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Sample records for sublingual zolpidem tartrate

  1. Influence of food on pharmacokinetics of zolpidem from fast dissolving sublingual zolpidem tartrate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David J; Harmatz, Jerold S; Singh, Nikhilesh N; Roth, Thomas; Harris, Stephen C; Kapil, Ram P

    2013-11-01

    Ingesting food can impact the pharmacokinetics of sedative-hypnotic drugs. A buffered zolpidem sublingual tablet (ZST) recently became available for the treatment of middle-of-the-night awakening. In this randomized, open-label, single-site study, the pharmacokinetic profile of ZST was evaluated when administered while fasting and following a standard high-fat meal (fed state). Healthy adults aged 18-64 years received a single morning dose of 3.5 mg ZST in the fed or fasting state. From 20 min to 3 h post-dose, zolpidem plasma levels were lower in the fed state compared to the fasting state. After 4 h post-dose (corresponding to "morning wake time"), higher zolpidem plasma levels were evident in the fed state. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values for the 0-8 h interval were 160 ng/mL h in the fed state and 203 ng/mL h in the fasting state (P fasting states, Cmax was 32.0 ng/mL versus 57.3 ng/mL (P < .001), respectively, and Tmax was 3.0 h versus 0.92 h (P < .001), respectively. Together these data suggest that administration of ZST in the fed state is not optimal for maximizing the likelihood of therapeutic benefit and minimizing the probability of residual sedation. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Fast-Acting Sublingual Zolpidem for Middle-of-the-Night Wakefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph V. Pergolizzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders (somnipathies are conditions characterized by disruptions of sleep quality or of sleep pattern. They can involve difficulty falling asleep (prolonged sleep onset latency, difficulty staying asleep (disturbance of sleep maintenance, sleep of poor quality (unrefreshing, or combinations of these and can lead to poor health and quality of life problems. A subtype of sleep-maintenance insomnia is middle-of-the-night wakefulness, a relatively common occurrence. Zolpidem, a nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist, allosterically modulates an ion channel and increases the influx of Cl−, thereby dampening the effect of excitatory (sleep disrupting input. Recently, product label changes to some zolpidem containing products have been implemented by the FDA in order to reduce the risk associated with their morning after residual side effects. A new formulation of zolpidem tartrate (Intermezzo sublingual tablet, an approved product indicated exclusively for the treatment of middle-of-the-night wakefulness and difficulty returning to sleep, did not have its label changed. We present a short summary of its basic science and clinical attributes in light of the recent regulatory changes for zolpidem products.

  3. Development of Modified-Release Tablets of Zolpidem Tartrate by Biphasic Quick/Slow Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Mahapatra, Anjan Kumar; Sameeraja, N. H.; Murthy, P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Zolpidem tartrate is a non-benzodiazepine analogue of imidazopyridine of sedative and hypnotic category. It has a short half-life with usual dosage regimen being 5 mg, two times a day, or 10 mg, once daily. The duration of action is considered too short in certain circumstances. Thus, it is desirable to lengthen the duration of action. The formulation design was implemented by preparing extended-release tablets of zolpidem tartrate using the biphasic delivery system technology, where sodium s...

  4. Development of modified-release tablets of zolpidem tartrate by biphasic quick/slow delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Anjan Kumar; Sameeraja, N H; Murthy, P N

    2015-06-01

    Zolpidem tartrate is a non-benzodiazepine analogue of imidazopyridine of sedative and hypnotic category. It has a short half-life with usual dosage regimen being 5 mg, two times a day, or 10 mg, once daily. The duration of action is considered too short in certain circumstances. Thus, it is desirable to lengthen the duration of action. The formulation design was implemented by preparing extended-release tablets of zolpidem tartrate using the biphasic delivery system technology, where sodium starch glycolate acts as a superdisintegrant in immediate-release part and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose as a release retarding agent in extended-release core. Tablets were prepared by direct compression. Both the core and the coat contained the drug. The pre-compression blends were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, and compressibility index. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, hardness, weight variation test, friability, and in vitro release studies. No interaction was observed between zolpidem tartrate and excipients from the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The results of all the formulations prepared were compared with reference product Stilnoct®. Optimized formulations showed release patterns that match the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines for zolpidem tartrate extended-release tablets. The mechanism of drug release was studied using different mathematical models, and the optimized formulation has shown Fickian diffusion. Accelerated stability studies were performed on the optimized formulation.

  5. Sublingual fast dissolving niosomal films for enhanced bioavailability and prolonged effect of metoprolol tartrate

    OpenAIRE

    Allam, Ayat; Fetih, Gihan

    2016-01-01

    Ayat Allam, Gihan Fetih Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt Abstract: The aim of the present work was to prepare and evaluate sublingual fast dissolving films containing metoprolol tartrate-loaded niosomes. Niosomes were utilized to allow for prolonged release of the drug, whereas the films were used to increase the drug’s bioavailability via the sublingual route. Niosomes were prepared using span 60 and cholesterol at different drug to...

  6. Bioanalytical HPTLC Method for Estimation of Zolpidem Tartrate from Human Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Abhay R. Shirode; Bharti G. Jadhav; Vilasrao J. Kadam

    2016-01-01

    A simple and selective high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed and validated for the estimation of zolpidem tartrate from human plasma using eperisone hydrochloride as an internal standard (IS). Analyte and IS were extracted from human plasma by liquid liquid extraction (LLE) technique. The Camag HPTLC system, employed with software winCATS (ver.1.4.1.8) was used for the proposed bioanalytical work. Planar chromatographic development was carried out with the h...

  7. Formulation and Evaluation of Extended- Release Tablet of Zolpidem Tartrate by Wet Granulation Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Pourhashem; Mohammad Reza Avadi

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to design and evaluate extended - release system of the hypnotic agent, Zolpidem tartrate usefulness for the treatment of insomnia. The half-life of this drug is about 1.9 - 3 hours that indicating it a candidate for the extended release formulation. Our investigation relates to development of extended drug delivery system based on Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMCK4M) as release retardant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP k30) as binder and Magnesium S...

  8. HPTLC Method Development and Validation of Zolpidem Tartrate in Bulk and Marketed Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Abhay R. Shirode; Bharti G. Jadhav; Vilasrao J. Kadam

    2015-01-01

    High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) offers many advantages over HPLC. It reduces the cost of analysis as compare to HPLC. The mobile phase consumption per sample is extremely low in HPTLC, hence reducing the acquisition and disposal cost. Considering the cost and suitability of analysis for estimation of zolpidem tartrate in bulk and its marketed formulation, HPTLC method was developed and validated. The Camag HPTLC system, employed with software winCATS (ver.1.4.1.8) was used ...

  9. Sublingual fast dissolving niosomal films for enhanced bioavailability and prolonged effect of metoprolol tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ayat Allam, Gihan Fetih Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt Abstract: The aim of the present work was to prepare and evaluate sublingual fast dissolving films containing metoprolol tartrate-loaded niosomes. Niosomes were utilized to allow for prolonged release of the drug, whereas the films were used to increase the drug’s bioavailability via the sublingual route. Niosomes were prepared using span 60 and cholesterol at different drug to surfactant ratios. The niosomes were characterized for size, zeta-potential, and entrapment efficiency. The selected niosomal formulation was incorporated into polymeric films using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E15 and methyl cellulose as film-forming polymers and Avicel as superdisintegrant. The physical characteristics (appearance, texture, pH, uniformity of weight and thickness, disintegration time, and palatability of the prepared films were studied, in addition to evaluating the in vitro drug release, stability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The release of the drug from the medicated film was fast (99.9% of the drug was released within 30 minutes, while the drug loaded into the niosomes, either incorporated into the film or not, showed only 22.85% drug release within the same time. The selected sublingual film showed significantly higher rate of drug absorption and higher drug plasma levels compared with that of commercial oral tablet. The plasma levels remained detectable for 24 hours following sublingual administration, compared with only 12 hours after administration of the oral tablet. In addition, the absolute bioavailability of the drug (ie, relative to intravenous administration following sublingual administration was found to be significantly higher (91.06%±13.28%, as compared with that after oral tablet administration (39.37%±11.4%. These results indicate that the fast dissolving niosomal film could be a promising delivery system to

  10. Sublingual fast dissolving niosomal films for enhanced bioavailability and prolonged effect of metoprolol tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ayat; Fetih, Gihan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and evaluate sublingual fast dissolving films containing metoprolol tartrate-loaded niosomes. Niosomes were utilized to allow for prolonged release of the drug, whereas the films were used to increase the drug's bioavailability via the sublingual route. Niosomes were prepared using span 60 and cholesterol at different drug to surfactant ratios. The niosomes were characterized for size, zeta-potential, and entrapment efficiency. The selected niosomal formulation was incorporated into polymeric films using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E15 and methyl cellulose as film-forming polymers and Avicel as superdisintegrant. The physical characteristics (appearance, texture, pH, uniformity of weight and thickness, disintegration time, and palatability) of the prepared films were studied, in addition to evaluating the in vitro drug release, stability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The release of the drug from the medicated film was fast (99.9% of the drug was released within 30 minutes), while the drug loaded into the niosomes, either incorporated into the film or not, showed only 22.85% drug release within the same time. The selected sublingual film showed significantly higher rate of drug absorption and higher drug plasma levels compared with that of commercial oral tablet. The plasma levels remained detectable for 24 hours following sublingual administration, compared with only 12 hours after administration of the oral tablet. In addition, the absolute bioavailability of the drug (ie, relative to intravenous administration) following sublingual administration was found to be significantly higher (91.06%±13.28%), as compared with that after oral tablet administration (39.37%±11.4%). These results indicate that the fast dissolving niosomal film could be a promising delivery system to enhance the bioavailability and prolong the therapeutic effect of metoprolol tartrate.

  11. Formulation and Evaluation of Extended- Release Tablet of Zolpidem Tartrate by Wet Granulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Pourhashem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to design and evaluate extended - release system of the hypnotic agent, Zolpidem tartrate usefulness for the treatment of insomnia. The half-life of this drug is about 1.9 - 3 hours that indicating it a candidate for the extended release formulation. Our investigation relates to development of extended drug delivery system based on Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMCK4M as release retardant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP k30 as binder and Magnesium Stearate using Factorial design. In vitro release study of matrix tablets was carried out in 0.01N HCl for 2 hours. All prepared matrix tablets were evaluated for physicochemical evaluation and drug content. The formulation that had release profile according to United State Pharmacopoeia selected for stability study according to ICH guidelines.

  12. Use of partial AUC to demonstrate bioequivalence of Zolpidem Tartrate Extended Release formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Robert A; Raw, Andre S; Kim, Stephanie H; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Lawrence X

    2012-04-01

    FDA's bioequivalence recommendation for Zolpidem Tartrate Extended Release Tablets is the first to use partial AUC (pAUC) metrics for determining bioequivalence of modified-release dosage forms. Modeling and simulation studies were performed to aid in understanding the need for pAUC measures and also the proper pAUC truncation times. Deconvolution techniques, In Vitro/In Vivo Correlations, and the CAT (Compartmental Absorption and Transit) model were used to predict the PK profiles for zolpidem. Models were validated using in-house data submitted to the FDA. Using dissolution profiles expressed by the Weibull model as input for the CAT model, dissolution spaces were derived for simulated test formulations. The AUC(0-1.5) parameter was indicative of IR characteristics of early exposure and effectively distinguished among formulations that produced different pharmacodynamic effects. The AUC(1.5-t) parameter ensured equivalence with respect to the sustained release phase of Ambien CR. The variability of AUC(0-1.5) is higher than other PK parameters, but is reasonable for use in an equivalence test. In addition to the traditional PK parameters of AUCinf and Cmax, AUC(0-1.5) and AUC(1.5-t) are recommended to provide bioequivalence measures with respect to label indications for Ambien CR: onset of sleep and sleep maintenance.

  13. Novel sublingual low-dose zolpidem tablet reduces latency to sleep onset following spontaneous middle-of-the-night awakening in insomnia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, outpatient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Krystal, Andrew; Steinberg, Frank J; Singh, Nikhilesh N; Moline, Margaret

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of 3.5-mg zolpidem tartrate sublingual tablets (ZST) on latency to sleep onset after middle-of-the-night (MOTN) awakenings in patients with insomnia characterized by difficulty returning to sleep after MOTN awakenings. Multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group. Outpatient. There were 295 adults (median age 43 y; 68.1% female) with primary insomnia and difficulty returning to sleep after MOTN awakenings (three or more MOTN awakenings/wk during screening). After a 2-wk, single-blind placebo eligibility period, participants were randomized 1:1 to as-needed MOTN dosing with 3.5 mg ZST or placebo for 28 nights. An interactive voice response system determined if the study drug could be taken and recorded sleep/wake efficacy measures. ZST significantly (P Zolpidem Tartrate Tablet in Adult Patients with Insomnia" http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00466193?spons=%22Transcept+Pharmaceuticals%22&spons_ex=Y&rank=2

  14. High-dose zolpidem dependence - Psychostimulant effects? A case report and literature review

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    Abhijna Chandan Chattopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem, an imidazoline nonbenzodiazepine sedative drug, is used widely. Initial reports showed minimal abuse potential. However, multiple reports have appeared of dose escalation and abuse. Subjective effects of high-dose zolpidem are not known. In light of accumulating evidence of abuse potential, we hereby report a case of high-dose dependence and a review of relevant literature. A 33-year-old male presented with 5 years of daily use of 600–1700 mg of zolpidem tartrate. He reported subjective effects of euphoria, intense craving, and inability to stop use. Loss of receptor specificity, pharmacokinetic factors, and different receptor distributions can explain paradoxical stimulatory effects of high-dose zolpidem. Further studies are required to characterize subjective effects of high-dose zolpidem.

  15. Zolpidem (Ambien): a pediatric case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurta, D L; Myers, L B; Krenzelok, E P

    1997-01-01

    In 1993, the nonbenzodiazepine sedative-hypnotic zolpidem tartrate (Ambien) was approved for use in the US. Zolpidem has an imidazopyridine structure and possesses a rapid onset of action and a short half-life. The toxic threshold and profile have not been well established in the pediatric population. All pediatric zolpidem exposures reported to a regional poison information center over 24 months were reviewed retrospectively from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System data collection forms. Twelve pediatric zolpidem exposures were reported. Seven were unintentional (ages 20 mon-5 y) and five were intentional misuse/suicide (ages 12-16 y). The regional poison information center was contacted within 1 h in ten cases with onset of symptoms within 10 to 60 min (mean 31.6 min). One child had no effect with 2.5 mg. As little as 5 mg caused symptoms with minor outcome in six unintentional ingestions (5-30 mg). Minor to moderate symptoms were reported 1-4 h after intentional ingestions (12.5-150 mg). The duration of symptoms in the unintentional cases ranged from less than 60 min up to 4 h (mean 2.4 h) and 6-10 h (mean 7.5 h) in the intentional exposures. Treatment consisted of observation (4), syrup of ipecac (1), lavage and activated charcoal (1), activated charcoal alone (5), and unknown (1). Due to the very rapid onset of central nervous system symptoms in children, emesis is not a treatment option. Supportive care, activated charcoal in large ingestions, and observation until symptoms resolve may be sufficient in most pediatric cases.

  16. Synthesis of [3H] Zolpidem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.; Parent, G.; Tizot, A.

    1986-01-01

    Zolpidem is a novel hypnotic agent possessing a substituted imidazo [1,2-a] pyridine structure. The synthesis of the tritium labelled compound with a specific activity of 60.5 Ci/mmol is described. This new radioligand was initially used to establish and characterize the binding properties of Zolpidem in the rat brain. (author)

  17. Reversal of diaschisis by zolpidem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, R.P.; Nel, H.W.; Sathekge, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Recent literature has reported on clinical improvement after zolpidem, a GABAergic anti insomnia drug, in brain injury and stroke patients. In this study, the effect of zolpidem on crossed cerebellar diaschisis was investigated in such patients. Method: Four patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis after brain injury or stroke were investigated before and after application of 10 mg zolpidem by 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT. Result: Apart from clinical improvements, 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT studies showed reversal of the crossed cerebellar diaschisis and improvement of perfusion defects after zolpidem. Conclusion: 99mTc HMPAO brain SPECT may have a role to pre-select brain injury and stroke patients who will benefit clinically from zolpidem therapy. (author)

  18. Zolpidem in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Sandip K. Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by motor symptoms, postural instability, personality changes, and cognitive impairment. There is no effective treatment for this disorder. Reduced neurotransmission of GABA in the striatum and globus pallidus may contribute to the symptoms of motor and cognitive symptoms seen in PSP. Zolpidem is a GABA agonist of the benzodiazepine subreceptor BZ1. Here a nondiabetic, normotensive case of PSP is (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy described, which showed improvement in swallowing, speech, and gaze paresis after zolpidem therapy and possible mechanism of actions are discussed. However, more trials are needed with large number of patients to confirm the effectiveness of zolpidem in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  19. Monoid sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Santos, A S; Branco-Ferreira, M; Pregal, A L; Palma-Carlos, M L

    2006-03-01

    Sublingual monoid immunotherapy with monomeric allergoids has been largely used in Europe in the last few years. An open trial of allergoid in tablets has been done in rhinitic patients allergic to house dust mites, grass pollens and Parietaria with clear improvement in clinics and drug consumption scores. In a second phase a double blind placebo controlled trial of grass pollens allergoids have been done in hay fever patients with significant decrease on the scores of rhinorrea, sneezing and conjunctivitis nasal steroid consumption and clinical score after serial nasal challenges. Monomeric allergoids are an efficace and safe immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis.

  20. Aging-driven decomposition in zolpidem hemitartrate hemihydrate and the single-crystal structure of its decomposition products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Daniel R; Baggio, Ricardo; Roca, Mariana; Tombari, Dora

    2011-04-01

    The "aging-driven" decomposition of zolpidem hemitartrate hemihydrate (form A) has been followed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and the crystal and molecular structures of the decomposition products studied by single-crystal methods. The process is very similar to the "thermally driven" one, recently described in the literature for form E (Halasz and Dinnebier. 2010. J Pharm Sci 99(2): 871-874), resulting in a two-phase system: the neutral free base (common to both decomposition processes) and, in the present case, a novel zolpidem tartrate monohydrate, unique to the "aging-driven" decomposition. Our room-temperature single-crystal analysis gives for the free base comparable results as the high-temperature XRPD ones already reported by Halasz and Dinnebier: orthorhombic, Pcba, a = 9.6360(10) Å, b = 18.2690(5) Å, c = 18.4980(11) Å, and V = 3256.4(4) Å(3) . The unreported zolpidem tartrate monohydrate instead crystallizes in monoclinic P21 , which, for comparison purposes, we treated in the nonstandard setting P1121 with a = 20.7582(9) Å, b = 15.2331(5) Å, c = 7.2420(2) Å, γ = 90.826(2)°, and V = 2289.73(14) Å(3) . The structure presents two complete moieties in the asymmetric unit (z = 4, z' = 2). The different phases obtained in both decompositions are readily explained, considering the diverse genesis of both processes. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    To cite this article: Calderón MA, Simons FER, Malling H-J, Lockey RF, Moingeon P, Demoly P. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile. Allergy 2012; 67: 302-311. ABSTRACT: Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses......-presenting cells (mostly Langerhans and myeloid dendritic cells) exhibit a tolerogenic phenotype, despite constant exposure to danger signals from food and microbes. This reduces the induction of pro-inflammatory immune responses leading to systemic allergic reactions. Oral tissues contain relatively few mast...... cells and eosinophils (mostly located in submucosal areas) and, in comparison with subcutaneous tissue, are less likely to give rise to anaphylactic reactions. SLIT-associated immune responses include the induction of circulating, allergen-specific Th1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells, leading to clinical...

  2. Synthesis of (/sup 3/H) Zolpidem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J.; Parent, G.; Tizot, A.

    1986-08-01

    Zolpidem is a novel hypnotic agent possessing a substituted imidazo (1,2-a) pyridine structure. The synthesis of the tritium labelled compound with a specific activity of 60.5 Ci/mmol is described. This new radioligand was initially used to establish and characterize the binding properties of Zolpidem in the rat brain.

  3. An update on zolpidem abuse and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Gérardin, Marie; Rousselet, Morgane; Guerlais, Marylène; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, the health authorities (French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety-ANSM) modified the summary of zolpidem characteristics. Particularly it now includes the sentence "a pharmacodependence may materialize." The current article aims to show that despite this modification, zolpidem continues to be associated with problematic drug use, as the official system (Center for Evaluation and Information on Pharmacodependence-Addictovigilance network) providing information on the abuse and dependence potential of drugs informs us. The authors reviewed the literature on this topic and analyzed French data from zolpidem's postmarketing period that were collected by the Addictovigilance network from 2003 to 2010. Postmarketing data and the 30 case reports yielded from the literature review highlight a significant dependence and abuse potential for zolpidem. This survey led to propose in stronger additional rules in France to try to mitigate the abuse potential of zolpidem.

  4. Sublingual Immunotherapy: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Compalati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of administering sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is gaining more and more diffusion worldwide as a consequence of the robust demonstration of clinical efficacy and safety provided by recent high-powered and well-designed studies, confirming for individual seasonal allergens the results of previous metanalyses in adult and pediatric populations. Preliminary evidence derives from recent rigorous trials on perennial allergens, like house dust mites, and specifically designed studies addressed the benefits on asthma. Emerging research suggests that SLIT may have a future role in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, food, latex and venom allergy. Efforts to develop a safer and more effective SLIT for inhalant allergens have led to the development of allergoids, recombinant allergens and formulations with adjuvants and substances targeting antigens to dendritic cells that possess a crucial role in initiating immune responses. The high degree of variation in the evaluation of clinical effects and immunological changes requires further studies to identify the candidate patients to SLIT and biomarkers of short and long term efficacy. Appropriate management strategies are urgently needed to overcome the barriers to SLIT compliance.

  5. Biopharmaceutical evaluation of transnasal, sublingual, and buccal disk dosage forms of butorphanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, W C; Mayol, R F; Pfeffer, M; Pittman, K A; Gammans, R E; Barbhaiya, R H

    1993-07-01

    A series of three-way crossover randomized studies were conducted to evaluate the absolute bioavailability of butorphanol, a potent agonist-antagonist analgesic, from transnasal, sublingual, and buccal disk formulations in order to identify a practical alternative to oral administration. In each study, healthy male volunteers received 2 mg doses of butorphanol tartrate intravenously and either transnasally, sublingually or buccally. Serial blood samples were collected over 12 h and butorphanol plasma concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The plasma concentration data were subjected to non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The elimination half-life of butorphanol was about 3-5 h and was independent of the route of administration. Absorption of butorphanol following transnasal administration was faster than that observed following sublingual or buccal administration. Mean absolute bioavailabilities of sublingual tablet and buccal disk formulation were only 19 per cent and 29 per cent, respectively, but for transnasal administration the value rose significantly, to 70 per cent. Based on the results of these studies, transnasal dosage form of butorphanol was selected for further clinical trials of treatment of moderate to severe pain.

  6. Tumors of the sublingual gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; Bjørndal, K; Agander, T K

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the salivary glands are a heterogeneous group of diseases most often originating in the major salivary glands. Only a minor proportion of mainly malignant tumors arise in the sublingual gland. Due to the rarity of sublingual gland tumors (SGTs), little is known about the clinicopathologic...... are malignant, most frequently ACC with a high rate of metastatic spread. The diagnostic value of FNAC in SGTs seems inferior to what is found for other major salivary glands. DSS is determined by stage and T-stage and not by histopathological parameters. International collaboration is warranted to confirm...

  7. Buccal and sublingual vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Heleen; Vrieling, Hilde; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Jiskoot, Wim; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-28

    Because of their large surface area and immunological competence, mucosal tissues are attractive administration and target sites for vaccination. An important characteristic of mucosal vaccination is its ability to elicit local immune responses, which act against infection at the site of pathogen entry. However, mucosal surfaces are endowed with potent and sophisticated tolerance mechanisms to prevent the immune system from overreacting to the many environmental antigens. Hence, mucosal vaccination may suppress the immune system instead of induce a protective immune response. Therefore, mucosal adjuvants and/or special antigen delivery systems as well as appropriate dosage forms are required in order to develop potent mucosal vaccines. Whereas oral, nasal and pulmonary vaccine delivery strategies have been described extensively, the sublingual and buccal routes have received considerably less attention. In this review, the characteristics of and approaches for sublingual and buccal vaccine delivery are described and compared with other mucosal vaccine delivery sites. We discuss recent progress and highlight promising developments in the search for vaccine formulations, including adjuvants and suitable dosage forms, which are likely critical for designing a successful sublingual or buccal vaccine. Finally, we outline the challenges, hurdles to overcome and formulation issues relevant for sublingual or buccal vaccine delivery. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Zolpidem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm089833.pdf) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication ... in the hands, arms, feet, or legs unusual dreams redness, burning, or tingling of the tongue (with ...

  9. Sublingual piroxicam in migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, K; Tayade, Himanshu; Mandlik, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of a single dose of sublingual piroxicam to that of a placebo during acute attacks of migraine without aura. The drug (N = 30) or a placebo (N = 30) was administered, on randomisation and double-blind basis, to 60 patients between 18 and 50 years of age suffering from migraine without aura. The patients were instructed to take a single tablet sublingually [corresponding to piroxicam 40 mg or placebo] and the severity of the painful symptomatology and associated symptoms were evaluated by this study. The patients treated with sublingual piroxicam showed a significant (P piroxicam administration. In 83.3%, the drug resulted in excellent to good response as compared to only 10% in the placebo group. No local and systemic side effects were reported with sublingual piroxicam. The present study has demonstrated that for the acute management of migraine without aura sublingual piroxicam showed significant analgesic effect with excellent tolerability.

  10. Synthesis of (/sup 14/C)Zolpidem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J.; Tizot, A.

    1986-04-01

    The synthesis of (/sup 14/C)Zolpidem, a new hypnotic agent having a non-benzodiazepine structure, is described. This compound was synthesised in a 64% overall radiochemical yield from potassium (/sup 14/C)cyanide and with a specific radioactivity of 56 mCi/mmol. It was used for pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism studies.

  11. Synthesis of [14C]Zolpidem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.; Tizot, A.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of [ 14 C]Zolpidem, a new hypnotic agent having a non-benzodiazepine structure, is described. This compound was synthesised in a 64% overall radiochemical yield from potassium [ 14 C]cyanide and with a specific radioactivity of 56 mCi/mmol. It was used for pharmacokinetic and drug metabolism studies. (author)

  12. Zolpidem and traffic safety - the importance of treatment compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verster, Joris C; Volkerts, Edmund R; Olivier, Berend; Johnson, William; Liddicoat, Laura

    2007-09-01

    Zolpidem is among the most frequently prescribed hypnotic drugs for those who suffer from insomnia. Recent media reports drew attention to driving impairment after zolpidem misuse. This review summarizes the available data on the effects of recommended use and misuse of zolpidem on driving ability and traffic safety. Both experimental studies and roadside evidence were taken into account. From these studies it must be concluded that patients should fully comply with the prescription instructions of zolpidem, i.e. to take the medication just prior to a full 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep. If this strategy is adopted, zolpidem is a safe alternative to benzodiazpine hypnotics and zopiclone who do show significant driving impairment the morning following bedtime administration. However, to ensure traffic safety higher dosages than recommended (10 mg) or allowing less than 8 hours between zolpidem intake and actual operation of a motor vehicle should be avoided.

  13. Dielectric behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dielectric loss (tan δ) as functions of frequency and temperature. Ion core type ... Since the data on dielectric properties of strontium tartrate trihydrate (STT) do not ... through 'AE' make 15-amp dimmerstat, the rate of heating was maintained ...

  14. 21 CFR 556.425 - Morantel tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Morantel tartrate. 556.425 Section 556.425 Food... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.425 Morantel tartrate. A tolerance of 0.7 part per million is established for N-methyl-1,3-propanediamine (MAPA, marker residue) in the liver (target tissue) of...

  15. Urine specimen detection of zolpidem use in patients with pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Lindsey M; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M; Morello, Candis M; Ma, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined zolpidem and concurrent opioid, benzodiazepine, other central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and alcohol use. Urine specimens were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Specimens were tested for zolpidem (n = 71,919) and separated into a provider-reported medication list documenting (n = 5,257) or not documenting zolpidem use (n = 66,662). Zolpidem-positive specimens were further separated into reported and unreported use cohorts. The total number of zolpidem-positive specimens in the reported and unreported use cohorts was 3,391 and 3,190, respectively. Non-informed prescribers were 4.4% (3,190/71,919) among the general population and 48.5% (3,190/6,581) when only zolpidem users were considered. In the zolpidem user population, the most common concurrent opioids in both cohorts were hydrocodone and oxycodone. Alprazolam and clonazepam were higher in the unreported use cohort (P ≤ 0.05). The unreported use cohort also had a higher detection of zolpidem plus a benzodiazepine (49.7 vs. 46%; P ≤ 0.05), zolpidem plus an opioid and a benzodiazepine (40.8% vs. 37.4%; P ≤ 0.05) and zolpidem plus an opioid, a benzodiazepine, and an other CNS depressant (12.9 vs. 10.9%; P ≤ 0.05). Concurrent use of zolpidem, an opioid, a benzodiazepine and an other CNS depressant is prevalent in a pain patient population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Evidence for zolpidem efficacy in brain damage | Clauss | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous reports have shown that zolpidem could reverse semi-coma and improve cerebral perfusion after brain injury. Studies in animals have implicated omega 1 GABAergic action as reason for this improvement. Evidence for the efficacy of zolpidem in a wide range of brain pathology is reviewed here and the mechanism ...

  17. Zolpidem as a Sleep Aid for Military Aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Kew, Guan; See, Brian

    2018-04-01

    Zolpidem is a short-acting nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic that has been approved by the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) for aircrew sleep management since 2005. Prior to consuming zolpidem for operational reasons, each RSAF aircrew member is required to undergo a ground test to exclude operationally relevant adverse drug effects. This study describes the RSAF's zolpidem ground testing outcomes over a 12.5-yr period. This is a retrospective case series of 578 RSAF aircrew members who underwent zolpidem test dosing from 1 January 2005 to 30 June 2017. The median age was 29 yr (range, 19-54 yr) and the mean age was 30.1 yr ± 6.3 yr. Of the aircrew members, 568 (98.3%) were men and all were of Asian origin; 558 (96.5%) were medically cleared for the operational use of zolpidem. Among the 20 (3.5%) who failed zolpidem ground testing, next-day drowsiness (cumulative incidence, 1.04%), headache (cumulative incidence, 0.87%), and dizziness (cumulative incidence, 0.35%) were the most common causes of failure. None of the aircrew members reported abnormal sleep behaviors or major adverse drug events from zolpidem ingestion. Our results suggest a low occurrence of adverse effects among military aircrew members who undergo zolpidem test dosing prior to using the drug operationally. To our knowledge, this is the single largest published case series of zolpidem ground testing outcomes among Asian military aviators.Kew GS, See B. Zolpidem as a sleep aid for military aviators. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(4):406-408.

  18. Diastereoselectivity in scalemic tartrate/titanium epoxidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J M; Leppard, S J; Oakes, J; Thornthwaite, D

    2000-06-01

    Nonlinearity in the diastereoselectivity of epoxidation of allylic alcohols with mixtures of titanium isopropoxide, tertbutyl hydroperoxide, and diethyl tartrate was observed. Racemic and enantiomerically pure alcohols E-2-methyl-4-hexen-3-ol and E-1-methoxy-5-(O-tertbutyldimethylsilyloxy)-2-penten-4-ol were prepared. Epoxidation reactions were carried out with Ti(OPri)4 and ButOOH accompanied by diethyl tartrate of varying enantiomeric purity. The simplest explanation of these results is that a dimeric epoxidation reagent is involved, with significantly different reactivity for the homochiral and racemic forms. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Tinnitus after administration of sublingual immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    , for example, itching, swelling, irritation, ulceration of the oropharynx and nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and vomiting. More severe side effects are dominated by systemic and respiratory tract manifestations. RESULTS: In this clinical case, the author reports a right-sided transient tinnitus lasting...... for 48 h after administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. CONCLUSIONS: This case provide important insights for clinical practice, as tinnitus has not been previously reported as a side effect of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite allergens....

  20. Intractable nausea caused by zolpidem withdrawal: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Edward; Vernon, Leonard F; Hasbun, Rafael J

    2007-03-01

    First launched in France in 1988, zolpidem (Ambien®) is a short-acting hypnotic agent. Early studies reported that that the development of physical dependence and tolerance to sedative-hypnotic drugs, such as the depressant and anticonvulsant effects evidenced with benzodiazepines, is not found with zolpidem. Direct to consumer advertising by the manufacturer continues to state that the risk for dependency is low; however, recent publications seem to contradict this. Additionally, adverse drug reactions affecting the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory system have been reported. Other studies have examined the interactions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and zolpidem as a possible cause of hallucinations. With continued physician marketing efforts touting the safety and efficacy of zolpidem, there is a high likelihood to overlook the risk of dependency and the symptoms related to zolpidem withdrawal. We report a case of a 41-year-old female who developed a dependency to zolpidem, who on her own decided to decrease her dosage, resulting in intractable nausea requiring hospitalization. Reported cases of zolpidem withdrawal have occurred with doses in excess of 160 mg per day, none of these have reported with intractable nausea as the sole symptom. In our reported case, although exceeding recommended dosage withdrawal phenomenon seemed to be severe after withdrawal from a comparatively low dose of zolpidem. Before zolpidem is prescribed, patient education should include warnings about the potential problems associated with dependency and abrupt discontinuation. Education about this common and likely underrecognized clinical phenomenon will help prevent future episodes and minimize the risk of misdiagnosis.

  1. Zolpidem Overdose: A Medical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, Waqas; Beatrice, Cristina; Abazid, Ahmad G

    Acute altered mental status can be caused by a broad range of etiologies, including cerebrovascular, neurologic, traumatic, metabolic, infectious, psychiatric, medications, etc. We present a case of a 53-year-old healthcare professional with an acute altered mental status after a trip to Africa. The patient was extensively worked up for infectious, cardiovascular, and neurologic etiologies, and all results were within normal limits. Further history revealed an overdose of a self-medicated hypnotic (zolpidem) for insomnia. The patient was conservatively managed and discharged on trazadone for insomnia.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1801 - Sodium tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium tartrate. 184.1801 Section 184.1801 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... crystals. It is obtained as a byproduct of wine manufacture. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of...

  3. Zolpidem Overdose: A Dilemma in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    Sleeping pills are one of the most common drugs taken by adults when afflicted by insomnia. Adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, however, should not be overlooked, and monitoring is needed to check for an overdose of sleeping pills. We reviewed zolpidem overdose and patient suicide with benefits and disadvantages of pharmacotherapy. Cases of adverse effects concerning the central nervous system, including delirium and hallucination, as well as abnormal behavior during sleep, are commonly reported among patients who have taken zolpidem for more than 1 year. The serious problem of long-term prescription to medication can lead to a higher mortality rate of insomniac patients. An alternative to medication for treating insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy, which can improve sleeping habits. Cognitive behavioral therapy induces patients to recognize and change the negative thoughts that affect their sleep. Medical providers should be aware of the adverse effects of sleep inducers and provide sufficient information to their patients about them. When establishing treatment plans, they should encourage patients to make the proper decisions and try to reduce the adverse effects of any medication as much as possible.

  4. Central nervous system side effects associated with zolpidem treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, L C; Tsambiras, B M; Catalano, G; Catalano, M C; Cooper, D S

    2000-01-01

    Zolpidem is one of the newer medications developed for the treatment of insomnia. It is an imidazopyridine agent that is an alternative to the typical sedative-hypnotic agents. Zolpidem use is gaining favor because of its efficacy and its side effect profile, which is milder and less problematic than that of the benzodiazepines and barbiturates used to treat insomnia. Still, side effects are not uncommon with zolpidem use. We report a series of cases in which the patients developed delirium, nightmares and hallucinations during treatment with zolpidem. We will review its pharmacology, discuss previous reports of central nervous system side effects, examine the impact of drug interactions with concurrent use of antidepressants, examine gender differences in susceptibility to side effects, and explore the significance of protein binding in producing side effects.

  5. A Case with Improvement of Blepharospasm by Zolpidem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munkyung Sunwoo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem is usually used for the treatment of insomnia as a hypnotic drug. It was also suggested to be effective in the treatment of dystonia in some studies. A 74-year-old woman had been suffering from frequent and intense bilateral spasms of the eyelids for 20 years. She has been treated with botulinum toxin injection and taken some medications. But, she experienced a little effect and was not satisfied with those treatments. Her symptom was improved after taking Zolpidem which had been prescribed for insomnia by her primary physician. She did not show any improvement after placebo injection and neostigmine test. This is the first report which shows improvement of isolated blepharospasm by Zolpidem in Korea. Zolpidem can be one of useful alternative pharmacological treatments for blepharospasm. Further randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled studies are needed to validate this finding.

  6. Extraordinary arousal from semi-comatose state on zolpidem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    propylene amine oxime (99mTc HMPAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECf) before and after administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist zolpidem. It was observed that 15 minutes after application ...

  7. [Inhibitory mechanism of ifenprodil tartrate on rabbit platelet aggregation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irino, O; Saitoh, K; Hayashi, T; Ohkubo, K

    1985-05-01

    The effects of dl-erythro-4-benzyl-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-l-piperidine-eth anol tartrate (ifenprodil tartrate) on rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo were studied. Ifenprodil tartrate inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro induced by ADP, collagen and epinephrine. It also inhibited 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake into platelets and 5-HT release from platelets. Since these inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on the functions of rabbit platelets were similar to the effects of imipramine, the effects of ifenprodil tartrate may be due to the stabilizing action of ifenprodil tartrate on the platelet membrane. The platelet aggregation by ADP was significantly inhibited in rabbits after oral administration of ifenprodil tartrate, the maximal plasma level of ifenprodil being reached at 20 ng/ml ex vivo, while the maximal level was only 1/40 of the minimal concentration of ifenprodil tartrate necessary to inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro. These results indicate that factors other than ifenprodil tartrate acting directly on the platelets (e.g., PGI2 which is an endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation) are involved in inducing the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation ex vivo. The effects of ifenprodil tartrate on both PGI2 release from the aorta and the inhibitory effects of PGI2 on platelet aggregation in vitro were investigated: PGI2 was found to intensify the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation in vitro, but there was little effect, if any, on PGI2 release. Therefore, it is considered that the ex vivo effects of ifenprodil tartrate might be due to its interaction with endogenous PGI2 in the blood.

