: Coefficient of variation in isokinetic measurement in maximal effort and in submaximal effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, S; Hupli, M; Alaranta, H; Hurri, H

    1996-12-01

    It has been claimed that with the aid of isokinetic trunk strength measuring devices it is possible to distinguish true muscular weakness from submaximal effort in the test. This proposition is based on the presumption that in the isokinetic trunk strength test identical performances can only be reproduced by maximal effort. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to distinguish maximal effort from submaximal with the aid of the coefficient of variation (CV) in an isokinetic trunk muscle strength test. The study group included 35 (21 male and 14 female) subjects of whom 12 were healthy, 10 had a mild low-back pain and 13 had a more severe chronic low-back pain. The subjects performed five consecutive bendings both with maximal (100%) and submaximal (50%) efforts at a speed of 90 degrees/second. In maximal effort only healthy subjects reached an average level of CV close to 10% both in extension and in flexion. In the chronic low-back pain group the average CV was close to 20%. The difference in CV was statistically significant (p < 0.05-0.02) between the healthy and the chronic low-back pain subjects. In the submaximal effort all health groups had a CV of approximately 20% or more and no significant differences were found. The group of slightly variable measurements (CV = 11-20%) was remarkably large in both the maximal and submaximal effort. The results suggest that an effort with a CV of 11-20% cannot be classified as definitely submaximal or maximal. When the CV is less than 10% the effort can be fairly certainly classified as maximal.

  6. Influence of shoes increasing dorsiflexion and decreasing metatarsus flexion on lower limb muscular activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgit, David; Millet, Guillaume Y; Fuchslocher, Jörg

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare electromyographic activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running among 3 different dorsiflexion shoes (+2 degrees , +4 degrees , and +10 degrees ) and standard shoes (-4 degrees ). The 3 different dorsiflexion shoes tested in this study have a curvature placed in the middle of the sole. This design was specially projected to decrease the metatarsus flexion. Electromyographic activity of 9 lower limb muscles was measured on 12 healthy female subjects during 5 fitness exercises (unload squat, side and front step, submaximal ballistic plantar flexion, and lunge exercise), and during running (10 km x h(-1)) and walking (4.5 km x h(-1)) on a treadmill. EMG signal was analyzed with the root mean square (RMS) and integrated EMG. All RMS data measured during these exercises were expressed as percentages of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. The results show that dorsiflexion affects muscle recruitment and reorganizes the motor pattern. The general tendency was that the tibialis anterior activity increased with dorsiflexion. However, an optimal dorsiflexion existed for various exercises. It is concluded that shoes with moderate dorsiflexion can activate lower limb muscles differently compared with both standard shoes and shoes with large dorsiflexion during submaximal exercises and locomotion.

  7. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope, a new submaximal parameter in evaluating exercise capacity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laethem, Christophe; Bartunek, Jozef; Goethals, Marc; Nellens, Paul; Andries, Erik; Vanderheyden, Marc

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a new submaximal parameter which objectively predicts the maximal exercise capacity in children and healthy subjects. However, the usefulness of OUES in adult patients with and without advanced heart failure remains undetermined. The present study investigates the stability and the usefulness of OUES in adult cardiac patients with and without heart failure. Forty-five patients with advanced heart failure (group A) and 35 patients with ischemic heart disease but normal left ventricular ejection fraction (group B) performed a maximal exercise test. PeakVO2 and percentage of predicted peakVO2 were markers of maximal exercise capacity, whereas OUES, ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT), and slope VE/VCO2 were calculated as parameters of submaximal exercise. Group A patients had lower peakVO2 (P slope VE/VCO2 (P slope VE/VCO2, and OUES (all P slope VE/VCO2 (r = -.492, P failure patients unable to perform a maximal exercise test. Further studies are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  8. Comparing VO2max determined by using the relation between heart rate and accelerometry with submaximal estimated VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönis, T M; Gorter, K; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M M R; Hermens, H

    2012-08-01

    An exploratory study to identify parameters that can be used for estimating a subject's cardio-respiratory physical fitness level, expressed as VO2max, from a combination of heart rate and 3D accelerometer data. Data were gathered from 41 healthy subjects (23 male, 18 female) aged between 20 and 29 years. The measurement protocol consisted of a sub-maximal single stage treadmill walking test for VO2max estimation followed by a walking test at two different speeds (4 and 5.5 kmh-1) for parameter determination. The relation between measured heart rate and accelerometer output at different walking speeds was used to get an indication of exercise intensity and the corresponding heart rate at that intensity. Regression analysis was performed using general subject measures (age, gender, weight, length, BMI) and intercept and slope of the relation between heart rate and accelerometer output during walking as independent variables to estimate the VO2max. A linear regression model using a combination of the slope and intercept parameters, together with gender revealed the highest percentage of explained variance (R2 = 0.90) and had a standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 2.052 mL O2kg-1min-1 with VO2max. Results are comparable with current commonly used sub-maximal laboratory tests to estimate VO2max. The combination of heart rate and accelerometer data seems promising for ambulant estimation of VO2max-.

  9. Exposure to a combination of heat and hyperoxia during cycling at submaximal intensity does not alter thermoregulatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Zinner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we tested the hypothesis that breathing hyperoxic air (FinO2 = 0.40 while exercising in a hot environment exerts negative effects on the total tissue level of haemoglobin concentration (tHb; core (Tcore and skin (Tskin temperatures; muscle activity; heart rate; blood concentration of lactate; pH; partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 and carbon dioxide; arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2; and perceptual responses. Ten well-trained male athletes cycled at submaximal intensity at 21°C or 33°C in randomized order: first for 20 min while breathing normal air (FinO2 = 0.21 and then 10 min with FinO2 = 0.40 (HOX. At both temperatures, SaO2 and PaO2, but not tHb, were increased by HOX. Tskin and perception of exertion and thermal discomfort were higher at 33°C than 21°C (p 0.07. Blood lactate and heart rate were higher at 33°C than 21°C. In conclusion, during 30 min of submaximal cycling at 21°C or 33°C, Tcore, Tskin and Tbody, tHb, muscle activity and ratings of perceived exertion and thermal discomfort were the same under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions. Accordingly, breathing hyperoxic air (FinO2 = 0.40 did not affect thermoregulation under these conditions.

  10. Regadenoson in Europe: first-year experience of regadenoson stress combined with submaximal exercise in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkert, M; Reyes, E; Walker, S; Latus, K; Maenhout, A; Mizumoto, R; Nkomo, C; Standbridge, K; Wechalekar, K; Underwood, S R

    2014-03-01

    Regadenoson was approved for clinical use in Europe in 2011. Since then, it has become the default form of stress at our institution. We have assessed the side-effect profile and tolerability of regadenoson in patients undergoing clinically indicated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy between July 2011 and July 2012. Clinical, stress and imaging data were recorded prospectively. Symptoms during stress were recorded and defined as mild, moderate or severe. An adverse event was defined as any symptom that persisted for more than 30 min or that required investigation or treatment. Of 1,764 consecutive patients, 1,581 (90%) received regadenoson combined with submaximal exercise unless contraindicated. Symptoms were common (63%) but transient and well-tolerated. The severity of symptoms was recorded in most patients as mild (84%). Dyspnoea (36%) and chest discomfort (12%) were the commonest side effects. Adverse events were reported in eight patients (0.5%), thought to be vasovagal in seven of these. All patients recovered fully without sequelae. There were no deaths, myocardial infarction or hospital admissions. Regadenoson stress was performed in 206 patients (12%) with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) without bronchospasm or any other major side effect. We studied the symptom profile of regadenoson in the largest European cohort to date. Regadenoson combined with submaximal exercise was well tolerated, notably also in patients with asthma or COPD. The majority of regadenoson-related adverse events were vasovagal episodes without sequelae.

  11. DESIGN IMPROVEMENT OF THE LOCOMOTIVE RUNNING GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the dynamic qualities of the mainline freight locomotives characterizing the safe motion in tangent and curved track sections at all operational speeds, one needs a whole set of studies, which includes a selection of the design scheme, development of the corresponding mathematical model of the locomotive spatial fluctuations, construction of the computer calculation program, conducting of the theoretical and then experimental studies of the new designs. In this case, one should compare the results with existing designs. One of the necessary conditions for the qualitative improvement of the traction rolling stock is to define the parameters of its running gears. Among the issues related to this problem, an important place is occupied by the task of determining the locomotive dynamic properties on the stage of projection, taking into account the selected technical solutions in the running gear design. Methodology. The mathematical modeling studies are carried out by the numerical integration method of the dynamic loading for the mainline locomotive using the software package «Dynamics of Rail Vehicles » («DYNRAIL». Findings. As a result of research for the improvement of locomotive running gear design it can be seen that the creation of the modern locomotive requires from engineers and scientists the realization of scientific and technical solutions. The solutions enhancing design speed with simultaneous improvement of the traction, braking and dynamic qualities to provide a simple and reliable design, especially the running gear, reducing the costs for maintenance and repair, low initial cost and operating costs for the whole service life, high traction force when starting, which is as close as possible to the ultimate force of adhesion, the ability to work in multiple traction mode and sufficient design speed. Practical Value. The generalization of theoretical, scientific and methodological, experimental studies aimed

  12. Economic barriers to implementation of innovations in health care: is the long run-short run efficiency discrepancy a paradox?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adang, E.M.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Favourable cost-effectiveness of innovative technologies is more and more a necessary condition for implementation in clinical practice. But proven cost-effectiveness itself does not guarantee successful implementation. The reason for this is a potential discrepancy between long run efficiency, on

  13. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-12-02

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. This protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted, plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured via a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Changes in Running Mechanics During a 6-Hour Running Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, Nicola; Taboga, Paolo; Lazzer, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    To investigate changes in running mechanics during a 6-h running race. Twelve ultraendurance runners (age 41.9 ± 5.8 y, body mass 68.3 ± 12.6 kg, height 1.72 ± 0.09 m) were asked to run as many 874-m flat loops as possible in 6 h. Running speed, contact time (t c ), and aerial time (t a ) were measured in the first lap and every 30 ± 2 min during the race. Peak vertical ground-reaction force (F max ), stride length (SL), vertical downward displacement of the center of mass (Δz), leg-length change (ΔL), vertical stiffness (k vert ), and leg stiffness (k leg ) were then estimated. Mean distance covered by the athletes during the race was 62.9 ± 7.9 km. Compared with the 1st lap, running speed decreased significantly from 4 h 30 min onward (mean -5.6% ± 0.3%, P running, reaching the maximum difference after 5 h 30 min (+6.1%, P = .015). Conversely, k vert decreased after 4 h, reaching the lowest value after 5 h 30 min (-6.5%, P = .008); t a and F max decreased after 4 h 30 min through to the end of the race (mean -29.2% and -5.1%, respectively, P running, suggesting a possible time threshold that could affect performance regardless of absolute running speed.

  15. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  16. The correlation between running economy and maximal oxygen uptake: cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships in highly trained distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Andrew J; Ingham, Stephen A; Atkinson, Greg; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    A positive relationship between running economy and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) has been postulated in trained athletes, but previous evidence is equivocal and could have been confounded by statistical artefacts. Whether this relationship is preserved in response to running training (changes in running economy and V̇O2max) has yet to be explored. This study examined the relationships of (i) running economy and V̇O2max between runners, and (ii) the changes in running economy and V̇O2max that occur within runners in response to habitual training. 168 trained distance runners (males, n = 98, V̇O2max 73.0 ± 6.3 mL∙kg-1∙min-1; females, n = 70, V̇O2max 65.2 ± 5.9 mL kg-1∙min-1) performed a discontinuous submaximal running test to determine running economy (kcal∙km-1). A continuous incremental treadmill running test to volitional exhaustion was used to determine V̇O2max 54 participants (males, n = 27; females, n = 27) also completed at least one follow up assessment. Partial correlation analysis revealed small positive relationships between running economy and V̇O2max (males r = 0.26, females r = 0.25; Peconomy and V̇O2max in response to habitual training (r = 0.35; Peconomy and V̇O2max in highly trained distance runners. With >85% of the variance in these parameters unexplained by this relationship, these findings reaffirm that running economy and V̇O2max are primarily determined independently.

  17. Monitoring Training Progress During Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors : A Submaximal Exercise Test as an Alternative for a Maximal Exercise Test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

    May AM, van Weert E, Korstjens 1, Hoekstra-Weebers JE, van der Schans CP, Zonderland ML, Mesters 1, van den Borne B, Ros WJ. Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? Arch Phys Med Rehabil

  18. Assessment of muscle endurance of the knee extensor muscles in adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy using a submaximal repetitions-to-fatigue protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eken, Maaike M; Dallmeijer, Annet J; Doorenbosch, Caroline A; Dekkers, Hurnet; Becher, Jules G; Houdijk, Han

    2014-10-01

    To compare muscle endurance in adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with typically developing (TD) peers using a submaximal repetitions-to-fatigue (RTF) protocol. Cross sectional. Human motion laboratory. Adolescents with spastic CP (n=16; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I or II) and TD adolescents (n=18) within the age range of 12 to 19 years old. Not applicable. Each participant performed 3 RTF tests at different submaximal loads, ranging from 50% to 90% of their maximal voluntary knee extension torque. The relation between the number of repetitions (repetition maximum [RM]) and imposed submaximal relative (percent of maximal voluntary torque [%MVT]) and absolute (Nm/kg) torque was quantified. To compare adolescents with CP with TD adolescents, a mixed linear model was used to construct load endurance curves. Surface electromyography of quadriceps muscles was measured to assess changes in normalized amplitude and median frequency (MF) as physiological indicators of muscle fatigue. Adolescents with CP showed a larger decrease in %MVT per RM than TD adolescents (Pmuscles in all tests for both groups. Electromyographic MF decreased significantly (Pmuscle fatigue were reached. Adolescents with CP show slightly lower muscle endurance compared with TD adolescents on a submaximal RTF protocol, which is in contrast with earlier findings in a maximal voluntary fatigue protocol. Accordingly, adolescents with CP have a reduced capacity to endure activities at similar relative loads compared with TD adolescents. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Myocardial perfusion after marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Laaksonen, Marko S; Luotolahti, Matti; Laine, Hanna; Takala, Teemu O; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effects of acute prolonged exercise (marathon running) on cardiac function and myocardial perfusion. Cardiac dimensions and function were measured in seven endurance-trained men using echocardiography before and repeatedly after marathon (42.2 km) running (at 10 min, 150 min, and 20 h). Myocardial perfusion and perfusion resistance were measured using positron emission tomography and 15O-H2O before and 85-115 min after running. Echocardiographic indices showed only mild and clinically non-significant changes in cardiac function after running. Rate-pressure-corrected basal myocardial perfusion (0.89+/-0.13 vs. 1.20+/-0.32 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.04) was increased after running. Also, adenosine-stimulated perfusion tended to be higher (3.67+/-0.81 vs. 4.47+/-0.52 mL min(-1) g(-1), P=0.12) and perfusion resistance during adenosine stimulation was significantly lower after running (26+/-6 vs. 18+/-3 mmHg min g mL(-1), P=0.03). Plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration was significantly increased after running. These results show that marathon running does not cause marked changes in cardiac function in healthy men. Basal perfusion was increased after exercise, probably reflecting changes in fuel preferences to increased use of FFAs. Strenuous exercise also seems to enhance coronary reactivity, which could thereby serve as a protective mechanism to vascular events after exercise.

  20. Dichloroacetate therapy attenuates the blood lactate response to submaximal exercise in patients with defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, G E; Perkins, L A; Theriaque, D W; Neiberger, R E; Stacpoole, P W

    2004-04-01

    We determined acute and chronic effects of dichloroacetate (DCA) on maximal (MAX) and submaximal (SUB) exercise responses in patients with abnormal mitochondrial energetics. Subjects (n = 9) completed a MAX treadmill bout 1 h after ingesting 25 mg/kg DCA or placebo (PL). A 15-min SUB bout was completed the next day while receiving the same treatment. After a 1-d washout, MAX and SUB were repeated while receiving the alternate treatment (acute). Gas exchange and heart rate were measured throughout all tests. Blood lactate (Bla) was measured 0, 3, and 10 min after MAX, and 5, 10, and 15 min during SUB. MAX and SUB were repeated after 3 months of daily DCA or PL. After a 2-wk washout, a final MAX and SUB were completed after 3 months of alternate treatment (chronic). Average Bla during SUB was lower (P abnormal mitochondrial energetics.

  1. Effect of chain wheel shape on crank torque, freely chosen pedal rate, and physiological responses during submaximal cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Albin; Jensen, Kurt; Hallén, Jostein

    2009-01-01

    . A musculoskeletal simulation model supported the idea that a contributing factor to the observed difference in blood lactate concentration may be slightly reduced muscle activity around the phase where peak crank torque occurs during cycling with the Biopace chain wheel. In that particular phase of the crank......The development of noncircular chain wheels for the enhancement of cycling performance has been in progress for a long time and continues apace. In this study we tested whether submaximal cycling using a non-circular (Biopace) versus a circular chain wheel resulted in lower peak crank torque...... chain wheel at 180 W at 65 and 90 rpm for recording of crank torque profiles, and at their freely chosen pedal rate for recording of pedal rate and metabolic response, including oxygen uptake and blood lactate concentration. Crank torque profiles were similar between the two chain wheels during cycling...

  2. Torque decrease during submaximal evoked contractions of the quadriceps muscle is linked not only to muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowski, Boris; Lepers, Romuald; Martin, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the neuromuscular mechanisms involved in the torque decrease induced by submaximal electromyostimulation (EMS) of the quadriceps muscle. It was hypothesized that torque decrease after EMS would reflect the fatigability of the activated motor units (MUs), but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited as a result of changes in axonal excitability threshold. Two experiments were performed on 20 men to analyze 1) the supramaximal twitch superimposed and evoked at rest during EMS (Experiment 1, n = 9) and 2) the twitch response and torque-frequency relation of the MUs activated by EMS (Experiment 2, n = 11). Torque loss was assessed by 15 EMS-evoked contractions (50 Hz; 6 s on/6 s off), elicited at a constant intensity that evoked 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The same stimulation intensity delivered over the muscles was used to induce the torque-frequency relation and the single electrical pulse evoked after each EMS contraction (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, supramaximal twitch was induced by femoral nerve stimulation. Torque decreased by ~60% during EMS-evoked contractions and by only ~18% during MVCs. This was accompanied by a rightward shift of the torque-frequency relation of MUs activated and an increase of the ratio between the superimposed and posttetanic maximal twitch evoked during EMS contraction. These findings suggest that the torque decrease observed during submaximal EMS-evoked contractions involved muscular mechanisms but also a reduction in the number of MUs recruited due to changes in axonal excitability. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Relationship between cytokines and running economy in marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Junior Luiz Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Running economy (RE, expresses the relationship between the energy cost of running (Cr and the work performed by a runner and is an predictor of performance. Given the intense effort of marathon runners during training and competition and the dearth of studies that address performance and cytokines in this population, the objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between RE and cytokines in marathon runners.

  4. Design of ProjectRun21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Camma; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sørensen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    the exposure to running is pre-fixed in the running schedules and thereby conditioned by design. Time-to-event models will be used for analytical purposes. DISCUSSION: ProjectRun21 will examine if particular subgroups of runners with certain running experiences and running paces seem to sustain more running...

  5. Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test as a Procedure to Evaluate Anaerobic Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, V L; Zagatto, A M; Kalva-Filho, C A; Mendes, O C; Gobatto, C A; Campos, E Z; Papoti, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the running anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a predictor of anaerobic capacity, compare it to the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and to compare the RAST's parameters with the parameters of 30-s all-out tethered running on a treadmill. 39 (17.0±1.4 years) soccer players participated in this study. The participants underwent an incremental test, 10 submaximal efforts [50-95% of velocity correspondent to VO(2MAX) (vVO(2MAX))] and one supramaximal effort at 110% of vVO(2MAX) for the determination of MAOD. Furthermore, the athletes performed the RAST. In the second stage the 30-s all-out tethered running was performed on a treadmill (30-s all-out), and compared with RAST. No significant correlation was observed between MAOD and RAST parameters. However, significant correlations were found between the power of the fifth effort (P5) of RAST with peak and mean power of 30-s all-out (r=0.73 and 0.50; pRAST do not have an association with MAOD, suggesting that this method should not be used to evaluate anaerobic capacity. Although the correlations between RAST parameters with 30-s all-out do reinforce the RAST as an evaluation method of anaerobic metabolism, such as anaerobic power. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Wheel running in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  7. Thermoregulation and marathon running: biological and environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, S N; Haymes, E M

    2001-01-01

    The extreme physical endurance demands and varied environmental settings of marathon footraces have provided a unique opportunity to study the limits of human thermoregulation for more than a century. High post-race rectal temperatures (Tre) are commonly and consistently documented in marathon runners, yet a clear divergence of thought surrounds the cause for this observation. A close examination of the literature reveals that this phenomenon is commonly attributed to either biological (dehydration, metabolic rate, gender) or environmental factors. Marathon climatic conditions vary as much as their course topography and can change considerably from year to year and even from start to finish in the same race. The fact that climate can significantly limit temperature regulation and performance is evident from the direct relationship between heat casualties and Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT), as well as the inverse relationship between record setting race performances and ambient temperatures. However, the usual range of compensable racing environments actually appears to play more of an indirect role in predicting Tre by acting to modulate heat loss and fluid balance. The importance of fluid balance in thermoregulation is well established. Dehydration-mediated perturbations in blood volume and blood flow can compromise exercise heat loss and increase thermal strain. Although progressive dehydration reduces heat dissipation and increases Tre during exercise, the loss of plasma volume contributing to this effect is not always observed for prolonged running and may therefore complicate the predictive influence of dehydration on Tre for marathon running. Metabolic heat production consequent to muscle contraction creates an internal heat load proportional to exercise intensity. The correlation between running speed and Tre, especially over the final stages of a marathon event, is often significant but fails to reliably explain more than a fraction of the variability in

  8. Effect of Jump Interval Training on Kinematics of the Lower Limbs and Running Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache-Dias, Jonathan; Pupo, Juliano Dal; Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Teixeira, Anderson S; Mochizuki, Luis; Moro, Antônio R P

    2018-02-01

    Ache-Dias, J, Pupo, JD, Dellagrana, RA, Teixeira, AS, Mochizuki, L, and Moro, ARP. Effect of jump interval training on kinematics of the lower limbs and running economy. J Strength Cond Res 32(2): 416-422, 2017-This study analyzed the effects of the addition of jump interval training (JIT) to continuous endurance training (40-minute running at 70% of peak aerobic velocity, 3 times per week for 4 weeks) on kinematic variables and running economy (RE) during submaximal constant-load running. Eighteen recreational runners, randomized into control group (CG) or experimental group (EG) performed the endurance training. In addition, the EG performed the JIT twice per week, which consisted of 4-6 bouts of continuous vertical jumping (30 seconds) with 5-minute intervals. The oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) during the submaximal test (performed at 9 km·h) was similar before (EG: 38.48 ± 2.75 ml·kg·min; CG: 36.45 ± 2.70 ml·kg·min) and after training (EG: 37.42 ± 2.54 ml·kg·min; CG: 35.81 ± 3.10 ml·kg·min). No effect of training, group, or interaction (p > 0.05) was found for RE. There was no interaction or group effect for the kinematic variables (p > 0.05). Most of the kinematic variables had a training effect for both groups (support time [p ≤ 0.05]; step rate [SR; p ≤ 0.05]; and step length [SL; p ≤ 0.05]). In addition, according to the practical significance analysis (percentage chances of a better/trivial/worse effect), important effects in leg stiffness (73/25/2), vertical stiffness (73/25/2), SR (71/27/2), and SL (64/33/3) were found for the EG. No significant relationship between RE and stiffness were found for EG and CG. In conclusion, the results suggest that JIT induces important changes in the kinematics of the lower limbs of recreational runners, but the changes do not affect RE.

  9. Phthalate SHEDS-HT runs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inputs and outputs for SHEDS-HT runs of DiNP, DEHP, DBP. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moreau, M., J. Leonard, K. Phillips, J. Campbell,...

  10. Turkey Run Landfill Emissions Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — landfill emissions measurements for the Turkey run landfill in Georgia. This dataset is associated with the following publication: De la Cruz, F., R. Green, G....

  11. How to run 100 meters?

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to bring a mathematical justification to the optimal way of organizing one's effort when running. It is well known from physiologists that all running exercises of duration less than 3mn are run with a strong initial acceleration and a decelerating end; on the contrary, long races are run with a final sprint. This can be explained using a mathematical model describing the evolution of the velocity, the anaerobic energy, and the propulsive force: a system of ordinary differential equations, based on Newton's second law and energy conservation, is coupled to the condition of optimizing the time to run a fixed distance. We show that the monotony of the velocity curve vs time is the opposite of that of the oxygen uptake (V O2) vs time. Since the oxygen uptake is monotone increasing for a short run, we prove that the velocity is exponentially increasing to its maximum and then decreasing. For longer races, the oxygen uptake has an increasing start and a decreasing end and this accounts for...

  12. Individual anaerobic threshold: methodological aspects of its assessment in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, B; Urhausen, A; Kindermann, W

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed in order to examine the objectivity and reliability of the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) as well as its resistance against several interfering factors: missing exhaustion, preliminary exercise, longer step duration, and lower speed increment. 87 male and 24 female runners and triathletes were examined. They performed both the original test procedure (IAT(3/2); 3 min step duration, 2 km x h(-1) increment until volitional exhaustion) and either a retest or one of several alternative test procedures (submaximal, preliminary exercise, 5 min step duration, 1 km x h(-1) increment) to be compared with IAT(3/2). The graphic determination of the IAT is characterized by a low inter-observer-variability without significant differences between 4 independent blinded examiners. Both the lactate performance curve (p = 0.07) as well as the heart rate performance curve (p = 0.05) show a slight shift to higher velocities during the retest. The IAT shows an identical running velocity during the retest, the heart rate tends to be lower, and the lactate concentration is significantly (by 0.26 mmol x l(-1); p lactate; IAT(3/2) shortened by 180 s) and an extension of the step duration from 3 to 5 min do not lead to significantly different velocities at the IAT. Moderate preliminary exercises (approximately 4 mmol x l(-1) lactate) do not influence the velocity at the IAT, the heart rate is significantly higher. A reduction of the speed increment from 2 to 1 km x h(-1) significantly increases the velocity at the IAT by 6%. It is concluded that the determination of the IAT is highly objective, reliable and insensitive to changes of the incremental graded testing protocol, such as a previous warm-up, an extension of the step duration from 3 to 5 min as well as a lower degree of exhaustion. Significant differences may only arise from changes in the speed increment.

  13. Effect Of Running Shoes on Foot Impact During Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nassif, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Running is part of almost every sport, and requires a great amount of stamina, endurance, mental toughness and overall strength. At every step, the foot experiences ground reaction forces necessary to support the motion of the body. With the advancements in shoe technology, running shoes have grown in popularity among runners, as well as non-runners, because they reduce the risk of injuries from the impact felt by the foot. The purpose of this report is to analyze the effect of running shoes on impact forces on the foot. This is achieved through the use of three force pads fixed at different locations on the foot The force measured by each sensor is then used to estimate the vertical ground reaction force, using the sensors' calibrations equations . Based on the ground reaction force, the effective mass corresponding to the momentum change occurring during the transient phase of the impact is estimated. The results show that running at 9 miles per hour without running shoes generates an effective mass of (14....

  14. The effect of maximal vs submaximal exertion on postprandial lipid levels in individuals with and without coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronov, David M; Bubnova, Marina G; Perova, Natalia V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    Decisions about fat consumption and levels of physical activity are among the everyday choices we make in life and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) can be affected by those choices. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a standard fat load combined with physical exertion of different intensities on the plasma lipid profile of CHD patients and CHD-free individuals. This study looked at the influence of different intensities of physical exercise on postprandial lipid metabolism in 20 healthy men and 36 men with diagnosis of CHD. Venous blood samples were obtained after overnight fasting, 3 hours after standard fat load (before the physical load), and immediately after maximal or submaximal physical exercise on bicycle ergometer. After fat load total cholesterol (TC) concentration did not change in either group. However, after the addition of maximal exercise, TC, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and apolipoprotein (Apo) B increased significantly (P < .01) in both groups. After fat load and maximal exercise, there was no change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in healthy men, but in men with CHD, HDL-C fell significantly (P < .01); and Apo AI rose in healthy men (P < .01) but dropped significantly (P < .01) in men with CHD. Submaximal physical exercise (60% of max VO2 load for 40 minutes) after fat load decreased TG level in CHD patients (P < .01) and improved other lipid parameters in both groups significantly (↓LDL-C, ↑HDL-C, ↑Apo AI, ↓Apo B, P < .01). We observed a worsening of physical work capacity in men with CHD (significant reduction of duration and total amount of work performed, maximal VO2, oxygen pulse), during maximal stress test performed 3 hours after fat load. There was a doubling of the number of abnormal stress test results (P < .01). Healthy persons showed an increase in respiratory parameters (ventilation, CO2 production, maximal VO2, and oxygen

  15. Ice slurry ingestion increases running time in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    To examine the effect of drinking an ice slurry (slushy) compared with cold water on prolonged submaximal exercise performed in the heat and on thermoregulatory responses. Crossover trial, with the 2 conditions counterbalanced and in random order. Results were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the method of Bonferroni. Exercise laboratory study; Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. Moderately active male volunteers (n = 10; mean age, 28 years) who participated in recreational sport and who had no injuries or history of heat illness were included. Five to 14 days before the trials, the participants were familiarized with the procedure by a progressive treadmill run to volitional exhaustion at their previously determined first ventilatory threshold running speed, in the same hot environment as the trials (34°C, 55% relative humidity). The 2 experimental trials were completed at the same time of day, 5 to 20 days apart. During the first 15 minutes, the participants rested while baseline measurements were taken. Over the next 30 minutes, they drank either a 7.5 g/kg flavored ice slurry (-1°C) or the same volume of flavored cold water (4°C) and then commenced the treadmill run. Participants were instructed to keep their normal lifestyle habits stable. In the 24 hours preceding the trials, they were asked to avoid strenuous exercise and to consume a specified amount of carbohydrate and fluid but no alcohol, caffeine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or nutritional supplements. Urine and blood samples were taken, and respiratory variables, heart rate, and rectal and skin temperatures were continuously monitored. Heat storage was calculated from temperature and anthropomorphic measurements. The primary outcome measures were comparisons of run time to exhaustion, perceived exhaustion, heat storage capacity, and changes in rectal and skin body temperatures during the 2 trials. All 10 participants took longer to fatigue (range, 2.4-14.2 minutes) after ice

  16. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in chronic stroke women is attenuated after submaximal exercise test, as evaluated by linear and nonlinear analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francica, Juliana Valente; Bigongiari, Aline; Mochizuki, Luís; Scapini, Kátia Bilhar; Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Mostarda, Cristiano; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; De Angelis, Katia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2015-09-29

    We evaluated cardiac autonomic modulation in women with chronic ischemic stroke (at least 4 years post-stroke) at rest and in response to submaximal exercise test. Fourteen post-stroke women (S group) and 10 healthy women (C group) participated in this study. Autonomic modulation (using linear and nonlinear analysis), blood pressure and metabolic variables at rest were evaluated immediately after the exercise test and during the recovery period (20 min). All participants underwent submaximal exercise test on cycle ergometer with gas analysis. At rest, the S group displayed higher lactate concentration, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) values when compared to C group. Furthermore, the S group had lower heart rate variability (HRV) in time domain (SDNN: S = 30 ± 5 vs. 40 ± 8 ms; rMSSD: S = 14 ± 2 vs. C = 34 ± 3 ms), decreased high frequency band of pulse interval (S = 8.4 ± 2 vs. 33.1 ± 9 %) and 2V pattern of symbolic analysis (S = 17.3 ± 1 vs. 30 ± 3 %) (both indicators of cardiac vagal modulation) when compared to C group. Immediately after exercise, S group presented higher values of lactate, SBP, DBP and double product when compared to C group, as well as decreased heart rate recovery (HRR) measured at the first, second and third minutes. At recovery time, all HRV parameters in time and frequency domains improved in the S group; however, HF band remained lower when compared to C group. After the exercise test, women with chronic stroke presented reduced heart rate variability, reduced cardiac vagal modulation, as well as reduced HRR, while displayed an improvement of heart rate variability and cardiac vagal modulation when compared to their baseline. These results reinforce the importance of a physically active lifestyle for cardiovascular autonomic disorders observed in chronic stroke women.

  17. Developing new VO2max prediction models from maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables using support vector machines combined with feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abut, Fatih; Akay, Mehmet Fatih; George, James

    2016-12-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is an essential part of health and physical fitness, and refers to the highest rate of oxygen consumption an individual can attain during exhaustive exercise. In this study, for the first time in the literature, we combine the triple of maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables to propose new VO2max prediction models using Support Vector Machines (SVM's) combined with the Relief-F feature selector to predict and reveal the distinct predictors of VO2max. For comparison purposes, hybrid models based on double combinations of maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables have also been developed. By utilizing 10-fold cross-validation, the performance of the models has been calculated using multiple correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error (RMSE). The results show that the best values of R and RMSE, with 0.94 and 2.92mLkg-1min-1 respectively, have been obtained by combining the triple of relevantly identified maximal, submaximal and questionnaire variables. Compared with the results of the rest of hybrid models in this study and the other prediction models in literature, the reported values of R and RMSE have been found to be considerably more accurate. The predictor variables gender, age, maximal heart rate (MX-HR), submaximal ending speed (SM-ES) of the treadmill and Perceived Functional Ability (Q-PFA) questionnaire have been found to be the most relevant variables in predicting VO2max. The results have also been compared with that of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and Tree Boost (TB), and it is seen that SVM significantly outperforms other regression methods for prediction of VO2max. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During, and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During, and After Long Duration International Space Station Missions (VO2max) will document changes in maximum oxygen uptake for crewmembers onboard the International Space Station (ISS) on long-duration missions, greater than 90 days. This investigation will establish the characteristics of VO2max during flight and assess the validity of the current methods of tracking aerobic capacity change during and following the ISS missions.

  19. The relationship between negative addiction to running and running ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For black South African runners, both intrinsic and achievement running enjoyment sources were more motivating than extrinsic or non-achievement factors. Extrinsic and achievement factors were more motivating for black South African runners compared to Macpherson's (1998) sample of white runners. These results ...

  20. How Fast Can a Human Run? - Bipedal vs. Quadrupedal Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Usami, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Usain Bolt holds the current world record in the 100-m run, with a running time of 9.58 s, and has been described as the best human sprinter in history. However, this raises questions concerning the maximum human running speed, such as "Can the world's fastest men become faster still?" The correct answer is likely "Yes." We plotted the historical world records for bipedal and quadrupedal 100-m sprint times according to competition year. These historical records were plotted using several curve-fitting procedures. We found that the projected speeds intersected in 2048, when for the first time, the winning quadrupedal 100-m sprint time could be lower, at 9.276 s, than the winning bipedal time of 9.383 s. Video analysis revealed that in quadrupedal running, humans employed a transverse gallop with a small angular excursion. These results suggest that in the future, the fastest human on the planet might be a quadrupedal runner at the 2048 Olympics. This may be achieved by shifting up to the rotary gallop and taking longer strides with wide sagittal trunk motion.

  1. Is Moderate Intensity Cycling Sufficient to Induce Cardiorespiratory and Biomechanical Modifications of Subsequent Running?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joel A; Dawber, James P; Lepers, Romuald; Brown, Marc; Stapley, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Walsh, JA, Dawber, JP, Lepers, R, Brown, M, and Stapley, PJ. Is moderate intensity cycling sufficient to induce cardiorespiratory and biomechanical modifications of subsequent running? J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1078-1086, 2017-This study sought to determine whether prior moderate intensity cycling is sufficient to influence the cardiorespiratory and biomechanical responses during subsequent running. Cardiorespiratory and biomechanical variables measured after moderate intensity cycling were compared with control running at the same intensity. Eight highly trained, competitive triathletes completed 2 separate exercise tests; (a) a 10-minute control run (no prior cycling) and, (b) a 30-minute transition run (TR) (preceded by 20-minute of variable cadence cycling, i.e., run versus cycle-run). Respiratory, breathing frequency (fb), heart rate (HR), cost of running (Cr), rate constant, stride length, and stride frequency variables were recorded, normalized, and quantified at the mean response time (MRT), third minute, 10th minute (steady state), and overall for the control run (CR) and TR. Cost of running increased (p ≤ 0.05) at all respective times during the TR. The V[Combining Dot Above]E/V[Combining Dot Above]CO2 and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were significantly (p running. Furthermore, prior cycling seems to have a sustained effect on the Cr during subsequent running.

  2. Optimal Infinite Runs in One-Clock Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Ejsing-Duun, Daniel; Fontani, Lisa

    We address the problem of finding an infinite run with the optimal cost-time ratio in a one-clock priced timed automaton and pro- vide an algorithmic solution. Through refinements of the quotient graph obtained by strong time-abstracting bisimulation partitioning, we con- struct a graph with time...

  3. Survivability Enhanced Run-Flat Variable Footprint Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    pressure sensors or alarm indicators  Explosion of a hoop tire is an impossible event  Cost-effective (in compare to run-flat solutions...International Limited, “Runflat-Runflat Tyre Systems.” http://www.army-technology.com/contractors/tracks/runflat/ Accessed 15 July 2010. [2

  4. Effects of Submaximal Aerobic Exercise on Regulatory T Cell Markers of Male Patients Suffering from Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raygan, Fariba; Sayyah, Mansour; Janesar Qamsari, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sehat, Mojtaba

    2017-02-01

    There are confirmed beneficiary effects of exercise on atherosclerotic inflammation of ischemia-associated heart diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aerobic exercise on T-regulatory cell markers of IL-35 as well as FoxP3 and T-helper2 marker of IL-33 in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). This research was performed on 44 asymptomatic male patients with ischemic heart disease. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups of submaximal aerobic exercise and control group. Blood samples were collected before and after the termination of the exercise protocol. Serum levels of IL-35 and IL-33 as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured by Elisa and Real time PCR, respectively. Serum levels of IL-35 (p=0.001) as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression increased significantly (p=0.012)  in exercise group even after controlling the likely confounding effects of age, length of ischemia, duration of the disease, and the amount of such factors before exercise (p≤0.042). It seems that exercise may yield a better control of atherosclerotic inflammation in patients with ischemic heart disease through the induction of regulatory T cells.

  5. Identification of patients at low risk of dying after acute myocardial infarction, by simple clinical and submaximal exercise test criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S; A'Hern, R; Quigley, P; Vincent, R; Jewitt, D; Chamberlain, D

    1988-09-01

    A consecutive series of 559 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction aged less than 66 years were studied; 93 were designated prospectively as low-risk because they were suitable for early submaximal exercise testing and had none of the following clinical or exercise test 'risk factors': (1) angina for at least one month prior to infarction; (2) symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias, or (3) recurrent ischaemic pain, both after the first 24 h of infarction; (4) cardiac failure; (5) cardiomegaly; and (6) an abnormal exercise test (angina, ST-depression or poor blood pressure response). Altogether 301 patients were exercised; their mortality over a median follow-up of 2.4 years was 10.2%, versus 24.6% in the 258 patients not exercised (P = 0.0005). Absence of clinical 'risk factors' alone, in the exercised patients, identified 156 with a mortality of 5.4% versus 15.6% in the 145 with at least one clinical 'risk factor' (P = 0.004). The fully defined low-risk group comprised 93 of the former patients who had neither clinical nor exercise test 'risk factors'. None of these patients died compared with 19 of those with at least one 'risk factor' (mortality = 14.7%; P = 0.002). Their respective rates of non-fatal reinfarction were similar and never exceeded 5% per annum. Therefore, simple clinical and exercise test criteria can positively identify low-risk patients after infarction in whom secondary prevention may be inappropriate.

  6. Endurance and fatigue characteristics in the neck muscles during sub-maximal isometric test in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Abbott, Allan; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare myoelectric manifestation in neck muscle endurance and fatigue characteristics during sub-maximal isometric endurance test in patients with cervical radiculopathy and asymptomatic subjects. An additional aim was to explore associations between primary neck muscle endurance, myoelectric fatigability, and self-rated levels of fatigue, pain and subjective health measurements in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Muscle fatigue in the ventral and dorsal neck muscles was assessed in patients with cervical radiculopathy and in an asymptomatic group during an isometric neck muscle endurance test in prone and supine. 46 patients and 34 asymptomatic subjects participated. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the sternocleidomastoid, cervical paraspinal muscles and upper and middle trapezius bilaterally during the endurance test. Subjective health measurements were assessed with questionnaires. The results showed altered neck muscle endurance in several of the muscles investigated with greater negative median frequency slope, greater variability, side imbalance, lower endurance time and higher experience of fatigue among the cervical radiculopathy patients compared with healthy subjects. Endurance times were significantly lower in both prone and in supine positions between the patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. During the neck muscle endurance test, fatigues in the upper trapezius muscles during the prone test and in the sternocleidomastoid muscles during the supine test were of more importance than self-perceived pain, fatigue, disability and kinesiophobia in predicting neck muscle endurance (NME). NME testing in the primary neck muscles seems to be an important factor to take into consideration in rehabilitation.

  7. The effects of an acute bout of sleep on running economy and VO2 max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, E F; McGowan, R W; Barkett, E; Fry, R W

    1993-04-01

    Synchronized human sleep has been shown to decrease activation of the sympathetic nervous system, resulting in reduced levels of oxygen consumption. This is in direct conflict with sympathetic arousal, which coincides with the initiation of exercise. Although a considerable body of research has investigated the effects of sleep deprivation on exercise performance, the effects of an acute bout of sleep on exercise response have not been previously reported. This question appears relevant considering the occurrence of acute sleep bouts among athletes competing in prolonged multi-event competition (e.g. swimming, track and field). To investigate the effects of an acute bout of sleep on submaximal (running economy) and maximal oxygen consumption, seven male volunteers participated in a continuous, progressive treadmill test to volitional exhaustion immediately following a 1-h bout of sleep (SB) or no sleep (Control). The subjects served as their own controls and the order of trials was randomized. A MANOVA with repeated measures indicated no difference between groups for running economy or VO2 (P sleep.

  8. Bremen Workshop : Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Schlütter, F.

    The objective of the workshop was a comparison between the prototype and the laboratory measurements. the emphasis is put on comparison between recorded run-up levels. Three enclosed reports present measurements and results from University of Ghent (UG)/ FCCD, Flanders Hydraulics (FH) and Aalborg...... University, respectively. These three reports have served as basis for the comparisons carried out during the workshop....

  9. Red light running camera assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    In the 2004-2007 period, the Mission Street SE and 25th Street SE intersection in Salem, Oregon showed relatively few crashes attributable to red light running (RLR) but, since a high number of RLR violations were observed, the intersection was ident...

  10. Running gratings in photoconductive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kukhtarev, N. V.; Kukhtareva, T.; Lyuksyutov, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the three-dimensional version of a standard photorefractive model (STPM), we obtain a reduced compact Set of equations for an electric field based on the assumption of a quasi-steady-state fast recombination. The equations are suitable for evaluation of a current induced by running...

  11. [Pronation angle of the rear foot during running in relation to load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, A; Winkelmann, F; Thorwesten, L; Reer, R; Jerosch, J

    1997-06-01

    In 20 volunteers the relationship between rear-foot pronation and increasing physical exertion during treadmill ergometry was examined. In order to assess the influence of regularly performed running training a group of 10 endurance trained middle- and long-distance runners (age: 27.4 +/- 4.9 years; weight: 71.0 +/- 8.8 kg; height: 184.2 +/- 8.3 cm) was compared to another group of 10 untrained subjects (age: 24.7 +/- 2.1 years; weight: 73.3 +/- 9.8 kg; height: 179.1 +/- 8.3 cm). The examinations were carried out on a treadmill using a high-frequency motion analyzing system. Heart rate, blood lactate as well as rear-foot pronation were measured. Regarding heart rate and lactate concentration there were significant differences between trained and untrained volunteers. The pronation angle increased with higher speed up to a maximum of 6.54 +/- 4.22 degree for the trained group and 6.84 +/- 4.59 degree for the untrained group. With reference to maximal as well as submaximal stages the pronation angles showed no significant differences between both groups. Following the maximal exercise level the runners performed an additional 3 min run with a velocity reduced by 8 km/h compared to the maximal speed. At this level the total group as well as the untrained group showed significantly greater pronation angles compared to those of the corresponding velocity at the beginning of the test. The extent of the differences, however, was not significantly correlated with the lactate levels. Our results demonstrate that the increase of the pronation angle is a function of the running speed. But there is also an influence of fatigue, which depends neither on the running velocity nor on the lactate levels during exercise. Therefore, further investigations should emphasize the question which factors are responsible for this effect.

  12. Overspeed HIIT in Lower-Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Improves Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojanovic, Boris; Shultz, Rebecca; Feihl, Francois; Matheson, Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Optimal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) regimens for running performance are unknown, although most protocols result in some benefit to key performance factors (running economy (RE), anaerobic threshold (AT), or maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)). Lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmills offer the unique possibility to partially unload runners and reach supramaximal speeds. We studied the use of LBPP to test an overspeed HIIT protocol in trained runners. Eleven trained runners (35 ± 8 yr, VO2max, 55.7 ± 6.4 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) were randomized to an LBPP (n = 6) or a regular treadmill (CON, n = 5), eight sessions over 4 wk of HIIT program. Four to five intervals were run at 100% of velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) during 60% of time to exhaustion at vVO2max (Tlim) with a 1:1 work:recovery ratio. Performance outcomes were 2-mile track time trial, VO2max, vVO2max, vAT, Tlim, and RE. LBPP sessions were carried out at 90% body weight. Group-time effects were present for vVO2max (CON, 17.5 vs. 18.3, P = 0.03; LBPP, 19.7 vs. 22.3 km·h⁻¹; P HIIT protocol at 100% vVO2max improves field performance, vVO2max, VO2max and submaximal HR in trained runners. Improvements are similar if intervals are run on a regular treadmill or at higher speeds on a LPBB treadmill with 10% body weight reduction. LBPP could provide an alternative for taxing HIIT sessions.

  13. Running free: embracing a healthy lifestyle through distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipway, Richard; Holloway, Immy

    2010-11-01

    Sport and leisure activity contribute to both health and quality of life. There is a dearth of qualitative studies on the lived experiences of active people, so the aim of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the experiences of one particular group of active leisure participants, distance runners, and to highlight the associated health and well-being benefits that result from participating in this increasingly popular form of active leisure. In doing so, this paper will briefly explore the potential opportunities and implications for sport and leisure policy and provision, and highlight examples of how distance running could positively contribute towards government objectives linked to tackling obesity levels, healthy living and physical well-being. It is suggested that similar benefits also exist across other forms of physical activity, exercise and sport. Qualitative methods of enquiry were adopted to understand the nature of the social world of long distance runners through interviews and observations, which were thematically analyzed. One of the key themes emerging from the data was the desire to embrace a healthy lifestyle, which then led to the emergence of four main sub-themes. The first was linked to the importance of seeking self-esteem and confirmation through running; second, an investigation of a selection of negative aspects associated with exercise addiction; third, the need to exercise among sport and leisure participants; and finally, an understanding of the concept of the 'running body'. Cautionary notes also identified negative aspects associated with exercise and physical activity. The findings highlight the potential role that distance running can play as an easily accessible and enjoyable leisure activity, one that can help facilitate increased participation in exercise and physical activity as an integral part of an active and healthy lifestyle.

  14. Stroller running: Energetic and kinematic changes across pushing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Ryan S; Wall-Scheffler, Cara M

    2017-01-01

    Running with a stroller provides an opportunity for parents to exercise near their child and counteract health declines experienced during early parenthood. Understanding biomechanical and physiological changes that occur when stroller running is needed to evaluate its health impact, yet the effects of stroller running have not been clearly presented. Here, three commonly used stroller pushing methods were investigated to detect potential changes in energetic cost and lower-limb kinematics. Sixteen individuals (M/F: 10/6) ran at self-selected speeds for 800m under three stroller conditions (2-Hands, 1-Hand, and Push/Chase) and an independent running control. A significant decrease in speed (p = 0.001) and stride length (pstroller conditions, however no significant change in energetic cost (p = 0.080) or heart rate (p = 0.393) was observed. Additionally, pushing method had a significant effect on speed (p = 0.001) and stride length (pstroller running speed and kinematics. These findings suggest specific fitness effects may be achieved through the implementation of different pushing methods.

  15. Stroller running: Energetic and kinematic changes across pushing methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S Alcantara

    Full Text Available Running with a stroller provides an opportunity for parents to exercise near their child and counteract health declines experienced during early parenthood. Understanding biomechanical and physiological changes that occur when stroller running is needed to evaluate its health impact, yet the effects of stroller running have not been clearly presented. Here, three commonly used stroller pushing methods were investigated to detect potential changes in energetic cost and lower-limb kinematics.Sixteen individuals (M/F: 10/6 ran at self-selected speeds for 800m under three stroller conditions (2-Hands, 1-Hand, and Push/Chase and an independent running control.A significant decrease in speed (p = 0.001 and stride length (p<0.001 was observed between the control and stroller conditions, however no significant change in energetic cost (p = 0.080 or heart rate (p = 0.393 was observed. Additionally, pushing method had a significant effect on speed (p = 0.001 and stride length (p<0.001.These findings suggest that pushing technique influences stroller running speed and kinematics. These findings suggest specific fitness effects may be achieved through the implementation of different pushing methods.

  16. Pulmonary and leg VO2 during submaximal exercise: implications for muscular efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, D. C.; Gaesser, G. A.; Hogan, M. C.; Knight, D. R.; Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    Insights into muscle energetics during exercise (e.g., muscular efficiency) are often inferred from measurements of pulmonary gas exchange. This procedure presupposes that changes of pulmonary O2 (VO2) associated with increases of external work reflect accurately the increased muscle VO2. The present investigation addressed this issue directly by making simultaneous determinations of pulmonary and leg VO2 over a range of work rates calculated to elicit 20-90% of maximum VO2 on the basis of prior incremental (25 or 30 W/min) cycle ergometry. VO2 for both legs was calculated as the product of twice one-leg blood flow (constant-infusion thermodilution) and arteriovenous O2 content difference across the leg. Measurements were made 3-5 min after each work rate imposition to avoid incorporation of the VO2 slow component above the lactate threshold. For all 17 subjects, the slope of pulmonary VO2 (9.9 +/- 0.2 ml O2.W-1.min-1) was not different (P greater than 0.05) from that for leg VO2 (9.2 +/- 0.6 ml O2.W-1.min-1). Estimation of "delta" efficiency (i.e., delta work accomplished divided by delta energy expended, calculated from slope of VO2 vs. work rate and a caloric equivalent for O2 of 4.985 cal/ml) using pulmonary VO2 measurements (29.1 +/- 0.6%) was likewise not significantly different (P greater than 0.05) from that made using leg VO2 measurements (33.7 +/- 2.4%). These data suggest that the net VO2 cost of metabolic "support" processes outside the exercising legs changes little over a relatively broad range of exercise intensities. Thus, under the conditions of this investigation, changes of VO2 measured from expired gas reflected closely those occurring within the exercising legs.

  17. Application of the allometric scale for the submaximal oxygen uptake in runners and rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Tartaruga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the current study was to determine the allometric exponents for runners and rower’s metabolic cost, while also verifying the relation of performance with and without the allometric application. Methods: Eleven runners (age: 22.3±10.4 years; height: 174±8.8 cm; body mass: 61.7±9.3 kg; maximum oxygen uptake ( •VO2max: 56.3±3.9 ml.kg[sup]-1[/sup].min[sup]-1[/sup] and fifteen rowers (age: 24±5.4 years; height: 185.5±6.5 cm; body mass: 83.5±7.2 kg; •VO2max: 61.2±3.4 ml.kg[sup]-1[/sup].min[sup]-1[/sup] carried out a specific progressive maximum test. The allometric exponent was determined from the logarithmic equation Log y = Log b Log x, where x is the mass, y is the VO2max (l.min[sup]-1[/sup], a is one constant and b is the allometric exponent. The data were analyzed using descriptive and comparative statistics (independent T test of the Student, with p<0.05 (SPSS version 13.0. Results: The allometric exponent of the rowers was 0.70 and that of the runners was 1.00. Significant differences were found between the fat mass percentage, with higher value for rowers, suggesting that this variable may influence the behavior of the allometric exponent and consequently of the basal metabolic rate. Conclusions: Scaling may help in understanding variation in aerobic power and in defining the physiological limitations of work capacity.

  18. The ATLAS RunTimeTester

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS RunTimeTester is a job based software test system. The RunTimeTester runs jobs, and optional tests on the job outputs. Job and test results are reported via a web site. The system currently runs $\\approx$ 8000 jobs daily, and the web site receives $\\approx$ 25K hits a week. This note provides an overview of the system.

  19. A river runs through it

    OpenAIRE

    F P J G Lafeber

    2010-01-01

    A river runs through it is een waar gebeurd verhaal over twee jongens, Norman en Paul, die in het begin van de 20ste eeuw opgroeiden in landelijk Montana (Amerika). Norman is in zijn jeugd een gereserveerde persoonlijkheid, terwijl Paul een rebelse ondeugd is. Beiden hebben echter een grote liefde voor vliegvissen. Het verhaal, gedeeltelijk autobiografisch, is geschreven in 1976 door Norman Maclean1. Er is geen Nederlandse vertaling. Wel is het boek in 1992 verfilmd onder regie van Robert Red...

  20. Running is rewarding and antidepressive

    OpenAIRE

    Brené, Stefan; Bjørnebekk, Astrid; Åberg, Elin; Mathé, Aleksander A; Olson, Lars; Werme, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Natural behaviors such as eating, drinking, reproduction and exercise activate brain reward pathways and consequently the individual engages in these behaviors to receive the reward. However, drugs of abuse are even more potent to activate the reward pathways. Rewarding behaviors and addictive drugs also affect other parts of the brain not directly involved in the mediation of reward. For instance, running increases neurogenesis in hippocampus and is beneficial as an antidepressant in a genet...