  8. Flumazenil antagonizes the central effects of zolpidem, an imidazopyridine hypnotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, A; Naef, M M; van Gessel, E; Forster, A; Dubruc, C; Rosenzweig, P

    1994-10-01

    Zolpidem is a new imidazopyridine-hypnotic that selectively binds to the central omega 1-receptor subtype. A double-blind, randomized, three-way, crossover placebo-controlled study was carried out in nine healthy male volunteers to assess the possible antagonism of central nervous system--depressant effects of zolpidem by flumazenil. Subjects received zolpidem (0.21 mg/kg) or placebo, intravenously, followed 17 minutes later by flumazenil (0.04 mg/kg) or placebo. Vigilance and performance were assessed by a trained anesthetist with use of ciliary reflex, response to a verbal instruction, subjective sedation, a tracking task, and a free recall task. Zolpidem produced a clinically relevant hypnotic effect in five subjects and significantly impaired performance in all nine subjects up to 90 minutes after dosing. Flumazenil rapidly antagonized clinical sedation in the five subjects who were asleep and significantly reversed the performance decrement within 3 minutes, without any escape phenomenon. Flumazenil did not change zolpidem plasma concentrations, confirming the pharmacodynamic nature of the interaction. Flumazenil may thus be a safe and effective antidote in patients with zolpidem overdosage.

  9. Metabolic Changes Underlying Bold Signal Variations after Administration of Zolpidem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rojas, Rafael; Machado, Calixto; Alvarez, Lazaro; Carballo, Maylen; Perez-Nellar, Jesus; Estevez, Mario; Pavon, Nancy; Chinchilla, Mauricio

    2010-12-01

    Zolpidem is a non-benzodiazepine drug belonging to the imidazopiridine class, which has selectivity for stimulating the effect of gamma aminobutyric acid [GABA] and is used for the therapy of insomnia. Nonetheless, several reports have been published over recent years about a paradoxical arousing effect of Zolpidem in patients with severe brain damage. We studied a PVS case using 1 H-MRS and BOLD signal, before and after Zolpidem administration. Significantly increased BOLD signal was localized in left frontal superior cortex, bilateral cingulated areas, left thalamus and right head of the caudate nucleus. A transient activation was observed in frontal cortex, comprising portions of anterior cingulate, medial, and orbito-frontal cortices. Additionally, significant pharmacological activation in sensory-motor cortex is observed 1 hour after Zolpidem intake. Significant linear correlations of BOLD signal changes were found with primary concentrations of NAA, Glx and Lac in the right frontal cortex. We discussed that when Zolpidem attaches to the modified GABA receptors of the neurodormant cells, dormancy is switched off, inducing brain activation. This might explain the significant correlations of BOLD signal changes and 1 H-MRS metabolites in our patient. We concluded that 1 H-MRS and BOLD signal assessment might contribute to study neurovascular coupling in PVS cases after Zolpidem administration. Although this is a report of a single case, considering our results we recommend to apply this methodology in series of PVS and MCS patients. (author)

  10. High resolution sonography of sublingual space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ultrasound examination of the sublingual region is a non-invasive, safe, inexpensive and widely available procedure, unaffected by the amalgam in teeth which is a source of considerable artefact on CT and MRI images. With a little practice and good understanding of the anatomy, ultrasound can be a very helpful primary examination. If the lesion is clearly seen, no further imaging may be required.

  11. Insomnia: clinical experience with zolpidem (sanval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov Iosifovich Levin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the present view of the problem of insomnia and gives a classification of sleep disorders and basic methods for their drug and non-drug therapy. Emphasis is placed on the role of the objective sleep study - polysomnography. The use of the current hypnotics belonging to a three Zs group and the minimization of administration of benzodiazepines are most important in pharmacotherapy for insomnia. The results of a clinical polysomnographic study of the effect of Zolpidem (Sanval in patients with insomnia are presented. The subjective evaluation of the beneficial effect of a 10-day course of Sanval is confirmed by the objective studies of the sleep pattern undergoing positive changes in the most important indicators, such as the process of falling asleep, the time of intrasleep awakenings, and the duration of Δ-sleep. The high safety and good tolerability of Sanval permit the latter to be assessed as an effective agent for the treatment of insomnia.

  12. Dystonic Dysarthria in Wilson Disease: Efficacy of Zolpidem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Poujois

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson disease (WD is a rare genetic disorder characterized by copper overload in the liver and the brain. Neurological presentations are mainly related to the accumulation of copper in the basal ganglia, the brainstem, and the cerebellum. Dysarthria is a frequent symptom, with dystonic, spastic, or parkinsonian components and is usually resistant to medical or voice rehabilitation therapies. Here, we report the case of a patient with WD diagnosed at the age of 12, who presented a severe and constant dysarthria from dystonic origin which was unresponsive to benzodiazepines and anticholinergic drugs. When she was 25-year-old, she tried zolpidem at bedtime for sleeping difficulties and reported a paradoxical effect of this drug on her voice. To confirm the effect of zolpidem on her dystonic dysarthria, we realized a full evaluation of her dysarthria at baseline without zolpidem and after 4 days of treatment by 10 mg twice a day. Lexical access was evaluated by the semantic fluency; dysarthria by the Intelligibility Score, the spontaneous speech and reading rates, the maximum phonation time on the sustained vowel [a] and by a perceptive evaluation. Two hours after the intake of zolpidem, improvement of all the parameters tested, with the exception of the maximum phonation time, was observed. Semantic fluency increased by 59%, the spontaneous speech rate by 88% and the reading rate by 76%. General dystonia remained unchanged and the tolerance of zolpidem was satisfactory. Since then, the patient takes zolpidem 5 mg five times a day, and 4 years later shows persistent improvement in oral communication and a good drug tolerance. In this single-case study, we showed that regular daytime intake of zolpidem could have a persisting effect on a complex dystonic dysarthria that was resistant to usual medical treatments.

  13. The antinociceptive effect of zolpidem and zopiclone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Chaim G; Chernes, Yakov; Rigai, Tova; Rice, Kenner C; Schreiber, Shaul

    2005-07-01

    Zolpidem and zopiclone are two of a newer hypno-sedative class of drugs, the "Z compounds". Their use for the treatment of short-term insomnia has been expanding constantly during the last two decades. The "Z compounds" are considered to cause less significant rebound insomnia or tolerance than the conventional hypnotic benzodiazepines. Their possible antinociceptive effect and interaction with the opioid system has not been studied yet. Our results demonstrate a significant difference between the antinociceptive properties of zopiclone and zolpidem when injected s.c. in the hotplate analgesic assay in mice. Zopiclone induced a weak, dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized only by the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine. Zolpidem induced a weak, biphasic dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized primarily by the non-selective opioid antagonist naloxone and by yohimbine. The weak antinociceptive effect of both drugs, evident only at very high doses (far beyond those used clinically to induce sleep), implies no clinical use for zopiclone or zolpidem in the management of pain. However, the possible interaction of zolpidem with the opioid system should be further investigated (in behavioral models, which do not overlap with the acute-pain antinociception model we used), both for possible side effects in special populations (i.e. elderly) and for possible drug-drug interactions, in order to minimize possible hazards and maximize clinical beneficial effects of its use for sleep.

  14. The paradox of caffeine-zolpidem interaction: a network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myslobodsky, Michael

    2009-10-01

    A widely prescribed and potent short-acting hypnotic, zolpidem has become the mainstay for the treatment of middle-of-the-night sleeplessness. It is expected to be antagonized by caffeine. Paradoxically, in some cases caffeine appears to slightly enhance zolpidem sedation. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic nature of this odd effect remains unexplored. The purpose of this study is to reproduce a hypothetical molecular network recruited by caffeine when co-administered with zolpidem using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Thus generated, network drew attention to several possible contributors to caffeine sedation, such as tachykinin precursor 1, cannabinoid, and GABA receptors. The present overview is centered on the possibility that caffeine potentiation of zolpidem sedation does not involve a centralized interaction of specific neurotransmitters, but rather is contributed by its antioxidant capacity. It is proposed that by modifying the cellular redox state, caffeine ultimately reduces the pool of reactive oxygen species, thereby increasing the bioavailability of endogenous melatonin for interaction with zolpidem. This side effect of caffeine encourages further studies of multiple antioxidants as an attractive way to potentially increasing somnolence.

  15. Local immunological mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija

    2011-12-01

    To summarize novel insights into the immunological mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Within the recent decades, several alternative noninvasive allergen application strategies have been investigated in allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT), of which intra-oral allergen application to sublingual mucosa has been proven to be well tolerated and effective. To date, SLIT is widely accepted by most allergists as an alternative option to conventional subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). Although detailed immunological mechanisms remain to be elucidated, much scientific effort has been made to shed some light on local and systemic immunological responses to SLIT in mice as well as humans. Only a few studies focused on the detailed mechanisms following allergen application to the oral mucosa as part of the sophisticated mucosal immunological network. Within this network, the pro-tolerogenic properties of local antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells - which are able to enforce tolerogenic mechanisms and to induce T-cell immune responses - play a central role. Further on, basic research focused not only on the immune response in nasal and bronchial mucosa but also on the systemic T-cell immune response. Thus, much exiting data have been published providing a better understanding of immunological features of SLIT but far more investigations are necessary to uncover further exciting details on the key mechanisms of SLIT.

  16. Association between zolpidem use and glaucoma risk: a Taiwanese population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Hao; Chang, Yue-Cune; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Che-Chen; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    To date, the relationship between zolpidem use and subsequent risk of glaucoma in a Taiwanese population has not been assessed. We used data from the National Health Insurance system to investigate whether zolpidem use was related to glaucoma risk. A 1:4 matched case-control study was conducted. The cases were patients newly diagnosed with glaucoma from 2001 to 2010. The controls were randomly selected non-glaucoma subjects matched by sex and age (± 5 years). Zolpidem exposure and/or the average dosage of zolpidem used (mg/year) were evaluated. Medical comorbidities were considered as confounding factors. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the potential risk of zolpidem exposure on glaucoma with/without adjustment for the effects of confounding variables. The exposure rate of zolpidem use in the glaucoma group was significantly higher than that of the control group (2.8% vs. 2.0%, P zolpidem use vs. those without was 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.38). Compared to non-zolpidem users, zolpidem users with an average dose of more than 200 mg/year had significantly increased risk of glaucoma (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.03-1.68). This study suggests that the use of zolpidem might increase the risk of subsequent glaucoma. Further confirmatory studies are recommended to clarify this important issue.

  17. Zolpidem Administration and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Lai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Previous studies showed that zolpidem use could be associated with increased cancer risk, but the role of zolpidem on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC risk remains undetermined. The study purpose was to examine the association between HCC risk and zolpidem use in Taiwan.Methods: Using the database from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we designed a case-control study which consisted of 77986 subjects aged 20 years or older with newly diagnosed HCC as the case group, and 77986 subjects without HCC as the control group, from 2000 to 2011. Ever use of zolpidem was defined as a subject who had at least a prescription for zolpidem before the index date. Never use was defined as a subject who did not have a prescription for zolpidem before the index date. The association between HCC risk and zolpidem use was determined by the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI in a multivariable logistic regression model.Results: After adjustment for confounding factors, the adjusted OR of HCC was 1.05 (95% CI 0.97, 1.13 for subjects with ever use of zolpidem, compared with never use of zolpidem. The adjusted OR of HCC was 1.01 for subjects with increasing cumulative duration of zolpidem use for every 1 year (95% CI 0.99, 1.03, compared with never use of zolpidem.Conclusion: There is no significant association between HCC risk and zolpidem use. There is no duration-dependent effect of zolpidem use on HCC risk.

  18. Zolpidem efficacy and safety in disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Calixto; Estévez, Mario; Rodriguez-Rojas, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Sutton and Clauss presented a detailed review about the effectiveness of zolpidem, discussing recoveries from brain damage due to strokes, trauma and hypoxia. A significant finding has been the unexpected and paradoxical increment of brain activity in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS). On the contrary, zolpidem is considered one of the best sleep inducers in normal subjects. We have studied series of VS/UWS cases after zolpidem intake. We have demonstrated EEG activation, increment of BOLD signal in different brain regions, and an autonomic influence, mainly characterized by a vagolytic chronotropic effect without a significant increment of the vasomotor sympathetic tone. As this autonomic imbalance might induce cardio- circulatory complications, which we didn't find in any of our patients, we suggest developing future trials under control of physiological indices by bedside monitoring. However, considering that the paradoxical arousing zolpidem effect might be certainly related to brain function improvement, we agree with Sutton and Clauss that future multicentre and multinational clinical trials should be developed, but under control of physiological indices.

  19. Efficacy of zolpidem for dystonia: a study among different subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimichi eMiyazaki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there are some newly-developed options to treat dystonia, its medical treatment is not always satisfactory. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine agonist with a high affinity on benzodiazepine subtype receptor BZ1(ω1 , was found to improve clinical symptoms of dystonia in a limited number of case reports. To investigate what subtype of dystonia is responsive to the therapy, we conducted an open label study to assess the efficacy of zolpidem (5-20mg in 34 patients suffering from miscellaneous types of dystonia using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS. Patients were entered into the study if they had been refractory to other medications as evaluated by BFMDRS (no change in the previous 2 successive visits. After zolpidem therapy, the scores in the patients as a whole were decreased from 7.2±7.9 to 5.5±5.0 (P=0.042. Patients with generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome/blepharospasm, and hand dystonia improved in the scale by 27.8%, 17.8% and 31.0%, respectively, whereas no improvement was found in cervical dystonia patients. Overall response rate among patients were comparable to that of trihexyphenidyl. Zolpidem may be a therapeutic option for generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome and hand dystonia including musician’s. Drowsiness was the dose-limiting factor.

  20. Efficacy of Zolpidem for Dystonia: A Study Among Different Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Sako, Wataru; Asanuma, Kotaro; Izumi, Yuishin; Miki, Tetsuro; Kaji, Ryuji

    2012-01-01

    Although there are some newly developed options to treat dystonia, its medical treatment is not always satisfactory. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine agonist with a high affinity on benzodiazepine subtype receptor BZ1 (ω1), was found to improve clinical symptoms of dystonia in a limited number of case reports. To investigate what subtype of dystonia is responsive to the therapy, we conducted an open label study to assess the efficacy of zolpidem (5–20 mg) in 34 patients suffering from miscellaneous types of dystonia using the Burke–Fahn–Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). Patients were entered into the study if they had been refractory to other medications as evaluated by BFMDRS (no change in the previous two successive visits). After zolpidem therapy, the scores in the patients as a whole were decreased from 7.2 ± 7.9 to 5.5 ± 5.0 (P = 0.042). Patients with generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome/blepharospasm, and hand dystonia improved in the scale by 27.8, 17.8, and 31.0%, respectively, whereas no improvement was found in cervical dystonia patients. Overall response rate among patients were comparable to that of trihexyphenidyl. Zolpidem may be a therapeutic option for generalized dystonia, Meige syndrome, and hand dystonia including musician’s. Drowsiness was the dose-limiting factor. PMID:22529836

  1. CT features of invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yi; Xiao Jiahe; Zhou Xiangping; Deng Kaihong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT features of the invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors in order to provide more accurate information for clinical treatment. Methods: Fifty-eight cases of pathologically proven malignant oropharyngeal tumors were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among all the cases, invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors could be seen in 14 cases, of which, 7 cases got access to sublingual space through tongue base, 3 cases through parapharyngeal space, 2 cases through pterygomandibular raphe, 2 cases through uncertain routes. Invasion of sublingual space manifested on CT scan as obliteration of fat plane in sublingual space and involvement of the sublingual vessels in the space. Conclusion: Malignant oropharyngeal tumors can invade the adjacent sublingual space via tongue base, pterygomandibular raphe, and parapharyngeal space. The invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors manifests in CT as effacement of sublingual fat plane and envelopment of hyoid artery

  2. Effects of zolpidem on sleep architecture, night time ventilation, daytime vigilance and performance in heavy snorers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quera-Salva, M A; McCann, C; Boudet, J; Frisk, M; Borderies, P; Meyer, P

    1994-01-01

    1. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo controlled trial, zolpidem 10 mg, a new imidazopyridine hypnotic drug, was administered in a single dose to 10 healthy non-obese heavy snorers. 2. Nocturnal polysomnography showed that zolpidem increased total sleep time, sleep efficiency and the percentage of stage 2. 3. Respiratory monitoring showed that zolpidem did not modify the percentage of total sleep time spent snoring. The percentages of total sleep time with a SaO2 < 4% of the baseline value and with a SaO2 < 90% and the mean SaO2 were also unchanged with zolpidem. The respiratory disturbance index was modestly increased by zolpidem although in all but one subject it remained < 5 with both treatments. 4. Zolpidem intake did not impair daytime vigilance and performance evaluated the day after. PMID:7917771

  3. [Treatment of small and sublingual salivary glands cysts by laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, V V; Vybornov, V V; Malinovskiĭ, I Iu

    2011-01-01

    The differents variants of treatment of retention cysts of mucous membrane of oral cavity and sublingual salivary gland cysts were presented and analysed. Results of doppler examination as a method of research blood microcirculation in postoperation time were presented.

  4. Development of nanoparticle based delivery systems for sublingual immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alija, Hava; Rask, Carola; Brimnes, Jens

    The prevalence of IgE mediated allergic diseases is increasing dramatically in industrialized countries. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been demonstrated to be a safe and efficacious treatment for IgE mediated allergic diseases, but requires protracted treatment duration. Even though SLIT...... (OVA)-induced allergic airway inflammation model for their ability to improve immune tolerance induction of ovalbumin (protein and peptide) when delivered sublingually. In the liposome study, mice were treated sublingually during two weeks with free or liposome encapsulated OVA (OVA-liposomes) followed...... by intraperitoneal injections and intranasal challenge. Mice treated sublingually with OVA-liposomes showed a significant reduction of airway eosinophilia, OVA-specific IgE antibodies and splenocyte proliferation in comparison to free OVA. In addition, reduced levels of IFN-ɣ and IL-5 were observed in spleen cell...

  5. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  6. Synthesis and characterization of gel-grown cobalt tartrate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... in electronics, optics and industries. A series of pure and mixed crystals ... bility method. A few researchers reported the growth of crystals of strontium tartrate ... grow it by chemical reaction method using the gel technique. The crystallization ...

  7. Patterns of zolpidem use among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans: A retrospective cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuan, Megan E.; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Eapen, Blessen C.

    2018-01-01

    Background Although concern exists regarding the adverse effects and rate of zolpidem use, especially long-term use, limited information is available concerning patterns of zolpidem use. Objective To examine the prevalence and correlates of zolpidem exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans (IAVs). Methods A retrospective cohort study of zolpidem prescriptions was performed with National Veterans Health Administration (VHA) data. We gathered national VA inpatient, outpatient, and pharmacy data files for IAV’s who received VA care between fiscal years (FY) 2013 and 2014. The VA pharmacy database was used to identify the prevalence of long term (>30 days), high-dose zolpidem exposure (>10mg immediate-release; >12.5mg extended-release) and other medications received in FY14. Baseline characteristics (demographics, diagnoses) were identified in FY13. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to examine the demographic, clinical, and medication correlates of zolpidem use. Results Of 493,683 IAVs who received VHA care in FY 2013 and 2014, 7.6% (n = 37,422) were prescribed zolpidem in FY 2014. Women had lower odds of high-dose zolpidem exposure than men. The majority (77.3%) of IAVs who received zolpidem prescriptions had long-term use with an average days’ supply of 189.3 days and a minority (0.9%) had high-dose exposure. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with long-term zolpidem exposure included age greater than 29 years old, PTSD, insomnia, Selim Index, physical 2–3 conditions, opioids, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, atypical antipsychotics, and stimulants. High dose exposure was associated with PTSD, depression, substance use disorder, insomnia, benzodiazepines, atypical antipsychotics, and stimulant prescriptions. Conclusion The current practices of insomnia pharmacotherapy in IAVs fall short of the clinical guidelines and may reflect high-risk zolpidem prescribing practices that put Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans at risk for adverse effects

  8. Association Between Zolpidem Use and Glaucoma Risk: A Taiwanese Population-Based Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Yi-Hao; Chang, Yue-Cune; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Che-Chen; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, the relationship between zolpidem use and subsequent risk of glaucoma in a Taiwanese population has not been assessed. Methods We used data from the National Health Insurance system to investigate whether zolpidem use was related to glaucoma risk. A 1:4 matched case-control study was conducted. The cases were patients newly diagnosed with glaucoma from 2001 to 2010. The controls were randomly selected non-glaucoma subjects matched by sex and age (?5 years). Zolpidem exposu...

  9. Molecular studies on di-sodium tartrate molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, P.; Jayakumar, S.; George, Preethamary; Shubashree, N. S.; Ahmed. M, Anees

    2015-06-01

    Structural characterization is important for the development of new material. The acoustical parameters such as Free Length, Internal Pressure have been measured from ultrasonic velocity, density for di sodium tartrate an optically active molecule at different temperatures using ultrasonic interferometer of frequency (2MHZ). The ultrasonic velocity increases with increase in concentration there is an increase in solute-solvent interaction. The stability constant had been calculated. SEM with EDAX studies has been done for Di-sodium tartrate an optically active molecule.

  10. Analysis of zolpidem in postmortem fluids and tissues using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine sedative hypnotic drug used for the short-term treatment of insomnia. Its : use is common and wide-spread. While quite effective in producing sedation, zolpidem has potentially : hazardous side effects when put in the ...

  11. Pediatric zolpidem ingestion demonstrating zero-order kinetics treated with flumazenil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen L; Negus, Elezer; Carstairs, Shaun D

    2013-11-01

    Zolpidem is a widely prescribed anti-insomnia agent. Although most pediatric zolpidem ingestions are benign, large ingestions can cause significant central nervous system (CNS) depression. Flumazenil has been reported to reverse the CNS effects of zolpidem. We describe a case of a large pediatric zolpidem ingestion resulting in profound CNS depression that responded to flumazenil administration. Serial zolpidem serum levels confirmed the ingestion. A 10-year-old boy with trisomy 21 presented to the emergency department 1 hour after he was found sedate with several zolpidem 5-mg tablets in his mouth. Seventeen tables (85 mg) were unaccounted for from a prescription bottle. He became unarousable approximately 2 hours after his ingestion. Flumazenil 0.2 mg intravenously was given with rapid return to his baseline mental status. He became resedate 1 hour later but was arousable. Sixteen hours after his presentation, he was asymptomatic. Serial zolpidem serum levels were obtained, showed an initial level of 310 ng/mL, and demonstrated zero-order kinetics. Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine, which binds to the benzodiazepine receptor. It is rapidly absorbed and has a short-half life. Unintentional pediatric ingestions of zolpidem are typically well tolerated. However, this case demonstrates that large ingestions may cause significant and prolonged CNS depression. Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, has been described to reverse the effects of zolpidem in adult ingestions. There are few published reports describing flumazenil use in pediatric ingestion patients. This case suggests that flumazenil may be an effective treatment for zolpidem-induced CNS depression in the pediatric patient.

  12. Enhanced efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy by liposome-mediated delivery of allergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aliu, Have; Rask, Carola; Brimnes, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy by sublingual administration of allergens provides high patient compliance and has emerged as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy for the - treatment of IgE-associated allergic diseases. However, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) can cause adverse events. Development...

  13. Metabolism of anxiolytics and hypnotics: benzodiazepines, buspirone, zoplicone, and zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, G; Lefko-Singh, K; Teboul, E

    1999-08-01

    1. The benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed of all drugs and have been used for their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative/hypnotic properties. Since absorption rates, volumes of distribution, and elimination rates differ greatly among the benzodiazepine derivatives, each benzodiazepine has a unique plasma concentration curve. Although the time to peak plasma levels provides a rough guide, it is not equivalent to the time to clinical onset of effect. The importance of alpha and beta half-lives in the actions of benzodiazepines is discussed. 2. The role of cytochrome P450 isozymes in the metabolism of benzodiazepines and in potential pharmacokinetic interactions between the benzodiazepines and other coadministered drugs is discussed. 3. Buspirone, an anxiolytic with minimal sedative effects, undergoes extensive metabolism, with hydroxylation and dealkylation being the major pathways. Pharmacokinetic interactions of buspirone with other coadministered drugs seem to be minimal. 4. Zopiclone and zolpidem are used primarily as hypnotics. Both are extensively metabolized; N-demethylation, N-oxidation, and decarboxylation of zopiclone occur, and zolpidem undergoes oxidation of methyl groups and hydroxylation of a position on the imidazolepyridine ring system. Zopiclone has a chiral centre, and demonstrates stereoselective pharmacokinetics. Metabolic drug-drug interactions have been reported with zopiclone and erythromycin, trimipramine, and carbamazepine. Reports to date indicate minimal interactions of zolpidem with coadministered drugs; however, it has been reported to affect the Cmax and clearance of chlorpromazepine and to decrease metabolism of the antiviral agent ritonavin. Since CYP3A4 has been reported to play an important role in metabolism of zolpidem, possible interactions with drugs which are substrates and/or inhibitors of that CYP isozyme should be considered.

  14. [Single and combining effects of Calculus Bovis and zolpidem on inhibitive neurotransmitter of rat striatum corpora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; He, Xinrong; Guo, Mei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the correlation effects between single or combined administration of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem and changes of inhibitive neurotransmitter in rat striatum corpora. Sampling from rat striatum corpora was carried out through microdialysis. The content of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat corpus striatum- glycine (Gly) and gama aminobutyric acid (GABA), was determined by HPLC, which involved pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde, reversed-phase gradient elution and fluorescence detection. GABA content of rat striatum corpora in Calculus Bovis group was significantly increased compared with saline group (P Calculus Boris plus zolpidem group were increased largely compared with saline group as well (P Calculus Bovis group was higher than combination group (P Calculus Bovis or zolpidem group was markedly increased compared with saline group or combination group (P Calculus Bovis group, zolpidem group and combination group. The magnitude of increase was lower in combination group than in Calculus Bovis group and Zolpidem group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis promoted encephalon inhibition is more powerful than zolpidem. The increase in two inhibitive neurotransmitters did not show reinforcing effect in combination group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis and zolpidem may compete the same receptors. Therefore, combination of Calculus Bovis containing drugs and zolpidem has no clinical significance. Calculus Bovis shouldn't as an aperture-opening drugs be used for resuscitation therapy.

  15. Risk of Parkinson's disease following zolpidem use: a retrospective, population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Kang-Hsu; Lu, Ming-Kuei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of long-term zolpidem use on the incidence of developing Parkinson's disease. 2,961 subjects who used zolpidem for the first time longer than 3 months between 1998 and 2000 were identified in the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan. Subjects without a history of zolpidem use were randomly selected as a comparison cohort and frequency matched to zolpidem users based on age, sex, and index date. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was based on the criteria of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Its incidence until the end of 2009 was calculated and its hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier analysis. The overall incidence of Parkinson's disease was greater among zolpidem users than in the comparison cohort (HR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.45-2.45). However, there was no difference in Parkinson's disease incidence between these 2 cohorts after 5 years of observation. The risk of Parkinson's disease increased with increasing zolpidem dose, with an HR of 0.70 for low-dose users (zolpidem only (HR = 2.35; 95% CI, 1.66-3.33) compared to those using benzodiazepines only (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 0.91-1.90). By stratified analysis, zolpidem use with concurrent depression (HR = 4.79) increased the risk of Parkinson's disease compared to that of zolpidem users without concurrent depression. Zolpidem use might unmask preclinical Parkinson's disease, especially in patients with depression. However, large population-based, unbiased, randomized trials are warranted to confirm this finding. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Properties of the ammonium tartrate/EPR dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanov, N.D.; Gancheva, V.

    2004-01-01

    The EPR response of γ-irradiated ammonium tartrate on the absorbed dose of γ-rays up to 22 kGy as well as the changes in the shape of the EPR spectrum upon applied modulation amplitude and microwave power are reported. Also the possibility to use ammonium tartrate together with Mn 2+ magnetically diluted in MgO as an internal reference material is evaluated. The influence of the microwave power and the modulation amplitude on their dose response is investigated. The results show that the radiation-induced EPR spectrum of ammonium tartrate, obtained at a low microwave power is complex consisting several patterns and is more easily saturated than the Mn 2+ EPR spectrum. In this case the following settings of the EPR parameters are recommended: H mod ≤0.05 mT and 10≤P MW ≤13 mW. Using these parameters the dosimeters can be considered for use in intercomparisons

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of the structures of dialkyl tartrates and their cyclodextrin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Polavarapu, Prasad L

    2007-02-08

    Structures of three dialkyl tartrates, namely, dimethyl tartrate, diethyl tartrate, and diisopropyl tartrate, in CCl4, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/DMSO-d6, and H2O/D2O solvents have been investigated using vibrational absorption (VA), vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), and optical rotatory dispersion (ORD). VA, VCD, and ORD spectra are found to be dependent on the solvent used. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to interpret the experimental data in CCl4 and DMSO. The trans-COOR conformer with hydrogen bonding between the OH group and the C=O group attached to the same chiral carbon is dominant for dialkyl tartrates both in vacuum and in CCl4. The experimental VA, VCD, and ORD data of dialkyl-D-tartrates in CCl4 correlated well with those predicted for dimethyl-(S,S)-tartrate molecule as both isolated and solvated in CCl4. In DMSO solvent, dialkyl tartrate molecules favor formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding with DMSO molecules. Clusters of dimethyl-(S,S)-tartrate, with one molecule of dimethyl-(S,S)-tartrate hydrogen bonded to two DMSO molecules, are used for the DFT calculations. A trans-COOR cluster and a trans-H cluster are needed to obtain a reasonable agreement between the predicted and experimental data of dimethyl tartrate in DMSO solvent. VA, VCD, and optical rotations are also measured for dialkyl tartrate-cyclodextrin complexes. It is noted that these properties are barely affected by complexation of dialkyl tartrates with cyclodextrins, indicating weak interaction between tartrates and cyclodextrin. Binding constants of alpha-CD and beta-CD with diethyl L-tartrate in both H2O and DMSO have been determined using isothermal titration calorimetry technique. The smaller binding constants (less than 100) confirmed the weak interaction between tartrates and cyclodextrin in the solution state.

  18. [Characteristics of sublingual vein and expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha proteins in sublingual tissues of Beagle dogs with portal hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bai-yu; Wang, Li-na; Yue, Xiao-qiang; Li, Bai

    2009-05-01

    To observe sublingual vein characteristics and the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) proteins in sublingual tissues of Beagle dogs with cirrhotic portal hypertension. Twelve Beagle dogs were randomly divided into normal control group and cirrhotic portal hypertension group. There were 6 dogs in each group. A canine model of cirrhosis portal hypertension was established by injecting dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) into portal vein once a week for 7 weeks. The characteristics of sublingual vein were observed. Portal venous pressure was measured by using bioelectric recording techniques. The expressions of VEGF and HIF-1alpha proteins in sublingual vein were detected by immunohistochemical method. The shape and color of sublingual vein in beagle dogs in the cirrhotic portal hypertension group changed obviously as compared with the normal control group. Immunohistochemical results showed that there were almost no expressions of VEGF and HIF-1alpha proteins in sublingual tissues in the normal control group; however, the expressions of VEGF and HIF-1alpha proteins in sublingual tissues in the cirrhotic portal hypertension group significantly increased. Changes of portal pressure may lead to the formation of the abnormal sublingual vein by increasing the expressions of VEGF and HIF-1alpha proteins in sublingual tissues in Beagle dogs with portal hypertension.

  19. Cerebral blood perfusion after treatment with zolpidem and flumazenil in the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Ralf P; Dormehl, Irene C; Kilian, Elmaré; Louw, Werner K A; Nel, Wally H; Oliver, Douglas W

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zolpidem (CAS 82626-48-0) can lead to improved perfusion in damaged brain tissue. Zolpidem belongs to the imidazopyridine chemical class and it illicits its pharmacological action via the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor system through stimulation of particularly the omega 1 receptors and to a lesser extent omega 2 receptors. Previously it was reported that no cerebral blood flow effects were observed in normal baboons after treatment with zolpidem, whereas an asymmetric regional increase in cerebral blood flow was observed in a neurologically abnormal baboon. In this study, the effect of a combination of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (CAS 78755-81-4) and zolpidem on brain perfusion was examined by the 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) split dose brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Four normal baboons and the neurologically abnormal baboon from the previous zolpidem study were examined. In the current study the asymmetric changes observed after zolpidem--only treatment in the abnormal baboon was attenuated by flumazenil intervention. A decreased brain blood flow was observed after combination treatment of zolpidem and flumazenil in the normal baboons. The involvement of the omega receptors is suggested by these results. Up- or down-regulation of omega receptors may also contribute to the observed responses in the abnormal baboon and a brain injured patient.

  20. Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals grown in gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Strontium tartrate; dopant; effect of magnetic field; thermal behaviour. 1. Introduction ... tals of such type of compounds cannot be grown by either slow evaporation or ... is observed under a stereo binocular microscope (Carl. Zeiss) and ... a depth of 1⋅8 cm due to the diffusion of the top solution. After about a week ...

  1. Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals grown in gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate crystals grown with the aid of sodium metasilicate gel is investigated using thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Effect of magnetic field and dopant (Pb)2+ on the crystal stability is also studied using thermal analysis. This study reveals that water molecules are ...

  2. Determination of Tolterodine tartrate in bulk and formulation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a new simple, accurate, precise and fully validated extractive colorimetric method for the determination of tolterodine tartrate (TL) in bulk and in tablet dosage form, Method: A chloroform extractable orange red complex formed between the acid dye, tropaeolin OOO-1 and tolterodine in acid media is the ...

  3. Growth features of ammonium hydrogen d-tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Ammonium hydrogen d-tartrate (d-AHT) single crystals were grown in silica gel. The growth fea- ... solution (specific gravity, 1⋅04 g/cc) with d-tartaric acid solution having ... resulting in the production of crystal nuclei. The interface.

  4. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Calcium tartrate single crystals were grown using silica gel as the growth medium. Calcium for- mate mixed with formic acid was taken as the supernatant solution. It was observed that the nucleation den- sity was reduced and the size of the crystals was improved to a large extent compared to the conventional way.

  5. Arformoterol Tartrate: A Review of Pharmacology, Analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is a review of the therapeutic significance of arformoterol tartrate, a new generation 2 adrenergic agonist bronchodilator available in a nebulized form. Arformoterol is well absorbed through the lungs when administered via a standard jet nebulizer and is useful in long-term maintenance therapy of ...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1804 - Sodium potassium tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium potassium tartrate. 184.1804 Section 184.1804 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... has a cooling saline taste. It is obtained as a byproduct of wine manufacture. (b) The ingredient...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1077 - Potassium acid tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium acid tartrate. 184.1077 Section 184.1077 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... a white, crystalline powder. It has a pleasant, acid taste. It is obtained as a byproduct of wine...

  8. Formulation and evaluation of sublingual tablets of losartan potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikunj J. Aghera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sublingual tablets of Losartan Potassium were prepared to improve its bioavailability, to avoid pre-systemic metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract and hepatic first pass elimination. Methods: The Sublingual tablets were prepared by direct compression procedure using different concentration of Starch 1500 and microcrystalline cellulose. Compatibility studies of drug and polymer were performed by FTIR spectroscopy and DSC. Preformulation property of API was evaluated. Postcompressional parameters such disintegration time, wetting time, water absorption ratio, in vitro drug release and in vivo bioavailability study of optimized formulation were determined. Results: FTIR spectroscopy and DSC study revealed that there was no possible interaction between drug and polymers. The precompression parameters were in acceptable range of pharmacopoeial specification. The disintegration time of optimized formulation (F3 was upto 48 sec. The in vitro release of Losartan Potassium was upto 15 min. The percentage relative bioavailability of Losartan Potassium from optimized sublingual tablets was found to be 144.7 %. Conclusions: Sublingual tablets of Losartan Potassium were successfully prepared with improved bioavailability.

  9. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arstikyte, Justina; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands), and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km), directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD) and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37 ± 30.2 versus 221.80 ± 23.4 min, p = 0.045), ingested less fluids (907 ± 615 versus 1950 ± 488 mL, p = 0.007) during the race, and lost much more weight (−2.4 ± 1.3 versus −1.0 ± 0.8 kg, p = 0.041). Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation. PMID:28828386

  10. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranskunas, Andrius; Arstikyte, Justina; Pranskuniene, Zivile; Bernatoniene, Jurga; Kiudulaite, Inga; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Vaitkaitis, Dinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands), and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km), directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD) and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37 ± 30.2 versus 221.80 ± 23.4 min, p = 0.045), ingested less fluids (907 ± 615 versus 1950 ± 488 mL, p = 0.007) during the race, and lost much more weight (-2.4 ± 1.3 versus -1.0 ± 0.8 kg, p = 0.041). Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation.

  11. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Pranskunas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands, and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km, directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37±30.2 versus 221.80±23.4 min, p=0.045, ingested less fluids (907±615 versus 1950±488 mL, p=0.007 during the race, and lost much more weight (-2.4±1.3 versus -1.0±0.8 kg, p=0.041. Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation.

  12. Clinically important drug interactions with zopiclone, zolpidem and zaleplon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Leah M; von Moltke, Lisa L; Greenblatt, David J

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia, an inability to initiate or maintain sleep, affects approximately one-third of the American population. Conventional benzodiazepines, such as triazolam and midazolam, were the treatment of choice for short-term insomnia for many years but are associated with adverse effects such as rebound insomnia, withdrawal and dependency. The newer hypnosedatives include zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. These agents may be preferred over conventional benzodiazepines to treat short-term insomnia because they may be less likely to cause significant rebound insomnia or tolerance and are as efficacious as the conventional benzodiazepines. This review aims to summarise the published clinical drug interaction studies involving zolpidem, zaleplon and zopiclone. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may be clinically important are highlighted. Clinical trials have studied potential interactions of zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone with the following types of drugs: cytochrome P450 (CYP) inducers (rifampicin), CYP inhibitors (azoles, ritonavir and erythromycin), histamine H(2) receptor antagonists (cimetidine and ranitidine), antidepressants, antipsychotics, antagonists of benzodiazepines and drugs causing sedation. Rifampicin significantly induced the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and decreased their sedative effects, indicating that a dose increase of these agents may be necessary when they are administered with rifampicin. Ketoconazole, erythromycin and cimetidine inhibited the metabolism of the newer hypnosedatives and enhanced their sedative effects, suggesting that a dose reduction may be required. Addition of ethanol to treatment with the newer hypnosedatives resulted in additive sedative effects without altering the pharmacokinetic parameters of the drugs. Compared with some of the conventional benzodiazepines, fewer clinically important interactions appear to have been reported in the literature with zaleplon, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  13. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jessica L; Fixen, Danielle R; Saseen, Joseph J; Saba, Laura M; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2017-01-01

    Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) per night in women. The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zolpidem labeling change. A secondary objective was to evaluate serious adverse events potentially related to zolpidem. Electronic medical records of adults receiving care through the University of Colorado Health system were accessed for study inclusion if patients were provided a first-time prescription for zolpidem either prior to or after the Food and Drug Administration labeling change. Patients were randomly chosen from eight strata based on age, gender, and date of zolpidem initiation (before/after the labeling change). Demographic and zolpidem prescribing data were collected. Low-dose zolpidem was considered 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) daily or less. Documentation of potentially related serious adverse events within the patients' records was also evaluated. A total of 400 patients were included in the study. The overall percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased from 44% to 58% after the labeling change (p = 0.0020). In a pre-specified subgroup analysis, the percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased in all groups, including young men (38%-50%, p = 0.23), elderly men (34%-40%, p = 0.53), and elderly women (60%-74%, p = 0.14), but the change was only significant in young women (42%-70%, p = 0.0045). After Food and Drug Administration-mandated labeling changes for zolpidem in 2013, the percentage of overall patients in our health system, and specifically young women, with initial prescriptions for low

  15. Three cases of zolpidem dependence treated with fluoxetine: the serotonin hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liappas, Ioannis A; Malitas, Petros N; Dimopoulos, Nikolaos P; Gitsa, Olympia E; Liappas, Alexandros I; Nikolaou, Chrisoula K; Christodoulou, Georgios N

    2003-04-01

    Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine hypnotic that is believed to act selectively at alpha(1) subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors and thus to have minimal abuse and dependence potential. We present three cases of zolpidem abuse and dependence in which the drug was used not for sedation but for stimulation and anxiolysis. All of the patients were treated with fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and managed to discontinue the abuse and remain abstinent from the drug. The efficacy of this kind of medication on the abuse of a GABAergic agonist, in this case dependence on zolpidem, leads to a serotonergic and GABAergic system interaction hypothesis.