  1. Estimating Neural Control from Concentric vs. Eccentric Surface Electromyographic Representations during Fatiguing, Cyclic Submaximal Back Extension Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold R. Ebenbichler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the differences in neural control of back muscles activated during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of a cyclic, submaximal, fatiguing trunk extension exercise via the analysis of amplitude and time-frequency parameters derived from surface electromyographic (SEMG data.Methods: Using back dynamometers, 87 healthy volunteers performed three maximum voluntary isometric trunk extensions (MVC's, an isometric trunk extension at 80% MVC, and 25 cyclic, dynamic trunk extensions at 50% MVC. Dynamic testing was performed with the trunk angular displacement ranging from 0° to 40° and the trunk angular velocity set at 20°/s. SEMG data was recorded bilaterally from the iliocostalis lumborum at L1, the longissimus dorsi at L2, and the multifidus muscles at L5. The initial value and slope of the root mean square (RMS-SEMG and the instantaneous median frequency (IMDF-SEMG estimates derived from the SEMG recorded during each exercise cycle were used to investigate the differences in MU control marking the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the exercise.Results: During the concentric portions of the exercise, the initial RMS-SEMG values were almost twice those observed during the eccentric portions of the exercise. The RMS-SEMG values generally increased during the concentric portions of the exercise while they mostly remained unchanged during the eccentric portions of the exercise with significant differences between contraction types. Neither the initial IMDF-SEMG values nor the time-course of the IMDF-SEMG values significantly differed between the eccentric and the concentric portions of the exercise.Conclusions: The comparison of the investigated SEMG parameters revealed distinct neural control strategies during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the cyclic exercise. We explain these differences by relying upon the principles of orderly recruitment and common drive governing motor unit behavior.

  2. High-frequency submaximal stimulation over muscle evokes centrally generated forces in human upper limb skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Walsh, Lee D; Nickolls, Peter; Gandevia, Simon C

    2009-02-01

    Control of posture and movement requires control of the output from motoneurons. Motoneurons of human lower limb muscles exhibit sustained, submaximal activity to high-frequency electrical trains, which has been hypothesized to be partly triggered by monosynaptic Ia afferents. The possibility to trigger such behavior in upper limb motoneurons and the potential unique role of Ia afferents to trigger such behavior remain unclear. Subjects (n = 9) received high-frequency trains of electrical stimuli over biceps brachii and flexor pollicis longus (FPL). We chose to study the FPL muscle because it has weak monosynaptic Ia afferent connectivity and it is involved in fine motor control of the thumb. Two types of stimulus trains (100-Hz bursts and triangular ramps) were tested at five intensities below painful levels. All subjects exhibited enhanced torque in biceps and FPL muscles after both types of high-frequency train. Torques also persisted after stimulation, particularly for the highest stimulus intensity. To separate the evoked torques that resulted from a peripheral mechanism (e.g., muscle potentiation) and that which resulted from a central origin, we studied FPL responses to high-frequency trains after complete combined nerve blocks of the median and radial nerves (n = 2). During the blocks, high-frequency trains over the FPL did not yield torque enhancements or persisting torques. These results suggest that enhanced contractions of central origin can be elicited in motoneurons innervating the upper limb, despite weak monosynaptic Ia connections for FPL. Their presence in a recently evolved human muscle (FPL) indicates that these enhanced contractions may have a broad role in controlling tonic postural outputs of hand muscles and that they may be available even for fine motor activities involving the thumb.

  3. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin and cortisol responses to sub-maximal exercise after sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, F; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Mougin, C; Bourdin, H; Jacquier, M C; Henriet, M T; Davenne, D; Kantelip, J P; Magnin, P; Gaillard, R C

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of partial sleep deprivation and the effects of an intake of a hypnotic compound (zolpidem) prior to bedtime, on sleep and on hormonal and metabolic adaptations to subsequent exercise. Sleep deprivation consisted of a delayed bedtime and an early getting-up time. Eight young subjects, who slept well and were highly trained athletes, were enrolled in this study. Sleep was recorded polygraphically and the following afternoon exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) after a 10-min warm up. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin, cortisol, and lactate concentrations were measured at rest and during exercise. The data obtained after experimental sleep, with and without medication were compared with those obtained in the reference condition with normal sleep. Both types of sleep reduction decreased the total sleep time, stage 2 sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep, whereas zolpidem administration did not modify either the duration of sleep or the sleep stages. After the reference night, plasma met-enkephalin did not show any significant change at the end of the submaximal exercise, whereas beta-endorphin, cortisol, and lactic acid concentrations increased significantly in all subjects. The changes in concentration in beta-endorphin were significantly related to the changes in cortisol (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01) and to the changes in plasma lactic acid (r = 0.58; P less than 0.05). Cortisol concentrations were also related to lactic acid values (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Muscle coordination, activation and kinematics of world-class and elite breaststroke swimmers during submaximal and maximal efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, Bjørn Harald; Vaz, João Rocha; Zinner, Christoph; Cabri, Jan M H; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to describe muscular activation patterns and kinematic variables during the complete stroke cycle (SC) and the different phases of breaststroke swimming at submaximal and maximal efforts. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was collected from eight muscles in nine elite swimmers; five females (age 20.3 ± 5.4 years; Fédération Internationale de Natation [FINA] points 815 ± 160) and four males (27.7 ± 7.1 years; FINA points 879 ± 151). Underwater cameras were used for 3D kinematic analysis with automatic motion tracking. The participants swam 25 m of breaststroke at 60%, 80% and 100% effort and each SC was divided into three phases: knee extension, knee extended and knee flexion. With increasing effort, the swimmers decreased their SC distance and increased their velocity and stroke rate. A decrease during the different phases was found for duration during knee extended and knee flexion, distance during knee extended and knee angle at the beginning of knee extension with increasing effort. Velocity increased for all phases. The mean activation pattern remained similar across the different effort levels, but the muscles showed longer activation periods relative to the SC and increased integrated sEMG (except trapezius) with increasing effort. The muscle activation patterns, muscular participation and kinematics assessed in this study with elite breaststroke swimmers contribute to a better understanding of the stroke and what occurs at different effort levels. This could be used as a reference for optimising breaststroke training to improve performance.

  6. GASIFICATION TEST RUN TC06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services, Inc.

    2003-08-01

    This report discusses test campaign TC06 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC06. Test run TC06 was started on July 4, 2001, and completed on September 24, 2001, with an interruption in service between July 25, 2001, and August 19, 2001, due to a filter element failure in the PCD caused by abnormal operating conditions while tuning the main air compressor. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 190 to 230 psig. In TC06, 1,214 hours of solid circulation and 1,025 hours of coal feed were attained with 797 hours of coal feed after the filter element failure. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. Due to its length and stability, the TC06 test run provided valuable data necessary to analyze long-term reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance as well as progressing the goal of many thousands of hours of filter element exposure.

  7. Running Jobs in the Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Ubeda Garcia, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a model for the operation of computing nodes at a site using Virtual Machines (VMs), in which VMs are created and contextualized for experiments by the site itself. For the experiment, these VMs appear to be produced spontaneously "in the vacuum" rather having to ask the site to create each one. This model takes advantage of the existing pilot job frameworks adopted by many experiments. In the Vacuum model, the contextualization process starts a job agent within the VM and real jobs are fetched from the central task queue as normal. An implementation of the Vacuum scheme, Vac, is presented in which a VM factory runs on each physical worker node to create and contextualize its set of VMs. With this system, each node's VM factory can decide which experiments' VMs to run, based on site-wide target shares and on a peer-to-peer protocol in which the site's VM factories query each other to discover which VM types they are running. A property of this system is that there is no gate keeper service, head node, or batch system accepting and then directing jobs to particular worker nodes, avoiding several central points of failure. Finally, we describe tests of the Vac system using jobs from the central LHCb task queue, using the same contextualization procedure for VMs developed by LHCb for Clouds.

  8. LHC Report: Positive ion run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The current LHC ion run has been progressing very well. The first fill with 358 bunches per beam - the maximum number for the year - was on Tuesday, 15 November and was followed by an extended period of steady running. The quality of the beam delivered by the heavy-ion injector chain has been excellent, and this is reflected in both the peak and the integrated luminosity.   The peak luminosity in ATLAS reached 5x1026 cm-2s-1, which is a factor of ~16 more than last year's peak of 3x1025 cm-2s-1. The integrated luminosity in each of ALICE, ATLAS and CMS is now around 100 inverse microbarn, already comfortably over the nominal target for the run. The polarity of the ALICE spectrometer and solenoid magnets was reversed on Monday, 28 November with the aim of delivering another sizeable amount of luminosity in this configuration. On the whole, the LHC has been behaving very well recently, ensuring good machine availability. On Monday evening, however, a faulty level sensor in the cooling towe...

  9. Better in the long run

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Last week, the Chamonix workshop once again proved its worth as a place where all the stakeholders in the LHC can come together, take difficult decisions and reach a consensus on important issues for the future of particle physics. The most important decision we reached last week is to run the LHC for 18 to 24 months at a collision energy of 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). After that, we’ll go into a long shutdown in which we’ll do all the necessary work to allow us to reach the LHC’s design collision energy of 14 TeV for the next run. This means that when beams go back into the LHC later this month, we’ll be entering the longest phase of accelerator operation in CERN’s history, scheduled to take us into summer or autumn 2011. What led us to this conclusion? Firstly, the LHC is unlike any previous CERN machine. Because it is a cryogenic facility, each run is accompanied by lengthy cool-down and warm-up phases. For that reason, CERN’s traditional &...

  10. Injuries And Footwear (Part 2): Minimalist Running Shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Orr, Robin; Pope, Rodney; Grier, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    This article defines minimalist running shoes and examines physiological, biomechanical, and injury rate differences when running in conventional versus minimalist running shoes. A minimalist shoe is one that provides "minimal interference with the natural movement of the foot, because of its high flexibility, low heel to toe drop, weight and stack height, and the absence of motion control and stability devices." Most studies indicate that running in minimalist shoes results in a lower physiological energy cost than running in conventional shoes, likely because of the lower weight of the minimalist shoe. Most individuals running in conventional shoes impact the ground heel first (rearfoot strike pattern), whereas most people running in minimalist shoes tend to strike with the front of the foot (forefoot strike pattern). The rate at which force is developed on ground impact (i.e., the loading rate) is generally higher when running in conventional versus minimalist shoes. Findings from studies that have looked at associations between injuries and foot strike patterns or injuries and loading rates are conflicting, so it is not clear if these factors influence injury rates; more research is needed. Better-designed prospective studies indicate that bone stress injuries and the overall injury incidence are higher in minimalist shoes during the early weeks (10-12 weeks) of transition to this type of footwear. Longer-term studies are needed to define injury rates once runners are fully transitioned to minimalist shoes. At least one longer-term minimalist-shoe investigation is ongoing and, hopefully, will be published soon. 2016.

  11. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: optimality of walk-run-rest mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leroy L; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2013-04-06

    On a treadmill, humans switch from walking to running beyond a characteristic transition speed. Here, we study human choice between walking and running in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground in a given allowed time duration. During this task, the subjects carried, and could look at, a stopwatch that counted down to zero. As expected, if the total time available were large, humans walk the whole distance. If the time available were small, humans mostly run. For an intermediate total time, humans often use a mixture of walking at a slow speed and running at a higher speed. With analytical and computational optimization, we show that using a walk-run mixture at intermediate speeds and a walk-rest mixture at the lowest average speeds is predicted by metabolic energy minimization, even with costs for transients-a consequence of non-convex energy curves. Thus, sometimes, steady locomotion may not be energy optimal, and not preferred, even in the absence of fatigue. Assuming similar non-convex energy curves, we conjecture that similar walk-run mixtures may be energetically beneficial to children following a parent and animals on long leashes. Humans and other animals might also benefit energetically from alternating between moving forward and standing still on a slow and sufficiently long treadmill.

  12. The Power of Auditory-Motor Synchronization in Sports: Enhancing Running Performance by Coupling Cadence with the Right Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bood, Robert Jan; Nijssen, Marijn; van der Kamp, John; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli, like music and metronomes, are often used in sports. Adjusting movement tempo to acoustic stimuli (i.e., auditory-motor synchronization) may be beneficial for sports performance. However, music also possesses motivational qualities that may further enhance performance. Our objective was to examine the relative effects of auditory-motor synchronization and the motivational impact of acoustic stimuli on running performance. To this end, 19 participants ran to exhaustion on a treadmill in 1) a control condition without acoustic stimuli, 2) a metronome condition with a sequence of beeps matching participants’ cadence (synchronization), and 3) a music condition with synchronous motivational music matched to participants’ cadence (synchronization+motivation). Conditions were counterbalanced and measurements were taken on separate days. As expected, time to exhaustion was significantly longer with acoustic stimuli than without. Unexpectedly, however, time to exhaustion did not differ between metronome and motivational music conditions, despite differences in motivational quality. Motivational music slightly reduced perceived exertion of sub-maximal running intensity and heart rates of (near-)maximal running intensity. The beat of the stimuli –which was most salient during the metronome condition– helped runners to maintain a consistent pace by coupling cadence to the prescribed tempo. Thus, acoustic stimuli may have enhanced running performance because runners worked harder as a result of motivational aspects (most pronounced with motivational music) and more efficiently as a result of auditory-motor synchronization (most notable with metronome beeps). These findings imply that running to motivational music with a very prominent and consistent beat matched to the runner’s cadence will likely yield optimal effects because it helps to elevate physiological effort at a high perceived exertion, whereas the consistent and correct cadence induced by

  13. The power of auditory-motor synchronization in sports: enhancing running performance by coupling cadence with the right beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bood, Robert Jan; Nijssen, Marijn; van der Kamp, John; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli, like music and metronomes, are often used in sports. Adjusting movement tempo to acoustic stimuli (i.e., auditory-motor synchronization) may be beneficial for sports performance. However, music also possesses motivational qualities that may further enhance performance. Our objective was to examine the relative effects of auditory-motor synchronization and the motivational impact of acoustic stimuli on running performance. To this end, 19 participants ran to exhaustion on a treadmill in 1) a control condition without acoustic stimuli, 2) a metronome condition with a sequence of beeps matching participants' cadence (synchronization), and 3) a music condition with synchronous motivational music matched to participants' cadence (synchronization+motivation). Conditions were counterbalanced and measurements were taken on separate days. As expected, time to exhaustion was significantly longer with acoustic stimuli than without. Unexpectedly, however, time to exhaustion did not differ between metronome and motivational music conditions, despite differences in motivational quality. Motivational music slightly reduced perceived exertion of sub-maximal running intensity and heart rates of (near-)maximal running intensity. The beat of the stimuli -which was most salient during the metronome condition- helped runners to maintain a consistent pace by coupling cadence to the prescribed tempo. Thus, acoustic stimuli may have enhanced running performance because runners worked harder as a result of motivational aspects (most pronounced with motivational music) and more efficiently as a result of auditory-motor synchronization (most notable with metronome beeps). These findings imply that running to motivational music with a very prominent and consistent beat matched to the runner's cadence will likely yield optimal effects because it helps to elevate physiological effort at a high perceived exertion, whereas the consistent and correct cadence induced by auditory

  14. The power of auditory-motor synchronization in sports: enhancing running performance by coupling cadence with the right beats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jan Bood

    Full Text Available Acoustic stimuli, like music and metronomes, are often used in sports. Adjusting movement tempo to acoustic stimuli (i.e., auditory-motor synchronization may be beneficial for sports performance. However, music also possesses motivational qualities that may further enhance performance. Our objective was to examine the relative effects of auditory-motor synchronization and the motivational impact of acoustic stimuli on running performance. To this end, 19 participants ran to exhaustion on a treadmill in 1 a control condition without acoustic stimuli, 2 a metronome condition with a sequence of beeps matching participants' cadence (synchronization, and 3 a music condition with synchronous motivational music matched to participants' cadence (synchronization+motivation. Conditions were counterbalanced and measurements were taken on separate days. As expected, time to exhaustion was significantly longer with acoustic stimuli than without. Unexpectedly, however, time to exhaustion did not differ between metronome and motivational music conditions, despite differences in motivational quality. Motivational music slightly reduced perceived exertion of sub-maximal running intensity and heart rates of (near-maximal running intensity. The beat of the stimuli -which was most salient during the metronome condition- helped runners to maintain a consistent pace by coupling cadence to the prescribed tempo. Thus, acoustic stimuli may have enhanced running performance because runners worked harder as a result of motivational aspects (most pronounced with motivational music and more efficiently as a result of auditory-motor synchronization (most notable with metronome beeps. These findings imply that running to motivational music with a very prominent and consistent beat matched to the runner's cadence will likely yield optimal effects because it helps to elevate physiological effort at a high perceived exertion, whereas the consistent and correct cadence induced by

  15. Effects of footwear on running economy in distance runners: A meta-analytical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, R T; Ngai, S P

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies reported inconsistent findings about the effects of footwear on running economy, which is a surrogate measure of running performance. This meta-analytical review compared the running economy between running in barefoot, minimalists, and standard running shoes. Meta-analysis. Electronic searches on MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Library databases were performed and the reference lists of the screened articles were also scrutinized. Two reviewers screened clinical trials that measured the oxygen cost of runners in different footwear conditions. Thirteen studies were selected in this meta-analysis with a total of 168 runners included. Barefoot running was shown to be more economic than shod running (p<0.01; standardized mean difference=-0.43; 95% Confidence Interval=-0.21 to -0.64; Z=3.96). Similar pattern was found when comparing minimalist and shoe (p<0.01; standardized mean difference=-0.49; 95% Confidence Interval=-0.29 to -0.70; Z=4.64). The observed changes were of small effect. Conversely, no significant difference in the metabolic cost was found between running in minimalists and barefoot running (p=0.45). Barefoot running or running in minimalist may require lower utilization of oxygen than shod running. Theoretically, the lower oxygen cost may improve long distance running performance. However, more than half of the runners in the included studies had previous barefoot experience and the findings may not apply to those habitual shod runners who are undergoing the transition. In addition, high risk of bias was reported in the included studies and quality study in the future is still warranted. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling Run-Time Arbitration by Latency-Rate Servers in Dataflow Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, M.H.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit; Bekooij, Marco; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain a cost-efficient solution, tasks share resources in a Multi-Processor System-on-Chip. In our architecture, shared resources are run-time scheduled. We show how the effects of Latency-Rate servers, which is a class of run-time schedulers, can be included in a dataflow model. The

  17. LHCb siliicon detectors: the Run 1 to Run 2 transition and first experience of Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Rinnert, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The detector includes a high precision tracking system consisting of a silicon-strip vertex detector (VELO) surrounding the pp interaction region, a large- area silicon-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet (TT), and three stations of silicon- strip detectors (IT) and straw drift tubes placed downstream (OT). The operational transition of the silicon detectors VELO, TT and IT from LHC Run 1 to Run 2 and first Run 2 experiences will be presented. During the long shutdown of the LHC the silicon detectors have been maintained in a safe state and operated regularly to validate changes in the control infrastructure, new operational procedures, updates to the alarm systems and monitoring software. In addition, there have been some infrastructure related challenges due to maintenance performed in the vicinity of the silicon detectors that will be discussed. The LHCb silicon dete...

  18. Do you get value for money when you buy an expensive pair of running shoes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinghan, R; Arnold, G P; Drew, T S; Cochrane, L A; Abboud, R J

    2008-03-01

    This investigation aims to determine if more expensive running shoes provide better cushioning of plantar pressure and are more comfortable than low-cost alternatives from the same brand. Three pairs of running shoes were purchased from three different manufacturers at three different price ranges: low (40-45 pounds), medium (60-65 pounds) and high (70-75 pounds). Plantar pressure was recorded with the Pedar in-shoe pressure measurement system. Comfort was assessed with a 100 mm visual analogue scale. A follow-on study was conducted to ascertain if shoe cushioning and comfort were comparable to walking while running on a treadmill. Forty-three and 9 male subjects participated in the main and follow-on studies, respectively. The main outcome measure was the evaluation of plantar pressure and comfort. Plantar pressure measurements were recorded from under the heel, across the forefoot and under the great toe. Differences in plantar pressure were recorded between models and between brands in relation to cost. Shoe performance was comparable between walking and running trials on a treadmill. No significant difference was observed between shoes and test occasions in terms of comfort. Low- and medium-cost running shoes in each of the three brands tested provided the same (if not better) cushioning of plantar pressure as high-cost running shoes. Cushioning was comparable when walking and running on a treadmill. Comfort is a subjective sensation based on individual preferences and was not related to either the distribution of plantar pressure or cost.

  19. Preparing ATLAS Distributed Computing for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS software and computing is in a period of intensive evolution. The current long shutdown presents an opportunity to assimilate lessons from the very successful Run 1 (2009-2013) and to prepare for the substantially increased computing requirements for Run 2 (from spring 2015). Run 2 will bring a near doubling of the energy and the data rate, high event pile-up levels, and higher event complexity from detector upgrades, meaning the number and complexity of events to be analyzed will increase dramatically. At the same time operational loads must be reduced through greater automation, a wider array of opportunistic resources must be supported, costly storage must be used with greater efficiency, a sophisticated new analysis model must be integrated, and concurrency features of new processors must be exploited. This presentation will survey the distributed computing aspects of the upgrade program and the plans for 2014 to exercise the new capabilities in a large scale Data Challenge.

  20. ATLAS computing challenges before the next LHC run

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS software and computing is in a period of intensive evolution. The current long shutdown presents an opportunity to assimilate lessons from the very successful Run 1 (2009-2013) and to prepare for the substantially increased computing requirements for Run 2 (from spring 2015). Run 2 will bring a near doubling of the energy and the data rate, high event pile-up levels, and higher event complexity from detector upgrades, meaning the number and complexity of events to be analyzed will increase dramatically. At the same time operational loads must be reduced through greater automation, a wider array of opportunistic resources must be supported, costly storage must be used with greater efficiency, a sophisticated new analysis model must be integrated, and concurrency features of new processors must be exploited. This paper surveys the distributed computing aspects of the upgrade program and the plans for 2014 to exercise the new capabilities in a large scale Data Challenge.

  1. ATLAS computing challenges before the next LHC run

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS software and computing is in a period of intensive evolution. The current long shutdown presents an opportunity to assimilate lessons from the very successful Run 1 (2009-2013) and to prepare for the substantially increased computing requirements for Run 2 (from spring 2015). Run 2 will bring a near doubling of the energy and the data rate, high event pile-up levels, and higher event complexity from detector upgrades, meaning the number and complexity of events to be analyzed will increase dramatically. At the same time operational loads must be reduced through greater automation, a wider array of opportunistic resources must be supported, costly storage must be used with greater efficiency, a sophisticated new analysis model must be integrated, and concurrency features of new processors must be exploited. This presentation will survey the distributed computing aspects of the upgrade program and the plans for 2014 to exercise the new capabilities in a large scale Data Challenge.

  2. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  3. Human skeletal muscle type 1 fibre distribution and response of stress-sensing proteins along the titin molecule after submaximal exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Satu O A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Flink, Riina; Selänne, Harri P; Gagnon, Sheila S; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Nindl, Bradley C; Lehti, Maarit

    2017-11-01

    Early responses of stress-sensing proteins, muscle LIM protein (MLP), ankyrin repeat proteins (Ankrd1/CARP and Ankrd2/Arpp) and muscle-specific RING finger proteins (MuRF1 and MuRF2), along the titin molecule were investigated in the present experiment after submaximal exhaustive exercise. Ten healthy men performed continuous drop jumping unilaterally on a sledge apparatus with a submaximal height until complete exhaustion. Five stress-sensing proteins were analysed by mRNA measurements from biopsies obtained immediately and 3 h after the exercise from exercised vastus lateralis muscle while control biopsies were obtained from non-exercised legs before the exercise. Decreased maximal jump height and increased serum creatine kinase activities as indirect markers for muscle damage and HSP27 immunostainings on muscle biopsies as a direct marker for muscle damage indicated that the current exercised protocol caused muscle damage. mRNA levels for four (MLP, Ankrd1/CARP, MuRF1 and MuRF2) out of the five studied stress sensors significantly (p exercise. The magnitude of MLP and Ankrd2 responses was related to the proportion of type 1 myofibres. Our data showed that the submaximal exhaustive exercise with subject's own physical fitness level activates titin-based stretch-sensing proteins. These results suggest that both degenerative and regenerative pathways are activated in very early phase after the exercise or probably already during the exercise. Activation of these proteins represents an initial step forward adaptive remodelling of the exercised muscle and may also be involved in the initiation of myofibre repair.

  4. Google Wave Up and Running

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrate, Andres

    2010-01-01

    Catch Google Wave, the revolutionary Internet protocol and web service that lets you communicate and collaborate in realtime. With this book, you'll understand how Google Wave integrates email, instant messaging (IM), wiki, and social networking functionality into a powerful and extensible platform. You'll also learn how to use its features, customize its functions, and build sophisticated extensions with Google Wave's open APIs and network protocol. Written for everyone -- from non-techies to ninja coders -- Google Wave: Up and Running provides a complete tour of this complex platform. You'

  5. Electroweak processes at Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Spalla, Margherita; Sestini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the studies of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at LHC after the first year of data taking of Run2, focusing on possible results to be achieved with the analysis of full 2015 and 2016 data. We discuss the measurements of W and Z boson production, with particular attention to the precision determination of basic Standard Model parameters, and the study of multi-boson interactions through the analysis of boson-boson final states. This work is the result of the collaboration between scientists from the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments.

  6. HTML 5 up and running

    CERN Document Server

    Pilgrim, Mark

    2010-01-01

    If you don't know about the new features available in HTML5, now's the time to find out. This book provides practical information about how and why the latest version of this markup language will significantly change the way you develop for the Web. HTML5 is still evolving, yet browsers such as Safari, Mozilla, Opera, and Chrome already support many of its features -- and mobile browsers are even farther ahead. HTML5: Up & Running carefully guides you though the important changes in this version with lots of hands-on examples, including markup, graphics, and screenshots. You'll learn how to

  7. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  8. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum from Running Sprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W. Turban

    2010-01-01

    A case of SPM is presented in a 15-year-old male, who complained of throat pain and dyspnea while running sprints at football practice. Workup revealed SPM, and he was subsequently admitted and treated conservatively. His symptoms resolved in 2 days and he was discharged and suffered no further recurrences. In contrast to secondary pneumomediastinum, SPM is usually a benign condition although life-threatening conditions can rarely arise. Differentiating between these two conditions has important prognostic indications. There is a paucity of prospectively collected data regarding SPM, and considerable variation in recommendations concerning the extent of workup.

  9. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  10. Effect of Minimalist Footwear on Running Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, Stephen M.; Laux, Sara; Kuivila, Thomas; Hass, Daniel; Joy, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although minimalist footwear is increasingly popular among runners, claims that minimalist footwear enhances running biomechanics and efficiency are controversial. Hypothesis: Minimalist and barefoot conditions improve running efficiency when compared with traditional running shoes. Study Design: Randomized crossover trial. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Fifteen experienced runners each completed three 90-second running trials on a treadmill, each trial performed in a different type of footwear: traditional running shoes with a heavily cushioned heel, minimalist running shoes with minimal heel cushioning, and barefoot (socked). High-speed photography was used to determine foot strike, ground contact time, knee angle, and stride cadence with each footwear type. Results: Runners had more rearfoot strikes in traditional shoes (87%) compared with minimalist shoes (67%) and socked (40%) (P = 0.03). Ground contact time was longest in traditional shoes (265.9 ± 10.9 ms) when compared with minimalist shoes (253.4 ± 11.2 ms) and socked (250.6 ± 16.2 ms) (P = 0.005). There was no difference between groups with respect to knee angle (P = 0.37) or stride cadence (P = 0.20). When comparing running socked to running with minimalist running shoes, there were no differences in measures of running efficiency. Conclusion: When compared with running in traditional, cushioned shoes, both barefoot (socked) running and minimalist running shoes produce greater running efficiency in some experienced runners, with a greater tendency toward a midfoot or forefoot strike and a shorter ground contact time. Minimalist shoes closely approximate socked running in the 4 measurements performed. Clinical Relevance: With regard to running efficiency and biomechanics, in some runners, barefoot (socked) and minimalist footwear are preferable to traditional running shoes. PMID:26131304

  11. The PS locomotive runs again

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Over forty years ago, the PS train entered service to steer the magnets of the accelerator into place... ... a service that was resumed last Tuesday. Left to right: Raymond Brown (CERN), Claude Tholomier (D.B.S.), Marcel Genolin (CERN), Gérard Saumade (D.B.S.), Ingo Ruehl (CERN), Olivier Carlier (D.B.S.), Patrick Poisot (D.B.S.), Christian Recour (D.B.S.). It is more than ten years since people at CERN heard the rumbling of the old PS train's steel wheels. Last Tuesday, the locomotive came back into service to be tested. It is nothing like the monstrous steel engines still running on conventional railways -just a small electric battery-driven vehicle employed on installing the magnets for the PS accelerator more than 40 years ago. To do so, it used the tracks that run round the accelerator. In fact, it is the grandfather of the LEP monorail. After PS was commissioned in 1959, the little train was used more and more rarely. This is because magnets never break down, or hardly ever! In fact, the loc...

  12. Feel your stride and find your preferred running speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lussiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable inter-individual variability in self-selected intensity or running speed. Metabolic cost per distance has been recognized as a determinant of this personal choice. As biomechanical parameters have been connected to metabolic cost, and as different running patterns exist, we can question their possible determinant roles in self-selected speed. We examined the self-selected speed of 15 terrestrial and 16 aerial runners, with comparable characteristics, on a 400 m track and assessed biomechanical parameters and ratings of pleasure/displeasure. The results revealed that aerial runners choose greater speeds associated with shorter contact time, longer flight time, and higher leg stiffness than terrestrial runners. Pleasure was negatively correlated with contact time and positively with leg stiffness in aerial runners and was negatively correlated with flight time in terrestrial runners. We propose the existence of an optimization system allowing the connection of running patterns at running speeds, and feelings of pleasure or displeasure.

  13. Ventilatory Threshold, Running Economy and Distance Running Performance of Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to identify physiological factors that account for success in distance running, researchers evaluated relationships among ventilatory threshold, running economy, and distance running performance. Subjects were trained male runners with similar maximal aerobic power. (Authors/PP)

  14. Evaluation of respiratory dynamics by volumetric capnography during submaximal exercise protocol of six minutes on treadmill in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzi, Paloma L F; Marson, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Schivinski, Camila I S; Ribeiro, José D

    2017-11-29

    Volumetric capnography provides the standard CO2 elimination by the volume expired per respiratory cycle and is a measure to assess pulmonary involvement. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory dynamics of healthy control subjects and those with cystic fibrosis in a submaximal exercise protocol for six minutes on the treadmill, using volumetric capnography parameters (slope 3 [Slp3], Slp3/tidal volume [Slp3/TV], and slope 2 [Slp2]). This was a cross-sectional study with 128 subjects (cystic fibrosis, 64 subjects; controls, 64 subjects]. Participants underwent volumetric capnography before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, considering age and sex. An alpha=0.05 was considered. Six minutes on the treadmill evaluation: in cystic fibrosis, volumetric capnography parameters were different before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill; the same was observed for the controls, except for Slp2. Regarding age, an Slp3 difference was observed in cystic fibrosis patients regardless of age, at all moments, and in controls for age≥12 years; a difference in Slp3/TV was observed in cystic fibrosis and controls, regardless of age; and an Slp2 difference in the cystic fibrosis, regardless of age. Regarding sex, Slp3 and Slp3/TV differences were observed in cystic fibrosis regardless of sex, and in controls in male participants; an Slp2 difference was observed in the cystic fibrosis and female participants. The analysis between groups (cystic fibrosis and controls) indicated that Slp3 and Slp3/TV has identified the CF, regardless of age and sex, while the Slp2 showed the CF considering age. Cystic fibrosis showed greater values of the parameters before, during, and after exercise, even when stratified by age and sex, which may indicate ventilation inhomogeneity in the peripheral pathways in the cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade

  15. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jefferson, D. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  16. Run-up on Offshore Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vos, Leen; Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    For the present report a testprogramme has been performed to determine the run-up on offshore windturbine foundations.......For the present report a testprogramme has been performed to determine the run-up on offshore windturbine foundations....

  17. Renewables cannot be stored economically on a well-run power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift-Hook Donald

    2017-01-01

    When a power system has different sorts of plant generating - coal, gas, nuclear, wind etc - any power being put into storage is from the plant that would need to be switched off [because less power was needed] if storage ceased [e.g. because the store became full or failed]. On a well-run power system, that always has the highest fuel/running cost, but the wind blows free and has zero fuel/running cost, so wind is never [normally] stored unless there is no other plant on line i.e. wind power is the last to be stored.

  18. Discount-Optimal Infinite Runs in Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new discounting semantics for priced timed automata. Discounting provides a way to model optimal-cost problems for infinite traces and has applications in optimal scheduling and other areas. In the discounting semantics, prices decrease exponentially, so that the contribution...... of a certain part of the behaviour to the overall cost depends on how far into the future this part takes place. We consider the optimal infinite run problem under this semantics: Given a priced timed automaton, find an infinite path with minimal discounted price. We show that this problem is computable...

  19. Effects of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on pacing during 5-km running trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R; Damasceno, M; Cruz, R; Silva-Cavalcante, M D; Lima-Silva, A E; Bishop, D J; Bertuzzi, R

    2017-10-19

    This study analyzed the influence of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on the pacing strategy adopted by runners during a 5-km running trial. Sixteen male recreational long-distance runners were randomly assigned to a control group (CON, n=8) or a high-intensity interval training group (HIIT, n=8). The HIIT group performed high-intensity interval-training twice per week, while the CON group maintained their regular training program. Before and after the training period, the runners performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion to measure the onset of blood lactate accumulation, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and peak treadmill speed (PTS). A submaximal constant-speed test to measure the running economy (RE) and a 5-km running trial on an outdoor track to establish pacing strategy and performance were also done. During the 5-km running trial, the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and time to cover the 5-km trial (T5) were registered. After the training period, there were significant improvements in the HIIT group of ∼7 and 5% for RE (P=0.012) and PTS (P=0.019), respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups for VO2max (P=0.495) or onset of blood lactate accumulation (P=0.101). No difference was found in the parameters measured during the 5-km trial before the training period between HIIT and CON (P>0.05). These findings suggest that 4 weeks of HIIT can improve some traditional physiological variables related to endurance performance (RE and PTS), but it does not alter the perception of effort, pacing strategy, or overall performance during a 5-km running trial.

  20. Effect of fat- and carbohydrate-rich diets on metabolism and running performance in trained adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes Couto, Patricia; Marani Lima, Hessel; Pinheiro Soares, Ruda; Bertuzzi, Romulo; De-Oliveira, Fernando Roberto; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    A randomized crossover trial was designed to analyze the impact of a short-term, isoenergetic fat-rich or carbohydrate (CHO)-rich diet on substrate oxidation rates during submaximal exercise and on performance in a 10,000-m running time trial in trained, mid- to late-pubertal boys. An incremental test was performed to determine the peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak). After 2 days on a fat-rich (24.2% ± 0.8% CHO, 60.4% ± 0.3% fat, and 15.5% ± 1.0% protein), CHO-rich (69.3% ± 1.2% CHO, 15.9% ± 2.1% fat, and 15.1% ± 1.1% protein), or habitual (56.1% ± 7.0% CHO, 27.5% ± 4.9% fat, and 16.5% ± 4.0% protein) diet, 19 trained adolescent boys (15.2 ± 1.5 years) performed a 10-minute constant run at 65% VO2peak to determine the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise and 10,000-m running on an outdoor track. During the constant run, the RER and CHO contribution to energy expenditure were lower, and fat contribution higher, in the fat-rich diet than in the CHO-rich diet (P benefits to 10,000-m running performance in trained adolescent boys compared with a fat-rich diet.

  1. Effects of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on pacing during 5-km running trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the influence of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on the pacing strategy adopted by runners during a 5-km running trial. Sixteen male recreational long-distance runners were randomly assigned to a control group (CON, n=8 or a high-intensity interval training group (HIIT, n=8. The HIIT group performed high-intensity interval-training twice per week, while the CON group maintained their regular training program. Before and after the training period, the runners performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion to measure the onset of blood lactate accumulation, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, and peak treadmill speed (PTS. A submaximal constant-speed test to measure the running economy (RE and a 5-km running trial on an outdoor track to establish pacing strategy and performance were also done. During the 5-km running trial, the rating of perceived exertion (RPE and time to cover the 5-km trial (T5 were registered. After the training period, there were significant improvements in the HIIT group of ∼7 and 5% for RE (P=0.012 and PTS (P=0.019, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups for VO2max (P=0.495 or onset of blood lactate accumulation (P=0.101. No difference was found in the parameters measured during the 5-km trial before the training period between HIIT and CON (P>0.05. These findings suggest that 4 weeks of HIIT can improve some traditional physiological variables related to endurance performance (RE and PTS, but it does not alter the perception of effort, pacing strategy, or overall performance during a 5-km running trial.

  2. Robotic Bipedal Running : Increasing disturbance rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssen, J.G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to increase the understanding of the human running gait. The understanding of the human running gait is essential for the development of devices, such as prostheses and orthoses, that enable disabled people to run or that enable able people to

  3. Running-in of rolling contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamari, Jamari

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with running-in of the pure rolling contact situation operating in the boundary lubrication regime, so that normal plastic deformation due to the contact between asperities is the main aspect. The change of the surface topography during the running-in process and the run-in

  4. Barefoot running survey: Evidence from the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hryvniak

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Prior studies have found that barefoot running often changes biomechanics compared to shod running with a hypothesized relationship of decreased injuries. This paper reports the result of a survey of 509 runners. The results suggest that a large percentage of this sample of runners experienced benefits or no serious harm from transitioning to barefoot or minimal shoe running.

  5. Future Intent to Run and Running Performance of Students Exposed to a Traditional versus an Autonomy Supportive Motivational Running Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study's primary purpose was to investigate whether an autonomy supportive motivational climate in a running program would increase future running intent among high school students. A secondary purpose was to examine whether the program would increase individual performance in the Cooper 12-minute run. Methods. Students participated in a 4-month running intervention program which included four timed runs, one per month, and a future intent questionnaire prior to the start of the timed runs and following the last run. Results. Factorial repeated measures ANOVA revealed significance regarding future intent ( at both schools. Factorial repeated measures ANOVA indicated differences between the runs at both schools (. Paired samples -tests were conducted to look at significance with paired runs. Results revealed significance in two of the six pairs at the treatment school, notably between the first and last timed runs (. Only one pair was found to be significant ( with the control school. Conclusion. At both schools, the overall number of laps increased as well as future intent to run scores. The results do not support evidence of a greater effect from the autonomy supportive environment over a traditional environment.

  6. ATLAS inner detector: the Run 1 to Run 2 transition, and first experience from Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Dobos, Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is equipped with a tracking system, the Inner Detector, built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift- tubes, all embedded in a 2T solenoidal magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the system has been upgraded; taking advantage of the long showdown, the Pixel Detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm from the beam axis. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point and the increase of Luminosity that LHC will face in Run-2, a new read-out chip within CMOS 130nm and two different silicon sensor pixel technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. SCT and TRT systems consolidation was also carri...

  7. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Description of a standardized rehabilitation program based on sub-maximal eccentric following a platelet-rich plasma infiltration for jumper’s knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaux, Jean-François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Namurois, Marie-Hélène; Bauvir, Philippe; Defawe, Nathalie; Delvaux, François; Lehance, Cédric; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction. Different series emphasized the necessity of rehabilitation program after infiltration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in case of tendinopathy. However, most of them describe only briefly the reeducation protocol and these programs vary. Our aim was to extensively describe a specific standardized rehabilitation program. Methods. After a review of literature of post-PRP infiltration protocols, we had developed a standardized rehabilitation protocol. This protocol was evaluated by 30 subjects with chronic jumper’s knee who. A standardised progressive sub-maximal eccentric program supervised by a physical therapist for 6 weeks was started 1 week post-infiltration. The patient benefited also from electromyostimulation, isometric strengthening and stretching of the quadriceps, cycloergometer and cryotherapy. After the supervised program, the patient had to make an auto-reeducation added to the reathletisation protocol for 6 more weeks which was followed by maintenance exercises up to 1 year. The assessments were made using a VAS, IKDC and VISA-P scores. Results. The VAS, IKDC and VISA-P scores decreased very significantly with time. The compliance to auto-reeducation was good. Conclusions. We proposed a simple and efficient protocol based on sub-maximal eccentric reeducation to add to PRP infiltrations in case of patellar tendinopathy. PMID:24932453

  9. Anaerobic contribution during maximal anaerobic running test: correlation with maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, A; Redkva, P; Loures, J; Kalva Filho, C; Franco, V; Kaminagakura, E; Papoti, M

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to measure energy system contributions in maximal anaerobic running test (MART); and (ii) to verify any correlation between MART and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Eleven members of the armed forces were recruited for this study. Participants performed MART and MAOD, both accomplished on a treadmill. MART consisted of intermittent exercise, 20 s effort with 100 s recovery, after each spell of effort exercise. Energy system contributions by MART were also determined by excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, lactate response, and oxygen uptake measurements. MAOD was determined by five submaximal intensities and one supramaximal intensity exercises corresponding to 120% at maximal oxygen uptake intensity. Energy system contributions were 65.4±1.1% to aerobic; 29.5±1.1% to anaerobic a-lactic; and 5.1±0.5% to anaerobic lactic system throughout the whole test, while only during effort periods the anaerobic contribution corresponded to 73.5±1.0%. Maximal power found in MART corresponded to 111.25±1.33 mL/kg/min but did not significantly correlate with MAOD (4.69±0.30 L and 70.85±4.73 mL/kg). We concluded that the anaerobic a-lactic system is the main energy system in MART efforts and this test did not significantly correlate to MAOD. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. A Negative Life Event Impairs Psychosocial Stress, Recovery and Running Economy of Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, R T A; Brink, M S; Diercks, R L; Lemmink, K A P M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose was to investigate how a negative life event (NLE) affects perceived psychosocial stress, recovery and running economy (RE). Competitive runners were monitored in a prospective non-experimental cohort study over one full training season in which they experienced the same unplanned severe NLE. 16 runners recorded stress and recovery scores (RESTQ-Sport) every week. The average scores over 3 weeks before the NLE were used as a baseline and were compared to scores during the week of the NLE (week 0), week 1 and week 2. 7 runners completed a submaximal treadmill test before and after the NLE. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that most scores on general stress scales were increased in week 0 and 1. Of the general recovery scales, "general well-being" was decreased in week 0 and 1, "social" and "physical recovery" were decreased in week 0. No changes in the sport-specific stress scales were found. However, 2 of the sport-specific recovery scales were decreased in week 0. An impaired RE was shown 3 weeks after the NLE. Therefore, it is important to know what is going on in an athlete's life, because stressful life events alter RE after the stress and recovery already returned to normal levels. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Are multiple runs better than one?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2001-01-04

    This paper investigates whether it is better to use a certain constant amount of computational resources in a single run with a large population, or in multiple runs with smaller populations. The paper presents the primary tradeoffs involved in this problem and identifies the conditions under which there is an advantage to use multiple small runs. The paper uses an existing model that relates the quality of the solutions reached by a GA with its population size. The results suggest that in most cases a single run with the largest population possible reaches a better solution than multiple isolated runs. The findings are validated with experiments on functions of varying difficulty.

  12. Reducing gravity takes the bounce out of running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, Delyle T; Schroeder, Ryan T; Bertram, John E A

    2017-12-07

    In gravity below Earth normal, a person should be able to take higher leaps in running. We asked ten subjects to run on a treadmill in five levels of simulated reduced gravity and optically tracked center of mass kinematics. Subjects consistently reduced ballistic height compared to running in normal gravity. We explain this trend by considering the vertical takeoff velocity (defined as maximum vertical velocity). Energetically optimal gaits should balance energetic costs of ground-contact collisions (favouring lower takeoff velocity), and step frequency penalties such as leg swing work (favouring higher takeoff velocity, but less so in reduced gravity). Measured vertical takeoff velocity scaled with the square root of gravitational acceleration, following energetic optimality predictions and explaining why ballistic height decreases in lower gravity. The success of work-based costs in predicting this behaviour challenges the notion that gait adaptation in reduced gravity results from an unloading of the stance phase. Only the relationship between takeoff velocity and swing cost changes in reduced gravity; the energetic cost of the down-to-up transition for a given vertical takeoff velocity does not change with gravity. Because lower gravity allows an elongated swing phase for a given takeoff velocity, the motor control system can relax the vertical momentum change in the stance phase, so reducing ballistic height, without great energetic penalty to leg swing work. While it may seem counterintuitive, using less "bouncy" gaits in reduced gravity is a strategy to reduce energetic costs, to which humans seem extremely sensitive. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Running Technique is an Important Component of Running Economy and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folland, Jonathan P; Allen, Sam J; Black, Matthew I; Handsaker, Joseph C; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2017-07-01

    Despite an intuitive relationship between technique and both running economy (RE) and performance, and the diverse techniques used by runners to achieve forward locomotion, the objective importance of overall technique and the key components therein remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to determine the relationship between individual and combined kinematic measures of technique with both RE and performance. Ninety-seven endurance runners (47 females) of diverse competitive standards performed a discontinuous protocol of incremental treadmill running (4-min stages, 1-km·h increments). Measurements included three-dimensional full-body kinematics, respiratory gases to determine energy cost, and velocity of lactate turn point. Five categories of kinematic measures (vertical oscillation, braking, posture, stride parameters, and lower limb angles) and locomotory energy cost (LEc) were averaged across 10-12 km·h (the highest common velocity Performance was measured as season's best (SB) time converted to a sex-specific z-score. Numerous kinematic variables were correlated with RE and performance (LEc, 19 variables; SB time, 11 variables). Regression analysis found three variables (pelvis vertical oscillation during ground contact normalized to height, minimum knee joint angle during ground contact, and minimum horizontal pelvis velocity) explained 39% of LEc variability. In addition, four variables (minimum horizontal pelvis velocity, shank touchdown angle, duty factor, and trunk forward lean) combined to explain 31% of the variability in performance (SB time). This study provides novel and robust evidence that technique explains a substantial proportion of the variance in RE and performance. We recommend that runners and coaches are attentive to specific aspects of stride parameters and lower limb angles in part to optimize pelvis movement, and ultimately enhance performance.

  14. Running Technique is an Important Component of Running Economy and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOLLAND, JONATHAN P.; ALLEN, SAM J.; BLACK, MATTHEW I.; HANDSAKER, JOSEPH C.; FORRESTER, STEPHANIE E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite an intuitive relationship between technique and both running economy (RE) and performance, and the diverse techniques used by runners to achieve forward locomotion, the objective importance of overall technique and the key components therein remain to be elucidated. Purpose This study aimed to determine the relationship between individual and combined kinematic measures of technique with both RE and performance. Methods Ninety-seven endurance runners (47 females) of diverse competitive standards performed a discontinuous protocol of incremental treadmill running (4-min stages, 1-km·h−1 increments). Measurements included three-dimensional full-body kinematics, respiratory gases to determine energy cost, and velocity of lactate turn point. Five categories of kinematic measures (vertical oscillation, braking, posture, stride parameters, and lower limb angles) and locomotory energy cost (LEc) were averaged across 10–12 km·h−1 (the highest common velocity < velocity of lactate turn point). Performance was measured as season's best (SB) time converted to a sex-specific z-score. Results Numerous kinematic variables were correlated with RE and performance (LEc, 19 variables; SB time, 11 variables). Regression analysis found three variables (pelvis vertical oscillation during ground contact normalized to height, minimum knee joint angle during ground contact, and minimum horizontal pelvis velocity) explained 39% of LEc variability. In addition, four variables (minimum horizontal pelvis velocity, shank touchdown angle, duty factor, and trunk forward lean) combined to explain 31% of the variability in performance (SB time). Conclusions This study provides novel and robust evidence that technique explains a substantial proportion of the variance in RE and performance. We recommend that runners and coaches are attentive to specific aspects of stride parameters and lower limb angles in part to optimize pelvis movement, and ultimately enhance performance

  15. Hierarchical process modeling : Describing within-run and between-run variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Entink, R.H.; Fox, J.P.; Betlem, B.H.L.; Roffel, B.

    2007-01-01

    Run-to-run variability is a common problem for modeling batch-wise and semi-continuous operated processes. Although observed reactor runs show the same trends in process behaviour, each specific reactor run also shows its own characteristics. Until now, available modeling methods were unable to

  16. Rating of perceived exertion during cycling is associated with subsequent running economy in triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Jason; Vleck, Veronica; Saunders, Philo U; Blanch, Peter; Vicenzino, Bill

    2013-01-01

    To determine which commonly measured variables of cycling intensity are related to subsequent running economy in triathletes. Cross-sectional laboratory study. Running economy was compared between a control run (no preceding cycle) and a run performed after a 45 min high-intensity cycle in eighteen triathletes. Power output, heart rate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood lactate concentration were monitored throughout the cycle. The relationship between measures of cycle intensity and the change in running economy was evaluated using Pearson's product moment correlation. Changes in running economy were also interpreted using the smallest worthwhile change (>2.4%) and grouped accordingly (i.e. impaired, no change, or improved running economy). Triathletes' RPE at the end of the cycling bout was significantly associated with the change in running economy after cycling (r=0.57, p=0.01). Average RPE of the cycle bout and RPE at the end of the cycling bout were significantly different between groups, with higher RPE scores being related to impairments in running economy (p=0.04 and p=0.02 respectively). RPE during cycling is associated with subsequent running economy in triathletes. RPE is a simple, cost-effective measure that triathletes and their coaches can use in competition and training to control cycling intensity without the need for specialist equipment such as crank systems or blood analysers. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. LHCf completes its first run

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    LHCf, one of the three smaller experiments at the LHC, has completed its first run. The detectors were removed last week and the analysis of data is continuing. The first results will be ready by the end of the year.   One of the two LHCf detectors during the removal operations inside the LHC tunnel. LHCf is made up of two independent detectors located in the tunnel 140 m either side of the ATLAS collision point. The experiment studies the secondary particles created during the head-on collisions in the LHC because they are similar to those created in a cosmic ray shower produced when a cosmic particle hits the Earth’s atmosphere. The focus of the experiment is to compare the various shower models used to estimate the primary energy of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The energy of proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be equivalent to a cosmic ray of 1017eV hitting the atmosphere, very close to the highest energies observed in the sky. “We have now completed the fir...

  18. Running Club - Nocturne des Evaux

    CERN Multimedia

    Running club

    2017-01-01

    Les coureurs du CERN sont encore montés sur les plus hautes marches du podium lors de la course interentreprises. Cette course d’équipe qui se déroule de nuit et par équipe de 3 à 4 coureurs est unique dans la région de par son originalité : départ groupé toutes les 30 secondes, les 3 premiers coureurs doivent passer la ligne d’arrivée ensemble. Double victoire pour le running club a la nocturne !!!! 1ère place pour les filles et 22e au classement général; 1ère place pour l'équipe mixte et 4e au général, battant par la même occasion le record de l'épreuve en mixte d'environ 1 minute; 10e place pour l'équipe homme. Retrouvez tous les résultats sur http://www.chp-geneve.ch/web-cms/index.php/nocturne-des-evaux

  19. Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rebecca L; Rogers, Daniel K; Howe, Peter R C; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was related to reductions in exercise performance resulting from acute fatigue. Fourteen triathletes completed testing before and after a 2-h run. rHRI was assessed during 5 min of 100-W cycling and a sigmoidal (rHRIsig) and exponential (rHRIexp) model were applied. Exercise performance was assessed using a 5-min cycling time-trial. The run elicited reductions in time-trial performance (1.34 ± 0.19 to 1.25 ± 0.18 kJ · kg(-1), P exercise HR (73.0 ± 8.4 to 90.5 ± 11.4 beats · min(-1), P exercise and steady-state HR. rHRIsig was reduced following acute exercise-induced fatigue, and correlated with difference in performance.

  20. the costs ofprimary maternity care at the Diepkloof Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admissions to the labour ward were referred to doctors during March, while the monthly average was 3%. Cost analysis showed that the labour ward accounted for 25% of the total costs ofDK.' As with other clinical sections, capital costs were a minor factor, accounting for 2% oftotal costs.' Details ofthe running costs ofme.

  1. Exercise conditioning and cardiopulmonary fitness in cystic fibrosis. The effects of a three-month supervised running program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, D M; Franklin, B A; Doershuk, C F; Hellerstein, H K; Germann, K J; Horowitz, J G; Stern, R C

    1981-10-01

    Exercise intolerance is common in cystic fibrosis (CF). We examined the effects of a supervised three-month running program on exercise tolerance, pulmonary function, cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption), and respiratory muscle endurance in CF patients. We studied 31 patients, 21 exercise and ten control, aged 10 to 30 years, with pulmonary involvement ranging from mild to severe. The exercise and control groups were not significantly different with respect to age, sex, pulmonary function, exercise tolerance, or cardiorespiratory fitness. After three months of physical conditioning, the exercise group had significantly increased exercise tolerance and peak oxygen consumption and significantly lower heart rates for submaximal work loads, while the nonexercising (control) group was unchanged in all these variables. The FEV1 decreased significantly in the control group. There were no other significant changes in pulmonary function in either the control or exercise group. Respiratory muscle endurance increased significantly in the exercise patients, and did not change in the control patients. There were no adverse effects of the program. The data suggest that a supervised running program can increase CF patients' exercise tolerance and cardiorespiratory fitness, perhaps in part by increasing respiratory muscle tolerance. The effects of a much longer program deserve study.

  2. The backpack run test: a model for a fair and occupationally relevant military fitness test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburgh, P M; Flanagan, S

    2000-05-01

    Our purpose in this investigation was to develop and validate a theoretical model for a backpack run test based on how fast one can run 2 miles while wearing a backpack. Using actual unloaded (no backpack) 2-mile-run test data from 59 male service academy cadets, we calculated the average oxygen cost during the run, the equivalent cost if wearing additional weight, and the corresponding estimated run time with the backpack. The correlations between body weight and loaded (backpack weight = 30 kg) run times (r = 0.55 [p 0.05], respectively) demonstrate that the bias against heavier runners is eliminated with the backpack run. Given that the backpack run test requires only standard-issue equipment, demonstrates clear occupational and health-related fitness relevance, predicts no apparent body-size bias, and measures work- and health-related components of fitness, we recommend that the military services consider the present data when developing or modifying tests of physical fitness.