  16. Zolpidem prescribing and adverse drug reactions in hospitalized general medicine patients at a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Webb, Melissa J; Gray, Shelly L

    2004-03-01

    Zolpidem is prescribed for sleep disruption in hospitalized patients, but data on the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are based largely on outpatient studies. Thus, the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized patients may be much higher. The goal of this study was to describe prescribing patterns of zolpidem for hospitalized medical patients aged 50 years, the incidence of ADRs possibly and probably associated with its use, and the factors associated with central nervous system (CNS) ADRs. This case series was conducted in 4 general medicine wards at a Veterans Affairs hospital and was a consecutive sample of patients aged 50 years who were hospitalized between 1993 and 1997 and received zolpidem as a hypnotic during hospitalization, but had not received it in the previous 3 months. Chart review was conducted by 2 evaluators. Data extracted from the medical records included admission demographic characteristics, medications, comorbidities, and levels of function in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The main outcome measure was ADRs possibly or probably related to zolpidem use. The association between zolpidem and the occurrence of CNS ADRs (eg, confusion, dizziness, daytime somnolence) was analyzed separately. The review included 119 medical patients aged > or =50 years who had newly received zolpidem for sleep disruption during hospitalization. The median age of the population was 70 years; 86 (72.3%) patients were aged 65 years. The initial zolpidem dose was 5 mg in 42 patients (35.3%) and 10 mg in 77 patients (64.7%). Twenty-three patients had a respective 16 and 10 ADRs possibly and probably related to zolpidem use (19.3% incidence). Of a total of 26 ADRs, 21 (80.8%) were CNS ADRs, occurring with both zolpidem 5 mg (10.8% of users) and 10 mg (18.3% of users). On univariate analyses, the only factor significantly associated with a CNS ADR was functional impairment at baseline (P = 0.003). Zolpidem was discontinued in 38.8% of

  17. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Norman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release or 6.25 mg (controlled release per night in women. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zolpidem labeling change. A secondary objective was to evaluate serious adverse events potentially related to zolpidem. Methods: Electronic medical records of adults receiving care through the University of Colorado Health system were accessed for study inclusion if patients were provided a first-time prescription for zolpidem either prior to or after the Food and Drug Administration labeling change. Patients were randomly chosen from eight strata based on age, gender, and date of zolpidem initiation (before/after the labeling change. Demographic and zolpidem prescribing data were collected. Low-dose zolpidem was considered 5 mg (immediate release or 6.25 mg (controlled release daily or less. Documentation of potentially related serious adverse events within the patients’ records was also evaluated. Results: A total of 400 patients were included in the study. The overall percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased from 44% to 58% after the labeling change (p = 0.0020. In a pre-specified subgroup analysis, the percentage of patients prescribed low-dose zolpidem increased in all groups, including young men (38%–50%, p = 0.23, elderly men (34%–40%, p = 0.53, and elderly women (60%–74%, p = 0.14, but the change was only significant in young women (42%–70%, p = 0.0045. Conclusion: After Food and Drug Administration–mandated labeling changes for zolpidem in 2013, the percentage of overall patients in our health

  18. Measurement of cerebral perfusion after zolpidem administration in the baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, R P; Dormehl, I C; Oliver, D W; Nel, W H; Kilian, E; Louw, W K

    2001-01-01

    A recent report showed that zolpidem (CAS 82626-48-0) can lead to the arousal of a semi-comatosed patient. Zolpidem is clinically used for the treatment of insomnia. It belongs to the imidazopyridine chemical class and is a non benzodiazepine drug. It illicits its pharmacological action via the GABA receptor system through stimulation of particularly the omega 1 receptors. In this study, the effect of zolpidem on brain perfusion was examined by 99mTc hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) split dose brain SPECT on four normal baboons and in one baboon with abnormal neurological behaviour. The global and regional brain perfusion was not significantly affected in the normal brains. In some regions of the abnormal baboon brain, however, there was a disproportionate increase in perfusion after zolpidem.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and the pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic relationship of zolpidem in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, S L; Schoemaker, R C; van Gerven, J M A; Hoever, P; Cohen, A F; Dingemanse, J

    2010-11-01

    Zolpidem is one of the most frequently prescribed hypnotics, as it is a very short-acting compound with relatively few side effects. Zolpidem's short duration of action is partly related to its short elimination half-life, but the associations between plasma levels and pharmacodynamic (PD) effects are not precisely known. In this study, the concentration-effect relationships for zolpidem were modelled. Zolpidem (10 mg) was administered in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial to determine PD and pharmacokinetics (PK) in 14 healthy volunteers. Zolpidem was absorbed and eliminated quickly, with a median T(max) of 0.78 h (range: 0.33-2.50) and t(1/2) of 2.2 h. Zolpidem reduced saccadic peak velocity (SPV), adaptive tracking performance, electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and visual analogue scale (VAS) alertness score and increased body sway, EEG beta power and VAS 'feeling high'. Short- and long-term memory was not affected. Central nervous system effects normalised more rapidly than the decrease of plasma concentrations. For most effects, zolpidem's short duration of action could be adequately described by both a sigmoid E(max) model and a transit tolerance model. For SPV and EEG alpha power, the tolerance model seemed less suitable. These PK/PD models have different implications for the mechanism underlying zolpidem's short duration of action. A sigmoid E(max) model (which is based on ligand binding theory) would imply a threshold value for the drug's effective concentrations. A transit tolerance model (in which a hypothetical factor builds up with time that antagonises the effects of the parent compound) is compatible with a rapid reversible desensitisation of GABAergic subunits.

  20. Relationship of zolpidem and cancer risk: a Taiwanese population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Hung; Sun, Li-Min; Liang, Ji-An; Chang, Shih-Ni; Sung, Fung-Chang; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the use of zolpidem and subsequent cancer risk in Taiwanese patients. We used data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan to investigate whether use of zolpidem was related to cancer risk. For the study cohort, we identified 14,950 patients who had received a first prescription for zolpidem from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2000. For each zolpidem user, we selected randomly 4 comparison patients without a history of using zolpidem who were frequency-matched by sex, age, and year of the index date. Incidence rates of all cancers and selected site-specific cancers were measured by the end of 2009, and related hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the cancer were measured as well. The risk of developing any cancer was greater in patients using zolpidem than in nonusers (HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.55-1.82). The stratified analysis showed that the overall HR for high-dosage zolpidem (≥300 mg/y) was 2.38. The site-specific cancer risk was the highest for oral cancer (HR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.57-3.56), followed by kidney cancer, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.06-2.41). Men were at higher risk than women. This population-based study revealed some unexpected findings, suggesting that the use of zolpidem may be associated with an increased risk of subsequent cancer. Further large-scale and in-depth investigations in this area are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zolpidem prescribing practices before and after Food and Drug Administration required product labeling changes

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Jessica L; Fixen, Danielle R; Saseen, Joseph J; Saba, Laura M; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Women have higher morning serum zolpidem concentrations than men after taking an evening dose, potentially leading to increased risk of harm. On 19 April 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration required labeling changes for zolpidem, recommending an initial dose of no greater than 5 mg (immediate release) or 6.25 mg (controlled release) per night in women. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to compare prescribing practices before and after the 2013 zo...

  2. Zolpidem displays heterogeneity in its binding to the nonhuman primate benzodiazepine receptor in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L; Bottlaender, M; Fuseau, C; Fournier, D; Brouillet, E; Mazière, M

    1995-10-01

    The distinctive pharmacological activity of zolpidem in rats compared with classical benzodiazepines has been related to its differential affinity for benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) subtypes. By contrast, in nonhuman primates the pharmacological activity of zolpidem was found to be quite similar to that of classical BZR agonists. In an attempt to explain this discrepancy, we examined the ability of zolpidem to differentiate BZR subtypes in vivo in primate brain using positron emission tomography. The BZRs were specifically labeled with [11C]flumazenil. Radiotracer displacement by zolpidem was monophasic in cerebellum and neocortex, with in vivo Hill coefficients close to 1. Conversely, displacement of [11C]flumazenil was biphasic in hippocampus, amygdala, septum, insula, striatum, and pons, with Hill coefficients significantly smaller than 1, suggesting two different binding sites for zolpidem. In these cerebral regions, the half-maximal inhibitory doses for the high-affinity binding site were similar to those found in cerebellum and neocortex and approximately 100-fold higher for the low-affinity binding site. The low-affinity binding site accounted for zolpidem binding characteristics contrast with those reported for rodents, where three different binding sites were found. Species differences in binding characteristics may explain why zolpidem has a distinctive pharmacological activity in rodents, whereas its pharmacological activity in primates is quite similar to that of classical BZR agonists, except for the absence of severe effects on memory functions, which may be due to the lack of substantial zolpidem affinity for a distinct BZR subtype in cerebral structures belonging to the limbic system.

  3. Zolpidem reduces the blood oxygen level-dependent signal during visual system stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Trksak, George H.; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Zolpidem is a short-acting imidazopyridine hypnotic that binds at the benzodiazepine binding site on specific GABAA receptors to enhance fast inhibitory neurotransmission. The behavioral and receptor pharmacology of zolpidem has been studied extensively, but little is known about its neuronal substrates in vivo. In the present within-subject, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study, blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) at 3 Tesla was used to assess...

  4. An Increased Risk of Reversible Dementia May Occur After Zolpidem Derivative Use in the Elderly Population

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Hsin-I; Lin, Che-Chen; Tu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Chi, Chih-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluate the effects of zolpidem use to develop dementia or Alzheimer disease from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). A retrospective population-based nested case–control study. Newly diagnosed dementia patients 65 years and older and controls were sampled. A total of 8406 dementia and 16,812 control subjects were enrolled from Taiwan NHIRD during 2006 to 2010. The relationships between zolpidem use and dementia were measured using odds and adjusted od...

  5. Zolpidem metabolism in vitro: responsible cytochromes, chemical inhibitors, and in vivo correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Moltke, Lisa L; Greenblatt, David J; Granda, Brian W; Duan, Su Xiang; Grassi, Jeffrey M; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Harmatz, Jerold S; Shader, Richard I

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine the human cytochromes mediating biotransformation of the imidazopyridine hypnotic, zolpidem, and the clinical correlates of the findings. Methods Kinetic properties of zolpidem biotransformation to its three hydroxylated metabolites were studied in vitro using human liver microsomes and heterologously expressed individual human cytochromes. Results The metabolic product termed M-3 accounted for more than 80% of net intrinsic clearance by liver microsomes in vitro. Microsomes containing human cytochromes CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3 A4 expressed by cDNA-transfected human lymphoblastoid cells mediated zolpidem metabolism in vitro. The kinetic profile for zolpidem metabolite formation by each individual cytochrome was combined with estimated relative abundances based on immunological quantification, yielding projected contributions to net intrinsic clearance of: 61% for 3 A4, 22% for 2C9, 14% for 1A2, and less than 3% for 2D6 and 2C19. These values were consistent with inhibitory effects of ketoconazole and sulfaphenazole on zolpidem biotransformation by liver microsomes. Ketoconazole had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.61 μm vs formation of the M-3 metabolite of zolpidem in vitro; in a clinical study, ketoconazole coadministration reduced zolpidem oral clearance by ≈40%, somewhat less than anticipated based on the IC50 value and total plasma ketoconazole levels, but much more than predicted based on unbound plasma ketoconazole levels. Conclusions The incomplete dependence of zolpidem clearance on CYP3A activity has clinical implications for susceptibility to metabolic inhibition. PMID:10383565

  6. Zolpidem reduces the blood oxygen level-dependent signal during visual system stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C; Lowen, Steven B; Trksak, George H; Maclean, Robert R; Lukas, Scott E

    2011-08-15

    Zolpidem is a short-acting imidazopyridine hypnotic that binds at the benzodiazepine binding site on specific GABA(A) receptors to enhance fast inhibitory neurotransmission. The behavioral and receptor pharmacology of zolpidem has been studied extensively, but little is known about its neuronal substrates in vivo. In the present within-subject, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study, blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) at 3 Tesla was used to assess the effects of zolpidem within the brain. Healthy participants (n=12) were scanned 60 min after acute oral administration of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20mg), and changes in BOLD signal were measured in the visual cortex during presentation of a flashing checkerboard. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were monitored continuously throughout the session. Zolpidem (10 and 20mg) reduced the robust visual system activation produced by presentation of this stimulus, but had no effects on physiological activity during the fMRI scan. Zolpidem's modulation of the BOLD signal within the visual cortex is consistent with the abundant distribution of GABA(A) receptors localized in this region, as well as previous studies showing a relationship between increased GABA-mediated neuronal inhibition and a reduction in BOLD activation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporal changes in postural sway caused by ultrashort-acting hypnotics: triazolam and zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Ishii, M; Niwa, Y; Yamazaki, M; Ito, H

    2005-01-01

    Two ultrashort-acting hypnotics, triazolam 0.25 mg and zolpidem 10 mg, were studied for their effects on equilibrium function in humans. Eight healthy male subjects participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study after informed consent. They subjected to static equilibrium tests, oculomotor tests and an assay of drug concentrations in the blood. Zolpidem was statistically significant in postural sway in tandem stance test, as defined by parametric values of tracing sum length and polygonal area of foot pressure center measured by a gait analysis system. In the tandem stance test, triazolam was statistically significant in postural sway only as defined by the polygonal area. However, in the Romberg test, the only statistically significant difference in zolpidem use was observed in polygonal area values. Blood concentrations of triazolam and zolpidem were found to closely correlate with the extent of postural sway in both tandem stance and Romberg tests. In this study, zolpidem with minimal muscle-relaxant effect incurred imbalance more extensively than triazolam, which is known for its effect of muscle relaxation. In addition, gaze deviation nystagmus was observed only in zolpidem use in 5 of 8 subjects (62.5%). From these results, it is suggested that in the use of hypnotics, sway derives from the suppression of the central nervous system relevant to awakening rather than from muscle relaxation. The prior reference to blood concentrations of hypnotics should help improve safety care in minimizing loss of balance control and possible fall. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Temazepam, but not zolpidem, causes orthostatic hypotension in astronauts after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shang-Jin; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Meck, Janice V.

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common symptom, not only in the adult population but also in many astronauts. Hypnotics, such as temazepam (a benzodiazepine) and zolpidem (an imidazopyridine), are often taken to relieve insomnia. Temazepam has been shown clinically to have hemodynamic side effects, particularly in the elderly; however, the mechanism is not clear. Zolpidem does not cause hemodynamic side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of different hypnotics during spaceflight might contribute significantly to the high incidence of postflight orthostatic hypotension, and to compare the findings in astronauts with clinical research. Astronauts were separated into three groups: control (n = 40), temazepam (15 or 30 mg; n = 9), and zolpidem (5 or 10 mg; n = 8). In this study, temazepam and zolpidem were only taken the night before landing. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rates of the astronauts were measured during stand tests before spaceflight and on landing day. On landing day, systolic pressure decreased significantly and heart rate increased significantly in the temazepam group, but not in the control group or in the zolpidem group. Temazepam may aggravate orthostatic hypotension after spaceflight when astronauts are hemodynamically compromised. Temazepam should not be the initial choice as a sleeping aid for astronauts. These results in astronauts may help to explain the hemodynamic side effects in the elderly who are also compromised. Zolpidem may be a better choice as a sleeping aid in these populations.

  9. Enhancement of GABAergic transmission by zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with preferential affinity for type I benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggio, G; Concas, A; Corda, M G; Serra, M

    1989-02-28

    The effect of zolpidem, an imidazopyridine derivative with high affinity at the type I benzodiazepine recognition site, on the function of the GABAA/ionophore receptor complex was studied in vitro. Zolpidem, mimicking the action of diazepam, increased [3H]GABA binding, enhanced muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake and reduced [35S]TBPS binding in rat cortical membrane preparations. Zolpidem was less effective than diazepam on the above parameters. Zolpidem induced a lower increase of [3H]GABA binding (23 vs. 35%) and muscimol-stimulated 36Cl- uptake (22 vs. 40%) and a smaller decrease of [35S]TBPS binding (47 vs. 77%) than diazepam. The finding that zolpidem enhanced the function of GABAergic synapses with an efficacy qualitatively and quantitatively different from that of diazepam suggests that this compound is a partial agonist at the benzodiazepine recognition site. Thus, our results are consistent with the view that the biochemical and pharmacological profile of a benzodiazepine recognition site ligand reflects its efficacy to enhance GABAergic transmission. Whether the preferential affinity of zolpidem at the type I site is involved in its atypical biochemical and pharmacological profile remains to be clarified.

  10. Chemical nickel plating in tartrate solutions with borohydride reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plokhov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the influence of various factors on the rate of chemical nickel plating in strongly alkaline tartrate solutions with a borohydride reducing agent. After 30 min of the process of nickel plating, the final concentration of sodium borohydride decreases to 0.26 g/liter, leading to stoppage of the process. The nickel plating process can be intensified by increasing the concentration of sodium hydroxide in the solution, suppressing hydrolysis of borohydride, and also by introducing additives which suppress hydrolysis of borohydride. For chemical deposition of nickel-boron coatings from tartrate solutions the authors recommend the following composition (g/liter): nickel chloride 15-25, Rochelle salt 450-550, sodium hydroxide 140-160, sodium borohydride 0.8-1.0, thallium nitrate 0.003-0.008. The process temperature is 92-95 C, and the deposition rate is 4-6 um/h

  11. Síndrome de ingesta nocturna como efecto colateral del zolpidem Sleep related eating disorders as a side effect of zolpidem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Valiensi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El zolpidem es una droga hipnótica utilizada para el tratamiento del insomnio. Disminuye la latencia del sueño, el número total de despertares y aumenta el tiempo total del sueño respetando en general su arquitectura. Se cree que aumenta la fase 3 del sueño lento profundo. Nuestro objetivo es comunicar 8 casos de síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño y conductas automáticas complejas asociadas a sonambulismo como efecto colateral del zolpidem. Se analizaron las historias clínicas de 8 pacientes tratados con zolpidem que referían ingesta nocturna de alimentos con amnesia total o parcial del episodio. Se presentan 6 mujeres y 2 hombres, entre 32 y 72 años (media: 58 años, 7 tratados con zolpidem 10 mg/noche y 1 con zolpidem 12.5 mg/noche de liberación prolongada. El tiempo de exposición previo al desarrollo de eventos fue de 1 a 180 días (media de 39.8. El número de episodios relatados era de 1 a 8/noche (media 2.5 asociado con amnesia. Los episodios desaparecieron por completo en el 100% de los casos al suspender la medicación. El síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño es una parasomnia de sueño lento profundo que consiste en episodios de ingesta de alimento o bebida durante la noche, con amnesia parcial o completa del episodio. El zolpidem podría inducir el síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño en aproximadamente el 1% de pacientes, aunque creemos que es un efecto adverso que está subdiagnosticado. Se resuelve simplemente suspendiendo la medicación.Zolpidem is a hypnotic drug used in sleep disorders. It binds selectively to alpha 1 subunit of the GABA A benzodiazepine receptor. Zolpidem reduces sleep latency, number of arousals and increases the total time of sleep. However, it is considered that it may increase phase 3 of non rapid eye movement sleep, where somnambulism can take place. Our aim is to report 8 cases of sleep related eating disorders associated with the use of this drug

  12. Characterization of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single crystal growth of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals bearing composition Cu Fe(1−) C4H4O6 · H2O, where = 0, 0.07, 0.06, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, is achieved using gel technique. The elemental analysis has been done using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) spectrum. The characterization studies ...

  13. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of sublingual glands. Surgery and radiotherapy combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campagnale, Ramiro; Campagnale, Rodrigo; Varalli, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    The Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC) or Cilindroma is a strange entity classified by the WHO within the carcinomas of salivary glands. It represents only 1 % of all the wicked tumours of the oral and maxillofacial region although, when making reference to the salivary glands, it constitutes 5% of the parotid, submaxilar and sublingual carcinomas, and about 50% of the smallest ones. The most frequent location is in the palatine glands and its main characteristics are: slow but persistent growth, high rates of local relapse and metastasis at distance originating the death between the first 5 and 10 years in 50-70% of the cases approximately. A case of localization is presented in sublingual gland which was first treated surgically and later with radiotherapy, obtaining good results. (author) [es

  14. Time evolution of sublingual microcirculatory changes in recreational marathon runners

    OpenAIRE

    Pranskūnas, Andrius; Kiudulaitė, Inga; Šimkienė, Jūratė; Damanskytė, Diana; Pranskūnienė, Živilė; Arštikytė, Justina; Vaitkaitis, Dinas; Pilvinis, Vidas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Marathon race transiently elevates the probability of sudden death. Also during long-distance run may occur various gastrointestinal symptoms with range from mild nausea to hemorrhagic stool. However microcirculatory nature of this disturbances is not clear. Microcirculation of sublingual mucosa is part of interest, because it is easy and noninvasively accessible, changes have relation with mortality and it is part of the upper digestive tract. Here, we evaluate changes in subli...

  15. Stability evaluation of house dust mite vaccines for sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA GAVROVIĆ-JANKULOVIĆ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy with house dust mite (HDM allergen extracts can effectively alleviate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The efficacy of the immunotherapeutic treatment is highly dependent on the quality of house dust mite vaccines. This study was performed to assess the stability of house dust mite allergen vaccines prepared for sublingual immunotherapy. Lyophilized Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt mite bodies were the starting material for the production of sublingual vaccines in four therapeutic concentrations. The stability of the extract for vaccine production, which was stored below 4 °C for one month, showed consistence in the protein profile in SDS PAGE. ELISA-inhibition showed that the potencies of Dpt vaccines during a 12 month period were to 65–80 % preserved at all analyzed therapeutic concentrations. This study showed that glycerinated Dpt vaccines stored at 4 °C preserved their IgE-binding potential during a 12 month period, implying their suitability for sublingual immunotherapeutic treatment of HDM allergy.

  16. Formulation and Evaluation of New Glimepiride Sublingual Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa Al-Madhagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal delivery of drugs promotes rapid absorption and high bioavailability, with a subsequent immediate onset of pharmacological effect. However, many oral mucosal deliveries are compromised by the possibility of the patient swallowing the active substance before it has been released and absorbed locally into the systemic circulation. The aim of this research was to introduce a new glimepiride formula for sublingual administration and rapid drug absorption that can be used in an emergency. The new sublingual formulation was prepared after five trials to prepare the suitable formulation. Two accepted formulations of the new sublingual product were prepared, but one of them with disintegration time of 1.45 min and searching for preferred formulation, the binder, is changed with Flulac and starch slurry to prepare formula with disintegration time of 21 seconds that supports the aim of research to be used in an emergency. The five formulations were done, after adjusting to the binder as Flulac and aerosil with disintegration time of 21 seconds and accepted hardness as well as the weight variation. The assay of a new product (subglimepiride is 103% which is a promising result, confirming that the formula succeeded. The new product (subglimepiride is accepted in most quality control tests and it is ready for marketing.

  17. Sublingual epidermoid cyst presenting with distinctive magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Kodama, Kozue; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-06-18

    A case of sublingual epidermoid cyst presenting distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is described. A 39-year-old man presented to our hospital with a three months progressive left submandibular swelling, difficulty moving his tongue, and snoring. Preoperative evaluation with MRI and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) revealed that the heterogeneous cystic lesion contained the squamous cells, which is compatible with ectodermal tissue. The mass was located above the mylohyoid muscle and spread to the pharyngeal space. By considering the size, infection history, patient age, and location, the cyst was completely resected under general anesthesia via cervical approach without any complication. Histopathologically, the cyst wall was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with no skin appendage, suggesting an epidermoid cyst. Ultrasound (US), MRI and FNAC were very useful of the preoperative diagnosis for oral and sublingual lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful and without recurrence after 24 months. This case showed that epidermoid cysts formed the rarely heterogeneous cystic tumor and it underlined usefulness of preoperative diagnosis, such as US, MRI and FNAC for oral and sublingual tumor.

  18. Quantitative Studies of Sublingual PCO2 as a Resuscitation End-Point in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hemorrhagic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivatury, Pao

    2005-01-01

    This clinical study is examining the relationship between sublingual PCO2 (PslCO2) to real-time changes in microcirculatory blood flow of the sublingual mucosa in victims of traumatic and hemorrhagic shock...

  19. Virus-mediated swapping of zolpidem-insensitive with zolpidem-sensitive GABA(A) receptors in cortical pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumegi, Mate; Fukazawa, Yugo; Matsui, Ko; Lorincz, Andrea; Eyre, Mark D; Nusser, Zoltan; Shigemoto, Ryuichi

    2012-04-01

    Recently developed pharmacogenetic and optogenetic approaches, with their own advantages and disadvantages, have become indispensable tools in modern neuroscience. Here, we employed a previously described knock-in mouse line (GABA(A)Rγ2(77I)lox) in which the γ2 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) was mutated to become zolpidem insensitive (γ2(77I)) and used viral vectors to swap γ2(77I) with wild-type, zolpidem-sensitive γ2 subunits (γ2(77F)). The verification of unaltered density and subcellular distribution of the virally introduced γ2 subunits requires their selective labelling. For this we generated six N- and six C-terminal-tagged γ2 subunits, with which cortical cultures of GABA(A)Rγ2(−/−) mice were transduced using lentiviruses. We found that the N-terminal AU1 tag resulted in excellent immunodetection and unimpaired synaptic localization. Unaltered kinetic properties of the AU1-tagged γ2 ((AU1)γ2(77F)) channels were demonstrated with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous IPSCs from cultured cells. Next, we carried out stereotaxic injections of lenti- and adeno-associated viruses containing Cre-recombinase and the (AU1)γ2(77F) subunit (Cre-2A-(AU1)γ2(77F)) into the neocortex of GABA(A)Rγ2(77I)lox mice. Light microscopic immunofluorescence and electron microscopic freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling demonstrated the efficient immunodetection of the AU1 tag and the normal enrichment of the (AU1)γ2(77F) subunits in perisomatic GABAergic synapses. In line with this,miniature and action potential-evoked IPSCs whole-cell recorded from transduced cells had unaltered amplitudes, kinetics and restored zolpidem sensitivity. Our results obtained with a wide range of structural and functional verification methods reveal unaltered subcellular distributions and functional properties of γ2(77I) and (AU1)γ2(77F) GABA(A)Rs in cortical pyramidal cells. This transgenic–viral pharmacogenetic approach has the advantage that it

  20. Bottom-Up versus Top-Down Induction of Sleep by Zolpidem Acting on Histaminergic and Neocortex Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, David S.; Ye, Zhiwen; Zecharia, Anna Y.; Harding, Edward C.; Yu, Xiao; Yustos, Raquel; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Brickley, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem, a GABAA receptor-positive modulator, is the gold-standard drug for treating insomnia. Zolpidem prolongs IPSCs to decrease sleep latency and increase sleep time, effects that depend on α2 and/or α3 subunit-containing receptors. Compared with natural NREM sleep, zolpidem also decreases the EEG power, an effect that depends on α1 subunit-containing receptors, and which may make zolpidem-induced sleep less optimal. In this paper, we investigate whether zolpidem needs to potentiate only particular GABAergic pathways to induce sleep without reducing EEG power. Mice with a knock-in F77I mutation in the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit gene are zolpidem-insensitive. Using these mice, GABAA receptors in the frontal motor neocortex and hypothalamic (tuberomammillary nucleus) histaminergic-neurons of γ2I77 mice were made selectively sensitive to zolpidem by genetically swapping the γ2I77 subunits with γ2F77 subunits. When histamine neurons were made selectively zolpidem-sensitive, systemic administration of zolpidem shortened sleep latency and increased sleep time. But in contrast to the effect of zolpidem on wild-type mice, the power in the EEG spectra of NREM sleep was not decreased, suggesting that these EEG power-reducing effects of zolpidem do not depend on reduced histamine release. Selective potentiation of GABAA receptors in the frontal cortex by systemic zolpidem administration also reduced sleep latency, but less so than for histamine neurons. These results could help with the design of new sedatives that induce a more natural sleep. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many people who find it hard to get to sleep take sedatives. Zolpidem (Ambien) is the most widely prescribed “sleeping pill.” It makes the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA work better at its receptors throughout the brain. The sleep induced by zolpidem does not resemble natural sleep because it produces a lower power in the brain waves that occur while we are sleeping. We show using mouse genetics

  1. Zolpidem improves neuropsychiatric symptoms and motor dysfunction in a patient with Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Wu, Yu-Chin; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kao, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Mu-Chieh; Tsai, Chon-Haw

    2012-06-01

    To illustrate the beneficial effect of zolpidem on the neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms in a patient with Parkinson disease (PD) after bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The 61-year-old housewife was diagnosed to have PD for 12 years with initial presentation of clumsiness and rest tremor of right limbs. She was referred to our hospital in March 2009 due to shortening of drug beneficial period since 3 years ago and on-phase dyskinesia in recent 2 years. Bilateral STN DBS was conducted on 18 June, 2009. Fluctuating spells of mental confusion were developed on the next day after surgery. Electric stimuli via DBS electrodes were delivered with parameters of 2 volts, 60 μs, 130 Hz on bilateral STN 32 days after DBS. The incoherent behaviors and motor fluctuation remained to occur. The beneficial effect of zolpidem on her neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms was detected incidentally in early July 2009. She could chat normally with her caregiver and walk with assistance after taking zolpidem. The beneficial period may last for 2 hours. Zolpidem was then given in dosage of 10 mg three times per day. The neuropsychiatric inventory was scored 56 during zolpidem 'off' and 30 during zolpidem 'on'. To understand the intriguing feature, we conducted FDG-PET during 'off' and 'on' zolpidem conditions. The results revealed that the metabolism was decreased in the right frontal, parietal cortex and caudate nucleus during zolpidem 'off'. These cool spots can be partially restored by zolpidem. Zolpidem ameliorated the neuropsychiatric and parkinsonian motor symptom in the PD patient. Since GABAA benzodiazepine receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, zolpidem probably acts via modulating structures lying within the cortico-subcortical loop or by direct effect on these cortical regions.

  2. Intranasal and sublingual delivery of inactivated polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Heleen; Soema, Peter; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Kersten, Gideon

    2017-05-09

    Polio is on the brink of eradication. Improved inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) are needed towards complete eradication and for the use in the period thereafter. Vaccination via mucosal surfaces has important potential advantages over intramuscular injection using conventional needle and syringe, the currently used delivery method for IPV. One of them is the ability to induce both serum and mucosal immune responses: the latter may provide protection at the port of virus entry. The current study evaluated the possibilities of polio vaccination via mucosal surfaces using IPV based on attenuated Sabin strains. Mice received three immunizations with trivalent sIPV via intramuscular injection, or via the intranasal or sublingual route. The need of an adjuvant for the mucosal routes was investigated as well, by testing sIPV in combination with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin. Both intranasal and sublingual sIPV immunization induced systemic polio-specific serum IgG in mice that were functional as measured by poliovirus neutralization. Intranasal administration of sIPV plus adjuvant induced significant higher systemic poliovirus type 3 neutralizing antibody titers than sIPV delivered via the intramuscular route. Moreover, mucosal sIPV delivery elicited polio-specific IgA titers at different mucosal sites (IgA in saliva, fecal extracts and intestinal tissue) and IgA-producing B-cells in the spleen, where conventional intramuscular vaccination was unable to do so. However, it is likely that a mucosal adjuvant is required for sublingual vaccination. Further research on polio vaccination via sublingual mucosal route should include the search for safe and effective adjuvants, and the development of novel oral dosage forms that improve antigen uptake by oral mucosa, thereby increasing vaccine immunogenicity. This study indicates that both the intranasal and sublingual routes might be valuable approaches for use in routine vaccination or outbreak control in the period after

  3. A study of factors affecting the labelling of tartrate with 188Re and the transchelation of the 188Re from the tartrate to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailerova, Eva; Billinghurst, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of 188 Re-tartrate for use in transchelation reactions and the transchelation of the 188 Re onto albumin was studied. Two labelled tartrate products were separated using a non-traditional mobile phase on ITLC strips. Tartrate labelling yield increases with pH but so does the instability when the product is exposed to air. Lower pH's are preferred when oxygen-free labelling conditions can be achieved. Higher tin levels protect against air oxidation. Stability of the Re-tartrate complex is supported by addition of ascorbic acid and ferrous sulphate, however both these agents decreased the rate of the formation of the Re-tartrate complex. The labelling efficiency of a perrhenate solution decreased with the time for which it is stored prior to the labelling reaction, depending on the radioactive concentration. Re-albumin transchelation efficiency increases with the tartrate concentration, while increased stability of the Re-tartrate complex lowers the transchelation yields of Re-albumin

  4. Doctor Shopping Behavior for Zolpidem Among Insomnia Patients in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tzu-Hsuan; Lee, Yen-Ying; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, You-Meei

    2015-07-01

    Although zolpidem is listed as a controlled drug in Taiwan, patients' behavior has not been restricted and has led to the problem of doctor shopping behavior (DSB), leading to overutilization of medical resources and excess spending. The National Health Insurance Administration in Taiwan has instituted a new policy to regulate physicians' prescribing behavior and decrease DSB. This retrospective study aimed to analyze the DSB for zolpidem by insomnia patients and assess related factors. Data were extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. Individuals with a diagnosis of insomnia who received more than one prescription of zolpidem in 2008 were followed for 24 mo. Doctor shopping was defined as ≥ 2 prescriptions by different doctors within ≥ 1 day overlapping in the duration of therapy. The percentage of zolpidem obtained through doctor shopping was used as an indicator of the DSB of each patient. Among the 6,947 insomnia patients who were prescribed zolpidem, 1,652 exhibited DSB (23.78%). The average dose of zolpidem dispensed for each patient during 24 mo was 244.21 daily defined doses. The doctor shopping indicator (DSI) was 0.20 (standard deviation, 0.23) among patients with DSB. Younger age, chronic diseases, high number of diseases, higher premium status, high socioeconomic status, and fewer people served per practicing physicians were all factors significantly related to doctor shopping behavior. Doctor shopping for zolpidem appears to be an important issue in Taiwan. Implementing a proper referral system with efficient data exchange by physician or pharmacist-led medication reconciliation process might reduce DSB. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Clinical efficacy of sublingual and subcutaneous birch pollen allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khinchi, M S; Poulsen, Lars K.; Carat, F

    2004-01-01

    Both sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) have a documented clinical efficacy, but only few comparative studies have been performed.......Both sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) have a documented clinical efficacy, but only few comparative studies have been performed....

  6. Clinical syndrome associated with zolpidem ingestion in dogs: 33 cases (January 1998-July 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jill A; Gwaltney-Brant, Sharon M; Albretsen, Jay C; Khan, Safdar A; Porter, Jessica A

    2002-01-01

    Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic of the imidazopyridine class that is used to treat insomnia in humans. Zolpidem binds selectively to the benzodiazepine omega-1 receptor and increases the frequency of chloride channel opening, which results in inhibition of neuronal excitation. A retrospective study was conducted of zolpidem ingestion in dogs that were reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) between January 1998 and July 2000. Data analysis included amount ingested, clinical effects, and time of onset of signs. Thirty-three reports of zolpidem ingestion in dogs (ranging in age from 5 months to 16 years) were evaluated. Approximate ingested dosages ranged from 0.24 to 21 mg/kg. Clinical signs reported included ataxia (18 dogs; 54.5%), hyperactivity (10 dogs; 30.3%), vomiting (7 dogs; 21.2%), and lethargy (5 dogs; 15.2%), as well as panting, disorientation, nonspecific behavior disorder, and hypersalivation (4 dogs each sign; 12.1%). Other signs reported include tachycardia, tremors, apprehension, vocalization, hypersalivation, weakness, and hyperesthesia. In 85% percent of reports, clinical signs developed within 1 hour and usually resolved within 12 hours. Although central nervous system (CNS) depression is reported as a primary effect of zolpidem in humans and would also be expected in dogs, information obtained from this study indicates that some dogs may exhibit a paradoxical excitation reaction. This effect appears to vary among individual dogs.

  7. Lack of cross-reactivity of Ambien (zolpidem) with drugs in standard urine drug screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergies, A A; Sainati, S; Roth-Schechter, B

    1997-04-01

    To determine in healthy volunteers (men and women; 18 to 40 years old) the potential cross-reactivity of Ambien (zolpidem) and/or its metabolites with drugs that are screened by the Syva EMIT II and the Abbott ADx urine drug screens assays. Open-label, fixed-treatment sequence of 1 night each of treatment with zolpidem (10 mg) and temazepam (15 mg). Clinical Pharmacology Unit within a teaching hospital. Over a 24-hour period, presence or absence of positive results on the Syva EMIT II or the Abbott ADx urine drug assay system, each performed at two different laboratory assay sites. Following ingestion of zolpidem, no subject had any positive response in either laboratory to the Syva EMIT II or the Abbott ADx urine drug screen assays at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours postdose. During the same time period, all subjects had measurable zolpidem plasma concentrations at 1.5 and 8 hours postdose, with mean concentrations of 115.2 ng/mL and 30.1 ng/mL, respectively (in agreement with its half-life of 2.5 hours). The positive response rate at 10 hours after ingestion of Restoril (temazepam) among the four laboratory/assay combinations ranged from 36.8% to 73.7%, a range that is within the reported response rates for these tests. These data indicate that zolpidem will not cross-react in standard urine drug screens with benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, cocaine, cannabinoids, or amphetamines.