  3. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  4. Wave Run-Up on Rubble Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van de Walle, Bjorn; De Rouck, Julien; Troch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Seven sets of data for wave run-up on a rubble mound breakwater were combined and re-analysed, with full-scale, large-scale and small-scale model test results being taken into account. The dimensionless wave run-up value Ru-2%/Hm0 was considered, where R u-2% is the wave run-up height exceeded by 2......% of the wave run-up events and Hm0 is the significant wave height. The wave run-up data sets were compared and a clear influence of the spectral shape, characterised by the spectral width parameter epsilon, on wave run-up was noticed: high values of epsilon correspond to high values of Ru-2%/Hm0 and vice versa...... or rip-rap with a slope steeper than 1 : 2, surging waves and a JONSWAP-type wave spectrum....

  5. Below-knee amputee running gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoka, R M; Miller, D I; Burgess, E M

    1982-04-01

    The running ability of ten unilateral below-knee amputees was examined by analyzing the temporal and length characteristics of their running strides and the angular displacement patterns of their intact and prosthetic limbs. Six of the individuals tested were able to run and in several cases their locomotor patterns were similar to those of non-amputees. The running gait of three of the amputee runners, however, did contain one particular undesirable element namely an excessively straight residual knee during at least a portion of support on the prosthesis. Although several explanations could be postulated to account for this tendency, we believe that it could be eliminated with training and possible prosthetic modification. Results of the study, while attesting to the fact that many lower extremity amputees can run, also suggested directions in which research efforts can and are being focused to facilitate their running performance.

  6. Running with technology: Where are we heading?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Mueller, Florian 'Floyd'

    2014-01-01

    Running has become popular in recent years, and numerous runners utilize wearable technologies in order to improve their run training. This paper investigates the development and trends in technologies used for run training, and describes how these are changing from solely focusing...... on the performance (e.g. pace) to having an additional focus on the technique (e.g. foot strike type). Based on this investigation, we present a design space for run-training technologies. By plotting existing technologies onto the design space, we argue that there has been limited attention on how to utilize...... technique- related information in run-training interfaces. From that finding, this paper presents three questions to be addressed by designers of future run-training interfaces. We believe that addressing these questions will support creation of expedient interfaces that improve runners’ technique...

  7. The CMS trigger in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, Mia

    2017-01-01

    In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has undergone a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT went through big improvements; in particula...

  8. Run 2 ATLAS Trigger and Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in June 2015 with a proton-proton centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV. During the years 2016 and 2017, LHC delivered an unprecedented amount of luminosity under the ever-increasing challenging conditions in terms of peak luminosity, pile-up and trigger rates. In this talk, the LHC running conditions and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment in the course of Run 2 will be discussed, and the latest ATLAS detector and ATLAS trigger performance results from the Run 2 will be presented.

  9. Sub-maximal and maximal Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 2: heart rate response, reproducibility and application to elite soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Paul S; Mohr, Magni; Bendiksen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) determine the reproducibility of sub-maximal and maximal versions of the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 2 (Yo-Yo IE2 test), (2) assess the relationship between the Yo-Yo IE2 test and match performance and (3) quantify the sensitivity of the Yo-Yo IE2 te......) in Yo-Yo IE2 test performance and heart rate after 6 min were 3.9% (n = 37) and 1.4% (n = 32), respectively. Elite male senior and youth U19 players Yo-Yo IE2 performances were better (P ...

  10. Coconut Water Does Not Improve Markers of Hydration During Sub-maximal Exercise and Performance in a Subsequent Time Trial Compared with Water Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Daniel J; Hensby, Andy; Shaw, Matthew P

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare markers of hydration during submaximal exercise and subsequent time trial performance when consuming water (PW) or coconut water (CW). There was also a secondary aim to assess the palatability of CW during exercise and voluntary intake during intense exercise. 10 males (age 27.9 ± 4.9 years, body mass 78.1 ± 10.1kg, average max minute power 300.2 ± 28.2W) completed 60-min of submaximal cycling followed by a 10-km time trial on two occasions. During these trials participants consumed either PW or CW in a randomized manner, drinking a 250 ml of the assigned drink between 10-15 min, 25-30 min and 40-45 min, and then drinking ad libitum from 55-min until the end of the time trial. Body mass and urine osmolality were recorded preexercise and then after 30-min, 60-min, and post time trial. Blood glucose, lactate, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE; 6-20) and ratings of thirst, sweetness, nausea, fullness and stomach upset (1 =very low/none, 5= very high) were recorded during each drink period. CW did not significantly improve time trial performance compared with PW (971.4 ± 50.5 and 966.6 ± 44.8 s respectively; p = .698) and there was also no significant differences between trials for any of the physiological variables measured. However there were subjective differences between the beverages for taste, resulting in a significantly reduced volume of voluntary intake in the CW trial (115 ± 95.41 ml and 208.7 ± 86.22 ml; p < .001).

  11. Submaximal exercise testing with near-infrared spectroscopy in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients compared to healthy controls: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth R; Reid, W Darlene; Mattman, Andre; Yamabayashi, Cristiane; Steiner, Theodore; Parker, Shoshana; Gardy, Jennifer; Tang, Patrick; Patrick, David M

    2015-05-20

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating illness. Symptoms include profound fatigue and distinctive post-exertional malaise (PEM). We asked whether a submaximal exercise test would prove useful for identifying different patterns of tissue oxygen utilization in individuals with ME/CFS versus healthy subjects. Such a test has potential to aid with ME/CFS diagnosis, or to characterize patients' illness. A case-control study of 16 patients with ME/CFS compared to 16 healthy controls completing a 3-min handgrip protocol was performed. Response was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy, resulting in measurements of oxygenated (O2Hb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb) over wrist extensors and flexors. Changes in O2Hb (delta (d)O2Hb) and HHb (dHHb) absorbance between the first and last contraction were calculated, as were the force-time product of all contractions, measured as tension-time index (TTI), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). Individuals with ME/CFS demonstrated smaller dO2Hb and dHHb than controls. However, after adjusting for TTI and change in total hemoglobin (delta (d)tHb), differences in dO2Hb and dHHb were reduced, with large overlapping variances. RPE was significantly higher for cases than controls, particularly at rest. Relative to controls, participants with ME/CFS demonstrated higher RPE, lower TTI, and reduced dO2Hb and dHHb during repetitive handgrip exercise, although considerable variance was observed. With further study, submaximal exercise testing may prove useful for stratifying patients with a lower propensity for inducing PEM, and have the ability to establish baseline intensities for exercise prescription.

  12. Measuring submaximal performance parameters to monitor fatigue and predict cycling performance: a case study of a world-class cyclo-cross cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Robert P; Rietjens, Gerard J; Tijdink, Hendrik H; Noakes, Timothy D; Lambert, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    Recently a novel submaximal test, known as the Lamberts and Lambert submaximal cycle test (LSCT), has been developed with the purpose of monitoring and predicting changes in cycling performance. Although this test has been shown to be reliable and able to predict cycling performance, it is not known whether it can measure changes in training status. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the LSCT is able to track changes in performance parameters, and objective and subjective markers of well-being. A world class cyclo-cross athlete (31 years) volunteered to participate in a 10-week observational study. Before and after the study, a peak power output (PPO) test with respiratory gas analysis (VO(2max)) and a 40-km time trial (40-km TT) test were performed. Training data were recorded in a training logbook with a daily assessment of well-being, while a weekly LSCT was performed. After the training period all performance parameters had improved by a meaningful amount (PPO +5.2%; 40-km TT time -2.5%; VO(2max) +1.4%). Increased training loads during weeks 2 and 6 and the subsequent training-induced fatigue was reflected in the increased well-being scores. Changes during the LSCT were most clearly notable in (1) increased power during the first minute of third stage, (2) increased rating of perceived exertion during second and third stages, and (3) a faster heart rate recovery after the third stage. In conclusion, these data suggest that the LSCT is able to track changes in training status and detect the consequences of sharp increases in training loads which seem to be associated with accumulating fatigue.

  13. [Physiological effects of ultra-marathon run].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, E B; Son'kin, V D

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the performance of vegetative systems of the body, and gas exchange in the implementation of one athlete (master of skiing, 27 years, MaxVO2 = 67 ml/min/kg) during 6 hours ultra-marathon race in a closed stadium at an average speed of 2.7 m/s. Continuous monitoring of heart rate was carried out using the heart rate monitor Polar RS 800. During the first hour and then for 20-30 minutes each hour gas analysis was performed with Metamaxdevice (Germany), mounted on the test subject during all the time of the race. Before and after the passages of the measured interval distance blood lactate content was measured. These data demonstrate a number of features that accompany fatigue in the final stretches a distance: reduction of body economy, which is to increase heart rate and oxygen cost of work; activation of anaerobic-glycolitic energy production mechanism, the intensification of respiratory function. Along with this, the methods of correlation and regression analysis revealed changes (increase or decrease) the relationship between the functions depending on whether the body is in the initial stage of the physical load, sustainable high performance or in either a state of extreme fatigue. These results suggest the interference effects of the central and tissue mechanisms of fatigue in the organization of the oxygen transport function of the body. Apparently, in the case of ultra-marathon run, that is, long-term work of moderate power, the main limiting factor is not the energy of the body, and the autonomic software.

  14. Performance evaluation and financial market runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, W.B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a model in which performance evaluation causes runs by fund managers and results in asset fire sales. Performance evaluation nonetheless is efficient as it disciplines managers. Optimal performance evaluation combines absolute and relative components in order to make runs less

  15. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-09-20

    EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

  16. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  17. Separating Fact from Fiction: Increasing Running Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Carla

    2008-01-01

    From a biomechanical point of view, this article explores the common belief that one must increase stride length and frequency in order to increase running speed. The limb length, explosive power, and anaerobic capacity of the athlete, as well as the type of running (sprinting vs. long distance) must be considered before making such a…

  18. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  19. Impact of Running Away on Girls' Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrane, Lisa E.; Chen, Xiaojin

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of running away on pregnancy in the subsequent year among U.S. adolescents. We also investigated interactions between running away and sexual assault, romance, and school disengagement. Pregnancy among females between 11 and 17 years (n = 6100) was examined utilizing the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add…

  20. Long Run Relationship Between Agricultural Production And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sought to estimate the impact of agricultural production on the long run economic growth in Nigeria using the Vector Error Correction Methodology. The result shows that long run relationship exists between agricultural production and economic growth in Nigeria. Among the variables in the model, crop production ...

  1. Training errors and running related injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Buist, Ida; Sørensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the link between training characteristics (volume, duration, frequency, and intensity) and running related injuries.......The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the link between training characteristics (volume, duration, frequency, and intensity) and running related injuries....

  2. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyngeraa, T. S.; Pedersen, L. M.; Mantoni, T.; Belhage, B.; Rasmussen, L. S.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Pott, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA)

  3. INDIRECT CALORIMETRY DURING ULTRADISTANCE RUNNING: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Dumke

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to determine the energy expenditure during ultradistance trail running. A portable metabolic unit was carried by a male subject for the first 64.5 km portion of the Western States 100 running race. Calibrations were done with known gases and volumes at ambient temperature, humidity and pressure (23-40.5 °C and 16-40% respectively. Altitude averaged 1692.8 ± 210 m during data collection. The male subject (36 yrs, 75 kg, VO2max of 67.0 ml·kg-1·min-1 had an average (mean ± SD heart rate of 132 ± 9 bpm, oxygen consumption of 34.0 ± 6.8 ml·kg-1·min-1, RER of 0.91 ± 0.04, and VE of 86.0 ± 14.3 L·min-1 during the 21.7 km measuring period. This represented an average of 51% VO2max and 75% heart rate maximum. Energy expenditure was 12.6 ± 2.5 kcals·min-1, or 82.7 ± 16.6 kcals·km-1 (134 ± 27 kcals·mile-1 at 68.3 ± 12.5% carbohydrate. Extrapolation of this data would result in an energy expenditure of >13,000 kcals for the 160 km race, and an exogenous carbohydrate requirement of >250 kcal·hr-1. The energy cost of running for this subject on separate, noncompetitive occasions ranged from 64.9 ± 8.5 to 74.4 ± 5.5 kcals·km-1 (105 ± 14 to 120 ± 9 kcals·mile-1. Ultradistance trail running increases energy expenditure above that of running on nonundulating terrain, which may result in underestimating energy requirements during these events and subsequent undernourishment and suboptimal performance.

  4. Biomechanics of running indicates endothermy in bipedal dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Allen, Vivian; Hutchinson, John R

    2009-11-11

    One of the great unresolved controversies in paleobiology is whether extinct dinosaurs were endothermic, ectothermic, or some combination thereof, and when endothermy first evolved in the lineage leading to birds. Although it is well established that high, sustained growth rates and, presumably, high activity levels are ancestral for dinosaurs and pterosaurs (clade Ornithodira), other independent lines of evidence for high metabolic rates, locomotor costs, or endothermy are needed. For example, some studies have suggested that, because large dinosaurs may have been homeothermic due to their size alone and could have had heat loss problems, ectothermy would be a more plausible metabolic strategy for such animals. Here we describe two new biomechanical approaches for reconstructing the metabolic rate of 14 extinct bipedal dinosauriforms during walking and running. These methods, well validated for extant animals, indicate that during walking and slow running the metabolic rate of at least the larger extinct dinosaurs exceeded the maximum aerobic capabilities of modern ectotherms, falling instead within the range of modern birds and mammals. Estimated metabolic rates for smaller dinosaurs are more ambiguous, but generally approach or exceed the ectotherm boundary. Our results support the hypothesis that endothermy was widespread in at least larger non-avian dinosaurs. It was plausibly ancestral for all dinosauriforms (perhaps Ornithodira), but this is perhaps more strongly indicated by high growth rates than by locomotor costs. The polarity of the evolution of endothermy indicates that rapid growth, insulation, erect postures, and perhaps aerobic power predated advanced "avian" lung structure and high locomotor costs.

  5. PECULIARITIES OF RUNNING GEAR CONSTRUCTION OF ROLLING STOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the dynamic qualities of the main locomotives that characterize safety traffic along straight and curved track sections in the entire range of operational speeds, it is necessary to perform a whole range of studies. One of the necessary conditions for a qualitative improvement of the traction rolling stock of railways is the determination of the parameters of its running gears. Among the issues related to this problem, the important task is to determine the dynamic qualities of locomotives at the design stage, taking into account the selected technical solutions in the design of running gears. At the same time, special attention is paid to the connections of the body with bogie, in particular, using the inclined rods. Methodology. Mathematical modeling is carried out by the method of numerical integration of the equations of the mathematical model of locomotive spatial oscillations to determine the dynamic loading of the mainline locomotive using the software package "Dynamics of Rail Vihicles" ("DYNRAIL". Findings. The research results show that in order to create a simple and reliable design of running gears, which will reduce maintenance and repair costs, will have low initial cost and operating costs for the whole life cycle, high traction force as close as possible to the ultimate force in traction, will make it possible to operate in the multiple traction mode, the designers and scientists should implement scientific and technical solutions. Originality. In accordance with researches authors formed general classification formation of body/bogie connections and the general classification of structures of inclined rod of locomotives. Practical value. Generalization of the results of theoretical, scientific-methodical, experimental studies aimed at further improving the running gears of long-distance locomotives of perspective structures is urgent in improving the rolling stock constructions. The research carried out by

  6. Effect of footwear on muscular loading and energy demand during distance running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Shahin

    The most popular activity around the world which involves the conversion of muscular forces into translocation through complex reciprocal movement patterns is running. Running economy is an important element of performance in distance running. A number of biomechanical parameters have been related...... inserts on calcaneal movement to affect energy stored in the ligaments and muscles of the foot and to modulate the energy storage and return mechanism of the triceps surae muscle group, muscle activity and running economy are investigated. The results indicate that the energy consumption savings achieved...... by footwear most likely assist in improving RE by optimizing energy storage and return mechanisms within the biological system. Shoe-induced kinematic changes relate to overall metabolic cost where inserts can have the potential to regulate muscle activity and thus may affect running economy and muscle...

  7. The Cost of Railroad Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federico, Giovanni; Sharp, Paul R.

    commodities until the First World War. We demonstrate that this reflected changes in transportation costs which in turn in the long run depended on productivity growth in railroads. 1920 marked a change in this relationship, however, and between the First and Second World Wars we find considerable...

  8. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  9. Equilibrium at a bottleneck when long-run and short-run scheduling preferences diverge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peer, S.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the use of a Vickrey road bottleneck in the context of repetitive scheduling choices, distinguishing between long-run and short-run scheduling preferences. The preference structure reflects that there is a distinction between the (exogenous) 'long-run preferred arrival time', which would

  10. Rocker shoe, minimalist shoe, and standard running shoe : A comparison of running economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Bredeweg, Steven; Dekker, Rienk; Kluitenberg, Bas; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Hijmans, Juha; Postema, Klaas

    Objectives: Running with rocker shoes is believed to prevent lower limb injuries. However, it is not clear how running in these shoes affects the energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to assess the effects of rocker shoes on running economy in comparison with standard and

  11. The Effect of Concurrent Plyometric Training Versus Submaximal Aerobic Cycling on Rowing Economy, Peak Power, and Performance in Male High School Rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan-Shuttler, Julian D; Edmonds, Rohan; Eddy, Cassandra; O'Neill, Veronica; Ives, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Plyometric training has been shown to increase muscle power, running economy, and performance in athletes. Despite its use by rowing coaches, it is unknown whether plyometrics might improve rowing economy or performance. The purpose was to determine if plyometric training, in conjunction with training on the water, would lead to improved rowing economy and performance. Eighteen male high school rowers were assigned to perform 4 weeks of either plyometric training (PLYO, n = 9) or steady-state cycling below ventilatory threshold (endurance, E, n = 9), for 30 min prior to practice on the water (matched for training volume) 3 days per week. Rowing performance was assessed through a 500-m rowing time trial (TT) and peak rowing power (RP), while rowing economy (RE) was assessed by measuring the oxygen cost over four work rates (90, 120, 150, and 180 W). Rowing economy was improved in both PLYO and E (p  0.05). Finally, RP was moderately higher in the PLYO group post-training (E 569 ± 75 W, PLYO 629 ± 51 W, ES = 0.66) CONCLUSIONS: In a season when the athletes performed no rowing sprint training, 4 weeks of plyometric training improved the 500-m rowing performance and moderately improved peak power. This increase in performance may have been mediated by moderate improvements in rowing power, but not economy, and warrants further investigation.

  12. Gait selection in the ostrich: mechanical and metabolic characteristics of walking and running with and without an aerial phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubenson, Jonas; Heliams, Denham B.; Lloyd, David G.; Fournier, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been argued that minimization of metabolic-energy costs is a primary determinant of gait selection in terrestrial animals. This view is based predominantly on data from humans and horses, which have been shown to choose the most economical gait (walking, running, galloping) for any given speed. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic costs is associated with the selection of other prevalent forms of terrestrial gaits, such as grounded running (a widespread gait in birds)....

  13. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...... surface. NS3 is used to simulate the wave run-up due to a regular wave to calculate the maximum wave run-up around a cylinder. The aim of this paper is shown the calculations of NS3 code and compared with the data obtained from the large scale test performed in Grossen Wellenkanal (GWK...

  14. Factors Influencing Running-Related Musculoskeletal Injury Risk Among U.S. Military Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Joseph M

    2016-06-01

    Running-related musculoskeletal injuries among U.S. military recruits negatively impact military readiness. Low aerobic fitness, prior injury, and weekly running distance are known risk factors. Physical fitness screening and remedial physical training (or discharging the most poorly fit recruits) before entry-level military training have tended to reduce injury rates while decreasing attrition, training, and medical costs. Incorporating anaerobic running sessions into training programs can offset decreased weekly running distance and decrease injury risk. Varying lower extremity loading patterns, stride length or cadence manipulation, and hip stability/strengthening programming may further decrease injury risk. No footstrike pattern is ideal for all runners; transitioning to forefoot striking may reduce risk for hip, knee, or tibial injuries, but increase risk for calf, Achilles, foot or ankle injuries. Minimal evidence associates running surfaces with injury risk. Footwear interventions should focus on proper fit and comfort; the evidence does not support running shoe prescription per foot type to reduce injury risk among recruits. Primary injury mitigation efforts should focus on physical fitness screening, remedial physical training (or discharge for unfit recruits), and continued inclusion of anaerobic running sessions to offset decreased weekly running distance. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Run 16, eIPM Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dawson, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jao, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Three problems with the eIPMs were corrected during the 2015 summer shutdown. These involved ac coupling and 'negative profiles', detector 'dead zone' created by biasing, and gain control on ramp. With respect to Run 16, problems dealt with included gain depletion on horizontal MCP and rf pickup on profile signals; it was found that the MCP was severely damaged over part of the aperture. Various corrective measures were applied. Some results of these measured obtained during Run 16 are shown. At the end of Run 16 there was a three-­day beam run to study polarized proton beams in the AGS. Attempts to minimize beam injection errors which increase emittance by using the eIPMs to measure the contribution of injection mismatch to the AGS output beam emittance are recounted. .

  16. Are there limits to running world records?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nevill, Alan M; Whyte, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    ... records could reach their asymptotic limits some time in the future. Middle- and long-distance running world record speeds recorded during the 20th century were modeled using a flattened S-shaped logistic curve...

  17. Marathon running for amateurs: Benefits and risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burkule, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    ...) and all-cause mortality at the population level. There is growing participation in marathon running by amateur, middle-aged cases with a belief that more intense exercise will give incremental health benefits...

  18. ALFA detector before LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00188264; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The operation experience with ATLAS ALFA detectors in the LHC environment during the Run1 period has shown significant beam-induced heating. Subsequent comprehensive studies revealed that heating effects could be disastrous in the case of the larger beam intensities foreseen for higher luminosities in the LHC Run2. During the first LHC long shutdown (LS1) all ALFA detectors have been removed from the LHC tunnel and their covers - Roman Pots - underwent a geometry upgrade to minimize the impedance losses. It will be shown that this modification together with a system improving the internal heat transfer and an air cooling system, significantly shifted the temperatures of ALFA detectors away from the critical limits throughout the LHC Run2. Also ALFA trigger system was considerably upgraded to keep measured data safely inside the Run2 ATLAS latency budget and to minimize dead time. The needed hardware changes of the trigger system are also described

  19. ALFA detector upgrade before LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobel, Vit; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The operation experience with ATLAS ALFA detectors in the LHC environment during the Run1 period has shown significant beam-induced heating. Subsequent comprehensive studies revealed that heating effects could be disastrous in the case of the larger beam intensities foreseen for higher luminosities in the LHC Run2. During the first LHC long shutdown (LS1) all ALFA detectors have been removed from the LHC tunnel and their covers - Roman Pots - underwent a geometry upgrade to minimize the impedance losses. It will be shown that this modification together with a system improving the internal heat transfer and an air cooling system, significantly shifted the temperatures of ALFA detectors away from the critical limits throughout the LHC Run2. Also ALFA trigger system was considerably upgraded to keep measured data safely inside the Run2 ATLAS latency budget and to minimize dead time. The needed hardware changes of the trigger system will be presented in the second part of the talk.

  20. Input data to run Landis-II

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location...

  1. Wave run-up and overtopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.A.

    1972-01-01

    Overview of methods to design wave run-up and overtopping for dikes and other sloping structures for regular and irregular breaking waves. Summary of experimental data and suggestions for design formulae. English translation of: Golfoploop en golfoverslag -

  2. Sprint cycling training improves intermittent run performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardaway Chun-Kwan Chan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Sprint cycling significantly improved intermittent run performance, VO2max and peak power output at VO2max. Sprint cycling training is suitable for intermittent sports athletes but separate speed and COD training should be included.

  3. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  4. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  5. Reducing operational costs through MIPS management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwiatkowski, L.M.; Verhoef, C.

    2015-01-01

    We focus on an approach to reducing the costs of running applications. MIPS, which is a traditional acronym for millions of instructions per second, have evolved to become a measurement of processing power and CPU resource consumption. The need for controlling MIPS attributed costs is indispensable

  6. Is the COL5A1 rs12722 Gene Polymorphism Associated with Running Economy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Bueno, Salomão; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Matsuda, Monique; Marquezini, Monica; Saldiva, Paulo H.

    2014-01-01

    The COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is considered to be a novel genetic marker for endurance running performance. It has been postulated that COL5A1 rs12722 may influence the elasticity of tendons and the energetic cost of running. To date, there are no experimental data in the literature supporting the relationship between range of motion, running economy, and the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism. Therefore, the main purpose of the current study was to analyze the influence of the COL5A1rs12722 polymorphism on running economy and range of motion. One hundred and fifty (n = 150) physically active young men performed the following tests: a) a maximal incremental treadmill test, b) two constant-speed running tests (10 km•h−1 and 12 km•h−1) to determine the running economy, and c) a sit-and-reach test to determine the range of motion. All of the subjects were genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The genotype frequencies were TT = 27.9%, CT = 55.8%, and CC = 16.3%. There were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for running economy measured at 10 km•h−1 (p = 0.232) and 12 km•h−1 (p = 0.259). Similarly, there were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for range of motion (p = 0.337). These findings suggest that the previous relationship reported between COL5A1 rs12722 genotypes and running endurance performance might not be mediated by the energetic cost of running. PMID:25188268

  7. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...... to facilitate resource planning and earnings forecasting. As such, this dissertation relates to the topic of firm profitability and the interpretation of cost variability. The dissertation consists of three parts that are written in the form of separate academic papers. The following section briefly summarizes...

  8. Tracking Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  9. Low-protein vegetarian diet does not have a short-term effect on blood acid–base status but raises oxygen consumption during submaximal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hietavala Enni-Maria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid–base balance refers to the equilibrium between acids and bases in the human body. Nutrition may affect acid–base balance and further physical performance. With the help of PRAL (potential renal acid load, a low-protein vegetarian diet (LPVD was designed to enhance the production of bases in body. The aim of this study was to investigate if LPVD has an effect on blood acid–base status and performance during submaximal and maximal aerobic cycling. Methods Nine healthy, recreationally active men (age 23.5 ± 3.4 yr participated in the study and were randomly divided into two groups in a cross-over study design. Group 1 followed LPVD for 4 days and group 2 ate normally (ND before performing a cycle ergometer test. The test included three 10-min stages at 40, 60 and 80% of VO2max. The fourth stage was performed at 100% of VO2max until exhaustion. After 10–16 days, the groups started a second 4-day diet, and at the end performed the similar ergometer test. Venous blood samples were collected at the beginning and at the end of both diet periods and after every stage cycled. Results Diet caused no significant difference in venous blood pH, strong ion difference (SID, total concentration of weak acids (Atot, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 or HCO3- at rest or during cycling between LPVD and ND. In the LPVD group, at rest SID significantly increased over the diet period (38.6 ± 1.8 vs. 39.8 ± 0.9, p=0.009. Diet had no significant effect on exercise time to exhaustion, but VO2 was significantly higher at 40, 60 and 80% of VO2max after LPVD compared to ND (2.03 ± 0.25 vs. 1.82 ± 0.21 l/min, p=0.035; 2.86 ± 0.36 vs. 2.52 ± 0.33 l/min, p Conclusion There was no difference in venous blood acid–base status between a 4-day LPVD and ND. VO2 was increased during submaximal cycling after LPVD suggesting that the exercise economy was poorer. This had no further effect on maximal aerobic performance. More studies are needed to

  10. Comparative analysis of the 1-mile run test evaluation formulae: assessment of aerobic capacity in male law enforcement officers aged 20-23 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayihan, Gürhan; Özkan, Ali; Köklü, Yusuf; Eyuboğlu, Ender; Akça, Firat; Koz, Mitat; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare values of aerobic performance in the 1-mile run test (1-MRT) using different formulae. Aerobic capacities of 351 male volunteers working for the Turkish National Police within the age range of 20-23 years were evaluated by the 1-MRT and the 20-metre shuttle run (20-MST). VO2max values were estimated by the prediction equations developed by George et al. (1993), Cureton et al. (1995) and Kline et al. (1987) for the 1-MRT and by Leger and Lambert (1982) for the 20-MST. The difference between the results of the different formulae was significant (p = 0.000). The correlation coefficient between the estimated VO2max using Cureton's equation, George's equation, Kline's equation and the 20-MST were 0.691 (p < 0.001), 0.486 (p < 0.001) and 0.608 (p < 0.001), respectively. The highest correlation coefficient was between the VO2max estimated by the 20-MST and Cureton's equation. Similarly, the highest correlation coefficient (r = -0.779) was between the 1-mile run time and the VO2max estimated by Cureton's equation. When analysing more vigorous exercise than sub-maximal exercise, we suggest that Cureton's equation be used to predict the VO2max from 1-mile run/walk performance in large numbers of healthy individuals with high VO2max. This research compares the use of 3 different formulae to estimate VO2max from 1-mile run/walk performance in male law enforcement officers aged 20-23 years for the first time and reports the most accurate formula to use when evaluating aerobic capacities of large numbers of healthy individuals.