  8. Zolpidem reduces the blood oxygen level-dependent signal during visual system stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Trksak, George H.; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Zolpidem is a short-acting imidazopyridine hypnotic that binds at the benzodiazepine binding site on specific GABAA receptors to enhance fast inhibitory neurotransmission. The behavioral and receptor pharmacology of zolpidem has been studied extensively, but little is known about its neuronal substrates in vivo. In the present within-subject, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study, blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) at 3 Tesla was used to assess the effects of zolpidem within the brain. Healthy participants (n=12) were scanned 60 minutes after acute oral administration of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg), and changes in BOLD signal were measured in the visual cortex during presentation of a flashing checkerboard. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were monitored continuously throughout the session. Zolpidem (10 and 20 mg) reduced the robust visual system activation produced by presentation of this stimulus, but had no effects on physiological activity during the fMRI scan. Zolpidem’s modulation of the BOLD signal within the visual cortex is consistent with the abundant distribution of GABAA receptors localized in this region, as well as previous studies showing a relationship between increased GABA-mediated neuronal inhibition and a reduction in BOLD activation. PMID:21640782

  9. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shawniqua T; Conte, Mary M; Goldfine, Andrew M; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas I; Victor, Jonathan D; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01157.001 PMID:24252875

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine following sublingual administration to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaio Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D

    2011-10-01

    To characterize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine gel administered sublingually in accordance with label instructions to establish appropriate withdrawal guidelines for horses before competition. 12 adult racehorses. Horses received a single sublingual administration of 0.04 mg of detomidine/kg. Blood samples were collected before and up to 72 hours after drug administration. Urine samples were collected for 5 days after detomidine administration. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and resulting data were analyzed by use of noncompartmental analysis. Chin-to-ground distance, heart rate and rhythm, glucose concentration, PCV, and plasma protein concentration were also assessed following detomidine administration. Mean ± SD terminal elimination half-life of detomidine was 1.5 ± 1 hours. Metabolite concentrations were below the limit of detection (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 ng/mL for detomidine, carboxydetomidine, and hydroxydetomidine, respectively) in plasma by 24 hours. Concentrations of detomidine and its metabolites were below the limit of detection (0.05 ng/mL for detomidine and 0.10 ng/mL for carboxydetomidine and hydroxydetomidine) in urine by 3 days. All horses had various degrees of sedation after detomidine administration. Time of onset was ≤ 40 minutes, and duration of sedation was approximately 2 hours. Significant decreases, relative to values at time 0, were detected for chin-to-ground distance and heart rate. There was an increased incidence and exacerbation of preexisting atrioventricular blocks after detomidine administration. A 48-hour and 3-day withdrawal period for detection in plasma and urine samples, respectively, should be adopted for sublingual administration of detomidine gel.

  11. Immunological mechanisms of sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Natalija; Bieber, T; Allam, J-P

    2011-06-01

    Within the last 100 years of allergen-specific immunotherapy, many clinical and scientific efforts have been made to establish alternative noninvasive allergen application strategies. Thus, intra-oral allergen delivery to the sublingual mucosa has been proven to be safe and effective. As a consequence, to date, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is widely accepted by most allergists as an alternative to conventional subcutaneous immunotherapy. Although immunological mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies in mice and humans within recent years provided deeper insights into local as well as systemic immunological features in response to SLIT. First of all, it was shown that the target organ, the oral mucosa, harbours a sophisticated immunological network as an important prerequisite for SLIT, which contains among other cells, local antigen-presenting cells (APC), such as dendritic cells (DCs), with a constitutive disposition to enforce tolerogenic mechanisms. Further on, basic research on local DCs within the oral mucosa gave rise to possible alternative strategies to deliver the allergens to other mucosal regions than sublingual tissue, such as the vestibulum oris. Moreover, characterization of oral DCs led to the identification of target structures for both allergens as well as adjuvants, which could be applied during SLIT. Altogether, SLIT came a long way since its very beginning in the last century and some, but not all questions about SLIT could be answered so far. However, recent research efforts as well as clinical approaches paved the way for another exciting 100 years of SLIT. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Schwannoma of the sublingual gland: report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sook; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    Schwannoma, also referred to as neurilemmoma, is a solitary, benign and slow growing tumor of nerve sheath origin. This rare lesion originates from Schwann cell of peripheral, autonomic and cranial nerve. Extracranial neurogenic tumor of the head and neck is uncommon. Schwannoma of the salivary gland is a particularly rare form of an extracranial neurogenic tumor, with most presenting in the parotid gland originating from a peripheral branch of the facial nerve. In this report, an unusual case of schwannoma in the sublingual region is presented and the literature concerning this subject is reviewed.

  13. Postoperative Sleep Disturbances after Zolpidem Treatment in Fast-Track Hip and Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Jennum, Poul; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have demonstrated pronounced reduction of REM sleep on the first nights following major surgery which may influence pain, analgesic use, and recovery. This placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study set out to evaluate the effect of zolpidem on sleep....... Polysomnography measures were performed for 2 nights, 1 night at home prior to surgery and on the first night after surgery, when the patient received placebo or zolpidem 10 mg. Analgesic use, pain levels, and subjective measures of fatigue and sleep quality were recorded. Analysis of sleep data was performed...... according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine manual. RESULTS: Objective sleep data did not show a significant difference between groups in any of the sleep stages. However, subjective data on sleep quality and fatigue showed significantly less fatigue and better sleep quality in the zolpidem group (p...

  14. Sibutramine-associated psychotic symptoms and zolpidem-induced complex behaviours: implications for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiglusz, Mariusz S; Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy; Nowak, Paweł; Jakuszkowiak-Wojten, Katarzyna; Landowski, Jerzy; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    Sibutramine is a weight loss agent recently withdrawn from the European market due to cardiovascular risk concerns. It was used for long-term obesity treatment. Zolpidem is a short acting hypnotic agent commonly used in the treatment of insomnia. A number of case reports describing psychotic reaction to sibutramine were reported in the literature. We present a case of a 61-year-old Caucasian woman who developed two psychotic episodes related to sibutramine treatment. The second psychotic episode was complicated with complex behaviours after zolpidem use due to insomnia. Sibutramine and zolpidem discontinuation resulted in rapid resolution of psychotic symptoms. This case suggests a possibility of incidence of psychotic symptoms and complex behaviour disturbances in patients prescribed sibutramine or other monoaminergic reuptake inhibitors.

  15. Síndrome de ingesta nocturna como efecto colateral del zolpidem

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    Stella Maris Valiensi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El zolpidem es una droga hipnótica utilizada para el tratamiento del insomnio. Disminuye la latencia del sueño, el número total de despertares y aumenta el tiempo total del sueño respetando en general su arquitectura. Se cree que aumenta la fase 3 del sueño lento profundo. Nuestro objetivo es comunicar 8 casos de síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño y conductas automáticas complejas asociadas a sonambulismo como efecto colateral del zolpidem. Se analizaron las historias clínicas de 8 pacientes tratados con zolpidem que referían ingesta nocturna de alimentos con amnesia total o parcial del episodio. Se presentan 6 mujeres y 2 hombres, entre 32 y 72 años (media: 58 años, 7 tratados con zolpidem 10 mg/noche y 1 con zolpidem 12.5 mg/noche de liberación prolongada. El tiempo de exposición previo al desarrollo de eventos fue de 1 a 180 días (media de 39.8. El número de episodios relatados era de 1 a 8/noche (media 2.5 asociado con amnesia. Los episodios desaparecieron por completo en el 100% de los casos al suspender la medicación. El síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño es una parasomnia de sueño lento profundo que consiste en episodios de ingesta de alimento o bebida durante la noche, con amnesia parcial o completa del episodio. El zolpidem podría inducir el síndrome de ingesta nocturna relacionado al sueño en aproximadamente el 1% de pacientes, aunque creemos que es un efecto adverso que está subdiagnosticado. Se resuelve simplemente suspendiendo la medicación.

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of nano-based films for buccal delivery of zolpidem

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    Bandar Essa AL-DHUBIAB

    Full Text Available Abstract Insomnia is becoming increasingly prevalent in the world general population. Therapies used by patients include over-the-counter therapies, herbal and dietary supplements, and pharmacological or nonpharmacological treatments. Among these, zolpidem is a pharmacological treatment popularly used for insomnia. Zolpidem is well tolerated and especially efficacious for initiation of sleep, and therefore is effective for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia. The purpose of the present study was to design and evaluate zolpidem nanoparticle-impregnated buccal films to prolong the duration of its action. Zolpidem nanospheres were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation and then loaded into buccoadhesive films (Z1-Z4 comprised of different concentrations of HPMC K100, Eudragit® RL 100, and carbopol 974P. The prepared films were characterized for physicomechanical properties, mucoadhesion, percent hydration, in vitro drug release, ex vivo permeation, and in vivo studies. In vitro drug release was found to depend upon film composition. Ex vivo studies showed that film Z4 had the highest flux. In vivo studies revealed that administration of zolpidem nanosphere-impregnated film enhanced absorption of the drug (p < 0.0001, with a higher peak plasma concentration (52.54 ± 8.22 ng/mL and area under the curve from time 0 to α (236.00 ± 39.51 ng.h/mL than oral administration. The increase in time taken to reach the maximum drug concentration (1.5 h further signifies the potential of these films to provide prolonged drug release. Given these promising results, we concluded that these buccal films could be an alternative route for effective zolpidem delivery.

  17. Compartment and Crush Syndromes After Sleep Deprivation and a Therapeutic Dose of Zolpidem

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    Martin R. Huecker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive review in the literature, compartment syndrome and crush syndrome remain difficult to diagnose. Trauma, toxins and reperfusion have been associated with these syndromes. Cases involving alcohol and drug abuse have described patients “found down” compressing an extremity. We present a case of a registered nurse who developed compartment syndrome in multiple limbs due to prolonged sleep after sleep deprivation and zolpidem use. To our knowledge, this is the first case of compartment syndrome or crush syndrome to have occurred in the setting of zolpidem use. Sleep disruption in healthcare workers represents a public health issue with dangerous sequelae, both acute and chronic.

  18. Development of midazolam sublingual tablets: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odou, P; Barthelemy, C; Robert, H

    1998-01-01

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine with short elimination half-life, used as induction or continuous agent for general anesthesia. At present, only injectable solution is available from French hospital pharmacies. The aim of the study is the development of 5 mg midazolam sublingual tablets to realize a short general anesthesia without intravenous or intramuscular injection. Incorporation of citric acid in the tablet formulation leads to an increase of dissolution rates of active drug, but a decrease of diffusion through lipid membranes is observed with 10 mg of citric acid when using the Dibbern's Resomat three phases apparatus. One explanation of this result is that midazolam (pKa = 6.1) in presence of 10 mg of citric acid is ionised. The ionised form, more hydrophilic, cannot cross the artificial lipid membrane and therefore the diffusion decreases. On the other hand, the decrease of diffusion's rate, when pH increases, is explained by the precipitation of midazolam at pH higher than 6. A compromise between dissolution and diffusion results leads us to choose the sublingual formulation containing 5 mg of citric acid per tablet.

  19. Evaluation of sublingual microcirculation in children with dengue shock

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    Daniella Mancino da Luz Caixeta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report the sublingual microcirculation observed using Sidestream Dark Field imaging in two children with dengue shock. METHOD: Two children, aged 9 and 10 years, were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with dengue shock and multiple organ dysfunction. Sublingual microcirculation was assessed in each patient on the first and second days of shock and was assessed a final time when the patients were no longer in shock (on the day prior to extubation using Sidestream Dark Field technology. The De Backer score and microvascular flow index were used for the analyses. RESULTS: Both patients had reduced perfused small vessel density in the first two days and showed predominantly intermittent or no microcirculation flow, as demonstrated by a low microvascular flow index. The blood flow in the large vessels was not affected. Prior to the extubation, the microvascular flow index had increased, although the perfused small vessel density remained diminished, suggesting persistent endothelial dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Severe microcirculation changes may be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the final stages of dengue shock, which is frequently irreversible and associated with high mortality rates. Microcirculatory monitoring may help elucidate the physiopathology of dengue shock and prove useful as a prognostic tool or therapeutic target.

  20. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

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    Jacob Juel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation, and dysphagia. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was first described in 1986. Following this description, the use has greatly increased in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, as an alternative to subcutaneously administered immunotherapy. Side effects are commonly of oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal nature, for example, swelling, itching, irritation, ulceration of the oropharynx and nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhoea. More serious side effects are dominated by respiratory tract and systemic manifestations. A 30-year-old male experienced refractory, relentless, and debilitation GORD subsequent to administration of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite in allergic rhinitis. The patient had to stop the SLIT after two weeks of administration due to GORD. The cessation resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms.

  1. Implication of mGlu5 receptor in the enhancement of morphine-induced hyperlocomotion under chronic treatment with zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Masahiro; Ishii, Kazunori; Masukawa, Daiki; Ando, Koji; Ikekubo, Yuiko; Ishikawa, Yutori; Shibasaki, Yumiko; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-05

    Long-term exposure to zolpidem induces drug dependence, and it is well known that the balance between the GABAergic and glutamatergic systems plays a critical role in maintaining the neuronal network. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between GABAA receptor α1 subunit and mGlu5 receptor in the limbic forebrain including the N.Acc. after treatment with zolpidem for 7 days. mGlu5 receptor protein levels were significantly increased after treatment with zolpidem for 7 days, and this change was accompanied by the up-regulation of phospholipase Cβ1 and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα, which are downstream of mGlu5 receptor in the limbic forebrain. To confirm that mGlu5 receptor is directly involved in dopamine-related behavior in mice following chronic treatment with zolpidem, we measured morphine-induced hyperlocomotion after chronic treatment with zolpidem in the presence or absence of an mGlu5 receptor antagonist. Although chronic treatment with zolpidem significantly enhanced morphine-induced hyperlocomotion, this enhancement of morphine-induced hyperlocomotion was suppressed by treating it with the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP. These results suggest that chronic treatment with zolpidem caused neural plasticity in response to activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system accompanied by an increase in mGlu5 receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Cu(II) ions be doped into the crystal structure of potassium hydrogen tartrate?

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Remesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    The differing binding preferences of the hydrogen tartrate ligand (HC4H4O6)- namely {\\mu}7-octadentate mode for potassium ion and bidentate mode for cupric ion rules out the doping (incorporation) of any Cu(II) ion into the crystal structure of potassium hydrogen tartrate. Hence, the claim of growth of copper doped potassium hydrogen tartrate viz. K0.96Cu0.04C4H5O6 by Mathivanan and Haris, Indian J Pure App Phys 51 (2013) 851-859 is untenable.

  3. Optical absorption in gel grown cadmium tartrate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, S K; Kothari, A J; Patel, R G; Chauha, K M; Chudasama, B N

    2006-01-01

    Single crystals of cadmium tartrate pentahydrate (CTP) have been grown by the famous gel technique. The slow and controlled reaction between Cd 2+ and (C 4 H 4 O 6 ) 2- ions in silica hydrogel results in formation of the insoluble product, CdC 4 H 4 O 6 .5H 2 O. Optical absorption spectra have been recorded in the range 200 to 2500 nm. Fundamental absorption edge for electronic transition has been analyzed. The direct allowed transition is found to be present in the region of relatively higher photon energy. Analysis of the segments of α 1/2 versus hν graph has been made to separate individual contribution of phonons. The phonons involved in the indirect transition are found to correspond to 335 and 420 cm -1 . Scattering of charge carriers in the lattice is found due to acoustic phonons

  4. The effects of diazepam and zolpidem on cocaine- and amphetamine-induced place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meririnne, E; Kankaanpää, A; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T

    1999-01-01

    Drugs such as benzodiazepines, which enhance the effects of inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), are known to modulate the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, which is considered to mediate the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. The effects of diazepam, a benzodiazepine that binds unspecifically to omega 1- (omega1-) and omega2-receptors, and zolpidem, a nonbenzodiazepine drug that binds preferentially to omega1-receptors, on cocaine- and amphetamine-induced place preference were evaluated in Wistar rats. In tests using the counterbalanced method, neither diazepam (0.2, 1, and 5 mg/kg) nor zolpidem (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg) alone induced place preference or place aversion. Diazepam pretreatment prevented both cocaine- and amphetamine-induced (15 and 9 mg/kg, respectively) place preference; however, at doses that were earlier shown to cause sedation and amnesia, zolpidem failed to prevent either cocaine- or amphetamine-induced place preference. These results suggest that diazepam interferes with the rewarding properties of the psychostimulants, whereas zolpidem is less effective in this respect, possibly due to differential distribution of omega1- and omega2-receptors in the brain.

  5. Design and in vitro evaluation of multiparticulate floating drug delivery system of zolpidem tartarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrutkar, P P; Chaudhari, P D; Patil, S B

    2012-01-01

    Zolpidem tartarate is a non-benzodiazepine, sedative-hypnotic, which finds its major use in various types of insomnia. The present work relates to development of multiparticulate floating drug delivery system based on gas generation technique to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability. Modified release dosage form of zolpidem tartarate adapted to release over a predetermined time period, according to biphasic profile of dissolution, where the first phase is immediate release phase for inducing the sleep and the second phase is modified release phase for maintaining the sleep up to 10 h. The system consists of zolpidem tartarate layered pellets coated with effervescent layer and polymeric membrane. The floating ability and in vitro drug release of the system were dependent on amount of the effervescent agent (sodium bicarbonate) layered onto the drug layered pellets, and coating level of the polymeric membrane (Eudragit(®) NE 30D). The system could float completely within 5 min and maintain the floating over a period of 10 h. The multiparticulate floating delivery system of zolpidem tartarate with rapid floating and modified drug release was obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. TESTING THE EFFECTS OF THE IMIDAZOPYRIDINE ZOLPIDEM ON MEMORY : AN ECOLOGICALLY VALID APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, JL; Louwerens, JW; Cnossen, F; de Jong, HTP

    1992-01-01

    The present study explores whether memory impairments are found on the morning following intake of the hypnotic zolpidem which is a member of a new pharmaceutical class, the imidazopyridines. The procedure used is novel: it involves testing subjects in their own homes via the telephone. A previous

  7. Relationship between sublingual and intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in patients with abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, E. Christiaan; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; Spronk, Peter E.; Ince, Can

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relation between sublingual and intestinal microcirculatory alterations in patients with abdominal sepsis. Design. Prospective observational study. Setting. A 23-bed mixed intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients: Twenty-three patients with abdominal

  8. Sublingual Nitroglycerin Administration in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography : a Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A. P.; Suchá, D.; Park, Jakob; Leiner, Tim; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-01-01

    To systematically investigate the literature for the influence of sublingual nitroglycerin administration on coronary diameter, the number of evaluable segments, image quality, heart rate and blood pressure, and diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography. A systematic

  9. Critical appraisal of the clinical utility of sublingual immunotherapy in allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aissa

    2016-12-01

    We performed a literature review in order to remind the mechanisms of action and to demonstrate efficacy and tolerability of the sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and its impact on the quality of life.

  10. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sublingual gland: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the sublingual gland is an extremely rare neoplasm. The clinicopathological characteristics of ACC are slow-growing swelling with or without ulceration, perineural spread, local recurrence, and distant metastasis. This report describes a 58-year-old male who had a slowly growing swelling without ulceration on the right side of the mouth floor that had been present for 1 month. In a radiological examination, the mass showed multilocular cystic features and no bony or tongue muscle invasion. No enlarged cervical lymph nodes were detected. Excisional biopsy and histological analysis showed that the lesion was ACC. In addition to reporting a rare case of ACC, this report also discusses the differential diagnosis and treatment of ACC with a review of the relevant literature.

  11. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  12. Histoanatomical study of the Sublingual Salivary Gland in the Camel

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    M.a Ebrahimi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The heads of ten adult camels were used in this study. Following skin removal, the length, width and thickness of the gland was measured by ruler and caliper. Dye injection was used to distinguish the sublingual duct papilla and 1cm sections from the gland were removed and fixed to prepare histologic sections stained with H & E for microscopic studies. The long, ribbon like and lobulated monostomatic part of the gland is situated underneath the tongue alongside the hypoglossus muscle. This part of the gland begins from the mandibular symphysis and is continued caudally to near the root of the tongue. The average length, width and thickness of this part were 15.2±0.02, 2.2±0.03 and 0.5±0.05 cm respectively. The polystomatic part was observed as scattered and lobulated near the submucosa and in front of the monostomatic part with decreasing concentration caudally. The average size of these fragments was approximately 0.5±0.02 cm. The overall appearance of the gland was lobulated with a pink colour. The monostomatic part has a single duct entering the sublingual caruncle. The minute polystomatic ducts open into the depressions alongside the tongue inside the oral cavity. These ducts are numerous. Histologically, the gland is surrounded by a capsule of dense connective tissue. Trabcules from the capsule penetrate the gland and divide it into lobules. Loose connective tissue makes up the framework of the gland and there are tubulo-acinus glands in the spaces of this framework. Approximately 95% of the secretory cells of this gland consist of mucous secreting cells. Myoepithelial cells are seen on the external surface of the secretory cells and also alongside the connecting ducts.

  13. Spontaneous Adverse Event Reports Associated with Zolpidem in the United States 2003–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen K.; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; Grunstein, Ronald R.; Ho, Samuel S.; Fois, Romano A.; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.; Saini, Bandana

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: Stimulated reporting occurs when patients and healthcare professionals are influenced or “stimulated” by media publicity to report specific drug-related adverse reactions, significantly biasing pharmacovigilance analyses. Among countries where the non-benzodiazepine hypnotic drug zolpidem is marketed, the United States experienced a comparable surge of media reporting during 2006–2009 linking the above drug with the development of complex neuropsychiatric sleep-related behaviors. However, the effect of this stimulated reporting in the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System has not been explored. Methods: Using disproportionality analyses, reporting odds ratios for zolpidem exposure and the following adverse events; parasomnia, movement-based parasomnia, nonmovement-based parasomnia, amnesia, hallucination, and suicidality were determined and compared to all other medications in the database, followed by specific comparison to the benzodiazepine hypnotic class, year-by-year from 2003 to 2012. Results: Odds ratios were increased significantly during and after the period of media publicity for parasomnias, movement-based parasomnias, amnesias and hallucinations. We also observed that zolpidem adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports have higher odds for parasomnias, movement-based parasomnias, amnesias, hallucinations, and suicidality compared to all other drugs, even before the media publicity cluster. Conclusions: Although our results indicate that zolpidem reports have higher odds for the ADR of interest even before the media publicity cluster, negative media coverage greatly exacerbated the reporting of these adverse reactions. The effect of such reporting must be borne in mind when decisions around drugs which have been the subject of intense media publicity are made by health professionals or regulatory bodies. Citation: Wong CK, Marshall NS, Grunstein RR, Ho SS, Fois RA, Hibbs DE, Hanrahan JR, Saini B

  14. Retrospective population cohort study on hip fracture risk associated with zolpidem medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Yu; Chen, Pei-Chun; Liao, Chun Hui; Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have evaluated the hip fracture risk for zolpidem users. We assessed the risk for subjects taking zolpidem. Population-based retrospective cohort study using claims data of a universal insurance system. We identified 6,978 patients newly prescribed for zolpidem in 2000-2001 age 18 y and older, and 27,848 nonusers frequency matched with sex, age, and date visiting a clinic. Both cohorts were followed up to the end of 2008 to measure the hip fracture incidence and risk, which considered factors such as sex, age, occupation, days of drug use, and osteoporosis status. The zolpidem users had a 2.23-fold higher hip fracture incidence than nonusers (3.10 versus 1.39 per 1,000 person-y). The risk increased with age for both cohorts. The elderly users had a 21-fold higher incidence than the younger users, or twofold higher than the elderly nonusers. Among 33 patients (20.4%) with hip fracture occurring during presumed medication days, which was accountable for an incidence of 1,083.0 per 1,000 person-y. Those taking the medicine for 8 days or longer had a moderately higher fracture rate than those taking it for less days (6.02 versus 4.48 per 100 person-times) with a ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval 0.42-4.56). Subjects with blue collar occupations were at a higher fracture risk. The hip fracture risk of zolpidem users is higher than that of nonusers. Fracture prevention awareness should be disseminated to the users.

  15. Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

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    Péter Palágyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue capnometry may be suitable for the indirect evaluation of regional hypoperfusion. We tested the performance of a new sublingual capillary tonometer in experimental hemorrhage. Thirty-six anesthetized, ventilated mini pigs were divided into sham-operated (n=9 and shock groups (n=27. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP to 40 mmHg for 60 min, after which fluid resuscitation started aiming to increase MAP to 75% of the baseline value (60–180 min. Sublingual carbon-dioxide partial pressure was measured by tonometry, using a specially coiled silicone rubber tube. Mucosal red blood cell velocity (RBCV and capillary perfusion rate (CPR were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS imaging. In the 60 min shock phase a significant drop in cardiac index was accompanied by reduction in sublingual RBCV and CPR and significant increase in the sublingual mucosal-to-arterial PCO2 gap (PSLCO2 gap, which significantly improved during the 120 min resuscitation phase. There was significant correlation between PSLCO2 gap and sublingual RBCV (r=-0.65, p<0.0001, CPR (r=-0.64, p<0.0001, central venous oxygen saturation (r=-0.50, p<0.0001, and central venous-to-arterial PCO2 difference (r=0.62, p<0.0001. This new sublingual tonometer may be an appropriate tool for the indirect evaluation of circulatory changes in shock.

  16. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly.

  17. Effects of sodium tartrate anodizing on fatigue life of TA15 titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Chunjuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anodizing is always used as an effective surface modification method to improve the corrosion resistance and wear resistance of titanium alloy. The sodium tartrate anodizing is a new kind of environmental anodizing method. In this work, the effects of sodium tartrate anodizing on mechanical property were studied. The oxide film was performed on the TA15 titanium alloy using sodium tartrate as the film former. The effects of this anodizing and the traditional acid anodizing on the fatigue life of TA15 alloy were compared. The results show that the sodium tartrate anodizing just caused a slight increase of hydrogen content in the alloy, and had a slight effect on the fatigue life. While, the traditional acid anodizing caused a significant increase of hydrogen content in the substrate and reduced the fatigue life of the alloy significantly.

  18. Technetium 99-m labeled radio-diagnostic agents employing stannous tartrate and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung. 31 claims, no drawings

  19. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly

  20. Effect of zolpidem on human cytochrome P450 activity, and on transport mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Moltke, Lisa L; Weemhoff, James L; Perloff, Michael D; Hesse, Leah M; Harmatz, Jerold S; Roth-Schechter, Barbara F; Greenblatt, David J

    2002-12-01

    The influence of high concentrations of zolpidem (100 microM, corresponding to approximately 200 times maximum therapeutic concentrations) on the activity of six human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was evaluated in a model system using human liver microsomes. Zolpidem produced negligible or weak inhibition of human CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A. Transport of rhodamine 123, presumed to be mediated mainly by the energy-dependent efflux transport protein P-glycoprotein, was studied in a cell culture system using a human intestinal cell line. High concentrations of zolpidem (100 microM), exceeding the usual therapeutic range by more than 100-fold, produced only modest impairment of rhodamine 123 transport. The findings indicate that zolpidem is very unlikely to cause clinical drug interactions attributable to impairment of CYP activity or P-gp mediated transport. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The discovery of novel tartrate-based TNF-[alpha] converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Kristin E.; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Shipps, Jr., Gerald W.; Belanger, David B.; Chan, Tin Yau; Curran, Patrick J.; Dai, Chaoyang; Deng, Yongqi; Girijavallabhan, Vinay M.; Hong, Liwu; Lavey, Brian J.; Lee, Joe F.; Li, Dansu; Liu, Zhidan; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Ting, Pauline C.; Vaccaro, Henry; Wang, Li; Wang, Tong; Yu, W.; Zhou, G.; Niu, X.; Sun, J.; Kozlowski, J.A.; Lundell, D.J.; Madison, V.; McKittrick, B.; Piwinski, J.J.; Shih, N.Y.; Siddiqui, M. Arshad; Strickland, Corey O. (SPRI)

    2010-09-17

    A novel series of TNF-{alpha} convertase (TACE) inhibitors which are non-hydroxamate have been discovered. These compounds are bis-amides of L-tartaric acid (tartrate) and coordinate to the active site zinc in a tridentate manner. They are selective for TACE over other MMP's. We report the first X-ray crystal structure for a tartrate-based TACE inhibitor.

  2. Clinical benefits of treatment with SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet in house dust mite allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Kleine-Tebbe, J; Rehm, D

    2017-10-01

    Treatment with SQ (standardised quality) house dust mite sublingual tablet for 1 year resulted in a decreased probability of having an allergic rhinitis (AR) exacerbation day (from 11% [placebo] to 5% [SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet]) and an increased probability of having a mild AR day (from 16% [placebo] to 34% [SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet]). © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  3. Zolpidem Reduces Hippocampal Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Mice: A Large Scale Calcium Imaging Study with Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Otte, Stephani; Aluisio, Leah; Ziv, Yaniv; Burns, Laurie D.; Dugovic, Christine; Yun, Sujin; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal’s state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25372144

  4. A therapeutic dose of zolpidem reduces thalamic GABA in healthy volunteers: a proton MRS study at 4 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C; Jensen, J Eric; Penetar, David M; Prescot, Andrew P; Lukas, Scott E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2009-05-01

    Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine sedative/hypnotic that acts at GABA(A) receptors to influence inhibitory neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system. A great deal is known about the behavioral effects of this drug in humans and laboratory animals, but little is known about zolpidem's specific effects on neurochemistry in vivo. We evaluated how acute administration of zolpidem affected levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and other brain metabolites. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 4 T was employed to measure the effects of zolpidem on brain chemistry in 19 healthy volunteers. Participants underwent scanning following acute oral administration of a therapeutic dose of zolpidem (10 mg) in a within-subject, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single-visit study. In addition to neurochemical measurements from single voxels within the anterior cingulate (ACC) and thalamus, a series of questionnaires were administered periodically throughout the experimental session to assess subjective mood states. Zolpidem reduced GABA levels in the thalamus, but not the ACC. There were no treatment effects with respect to other metabolite levels. Self-reported ratings of "dizzy," "nauseous," "confused," and "bad effects" were increased relative to placebo, as were ratings on the sedation/intoxication (PCAG) and psychotomimetic/dysphoria (LSD) scales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the decrease in GABA and "dizzy." Zolpidem engendered primarily dysphoric-like effects and the correlation between reduced thalamic GABA and "dizzy" may be a function of zolpidem's interaction with alpha1GABA(A) receptors in the cerebellum, projecting through the vestibular system to the thalamus.

  5. Association of zolpidem use and subsequent increased risk of epilepsy: a population-based, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnod, Tomor; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of long-term zolpidem use on the subsequent risk of epilepsy. We used data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan to conduct a population-based case-control study. We identified 4,972 newly diagnosed epilepsy patients (ICD-9-CM code 345) for the period of 2005-2010 as cases. For each epilepsy case, 4 controls without a history of epilepsy were randomly selected from the rest of the population. Zolpidem was used as a predictor of epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy exhibited an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 (95% CI, 1.70-2.03) and were, therefore, more strongly associated with zolpidem exposure than control patients were. The adjusted OR of epilepsy increased with the increase of mean zolpidem exposure (g/y). Compared with the OR of nonusers, the adjusted OR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.44-1.86) for those who had taken zolpidem and 2.38 (95% CI, 2.06-2.74) for those who had taken ≥ 20.0 g/y of zolpidem. An adjusted OR of 3.55 (95% CI, 2.94-4.28) was noted to be associated with epilepsy when users had stopped taking the drug less than 7 days earlier. The estimated risk declined to an OR of 1.62 (95% CI, 1.47-1.78) when users had stopped taking the drug more than 90 days earlier. This population-based, retrospective case-control study revealed a possible increase in epilepsy risk with zolpidem use, at either typical or supratherapeutic doses. These findings might stimulate public interest in safety issues regarding zolpidem use. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. Analysis of Zolpidem in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    in postmortem fluids and tissues. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement Forensic Toxicology , Zolpidem, Ambien, Postmortem Distribution, LC/MS/MS...Institute (CAMI) toxicology database identified 10 fatalities from separate avia- tion accidents that were reported positive for zolpidem and also...Sample Selection and Storage A search of the CAMI toxicology database (ToxFLO, DiscoverSoft Development, LLC; Oklahoma City, OK) identi- fied 10

  7. Zolpidem reduces hippocampal neuronal activity in freely behaving mice: a large scale calcium imaging study with miniaturized fluorescence microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Berdyyeva

    Full Text Available Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal's state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼ 65% significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3% showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders.

  8. Enantiopure Chiral Coordination Polymers Based on Polynuclear Paddlewheel Helices and Arsenyl Tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Valentín-Pérez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the preparation of chiral, one-dimensional coordination polymers based on trinuclear paddlewheel helices [M3(dpa4]2+ (M = Co(II and Ni(II; dpa = the anion of 2,2′-dipyridylamine. Enantiomeric resolution of a racemic mixture of [M3(dpa4]2+ complexes was achieved by chiral recognition of the respective enantiomer by [Δ-As2(tartrate2]2− or [Λ-As2(tartrate2]2− in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, affording crystalline coordination polymers formed from [(Δ-Co3(dpa4(Λ-As2(tartrate2]·3DMF (Δ-1, [(Λ-Co3(dpa4(Δ-As2(tartrate2]·3DMF (Λ-1, [(Δ-Ni3(dpa4(Λ-As2(tartrate2]·(4 − nDMF∙nEt2O (Δ-2 or [(Λ-Ni3(dpa4(Δ-As2(tartrate2]·(4 − nDMF∙nEt2O (Λ-2 repeating units. UV-visible circular dichroism spectra of the complexes in DMF solutions demonstrate the efficient isolation of optically active species. The helicoidal [M3(dpa4]2+ units that were obtained display high stability towards racemization as shown by the absence of an evolution of the dichroic signals after several days at room temperature and only a small decrease of the signal after 3 h at 80 °C.

  9. Buccal or sublingual misoprostol for cervical ripening and induction of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzonzini, G; Hofmeyr, G J

    2004-10-18

    This is one of a series of reviews of cervical ripening and labour induction using standardised methodology. Misoprostol administered by the oral and sublingual routes have the advantage of rapid onset of action, while the sublingual and vaginal routes have the advantage of prolonged activity and greatest bioavailability. To determine the effectiveness and safety of misoprostol administered buccally or sublingually for third trimester cervical ripening and induction of labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (8 December 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2003), and bibliographies of relevant papers. Randomised controlled trials comparing buccal or sublingual misoprostol used for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction with placebo/no treatment or other methods listed above it on a predefined list of labour induction methods. A generic strategy was developed to deal with the large volume and complexity of trial data relating to labour induction. Data were extracted onto standardized forms, checked for accuracy, and analysed using RevMan software. Three studies (502 participants) compared buccal/sublingual misoprostol respectively with a vaginal regimen (200 microg versus 50 microg) and with oral administration (50 versus 50 microg and 50 versus 100microg).The buccal route was associated with a trend to fewer caesarean sections than with the vaginal route (18/73 versus 28/79; relative risk (RR) 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42 to 1.15). There were no significant differences in any other outcomes. When the same dosage was used sublingually versus orally, the sublingual route was associated with less failures to achieve vaginal delivery within 24 hours (12/50 versus 19/50; RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.16), reduced oxytocin augmentation (17/50 versus 23/50; RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.21) and reduced caesarean section (8/50 versus 15/50; RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.25 to

  10. Effect of pH value and delayed-action time on catalytic activity of tartrate niobium(5) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, I.I.; Chernysheva, L.M.; Bobkova, M.V.; Solomonov, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Results of thermokinetic study of catalytic activity of niobium (5) tartrate solutions in the oxidation of ascorbic acid with hydrogen peroxide are presented. Addition of tartrate-ions to a concentration of 1x10 -2 M and higher in niobium (5) diluted solution enhances the catalytic activity of Nb(5). Alkaline tartrate solutions of niobium (5) may be used as standard solutions in determination of niobium microquantities by kinetic method

  11. Immunotherapy (oral and sublingual) for food allergy to fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes-Nuñez, Juan Jose; Zhang, Yuan; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Bartra Tomas, Joan; Reyes, Juan Manuel; Pineda de la Losa, Fernando; Enrique, Ernesto

    2015-11-09

    Food allergy is an abnormal immunological response following exposure (usually ingestion) to a food. Elimination of the allergen is the principle treatment for food allergy, including allergy to fruit. Accidental ingestion of allergenic foods can result in severe anaphylactic reactions. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a specific treatment, when the avoidance of allergenic foods is problematic. Recently, studies have been conducted on different types of immunotherapy for the treatment of food allergy, including oral (OIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). To determine the efficacy and safety of oral and sublingual immunotherapy in children and adults with food allergy to fruits, when compared with placebo or an elimination strategy. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and AMED were searched for published results along with trial registries and the Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine for grey literature. The date of the most recent search was July 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing OIT or SLIT with placebo or an elimination diet were included. Participants were children or adults diagnosed with food allergy who presented immediate fruit reactions. We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. We assessed treatment effect through risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes. We identified two RCTs (N=89) eligible for inclusion. These RCTs addressed oral or sublingual immunotherapy, both in adults, with an allergy to apple or peach respectively. Both studies enrolled a small number of participants and used different methods to provide these differing types of immunotherapy. Both studies were judged to be at high risk of bias in at least one domain. Overall, the quality of evidence was judged to be very low due to the small number of studies and participants and possible bias. The studies were clinically heterogeneous and hence we did not pool the

  12. Tolterodine Tartrate Proniosomal Gel Transdermal Delivery for Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Rajabalaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to formulate and evaluate side effects of transdermal delivery of proniosomal gel compared to oral tolterodine tartrate (TT for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB. Proniosomal gels are surfactants, lipids and soy lecithin, prepared by coacervation phase separation. Formulations were analyzed for drug entrapment efficiency (EE, vesicle size, surface morphology, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in vitro skin permeation, and in vivo effects. The EE was 44.87%–91.68% and vesicle size was 253–845 nm for Span formulations and morphology showed a loose structure. The stability and skin irritancy test were also carried out for the optimized formulations. Span formulations with cholesterol-containing formulation S1 and glyceryl distearate as well as lecithin containing S3 formulation showed higher cumulative percent of permeation such as 42% and 35%, respectively. In the in vivo salivary secretion model, S1 proniosomal gel had faster recovery, less cholinergic side effect on the salivary gland compared with that of oral TT. Histologically, bladder of rats treated with the proniosomal gel formulation S1 showed morphological improvements greater than those treated with S3. This study demonstrates the potential of proniosomal vesicles for transdermal delivery of TT to treat OAB.

  13. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer.Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity.Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  14. AAS and spectrophotometric determination of propranolol HCl and metoprolol tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ries, M A; Abou Attia, F M; Ibrahim, S A

    2000-12-15

    Two simple and accurate spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of propranolol hydrochloride (I) and metoprolol tartrate (II). The methods are based on the reaction of each drug as a secondary amine: (a) with carbon disulphide, the formed complex extracted into iso-butyl methyl ketone (IBMK) after chelation with Cu(II) ions at pH 7.5, followed by measuring the absorbance at 435.4 nm or indirectly for the drug by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The calibration graph is linear up to 40 and 60 microg ml(-1) with apparent molar absorptivities of 6.89 x 10(3) and 1.08 x 104 l mol(-1) cm(-1) and correlation coefficients of 0.9994 and 0.9995 for propranolol and metoprolol, respectively; (b) with pi-acceptors, tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), or chloranilic acid (CLA) to give highly coloured complex species. The coloured products are quantitated spectrophotometrically at 415 or 510 nm for the two drugs with TCNE and CLA, respectively, and obey Beer's Law with RSD less than 2.0. The methods were applied to the determination of these drugs in pharmaceutical preparation without interferences.

  15. Prehospital high-dose sublingual nitroglycerin rarely causes hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Thompson, Jeffrey J; Tundo, Gina N; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2013-10-01

    High-dose intravenous nitroglycerin is a common in-hospital treatment for respiratory distress due to congestive heart failure (CHF) with hypertension. Intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin administration is impractical in the prehospital setting. In 2011, a new regional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocol was introduced allowing advanced providers to treat CHF with high-dose oral nitroglycerin. The protocol calls for patients to be treated with two sublingual tabs (0.8 mg) when systolic blood pressure (SBP) was >160 mm Hg, or three sublingual tabs (1.2 mg) when SBP was >200 mm Hg, every five minutes as needed. Hypothesis/Problem To assess the protocol's safety, the incidence of hypotension following prehospital administration of multiple simultaneous nitroglycerin (MSN) tabs by EMS providers was studied. This study was a retrospective cohort study of patients from a single commercial EMS agency over a 6-month period. Records from patients with at least one administration of MSN were reviewed. For each administration, the first documented vital signs pre- and post-administration were compared. Administrations were excluded if pre- or post-administration vital signs were missing. One hundred case-patients had at least one MSN administration by an advanced provider during the study period. Twenty-five case-patients were excluded due to incomplete vital signs. Seventy-five case-patients with 95 individual MSN administrations were included for analysis. There were 65 administrations of two tabs, 29 administrations of three tabs, and one administration of four tabs. The mean change in SBP following MSN was -14.7 mm Hg (SD = 30.7; range, +59 to -132). Three administrations had documented systolic hypotension in the post-administration vital signs (97/71, 78/50 and 66/47). All three patients were over 65 years old, were administered two tabs, had documented improved respiratory status, and had repeat SBP of at least 100. The incidence of hypotension following MSN

  16. Misoprostol sublingual versus vaginal para indução do parto a termo Sublingual versus vaginal misoprostol for labor induction of term pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olímpio Barbosa de Moraes Filho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar efetividade e segurança de uso de comprimido sublingual de 25 µg de misoprostol com o comprimido vaginal de 25 µg do misoprostol na indução do parto com idade gestacional e > 37 semanas e colo uterino desfavorável. MÉTODOS: realizou-se ensaio clínico controlado e aleatorizado, não cego, na Maternidade Monteiro de Morais (CISAM-UPE, em Recife, no período de outubro de 2003 a fevereiro de 2004. Participaram do estudo 123 gestantes com idade gestacional e > 37 semanas, índice de Bishop PURPOSE: to compare the effectiveness and safety of sublingual misoprostol (25 µg versus vaginal misoprostol (25 µg (Prostokos® for labor induction with gestational age > 37 weeks and unripe cervices. METHODS: a randomized controlled clinical trial was performed at the Maternidade Monteiro de Morais (CISAM-UPE, in Recife - PE, Brazil, from October 2003 to February 2004. One hundred and twenty-three women with gestational age > 37 weeks, Bishop score <8, not in labor and with medical indication for interruption of pregnancy were included in this study. The women received randomly 25 µg sublingual misoprostol or 25 µg vaginal misoprostol every 6 h, not exceeding eight doses. In order to evaluate the differences between the groups, means, standard deviations, Student's t-test, c² trend and Mann-Whitney test were used. The statistical significance was considered to be 5%. RESULTS: there were no significant differences between the number of women with vaginal delivery in the sublingual group as compared with the vaginal group (65.5 vs 75.8%, p<0.22, or in the interval of time between the induction onset and delivery (24 h and 42 min vs 20 h and 37 min respectively, p=0.11. The two groups, sublingual and vaginal, also did not differ as to the hyperstimulation syndrome (1.7 vs 3.2%, p=0.95, meconium incidence (5.2 vs 4.8%, p=0.74, Apgar score <7 at 5 min (3.4 vs 4.8%, p=0.98 and other adverse effects. CONCLUSION: twenty-five micrograms of

  17. Two-chiral component microemulsion EKC - chiral surfactant and chiral oil. Part 2: diethyl tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Kimberly A; Foley, Joe P

    2007-08-01

    In this second study on dual-chirality microemulsions containing a chiral surfactant and a chiral oil, a less hydrophobic and lower interfacial tension chiral oil, diethyl tartrate, is employed (Part 1, Foley, J. P. et al.., Electrophoresis, DOI: 10.1002/elps.200600551). Six stereochemical combinations of dodecoxycarbonylvaline (DDCV: R, S, or racemic, 2.00% w/v), racemic 2-hexanol (1.65% v/v), and diethyl tartrate (D, L, or racemic, 0.88% v/v) were examined as pseudostationary phases (PSPs) for the enantioseparation of six chiral pharmaceutical compounds: pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, N-methyl ephedrine, metoprolol, synephrine, and atenolol. Average efficiencies increased with the addition of a chiral oil to R-DDCV PSP formulations. Modest improvements in resolution and enantioselectivity (alpha(enant)) were achieved with two-chiral-component systems over the one-chiral-component microemulsion. Slight enantioselective synergies were confirmed using a thermodynamic model. Results obtained in this study are compared to those obtained in Part 1 as well as those obtained with chiral MEEKC using an achiral, low-interfacial-tension oil (ethyl acetate). Dual-chirality microemulsions with the more hydrophobic oil dibutyl tartrate yielded, relative to diethyl tartrate, higher efficiencies (100,000-134,000 vs. 80,800-94,300), but lower resolution (1.64-1.91 vs. 2.08-2.21) due to lower enantioselectivities (1.060-1.067 vs. 1.078-1.081). Atenolol enantiomers could not be separated with the dibutyl tartrate-based microemulsions but were partially resolved using diethyl tartrate microemulsions. A comparable single-chirality microemulsion based on the achiral oil ethyl acetate yielded, relative to diethyl tartrate, lower efficiency (78 300 vs. 91 600), higher resolution (1.99 vs. 1.83), and similar enantioselectivities.

  18. Involvement of nitrergic system in anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus: Evaluation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Seyyed Majid; Ghasemi, Maryam; Bahremand, Taraneh; Momeny, Majid; Gholami, Mahdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2017-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the role of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus (SE) and probable mechanisms involved in seizure threshold alteration. In the present study, lithium chloride (127mg/kg) was administered 20h prior to pilocarpine (60mg/kg) to induce SE in adult male Wistar rats. Different doses of zolpidem (0.1, 1, 2, 5, 10mg/kg) were injected 30min before pilocarpine administration. Furthermore, to find out whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in the observed effect, L-arginine and L-NAME were injected 15min before zolpidem. Afterward, we identified the particular NO isoform mediating the effect of zolpidem by injecting aminoguanidine (AG) and 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI) 15min prior to zolpidem. Moreover, in both 6 and 24h after pilocarpine injection, experimental groups underwent hippocampectomy to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) genes expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Pre-treatment with zolpidem significantly prevented the onset of SE in a dose-dependent manner. AG and L-NAME significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem while L-arginine inverted this effect. Our qRT-PCR exerted that there was a continuous elevation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression over 6 and 24h after pilocarpine administration in SE and L-arginine+Zolpidem groups while in AG/L-NAME+Zolpidem and zolpidem groups this upregulation was prevented. Our study indicates that zolpidem prevents the onset of SE through inhibition of iNOS/COX-2 genes upregulation following lithium-pilocarpine administration. Consistent with our results, we suggest that iNOS activation could be probably upstream of COX-2 gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tolerância ao fenômeno alucinatório induzido pelo zolpidem: relato de caso Tolerancia al fenómeno alucinatorio inducido por el zolpidem: relato de caso Tolerance to zolpidem-induced hallucinations: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saint-Clair Bahls

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O hipnótico zolpidem é considerado efetivo e seguro, entretanto, existem na literatura alguns relatos de caso de fenômeno alucinatório associado ao seu uso. Relataremos mais um caso de alucinações induzidas pelo zolpidem em paciente jovem do sexo feminino. DISCUSSÃO: Este caso, segundo nosso conhecimento, é o primeiro descrito na literatura que sugere a possibilidade de ocorrer, em alguns pacientes, o desenvolvimento de tolerância a esse efeito alucinatório adverso raro, porém, importante. Apresentamos uma discussão sobre algumas hipóteses farmacocinéticas e farmacodinâmicas deste fenômeno. CONCLUSÕES: Alertamos para a necessidade de atenção ao fato da indução alucinatória pelo zolpidem e sua tolerância, assim como a importância de seu melhor entendimento.INTRODUCTION: El hipnótico zolpidem es considerado efectivo y seguro. Sin embargo, hay en la literatura algunos relatos de caso de fenómeno alucinatorio asociado a su uso. Relataremos un caso más sobre alucinaciones inducidas por zolpidem en una paciente joven de sexo femenino. DISCUSIÓN: Este caso, según nuestro conocimiento, es el primero descrito en la literatura que sugiere la posibilidad de que en algunos pacientes ocurra el desarrollo de tolerancia a este efecto alucinatorio, adverso y raro, sin embargo, importante. Presentamos una discusión sobre algunas hipótesis farmacocinéticas y farmacodinámicas de este fenómeno. CONCLUSION: Por la necesidad de atención, alertamos al hecho de la inducción alucinatoria relacionada al zolpidem y a su tolerancia, así como a la importancia de comprenderla mejor.BACKGROUND: Zolpidem is reported to be a safe and effective hypnotic agent. In the literature, there are some case reports of hallucinations after zolpidem administration. We report one more case in witch zolpidem lead to hallucinations in young adult female. DISCUSSION: This case, to our knowledge, is the first to suggest the possibility of

  20. Morphology and morphometry of the human sublingual glands in mouth floor enlargements of edentulous patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Costa Rodrigues de SA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic mouth floor enlargements may be observed in edentulous patients. These masses, which protrude from the mouth floor, may complicate the fitting of dentures and require surgery. Whether this "entity" may be considered an anatomical variation of the mouth floor or represent specific alterations in the sublingual gland is not known. Objective: The aim of this work is to investigate the morphological and morphometric aspects of the sublingual glands of edentulous patients with mouth floor enlargements and compare the glands of these patients with the sublingual glands of human cadavers. Material and Methods: Microscopic evaluation was performed on human sublingual glands from edentulous patients with mouth floor enlargements (n=20 and edentulous cadavers (n=20. The patients and cadavers were of similar ages. The data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact and Student's t tests (p0.05. Only the variables "autolysis" and "congested blood vessels" presented statistical difference between groups (p=0.014; p=0.043. The morphometric study revealed that the volume densities of acini, ducts, stroma and adipose tissue were similar between the groups (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: The microscopic characteristics of the sublingual glands in mouth floor enlargements in edentulous patients correspond to characteristics associated with the normal aging process. The glands are not pathological and represent an age-related alteration that occurs with or without the presence of the mouth floor enlargements.

  1. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  2. Local Side Effects of Sublingual and Oral Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is increasingly used worldwide, and several products have been recently registered as drugs for respiratory allergy by the European Medicine Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. Concerning inhalant allergens, the safety of SLIT is overall superior to that of subcutaneous immunotherapy in terms of systemic adverse events. No fatality has been ever reported, and episodes of anaphylaxis were described only exceptionally. Looking at the historical and recent trials, most (>90%) adverse events are "local" and confined to the site of administration. For this reason, a specific grading system has been developed by the World Allergy Organization to classify and describe local adverse events. There is an increasing amount of literature concerning oral desensitization for food allergens, referred to as oral immunotherapy. Also, in this case, local side effects are predominant, although systemic adverse events are more frequent than with inhalant allergens. We review herein the description of local side effects due to SLIT, with a special focus on large trials having a declared sample size calculation. The use of the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities nomenclature for adverse events is mentioned in this context, as recommended by regulatory agencies. It is expected that a uniform classification/grading of local adverse events will improve and harmonize the surveillance and reporting on the safety of SLIT. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy after Bee Sting and Treatment with Zolpidem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Demir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, a metabolic encephalopathy, develops as a result of cessation or reduction of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. The clinical picture may vary in severity from minimal neurologic deficits to coma. In living patients, permanent neuropsychological sequelae can develop. Herein, we present a case of HIE that occured after anaphylactic reaction due to bee sting, which was treatedm with zolpidem.

  4. Spontaneous Adverse Event Reports Associated with Zolpidem in the United States 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen K; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Grunstein, Ronald R; Ho, Samuel S; Fois, Romano A; Hibbs, David E; Hanrahan, Jane R; Saini, Bandana

    2017-02-15

    Stimulated reporting occurs when patients and healthcare professionals are influenced or "stimulated" by media publicity to report specific drug-related adverse reactions, significantly biasing pharmacovigilance analyses. Among countries where the non-benzodiazepine hypnotic drug zolpidem is marketed, the United States experienced a comparable surge of media reporting during 2006-2009 linking the above drug with the development of complex neuropsychiatric sleep-related behaviors. However, the effect of this stimulated reporting in the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System has not been explored. Using disproportionality analyses, reporting odds ratios for zolpidem exposure and the following adverse events; parasomnia, movement-based parasomnia, nonmovement-based parasomnia, amnesia, hallucination, and suicidality were determined and compared to all other medications in the database, followed by specific comparison to the benzodiazepine hypnotic class, year-by-year from 2003 to 2012. Odds ratios were increased significantly during and after the period of media publicity for parasomnias, movement-based parasomnias, amnesias and hallucinations. We also observed that zolpidem adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports have higher odds for parasomnias, movement-based parasomnias, amnesias, hallucinations, and suicidality compared to all other drugs, even before the media publicity cluster. Although our results indicate that zolpidem reports have higher odds for the ADR of interest even before the media publicity cluster, negative media coverage greatly exacerbated the reporting of these adverse reactions. The effect of such reporting must be borne in mind when decisions around drugs which have been the subject of intense media publicity are made by health professionals or regulatory bodies. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  5. Prior sleep with zolpidem enhances the effect of caffeine or modafinil during 18 hours continuous work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batéjat, Denise; Coste, Olivier; Van Beers, Pascal; Lagarde, Didier; Piérard, Christophe; Beaumont, Maurice

    2006-05-01

    Continuous military operations may disrupt sleep-wakefulness cycles, resulting in impaired performance and fatigue. We assessed the treatment efficacy of a hypnotic-psychostimulant combination to maintain sleep quality, performance, and alertness during a 42-h simulated military operation. A 6-h prophylactic sleep period with zolpidem (ZOL) followed by a 18-h continuous work period with administration at midway of 300 mg of slow release caffeine (CAF) or 200 mg of modafinil (MOD) was performed by eight healthy male subjects. Performance level was assessed with a reaction time test, a memory search test, a dual task, an attention test, and a computerized Stroop test. Cortical activation level was evaluated by the Critical Flicker Frequency test. Subjective sleepiness was evaluated using a visual analog scale and questionnaires. Effects of drugs on prophylactic and recovery sleep were also quantified from EEG recordings. CAF and MOD maintained performance and alertness throughout the 18-h work period. As shown by EEG recordings, ZOL improved prophylactic sleep without any deleterious effect on performance immediately after waking. As a result of its positive effects on prophylactic sleep, a lower pressure for slow wave sleep during recovery sleep was observed; nevertheless, zolpidem did not enhance the effects of either psychostimulant on performance. MOD and CAF may be of value in promoting performance and wakefulness during shiftwork or military operations while zolpidem improves prophylactic sleep quality without any deleterious effect after waking. We concluded that a zolpidem/ caffeine or modafinil combination could be useful in a context of environmental conditions not conducive to sleep.

  6. Efficacy and safety of sublingual tablets of house dust mite allergen extracts in adults with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Demoly, Pascal; Worm, Margitta; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Carrillo, Teresa; Tabar, Ana I.; Nguyen, Hélène; Montagut, Armelle; Zeldin, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary studies have suggested the efficacy of sublingual tablets of house dust mite (HDM) extracts in adults with allergic rhinitis. We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of 2 doses of HDM sublingual tablets over 1 treatment year and the subsequent immunotherapy-free year. Adults with

  7. The effect of zolpidem on sleep quality, stress status, and nondipping hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuli; Mai, Weiyi; Cai, Xiaoyan; Hu, Yunzhao; Song, Yuanbin; Qiu, Ruofeng; Wu, Yanxian; Kuang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    Poor sleep quality and stress status have previously been shown to be closely associated with higher activation of the sympathetic nervous system and to be independent predictors of nondipping hypertension. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the non-hypotensive sedative zolpidem on sleep quality, stress status, and nondipping hypertension. A total of 103 nondippers were defined as poor or good sleepers by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. They were randomized to receive zolpidem or placebo treatment for 30 days. Stress status was assessed by the Perceived Stress Scale, and levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were examined to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Poor sleepers treated with zolpidem for 30 days showed significant improvements in sleep quality and stress levels (Pzolpidem (11 of 22 patients, 50.0%) than in the placebo (2 of 23, 8.7%) (Pzolpidem (Pzolpidem can improve sleep quality and stress status, and can convert nondippers with poor sleep quality into dippers. It may be an option for treating nondipping hypertensive patients with poor sleep quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of a new computerized psychometric test battery: Effects of zolpidem and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Raveendranadh; Naidu, Mur; Pingali, Usharani; Shobha, Jc

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of centrally active drugs using a new indigenously developed automated psychometric test system and compare the results with that obtained using pencil- and paper-based techniques. The tests were standardized in 24 healthy participants. Reproducibility of the test procedure was evaluated by performing the tests by a single experimenter on two occasions (interday reproducibility). To evaluate the sensitivity of the tests, the effects of zolpidem (5 mg) and caffeine (500 mg) versus placebo were studied in 24 healthy participants in a randomized, double-blind three-way crossover design. Psychometric tests were performed at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 h after administration of study medication. The effects of zolpidem and caffeine on the psychomotor performance were most pronounced 1 h after administration. At this time, a significant impairment of performance in the simple reaction test (SRT), choice discrimination test (CDT), digit symbol substitution test (DSST), digit vigilance test (DVT), and card sorting test (CST) was observed with zolpidem. In contrast, caffeine showed a significant improvement in performance in CDT and DVT only. The results suggest that the tests of the computerized system are more sensitive and reliable then the pencil and paper tests in detecting the effects of central acting agents and are suitable for use in clinical areas to conduct studies with patients.

  9. Evaluation of benzodiazepines and zolpidem in nails and their stability after prolonged exposure to chlorinated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Matteo; Andrello, Luisa; Visonà, Silvia; Vignali, Claudia; Groppi, Angelo; Freni, Francesca; Osculati, Antonio; Tajana, Luca; Morini, Luca

    2018-04-15

    The study aims the development and validation of a LC-MS/MS method for the identification and quantification of benzodiazepines and zolpidem in nails as alternative keratinized matrix to hair in long-term monitoring of anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs. Both fingernail and toenail samples (1-2 mm) were collected by clipping the excess overhang of the nail from volunteers and from postmortem cases. They were washed twice with organic solvents, dried under nitrogen stream, pulverized, immersed in a methanol solution (internal standard: diazepam-D5) and sonicated up to two hours. The solution was then direct injected in the LC-MS/MS system. Mass spectrometry was set in MRM mode, selecting two transitions for each substance. 32 analytes among benzodiazepines, metabolites and hypnotics were included in the list. The method fulfilled the internationally required criteria for validation. Limits of detection ranged from 0.03 pg/mg (zolpidem) to 13.1 pg/mg (bromazepam). 9 subjects under therapy were positive at 7 different benzodiazepines and/or metabolites (lorazepam, desalkylflurazepam, bromazepam, diazepam, alprazolam, lormetazepam and prazepam), while 5 molecules were measured in 4 postmortem cases (diazepam, desmethyldiazepam, delorazepam, 7-aminoclonazepam and zolpidem). In vitro experiments on eight authentic samples suggested that benzodiazepines in nails are influenced by the prolonged exposure to chlorinated water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Zolpidem and Sleep in Pediatric Burn Patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Stephanie D; Gottschlich, Michele M; Gose, Lacy M; Kagan, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Existing research shows that hospitalized patients, especially pediatric burn patients, are often sleep deprived. A pre-existing diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) further compounds a burn patient's inability to sleep. This retrospective study compared the effectiveness of zolpidem on patients with acute burns with ADHD (n = 23) and patients with acute burns without ADHD (n = 23). Effectiveness was defined based on the need for a change in the sleep medication or an increase in the zolpidem dose during the first 12 days of treatment. This study found that sleep dysfunction was similar in pediatric burn patients with and without a concurrent diagnosis of ADHD. Sixteen (69.6%) patients with and 13 (56.5%) patients without ADHD required a sleep medication change (p = 0.541). Further, while patients with ADHD required a sleep medication change (median = 5 days) sooner than those without ADHD (median = 9 days), it appears that zolpidem is not an effective drug for managing sleep in pediatric burn patients with or without ADHD.

  11. Elevated serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5a levels in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jhih; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Chu, Der-Ming; Chen, Wei-Liang; Wu, Li-Wei

    2017-09-29

    Tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a is expressed in tumor-associated macrophages and is a biomarker of chronic inflammation. Herein, we correlated serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels with metabolic syndrome status and made comparisons with traditional markers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein and interleukin-6. One hundred healthy volunteers were randomly selected, and cut-off points for metabolic syndrome related inflammatory biomarkers were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Linear and logistic regression models were subsequently used to correlate inflammatory markers with the risk of metabolic syndrome. Twenty-two participants met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, and serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels of >5.8 μg/L were associated with metabolic syndrome (c-statistics, 0.730; p = 0.001; 95% confidence interval, 0.618-0.842). In addition, 1 μg/L increases in tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels were indicative of a 1.860 fold increase in the risk of metabolic syndrome (p = 0.012). Elevated serum tartrate-resistant phosphatase isoform 5a levels are associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome, with a cut-off level of 5.8 μg/L.

  12. Sharp tooth induced sublingual hematoma in a patient with elevated international normalized ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Baliah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual hematoma secondary to anticoagulation is a rare fatal condition. Hemorrhagic complications of warfarin are well-known. This particular case is unique because the patient was on warfarin for the past 2 years but did not develop the sublingual hematoma. However, a trauma by an attrited sharp cusp triggered the episode of the sublingual hematoma in this patient. Being a medical emergency, patient was promptly hospitalized in cardiac care unit and managed by medical team. The patient was transfused with 2 units of fresh frozen plasma and warfarin was temporarily stopped for 4 days. Alternate day regimen of warfarin was started after 4 days, and international normalized ratio dropped to 3. In dental management, enameloplasty of the mandibular first molar tooth was done to prevent trauma and ulcer development in the floor of the mouth. The hematoma resolved, and no new hematoma formation was observed for a period of 6 months.

  13. The effects of benzodiazepine (triazolam), cyclopyrrolone (zopiclone) and imidazopyridine (zolpidem) hypnotics on the frequency of hippocampal theta activity and sleep structure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, M; Higuchi, H; Kamata, M; Yoshida, K; Shimizu, T; Hishikawa, Y

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the relative efficacy and safety of zopiclone and zolpidem, we compared the effects of higher doses of zopiclone and zolpidem on the frequency of hippocampal theta activity and sleep structure with that of triazolam. Rats were divided into triazolam treatment group (1 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg), zopiclone treatment group (20 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg) and zolpidem treatment group (20 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with these drugs or their vehicle. Polygraphic sleep recording and visual frequency analysis of the hippocampal EEG activity in REM sleep were carried out for 6 h after each injection. Zolpidem, unlike triazolam and zopiclone, had a much milder reducing-effect on the frequency of hippocampal theta activity and suppressing-effect on REM sleep. These results suggest that zolpidem may prove to be a safer hypnotic drug which has fewer or milder side effects than are benzodiazepine and cyclopyrrolone hypnotics.

  14. Possible GABAergic modulation in the protective effect of zolpidem in acute hypoxic stress-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Goyal, Richa

    2008-03-01

    Hypoxia is an environmental stressor that is known to elicit alterations in both the autonomic nervous system and endocrine functions. The free radical or oxidative stress theory holds that oxidative reactions are mainly underlying neurodegenerative disorders. In fact among complex metabolic reactions occurring during hypoxia, many could be related to the formation of oxygen derived free radicals, causing a wide spectrum of cell damage. In present study, we investigated possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in the protective effect of zolpidem against acute hypoxia-induced behavioral modification and biochemical alterations in mice. Mice were subjected to acute hypoxic stress for a period of 2 h. Acute hypoxic stress for 2 h caused significant impairment in locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior, and antinocioceptive effect in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed a significant increased malondialdehyde, nitrite concentrations and depleted reduced glutathione and catalase levels. Pretreatment with zolpidem (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety effect, reduced tail flick latency and attenuated oxidative damage (reduced malondialdehyde, nitrite concentration, and restoration of reduced glutathione and catalase levels) as compared to stressed control (hypoxia) (P zolpidem (5 mg/kg) was blocked significantly by picrotoxin (1.0 mg/kg) or flumazenil (2 mg/kg) and potentiated by muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) in hypoxic animals (P zolpidem (5 mg/kg) per se (P zolpidem against hypoxic stress.

  15. Growth and characterization of magnesium chloride and lanthanum chloride doped strontium tartrate crystals - gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaiarasi, S.; Jaikumar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Growth of single crystals of doped strontium tartrate by controlled diffusion of strontium chloride into the silica gel charged with tartaric acid at room temperature is narrated. In this study, we synthesized magnesium chloride (5% and 10%) doped strontium tartrate crystals and Lanthanum chloride (5%, 10% and 15%) doped strontium tartrate crystals are grown. The crystal structure of the compound crystals was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of pure and doped crystals are recorded and analyzed. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum analysis reveals that the optical study of the grown crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency was measured by using Kurtz powder technique with Nd:YAG laser of wavelength 1064 nm. (author)

  16. Growth and characterization of 2-Methylimidazolium D-tartrate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, T. P.; Anandhi, S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2011-03-01

    Single crystal of 2-Methylimidazolium D-tartrate (2MImdT; C8N2O6H12) has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature using mixed solvents of ethanol and deionized water. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that 2-Methylimidazolium D-tartrate belongs to monoclinic crystal system with non-centrosymmetric space group P21. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of 2-Methylimidazolium D-tartrate reveals the presence of methyl and carboxyl functional groups in the compound. The mechanical properties of 2MImdT crystal were studied. The theoretical factor group analysis predicts 168 optical modes in the title compound. The dielectric behavior of 2MImdT crystals was studied at different frequencies and temperatures. Decomposition and melting point of 2MImdT were found using thermal measurements. SHG behavior of the title compound was demonstrated using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

  17. Postmortem acinar autolysis in rat sublingual gland: a morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Leticia Rodrigues; Moreira, Carla Ruffeil; Cestari, Tania Mary; Taga, Rumio; Damante, José Humberto

    2010-01-01

    To analyze and to quantify morphological acinar postmortem changes in rat sublingual glands (SLG). MATERIAL AND METHODSs: Fifty rats were divided into two groups of 25 animals each. Group I was used for morphological and morphometric evaluations and group II for the determination of gland density and processed gland volume. Acinar autolytic changes were studied at 0 (control group), 3, 6, 12 and 24 h postmortem periods. The morphometric analysis of the volume density (Vv) and total volume (Vt) of intact (ia) and autolyzed (aa) acini was performed under light microscopy using a Zeiss II integration grid with 100 symmetrically distributed points. Morphologically, temporal progressive nuclear alterations and gradual loss of the structural architecture of acinar cells were found. Regarding quantitative results, both the Vvaa and the Vvia showed statistically significant differences among all postmortem periods (p0.05), respectively. Vtaa increased from 0.18 mm³ at 0 h to 38.17 mm³ at 12 h, while Vtia showed a decrease from 33.47 mm³ to 0 mm³ between 3-24 h postmortem. Data concerning Vtaa were adjusted by two-variable linear regression, obtaining the equation: y=-3.54+3.38x (r²=0.90). The Vtaa growth rate calculated by this equation was 3.38 mm³/h between 0-12 h. Acinar autolysis on rat SLG demonstrated the most significant signs during the first 6 h postmortem and was widely spread through the gland at 12 h.

  18. Growth, structural, spectroscopic and optical characterization of barium doped calcium tartrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Seema; Raina, Bindu; Gupta, Vandana; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    Barium doped calcium tartrates synthesized by controlled diffusion using silica gel technique at ambient temperature was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction which establishes monoclinic crystal system with volume of the unit cell 923.97(10) Ǻ3 and the space group being P21. UV - Vis characterization gives various linear optical constants like absorption, transmittance, reflectance, band gap, extinction coefficient, urbach energy, complex dielectric constant, optical and electrical conductivity. These constants are considered to be essential in characterizing materials that are used in various applications like fabrication of optoelectronic devices. FTIR spectrum establishes the presence of various bands of functional groups expected from metal tartrate with water of crystallization.

  19. A therapeutic dose of zolpidem reduces thalamic GABA in healthy volunteers: A proton MRS study at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Prescot, Andrew P.; Lukas, scott E.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Zolpidem is a non-benzodiazepine sedative/hypnotic that acts at GABAA receptors to influence inhibitory neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system. A great deal is known about the behavioral effects of this drug in humans and laboratory animals, but little is known about zolpidem’s specific effects on neurochemistry in vivo. Objectives We evaluated how acute administration of zolpidem affected levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and other brain metabolites. Methods Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) at 4 Tesla was employed to measure the effects of zolpidem on brain chemistry in 19 healthy volunteers. Participants underwent scanning following acute oral administration of a therapeutic dose of zolpidem (10 mg) in a within-subject, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single-visit study. In addition to neurochemical measurements from single voxels within the anterior cingulate (ACC) and thalamus, a series of questionnaires were administered periodically throughout the experimental session to assess subjective mood states. Results Zolpidem reduced GABA levels in the thalamus, but not the ACC. There were no treatment effects with respect to other metabolite levels. Self-reported ratings of “dizzy”, “nauseous”, “confused”, and “bad effects” were increased relative to placebo, as were ratings on the sedation/intoxication (PCAG) and psychotomimetic/dysphoria (LSD) scales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the decrease in GABA and “dizzy”. Conclusions Zolpidem engendered primarily dysphoric-like effects and the correlation between reduced thalamic GABA and “dizzy” may be a function of zolpidem’s interaction with α1GABAA receptors in the cerebellum, projecting through the vestibular system to the thalamus. PMID:19125238

  20. Effects of zolpidem and zopiclone on cognitive and attentional function in young healthy volunteers: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, T; Takazawa, S; Hayashida, S; Nakagome, K; Sasaki, T; Kanno, O

    2000-02-01

    The effects of zolpidem and zopiclone, non-benzodiazepine ultra-short-acting hypnotics, on cognitive function and vigilance level were investigated in the morning following nocturnal administration using event-related potentials (ERP) and a sleep latency test (SLT). Zopiclone significantly shortened the sleep latency the following morning, whereas zolpidem did not, perhaps due to the difference in the elimination half-lives between the compounds. No significant effect was observed for either drug on the ERP indices, including the P3, mismatch negativity and negative difference components. At a clinically prescribed dosage these sleep inducers have no remarkable effect on cognitive or attentional functions but increase sleepiness of the subjects.

  1. A functional and chemical study of radiation effects on rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissink, A.; S-Gravenmade, E.J.; Ligeon, E.E.; Konings, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor composition and rate of secretion of rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva following local single doses of X-rays ranging from 5 to 20 Gy. Pilocarpine-stimulated samples of parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva were simultaneously collected with miniaturized Lashley cups before and 1-30 days after irradiation. The lag phase (period between injection of pilocarpine and start of the secretion) and flow rate were recorded and the concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, and amylase were measured. With increasing dose and time, the salivary flow rate as well as sodium concentration decreased, while potassium concentrations increased throughout the follow-up period. The lag phase and the concentration of amylase reached their maximum at 3 and 10 days after irradiation, respectively. The changes in lag phase and flow rate were most obvious after doses of 15 or 20 Gy and showed a great similarity for parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva. No dose-response relationship was observed for the changes in concentrations of calcium and phosphate. It is concluded that for radiation doses of 10 Gy and above, irreversible changes (lag phase, flow rate, potassium, sodium) were observed. A saturation of the irradiation effects (lag phase, flow rate) seems to exist at doses larger than 15 Gy. No significant differences were observed between the radiation-induced functional changes in parotid and submandibular/sublingual salivary gland tissue

  2. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, are the subject of NDA 20-733, held by Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Reckitt), and initially approved on October 8, 2002. SUBOXONE is indicated...,'' http://www.rb.com/site/rkbr/templates/mediainvestorsgeneral2.aspx?pageid=1332&cc=GB , Reckitt Benckiser...

  3. Sublingual nitroglycerin administration in coronary computed tomography angiography: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Sucha, Dominika; Leiner, Tim [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Park, Jakob [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hoffmann, Udo [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To systematically investigate the literature for the influence of sublingual nitroglycerin administration on coronary diameter, the number of evaluable segments, image quality, heart rate and blood pressure, and diagnostic accuracy of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. The studies were evaluated for the effect of sublingual nitroglycerin on coronary artery diameter, evaluable segments, objective and subjective image quality, systemic physiological effects and diagnostic accuracy. Due to the heterogeneous reporting of outcome measures, a narrative synthesis was applied. Of the 217 studies identified, nine met the inclusion criteria: seven reported on the effect of nitroglycerin on coronary artery diameter, six on evaluable segments, four on image quality, five on systemic physiological effects and two on diagnostic accuracy. Sublingual nitroglycerin administration resulted in an improved evaluation of more coronary segments, in particular, in smaller coronary branches, better image quality and improved diagnostic accuracy. Side effects were mild and were alleviated without medical intervention. Sublingual nitroglycerin improves the coronary diameter, the number of assessable segments, image quality and diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography without major side effects or systemic physiological changes. (orig.)

  4. Efficacy and safety of 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablets in pediatric allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahn, Ulrich; Tabar, Ana; Kuna, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of the 300-index of reactivity (IR) dose of 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablets (Stallergènes, Antony, France) have been demonstrated for the treatment of hay fever in adults. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of this tab...

  5. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis : quality of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roeder, Esther; van Wijk, Roy G.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Systematic reviews have gained popularity as a way to combine the increasing amount of research information. This study assessed the quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic rhinitis in children, published since 2000. Eligible reviews were

  6. Intestinal and sublingual microcirculation are more severely compromised in hemodilution than in hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrara, Gonzalo; Kanoore Edul, Vanina Siham; Martins, Enrique; Canales, Héctor Saúl; Canullán, Carlos; Murias, Gastón; Pozo, Mario Omar; Estenssoro, Elisa; Ince, Can; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The alterations in O2 extraction in hemodilution have been linked to fast red blood cell (RBC) velocity, which might affect the complete release of O2 from Hb. Fast RBC velocity might also explain the normal mucosal-arterial Pco2 (ΔPco2). Yet sublingual and intestinal microcirculation have not been

  7. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with sublingual misoprostol or oxytocin: a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellad, M B; Tara, D; Ganachari, M S; Mallapur, M D; Goudar, S S; Kodkany, B S; Sloan, N L; Derman, R

    2012-07-01

    Sublingual misoprostol produces a rapid peak concentration, and is more effective than oral administration. We compared the postpartum measured blood loss with 400 μg powdered sublingual misoprostol and after standard care using 10 iu intramuscular (IM) oxytocin. Double-blind randomised controlled trial. A teaching hospital: J N Medical College, Belgaum, India. A cohort of 652 consenting eligible pregnant women admitted to the labour room. Subjects were assigned to receive the study medications and placebos within 1 minute of clamping and cutting the cord by computer-generated randomisation. Chi-square and bootstrapped Student's t-tests were used to test categorical and continuous outcomes, respectively. Measured mean postpartum blood loss and haemorrhage (PPH, loss ≥ 500 ml), >10% pre- to post-partum decline in haemoglobin, and reported side effects. The mean blood loss with sublingual misoprostol was 192 ± 124 ml (n=321) and 366 ± 136 ml with oxytocin IM (n=331, P ≤ 0.001). The incidence of PPH was 3.1% with misoprostol and 9.1% with oxytocin (P=0.002). No woman lost ≥ 1000 ml of blood. We observed that 9.7% and 45.6% of women experienced a haemoglobin decline of >10% after receiving misoprostol and oxytocin, respectively (P ≤ 0.001). Side effects were significantly greater in the misoprostol group than in the oxytocin group. Unlike other studies, this trial found sublingual misoprostol more effective than intramuscular oxytocin in reducing PPH, with only transient side effects being greater in the misoprostol group. The sublingual mode and/or powdered formulation may increase the effectiveness of misoprostol, and render it superior to injectable oxytocin for the prevention of PPH. Further research is needed to confirm these results. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  8. A randomized trial of rectal indomethacin and sublingual nitrates to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Eloubeidi, Mohamad Ali; Asgari, Ali Ali; Farsinejad, Maryam; Khatibian, Morteza

    2014-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common adverse event of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Recent data suggest that indomethacin can reduce the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) in high-risk individuals. However, whether the combination of indomethacin and sublingual nitrates is superior to indomethacin alone is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of rectally administered indomethacin plus sublingual nitrate compared with indomethacin alone to prevent PEP. During a 17-month period, all eligible patients who underwent ERCP were enrolled in this study. We excluded patients who had undergone a prior endoscopic sphincterotomy. In a double-blind controlled randomized trial, patients received a suppository containing 100 mg of indomethacin, plus 5 mg of sublingual nitrate (group A), or a suppository containing 100 mg of indomethacin, plus sublingual placebo (group B), before ERCP. Serum amylase levels and clinically pertinent evaluations were measured in all patients after ERCP. Of the 300 enrolled patients, 150 received indomethacin plus nitrate. Thirty-three patients developed pancreatitis: 10 (6.7%) in group A and 23 (15.3%) in group B (P=0.016, risk ratio=0.39, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.18-0.86). More than 80% of the patients were at high risk of developing pancreatitis after ERCP. Absolute risk reduction, relative risk reduction, and number needed to treat for the prevention of PEP were 8.6% (95% CI: 4.7-14.5), 56.2% (95% CI: 50.6-60.8), and 12 (95% CI: 7-22), respectively. Combination of rectal indomethacin and sublingual nitrate given before ERCP was significantly more likely to reduce the incidence of PEP than indomethacin suppository alone. Multicenter trials to confirm these promising findings are needed.

  9. Premedication with benzodiazepines for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: Comparison between oral midazolam and sublingual alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Sebghatollahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premedication with orally administered benzodiazepines is effective in reducing anxiety and discomfort related to endoscopic procedures. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral midazolam in comparison to sublingual alprazolam as premedication for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD. Materials and Methods: Adult candidates for diagnostic EGD received either oral midazolam (7.5 mg in 15 cc apple juice or sublingual alprazolam (0.5 mg 30 min before EGD. Procedural anxiety and pain/discomfort were assessed using 11-point numerical rating scales. Patients' overall tolerance (using a four-point Likert scale and willingness to repeat the EGD, if necessary, were also assessed. Blood pressure, heart rate, and arterial oxygen saturation were monitored from medication to 30 min after the procedure. Results: Patients experienced a similar reduction in procedural anxiety after medication with oral midazolam and sublingual alprazolam; mean (standard deviation [SD] of 1.86 [1.63] and 2.02 [1.99] points, respectively, P = 0.91. Compared to oral midazolam, pain/discomfort scores were lower with sublingual alprazolam; mean (SD of 4.80 (3.01 versus 3.68 (3.28, P = 0.024. There was no significant difference between the two groups in patients' tolerance, willingness to repeat the procedure, or hemodynamic events. Conclusion: Oral midazolam and sublingual alprazolam are equally effective in reducing EGD-related anxiety; however, EGD-related pain/discomfort is lower with alprazolam. Both benzodiazepines are equally safe and can be used as premedication for patients undergoing diagnostic EGD.