  11. Comparative analysis of the 1-mile run test evaluation formulae: Assessment of aerobic capacity in male law enforcement officers aged 20–23 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürhan Kayihan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare values of aerobic performance in the 1-mile run test (1-MRT using different formulae. Material and Methods: Aerobic capacities of 351 male volunteers working for the Turkish National Police within the age range of 20-23 years were evaluated by the 1-MRT and the 20-metre shuttle run (20-MST. VO2max values were estimated by the prediction equations developed by George et al. (1993, Cureton et al. (1995 and Kline et al. (1987 for the 1-MRT and by Leger and Lambert (1982 for the 20-MST. Results: The difference between the results of the different formulae was significant (p = 0.000. The correlation coefficient between the estimated VO2max using Cureton's equation, George's equation, Kline's equation and the 20-MST were 0.691 (p < 0.001, 0.486 (p < 0.001 and 0.608 (p < 0.001, respectively. The highest correlation coefficient was between the VO2max estimated by the 20-MST and Cureton's equation. Similarly, the highest correlation coefficient (r = -0.779 was between the 1-mile run time and the VO2max estimated by Cureton's equation. Conclusions: When analysing more vigorous exercise than sub-maximal exercise, we suggest that Cureton's equation be used to predict the VO2max from 1-mile run/walk performance in large numbers of healthy individuals with high VO2max. This research compares the use of 3 different formulae to estimate VO2max from 1-mile run/ walk performance in male law enforcement officers aged 20-23 years for the first time and reports the most accurate formula to use when evaluating aerobic capacities of large numbers of healthy individuals.

  12. ATLAS for the First Physics Run: Detector and Resources Planning

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P.

    Over the past year not only have we had the pleasure of learning about exciting new physics concepts like signatures for 'extra dimensions', but we have also had to become familiar with less enjoyable matters like 'cost to completion'. Whereas ATLAS will do a great job on the first issue once we have the experiment in place, the second one definitely shows us that we are facing hard times for the coming years until we get the detector up and running. More than a year ago an internal ATLAS Working Group started an evaluation of the resources needed for maintenance and operation (M&O) work already required in the current years before the detector is fully ready for data. The same group also collected first information about cost overruns and items not included in the initial cost evaluation of the detector construction, called internally 'class-2' costs. The Resources Review Board (RRB) was presented with our preliminary estimates for the first time at its April meeting, 2001. Since then a great deal of wo...

  13. Delta FosB regulates wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werme, Martin; Messer, Chad; Olson, Lars; Gilden, Lauren; Thorén, Peter; Nestler, Eric J; Brené, Stefan

    2002-09-15

    DeltaFosB is a transcription factor that accumulates in a region-specific manner in the brain after chronic perturbations. For example, repeated administration of drugs of abuse increases levels of DeltaFosB in the striatum. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of spontaneous wheel running, as a model for a natural rewarding behavior, on levels of DeltaFosB in striatal regions. Moreover, mice that inducibly overexpress DeltaFosB in specific subpopulations of striatal neurons were used to study the possible role of DeltaFosB on running behavior. Lewis rats given ad libitum access to running wheels for 30 d covered what would correspond to approximately 10 km/d and showed increased levels of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens compared with rats exposed to locked running wheels. Mice that overexpress DeltaFosB selectively in striatal dynorphin-containing neurons increased their daily running compared with control littermates, whereas mice that overexpress DeltaFosB predominantly in striatal enkephalin-containing neurons ran considerably less than controls. Data from the present study demonstrate that like drugs of abuse, voluntary running increases levels of DeltaFosB in brain reward pathways. Furthermore, overexpression of DeltaFosB in a distinct striatal output neuronal population increases running behavior. Because previous work has shown that DeltaFosB overexpression within this same neuronal population increases the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, results of the present study suggest that DeltaFosB may play a key role in controlling both natural and drug-induced reward.

  14. The Implementation of Marginal External Cost Pricing in Road Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, Erik T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses a number of issues that will become increasingly important nowthat the concept of marginal external cost pricing becomes more likely to be implementedas a policy strategy in transport in reality. The first part of the paper deals with thelong-run efficiency of marginal external cost pricing. It is shown that such prices notonly optimize short-run mobility, given the shape and position of the relevant demandand cost curves, but even more importantly, also optimally affect ...

  15. Threshold evaluations of industrial conservation technologies run in ISTUM base case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-20

    The results of threshold evaluations performed on several INDUS technologies which were competed with other new and conventional industrial technologies in the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) developed by EEA are summarized. The ISTUM model is briefly described and includes the input technology categories and service sectors treated in the model, and the solution technique used. The input data specifications are summaried for the Industry Conservation Technologies run in the ISTUM base case. Included are listings of the technologies run in ISTUM, those not run in ISTUM, and a discussion of the absence of a retrofit algorithm in ISTUM and its resulting impact on conservation technologies. Also included is a discussion of the capital cost variability, maximum market fraction, size and load factors and data quality specifications for the conservation technologies in ISTUM. The results of the ISTUM base case run are presented, describing the important limitations and constraints of the base case run, the key assumptions inherent in the base case, and the summarized results of energy savings by year for different generic technology types. The technology characterization data developed for each INDUS technology run in the ISTUM base case are discussed in detail. The descriptions include the calculations and assumptions used in determining the service demand displacement, equipment cost, maximum market fraction, data quality, and size and load range for each technology.

  16. Students' Gender Stereotypes about Running in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Lin, Shuqiong; Gao, Zan; Francis, Xueying

    2018-01-01

    Two hundred forty-six students (132 boys, 114 girls) were tracked from fifth to eighth grades, and changes in gender stereotypes about running as a male sport, running performance, interest in running, and intention for future running participation were assessed. Results revealed that neither sex held gender stereotypes about running as a male…

  17. Wave Run-Up on Offshore Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; De Vos, Leen

    2005-01-01

    investigating run-up heights and run-up distribution on different offshore windturbine foundations due to regular and irregular waves. The influence of wave steepness, wave height and water depth on the run-up on a monopile foundation is investigated. The run-up on a cone foundation is compared with the run...

  18. Not Just Running: Coping with and Managing Everyday Life through Road-Running

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Simon

    2014-01-01

    From the external form, running looks like running. Yet this alikeness masks a hugely divergent practice consisting of different movements, meanings and experiences. In this paper I wish to shed light upon some of these different ‘ways of running’ and in turn identify a range of the sometimes surprising, sometimes significant and sometimes banal benefits that road-running can gift its practitioners beyond simply exercise and physical fitness. Drawing on an innovative mapping and ethnographic ...

  19. A prospective study of running injuries: the Vancouver Sun Run "In Training" clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunton, J E; Ryan, M B; Clement, D B; McKenzie, D C; Lloyd-Smith, D R; Zumbo, B D

    2003-06-01

    Seventeen running training clinics were investigated to determine the number of injuries that occur in a running programme designed to minimise the injury rate for athletes training for a 10 km race. The relative contributions of factors associated with injury were also reported. A total of 844 primarily recreational runners were surveyed in three trials on the 4th, 8th, and 12th week of the 13 week programme of the "In Training" running clinics. Participants were classified as injured if they experienced at least a grade 1 injury-that is, pain only after running. Logistic regression modelling and odds ratio calculation were performed for each sex using the following predictor variables: age, body mass index (BMI), previous aerobic activity, running frequency, predominant running surface, arch height, running shoe age, and concurrent cross training. Age played an important part in injury in women: being over 50 years old was a risk factor for overall injury, and being less than 31 years was protective against new injury. Running only one day a week showed a non-significant trend for injury risk in men and was a significant risk factor in women and overall injury. A BMI of > 26 kg/m(2) was reported as protective for men. Running shoe age also significantly contributed to the injury model. Half of the participants who reported an injury had had a previous injury; 42% of these reported that they were not completely rehabilitated on starting the 13 week training programme. An injury rate of 29.5% was recorded across all training clinics surveyed. The knee was the most commonly injured site. Although age, BMI, running frequency (days a week), and running shoe age were associated with injury, these results do not take into account an adequate measure of exposure time to injury, running experience, or previous injury and should thus be viewed accordingly. In addition, the reason for the discrepancy in injury rate between these 17 clinics requires further study.

  20. Run Economy on a Normal and Lower Body Positive Pressure Treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Corey; Lind, Erik; VAN Langen, Deborah; True, Larissa; Hupman, Saige; Hokanson, James F

    2017-01-01

    Lower body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmill running is used more frequently in clinical and athletic settings. Accurate caloric expenditure is required for proper exercise prescription, especially for obese patients performing LBPP exercise. It is unclear if running on LBPP changes running economy (RE) in proportion to the changes in body weight. The purpose of the study was to measure the oxygen consumption (VO2) and running economy (RE) of treadmill running at normal body weight and on LBPP. Twenty-three active, non-obese participants (25.8±7.2 years; BMI = 25.52±3.29 kg·m(-2)) completed two bouts of running exercise in a counterbalanced manner: (a) on a normal treadmill (NT) and (b) on a LBPP treadmill at 60% (40% of body weight supported) for 4 min at 2.24 (5 mph), 2.68 (6 mph), and 3.13 m·s(-1) (7 mph). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a statistically significant interaction in RE among trials, F(2, 44) = 6.510, p <.0005, partial η(2) = 0.228. An examination of pairwise comparisons indicated that RE was significantly greater for LBPP across the three speeds (p < 0.005). As expected, LBPP treadmill running resulted in significantly lower oxygen consumption at all three running speeds. We conclude that RE (ml O2·kg(-1)·km(-1)) of LBPP running is significantly poorer than normal treadmill running, and the ~30% change in absolute energy cost is not as great as predicted by the change in body weight (40%).

  1. Habitual Minimalist Shod Running Biomechanics and the Acute Response to Running Barefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nicholas; Darragh, Ian A J; Divekar, Nikhil V; Lamberts, Robert P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether habitual minimalist shoe runners present with purported favorable running biomechanithat reduce running injury risk such as initial loading rate. Eighteen minimalist and 16 traditionally cushioned shod runners were assessed when running both in their preferred training shoe and barefoot. Ankle and knee joint kinetics and kinematics, initial rate of loading, and footstrike angle were measured. Sagittal ankle and knee joint stiffness were also calculated. Results of a two-factor ANOVA presented no group difference in initial rate of loading when participants were running either shod or barefoot; however, initial loading rate increased for both groups when running barefoot (p=0.008). Differences in footstrike angle were observed between groups when running shod, but not when barefoot (minimalist:8.71±8.99 vs. traditional: 17.32±11.48 degrees, p=0.002). Lower ankle joint stiffness was found in both groups when running barefoot (p=0.025). These findings illustrate that risk factors for injury potentially differ between the two groups. Shoe construction differences do change mechanical demands, however, once habituated to the demands of a given shoe condition, certain acute favorable or unfavorable responses may be moderated. The purported benefits of minimalist running shoes in mimicking habitual barefoot running is questioned, and risk of injury may not be attenuated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Exercise economy in skiing and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losnegard, Thomas; Schäfer, Daniela; Hallén, Jostein

    2014-01-01

    Substantial inter-individual variations in exercise economy exist even in highly trained endurance athletes. The variation is believed to be determined partly by intrinsic factors. Therefore, in the present study, we compared exercise economy in V2-skating, double poling, and uphill running. Ten highly trained male cross-country skiers (23 ± 3 years, 180 ± 6 cm, 75 ± 8 kg, VO2peak running: 76.3 ± 5.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in the study. Exercise economy and VO2peak during treadmill running, ski skating (V2 technique) and double poling were compared based on correlation analysis. There was a very large correlation in exercise economy between V2-skating and double poling (r = 0.81) and large correlations between V2-skating and running (r = 0.53) and double poling and running (r = 0.58). There were trivial to moderate correlations between exercise economy and the intrinsic factors VO2peak (r = 0.00-0.23), cycle rate (r = 0.03-0.46), body mass (r = -0.09-0.46) and body height (r = 0.11-0.36). In conclusion, the inter-individual variation in exercise economy could be explained only moderately by differences in VO2peak, body mass and body height. Apparently other intrinsic factors contribute to the variation in exercise economy between highly trained subjects.

  3. ALICE HLT Run 2 performance overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Lindenstruth, Volker; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    For the LHC Run 2 the ALICE HLT architecture was consolidated to comply with the upgraded ALICE detector readout technology. The software framework was optimized and extended to cope with the increased data load. Online calibration of the TPC using online tracking capabilities of the ALICE HLT was deployed. Offline calibration code was adapted to run both online and offline and the HLT framework was extended to support that. The performance of this schema is important for Run 3 related developments. An additional data transport approach was developed using the ZeroMQ library, forming at the same time a test bed for the new data flow model of the O2 system, where further development of this concept is ongoing. This messaging technology was used to implement the calibration feedback loop augmenting the existing, graph oriented HLT transport framework. Utilising the online reconstruction of many detectors, a new asynchronous monitoring scheme was developed to allow real-time monitoring of the physics performance of the ALICE detector, on top of the new messaging scheme for both internal and external communication. Spare computing resources comprising the production and development clusters are run as a tier-2 GRID site using an OpenStack-based setup. The development cluster is running continuously, the production cluster contributes resources opportunistically during periods of LHC inactivity.

  4. Effects of acute caffeinated coffee consumption on energy utilization related to glucose and lipid oxidation from short submaximal treadmill exercise in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Sallepan, Maliwan; Charoenwattana, Sukanya

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the short term effect of coffee drinking on energy utilization in sedentary men. This study was performed in healthy sedentary men, who were randomized into three groups, control (n = 6), decaffeinated (n = 10), and caffeine (n = 10). The caffeine dose in coffee was rechecked and calculated for individual volunteers at 5 mg/kg. Baseline before drinking, complete blood count (CBC), glucose, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxide, and caffeine in blood was evaluated. After drinking coffee for 1 hr, the submaximal exercise test with a modified Bruce protocol was carried out, and the VO2 and RER were analyzed individually at 80% maximal heart rate, then the blood was repeat evaluated. Three groups showed a nonsignificant difference in CBC results and physical characteristics. The caffeine group showed significant changes in all parameters; higher VO2 levels, (P = 0.037) and lower RER (P = 0.047), when compared to the baseline. Furthermore, the glucose level after exercise test increased significantly (P = 0.033) as well as lipid peroxide levels (P = 0.005), whereas antioxidant capacity did not change significantly (P = 0.759), when compared to the before exercise testing. In addition, the blood caffeine level also increased only in the caffeine group (P = 0.008). Short consumption of caffeinated coffee (5 mg/kg of caffeine), improves energy utilization and relates to glucose derivation and lipid oxidation.

  5. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Szpinda, Michał; Augustyńska, Beata; Woźniak, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130°C) prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise), and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise). The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC. PMID:24489985

  6. The Effect of Submaximal Exercise Preceded by Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy on the Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Blood of Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC session applied prior to submaximal exercise on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the concentration of lipid peroxidation products, total oxidative status, and the level of cytokines in blood of volleyball players. The study group consisted of 18 male professional volleyball players, who were subjected to extremely cold air (−130∘C prior to exercise performed on cycloergometer. Blood samples were taken five times: before WBC, after WBC procedure, after exercise preceded by cryotherapy (WBC exercise, and before and after exercise without WBC (control exercise. The activity of catalase statistically significantly increased after control exercise. Moreover, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was lower after WBC exercise than after control exercise (P<0.001. After WBC exercise, the level of IL-6 and IL-1β was also lower (P<0.001 than after control exercise. The obtained results may suggest that cryotherapy prior to exercise may have some antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The relations between the level of studied oxidative stress and inflammatory markers may testify to the contribution of reactive oxygen species in cytokines release into the blood system in response to exercise and WBC.

  7. Biomechanics of running indicates endothermy in bipedal dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Pontzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the great unresolved controversies in paleobiology is whether extinct dinosaurs were endothermic, ectothermic, or some combination thereof, and when endothermy first evolved in the lineage leading to birds. Although it is well established that high, sustained growth rates and, presumably, high activity levels are ancestral for dinosaurs and pterosaurs (clade Ornithodira, other independent lines of evidence for high metabolic rates, locomotor costs, or endothermy are needed. For example, some studies have suggested that, because large dinosaurs may have been homeothermic due to their size alone and could have had heat loss problems, ectothermy would be a more plausible metabolic strategy for such animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe two new biomechanical approaches for reconstructing the metabolic rate of 14 extinct bipedal dinosauriforms during walking and running. These methods, well validated for extant animals, indicate that during walking and slow running the metabolic rate of at least the larger extinct dinosaurs exceeded the maximum aerobic capabilities of modern ectotherms, falling instead within the range of modern birds and mammals. Estimated metabolic rates for smaller dinosaurs are more ambiguous, but generally approach or exceed the ectotherm boundary. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the hypothesis that endothermy was widespread in at least larger non-avian dinosaurs. It was plausibly ancestral for all dinosauriforms (perhaps Ornithodira, but this is perhaps more strongly indicated by high growth rates than by locomotor costs. The polarity of the evolution of endothermy indicates that rapid growth, insulation, erect postures, and perhaps aerobic power predated advanced "avian" lung structure and high locomotor costs.

  8. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  9. CDF Run I B physics results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, S.

    2001-03-08

    The CDF Run I B physics program has been very successful, making numerous measurements over a wide variety of B physics topics. Measurements have included masses and lifetimes; discovery of the B{sub c}; B{sub s} {r_arrow} J/{psi}{phi} polarization; B{sup 0} {leftrightarrow} {bar B}{sup 0} mixing; sin (2{beta}); and rare decay limits. Recent results include a search for {Lambda}{sub b} {r_arrow} {Lambda}{gamma} and a study of B{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K(*){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} decays. The tools and experience developed during Run I are quite valuable as CDF enters Run II.

  10. Running Speed Can Be Predicted from Foot Contact Time during Outdoor over Ground Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Cornelis J; van Oeveren, Ben; Francke, Agnieta; Zijlstra, Patrick; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2016-01-01

    The number of validation studies of commercially available foot pods that provide estimates of running speed is limited and these studies have been conducted under laboratory conditions. Moreover, internal data handling and algorithms used to derive speed from these pods are proprietary and thereby unclear. The present study investigates the use of foot contact time (CT) for running speed estimations, which potentially can be used in addition to the global positioning system (GPS) in situations where GPS performance is limited. CT was measured with tri axial inertial sensors attached to the feet of 14 runners, during natural over ground outdoor running, under optimized conditions for GPS. The individual relationships between running speed and CT were established during short runs at different speeds on two days. These relations were subsequently used to predict instantaneous speed during a straight line 4 km run with a single turning point halfway. Stopwatch derived speed, measured for each of 32 consecutive 125m intervals during the 4 km runs, was used as reference. Individual speed-CT relations were strong (r2 >0.96 for all trials) and consistent between days. During the 4km runs, median error (ranges) in predicted speed from CT 2.5% (5.2) was higher (Pruns were adequately monitored with both methods: CT and GPS respectively explained 85% and 73% of the total speed variance during 4km runs. In conclusion, running speed estimates bases on speed-CT relations, have acceptable accuracy and could serve to backup or substitute for GPS during tarmac running on flat terrain whenever GPS performance is limited.

  11. A model to correct for short-run inefficiencies in economic evaluations in healthcare.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetering, G. van de; Woertman, W.H.; Adang, E.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Important assumptions that underlie cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) are that production technologies are convex and that production processes always perform at constant returns to scale. However, in the short run these assumptions are likely to be violated. Therefore, CEAs might overestimate

  12. ROX: The Robustness of a Run-time XQuery Optimizer Against Correlated Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdel Kader, R.; Boncz, Peter; Manegold, Stefan; van Keulen, Maurice

    We demonstrate ROX, a run-time optimizer of XQueries, that focuses on finding the best execution order of XPath steps and relational joins in an XQuery. The problem of join ordering has been extensively researched, but the proposed techniques are still unsatisfying. These either rely on a cost model

  13. New Physics at the LHC: results and Run II perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Kajomovitz, Enrique; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The talk gives an overview of selected Run-1 results on searches for New Physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments. A short outlook of the Run-2 schedule and some prospects for Run-2 sensitivity reach for New Physics

  14. Overeducation: A Short or Long Run Phenomenon for Individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubb, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Examines whether overeducation is a short-run or long-run phenomenon for individuals. Finds that for some individuals overeducation is not just a short-run phenomenon, but a permanent, multiyear phenomenon. (Contains 23 references.) (PKP)

  15. Health related aspects of PA & sport/running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Johan de Jong

    2015-01-01

    The lecture presents an overview of the positive but also the negative health related aspects of running. An deeper insight will be offered when it comes to running, especially the mass running events.

  16. The NLstart2run study: running related injuries in novice runners : Running related injuries in novice runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Hardlopen is wereldwijd een populaire sport welke vaak wordt beoefend voor de positieve gezondheidseffecten. Er is echter een keerzijde. Hardlopers worden vaak geplaagd door blessures. Een probleem waar veelal beginners tegenaan lopen. Dit proefschrift beschrijft de NLstart2run studie, een onderzoek

  17. Intensity related changes of running economy in recreational level distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeroff, Tobias; Bernardi, Andreas; Niederer, Daniel; Wilke, Jan; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2017-09-01

    Running economy (RE) is often described as a key demand of running performance. The variety of currently used assessment methods with different running intensities and outcomes restricts interindividual comparability of RE in recreational level runners. The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of RE, assessed as oxygen cost (OC) and caloric unit cost (CUC), on running speed at individual physiological thresholds. Eighteen recreational runners performed: 1) a graded exercise test to estimate first ventilatory threshold (VT1), respiratory compensation point (RCP) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); 2) discontinuous RE assessment to determine relative OC in milliliters per kilogram per kilometer (mL/kg/km) and CUC in kilocalories per kilogram per kilometer (kcal/kg/km) at three different running intensities: VT1, RCP and at a third standardized reference point (TP) in between. OC (mL/kg/km; at VT1: 235.4±26.2; at TP: 227.8±23.4; at RCP: 224.9±21.9) and CUC (kcal/kg/km at VT1: 1.18±0.13; at TP: 1.14±0.12; at RCP: 1.13±0.11) decreased with increasing intensities (P≤0.01). Controlling for the influence of sex OC and CUC linearly correlated with running speed at RCP and VO2max (P≤0.01). RE, even assessed at low intensity, is strongly related to running performance in recreational athletes. Both calculation methods used (OC and CUC) are sensitive for monitoring intensity related changes of substrate utilization. RE values decreased with higher running intensity indicating an increase of anaerobic and subsequent decrease of aerobic substrate utilization.

  18. Can crossover and maximal fat oxidation rate points be used equally for ergocycling and walking/running on a track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, M; Jinwala, K; Wuyam, B; Levy, P; Flore, P

    2012-06-01

    To verify whether exercise intensities at the crossover point (COP) and maximal lipid oxidation (Lipox(max)) can be used interchangeably regardless of exercise mode, this study compared COP, Lipox(max) and maximal fat oxidation rate (MFO) obtained during two modes of submaximal metabolic exercise tests: stationary cycling under laboratory conditions and walking/running on a track. After preliminary indirect maximal progressive tests, 15 healthy subjects randomly performed submaximal exercise tests on a stationary cycle ergometer (E) and on a track (T), during which gas exchanges and substrate oxidation rates were measured. There were no significant mean differences in COP [heart rate (HR): 149±23 beats.min(-1) (T), 145±28 beats.min(-1) (E); VO(2): 2168±896 mL.min(-1) (T), 2052±714 mL.min(-1) (E)], Lipox(max) [HR: 127±27 beats.min(-1) (T), 126±23 beats.min(-1) (E); VO(2): 1638±839 mL.min(-1) (T), 1696±656 mL.min(-1) (E)] or MFO [498.3±192.0 mg.min(-1) (T), 477.7±221.5 mg.min(-1) (E)] between the two modes of exercise. However, Bland-Altman analysis showed a clear disagreement between the two exercise modes and, in particular, a large random error [bias±random error: for COP, -3.5±53.2 beats.min(-1) (HR), -116.8±1556.4 mL.min(-1) (VO(2)); for Lipox(max), -0.4±43.3 beats.min(-1) (HR), -5.7±1286.4 mL.min(-1) (VO(2)); and for MFO, -20.6±384.9 mg.min(-1)]. This study showed that, in young, healthy, reasonably fit subjects, exercise mode can affect intensities at the COP and the Lipox(max). These results, which now have to be confirmed in patients with metabolic defects, suggest the need to perform specific tests to make individualized adaptations to physical activity outside of clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Asperity deformation during running-in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jørgen; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2011-01-01

    Asperities loaded in pure rolling against a hard, smooth surface will often be deformed at the first contact event and will thereby experience high normal stress, presumably of a magnitude near the Vickers hardness of the softer material. Continued running-in can be imagined to develop into lower...... stress levels and an increase of contact area. An asperity model simulating a running-in process of rough surfaces with lengthy protractions in the rolling direction was investigated. After a limited range of only about 104 contact events a state of very low deformation rate was found....

  20. Asperity deformation during running-in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jørgen; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2010-01-01

    Asperities loaded in pure rolling against a hard, smooth surface will often be deformed at the first contact event and will thereby experience high normal stress, presumably of a magnitude near the Vickers hardness of the softer material. Continued running-in can be imagined to develop into lower...... stress levels and an increase of contact area. An asperity model simulating a running-in process of rough surfaces with lengthy protractions in the rolling direction was investigated. After a limited range of only about 104 contact events a state of very low deformation rate was found....