  10. Comparative in vitro assessment of tolterodine tartrate tablets by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Danafar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tolterodine tartrate, is a new, potent and competitive muscarinic receptor antagonist in clinical development for the treatment of urge incontinence and other symptoms of unstable bladder. The purpose of this study is to establish a reliable and quick method for the assignment of tolterodine tartrate by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV. A rapid  and  sensitive  high  performance  liquid  chromatographic  (HPLC  method  has  been developed  for  determination  of  tolterodine tartrate.  Mobile phase was composed of phosphate acetate 0.1 M (pH 2.5-acetonitrile (50:50 v/v with a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The eluted peaks were detected by a UV detector was set at wavelength of 285 nm. The method was validated in the range of tolterodine tartrate concentrations from 10 to 100 µg/ml. The limits of detection (LOD and quantitation (LOQ of the method were 5 and 10 µg/ml, respectively. The average drug recovery was 98.20 % throughout the linear concentration range. The average within-run and between-run accuracy values of 98.56 % and 99.11 % respectively. Statistical  assessment  of  various  in  vitro  dissolution  parameters  and  assay  results was  also  conducted  to  establish  if  there were  any significant difference among them. The validated HPLC method has been used successfully to study tolterodine tartrate.

  11. Mechanism-based pharmacodynamic modeling of the interaction of midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuk, Bert; van Gool, Toon; Danhof, Meindert

    2002-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of ethanol with the full benzodiazepine agonist midazolam, the partial agonist bretazenil and the benzodiazepine BZ1 receptor subtype selective agonist zolpidem have been determined in the rat in vivo, using an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic approach. Ethanol was administered as a constant rate infusion resulting in constant plasma concentrations of 0.5 g/l. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem were determined following an intravenous infusion of 5.0, 2.5, and 18 mg/kg respectively. The amplitude in the 11.5-30 Hz frequency band of the EEG was used as measure of the pharmacological effect. For each of the benzodiazepines the concentration-EEG effect relationship could be described by the sigmoid Emax pharmacodynamic model. Significant differences in both EC50 and Emax were observed. The values of the EC50 were 76 +/- 11, 12 +/- 3, and 512 +/- 116 ng/ml for midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem respectively. The values of the Emax were 113 +/- 9, 44 +/- 3, and 175 +/- 10 microV/s. In the presence of ethanol the values of the EC50 of midazolam and zolpidem were reduced to approximately 50% of the original value. The values for Emax and Hill-factor were unchanged Due to a large interindividual variability no significant change in EC50 was observed for bretazenil. Analysis of the data on basis of a mechanism-based model showed only a decrease in the apparent affinity constant KPD for all three drugs, indicating that changes in EC50 can be explained entirely by a change in the apparent affinity constant KPD without concomitant changes in the efficacy parameter ePD and the stimulus-effect relationship. The findings of this study show that the pharmacodynamic interactions with a low dose of ethanol in vivo are qualitatively and quantitatively similar for benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, partial agonists, and benzodiazepine BZ1 receptor subtype selective

  12. Final product analysis in the e-beam and gamma radiolysis of aqueous solutions of metoprolol tartrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slegers, Catherine [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: catherine.slegers@cham.ucl.ac.be; Tilquin, Bernard [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-09-15

    The radiostability of metoprolol tartrate aqueous solutions and the influence of the absorbed dose (0-50 kGy), dose rate (e-beam (EB) vs. gamma ({gamma})) and radioprotectors (pharmaceutical excipients) are investigated by HPLC-UV analyses and through computer simulations. The use of radioprotecting excipients is more promising than an increase in the dose rate to lower the degradation of metoprolol tartrate aqueous solutions for applications such as radiosterilization. The decontamination of metoprolol tartrate from waste waters by EB processing appears highly feasible.

  13. Sublingual flagellin protects against acute pneumococcal pneumonia in a TLR5-dependent and NLRC4-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Rial, Analía; Fougeron, Delphine; Tabareau, Julien; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Chabalgoity, José A

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate efficacy of sublingual flagellin to treat acute pneumonia. Mice were treated sublingually with flagellin and challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of pneumococcus. Flagellins lacking TLR5 or NLRC4 activation domains were used to assess their contribution to protection. Sublingual flagellin protected mice in a TLR5-dependent, NLRC4-independent fashion. Neutrophils were required for protection. Flagellin-stimulated lung epithelial cells recapitulated the lung's transcriptional profile suggesting they could be targeted by flagellin in vivo. Ligation of TLR5, a pathogen recognition receptor not naturally engaged by pneumococcus, protects mice from invasive pneumonia when administered via sublingual route. This can be a highly cost-effective alternative therapy against pneumonia.

  14. Effect of escitalopram combined with zolpidem on sleep structure, sleep process and neurotransmitter in elderly patients with chronic insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Peng Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of escitalopram combined with zolpidem on sleep structure, sleep process and neurotransmitter in elderly patients with chronic insomnia. Methods: A total of 112 elderly patients with chronic insomnia treated in our hospital were included in the study and randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=56. Control group received zolpidem therapy alone, observation group received escitalopram combined with zolpidem therapy, and then differences in sleep structure and process, neurotransmitter, stress hormones, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis indexes and so on were compared between two groups of patients. Results: The sleep structure and sleep process parameters SL, RL and S2 levels of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group while TST, S3 and REM levels were significantly higher than those of control group; Orexin, ACTH, 5-HT, NE, CRH, E, AngⅡ, Cor, ALD, DA and TGA content in serum were significantly lower than those of control group while T3, T4, TSH and TRH content were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusions: Escitalopram combined with zolpidem can optimize the sleep structure and process in elderly patients with chronic insomnia, and also plays a prominent role in regulating the body's homeostasis.

  15. Differential effects of midazolam and zolpidem on sleep-wake states and epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depoortere, H.; Francon, D.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    1995-01-01

    Hypnotic drugs are known to possess antiepileptic activity. Therefore, the effects of the benzodiazepine hypnotic midazolam (10 mg/kg) and the novel imidazopyridine hypnotic zolpidem (10 mg/kg) on sleep-wake states and on the number of spike-wave discharges were evaluated in WAG/Rij rats. Rats of

  16. Effect of escitalopram combined with zolpidem on sleep structure, sleep process and neurotransmitter in elderly patients with chronic insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Peng Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of escitalopram combined with zolpidem on sleep structure, sleep process and neurotransmitter in elderly patients with chronic insomnia.Methods:A total of 112 elderly patients with chronic insomnia treated in our hospital were included in the study and randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=56). Control group received zolpidem therapy alone, observation group received escitalopram combined with zolpidem therapy, and then differences in sleep structure and process, neurotransmitter, stress hormones, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis indexes and so on were compared between two groups of patients.Results: The sleep structure and sleep process parameters SL, RL and S2 levels of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group while TST, S3 and REM levels were significantly higher than those of control group; Orexin, ACTH, 5-HT, NE, CRH, E, AngⅡ, Cor, ALD, DA and TGA content in serum were significantly lower than those of control group while T3, T4, TSH and TRH content were significantly higher than those of control group.Conclusions:Escitalopram combined with zolpidem can optimize the sleep structure and process in elderly patients with chronic insomnia, and also plays a prominent role in regulating the body's homeostasis.

  17. Warfarin-induced sublingual hematoma mimicking Ludwig angina: Conservative management of a potentially life-threatening condition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Sublingual hematoma secondary to excessive anticoagulation is a rare, life-threatening condition. Reports in the literature have emphasized the importance of a prompt reversal of the causative coagulopathy by intravenous administration of vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma. In the event of an unstable airway, surgical intervention via tracheostomy or cricothyroidectomy is advocated. We report a case of sublingual hematoma that was treated conservatively, and we discuss the presentation and management of this entity.

  18. Warfarin-induced sublingual hematoma mimicking Ludwig angina: Conservative management of a potentially life-threatening condition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, Emma

    2011-02-01

    Sublingual hematoma secondary to excessive anticoagulation is a rare, life-threatening condition. Reports in the literature have emphasized the importance of a prompt reversal of the causative coagulopathy by intravenous administration of vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma. In the event of an unstable airway, surgical intervention via tracheostomy or cricothyroidectomy is advocated. We report a case of sublingual hematoma that was treated conservatively, and we discuss the presentation and management of this entity.

  19. The influence of serotonin depletion on rat behavior in the Vogel test and brain 3H-zolpidem binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, M; Siemiatkowski, M; Bidziński, A; Członkowska, A; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H; Płaźnik, A

    1999-01-01

    The influence of p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA) and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT)-induced serotonin depletion on rat behavior as well as on zolpidem's the behavioral effects and binding to some brain areas of zolpidem, was examined with the help of Vogel's punished drinking test and autoradiography, respectively. Moreover, changes in the serotonin levels and turnover rate were studied in the forebrain and brainstem of rats pretreated with various ligands at the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors (midazolam, bretazenil, abecarnil, zolpidem). These drugs were given at doses shown previously to significantly disinhibit animal behavior suppressed by punishment in the Vogel test (Nazar et al., 1997). It was found that serotonin decrease in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after p-CPA significantly and inversely correlated with rat behavior controlled by fear in the VT. p-CPA produced an anticonflict activity in the absence of effect on spontaneous drinking, pain threshold and motility of animals. All applied benzodiazepine receptor ligands decreased the 5-HT turnover rate in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, whereas in the brainstem only abecarnil and zolpidem diminished 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. This part of the study replicated earlier data with neurotoxins and indicated that the anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT depletion in some models of anxiety did not depend on changes in animal appetitive behavior or stimulus control. Moreover, the fact that all nonselective and selective (zolpidem) agonists of the type 1 benzodiazepine receptors seemed to produce the same anticonflict effect and decreasing 5-HT turnover indicates that this subtype of benzodiazepine receptor may be important for the interaction between brain 5-HT and GABA/BDZ systems. Accordingly, it was found that serotonin decrease enhanced the anticonflict effect of zolpidem in the Vogel test and increased 3H-zolpidem binding to the occipital cortex and substantia nigra. Altogether, the present study

  20. MR imaging of squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth. Appearance of the sublingual and submandibular glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, R.; Baba, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Baba, T.; Nakaura, T.; Takahashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic value of MR imaging for tumors of the floor of the mouth and the effects of the tumors on the sublingual and submandibular glands. Material and methods: Thirty-seven patients with proven squamous cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth underwent MR imaging, including unenhanced T1-weighted, T2-weighted, dynamic, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. The appearance of the tumor and the sublingual and submandibular glands was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: All tumors demonstrated replacement of the normal signal intensity in the adjacent sublingual gland. Twenty-one patients (57%) had abnormal signal intensity of the submandibular gland without tumor invasion, presumably secondary to submandibular duct obstruction by the tumor. Unenhanced T1-weighted images provided high contrast between tumor and sublingual gland. Tumors limited within the gland were well detected on unenhanced T1-weighted images. Large tumors extending beyond the gland were well delineated on dynamic images, but no better than on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: At MR imaging for tumor of the floor of the mouth, one must carefully evaluate the appearance of the sublingual and submandibular glands. Contrast-enhanced studies are unnecessary when the tumor is limited within the sublingual gland on precontrast MR images. (orig.)

  1. [Safety profile of zolpidem: two studies of 3805 patients by Swiss practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzoni, E; Gugger, M

    1999-06-24

    Evaluation and treatment of insomnia are frequent procedures in the physician's everyday practice, since many patients seek medical treatment for this condition. Knowledge of pharmacological therapeutical alternatives is therefore decisive, in order to identify the most efficaceous and safe therapy for the patient among the available hypnotics. The short-acting hypnotic zolpidem has been investigated in Switzerland in two multicenter safety studies in ambulatory practice. In the first study 8.9% (n = 125 of 1,972 treated patients), and in the second 7.2% of the patients (n = 175 of 1,833 treated patients) reported an adverse event. The most frequent events were related to the central nervous system (CNS) (somnolence, headache, confusion, vertigo); gastrointestinal and cutaneous symptoms were the most frequent non CNS-dependent effects. New, unknown or serious adverse events were not found and no specific risk factor or population at risk was identified. The safety profile of zolpidem is consistent with its known pharmacological properties, the results of previous clinical trials and the international experience obtained in large patients groups.

  2. The discrimination of d-tartrate positive and d-tartrate negative S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B isolated in Malaysia by phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Norazah; Hoon, Shirley Tang Gee; Ghani, Mohamed Kamel Abd; Tee, Koh Yin

    2012-06-01

    Serotyping is not sufficient to differentiate between Salmonella species that cause paratyphoid fever from the strains that cause milder gastroenteritis as these organisms share the same serotype Salmonella Paratyphi B (S. Paratyphi B). Strains causing paratyphoid fever do not ferment d-tartrate and this key feature was used in this study to determine the prevalence of these strains among the collection of S. Paratyphi B strains isolated from patients in Malaysia. A total of 105 isolates of S. Paratyphi B were discriminated into d-tartrate positive (dT+) and d-tartrate negative (dT) variants by two lead acetate test protocols and multiplex PCR. The lead acetate test protocol 1 differed from protocol 2 by a lower inoculum size and different incubation conditions while the multiplex PCR utilized 2 sets of primers targeting the ATG start codon of the gene STM3356. Lead acetate protocol 1 discriminated 97.1% of the isolates as S. Paratyphi B dT+ and 2.9% as dT while test protocol 2 discriminated all the isolates as S. Paratyphi B dT+. The multiplex PCR test identified all 105 isolates as S. Paratyphi B dT+ strains. The concordance of the lead acetate test relative to that of multiplex PCR was 97.7% and 100% for protocol 1 and 2 respectively. This study showed that S. Paratyphi B dT+ is a common causative agent of gastroenteritis in Malaysia while paratyphoid fever appears to be relatively uncommon. Multiplex PCR was shown to be a simpler, more rapid and reliable method to discriminate S. Paratyphi B than the phenotypic lead acetate test.

  3. Direct chlorination of alcohols with chlorodimethylsilane catalyzed by a gallium trichloride/tartrate system under neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Makoto; Shimizu, Kenji; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Baba, Akio

    2008-08-07

    The reaction of secondary alcohols 1 with chlorodimethylsilane (HSiMe(2)Cl) proceeded in the presence of a catalytic amount of GaCl(3)/diethyl tartrate to give the corresponding organic chlorides 3. In the catalytic cycle, the reaction of diethyl tartrate 4a with HSiMe(2)Cl 2 gives the chlorosilyl ether 5 with generation of H(2). Alcohol-exchange between the formed chlorosilyl ether 5 and the substrate alcohol 1 affords alkoxychlorosilane 6, which reacts with catalytic GaCl(3) to give the chlorinated product 3. The moderate Lewis acidity of GaCl(3) facilitates chlorination. Strong Lewis acids did not give product due to excessive affinity for the oxy-functionalities. Although tertiary alcohols were chlorinated by this system even in the absence of diethyl tartrate, certain alcohols that are less likely to give carbocationic species were effectively chlorinated using the GaCl(3)/diethyl tartrate system.

  4. Development and evaluation of a sublingual film of the antiemetic granisetron hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vani; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Gautam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an oral transmucosal formulation of an antiemetic drug that can not only serve in the active form but also provide a controlled release profile. In this study, sublingual films based on the biodegradable and water-soluble polymers, that is HPMCK-4M and PVPK-30, were developed by the solvent casting method, and were loaded with the antiemetic drug granisetron hydrochloride (granisetron HCl). The entrapment efficiency of the developed formulation was found to be 86%. The in vitro profile showed an instant release of the drug from the sublingual film, in a pattern following the first order kinetics array. The in vivo studies showed that granisetron HCl was delivered in its active state and showed effective results, as compared to its activity in the marketed formulation.

  5. CHANGES OF IMMUNE INDEXES DURING SUBLINGUAL ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH HAY FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Gaiduk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims of study: evaluation of immunological parameters in course of sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy with tree pollen mixture in children with hay fever.Materials and methods: the study included one-hundred patients 5 to 18 years of age with hay fever (pollen rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was administered pre-seasonally for three consecutive years. Cytokinechanges were studied in blood serum and in lavages from nasal cavity. Samples assessed before treatment and after 2nd and 3rd courses SLIT completion.Results: increased serum concentrations of IL-10, IFNγ, and decreased IL-4 contents were revealed in the course of treatment. No significant changes in cytokineconcentrations were detectable in nasal lavages.Conclusions: the changes revealed correspond to a shift of T cell response profile towards Th1 pathway, thus confirming pathogenetic effects of sublingual allergen-specific

  6. An accelerometric measure of the gait pattern in horses after the administration of sublingual detomidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sanromán, F J; de la Riva Andrés, S; Holmbak-Petersen, R; Pérez-Nogués, M; Forés Jackson, P; Santos González, M

    2014-10-01

    The locomotor pattern alterations produced after the administration of a sublingual detomidine gel was measured by an accelerometric method in horses. Using a randomized two-way crossover design, all animals (n = 6) randomly received either detomidine gel or a placebo administered sublingually. A triaxial accelerometric device was used for gait assessment 15 minutes before (baseline) and every 10 minutes after each treatment for a period of 180 minutes. Eight different parameters were calculated, including speed, stride frequency, stride length, regularity, dorsoventral, propulsion, mediolateral, and total power. Force of acceleration and the three components of power were also calculated. Significant statistical differences were observed between groups in all the parameters but stride length. The majority of significant changes started between 30 and 70 minutes after drug administration and lasted for 160 minutes. This route of administration is definitely useful in horses in which a prolonged sedation is required, with stability being a major concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sublingual administration of detomidine to calves prior to disbudding: a comparison with the intravenous route.

    OpenAIRE

    Hokkanen, Ann-Helena; Raekallio, Marja R.; Salla, Kati; Hänninen, Laura; Viitasaari, Elina Anna Maria; Norring, Marianna; Raussi, Satu; Rinne, Valtteri; Scheinin, Mika; Vainio, Outi M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of oromucosal detomidine gel administered sublingually to calves prior to disbudding, and to compare its efficacy with intravenously (IV) administered detomidine. Study design Randomised, prospective clinical study. Animals Twenty dairy calves aged 12.4 ± 4.4days (mean ± SD), weight 50.5 ± 9.0 kg. Methods Detomidine at 80 μg kg−1 was administered to ten calves sublingually (GEL) and at 30 μg kg−1 to ten control calves IV (V. jugularis). Meloxicam (0.5 mg kg−1) a...

  8. Immunity of foot-and-mouth disease serotype Asia 1 by sublingual vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-tai Chen

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV causes vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals, with severe agricultural and economic losses. Here we present study using a sublingual (SL route with the killed serotype Asia 1 FMDV vaccine. Guinea pigs were vaccinated using a commercially available vaccine formulation at the manufacturer's recommended full, 1/4, and 1/16 antigen doses. Animals were challenged with homologous FMDV Asia1 strain at various times following vaccination. All control guinea pigs exhibited clinical disease, including fever, viremia, and lesions, specifically vesicle formation in feet. Animals vaccinated with the 1/16 and 1/4 doses were protected after challenge at days 7, 28, and 35 post vaccination. These data suggest that effective protection against foot-and-mouth disease can be achieved with 1/16 of the recommended vaccine dose using SL vaccination, indicating that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for the administration of the FMDV vaccine.

  9. Orally-dissolving film for sublingual and buccal delivery of ropinirole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ka Lun; Fang, Yuan; Han, Hao; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ho Yin; Chow, Shing Fung; Lam, Tai Ning; Lee, Wai Yip Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Ropinirole is a very important treatment option for Parkinson's disease (PD), a major threat to the aging population. However, this drug undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism, resulting in a low oral bioavailability. Moreover, the necessity of frequent administration due to the short half-life of ropinirole may jeopardize patient compliance. Indeed, taking this drug in solid oral dosage forms (e.g. Tablet) can be a challenge because of the tremor, rigidity, limited mobility, and impaired drug absorption experienced by PD patients. In light of these, there is a pressing need to devise formulations for the delivery of ropinirole that allow simple and easy administration and fast drug action, as well as avoidance of first-pass metabolism and overcoming the challenge of impaired absorption due to gastrointestinal dysfunctions, etc. Herein, we seek to overcome all these challenges via sublingual or buccal delivery of orally-dissolving films. Accordingly, we aimed to fabricate and characterize orally-dissolving films of ropinirole and assess their in vivo pharmacokinetics after sublingual and buccal administration. The ropinirole oral film was non-toxic and exhibited fast disintegration and dissolution and was physically stable for at least 28 days. Upon buccal/sublingual administration of the oral films, ropinirole reached the systemic circulation within 15 min and bioavailability was significantly improved, which may be attributable to avoidance of first-pass metabolism via absorption through the oral cavity. In conclusion, our ropinirole oral film improved bioavailability after sublingual or buccal administration. This formulation potentially overcomes biopharmaceutical challenges and provide a convenient means of administration of ropinirole or other anti-PD drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adrenaline (epinephrine) microcrystal sublingual tablet formulation: enhanced absorption in a preclinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem; Rachid, Ousama; Mendez, Belacryst A; Losada, Annette; Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    For anaphylaxis treatment in community settings, adrenaline (epinephrine) administration using an auto-injector in the thigh is universally recommended. Despite this, many people at risk of anaphylaxis in community settings do not carry their prescribed auto-injectors consistently and hesitate to use them when anaphylaxis occurs.The objective of this research was to study the effect of a substantial reduction in adrenaline (Epi) particle size to a few micrometres (Epi microcrystals (Epi-MC)) on enhancing adrenaline dissolution and increasing the rate and extent of sublingual absorption from a previously developed rapidly disintegrating sublingual tablet (RDST) formulation in a validated preclinical model. The in-vivo absorption of Epi-MC 20 mg RDSTs and Epi 40 mg RDSTs was evaluated in rabbits. Epi 0.3 mg intramuscular (IM) injection in the thigh and placebo RDSTs were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Epimean (standard deviation) area under the plasma concentration vs time curves up to 60 min and Cmax from Epi-MC 20 mg and Epi 40 mg RDSTs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) from Epi 0.3 mg IM injection. After adrenaline, regardless of route of administration, pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly higher (P adrenaline levels). Epi-MC RDSTs facilitated a twofold increase in Epi absorption and a 50% reduction in the sublingual dose. This novel sublingual tablet formulation is potentially useful for the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis in community settings. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Sublingual sugar for hypoglycaemia in children with severe malaria: A pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand; Dicko, Moussa; Willcox, Merlin L; Lambert, Bernard; Falquet, Jacques; Forster, Mathieu; Giani, Sergio; Diakite, Chiaka; Dembele, Eugène M; Diallo, Drissa; Barennes, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypoglycaemia is a poor prognostic indicator in severe malaria. Intravenous infusions are rarely feasible in rural areas. The efficacy of sublingual sugar (SLS) was assessed in a pilot randomized controlled trial among hypoglycaemic children with severe malaria in Mali. Methods Of 151 patients with presumed severe malaria, 23 children with blood glucose concentrations = 3.3 mmol/l (60 mg/dl) within 40 minutes after admission. Secondary outcome measures were early treatment response at 20 minutes, relapse (early and late), maximal BGC gain (CGmax), and treatment delay. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in the primary outcome measure. Treatment response occurred in 71% and 67% for SLS and IVG, respectively. Among the responders, relapses occurred in 30% on SLS at 40 minutes and in 17% on IVG at 20 minutes. There was one fatality in each group. Treatment failures in the SLS group were related to children with clenched teeth or swallowing the sugar, whereas in the IVG group, they were due to unavoidable delays in beginning an infusion (median time 17.5 min (range 3–40). Among SLS, the BGC increase was rapid among the nine patients who really kept the sugar sublingually. All but one increased their BGC by 10 minutes with a mean gain of 44 mg/dl (95%CI: 20.5–63.4). Conclusion Sublingual sugar appears to be a child-friendly, well-tolerated and effective promising method of raising blood glucose in severely ill children. More frequent repeated doses are needed to prevent relapse. Children should be monitored for early swallowing which leads to delayed absorption, and in this case another dose of sugar should be given. Sublingual sugar could be proposed as an immediate "first aid" measure while awaiting intravenous glucose. In many cases it may avert the need for intravenous glucose. PMID:19025610

  12. Sublingual sugar for hypoglycaemia in children with severe malaria: A pilot clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giani Sergio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoglycaemia is a poor prognostic indicator in severe malaria. Intravenous infusions are rarely feasible in rural areas. The efficacy of sublingual sugar (SLS was assessed in a pilot randomized controlled trial among hypoglycaemic children with severe malaria in Mali. Methods Of 151 patients with presumed severe malaria, 23 children with blood glucose concentrations = 3.3 mmol/l (60 mg/dl within 40 minutes after admission. Secondary outcome measures were early treatment response at 20 minutes, relapse (early and late, maximal BGC gain (CGmax, and treatment delay. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in the primary outcome measure. Treatment response occurred in 71% and 67% for SLS and IVG, respectively. Among the responders, relapses occurred in 30% on SLS at 40 minutes and in 17% on IVG at 20 minutes. There was one fatality in each group. Treatment failures in the SLS group were related to children with clenched teeth or swallowing the sugar, whereas in the IVG group, they were due to unavoidable delays in beginning an infusion (median time 17.5 min (range 3–40. Among SLS, the BGC increase was rapid among the nine patients who really kept the sugar sublingually. All but one increased their BGC by 10 minutes with a mean gain of 44 mg/dl (95%CI: 20.5–63.4. Conclusion Sublingual sugar appears to be a child-friendly, well-tolerated and effective promising method of raising blood glucose in severely ill children. More frequent repeated doses are needed to prevent relapse. Children should be monitored for early swallowing which leads to delayed absorption, and in this case another dose of sugar should be given. Sublingual sugar could be proposed as an immediate "first aid" measure while awaiting intravenous glucose. In many cases it may avert the need for intravenous glucose.

  13. Growth, structural, optical and surface analysis of piperazinium tartrate: A NLO single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Apurva; Raseel Rahman M., K.; Nair, Lekha

    2018-05-01

    Single crystal of piperazinium tartrate (PPZT) was grown by the slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Crystallinity of grown crystal was examined by powder X-ray diffraction. High transparency and wide band gap were observed in the UV-Visible spectroscopic studies. Intense and broad emissions were observed in the blue region, as that is indicated by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The quality of the grown PPZT single crystals were analyzed by the etching studies using the water as the etchant.

  14. CLINICAL AND ECONOMICAL ASSESSMENTS OF METOPROLOL TARTRATE/SUCCINATE USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

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    M. V. Soura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and clinicoeconomical studies review is presented as well as results of author’s comparative cost analysis on metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK usage in patients with ischemic heart disease. Efficacy of metoprolol therapy is proven in randomized clinical studies in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI. In angina patients metoprolol prevents cardiac attacks, MI, reduces nitroglycerine consumption, increases exercise tolerability, prolongs the exercise time before ST segment depression (succinate better than tartrate, decrease of angina intensity. In MI patients metoprolol therapy reduces mortality, sudden death, recurring MI and the rate of early post MI angina attacks. Nowadays metoprolol is the only β-blocker having indication on secondary MI prevention. Besides for the present metoprolol succinate is the only β-blocker with proven direct antisclerosis effect. According to Swedish clinicoeconomical study in patients after MI secondary prevention with metoprolol therapy saves the costs in comparison with placebo. American clinicoeconomical model of metoprolol and atenolol usage in all patients with MI could result in significant reduction in mortality and recurring MI rate, prolong the life and improve its quality, save financial resources. The cost of monthly treatment of angina patient with metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK is 135 and 354 rubles, respectively. The price range of comparative β-blockers in ascending order is the following: atenolol (Atenolol Nicomed → metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc → metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK → bisoprolol (Concor → nebivolol (Nebilet. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy is the one of mostly economically reasonable approach.

  15. A practical and azide-free synthetic approach to oseltamivir from diethyl D-tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jiang; Li, Yong-Bo; Wang, Rui-Bin; Li, Feng-Quan; Liu, Can; Chan, Albert S C; Lu, Gui

    2010-05-07

    A short and practical synthesis of oseltamivir was accomplished in 11 steps from inexpensive and abundant diethyl D-tartrate starting material. This azide-free route featured an asymmetric aza-Henry reaction and a domino nitro-Michael/Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) reaction as the key steps to construct the relevant cyclohexene ring of the product, which provided an economical and practical alternative for the synthesis of oseltamivir.

  16. Titrimetric and Spectrophotometric Determination of Metaprolol tartrate in Pharmaceuticals Using N-Bromosuccinimide

    OpenAIRE

    K. Basavaiah; B. C. Somashekar

    2007-01-01

    One titrimetric and two spectrophotometric methods are presented for the assay of metaprolol tartrate (MPT) in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods employ N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) as the oxidimetric reagent and two dyes, methyl orange and indigo carmine as spectrophotometric reagents. In titrimetry, an acidified solution of MPT is treated with a known excess amount of NBS and after a definite time, the unreacted oxidant is determined by iodometric back titration. Spectrophotometry involve...

  17. Characterization and in vitro degradation of poly(2,3-(1,4-diethyl tartrate)-co-2,3-isopropyliden tartrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliecker, Gesine; Schmidt, Carsten; Fuchs, Stefan; Kissel, Thomas

    2004-07-23

    In the present study, a less known polyester based on tartaric acid was characterized with respect to its degradation mechanism. Poly(2,3-(1,4-diethyl tartrate)-co-2,3-isopropyliden tartrate) (PTA) differs from commonly used biodegradable polyesters, such as poly(lactides-co-glycolides) (PLGA) by the presence of additional cleavable bonds in the polymer side chains. This modification results in different polymer properties and influences polymer degradation. The hydrolytic degradation of PTA was studied in parallel to PLGA using disc-shape matrices, which were obtained by compression-molding. The discs were incubated in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution at 37 degrees C. The degraded samples were characterized for percentage mass loss, water absorption, decay of molecular weight and change in glass transition temperature. The results demonstrate that the degradation of PTA proceeds via bulk erosion similar to PLGA. However, the degradation of PTA implants is characterized by a rapid mass loss within a short period of time appearing after a definite lag phase without remarkable mass loss. This makes the polymer promising for pulsatile drug release systems.

  18. A randomised controlled trial of sublingual misoprostol and intramuscular oxytocin for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sawaf, A; El-Mazny, A; Shohayeb, A

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and side-effects of 200 μg sublingual misoprostol vs 5 IU i.m. oxytocin, administered immediately following cord clamping in normal non-augmented vaginal delivery, in prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). A total of 104 women were randomised into three groups: misoprostol group (28 patients); oxytocin group (37 patients) and control group (39 patients). Misoprostol and oxytocin significantly minimised the blood loss during the third stage of labour and reduced the need for additional treatments for PPH as compared with the control group. Oxytocin was more effective than misoprostol in minimising blood loss and the need for additional uterotonic treatments. However, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, associated with tachycardia was observed in the oxytocin group. In conclusion, sublingual misoprostol appears to be less effective than i.m. oxytocin in the prevention of PPH; however, it has the potential advantages of being easily used, cost-effective and stable at room temperature. Therefore, sublingual misoprostol is still a feasible drug for routine management of third stage, especially in areas with limited medical facilities.

  19. [Efficacy of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lisheng; Jiang, Yinzhu; Li, Qi

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy(SLIT) in pediatric allergic rhiriitis caused by dust mites and compare its efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children. A total of 77 pediatric allergic rhinitis patients received Dermatophagoides farina extracts sublingual immunotherapy for 2 years were enrolled as desensitization group and were allocated into monosensitized group (41 cases) and polysensitized group (36 cases) according to the number of coexisting allergens. Meanwhile another 33 allergic rhinitis children treated by pharmacotherapy during the period were collected as control group. The total symptom scores (TNSS), total medication scores (TMS) and visual analogue scale(VAS) were assessed at the beginning, six months, 1 year and 2 years of the treatment. SPSS 13. 0 software was used to analyze the data. the score of TNSS and VAS in desensitization was slightly higher than the control after six months treatment, but without difference at l year and 2 years; the score of TMS had significantly improved in desensitization compared with the corresponding points in control. All the parameters in monosensitized group were equivalent with polysensitizend group, except the score of TMS was slightly lower than the polysensitizend group at six months. Dust mite drops sublingual immunotherapy is effective for the allergic rhinitis children caused by mites. And it has similar immunotherapy efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children.

  20. Bioavailability of detomidine administered sublingually to horses as an oromucosal gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, H; Aspegrén, J; Hyyppä, S; Tamm, L; Salonen, J S

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the absorption, bioavailability and sedative effect of detomidine administered to horses as an oromucosal gel compared to intravenous and intramuscular administration of detomidine injectable solution. The study was open and randomized, with three sequences crossover design. Nine healthy horses were given 40 μg/kg detomidine intravenously, intramuscularly or administered under the tongue with a 7-day wash-out period between treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after drug administration for the measurement of detomidine concentrations in serum. The effects of the route of administration on heart rate and rhythm were evaluated and the depth of sedation assessed. Mean (±SD) bioavailability of detomidine was 22% (±5.3%) after sublingual administration and 38.2% (±7.9%) after intramuscular administration. The sedative effects correlated with detomidine concentrations regardless of the route of administration. We conclude that less detomidine is absorbed when given sublingually than when given intramuscularly, because part of it does not reach the circulation. Sublingual administration of detomidine oromucosal gel at 40 μg/kg produces safe sedation in horses. Slow absorption leads to fewer and less pronounced adverse effects than the more rapid absorption after intramuscular injection. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. COMPARISON BETAXOLOL AND METOPROLOL TARTRATE THERAPIES IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Anderzhanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive, antianginal and antiischemic efficacy of β1-selective adrenoblockers (betaxolol and metoprolol tartrate in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree associated with stable angina class II.Material and methods. 100 patients (aged 23-66 y.o. with HT associated with stable angina or without angina were involved in the study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups (G1 and G2. G1 patients were treated with betaxolol, and G2 patients – with metoprolol tartrate. Ambulatory BP and electrocardiogram monitoring, exercise stress-test, echocardiography, evaluating of respiratory function, blood analysis was performed initially and in 30 and 90 days of treatment.Results. Target BP level was reached in 44 (88% patients treated with betaxolol (average daily dose 10±4 mg. 34 patients of G1 took 10 mg daily. Target BP level was reached in 41 (82% patients treated with metoprolol tartrate (average daily dose 150±27 mg. 30 patients of G2 took 150 mg daily. Exercise tolerance increased and a number of ischemic ST segment depressions reduced significantly in both groups. There were no significant differences in antihypertensive, antianginal, and antiischemic efficacy between groups.Conclusion. Betaxolol advantage is an ability to maintain target BP level more than 24 hours. A possibility to take betaxolol once a day raises patient’s compliance with therapy.

  2. COMPARISON BETAXOLOL AND METOPROLOL TARTRATE THERAPIES IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Anderzhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive, antianginal and antiischemic efficacy of β1-selective adrenoblockers (betaxolol and metoprolol tartrate in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree associated with stable angina class II.Material and methods. 100 patients (aged 23-66 y.o. with HT associated with stable angina or without angina were involved in the study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups (G1 and G2. G1 patients were treated with betaxolol, and G2 patients – with metoprolol tartrate. Ambulatory BP and electrocardiogram monitoring, exercise stress-test, echocardiography, evaluating of respiratory function, blood analysis was performed initially and in 30 and 90 days of treatment.Results. Target BP level was reached in 44 (88% patients treated with betaxolol (average daily dose 10±4 mg. 34 patients of G1 took 10 mg daily. Target BP level was reached in 41 (82% patients treated with metoprolol tartrate (average daily dose 150±27 mg. 30 patients of G2 took 150 mg daily. Exercise tolerance increased and a number of ischemic ST segment depressions reduced significantly in both groups. There were no significant differences in antihypertensive, antianginal, and antiischemic efficacy between groups.Conclusion. Betaxolol advantage is an ability to maintain target BP level more than 24 hours. A possibility to take betaxolol once a day raises patient’s compliance with therapy.

  3. Increasing efficacy and reducing systemic absorption of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic gels in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaochen; Li, Jiawei; Pi, Jiaxin; Qi, Dongli; Guo, Pan; Li, Nan; Wu, Yumei; Liu, Zhidong

    2018-03-01

    Systemic absorption of ocularly administered Brimonidine Tartrate has been reported to give rise to several side-effects. Hence, it has become crucial to develop a delivery system that could increase efficacy and reduce systemic absorption. Therefore, the present work aims to develop Brimonidine Tartrate gels with different concentrations (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2% w/v, respectively) using Carbopol 974 P and HPMC E4M, and compare the therapeutic efficacy and systemic absorption with that of eye drop (0.2%, w/v) by UPLC-MS/MS. The result of histological analysis did not show any morphological or structural changes after the administration of formulations. In vitro residence time studies demonstrated that the gels exhibited a better precorneal residence time as compared with the eye drop. The gels with lower concentrations of the drug (0.05% and 0.1%, w/v) could significantly decrease intraocular pressure (IOP) in both normal and water-loaded rabbits as compared to the eye drop. Finally, the values of the ratio of AUC (0→∞) in comparison to eye drop showed the gels with lower concentrations of Brimonidine Tartrate could decrease the systemic absorption. From the result, it can be concluded the 0.1% ophthalmic gel has a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential toxicity caused by systemic absorption.

  4. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue–penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste–disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  5. Design, development and in-vitro evaluation of metoprolol tartrate tablets containing xanthan-tragacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Akhtar; Iqbal, Muhammad; Murtaza, Ghulam; Waqas, Muhammad K; Hanif, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat A; Bhatti, Naveed S

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop oral sustained release tablets of metoprolol tartrate using natural hydrophilic matrix formers (xanthan gum and tragacanth). Sustained release matrix tablets of metoprolol tartrate were prepared by using different ratios of drug, xanthan gum and tragacanth. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was used as diluent. The polymer was incorporated into a matrix system using direct compression technique. All the lubricated formulations were compressed using concave punches in compression machine. Compressed tablets were evaluated for diameter, hardness, friability, weight variation and in vitro dissolution using USP dissolution apparatus-II. Different formulations were evaluated with respect to dissolution profile in 900 mL phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), 0.1 M HCl solution and distilled water for 12 h at 37 degrees C. Increasing the amount of polymer (xanthan gum) in the formulation led to slow release of drug and decreasing the amount of polymer gave enhanced release of metoprolol tartrate. The kinetic treatment showed the best fitted different mathematical models (Zero order, First order, Higuchi's and Hixson-Crowell). Most of the solid matrix formulations followed Higuchi or zero order kinetics. The formulations F1, F2, F3 and F7, F8, F9 showed maximum linearity while the formulations F4, F5, F6 were not of linear behavior. The results showed that the formulation F9 containing 30% xanthan gum and 10% gum tragacanth is the most similar to that of the reference marketed preparation.