  1. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Uythoven, J; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Hemelsoet, GH; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Kain, V; Mazzoni, S; Meddahi, M; Valuch, D

    2015-01-01

    To minimise the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  2. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  3. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uythoven, Jan [CERN; Boccardi, Andrea [CERN; Bravin, Enrico [CERN; Goddard, Brennan [CERN; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry [CERN; Höfle, Wolfgang [CERN; Jacquet, Delphine [CERN; Kain, Verena [CERN; Mazzoni, Stefano [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Valuch, Daniel [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  4. MODERNIZATION OF TRACKED VEHICLE RUNNING GEARS

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Korobkin; A. Ya. Kotlobai; V. P. Boikov; A. A. Kotlobai; V. F. Tamelo

    2013-01-01

    The paper contains some proposals pertaining  to modernization of tracked vehicle running gears, bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension, methodology  for bench-tests and description of test-bench equipment which is applied for testing bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension. Test results of a hydro-pneumatic spring with parameter stabilization system are given in the paper.The paper presents  description of tracked vehicle running gears with bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension which is equipped with a system...

  5. MODERNIZATION OF TRACKED VEHICLE RUNNING GEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Korobkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains some proposals pertaining  to modernization of tracked vehicle running gears, bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension, methodology  for bench-tests and description of test-bench equipment which is applied for testing bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension. Test results of a hydro-pneumatic spring with parameter stabilization system are given in the paper.The paper presents  description of tracked vehicle running gears with bogie hydro-pneumatic suspension which is equipped with a system for stabilizing a road clearance. Testing results of the gears being part of a test mule are cited in the paper.

  6. Weekly running volume and risk of running-related injuries among marathon runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina Haugaard; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Juul, Martin Serup

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.......PURPOSEBACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race....

  7. Weekly running volume and risk of running-related injuries among marathon runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina Haugaard; Nielsen, R.O.; Juul, Martin Serup

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.......The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race....

  8. Mean platelet volume (MPV) predicts middle distance running performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Skafidas, Spyros; Tarperi, Cantor; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Running economy and performance in middle distance running depend on several physiological factors, which include anthropometric variables, functional characteristics, training volume and intensity...

  9. A running controller for a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Amanda M; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a running controller for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The running controller was implemented on a powered prosthesis prototype and evaluated by a transfemoral amputee subject running on a treadmill at a speed of 2.25 m/s (5.0 mph). The ability of the prosthesis and controller to provide the salient features of a running gait was assessed by comparing the kinematics of running provided by the powered prosthesis to the averaged kinematics of five healthy subjects running at the same speed. This comparison indicates that the powered prosthesis and running controller are able to provide essential features of a healthy running gait.

  10. Running and Osteoarthritis: Does Recreational or Competitive Running Increase the Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Exercise, like running, is good for overall health and, specifically, our hearts, lungs, muscles, bones, and brains. However, some people are concerned about the impact of running on longterm joint health. Does running lead to higher rates of arthritis in knees and hips? While many researchers find that running protects bone health, others are concerned that this exercise poses a high risk for age-related changes to hips and knees. A study published in the June 2017 issue of JOSPT suggests that the difference in these outcomes depends on the frequency and intensity of running. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(6):391. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0505.

  11. The effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Bellenger, Clint R; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    The effect of footwear on running economy has been investigated in numerous studies. However, no systematic review and meta-analysis has synthesised the available literature and the effect of footwear on running performance is not known. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners, by reviewing controlled trials that compare different footwear conditions or compare footwear with barefoot. The Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), CINAHL and SPORTDiscus databases were searched from inception up until April 2014. Included articles reported on controlled trials that examined the effects of footwear or footwear characteristics (including shoe mass, cushioning, motion control, longitudinal bending stiffness, midsole viscoelasticity, drop height and comfort) on running performance or running economy and were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Of the 1,044 records retrieved, 19 studies were included in the systematic review and 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No studies were identified that reported effects on running performance. Individual studies reported significant, but trivial, beneficial effects on running economy for comfortable and stiff-soled shoes [standardised mean difference (SMD) economy for cushioned shoes (SMD = 0.37; P economy for training in minimalist shoes (SMD = 0.79; P economy for light shoes and barefoot compared with heavy shoes (SMD economy. Certain models of footwear and footwear characteristics can improve running economy. Future research in footwear performance should include measures of running performance.

  12. Comparison of Running Economy Values While Wearing No Shoes, Minimal Shoes, and Normal Running Shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrum, Robbie G; Connors, Ryan T; Coons, John M; Fuller, Dana K; Morgan, Don W; Caputo, Jennifer L

    2017-03-01

    Cochrum, RG, Connors, RT, Coons, JM, Fuller, DK, Morgan, DW, and Caputo, JL. Comparison of running economy values while wearing no shoes, minimal shoes, and normal running shoes. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 595-601, 2017-The purpose of this study was to quantify differences in running economy (RE) at 50 and 70% of each subject's velocity at V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max) across barefoot and 2 mass, stack height, and heel-to-toe-drop controlled footwear conditions (minimal shoes and normal running shoes) in 9 recreational distance runners (mean age 26.8 ± 6.8 years). Over 3 days, subjects ran in one of the footwear conditions while RE (oxygen consumption) and step frequency were measured at each speed with a 5-minute rest between each trial. A 2-way repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) and Bonferroni-adjusted follow-up analyses revealed that RE was not significantly different across footwear conditions at either speed. However, those running barefoot exhibited a higher step frequency than when running in minimal (50%, p = 0.007; and 70%, p running in minimal versus standard footwear (70% only, p = 0.007). Thus, RE is not affected by footwear or running barefoot in those with experience running in minimal-type footwear. Significant adjustments in step frequency when alternative footwear was introduced may help explain why RE was statistically maintained during each footwear and speed condition across but not between subjects. Therefore, determination of footwear for the enhancement of RE should be based on individual physical characteristics and preferences rather than a global recommendation of an economical running shoe.

  13. Book Review: HTML5: Up and Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Cyzyk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Pilgrim's HTML5: Up and Running was one of the first books published on the subject. If you’re looking for a really good, well-written, entertaining, concise overview of what’s going on right this very minute with HTML5 technologies and techniques, this is a good book to have.

  14. The Beautiful Physics of LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2015-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC offers some beautiful prospects for new physics, including flavour physics as well as more detailed studies of the Higgs boson and searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). One of the possibilities for BSM physics is supersymmetry, and flavour physics plays various important r\\^oles in constraining supersymmetric models.

  15. Individualism, innovation, and long-run growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnichenko, Yuriy; Roland, Gerard

    2011-12-27

    Countries having a more individualist culture have enjoyed higher long-run growth than countries with a more collectivist culture. Individualist culture attaches social status rewards to personal achievements and thus, provides not only monetary incentives for innovation but also social status rewards, leading to higher rates of innovation and economic growth.

  16. Effects of Running on Depressed Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Sprinkle, R. Leo

    1983-01-01

    Reviews three conceptual models of depression: (1) aggression-turned-inward; (2) object-loss; and (3) negative cognitive set, and measured the effects of group treatment emphasizing running. The reactive depression levels of adults (N=8) who ran noncompetitively for 4 weeks dropped by a significant amount. The social dimension was an important…

  17. Daytime running lights : its safety evidence revisited.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Retrospective in-depth accident studies from several countries confirm that human perception errors are the main causal factor in road accidents. The share of accident types which are relevant for the effect of daytime running lights (DRL), such as overtaking and crossing accidents, in the total of

  18. Marathon running for amateurs: Benefits and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Burkule

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The habitual level of physical activity of the human race has significantly and abruptly declined in the last few generations due to technological developments. The professional societies and government health agencies have published minimum physical activity requirement guidelines to educate the masses about the importance of exercise and to reduce cardiovascular (CV and all-cause mortality at the population level. There is growing participation in marathon running by amateur, middle-aged cases with a belief that more intense exercise will give incremental health benefits. Experts have cautioned the nonathlete amateurs about the "exercise paradox" and probable deleterious effects of high-intensity prolonged exercise on CV and musculoskeletal system. The epidemiological studies suggest a "reverse J shaped" relationship between running intensity and CV mortality. The highest benefits of reduction in CV and all-cause mortality are achieved at a lower intensity of running while the benefits tend to get blunted at a higher intensity of running. The physicians should have a balanced discussion with the amateur runners training for a marathon, about risks and benefits of high-intensity exercise, and should evaluate them to rule out the occult coronary disease.

  19. Common Running Overuse Injuries and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Kozinc

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Runners are particularly prone to developing overuse injuries. The most common running-related injuries include medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, patellar tendinopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, tibial stress fractures, and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Two of the most significant risk factors appear to be injury history and weekly distance. Several trials have successfully identified biomechanical risk factors for specific injuries, with increased ground reaction forces, excessive foot pronation, hip internal rotation and hip adduction during stance phase being mentioned most often. However, evidence on interventions for lowering injury risk is limited, especially regarding exercise-based interventions. Biofeedback training for lowering ground reaction forces is one of the few methods proven to be effective. It seems that the best way to approach running injury prevention is through individualized treatment. Each athlete should be assessed separately and scanned for risk factors, which should be then addressed with specific exercises. This review provides an overview of most common running-related injuries, with a particular focus on risk factors, and emphasizes the problems encountered in preventing running-related injuries.

  20. A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01

    In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

  1. Biomechanics of running with rocker shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W; Hijmans, Juha M

    2017-01-01

    Load reduction is an important consideration in conservative management of tendon overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy. Previous research has shown that the use of rocker shoes can reduce the positive ankle power and plantar flexion moment which might help in unloading the Achilles tendon. Despite this promising implication of rocker shoes, the effects on hip and knee biomechanics remain unclear. Moreover, the effect of wearing rocker shoes on different running strike types is unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanics of the ankle, knee and hip joints and the role of strike type on these outcomes. Randomized cross-over study. In this study, 16 female endurance runners underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing rocker shoes and standard shoes. We examined work, moments, and angles of the ankle, knee and hip during the stance phase of running. In comparison with standard shoes, running with rocker shoes significantly (pshoes significantly increased the positive work (14%), extension moment peak (6%), and extension moment impulse (12%). These findings indicate that although running with rocker shoes might lower mechanical load on the Achilles tendon, it could increase the risk of overuse injuries of the knee joint. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimating Stair Running Performance Using Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro V. Ojeda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stair running, both ascending and descending, is a challenging aerobic exercise that many athletes, recreational runners, and soldiers perform during training. Studying biomechanics of stair running over multiple steps has been limited by the practical challenges presented while using optical-based motion tracking systems. We propose using foot-mounted inertial measurement units (IMUs as a solution as they enable unrestricted motion capture in any environment and without need for external references. In particular, this paper presents methods for estimating foot velocity and trajectory during stair running using foot-mounted IMUs. Computational methods leverage the stationary periods occurring during the stance phase and known stair geometry to estimate foot orientation and trajectory, ultimately used to calculate stride metrics. These calculations, applied to human participant stair running data, reveal performance trends through timing, trajectory, energy, and force stride metrics. We present the results of our analysis of experimental data collected on eleven subjects. Overall, we determine that for either ascending or descending, the stance time is the strongest predictor of speed as shown by its high correlation with stride time.

  3. Evaluation of Barefoot Running in Preadolescent Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilianidis Theophilos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The literature shows few studies on shod and unshod running performance in athletes, with most limited to laboratory settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate preadolescent 1000 m running performance when barefoot and in running spikes or training shoes. Methods. A sample of 22 boys and 21 girls aged 10.6 ± 1.1 years was recruited. Anthropometric data and VO2max were recorded when completing the three study protocols in a counter balanced design. Student’s t tests were applied to compare mean 1000 m finish times while ANOVA was used to evaluate sex differences between the protocols. Pearson's correlation analysis measured interactions between the finish times, anthropometric variables, and VO2max. Results. Running performance with spikes (4.58 min was significantly better than with training shoes (5.21 min and barefoot (5.18 min. Male 1000 m times were overall better than the females. A substantial effect of VO2max and body fat on performance was found in all protocols. Conclusions. Preadolescent endurance performance was not significantly different between training shoes and barefoot; this may serve as an incentive for future research on the training of developmental age runners.

  4. Should the Air Force Teach Running Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    General for Podiatry and oversees recruitment, assignments, and career progression for the podiatry career field. After completing his residency...gait impossible.” Podiatry Management (March 1999): 50-69. Saxton, Ken, and Roy M. Wallack. Barefoot Running Step by Step. Minneapolis, MN: Fair Winds

  5. Tau isolation study for CMS run2

    CERN Document Server

    Stefko, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Final report on study of hadronic tau fake rate behavior for $H\\rightarrow \\tau \\tau$ analysis of CMS run2 data. Differences between same-sign and opposite-sign events were studied, and Monte Carlo simulation was compared with experimental data.

  6. Dynamics of a stochastically driven running sandpile

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T; Eckhardt, B

    1994-01-01

    We analyze in detail a one-dimensional stochastically driven running sandpile. The dynamics shows three different phases, depending on the on-site relaxation rate and stochastic driving rate. Two phases are characterized by the presence of travelling waves. The third shows algebraic relaxation.

  7. Healthy Living Initiative: Running/Walking Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Kloeppel, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    This study was grounded in the public health literature and the call for schools to serve as physical activity intervention sites. Its purpose was twofold: (a) to examine the daily distance covered by students in a before-school running/walking club throughout 1 school year and (b) to gain insights on the teachers perspectives of the club.…

  8. ATLAS Data Preparation in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, the data preparation workflows for Run 2 are presented. Online data quality uses a new hybrid software release that incorporates the latest offline data quality monitoring software for the online environment. This is used to provide fast feedback in the control room during a data acquisition (DAQ) run, via a histogram-based monitoring framework as well as the online Event Display. Data are sent to several streams for offline processing at the dedicated Tier-0 computing facility, including dedicated calibration streams and an "express" physics stream containing approximately 2% of the main physics stream. This express stream is processed as data arrives, allowing a first look at the offline data quality within hours of a run end. A prompt calibration loop starts once an ATLAS DAQ run ends, nominally defining a 48 hour period in which calibrations and alignments can be derived using the dedicated calibration and express streams. The bulk processing of the main physics stream starts on expi...

  9. Cost considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiel Ras; Debbie Verbeek-Oudijk; Evelien Eggink

    2013-01-01

    Original title: Lasten onder de loep The Dutch government spends almost 7 billion euros  each year on care for people with intellectual disabilities, and these costs are rising steadily. This report analyses what underlies the increase in costs that occurred between 2007 and 2011. Was

  10. DO RUNNING SHOES PROTECT ALL RUNNERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E.J. Spurgeon

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Running is a prevalent physical activity in today's health-conscious society. Over the course of a 1-mile run an individual will make approximately 1600 footstrikes. At the time of contact between foot and ground, impact forces and pronation place large stresses on the structures of the lower extremity. Exposure to repeated impact loading is linked to the development of runners' injuries, including joint degeneration and osteoarthritis (Dekel and Weissman, 1978. Pronation increases the stress in joints, muscles and tendons and is also connected to runners' injuries (James et al., 1978; Denoth, 1986; Stacoff et al., 1988. To prevent injury, running shoes are designed to reduce both impact forces and pronation. However, these innovations in shoe design might not benefit all runners. There are two main groups of runners: rearfoot strikers and midfoot strikers. Rearfoot strikers make initial ground contact with their heel, whereas midfoot strikers make initial ground contact with the mid-region of their foot. Eighty percent of runners are rearfoot strikers with the remainder being midfoot strikers (Kerr et al., 1983. So far, running shoe research has been focused only on rearfoot strikers. Thus, there is a good understanding of the shoe design requirements for these runners. For example, research has shown that the hardness and geometry of shoe-soles can be modified to reduce impact forces and pronation in rearfoot strikers (Luethi and Stacoff, 1987; Nigg and Morlock, 1987. Conversely, midfoot strikers have received no attention from running shoe research. This suggests that there is little understanding of the available techniques to reduce impact forces and pronation in these runners. Indeed, research has shown more pronation in midfoot strikers than in rearfoot strikers for the same shoe (De Wit et al., 1995. Hence, midfoot strikers might be running in poorly designed shoes which predispose them to injury. Do running shoes protect all runners

  11. Cost comparisons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    How much does the LHC cost? And how much does this represent in other currencies? Below we present a table showing some comparisons with the cost of other projects. Looking at the figures, you will see that the cost of the LHC can be likened to that of three skyscrapers, or two seasons of Formula 1 racing! One year's budget of a single large F1 team is comparable to the entire materials cost of the ATLAS or CMS experiments.   Please note that all the figures are rounded for ease of reading.    CHF € $   LHC 4.6 billions 3 billions  4 billions   Space Shuttle Endeavour (NASA) 1.9 billion 1.3 billion 1.7 billion   Hubble Space Telescope (cost at launch – NASA/...

  12. Troubleshooting Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L.

    Seventy-six million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States alone. Medical and lost productivity costs of the most common pathogens are estimated to be 5.6-9.4 billion. Product recalls, whether from foodborne illness or spoilage, result in added costs to manufacturers in a variety of ways. These may include expenses associated with lawsuits from real or allegedly stricken individuals and lawsuits from shorted customers. Other costs include those associated with efforts involved in finding the source of the contamination and eliminating it and include time when lines are shut down and therefore non-productive, additional non-routine testing, consultant fees, time and personnel required to overhaul the entire food safety system, lost market share to competitors, and the cost associated with redesign of the factory and redesign or acquisition of more hygienic equipment. The cost associated with an effective quality assurance plan is well worth the effort to prevent the situations described.

  13. Cost Model for Digital Preservation: Cost of Digital Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Bøgvad Kejser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish Ministry of Culture has funded a project to set up a model for costing preservation of digital materials held by national cultural heritage institutions. The overall objective of the project was to increase cost effectiveness of digital preservation activities and to provide a basis for comparing and estimating future cost requirements for digital preservation. In this study we describe an activity-based costing methodology for digital preservation based on the Open Archice Information System (OAIS Reference Model. Within this framework, which we denote the Cost Model for Digital Preservation (CMDP, the focus is on costing the functional entity Preservation Planning from the OAIS and digital migration activities. In order to estimate these costs we have identified cost-critical activities by analysing the functions in the OAIS model and the flows between them. The analysis has been supplemented with findings from the literature, and our own knowledge and experience. The identified cost-critical activities have subsequently been deconstructed into measurable components, cost dependencies have been examined, and the resulting equations expressed in a spreadsheet. Currently the model can calculate the cost of different migration scenarios for a series of preservation formats for text, images, sound, video, geodata, and spreadsheets. In order to verify the model it has been tested on cost data from two different migration projects at the Danish National Archives (DNA. The study found that the OAIS model provides a sound overall framework for the cost breakdown, but that some functions need additional detailing in order to cost activities accurately. Running the two sets of empirical data showed among other things that the model underestimates the cost of manpower-intensive migration projects, while it reinstates an often underestimated cost, which is the cost of developing migration software. The model has proven useful for estimating the

  14. Cost of a dedicated ART clinic | Harling | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost of a dedicated ART clinic. G Harling, L-G Bekker, R Wood. Abstract. Background. The provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being rolled out across South Africa. Little evidence exists on the cost of running clinics for ART provision. Objectives. To determine the cost per patient-month enrolled in an ART programme ...

  15. Research and Theory Towards a National Injury Costing System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the actual cost associated with these injuries remains relatively unknown, the estimated direct cost of the medical treatment, rehabilitation and administration of these victims may run into billions of rands. This public–private injury costing pilot study (hereafter the study) was conducted at a tertiary public health facility in ...

  16. Experiences in Running for the U. S. Senate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranberg, Lawrence

    2003-10-01

    A physicist running for the U. S. Senate in 2002 seems to be a first, although there are two physicists in the House of Representatives. The first beneficial experience was creating a suitable web-site. www.lawrencecranberg.org was the result for which I am indebted to a talented computer-artist, Kelly Reed. Of course the text is mine, and tells my story to anyone who wants to read it. One can only hope that the Internet will eventually revolutionize the electoral process. Web-sites are inexpensive to create, can tell a comprehensive story, and they distribute themselves instantaneously at zero cost. The front runner in the primary and eventual winner was a lawyer, now the fifty-fourth lawyer in the Senate. Why? Click on "Lawyerocracy" on my web-site for a general answer. A specific answer is to urge my fellow physicists to recognize that running for public office is a win-win proposition. You enrich your own experience in policy analysis and in human contact, and you enrich and enliven the democratic process by bringing to the public forum a fresh, informed point of view. It would be humbling to think that physicists cannot add something distinctive to the political process.

  17. Effects of treadmill running and fatigue on impact acceleration in distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, José Antonio; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana Belloch, Salvador; Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The effects of treadmill running on impact acceleration were examined together with the interaction between running surface and runner's fatigue state. Twenty recreational runners (11 men and 9 women) ran overground and on a treadmill (at 4.0 m/s) before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of a 30-minute run at 85% of individual maximal aerobic speed. Impact accelerations were analysed using two lightweight capacitive uniaxial accelerometers. A two-way repeated-measure analysis of variance showed that, in the pre-fatigue condition, the treadmill running decreased head and tibial peak impact accelerations and impact rates (the rate of change of acceleration), but no significant difference was observed between the two surfaces in shock attenuation. There was no significant difference in acceleration parameters between the two surfaces in the post-fatigue condition. There was a significant interaction between surface (treadmill and overground) and fatigue state (pre-fatigue and post-fatigue). In particular, fatigue when running overground decreased impact acceleration severity, but it had no such effect when running on the treadmill. The effects of treadmill running and the interaction need to be taken into account when interpreting the results of studies that use a treadmill in their experimental protocols, and when prescribing physical exercise.

  18. Split-plot Experiments with Unusual Numbers of Subplot Runs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat

    2007-01-01

    In many experimental situations, it may not be feasible or even possible to run experiments in a completely randomized fashion as usually recommended. Under these circumstances, split-plot experiments in which certain factors are changed less frequently than the others are often used. Most...... of the literature on split-plot designs is based on 2-level factorials. For those designs, the number of subplots is a power of 2. There may however be some situations where for cost purposes or physical constraints, we may need to have unusual number of subplots such as 3, 5, 6, etc. In this article, we explore...... this issue and provide some examples based on the Plackett and Burman designs. Also algorithmically constructed D-optimal split-plot designs are compared to those based on Plackett and Burman designs....

  19. David Duke, running for governor, proposes tattooing people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-19

    Former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke, planning a second run for governor of Louisiana, said he would curb the AIDS epidemic by tattooing people who are infected with HIV. His suggestion is to put indelible, glow-in-the-dark tattoos on the genitals of people infected with HIV. According to Duke, it may sound very draconian but it would not demean people. He also believes that tattooing would be legal because courts have a history of supporting the quarantining and institutionalizing of people with infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Duke said Cuba has had some success in using quarantines to reduce HIV infection, but he does not think it would work in the United States because it would cost too much. According to Duke, many people who get HIV from irresponsible behavior do not tell their partners that they have AIDS--these people are mad at the world and engage in dangerous behaviors even more.

  20. Estimate of the 3,5 MMOL.L-¹ lactate threshold by maximal and submaximal variables during treadmill incremental test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kiss

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In predictive models, there is a lack of studies that have associated maximal and submaximal variables to attain lactate threshold (LT. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to investigate the possibility for predicting 3.5 mmol.l-1 LT velocity (V3.5 using maximal and submaximal variables. The heart rate (HR corresponding to 12 km.h-1 velocity (HR12, the peak heart rate (HRPEAK, the velocity corresponding to HR of 170 bpm (V170 and the peak velocity (VPEAK were the independent variables used. Forty-six runners underwent to progressive test with initial velocity between 6 and 10.8 km.h-1, and increments of 1.2 km.h-1 every three minutes. The subjects were randomly assigned to validation group (n= 30 or cross-validation group (n= 16. Multiple regression analysis (Enter selection resulted in the following predictive equation (p RESUMO Em modelos preditivos, há uma ausência de estudos que tenham associado variáveis máximas e submáximas para a obtenção dos limiares de lactato. Desta maneira, o objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a possibilidade de estimativa do limiar de lactato, referente à concentração de lactato sangüíneo de 3,5 mmol.l-1 (LL3,5, a partir de variáveis máximas e submáximas obtidas em protocolo progressivo, em esteira rolante. Como variáveis preditoras, foram utilizadas a freqüência cardíaca (FC referente à velocidade de 12 km.h-1 (FC12, a FC de pico (FCPICO, a velocidade correspondente à FC de 170 bpm (VEL170 e a velocidade de pico (VELPICO. Após executar protocolo progressivo, com velocidade inicial entre 6,0 e 10,8 km.h-1, e incrementos de 1,2 km.h-1 a cada estágio de 3 minutos 5, 46 atletas aeróbios foram divididos aleatoriamente em grupo de validação (n= 30 e grupo de validação cruzada (n= 16. A análise de regressão múltipla (método Enter resultou na seguinte equação de predição (p< 0,05: LL3,5 (km.h1= -3,650 + (1,042 x VELPICO, com EPE de 1,2 km.h1 (7,7% e R² de 0,74. Não houve diferen

  1. Similar Running Economy With Different Running Patterns Along the Aerial-Terrestrial Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiana, Thibault; Gindre, Cyrille; Hébert-Losier, Kim; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Gimenez, Philippe; Mourot, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    No unique or ideal running pattern is the most economical for all runners. Classifying the global running patterns of individuals into 2 categories (aerial and terrestrial) using the Volodalen method could permit a better understanding of the relationship between running economy (RE) and biomechanics. The main purpose was to compare the RE of aerial and terrestrial runners. Two coaches classified 58 runners into aerial (n = 29) or terrestrial (n = 29) running patterns on the basis of visual observations. RE, muscle activity, kinematics, and spatiotemporal parameters of both groups were measured during a 5-min run at 12 km/h on a treadmill. Maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O 2 max) and peak treadmill speed (PTS) were assessed during an incremental running test. No differences were observed between aerial and terrestrial patterns for RE, V̇O 2 max, and PTS. However, at 12 km/h, aerial runners exhibited earlier gastrocnemius lateralis activation in preparation for contact, less dorsiflexion at ground contact, higher coactivation indexes, and greater leg stiffness during stance phase than terrestrial runners. Terrestrial runners had more pronounced semitendinosus activation at the start and end of the running cycle, shorter flight time, greater leg compression, and a more rear-foot strike. Different running patterns were associated with similar RE. Aerial runners appear to rely more on elastic energy utilization with a rapid eccentric-concentric coupling time, whereas terrestrial runners appear to propel the body more forward rather than upward to limit work against gravity. Excluding runners with a mixed running pattern from analyses did not affect study interpretation.

  2. Run-up distributions of waves breaking on sloping walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.A.

    1969-01-01

    Distributions of run-up are calculated by assigning to each individual wave in an irregular wave train a run-up value according to Hunt's formula. The use of this formula permits a normalization of the run-up in such a way that the run-up distributions are independent of slope angle, mean wave

  3. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events. ...

  4. Frequent price changes under menu costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Svejstrup

    1999-01-01

    , the price may be changed more frequent in the short run, and in the long run it definitely will. Hence, observing frequent price changes is not necessarily inconsistent with a firm operating under menu costs. This paper relies on an article by Dixit (1991), (Review of Economic studies, 58, 141......This paper investigates the effect of uncertainty on a single firm's pricing behaviour in a dynamic menu cost model that results in (S,s)-rules where the price is fixed inside a band. It will be demonstrated that even though the band of inaction widens in response to increased uncertainty...