  6. Validation of a method for the determination of zolpidem in human plasma using LC with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, P R; Bostick, J M

    2000-04-01

    A sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of zolpidem in human plasma. Zolpidem and the internal standard (trazodone) were extracted from human plasma that had been made basic. The basic sample was loaded onto a conditioned Bond Elut C18 cartridge, rinsed with water and eluted with methanol. Forty microliters were then injected onto the LC system. Separation was achieved on a C18 column (150 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile:50 mM potassium phosphate monobasic at pH 6.0 (4:6, v/v). Detection was by fluorescence, with excitation at 254 nm and emission at 400 nm. The retention times of zolpidem and internal standard were approximately 4.7 and 5.3 min, respectively. The LC run time was 8 min. The assay was linear in concentration range 1-400 ng/ml for zolpidem in human plasma. The analysis of quality control samples for zolpidem (3, 30, and 300 ng/ml) demonstrated excellent precision with relative standard deviations (RSD) of 3.7, 4.6, and 3.0%, respectively (n = 18). The method was accurate with all intraday (n = 6) and overall (n = 18) mean concentrations within 5.8% from nominal at all quality control sample concentrations. This method was also performed using a Gilson Aspec XL automated sample processor and autoinjector. The samples were manually fortified with internal standard and made basic. The aspec then performed the solid phase extraction and made injections of the samples onto the LC system. Using the automated procedure for analysis, quality control samples for zolpidem (3, 30, and 300 ng/ml) demonstrated acceptable precision with RSD values of 9.0, 4.9, and 5.1%, respectively (n = 12). The method was accurate with all intracurve (n = 4) and overall (n = 12) mean values being less than 10.8% from nominal at all quality control sample concentrations.

  7. A Three-Year Course of House Dust Mite Sublingual Immunotherapy Appears Effective in Controlling the Symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Silviya M; Novakova, Plamena I; Yakovliev, Plamen H; Staevska, Maria T; Mateva, Nonka G; Dimcheva, Teodora D; Peichev, Jivko L

    2018-05-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is the most common allergic disorder. Although the management of the disease is successful in many patients, based on guidelines, some of them remain with symptoms uncontrolled with pharmacotherapy. Presently, there is no substantiated information on the control of allergic rhinitis in patients who underwent sublingual immunotherapy. Objective The purpose of this prospective follow-up study was to assess the control of allergic rhinitis in adults after a three-year course of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy. Methods This prospective real-life study was designed to include adults with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis sensitized to house dust mite who underwent a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy. Control of symptoms was assessed by Rhinitis Control Assessment Test (RCAT) after three years of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy. Additionally, patients assessed their symptoms by utilizing a visual analog scale. Results A total number of 86 consecutively enrolled patients (46 (53.49%) men; mean age 26.10 years (SD = 5.85)) with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis and clinically relevant sensitization to house dust mite were evaluated. When assessed by RCAT on the third year, 74 (86.05%) had well-controlled symptoms and 20 (27.03%) of them were completely controlled. A significant reduction in visual analog scale scores-from 7.52 cm at baseline to 2.31 cm-was established ( P house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy appears effective in controlling the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  8. Improved Arousal and Motor Function Using Zolpidem in a Patient With Space-Occupying Intracranial Lesions: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomalaski, Martin Nicholas; Smith, Sean Robinson

    2017-08-01

    Patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) have profound functional limitations with few treatment options for improving arousal and quality of life. Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic used to treat insomnia that has also been observed to paradoxically improve arousal in those with DOC, such as the vegetative or minimally conscious states. Little information exists on its use in patients with DOC who have intracranial space-occupying lesions. We present a case of a 24-year-old man in a minimally conscious state due to central nervous system lymphoma who was observed to have increased arousal and improved motor function after the administration of zolpidem. V. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Maintenance of Therapeutic Gains Associated With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia Delivered Alone or Combined With Zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Ivers, Hans; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    To document the long-term sleep outcomes at 12 and 24 months after patients with chronic insomnia were treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), either singly or combined with zolpidem medication. Participants were 160 adults with chronic insomnia. They were first randomized for a six-week acute treatment phase involving CBT alone or CBT combined with nightly zolpidem, and randomized for a six-month extended treatment phase involving CBT, no additional treatment, CBT combined with zolpidem as needed, or CBT with zolpidem tapered. This paper reports results of the 12- and 24-month follow-ups on the main outcome measures derived from the Insomnia Severity Index and sleep diaries. Clinical improvements achieved 6 months following the end of treatment were well-maintained in all four conditions, with insomnia remission rates ranging from 48% to 74% at the 12-month follow-up, and from 44% to 63% at the 24-month follow-up. Participants receiving CBT with zolpidem taper in the extended treatment phase had significantly better results than those receiving CBT with continued zolpidem as needed. The magnitude of improvements on sleep diary parameters was similar between conditions, with a slight advantage for the CBT with zolpidem taper condition. The addition of extended CBT did not alter the long-term outcome over improvements obtained during the initial 6-week CBT. The results suggest that CBT for insomnia, when delivered alone or in combination with medication, produce durable sleep improvements up to two years after completion of treatment. These long-term results indicate that even if a combined CBT plus medication approach provide an added benefit immediately after treatment, extending CBT while tapering medication produce better sustained improvements compared to continued use of medication as needed. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  10. Assessment of the abuse liability of a dual orexin receptor antagonist: a crossover study of almorexant and zolpidem in recreational drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Hans G; Hoever, Petra; Chakraborty, Bijan; Schoedel, Kerri; Sellers, Edward M; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-04-01

    Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) enable initiation and maintenance of sleep in patients with primary insomnia. Blockade of the orexin system has shown reduction of drug-seeking behavior in animal studies, supporting the role of orexin antagonism as a novel approach for treating substance abuse. Since hypnotics are traditionally associated with misuse, a lack of abuse liability of DORAs would offer significant benefits over current therapies for sleep disorders. In this randomized, crossover, proof-of-concept study, single oral doses of the DORA almorexant (200, 400, and 1,000 mg) were administered to healthy subjects with previous non-therapeutic experience with central nervous system depressants and were compared with placebo and single oral doses of zolpidem (20 and 40 mg), a benzodiazepine-like drug. Subjective measures of abuse potential (visual analog scales [VAS], Addiction Research Center Inventory, and Subjective Drug Value) and objective measures (divided attention [DA]) were evaluated over 24 h post-dose in 33 evaluable subjects. Drug Liking VAS peak effect (E max; primary endpoint) was significantly higher for all doses of almorexant and zolpidem compared with placebo (p<0.001). Almorexant 200 mg showed significantly less 'Drug Liking' than both zolpidem doses (p<0.01), and almorexant 400 mg had smaller effects than zolpidem 20 mg (p<0.05), while almorexant 1,000 mg was not different from either zolpidem dose. Results were similar for other subjective measures, although almorexant generally showed smaller negative and perceptual effects compared with zolpidem. Almorexant also showed less cognitive impairment compared with zolpidem on most DA endpoints. This study in humans investigating single doses of almorexant is the first to explore and show abuse liability of a DORA, a class of compounds that is not only promising for the treatment of sleep disorders, but also of addiction.

  11. Dose-dependent EEG effects of zolpidem provide evidence for GABA(A) receptor subtype selectivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, S A G; Wolters, F L C; van der Graaf, P H; Peletier, L A; Danhof, M

    2003-03-01

    Zolpidem is a nonbenzodiazepine GABA(A) receptor modulator that binds in vitro with high affinity to GABA(A) receptors expressing alpha(1) subunits but with relatively low affinity to receptors expressing alpha(2), alpha(3), and alpha(5) subunits. In the present study, it was investigated whether this subtype selectivity could be detected and quantified in vivo. Three doses (1.25, 5, and 25 mg) of zolpidem were administered to rats in an intravenous infusion over 5 min. The time course of the plasma concentrations was determined in conjunction with the change in the beta-frequency range of the EEG as pharmacodynamic endpoint. The concentration-effect relationship of the three doses showed a dose-dependent maximum effect and a dose-dependent potency. The data were analyzed for one- or two-site binding using two pharmacodynamic models based on 1) the descriptive model and 2) a novel mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for GABA(A) receptor modulators that aims to separates drug- and system-specific properties, thereby allowing the estimation of in vivo affinity and efficacy. The application of two-site models significantly improved the fits compared with one-site models. Furthermore, in contrast to the descriptive model, the mechanism-based PK/PD model yielded dose-independent estimates for affinity (97 +/- 40 and 33,100 +/- 14,800 ng x ml(-1)). In conclusion, the mechanism-based PK/PD model is able to describe and explain the observed dose-dependent EEG effects of zolpidem and suggests the subtype selectivity of zolpidem in vivo.

  12. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [11C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N.; Montoya, Julie A.; Mattner, Filomena; Katsifis, Andrew; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of [ 11 C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors, is reported herein. The reaction of desmethylzolpidem with [ 11 C] methyl iodide afforded the title compound [ 11 C]zolpidem in a yield of 19.19 ± 3.23% in 41 ± 2 min in specific activities of 0.995-1.19 Ci/μmol (1.115 ± 0.105 Ci/μmol) (n = 3; decay corrected, EOB). The amount of radioactivity in the brain after tail vein injection in male Wistar rats was low, and the regional distribution was homogeneous and not consistent with the known distribution of the central benzodiazepine receptors. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was not significantly greater than one (1.007 ± 0.266 at 5 min) and did not increase from 5 to 40 min post-injection. A PET brain imaging study in one baboon confirmed the results obtained in rats. Therefore, it can be concluded that [ 11 C]zolpidem is not a suitable tracer for in vivo visualization of central benzodiazepine receptors

  13. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Montoya, Julie A.; Mattner, Filomena; Katsifis, Andrew; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-05-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of [{sup 11}C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors, is reported herein. The reaction of desmethylzolpidem with [{sup 11}C] methyl iodide afforded the title compound [{sup 11}C]zolpidem in a yield of 19.19 {+-} 3.23% in 41 {+-} 2 min in specific activities of 0.995-1.19 Ci/{mu}mol (1.115 {+-} 0.105 Ci/{mu}mol) (n = 3; decay corrected, EOB). The amount of radioactivity in the brain after tail vein injection in male Wistar rats was low, and the regional distribution was homogeneous and not consistent with the known distribution of the central benzodiazepine receptors. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was not significantly greater than one (1.007 {+-} 0.266 at 5 min) and did not increase from 5 to 40 min post-injection. A PET brain imaging study in one baboon confirmed the results obtained in rats. Therefore, it can be concluded that [{sup 11}C]zolpidem is not a suitable tracer for in vivo visualization of central benzodiazepine receptors.

  14. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [11C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N; Montoya, Julie A; Mattner, Filomena; Katsifis, Andrew; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Laruelle, Marc

    2003-05-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of [(11)C]zolpidem, an imidazopyridine with agonist properties at central benzodiazepine receptors, is reported herein. The reaction of desmethylzolpidem with [(11)C] methyl iodide afforded the title compound [(11)C]zolpidem in a yield of 19.19 +/- 3.23% in 41 +/- 2 min in specific activities of 0.995-1.19 Ci/micromol (1.115 +/- 0.105 Ci/micromol) (n = 3; decay corrected, EOB). The amount of radioactivity in the brain after tail vein injection in male Wistar rats was low, and the regional distribution was homogeneous and not consistent with the known distribution of the central benzodiazepine receptors. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio was not significantly greater than one (1.007 +/- 0.266 at 5 min) and did not increase from 5 to 40 min post-injection. A PET brain imaging study in one baboon confirmed the results obtained in rats. Therefore, it can be concluded that [(11)C]zolpidem is not a suitable tracer for in vivo visualization of central benzodiazepine receptors.

  15. Enantioselective toxicities of chiral ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium tartrate on Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huijun; Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Dong, Ying; Chen, Caidong; Zhu, Shimin; Ma, Xiangjuan

    2015-12-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are being used in various industries during the last few decades, while the good solubility and high stability of ILs may pose a potential threat to the aquatic environment. Effect of chiral ionic liquids (CILs) 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium tartrate (RMIM T) on Scenedesmus obliquus (S.obliquus) was studied. The growth rate inhibition and cell membrane permeability increased with increasing RMIM T concentration and increasing alkyl chain lengths. The IC50 values of D-(-)-tartrate 1-hexyl-3-methyl imidazolium (D-(-)-HMIM T) were 28.30, 12.23,10.15 and 14.41 mg/L, respectively, at 24, 48, 72 and 96h. While that of L-(+)-tartrate 1-hexyl-3-methyl imidazolium (L-(+)-HMIM T) were 15.97, 7.91, 9.43 and 12.04 mg/L respectively. The concentration of chl a, chl b and chl (a+b) decreased with increasing RMIM T concentration. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (F0, Fv/Fm, Fv/F0, Y(II), ETR and NPQ) were affected by RMIM T, indicating that the RMIM T will damage the PSII, inhibit the transmission of excitation energy, decrease the efficiency of photosynthesis. The results showed that there were enantioselective toxicity of RMIM T to algae, and the toxicity of L-(+)-RMIM T was greater than that of D-(-)-RMIM T, but the enantioselective difference becomes smaller with increasing exposure time, and with the increasing carbon chain length of cation, indicating that cation properties may have a larger effect on toxicity than anion properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of sustained release capsules containing "coated matrix granules of metoprolol tartrate".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Sabahuddin; Khanam, Jasmina; Bigoniya, Papiya

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to prepare sustained release capsule containing coated matrix granules of metoprolol tartrate and to study its in vitro release and in vivo absorption. The design of dosage form was performed by choosing hydrophilic hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K100M) and hydrophobic ethyl cellulose (EC) polymers as matrix builders and Eudragit® RL/RS as coating polymers. Granules were prepared by composing drug with HPMC K100M, EC, dicalcium phosphate by wet granulation method with subsequent coating. Optimized formulation of metoprolol tartrate was formed by using 30% HPMC K100M, 20% EC, and ratio of Eudragit® RS/RL as 97.5:2.5 at 25% coating level. Capsules were filled with free flowing optimized granules of uniform drug content. This extended the release period upto 12 h in vitro study. Similarity factor and mean dissolution time were also reported to compare various dissolution profiles. The network formed by HPMC and EC had been coupled satisfactorily with the controlled resistance offered by Eudragit® RS. The release mechanism of capsules followed Korsemeyer-Peppas model that indicated significant contribution of erosion effect of hydrophilic polymer. Biopharmaceutical study of this optimized dosage form in rabbit model showed 10 h prolonged drug release in vivo. A close correlation (R(2) = 0.9434) was established between the in vitro release and the in vivo absorption of drug. The results suggested that wet granulation with subsequent coating by fluidized bed technique, is a suitable method to formulate sustained release capsules of metoprolol tartrate and it can perform therapeutically better than conventional immediate release dosage form.

  17. Airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy. Methods: A total of 68 children with dust mite allergic rhinitis treated in our hospital from November, 2012 to October, 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into observation group 34 cases and control group 34 cases. The control group received clinical routine therapy for allergic rhinitis, the observation group received sublingual immunotherapy, and then differences in basic lung function indicator values, small airway function indicator values and levels of serum inflammatory factors as well as serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM were compared between two groups after treatment. Results: The FVC, FEV1, PEF and FEV1/FVC values of the observation group after treatment were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the MMEF, MEF50% and MEF25% values of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the proportion of AHR was lower than that of the control group (P<0.05; the serum IL-4, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and IL-16 levels of the observation group after treatment were lower than those of the control group, and the IL-10 and IL-12 levels are higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM levels of the observation group children after treatment were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Sublingual immunotherapy for children with dust mite allergic rhinitis can optimize the airway function, reduce the systemic inflammatory response and eventually improve the children’s overall state, and it’s has positive clinical significance.

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a sublingual fentanyl wafer formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim SCB

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stephen CB Lim,1,3 Michael J Paech,2 Bruce Sunderland,3 Yandi Liu3 1Pharmacy Department, Armadale Health Service, Armadale, 2School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, and Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women, Subiaco, 3School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Background: The objective of this study was to prepare a novel fentanyl wafer formulation by a freeze-drying method, and to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo release characteristics, including its bioavailability via the sublingual route. Methods: The wafer formulation was prepared by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of fentanyl containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose and amylogum as matrix formers. Uniformity of weight, friability, and dissolution testing of the fentanyl wafer was achieved using standard methods, and the residual moisture content was measured. The fentanyl wafer was also examined using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The absolute bioavailability of the fentanyl wafer was evaluated in 11 opioid-naïve adult female patients using a randomized crossover design. Results: In vitro release showed that almost 90% of the fentanyl dissolved in one minute. In vivo, the first detectable plasma fentanyl concentration was observed after 3.5 minutes and the peak plasma concentration between 61.5 and 67 minutes. The median absolute bioavailability was 53.0%. Conclusion: These results indicate that this wafer has potential as an alternative sublingual fentanyl formulation. Keywords: absolute bioavailability, fentanyl wafer, in vitro dissolution, in vivo study, pharmacokinetics, sublingual

  19. ROLE OF 400 MCG INTRAOPERATIVE SUBLINGUAL MISOPROSTOL FOR REDUCTION OF CAESAREAN BLOOD LOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalmohan Nayak

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lower segment caesarean section is a common surgical procedure. Postpartum haemorrhage incidence after LSCS is 4%. Misoprostol is a prostaglandin E1 analogue with good uterotonic properties, easy availability, low cost, thermostability, long shelf life, easy administration and few adverse effects at therapeutic dose. It is readily absorbed by oral, sublingual, buccal, vaginal or rectal route. Sublingual route attains quickest concentration. Dose of 400 mcg was chosen in this study to minimise adverse effects with optimal therapeutic benefit. The aim of the study is to determine the efficacy of sublingual misoprostol in reducing caesarean blood loss. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective experimental study done in VSSIMSAR, Burla. Women undergoing LSCS were randomly assigned to study and control groups of equal strength of 100 each. In all cases, preoperative Hb%, haematocrit, pulse, BP was noted. Study group were given 400 mcg misoprostol at the time of cord clamping. In control group, nothing was given. In all patients, active management of third stage of labour was done by using oxytocin 10 IU (IV along with uterine massage. Blood loss soaked by tetra was calculated using formula, blood loss = wet weight-dry weight/1.05 (1.05 is constant. Amount of blood loss, postoperative Hb%, haematocrit, pulse rate, BP was noted in both groups and compared. BP and pulse were noted after 1 hour and Hb%, haematocrit were noted after 24 hours. RESULTS Study group showed significant decrease in total blood loss (around 117.9 mL as compared to control group. There was significant decrease in the postoperative fall in Hb in the study group as compared to control, the mean difference being 0.631 gm%. Study group also showed decrease in postoperative fall in haematocrit as compared to control, the mean difference being 0.055. CONCLUSION Misoprostol significantly reduced caesarean blood loss and doesn’t affect foetal outcome without significant

  20. Ultrastructural changes in the sublingual salivary gland of prenatal buffalo (Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed to elucidate ultrastructural changes in the development of sublingual salivary gland of buffalo during prenatal life. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on sublingual salivary gland of 36 buffalo fetuses ranging from 13.2 cm curved crown-rump length (CVRL (88th day to full term. The fetuses were categorized into three groups based on their CVRL. Results: The cells lining the terminal tubules were undifferentiated with poorly developed cytoplasmic organelles but lacked secretory granules (SGs at 13.2 cm CVRL (88th day. The SGs appeared first in the form of membrane-bound secretory vesicles with homogeneous electron-dense as well as electron-lucent contents at 21.2 cm CVRL (122nd day; however, mucous acinar cells contained electron-lucent granules, while serous secretory cells as well as serous demilunes showed electron-dense granules at 34 cm CVRL (150th day of prenatal life. At 53.5 cm CVRL (194th day, both mucous and serous acini were differentiated by the density of SGs. Conclusion: The cytoplasm of acinar cells was filled with mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi profiles in mid and late fetal age groups. The SGs were increased in number during the late fetal age group. The myoepithelial cells (MECs were located at the base of the acinar cells as well as intercalated and striated ducts and were stellate in shape. The ultrastructure of MEC revealed a parallel stream of myofilaments in the cytoplasm and its processes. The mucous cells were predominantly present in the sublingual salivary gland and were pyramidal in shape.

  1. Sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia after sublingual administration of detomidine hydrochloride gel to donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Ignacio; Castillo-Alcala, Fernanda; Varner, Kelley M; Robinson, Lauren S

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sedative and mechanical hypoalgesic effects of sublingual administration of 2 doses of detomidine gel to donkeys. DESIGN Randomized blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 6 healthy castrated male donkeys. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, donkeys received each of the following sublingual treatments 1 week apart in a randomly assigned order: 1 mL of molasses (D0) or detomidine hydrochloride gel at 20 μg/kg (9 μg/lb; D20) or 40 μg/kg (18 μg/lb; D40). Sedation score (SS), head height above the ground (HHAG), and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were assessed before and for 180 minutes after treatment. Areas under the effect change-versus-time curves (AUCs) from 0 to 30, 30 to 60, 60 to 120, and 120 to 180 minutes after administration were computed for SS, HHAG, and MNT and compared among treatments. RESULTS D20 and D40 resulted in greater SS AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes and smaller HHAG AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes than did D0. The D40 resulted in smaller HHAG AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes than did D20. Compared with D0 values, MNT AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes were higher for D20, whereas MNT AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes were higher for D40. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE D20 and D40 induced sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia in donkeys by > 30 minutes after administration, but only sedation was dose dependent. Sublingual administration of detomidine gel at 40 μg/kg may be useful for sedation of standing donkeys prior to potentially painful minor procedures.

  2. Disintegration of sublingual tablets: proposal for a validated test method and acceptance criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weda, M; van Riet-Nales, D A; van Aalst, P; de Kaste, D; Lekkerkerker, J F F

    2006-12-01

    In the Netherlands the market share of isosorbide dinitrate 5 mg sublingual tablets is dominated by 2 products (A and B). In the last few years complaints have been received from health care professionals on product B. During patient use the disintegration of the tablet was reported to be slow and/or incomplete, and ineffectiveness was experienced. In the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) no requirement is present for the disintegration time of sublingual tablets. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro disintegration time of products A and B, and to establish a suitable test method and acceptance criterion. A and B were tested with the Ph. Eur. method described in the monograph on disintegration of tablets and capsules as well as with 3 modified tests using the same Ph. Eur. apparatus, but without movement of the basket-rack assembly. In modified test 1 and modified test 2 water was used as medium (900 ml and 50 ml respectively), whereas in modified test 3 artificial saliva was used (50 ml). In addition, disintegration was tested in Nessler tubes with 0.5 and 2 ml of water. Finally, the Ph. Eur. method was also applied to other sublingual tablets with other drug substances on the Dutch market. With modified test 3 no disintegration could be achieved within 20 min. With the Ph. Eur. method and modified tests 1 and 2 product A and B differed significantly (p disintegration times. These 3 methods were capable of discriminating between products and between batches. The time measured with the Ph. Eur. method was significantly lower compared to modified tests 1 and 2 (p tablets the disintegration time should be tested. The Ph. Eur. method is considered suitable for this test. In view of the products currently on the market and taking into consideration requirements in the United States Pharmacopeia and Japanese Pharmacopoeia, an acceptance criterion of not more than 2 min is proposed.

  3. Clinical potential of eliglustat tartrate in the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Paige KaplanLysosomal Disorders Center, Section of Metabolic Diseases, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Nonneuropathic type 1 Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disease caused by the deficiency or absence of beta glucocerebrosidase (beta glucosidase. The highest prevalence of type 1 is in Ashkenazi Jews, but it affects all ethnic groups. It manifests at any age but is seen predominantly in the first two decades. The phenotype is characterized by painless splenomegaly and secondary hypersplenism (low hemoglobin concentration and low platelet and white blood cell counts. Symptoms and signs include splenomegaly; chronic fatigue, frequent nose bleeds, prolonged bleeding, and/or bruising; hepatomegaly; bone pain, bone destruction and low bone density; and poor growth in childhood and delayed pubertal development. Current treatment with intravenous enzyme replacement has been generally successful. However, oral treatments have been developed because enzyme replacement is time-consuming and invasive, and intravenous infusions are not universally available for patients who live far from medical centers or home infusion nurses. Furthermore, it may become difficult to access veins after repeated infusions. Orally administered substrate reduction is a newer treatment approach. The aim is to limit the synthesis of the substrate, glucosylceramide. The residual intrinsic enzyme, acting alone or with recombinant enzyme, can then completely catabolize the smaller amounts of glucosylceramide that are transported into lysosomes. Eliglustat tartrate is a new specific inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase. Phase III trials in humans have been completed. Eliglustat tartrate has been shown to be efficacious and safe in adult humans. The results are as good or better compared with intravenous replacement with regard to reductions in spleen and liver enlargement and improvements in hemoglobin concentrations, platelet

  4. Removal of Pb2+ from the aqueous solution by tartrate intercalated layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanming; Zhao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xi; Li, Shifeng; Liu, Dongbin; Fan, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of Pb 2+ ion by a tartrate intercalated MgAl layered double hydroxides (MgAl-TA LDHs) was studied. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated as a function of various experimental parameters using batch adsorption experiments. The results indicated that the adsorption isotherm was well described by Sips model. The kinetic adsorption data were fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption of Pb 2+ was controlled mainly by the chemical process combined with intraparticle diffusion. Parameters of adsorption thermodynamic suggested that the interaction of Pb 2+ adsorbed by MgAl-TA LDHs adsorbents was thermodynamically spontaneous and endothermic.

  5. Evaluation of poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) containing copolymer networks of varied composition as sustained metoprolol tartrate delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Bistra; Ivanova, Sijka; Balashev, Konstantin; Rachev, Dimitar; Christova, Darinka

    2014-08-01

    Segmented copolymer networks (SCN) based on poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) and containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, and/or methyl methacrylate segments have been evaluated as potential sustained release systems of the water soluble cardioselective β-blocker metoprolol tartrate. The structure and properties of the drug carriers were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Swelling kinetics of SCNs in various media was followed, and the conditions for effective MT loading were specified. MT-loaded SCNs with drug content up to 80 wt.% were produced. The release kinetics of metoprolol tartrate from the systems was studied and it was shown that the conetworks of different structure and composition are able to sustain the metoprolol tartrate release without additional excipients.

  6. Involvement of the K+-Cl- co-transporter KCC2 in the sensitization to morphine-induced hyperlocomotion under chronic treatment with zolpidem in the mesolimbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Masahiro; Masukawa, Daiki; Ishii, Kazunori; Yamagishi, Yui; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2013-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are commonly used as sedatives, sleeping aids, and anti-anxiety drugs. However, chronic treatment with benzodiazepines is known to induce dependence, which is considered related to neuroplastic changes in the mesolimbic system. This study investigated the involvement of K(+) -Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) in the sensitization to morphine-induced hyperlocomotion after chronic treatment with zolpidem [a selective agonist of γ-aminobutyric acid A-type receptor (GABAA R) α1 subunit]. In this study, chronic treatment with zolpidem enhanced morphine-induced hyperlocomotion, which is accompanied by the up-regulation of KCC2 in the limbic forebrain. We also found that chronic treatment with zolpidem induced the down-regulation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) as well as the up-regulation of phosphorylated protein kinase C γ (pPKCγ). Furthermore, PP-1 directly associated with KCC2 and pPKCγ, whereas pPKCγ did not associate with KCC2. On the other hand, pre-treatment with furosemide (a KCC2 inhibitor) suppressed the enhancing effects of zolpidem on morphine-induced hyperlocomotion. These results suggest that the mesolimbic dopaminergic system could be amenable to neuroplastic change through a pPKCγ-PP-1-KCC2 pathway by chronic treatment with zolpidem. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Can a Positive Allosteric Modulation of GABAergic Receptors Improve Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson's Disease? The Potential Role of Zolpidem in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Antonio; Panza, Francesco; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Seripa, Davide

    2016-01-01

    At present, patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable) effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias. Since a high density of zolpidem binding sites is in the two main output structures of the basal ganglia which are abnormally overactive in PD (internal globus pallidus, GPi, and substantia nigra pars reticulata, SNr), it was hypothesized that in PD patients zolpidem may induce through GABAA receptors an inhibition of GPi and SNr (and, possibly, of the subthalamic nucleus also), resulting in an increased activity of motor cortical areas (such as supplementary motor area), which may give rise to improvement of motor symptoms of PD. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of zolpidem in treating motor symptoms of PD. PMID:27293955

  8. Reduced sublingual endothelial glycocalyx in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Signe Abitz; Frimodt-Møller, Marie; Zobel, Emilie Hein

    thickness was assessed by 5 measurements with the GlucoCheck device (GlucoCheck BV, The Netherlands), a non-invasive hand-held microscope generating video recordings of the sublingual capillaries. Endothelial glycocalyx thickness was estimated from the PBR in capillaries with a diameter range of 5-25 μm......- and macroalbuminuric patients (p=0.020) and micro- and macroalbuminuric patients (p=0.042) were significant, but the difference between normo- and microalbuminuric patients was not (p=0.74). After adjustment for age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration and systolic blood pressure, differences between normo...

  9. Multislice CT coronary angiography: effect of sublingual nitroglycerine on the diameter of coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, M.; Hamm, B.; Hoffmann, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the influence of sublingual glycerol trinitrate (1.2 mg, Nitrate [nitroglycerine], Nitrolingual N spray) on the coronary artery diameter on multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography. Materials and methods: out of our database of patients who underwent MSCT (slice thickness of 0.5 mm, Aquilion, Toshiba) coronary angiography between July 2003 and November 2005 (950 patients) we retrospectively identified patients with follow-up examinations who received Nitrate for one examination while another examination was performed without Nitrate (10 patients). Another 10 patients who underwent two MSCT examinations with sublingual Nitrate administration were randomly selected from this database to serve as control group. For the resulting 40 MSCT examinations, blinded MSCT datasets were prepared, which were randomly evaluated by a reader blinded to the patient information and whether or not Nitrate had been given. The proximal coronary artery diameters were measured for the left main coronary artery (LMA), the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX), and the right coronary artery (RCA) in all 40 datasets, resulting in altogether 160 measurements. Results: the proximal diameters of all four coronary arteries were significantly larger on the MSCT coronary angiograms obtained after sublingual administration of Nitrate compared with the examinations in the same 10 patients without Nitrate (p < 0.001). The average diameters without and with Nitrate for the LMA, LAD, LCX, and RCA were 4.3 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.9 mm (12% increase, p < 0.005), 3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 3.5 ± 0.5 mm (17% increase, p < 0.001), 2.7 ± 0.6 vs. 3.2 ± 0.7 mm (19% increase, p < 0.005), and 2.9 ± 0.9 vs. 3.5 ± 0.7 mm (21% increase, p < 0.005), respectively. In the control group of 10 patients who underwent two MSCT coronary angiographies after sublingual Nitrate, no significant difference in the proximal diameter of all four

  10. Distinct modulation of allergic T cell responses by subcutaneous versus sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Andersen, Kristian Aasbjerg

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms involved have not been fully explored. OBJECTIVE: To compare changes in the allergen-specific T cell response induced by subcutaneous versus sublingual administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). METHODS: Grass pollen allergic patients were randomized into groups receiving either SCIT...... injections, or SLIT tablets or neither. PBMC were tested for Timothy grass (TG)-specific cytokine production by ELISPOT after in vitro expansion with TG peptide pools. Phenotypic characterization of cytokine producing cells was performed by FACS. RESULTS: In the SCIT group, decreased IL-5 production...

  11. Profile of eliglustat tartrate in the management of Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechi A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Sechi, Andrea Dardis, Bruno Bembi Regional Coordinator Center for Rare Diseases, Academic Hospital of Udine, Udine, Italy Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficient activity of acid beta glucosidase, with consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and various organs and tissues. Currently, the gold standard for GD treatment is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. The efficacy of ERT in improving or stabilizing the visceral and hematological symptoms of GD is well-proven. However, since ERT has to be administered by frequent intravenous infusions, this therapeutic approach has an important impact on the patient’s quality of life. Eliglustat tartrate is a new substrate reduction therapy for GD, which acts as a specific and potent inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase and can be administered orally. This review summarizes the results of the preclinical and clinical trials, which experimented with eliglustat, and discusses its possible role in the management of GD, when compared to the currently available treatments and the new experimental approaches. Keywords: Gaucher disease, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, eliglustat tartrate

  12. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  13. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of metoprolol tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh Machhindranath Satpute

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for fast dissolving tablets has been growing during the last decade, especially for elderly and children who have swallowing difficulties. In the present work, fast dissolving tablets of metoprolol tartrate, were prepared using sodium starch glycolate, sodium croscarmellose and crospovidone as superdisintegrants, by the direct compression method. The tablets prepared were evaluated for various parameters including weight variation, hardness, friability, in vitro dispersion time, drug-polymer interaction, drug content water absorption ratio, wetting time, in vitro drug release, FTIR and DSC studies. The tablets prepared by the direct compression method had a weight variation in the range of 145 mg to 152 mg, which is below ± 7.5%, a hardness of 3.6 kg/cm² to 4.5 kg/cm², percentage friability of 0.46% to 0.73%, in vitro dispersion time of 18 s to 125 s, drug content uniformity of between 98.12% and 100.03%, a water absorption ratio of 67% to 87%, wetting time of 32 sec. to 64 sec., and an in vitro drug release of 53.92% - 98.82% within 15 min. The IR spectral analysis and DSC study showed no drug interaction with formulation additives of the tablet, and the formulations indicated no significant changes in hardness, friability, drug content or in vitro drug release. Fast dissolving tablets of metoprolol tartrate have enhanced dissolution and will lead to improved bioavailability and more effective therapy.

  14. Crystal structure of di-( N-methylmorpholine betaine)- L(+)-tartrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.; Szafran, M.

    2002-11-01

    The crystal structure of di-( N-methylmorpholine betaine)- L(+)-tartrate has been determined by X-ray diffraction method. Crystals are orthorhombic, space group P2 12 12 1, a=9.580(1), b=12.208(1), c=18.677(1) Å, Z=4, R=0.037. The molecule of L(+)-tartaric acid appears in the extended form with the hydroxyl groups as well as carboxyl groups in anti positions. The molecule is involved in a number of the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The COOH groups of the tartaric acid link two non-equivalent N-methylmorpholine betaine molecules by a short, intermolecular O-H⋯O bonds of the lengths 2.456(1) and 2.510(1) Å. The OH groups form two different bifurcated hydrogen bonds, the intramolecular with the CO oxygen atoms (2.641(2) and 2.638(2) Å) and the intermolecular (2.919(2) and 3.084(2) Å) with neighbouring tartaric acid molecules, and link complexes in the zigzag ribbon parallel to the x-axis. The morpholine rings of both betaine molecules are in chair conformation with methyl groups in an axial position and CH 2COO - substituents in an equatorial one. In the crystals and the PM3-optimized structures there is no symmetry, both in the tartrate and N-methylmorpholine betaine moieties. FTIR spectrum confirms the complex structure of the investigated molecule.

  15. Eliglustat tartrate for the treatment of adults with type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett LL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lunawati L Bennett, Kelsey TurcotteSchool of Pharmacy, Union University, Jackson, TN, USA Abstract: The purpose of this article is to review eliglustat tartrate, a substrate reduction therapy, for the treatment of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1. GD is an rare inborn error of metabolism caused by accumulation of lipid substrates such as glucosylceramide within the monocyte-macrophage system that affects the body by causing enlargement of the spleen and liver, destruction of bone, and abnormalities of the lungs and blood, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. GD is classified into three types: GD1, a chronic and non-neuronopathic disease accounting for 95% of GD cases; and types 2 and 3 (GD2 GD3 which are more progressive diseases with no approved drugs available at this time. Treatment options for GD1 include enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Eliglustat works by inhibiting UDP-glucosylceramide synthase, the first enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, thus reducing the load of glucosylceramide influx into the lysosome. Eliglustat was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration after three Phase I, two Phase II, and two Phase III clinical trials. The dose of eliglustat is 84 mg twice a day or once daily depending on the cytochrome P450 2D6 genotype of the patient. Keywords: Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase, glucosylceramide synthase, eliglustat tartrate, substrate reduction therapy

  16. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis; Tolentino, Elen de Souza; de Assis, Gerson Francisco; Cestari, Tânia Mary; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Damante, José Humberto

    2015-10-01

    Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG) found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated. The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death. 186 cadavers' glands were allocated to age groups: I (0-30 years); II (31-60), and III (61-90). Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (pautolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001). However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis. Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death.

  17. Spontaneous sublingual and intramural small-bowel hematoma in a patient on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moftah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous sublingual hematoma and intramural small bowel hematoma are rare and serious complications of anticoagulant therapy. Though previously reported individually, there has been no previous report of the same two complications occurring in a single patient. A 71-year-old Caucasian man, who was on warfarin for atrial fibrillation, presented with difficulty in swallowing due to a sublingual hematoma. He was observed in our intensive care unit, his warfarin was held and he recovered with conservative management. He represented two months later with a two day history of abdominal pain and distension. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT scan now showed small bowel obstruction due to intramural small bowel hematoma and haemorrhagic ascites. Again, this was treated expectantly with a good outcome. In conclusion, life threatening haemorrhagic complications of oral anticoagulant therapy can recur. Conservative treatment is successful in most cases, but an accurate diagnosis is mandatory to avoid unnecessary surgery. CT scan is the investigation of choice for the diagnosis of suspected haemorrhagic complications of over coagulation.

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a sublingual fentanyl wafer formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Stephen CB; Paech, Michael J; Sunderland, Bruce; Liu, Yandi

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to prepare a novel fentanyl wafer formulation by a freeze-drying method, and to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo release characteristics, including its bioavailability via the sublingual route. Methods The wafer formulation was prepared by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of fentanyl containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose and amylogum as matrix formers. Uniformity of weight, friability, and dissolution testing of the fentanyl wafer was achieved using standard methods, and the residual moisture content was measured. The fentanyl wafer was also examined using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The absolute bioavailability of the fentanyl wafer was evaluated in 11 opioid-naïve adult female patients using a randomized crossover design. Results In vitro release showed that almost 90% of the fentanyl dissolved in one minute. In vivo, the first detectable plasma fentanyl concentration was observed after 3.5 minutes and the peak plasma concentration between 61.5 and 67 minutes. The median absolute bioavailability was 53.0%. Conclusion These results indicate that this wafer has potential as an alternative sublingual fentanyl formulation. PMID:23596347

  19. Sublingual administration of detomidine in horses: sedative effect, analgesia and detection time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ami, Jiske J; Vermunt, Lian E; van Loon, Johannes P A M; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2013-05-01

    A single dose of 40 μg/kg bodyweight (BW) of oromucosal detomidine gel was administered sublingually to 10 healthy Dutch Warmblood mares aged 7 ± 4 years (mean ± SD) and BW 580 ± 69 kg. Blood and urine samples were collected before and for 8 days following administration and evaluated qualitatively in an FEI Reference Laboratory and quantitatively in a research laboratory. Clinical effects were evaluated at baseline and for 24 h after administration. Sedation was determined using head height and scores of reaction to auditory and mixed auditory/sensory stimuli. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) were assessed using pressure algometry to evaluate analgesia. Heart rate (HR) was measured and ataxia scored. All horses were considered negative for detomidine in blood samples by 48 h post-administration and in urine by 60 h. These results indicated that a safe withdrawal time for detomidine oromucosal gel may be 72 h following a single sublingual administration of 40 μg/kgBW. Decreases in HR and head height were maximal at 40 and 60 min post-administration, respectively. The maximal decrease in response to stimuli was observed at 100 min. Ataxia was maximal at 60 min. At 40 and 80 min MNTs were significantly increased compared to baseline. All parameters, except the MNTs of two locations, which were decreased, returned to baseline values within 24 h post-administration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Reis AZEVEDO-ALANIS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated.Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death.Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years; II (31–60, and III (61–90. Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05.Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001. However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis.Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death.