  5. Effects of human running cadence and experimental validation of the bouncing ball model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencsik, László; Zelei, Ambrus

    2017-05-01

    The biomechanical analysis of human running is a complex problem, because of the large number of parameters and degrees of freedom. However, simplified models can be constructed, which are usually characterized by some fundamental parameters, like step length, foot strike pattern and cadence. The bouncing ball model of human running is analysed theoretically and experimentally in this work. It is a minimally complex dynamic model when the aim is to estimate the energy cost of running and the tendency of ground-foot impact intensity as a function of cadence. The model shows that cadence has a direct effect on energy efficiency of running and ground-foot impact intensity. Furthermore, it shows that higher cadence implies lower risk of injury and better energy efficiency. An experimental data collection of 121 amateur runners is presented. The experimental results validate the model and provides information about the walk-to-run transition speed and the typical development of cadence and grounded phase ratio in different running speed ranges.

  6. Technical design report for the upgrade of the ICD for D-Zero Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, L. [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); De, K. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Draper, P. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Gallas, E. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Li, J. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Sosebee, M. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], Stephens, R.W. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)], White, A. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Inter Cryostat Detector (ICD) used in Run I of the D0 Experiment will be inoperable in the central, high magnetic field planned for Run II. In Run I, the ICD enhanced the hermeticity and uniformity of the D0 calorimeter system, improving both missing transverse energy and jet energy resolution. The goals for the Run II ICD are the same. In this document, the physics arguments for maintaining the ICD are presented, followed by a detailed description of the planned design changes, prototype tests, construction, installation, and commissioning of the device for the Run II D0 detector. Estimates of costs and schedule can be found on //DOSERVER2/Operations/Upgrade Project/ subareas available via DZERO`s WinFrame Program Manager. This detector is not intended to provide any ``L0`` capabilities (for luminosity monitoring), or to provide any EM coverage in the intermediate region, or to provide additional coverage in the intermediate regions, unlike previous upgrades proposed in this detector region. The ICD upgrade described here maintains most of the Run I capabilities in a high magnetic field environment.

  7. Relationship between running kinematic changes and time limit at vVO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo De Lucca

    2012-06-01

    Exhaustive running at maximal oxygen uptake velocity (vVO2max can alter running kinematic parameters and increase energy cost along the time. The aims of the present study were to compare characteristics of ankle and knee kinematics during running at vVO2max and to verify the relationship between changes in kinematic variables and time limit (Tlim. Eleven male volunteers, recreational players of team sports, performed an incremental running test until volitional exhaustion to determine vVO2max and a constant velocity test at vVO2max. Subjects were filmed continuously from the left sagittal plane at 210 Hz for further kinematic analysis. The maximal plantar flexion during swing (p<0.01 was the only variable that increased significantly from beginning to end of the run. Increase in ankle angle at contact was the only variable related to Tlim (r=0.64; p=0.035 and explained 34% of the performance in the test. These findings suggest that the individuals under study maintained a stable running style at vVO2max and that increase in plantar flexion explained the performance in this test when it was applied in non-runners.

  8. Fitness cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Pedersen, Thomas M.; Udekwu, Klas I.

    2012-01-01

    found significantly independent negative correlations between fitness and the presence of mecA or streptomycin resistance. Mathematical modelling confirmed that fitness costs of the magnitude carried by these isolates could result in the disappearance of MRSA prevalence during a time span similar...... phage types, predominantly only penicillin resistant. We investigated whether isolates of this epidemic were associated with a fitness cost, and we employed a mathematical model to ask whether these fitness costs could have led to the observed reduction in frequency. Bacteraemia isolates of S. aureus...... of each isolate was determined in a growth competition assay with a reference isolate. Significant fitness costs of 215 were determined for the MRSA isolates studied. There was a significant negative correlation between number of antibiotic resistances and relative fitness. Multiple regression analysis...

  9. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  10. Instrumental Variables in the Long Run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casey, Gregory; Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag

    2017-01-01

    In the study of long-run economic growth, it is common to use historical or geographical variables as instruments for contemporary endogenous regressors. We study the interpretation of these conventional instrumental variable (IV) regressions in a general, yet simple, framework. Our aim...... is to estimate the long-run causal effect of changes in the endogenous explanatory variable. We find that conventional IV regressions generally cannot recover this parameter of interest. To estimate this parameter, therefore, we develop an augmented IV estimator that combines the conventional regression...... with a separate regression estimating the degree of persistence in the endogenous regressor. Importantly, our estimator can overcome a particular violation of the exclusion restriction that can arise when there is a time gap between the instrument and the endogenous explanatory variable. We apply our results...

  11. Causal Analysis of Railway Running Delays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerreto, Fabrizio; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Harrod, Steven

    against service transit times and railway asset productivity. Methods to investigate the quality of supplement time allocation are necessary to reduce the behavioral response and the waste of resources. This is a preliminary study that investigates train delay data from the year 2014 supplied by Rail Net......Operating delays and network propagation are inherent characteristics of railway operations. These are traditionally reduced by provision of time supplements or “slack” in railway timetables and operating plans. Supplement allocation policies must trade off reliability in the service commitments...... Denmark (the Danish infrastructure manager). The statistical analysis of the data identifies the minimum running times and the scheduled running time supplements and investigates the evolution of train delays along given train paths. An improved allocation of time supplements would result in smaller...

  12. Measuring the running top-quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Berlin Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-06-15

    We present the first direct determination of the running top-quark mass based on the total cross section of top-quark pair-production as measured at the Tevatron. Our theory prediction for the cross section includes various next-to-next-to-leading order QCD contributions, in particular all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, the Coulomb corrections at two loops and all explicitly scale dependent terms at NNLO accuracy. The result allows for an exact and independent variation of the renormalization and factorization scales. For Tevatron and LHC we study its dependence on all scales, on the parton luminosity and on the top-quark mass using both the conventional pole mass definition as well as the running mass in the MS scheme. We extract for the top-quark an MS mass of m({mu}=m) =160.0{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} GeV. (orig.)

  13. CMS computing operations during run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Adelman, J; Artieda, J; Bagliese, G; Ballestero, D; Bansal, S; Bauerdick, L; Behrenhof, W; Belforte, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blyweert, S; Bonacorsi, D; Brew, C; Contreras, L; Cristofori, A; Cury, S; da Silva Gomes, D; Dolores Saiz Santos, M; Dost, J; Dykstra, D; Fajardo Hernandez, E; Fanzango, F; Fisk, I; Flix, J; Georges, A; Gi ffels, M; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Gowdy, S; Gutsche, O; Holzman, B; Janssen, X; Kaselis, R; Kcira, D; Kim, B; Klein, D; Klute, M; Kress, T; Kreuzer, P; Lahi , A; Larson, K; Letts, J; Levin, A; Linacre, J; Linares, J; Liu, S; Luyckx, S; Maes, M; Magini, N; Malta, A; Marra Da Silva, J; Mccartin, J; McCrea, A; Mohapatra, A; Molina, J; Mortensen, T; Padhi, S; Paus, C; Piperov, S; Ralph; Sartirana, A; Sciaba, A; S ligoi, I; Spinoso, V; Tadel, M; Traldi, S; Wissing, C; Wuerthwein, F; Yang, M; Zielinski, M; Zvada, M

    2014-01-01

    During the first run, CMS collected and processed more than 10B data events and simulated more than 15B events. Up to 100k processor cores were used simultaneously and 100PB of storage was managed. Each month petabytes of data were moved and hundreds of users accessed data samples. In this document we discuss the operational experience from this first run. We present the workflows and data flows that were executed, and we discuss the tools and services developed, and the operations and shift models used to sustain the system. Many techniques were followed from the original computing planning, but some were reactions to difficulties and opportunities. We also address the lessons learned from an operational perspective, and how this is shaping our thoughts for 2015.

  14. The Physics Case for Extended Tevatron Running

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Darien R.

    2010-11-01

    Run II of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is currently scheduled to end late in 2011. Given the current performance of the collider and of the CDF and D0 detectors, it is estimated that the current data set could be approximately doubled with a run extended into 2014. A few examples are presented of the physics potential of these additional statistics. These are discussed in the context of the expected reach of the LHC 7 TeV data and the existing Tevatron data. In particular, an extraordinary opportunity is described which could probe the existence of a standard model Higgs boson with mass in the currently preferred region between 115 GeV and 150 GeV.

  15. Opportunity cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Carolyn

    2011-05-01

    Opportunity cost and trade-off - similar concepts with slightly different meanings and definitions in different fields - are concepts that we were all probably first exposed to as a toddler. For most women however, opportunity cost and trade-off is a part of their daily lives as they try to balance their needs, including their health needs, with the demands of their families, careers and never-ending 'to do' lists.

  16. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  17. Locomotion Control of a Compliant Legged Robot from Slow Walking to Fast Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-Seok Kwon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a locomotion control method for a compliant legged robot from slow walking to fast running. We also examine the energy efficiency of the compliant legged robot controlled by the proposed locomotion control method. Experimentally, we obtain the robot running speed of about 4.3m/s with the initial compliant leg length of 0.1m. In addition, we obtain very good energy efficiency. In the best case, the mechanical cost of transport(Cmt, known as an energy efficiency measure, is obtained at about 0.2. Comparing with the other energy efficient robots, our robot exhibits very good energy efficiency.

  18. Analysis of Biomechanical Factors in Bend Running

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhang; Xinping You; Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Sprint running is the demonstration of comprehensive abilities of technology and tactics, under various conditions. However, whether it is just to allocate the tracks for short-distance athletes from different racetracks has been the hot topic. This study analyzes its forces, differences in different tracks and winding influences, in the aspects of sport biomechanics. The results indicate, many disadvantages exist in inner tracks, middle tracks are the best and outer ones are inferior to midd...

  19. Run-time Energy Management for Mobiles

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, L.T.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Due to limited energy resources, mobile computing requires an energy-efficient a rchitecture. The dynamic nature of a mobile environment demands an architecture that allows adapting to (quickly) changing conditions. The mobile has to adapt d ynamically to new circumstances in the best suitable manner. The hardware and so ftware architecture should be able to support such adaptability and minimize the energy consumption by making resource allocation decisions at run-time. To make these decisio...

  20. Marathon running for amateurs: Benefits and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Nitin Burkule

    2016-01-01

    The habitual level of physical activity of the human race has significantly and abruptly declined in the last few generations due to technological developments. The professional societies and government health agencies have published minimum physical activity requirement guidelines to educate the masses about the importance of exercise and to reduce cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality at the population level. There is growing participation in marathon running by amateur, middle-aged c...

  1. PHENIX plans for RHIC low energy run

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2009-01-01

    PHENIX plans for low energy running are presented. Current detector setting makes it possible to measure dielectron spectra down to sqrt(s_NN)=39GeV, and photon/high pT hadron spectra down to below sub-injection energy (sqrt(s_NN)=5-10GeV). The upgrade of the trigger scheme after the installation of VTX detector will enable PHENIX to fully explore the sub-injection energy regime, starting 2011.

  2. Common Running Overuse Injuries and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Žiga Kozinc; Nejc Sarabon

    2017-01-01

    Runners are particularly prone to developing overuse injuries. The most common running-related injuries include medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, patellar tendinopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, tibial stress fractures, and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Two of the most significant risk factors appear to be injury history and weekly distance. Several trials have successfully identified biomechanical risk factors for specific injuries, with increased groun...

  3. The aerodynamic signature of running spiders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Casas

    Full Text Available Many predators display two foraging modes, an ambush strategy and a cruising mode. These foraging strategies have been classically studied in energetic, biomechanical and ecological terms, without considering the role of signals produced by predators and perceived by prey. Wolf spiders are a typical example; they hunt in leaf litter either using an ambush strategy or by moving at high speed, taking over unwary prey. Air flow upstream of running spiders is a source of information for escaping prey, such as crickets and cockroaches. However, air displacement by running arthropods has not been previously examined. Here we show, using digital particle image velocimetry, that running spiders are highly conspicuous aerodynamically, due to substantial air displacement detectable up to several centimetres in front of them. This study explains the bimodal distribution of spider's foraging modes in terms of sensory ecology and is consistent with the escape distances and speeds of cricket prey. These findings may be relevant to the large and diverse array of arthropod prey-predator interactions in leaf litter.

  4. The Run-Up of Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, S.; Bravo, F. J.; Fuentes, M.; Matias, M.; Medina, M.

    2016-12-01

    Large earthquakes in subduction zones are liable to produce tsunamis that can cause destruction and fatalities. The Run-up is a geophysical parameter that quantifies damage and if critical facilities or population are exposed to. Here we use the coupling for certain subduction regions measured by different techniques (Potency and GPS observations) to define areas where large earthquakes can occur. Taking the slab 1.0 from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), we can define the geometry of the area including its tsunamigenic potential. By using stochastic earthquakes sources for each area with its maximum tsunamigenic potential, we calculate the numerical and analytical run-up for each case. Then, we perform a statistical analysis and calculate the envelope for both methods. Furthermore, we build an index of risk using: the closest slope to the shore in a piecewise linear approach (last slopecriteria) and the outputsfrom tsunami modeling. Results show that there are areas prone to produce higher run-up than others based on the size of the earthquake, geometrical constraints of the source, tectonic setting and the coast last slope. Based on these results, there are zones that have low risk index which can define escape routes or secure coastal areas for tsunami early warning, urban and planning purposes when detailed data is available.

  5. Constructing predictive models of human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Revzen, Shai; Guckenheimer, John; Ludwig, Christian; Reger, Johann; Seyfarth, Andre

    2015-02-06

    Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict future motions. We construct SLIP control models using data-driven Floquet analysis, and show how these models may be used to obtain predictive models of human running with six additional states comprising the position and velocity of the swing-leg ankle. Our methods are general, and may be applied to any rhythmic physical system. We provide an approach for identifying an event-driven linear controller that approximates an observed stabilization strategy, and for producing a reduced-state model which closely recovers the observed dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Oil shale project run summary for small retort Run S-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Laswell, B.H. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    A combustion run using sidewall heaters to control heat loss and computer control to set heater power were conducted to study the effectiveness of the heater control system, compare results with a one-dimensional retort model when radial heat loss is not significant, and determine effects of recycling off-gas to the retort (by comparison with future runs). It is concluded that adequate simulation of in-situ processing in laboratory retorts requires control of heat losses. (JRD)

  7. Short-run and long-run effects of unemployment on suicides: does welfare regime matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Pawel; Zhukovska, Kateryna

    2017-10-18

    Disentangling the immediate effects of an unemployment shock from the long-run relationship has a strong theoretical rationale. Different economic and psychological forces are at play in the first moment and after prolonged unemployment. This study suggests a diverse impact of short- and long-run unemployment on suicides in liberal and social-democratic countries. We take a macro-level perspective and simultaneously estimate the short- and long-run relationships between unemployment and suicide, along with the speed of convergence towards the long-run relationship after a shock, in a panel of 10 high-income countries. We also account for unemployment benefit spending, the share of the population aged 15-34, and the crisis effects. In the liberal group of countries, only a long-run impact of unemployment on suicides is found to be significant (P = 0.010). In social-democratic countries, suicides are associated with initial changes in unemployment (P = 0.028), but the positive link fades over time and becomes insignificant in the long run. Further, crisis effects are a much stronger determinant of suicides in social-democratic countries. Once the broad welfare regime is controlled for, changes in unemployment-related spending do not matter for preventing suicides. A generous welfare system seems efficient at preventing unemployment-related suicides in the long run, but societies in social-democratic countries might be less psychologically immune to sudden negative changes in their professional lives compared with people in liberal countries. Accounting for the different short- and long-run effects could thus improve our understanding of the unemployment-suicide link.

  8. CMS Pixel Detector: Operational Experience and Run1 to Run2 transition

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070830

    2015-01-01

    The CMS Pixel detector is at the centre of the CMS experiment and is made of three barrel layers and four endcap disks. It is essential for the reconstruction of track seeds and secondary vertices. Some aspects of the CMS Pixel detector operations during the first LHC run are presented. The work carried out during the first long shutdown of LHC (LS1) to prepare the detector for Run 2 and the plan for 2015 operations are also described.

  9. Adjustments with running speed reveal neuromuscular adaptations during landing associated with high mileage running training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, Jasper; Clansey, Adam C; Lake, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    It remains to be determined whether running training influences the amplitude of lower limb muscle activations before and during the first half of stance and whether such changes are associated with joint stiffness regulation and usage of stored energy from tendons. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate neuromuscular and movement adaptations before and during landing in response to running training across a range of speeds. Two groups of high mileage (HM; >45 km/wk, n = 13) and low mileage (LM; running speed. HM runners also demonstrated higher initial knee stiffness during the impact phase compared with LM runners, which was associated with an earlier peak knee flexion velocity, and both were relatively unchanged by running speed. In contrast, LM runners had higher knee stiffness during the slightly later weight acceptance phase and the disparity was amplified with increases in speed. It was concluded that initial knee joint stiffness might predominantly be governed by tendon stiffness rather than muscular activations before landing. Estimated elastic work about the ankle was found to be higher in the HM runners, which might play a role in reducing weight acceptance phase muscle activation levels and improve muscle activation efficiency with running training. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although neuromuscular factors play a key role during running, the influence of high mileage training on neuromuscular function has been poorly studied, especially in relation to running speed. This study is the first to demonstrate changes in neuromuscular conditioning with high mileage training, mainly characterized by lower thigh muscle activation after touch down, higher initial knee stiffness, and greater estimates of energy return, with adaptations being increasingly evident at faster running speeds. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Altered Running Economy Directly Translates to Altered Distance-Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kipp, Shalaya; Spiering, Barry A; Kram, Rodger

    2016-11-01

    Our goal was to quantify if small (1%-3%) changes in running economy quantitatively affect distance-running performance. Based on the linear relationship between metabolic rate and running velocity and on earlier observations that added shoe mass increases metabolic rate by ~1% per 100 g per shoe, we hypothesized that adding 100 and 300 g per shoe would slow 3000-m time-trial performance by 1% and 3%, respectively. Eighteen male sub-20-min 5-km runners completed treadmill testing, and three 3000-m time trials wearing control shoes and identical shoes with 100 and 300 g of discreetly added mass. We measured rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production and calculated metabolic rates for the treadmill tests, and we recorded overall running time for the time trials. Adding mass to the shoes significantly increased metabolic rate at 3.5 m·s by 1.11% per 100 g per shoe (95% confidence interval = 0.88%-1.35%). While wearing the control shoes, participants ran the 3000-m time trial in 626.1 ± 55.6 s. Times averaged 0.65% ± 1.36% and 2.37% ± 2.09% slower for the +100-g and +300-g shoes, respectively (P economy and slows 3000-m time-trial performance proportionally. Our data demonstrate that laboratory-based running economy measurements can accurately predict changes in distance-running race performance due to shoe modifications.

  11. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  12. Minimizing Costs Can Be Costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Rasmussen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A quite common practice, even in academic literature, is to simplify a decision problem and model it as a cost-minimizing problem. In fact, some type of models has been standardized to minimization problems, like Quadratic Assignment Problems (QAPs, where a maximization formulation would be treated as a “generalized” QAP and not solvable by many of the specially designed softwares for QAP. Ignoring revenues when modeling a decision problem works only if costs can be separated from the decisions influencing revenues. More often than we think this is not the case, and minimizing costs will not lead to maximized profit. This will be demonstrated using spreadsheets to solve a small example. The example is also used to demonstrate other pitfalls in network models: the inability to generally balance the problem or allocate costs in advance, and the tendency to anticipate a specific type of solution and thereby make constraints too limiting when formulating the problem.

  13. The Robust Running Ape: Unraveling the Deep Underpinnings of Coordinated Human Running Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kiely

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to other mammals, humans are not especially strong, swift or supple. Nevertheless, despite these apparent physical limitations, we are among Natures most superbly well-adapted endurance runners. Paradoxically, however, notwithstanding this evolutionary-bestowed proficiency, running-related injuries, and Overuse syndromes in particular, are widely pervasive. The term ‘coordination’ is similarly ubiquitous within contemporary coaching, conditioning, and rehabilitation cultures. Various theoretical models of coordination exist within the academic literature. However, the specific neural and biological underpinnings of ‘running coordination,’ and the nature of their integration, remain poorly elaborated. Conventionally running is considered a mundane, readily mastered coordination skill. This illusion of coordinative simplicity, however, is founded upon a platform of immense neural and biological complexities. This extensive complexity presents extreme organizational difficulties yet, simultaneously, provides a multiplicity of viable pathways through which the computational and mechanical burden of running can be proficiently dispersed amongst expanded networks of conditioned neural and peripheral tissue collaborators. Learning to adequately harness this available complexity, however, is a painstakingly slowly emerging, practice-driven process, greatly facilitated by innate evolutionary organizing principles serving to constrain otherwise overwhelming complexity to manageable proportions. As we accumulate running experiences persistent plastic remodeling customizes networked neural connectivity and biological tissue properties to best fit our unique neural and architectural idiosyncrasies, and personal histories: thus neural and peripheral tissue plasticity embeds coordination habits. When, however, coordinative processes are compromised—under the integrated influence of fatigue and/or accumulative cycles of injury, overuse

  14. From Concept to Realization: Designing Miniature Humanoids for Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbum Jun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humanoid robots present exciting research possibilities such as human gaits, social interaction, and even creativity. Full-size humanoid designs have shown impressive capabilities, yet are custom-built and expensive. Cost and sophistication barriers make reproducing and verifying results very difficult. The recent proliferation of mini-humanoids presents an affordable alternative, in that smaller robots are cheaper to own and simpler to operate. At less than 2000 USD, these robots are capable of human-like motion, yet lack precision sensors and processing power. The authors' goal is to produce a miniature humanoid robot that is both small and affordable, while capable of advanced dynamic walking and running. This requires sensing of the robot's inertia and velocity, the forces on its feet, and the ability to generate and modify motion commands in real time. The presented design uses commercial parts and simple machining methods to minimize cost. A power-efficient mobile x86 computer on-board leverages existing operating systems and simplifies software development. Preliminary results demonstrate controlled walking and feedback control.

  15. The effect of a sports drink on gastroesophageal reflux during a run-bike-run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H P; Wiersma, J W; Koerselman, J; Akkermans, L M; Bol, E; Mosterd, W L; de Vries, W R

    2000-01-01

    The effects of different modes of prolonged exercise and different drinks on gastroesophageal reflux and reflux-related symptoms were examined. In a cross-over design seven male triathletes performed two tests at one week intervals (50 min periods of alternately running, cycling and running at 70-75% VO2max), with supplementation of either a conventional sports drink (7% carbohydrates) or tap water. Gastroesophageal reflux (percentage time and number of periods esophageal pH < 4) was measured with an ambulant pH system before, during and after exercise. Percentage reflux time (+/- SEM) during running, cycling, running and recovery was 24.0 +/- 4.6, 8.2 +/- 4.8, 17.6 +/- 8.4 and 11.8 +/- 4.0 with carbohydrates and 7.4 +/- 2.9, 0 +/- 0, 2.4 +/- 1.4 and 0.2 +/- 0.2 with water, respectively. Reflux lasted longer during exercise as compared to the rest situation (5.6 + 1.4%), especially with carbohydrates, and lasted longer with carbohydrates than with water (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon signed rank test). In general, reflux lasted longer during running than during cycling (P < 0.05). Data on the number of reflux periods are concordant to these results. Chest pain was reported by one subject during running with carbohydrates. Heartburn during running was reported by two subjects with water and by one with carbohydrates. In conclusion, physical exercise increases gastroesophageal reflux, dependent on the mode of exercise and beverage used.

  16. Run-09 pC polarimeter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoyan, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Lee, S.; Li, X.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nakagawa, I.; Svirida, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of PC polarimeter data at {radical}s = 200 and 500 GeV from Run9 is presented. Final polarization results, fill-by-fill, for blue and yellow beams, as to be used by RHIC experiments (in collisions) are released and collected in http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/cnipol/pubdocs/Run09Offline/. Global relative systematic uncertainties {delta}P/P (to be considered as correlated from fill to fill) are 4.7% for 100 GeV beams, and 8.3% (12.1%) for blue (yellow) 250 GeV beams. For a product of two beam polarizations P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y} (used in double spin asymmetry measurements) the relative uncertainty {delta}(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y})/(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y}) 8.8% for 100 GeV beams and 18.5% for 250 GeV beams. For the average between two beam polarization (P{sub B} + P{sub Y})/2 (used in single spin asymmetry measurements, when data from two polarized beams are combined) the relative uncertainty is 4.4% for 100 GeV beams and 9.2% for 250 GeV beams. Larger uncertainties for 250 GeV beams relate to significant rate related systematic effects experienced in the first part of Run9 (due to thicker targets used and smaller trans. beam size at higher beam energy).

  17. Prevalence of Injury in Ultra Trail Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliaropoulos Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the study was to find the rate of musculoskeletal injuries in ultra-trail runners, investigate the most sensitive anatomical areas, and discover associated predicting factors to aid in the effective prevention and rapid rehabilitation of trail running injuries. Methods. Forty ultra trail runners responded to an epidemiological questionnaire. Results. At least one running injury was reported by 90% of the sample, with a total of 135 injuries were reported (111 overuse injuries, 24 appeared during competing. Lower back pain was the most common source of injury (42.5%. Running in the mountains (p = 0.0004 and following a personalized training schedule (p = 0.0995 were found to be protective factors. Runners involved in physical labor are associated with more injuries (p = 0.058. Higher-level runners are associated with more injuries than lower-level cohorts (p = 0.067, with symptoms most commonly arising in the lower back (p = 0.091, hip joint (p = 0.083, and the plantar surface of the foot (p = 0.054. Experienced runners (> 6 years are at greater risk of developing injuries (p = 0.001, especially in the lower back (p = 0.012, tibia (p = 0.049, and the plantar surface of the foot (p = 0 .028. Double training sessions could cause hip joint injury (p = 0.060. Conclusions. In order to avoid injury, it is recommended to train mostly on mountain trails and have a training program designed by professionals.

  18. Electron ID in ATLAS Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Thais, Savannah Jennifer; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Efficient and accurate electron identification is of critical importance to measuring many physics processes with leptons in the final state, including H->4l, dark vector boson searches, and various SUSY searches. This poster will describe the current status of the Likelihood driven Electron ID, highlighting the recent move from a MC driven ID to a data-driven ID. It will include the most recent identification efficiency and scale-factor measurements. Additionally, it will describe continued improvements for Run 2 electron ID, highlighting improvements in the low pt region and potential Machine Learning improvements.

  19. Chaotic inflation with curvaton induced running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2014-01-01

    of the apparent tension, but which would be in conflict with prediction of the simplest model of chaotic inflation. The large field chaotic model is sensitive to UV physics, and the nontrivial running of the spectral index suggested by the BICEP2 collaboration could therefore, if true, be telling us some...... additional new information about the UV completion of inflation. However, before we would be able to draw such strong conclusions with confidence, we would first have to also carefully exclude all the alternatives. Assuming monomial chaotic inflation is the right theory of inflation, we therefore explore...

  20. Electron ID in ATLAS Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Thais, Savannah Jennifer; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Efficient and accurate electron identification is of critical importance to measuring many physics processes with leptons in the final state, including H->4l, dark vector boson searches, and various SUSY searches. This poster will describe the current status of the Likelihood driven Electron ID, as well as the most recent identification efficiency and scale-factor measurements. The poster will include public results from ATLAS-CONF-2016-024 (2015 Electron ID Conf Note), and any potential public plot displaying the latest recommendations (Moriond 2017). Additionally, it will describe planned improvements for Run 2 electron ID, highlighting improvements in the low pt region.