  1. Congenital hypothyroidism due to ectopic sublingual thyroid gland in Prader-Willi Syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchini, Sarah; Fintini, Danilo; Grugni, Graziano; Boiani, Arianna; Convertino, Alessio; Crinò, Antonino

    2017-09-22

    Thyroid gland disorders are variably associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Many of the clinical features in newborns with PWS are similar to those found in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). We report a case of a girl with CH and PWS. At the age of 9 months CH caused by an ectopic sublingual thyroid was diagnosed, and hormone replacement therapy was started. In spite of this treatment a decrease in growth velocity, weight excess and delayed development were observed. At the age of 9 years PWS was suspected on the basis of phenotype and genetic tests confirmed a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. This is the second reported case of hypothyroidism due to an ectopic sublingual thyroid gland in PWS suggesting that, although rare, an association between CH and PWS may exist. In our case diagnosis of PWS was delayed because mental retardation, hypotonia, obesity and short stature were initially attributed to hypothyroidism. In this context PWS should be considered in obese children with CH who do not improve adequately with l-thyroxine therapy. Also, thyroid function in all PWS children should be assessed regularly in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of hypothyroidism.

  2. A double-blind, randomized, comparative study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zaleplon versus zolpidem in shortening sleep latency in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Shen-Ing; Chen, Chih-Ken

    2011-01-01

    Benzodiazepines cause a high proportion of adverse effects while non-benzodiazepine compounds have demonstrated high efficacy and less adverse effects in patients with insomnia. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of non-BZ zaleplon and zolpidem in primary insomnia. This was a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, double-dummy, comparative study. A total of 48 patients were enrolled, of which 45 patients completed the study. Patients who entered the study were required to take the study drug orally once daily at bedtime for two weeks. Each patient kept a sleep diary and answered a questionnaire. We used these documents to measure and evaluate changes from baseline to Week 2 in sleep latency, duration and quality of sleep, the number of awakenings and incidence of rebound insomnia. The data revealed a significant decrease in sleep latency from baseline to Week 2 for patients receiving zaleplon 10 mg and zolpidem 10 mg. Patients receiving zaleplon exhibited a marginally greater, but not statistically significant, reduction in sleep latency than those who received zolpidem. There was no significant difference in the frequency of adverse effects between the zaleplon and zolpidem groups; however, during this clinical trial there was one lethal event caused by a traffic accident in the zaleplon group. There was no significant difference between zaleplon and zolpidem in the efficacy of reducing sleep latency or adverse effects. A large pharmacovigilance study is needed before concluding that either zolpidem or zaleplon is free from next-day residual effects.

  3. Direct action of the X-ray on the submandibular and sublingual glands. Histologic and histochemical study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Pinto, M.C. dos; Martinelli, C.; Santos-Pinto, R. dos

    1991-01-01

    The submandibular and sublingual glands of rats are surgically exposed and irradiated by X-ray. A simulated group with surgical exposition of the glands is performed. In the irradiated submandibular glands occurred atrophy, architectural disorder and degenerative processes. RNA reduction in the nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm of the acini cells and a decrease of protein synthesis are described. (M.A.C.)

  4. Comparative Study Between Different Ready-Made Orally Disintegrating Platforms for the Formulation of Sumatriptan Succinate Sublingual Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Saadya A; El Nabarawi, Mohamed A; Amin, Maha M; AbouGhaly, Mohamed H H

    2017-02-01

    Sumatriptan succinate (SS) is a selective serotonin receptor agonist used for the treatment of migraine attacks, suffering from extensive first-pass metabolism and low oral bioavailability (∼14%). The aim of this work is to compare the performance of different ready-made co-processed platforms (Pharmaburst®, Prosolv ODT®, Starlac®, Pearlitol Flash®, or Ludiflash®) in the formulation of SS sublingual orodispersible tablets (ODTs) using direct compression technique. The prepared SS ODT formulae were evaluated regarding hardness, friability, simulated wetting time, and in vitro disintegration and dissolution tests. Different mucoadhesive polymers-HPMC K4M, Carbopol®, chitosan, or Polyox®-were tested aiming to increase the residence time in the sublingual area. A pharmacokinetic study on healthy human volunteers was performed, using LC/MS/MS assay, to compare the optimum sublingual formula (Ph25/HPMC) with the conventional oral tablet Imitrex®. Results showed that tablets prepared using Pharmaburst® had significantly (p disintegration times of 17.17 and 23.50 s, respectively, with Q 5 min of 83.62%. HPMC showed a significant (p tablet Imitrex®. In conclusion, Pharmaburst® was chosen as the optimum ready-made co-processed platform that can be successfully used in the preparation of SS sublingual tablets for the rapid relief of migraine attacks.

  5. Flupentixol tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamuna, Thammarse S; Kaur, Manpreet; Anderson, Brian J; Jasinski, Jerry P; Yathirajan, H S

    2014-02-01

    In the title salt, C23H26F3N2OS(+)·C4H5O6 (-) [systematic name: 1-(2-hy-droxy-eth-yl)-4-[3-(2-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)thioxanthen-9-yl-idene)prop-yl]piperazin-1-ium 3-carb-oxy-2,3-di-hydroxy-pro-pion-ate], the monoprotonated piperazine ring in the cation adopts a chair conformation, while the thio-pyran ring of the thioxanthene group has a boat conformation. The dihedral angle between the mean planes of the two outer aromatic rings of the thioxanthene groups is 31.6 (2)°. In the crystal, the cations and anions are linked via O-H⋯O, N-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. In addition, R (2) 2(7), R (2) 2(11), R (2) 2(10) and R (2) 2(12) graph-set ring motifs involving the anions, and R (2) 2(9) graph-set ring motifs involving both the cations and anions are observed. The three F atoms of the tri-fluoro-methyl group are disordered over two sets of sites and the individual atoms were refined with occupancy ratios of 0.54 (6):0.46 (6), 0.72 (2):0.28 (2) and 0.67 (3):0.33 (3).

  6. Durability of treatment response to zolpidem with three different maintenance regimens: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Michael; Grandner, Michael; Zee, Jarcy; Bremer, Erin; Whinnery, Julia; Barilla, Holly; Andalia, Priscilla; Gehrman, Phil; Morales, Knashawn; Thase, Michael; Bootzin, Richard; Ader, Robert

    2015-09-01

    At present, there is no consensus regarding how to medically manage chronic insomnia in the long term. The unstated standard of practice is for patients to use hypnotics intermittently. The present study aimed to compare a partial reinforcement strategy with nightly and intermittent dosing strategies for its potential as a maintenance therapy. A mixed model was used in the study. One between-subjects factor: group (n = 4). One repeated-measures factor: time (12 weekly assessments). A total of 74 subjects with chronic Insomnia were treated with 10 mg zolpidem for 4 weeks. Treatment respondents were randomized to nightly dosing with 10 mg or 5 mg (QHS-10 and QHS-5), intermittent dosing with 10 mg (IDS-10 [3-5 days weekly]), or partial reinforcement dosing with 10 mg (PRS-10 [nightly pill use with 50% active medication and 50% placebos]) for 12 weeks. It was found, in compliant subjects (n = 55), that all four strategies evaluated maintained treatment response over time (ie, prevented or delayed relapse). For the subjects that remained in remission, the subjects in the intermittent dosing group (IDS-10) group exhibited poorer sleep continuity. While best considered a preliminary study, the present findings suggest that the partial reinforcement strategy may be a viable means toward maintaining treatment gains over time with less active medication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effects of zolpidem on sedation, anxiety, and memory in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Sanday, Leandro; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Poyares, Dalva; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Zolpidem (Zolp), a hypnotic drug prescribed to treat insomnia, may have negative effects on memory, but reports are inconsistent. We examined the effects of acute doses of Zolp (2, 5, or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) on memory formation (learning, consolidation, and retrieval) using the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task. Mice were acutely treated with Zolp 30 min before training or testing. In addition, the effects of Zolp and midazolam (Mid; a classic benzodiazepine) on consolidation at different time points were examined. The possible role of state dependency was investigated using combined pre-training and pre-test treatments. Zolp produced a dose-dependent sedative effect, without modifying anxiety-like behavior. The pre-training administration of 5 or 10 mg/kg resulted in retention deficits. When administered immediately after training or before testing, memory was preserved. Zolp post-training administration (2 or 3 h) impaired subsequent memory. There was no participation of state dependency phenomenon in the amnestic effects of Zolp. Similar to Zolp, Mid impaired memory consolidation when administered 1 h after training. Amnestic effects occurred when Zolp was administered either before or 2-3 h after training. These memory deficits are not related to state dependency. Moreover, Zolp did not impair memory retrieval. Notably, the memory-impairing effects of Zolp are similar to those of Mid, with the exception of the time point at which the drug can modify consolidation. Finally, the memory effects were unrelated to sedation or anxiolysis.

  8. The effects of changes of plasma endothelin level in patients with hypertension after medication of metoprolol tartrate combined with felodipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Zhihu; Pan Quan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of metoprolol tartrate combined with felodipine sustained-release tablets in treatment of high blood pressure. Methods: Patients were allocated to groups of medication of metoprolol tartrate combined with felodipine (Group A, n=57) and single medication of metoprolol tartrate (Group B, n=60). All patients received daily measurement of blood pressure, heart rate, observation of adverse reactions and detection of the plasma endothelin levels before and after the medication. Results: Compared with Group B after the medication, the therapeutic effect was significant in Group A (P<0.01) and both the plasma endothelin levels and the side effects were much lower(P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively). Conclusion: Metoprolol tartrate combined with sustained release felodipine tablets appears effectively in treatment of hypertension, and the therapeutic effect may be associated with the variation of plasma endothelin levels. In addition, metoprolol in combination sustained release felodipine tablets can counteract the adverse reaction from single dose and is worthy for wide clinical use. (authors)

  9. Sublingual injection of microparticles containing glycolipid ligands for NKT cells and subunit vaccines induces antibody responses in oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLyria, Elizabeth S; Zhou, Dapeng; Lee, Jun Soo; Singh, Shailbala; Song, Wei; Li, Fenge; Sun, Qing; Lu, Hongzhou; Wu, Jinhui; Qiao, Qian; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Chun; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Shen, Haifa

    2015-03-20

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a unique type of innate immune cells which exert paradoxical roles in animal models through producing either Th1 or Th2 cytokines and activating dendritic cells. Alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), a synthetic antigen for NKT cells, was found to be safe and immune stimulatory in cancer and hepatitis patients. We recently developed microparticle-formulated αGalCer, which is selectively presented by dendritic cells and macrophages, but not B cells, and thus can avoid the anergy of NKT cells. In this study, we have examined the immunogenicity of microparticles containing αGalCer and protein vaccine components through sublingual injection in mice. The results showed that sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin triggered IgG responses in serum (titer >1:100,000), which persisted for more than 3months. Microparticles containing ovalbumin alone also induced comparable level of IgG responses. However, immunoglobulin subclass analysis showed that sublingually injected microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced 20 fold higher Th1 biased antibody (IgG2c) than microparticles containing OVA alone (1:20,000 as compared to 1:1000 titer). Sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced secretion of both IgG (titer >1:1000) and IgA (titer=1:80) in saliva secretion, while microparticles containing ovalbumin alone only induced secretion of IgG in saliva. Our results suggest that sublingual injection of microparticles and their subsequent trafficking to draining lymph nodes may induce adaptive immune responses in mucosal compartments. Ongoing studies are focused on the mechanism of antigen presentation and lymphocyte biology in the oral cavity, as well as the toxicity and efficacy of these candidate microparticles for future applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 77 FR 37068 - Muzaffer Aslan, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... submitted printouts it obtained from the California Substance Utilization Review & Evaluation System showing.../ acetaminophen, a schedule III controlled substance, as well as zolpidem tartrate and diethylproprion hcl, both...

  11. Effects of buspirone, diazepam, and zolpidem on open field behavior, and brain [3H]muscimol binding after buspirone pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiatkowski, M; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H; Członkowska, A I; Bidziński, A; Płaźnik, A

    2000-07-01

    The effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist buspirone, a nonselective (diazepam), and a selective (zolpidem) GABA(A) receptor agonist were compared in the open field test of neophobia. Unhabituated rats were pretreated with the drugs once, prior to a first exposure to the open field, and their behavior was recorded both during this test and during a second trial 24 h later. It has been hypothesized that the decrease in exploratory activity observed during the second test session may be considered an adaptive reaction to the first day aversive experience (neophobia). If so, a selective modulation of 5-HT and GABA systems activity during the test could bring about significant changes in animal behavior on the retest. Buspirone at the lowest dose of 0.3 mg/kg revealed anxiolytic-like properties on the first day, whereas the action of diazepam and zolpidem was modulated by the dose-related sedative effect. At the dose of 2.4 mg/kg buspirone elicited delayed in time anxiolytic-like action, i.e., produced the antithigmotactic effect during the retrial 24 h later. Diazepam and zolpidem failed to exhibit similar profile of action. Autoradiography of [3H]muscimol binding after pretreatment of rats with buspirone showed a significant increase in the selective radioligand binding within the frontal cortex and a similar, near-significant tendency in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The behavioral data validate buspirone as important drug for the treatment of anxiety disorders, devoid of disruptive influence on motor and cognitive processes. The open field test, as modified by us, appeared sensitive in distinguishing the behavioral profiles of action of different anxiolytic compounds, including 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist. The present results support the assumption that reduced turnover of 5-HT due to stimulation of 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, may bring about changes in GABA(A) receptor system activity, in some brain structures, leading to the anxiolytic effect.

  12. Bioavailability of House Dust Mite Allergens in Sublingual Allergy Tablets Is Highly Dependent on the Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Doi, Katsuyo; Kito, Hirokazu; Du, Weibin; Nakazawa, Hiroshi; Ipsen, Henrik; Gudmann, Pernille; Lund, Kaare

    2017-01-01

    In sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), the immune system is addressed by solubilized allergen that interacts with immunocompetent cells of the oral mucosa, the efficiency of which is governed by 2 main factors of SLIT allergen bioavailability: the allergen concentration and the mucosal contact time. Recently, 3 house dust mite (HDM) SLIT tablets were developed that differ with regard to allergen content, nominal strength (maintenance doses: 6 SQ-HDM/10,000 Japanese Allergen Units [JAU], 12 SQ-HDM/ 20,000 JAU, and 300 IR/57,000 JAU), and formulation (freeze-dried/compressed). Here, the importance of the SLIT tablet formulation for HDM major allergen bioavailability is examined. The HDM major allergen content, tablet disintegration times, and allergen release kinetics were determined. Dissolution kinetics (allergen concentration vs. time) of Der f 1, Der p 1, and Der 2 were measured. Area under the curve (AUC) was used as a surrogate parameter for allergen bioavailability. The release of HDM major allergens from the freeze-dried tablets was complete after 30 s, while only partial release was achieved with the compressed tablets, even after prolonged dissolution. At 1 min, i.e., the recommended sublingual holding time for the freeze-dried tablets, the allergen bioavailability (AUC) of the compressed 300 IR/57,000 JAU tablet was 4.7-fold (Der f 1), 10.8-fold (Der p 1), and 23.6-fold (Der 2) lower than that of the freeze-dried 12 SQ-HDM/20,000 JAU tablet and similar to (Der f 1) and 5.3-fold (Der p 1) and 12.5-fold (Der 2) lower than that of the freeze-dried 6 SQ-HDM/10,000 JAU tablet. SLIT tablet allergen bioavailability depends highly on the tablet formulation. Only the fast-dissolving freeze-dried tablets provide maximal delivery of soluble allergens and achieve allergen concentrations that reflect the nominal tablet strengths within the recommended sublingual holding time. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Rapid determination of benzodiazepines, zolpidem and their metabolites in urine using direct injection liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yu-Dong; Kim, Min Kyung; Suh, Sung Ill; In, Moon Kyo; Kim, Jin Young; Paeng, Ki-Jung

    2015-12-01

    Benzodiazepines and zolpidem are generally prescribed as sedative, hypnotics, anxiolytics or anticonvulsants. These drugs, however, are frequently misused in drug-facilitated crime. Therefore, a rapid and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for identification and quantification of benzodiazepines, zolpidem and their metabolites in urine using deuterium labeled internal standards (IS). Urine samples (120 μL) mixed with 80 μL of the IS solution were centrifuged. An aliquot (5 μL) of the sample solution was directly injected into the LC-MS/MS system for analysis. The mobile phases consisted of water and acetonitrile containing 2mM ammonium trifluoroacetate and 0.2% acetic acid. The analytical column was a Zorbax SB-C18 (100 mm × 2.1 mm i.d., 3.5 μm, Agilent). The separation and detection of 18 analytes were achieved within 10 min. Calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 0.5-20 ng/mL (zolpidem), 1.0-40 ng/mL (flurazepam and temazepam), 2.5-100 ng/mL (7-aminoclonazepam, 1-hydroxymidazolam, midazolam, flunitrazepam and alprazolam), 5.0-200 ng/mL (zolpidem phenyl-4-carboxylic acid, α-hydroxyalprazolam, oxazepam, nordiazepam, triazolam, diazepam and α-hydroxytriazolam), 10-400 ng/mL (lorazepam and desalkylflurazepam) and 10-100 ng/mL (N-desmethylflunitrazepam) with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) above 0.9971. The dilution integrity of the analytes was examined for supplementation of short linear range. Dilution precision and accuracy were tested using two, four and ten-folds dilutions and they ranged from 3.7 to 14.4% and -12.8 to 12.5%, respectively. The process efficiency for this method was 63.0-104.6%. Intra- and inter-day precisions were less than 11.8% and 9.1%, while intra- and inter-day accuracies were less than -10.0 to 8.2%, respectively. The lower limits of quantification were lower than 10 ng/mL for each analyte. The applicability of the developed method was successfully

  14. Scientific Opinion on the safety of the complexation product of sodium tartrate and iron(III) chloride as a food additive

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The complexation product of sodium tartrates and iron(III) chloride (Fe mTA) is proposed for use as an anti-caking agent, only in salt or its substitutes, with a maximum use level of 106 mg Fe mTA/kg salt. Fe mTA can be expected to dissociate into its constituent iron(III) and tartrate components upon ingestion. Studies in rats demonstrated that up to 90 % of ingested DL-tartrate or tartaric acid were absorbed, studies in humans suggested that only 20 % of an ingested dose of tartaric acid we...

  15. Spectrophotometric Determination of Metoprolol Tartrate in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms on Complex Formation with Cu(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cesme

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, sensitive and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the assay of metoprolol tartrate (MPT, which is based on the complexation of drug with copper(II [Cu(II] at pH 6.0, using Britton-Robinson buffer solution, to produce a blue adduct. The latter has a maximum absorbance at 675 nm and obeys Beer’s law within the concentration range 8.5-70 mg/mL. Regression analysis of the calibration data showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.998 with a limit of detection of 5.56 mg/mL. The proposed procedure has been successfully applied to the determination of this drug in its tablets. In addition, the spectral data and stability constant for the binuclear copper(II complex of MPT (Cu2MPT2Cl2 have been reported.

  16. EPR and optical absorption studies of Cr3+ ions in potassium sodium dl-tartrate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kripal, Ram; Singh, Pragya; Shukla, Santwana

    2011-01-01

    EPR spectra of Cr 3+ ions doped in potassium sodium dl-tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals are recorded at 77 K. The spin Hamiltonian and zero field parameters g, |D| and |E| are measured from the resonance lines obtained at various rotations of the magnetic field. The values obtained are: g x =1.9257±0.0002, g y =1.9720±0.0002, g z =2.0102±0.0002, |D|=313±2 (x10 -4 ) cm -1 and |E|=101±2 (x10 -4 ) cm -1 . From the results of EPR study, the site symmetry of Cr 3+ ion in the crystal is discussed. The optical absorption at room temperature is also studied. From the observed band positions, the crystal field splitting parameter (D q ) and the Racah inter-electronic repulsion parameters (B and C) are evaluated. The bonding parameters are obtained by correlating optical and EPR data and the nature of bonding in the crystal is discussed. -- Research Highlights: → EPR spectra of Cr 3+ ions doped in potassium sodium dl-tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals are done at 77 K. → The spin Hamiltonian and zero field parameters g, |D| and |E| are measured. From the results of EPR study, the site symmetry of Cr 3+ ion in the crystal is discussed. → The optical absorption at room temperature is also studied and the crystal field splitting parameter (D q ) as well as the Racah inter-electronic repulsion parameters (B and C) is evaluated. → The bonding parameters are obtained by correlating optical and EPR data and the nature of bonding in the crystal is discussed.

  17. Chick chorioallantoic membrane model for in ovo evaluation of timolol maleate-brimonidine tartrate ocular inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Vinod Kombath; Repala, Swathi; Subadhra, Sandhya; Appapurapu, Ashok Kumar

    2014-06-01

    The main aspire of this study was to develop ocular drug delivery system for dual drug glaucoma therapy by timolol maleate-brimonidine tartrate and endeavor the possibility of biocompatibility studies by in ova studies. Matrix type, both hydrophilic and lipophilic polymers, and reservoir-type ocular inserts of timolol maleate were prepared using hydrophilic polymers like polyvinyl alcohol, hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose K4M and lipophilic polymers like ethylcellulose and eudragit S100 and were optimized. Based on the optimized formulation, triple-layered ocular inserts (reservoir type) of dual drug were prepared by solvent casting technique with an objective of reducing the frequency of administration, obtaining controlled release and greater therapeutic efficacy, preservative free dosage form for the treatment of glaucoma. FTIR spectral studies revealed no pharmaceutical incompatibility and no drug polymer interactions. Maximum drug release (99.18 ± 1.7) was achieved when PVP and HPMC K4M in 1:1 ratio with PEG 400 (0.3 ml) drug reservoir layer was sandwiched between ethyl cellulose as rate control membrane up to 32 h in a controlled fashion. Drug release was by non-Fickian diffusion mechanism for single drug formulation. But in dual drug insert, timolol maleate best fit into zero order and for brimonidine tartrate to Higuchi model and diffusion of drugs from this by non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. In ovo studies suggested that the optimized formulation was found to be sterile, biocompatible and physicochemically stable and support us to claim that the developed formulation was biocompatible.

  18. Fentanyl sublingual spray for breakthrough cancer pain in patients receiving transdermal fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, David S; Smith, Christina Cognata; Parikh, Neha; Rauck, Richard L

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between effective fentanyl sublingual spray (FSS) doses for breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) and around-the-clock (ATC) transdermal fentanyl patch (TFP). Adults tolerating ATC opioids received open-label FSS for 26 days, followed by a 26-day double-blind phase for patients achieving an effective dose (100-1600 µg). Out of 50 patients on ATC TFP at baseline, 32 (64%) achieved an effective dose. FSS effective dose moderately correlated with mean TFP dose (r = 0.4; p = 0.03). Patient satisfaction increased during the study. Common adverse event included nausea (9%) and peripheral edema (9%). FSS can be safely titrated to an effective dose for BTCP in patients receiving ATC TFP as chronic cancer pain medication. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00538850.

  19. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  20. Post-treatment efficacy of discontinuous treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet in adults with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didier, A; Malling, H-J; Worm, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Sustained efficacy over three pollen seasons of pre- and co-seasonal treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet has been demonstrated in adults with moderate-severe grass pollen-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.......Sustained efficacy over three pollen seasons of pre- and co-seasonal treatment with 300IR 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet has been demonstrated in adults with moderate-severe grass pollen-associated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis....

  1. Histological study of human sublingual gland with special emphasis on intercalated and striated ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, R.; Minhas, L.A.; Mubarik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the histomorphological characteristics of human sublingual gland, specially of intercalated and striated ducts. Study design: Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Army Medical College from Jan 2002 to Dec 2002 Materials and methods: Fifteen sublingual glands (right and left) from postmortem cases were obtained from District Headquarter Hospital Rawalpindi, within twelve hours of death. Five micrometer thick sections were made and stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E). Morphology of intercalated and striated ducts was studied and their number was counted. Results: The mean number of intercalated ducts in the right gland 'a'and 'b' parts, and in the left gland 'a' and 'b' parts was 1.45+-0.14, 1.39+-.009, 1.31+-0.11 and 1.18+-0.10 respectively. The mean diameter of intercalated ducts in the same parts was 19.76+-0.44 micro m, 20.6+-0.53 micro m, 20.34+-0.49 micro m and 19.84+-0.98 micro m respectively. The mean number of striated ducts in the right gland ''a'' and ''b'' parts, and in the left gland ''a'' and ''b'' parts was 0.55+-.008, 0.57+-.008, 0.80+-0.14 and 0.80+-0.14 while mean diameter of striated ducts in the right gland ''a'' and ''b'' parts, and in the left gland ''a'' and ''b'' parts was 49.90+-4.70 micro m, 53.23+-2.50 micro m, 61.68+-3.93 micro m and 57.73+-2.85 micro m respectively. Conclusion: The difference between the mean number and diameter of the ducts of right and left glands was statistically insignificant. (author)

  2. Sublingual piroxicam in the management of postoperative pain after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shadab; Singh, Vibha; Wadhwani, Puneet; Tayade, Himanshu P; Rathod, Onkar K

    2012-01-01

    Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is one of the most commonly performed procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice. The role of preoperative and postoperative medications for management of postoperative complications has been extensively evaluated. To assess the therapeutic effect of a single dose of 40 mg sublingual piroxicam (study group) vs 150 mg oral diclofenac (50 mg thrice a day) (control group) in patients undergoing surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. A total of 100 patients with asymptomatic impacted mandibular third molars were randomized into two groups. One group received two 20-mg tablets of piroxicam once daily on the first and second postoperative days, followed by one 20-mg tablet on the third post-operative day. The other group received one tablet of diclofenac 50 mg orally thrice daily on the first, second, and third post-operative days. Repeated extraoral examinations were done for continuous assessment of swelling, trismus, and reduction in pain. Overall impression of the treating physician and the patient regarding efficacy of study drugs were recorded at the end of the study. In the piroxicam group there was >50% reduction in pain on all three days postoperatively. The incidence of swelling and trismus was found to be higher in the control group as compared to the study group. Adverse events, such as gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances, were significantly higher in the diclofenac group (11%) as compared to the piroxicam group (0%). Two sublingual piroxicam 20 mg tablets once daily has better efficacy and tolerability profile than diclofenac 50 mg one tablet thrice daily in the management of pain after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar.

  3. Uso y abuso del nifedipino por vía sublingual en nuestros sistemas de urgencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Guinart Zayas

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Se observa que el incremento de la prevalencia de pacientes hipertensos en nuestras comunidades, y la implantación del Programa Nacional para el control de la hipertensión arterial, no han podido disminuir la cantidad de pacientes que acuden con cifras altas de su presión arterial a nuestros servicios de urgencia con decisiones terapéuticas indiscriminadas y agresivas. Se ha generalizado el uso del nifedipino sublingual, incluso en pacientes de la tercera edad, lo que produce bajadas bruscas de la presión arterial por disminución en la sensibilidad de los barorreceptores y con ellas una alteración de los mecanismos de autorregulación del flujo hístico. Se señala que las complicaciones producidas no son alarmantes, pero con un uso racional y si se cumplen algunas normas, podrían disminuirse aún másIt is observed that the prevalence increase of hypertensive patients in our communities and the implementation of the National Program for the Hypertension Control have not so far been able to reduce the number of hypertensive patients going to our emergency medical services by applying indiscriminate and aggressive therapeutical methods. The use of sublingual administered nifedipine is extensive even in elderly patients, which may cause a sharp blood pressure drop and also a change in the hystic flow self-regulating mechanisms. It is stressed that complications are not serious but if this drug is more rationally used and some directions are fulfilled, then these complications will be further reduced

  4. Sublingual administration of detomidine to calves prior to disbudding: a comparison with the intravenous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkanen, Ann-Helena; Raekallio, Marja R; Salla, Kati; Hänninen, Laura; Viitasaari, Elina; Norring, Marianna; Raussi, Satu; Rinne, Valtteri M; Scheinin, Mika; Vainio, Outi M

    2014-07-01

    To study the effects of oromucosal detomidine gel administered sublingually to calves prior to disbudding, and to compare its efficacy with intravenously (IV) administered detomidine. Randomised, prospective clinical study. Twenty dairy calves aged 12.4 ± 4.4days (mean ± SD), weight 50.5 ± 9.0 kg. Detomidine at 80 μg kg(-1) was administered to ten calves sublingually (GEL) and at 30 μg kg(-1) to ten control calves IV (V. jugularis). Meloxicam (0.5 mg kg(-1) ) and local anaesthetic (lidocaine 3 mg kg(-1) ) were administered before heat cauterization of horn buds. Heart rate (HR), body temperature and clinical sedation were monitored over 240 minutes. Blood was collected from the V. cephalica during the same period for drug concentration analysis. Pharmacokinetic variables were calculated from the plasma detomidine concentration-time data using non-compartmental methods. Statistical analyses compared routes of administration by Student's t-test and linear mixed models as relevant. The maximum plasma detomidine concentration after GEL was 2.1 ± 1.2 ng mL(-1) (mean ±SD) and the time of maximum concentration was 66.0 ± 36.9 minutes. The bioavailability of detomidine was approximately 34% with GEL. Similar sedation scores were reached in both groups after administration of detomidine, but maximal sedation was reached earlier in the IV group (10 minutes) than in the GEL group (40 minutes). HR was lower after IV than GEL from 5 to 10 minutes after administration. All animals were adequately sedated, and we were able to administer local anaesthetic without resistance to all of the calves before disbudding. Oromucosally administered detomidine is an effective sedative agent for calves prior to disbudding. © 2014 The Authors Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  5. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (−10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  6. Development and evaluation of fixed dose bi therapy sublingual tablets for treatment stress hypertension and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A El-Nabarawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A stress induced rise in the blood pressure. Some believe that patients with hypertension are characterized by a generalized state of increased anxiety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to prepare a fixed dose bi therapy using bisoprolol hemifumarate (BH as antihypertensive drug and buspirone hydrochloride (BuHCl as anxiolytic drug, which can be used to treat both diseases concomitantly. Using sublingual tablets is hopeful to improve the BuHCl poor oral bioavailability and to facilitate administration to patients experiencing problems with swallowing. Materials and Methods: A total of 5mg BH and 10mg BuHCl were selected based on compatibility study. A 3×22 full factorial design was adopted for the optimization of the tablets prepared by direct compression method. The effects of the filler type, the binder molecular weight, and the binder type were studied. The prepared formulae were evaluated according to their physical characters as hardness, friability, disintegration time (new modified method and in vivo disintegration time and wetting properties. In vitro drugs dissolute, permeation through the buccal mucosa and the effect of storage were analyzed by a new valid high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC method. Bioavailability study of the selected formula study was carried out and followed by the clinical. Results: The optimized tablet formulation showed accepted average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, disintegration time (less than 3 min. Maximum drug release could be achieved with in 10 min. In addition enhancing drug permeation through the buccal mucosa and, the maximum concentration of the drug that reached the blood was in the first 10 min which means a rapid onset of action and improved the extent of both drug′s absorption. Conclusion: The results revealed that sublingual (F6 tablets containing both drugs would maintain rapid onset of action, and increase bioavailability. BuHCl with BH

  7. Do package inserts reflect symptoms experienced in practice?: assessment using an automated phone pharmacovigilance system with varenicline and zolpidem in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S; Amato, Mary; Marinacci, Lucas; Orav, E John; Schiff, Gordon D; Bates, David W

    2012-08-01

    While the US FDA maintains a voluntary reporting system, postmarketing adverse drug events (ADEs) are underreported, and this case report-based system does not allow accurate determination of incidence. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of an automated phone pharmacovigilance system for ambulatory patients by comparing systematically collected, patient-reported symptoms to reflect possible ADEs with those reported on the package inserts of two drugs with postmarketing safety concerns, varenicline and zolpidem. English-speaking adults who received a prescription for zolpidem (n = 370) or varenicline (n = 107) from a primary care physician at one of 11 participating clinics, and who participated in the pharmacovigilance system during 2008-2010, were included in the study. Patients were called approximately 4 weeks following their visit and asked to complete a standard script that asked about adherence and pre-specified symptoms. The main outcome measures were elicited rates of pre-specified symptoms or possible ADEs. Compared with the package insert, patients taking zolpidem were significantly (p zolpidem were not detected. These data highlight the potential value of, and innovative ways of collecting, information about possible ADEs directly from patients.

  8. Effects of GF-015535-00, a novel α1 GABA A receptor ligand, on the sleep-wake cycle in mice, with reference to zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaclet, Christelle; Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Chunmei; Buda, Colette; Seugnet, Laurent; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Novel, safe, and efficient hypnotic compounds capable of enhancing physiological sleep are still in great demand in the therapy of insomnia. This study compares the sleep-wake effects of a new α1 GABA(A) receptor subunit ligand, GF-015535-00, with those of zolpidem, the widely utilized hypnotic compound. Nine C57Bl6/J male mice were chronically implanted with electrodes for EEG and sleep-wake monitoring. Each mouse received 3 doses of GF-015535-00 and zolpidem. Time spent in sleep-wake states and cortical EEG power spectra were analyzed. Both zolpidem and GF-015535-00 prominently enhanced slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep in the mouse. However, as compared with zolpidem, GF-015535-00 showed several important differences: (1) a comparable sleep-enhancing effect was obtained with a 10 fold smaller dose; (2) the induced sleep was less fragmented; (3) the risk of subsequent wake rebound was less prominent; and (4) the cortical EEG power ratio between slow wave sleep and wake was similar to that of natural sleep and thus compatible with physiological sleep. The characteristics of the sleep-wake effects of GF-015535-00 in mice could be potentially beneficial for its use as a therapeutic compound in the treatment of insomnia. Further investigations are required to assess whether the same characteristics are conserved in other animal models and humans.

  9. Controlled clinical trial of zolpidem for the treatment of insomnia associated with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder in children 6 to 17 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Jeffrey L; Findling, Robert L; Shih, Weichung Joe; Soubrane, Christina; Reed, Michael D

    2009-05-01

    The goal was to evaluate the hypnotic efficacy of zolpidem at 0.25 mg/kg per day (maximum of 10 mg/day), compared with placebo, in children 6 through 17 years of age who were experiencing insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. An 8-week, North American, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Patients underwent stratification according to age (6-11 years [N = 111] or 12-17 years [N = 90]) and were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the study drug or placebo (in a 2:1 ratio). The primary efficacy variable was latency to persistent sleep between weeks 3 and 6. Secondary efficacy variables also were assessed, and behavioral and cognitive components of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were monitored. Safety was assessed on the basis of reports of adverse events, abnormal laboratory data, vital signs, and physical examination findings. The potential for next-day residual effects also was assessed. The baseline-adjusted mean change in latency to persistent sleep at week 4 did not differ significantly between the zolpidem and placebo groups (-20.28 vs -21.27 minutes). However, differences favoring zolpidem were observed for the older age group in Clinical Global Impression scores at weeks 4 and 8. No next-day residual effects of treatment were associated with zolpidem, and no rebound phenomena occurred after treatment discontinuation. Central nervous system and psychiatric disorders were the most-frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (>5%) that were observed more frequently with zolpidem than with placebo; these included dizziness, headache, and hallucinations. Ten (7.4%) patients discontinued zolpidem treatment because of adverse events. Zolpidem at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg per day to a maximum of 10 mg failed to reduce the latency to persistent sleep on polysomnographic recordings after 4 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents 6 through 17 years of age who had attention

  10. A polysomnographic placebo-controlled evaluation of the efficacy and safety of eszopiclone relative to placebo and zolpidem in the treatment of primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erman, Milton K; Zammit, Gary; Rubens, Robert; Schaefer, Kendyl; Wessel, Thomas; Amato, David; Caron, Judy; Walsh, James K

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the polysomnographic efficacy and the safety of a range of doses of eszopiclone relative to placebo in patients with primary insomnia. Zolpidem 10 mg was included as an active control. This multicenter, randomized, crossover study enrolled patients aged 21-64 years meeting the DSM-IV criteria for primary insomnia (n = 65). Patients received 2 nights treatment each with placebo, eszopiclone 1 mg, 2 mg, 2.5 mg, or 3 mg, and zolpidem 10 mg after randomization to one of 6 treatment sequences. Visits were separated by a 3-7 day washout. Objective efficacy was assessed by polysomnography (PSG). The primary endpoint was latency to persistent sleep (LPS); key secondary endpoints were sleep efficiency (SE) and wake time after sleep onset (WASO); other endpoints included wake time during sleep (WTDS) and number of awakenings (NAW), as well as patient-reported variables. LPS and SE were significantly different than placebo for all active treatments (p zolpidem 10 mg or the other eszopiclone doses. The incidence of central nervous system adverse events was 23.4% for zolpidem 10 mg, 6.2% to 12.5% for the eszopiclone doses, and 7.9% for placebo. Relative to placebo, all active treatments were effective in reducing LPS and increasing SE. Eszopiclone 3 mg was significantly different from placebo on the 3 PSG measures of sleep maintenance (WASO, WTDS, and NAW). Significant differences between zolpidem 10 mg and eszopiclone (2 mg or 3 mg) were not observed for PSG-measured outcomes, although the study was not powered to detect differences between the active drug conditions.

  11. Residual effects of middle-of-the-night administration of zaleplon and zolpidem on driving ability, memory functions, and psychomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verster, Joris C; Volkerts, Edmund R; Schreuder, Antonia H C M L; Eijken, Erik J E; van Heuckelum, Janet H G; Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Verbaten, Marinus N; Paty, Isabelle; Darwish, Mona; Danjou, Philippe; Patat, Alain

    2002-12-01

    Thirty healthy volunteers participated in this two-part study. Part 1 was a single-blind, two-period crossover design to determine the effects of a single dose of ethanol (0.03% driving ability, memory, and psychomotor performance. Part 2 was a double-blind, five-period crossover design to measure the effects of a middle-of-the-night administration of zaleplon 10 or 20 mg, zolpidem 10 or 20 mg, or placebo on driving ability 4 hours after administration and memory and psychomotor performance 6 hours after administration. The on-the-road driving test consisted of operating an instrumented automobile over a 100-km highway circuit at a constant speed (95 km/h) while maintaining a steady lateral position between the right lane boundaries. The standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP) was the primary performance parameter of the driving test. The psychomotor and memory test battery consisted of the Word Learning Test, the Critical Tracking Test, the Divided Attention Test, and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Data for each part were analyzed separately using ANOVA for crossover designs. Zaleplon 10 and 20 mg did not significantly impair driving ability 4 hours after middle-of-the-night administration. Relative to placebo, after zolpidem 10 mg, SDLP was significantly elevated, but the magnitude of the difference was small and not likely to be of clinical importance. Memory and psychomotor test performance was unaffected after both doses of zaleplon and zolpidem 10 mg. In contrast, zolpidem 20 mg significantly increased SDLP and speed variability. Further, zolpidem 20 mg significantly impaired performance on all psychomotor and memory tests. Finally, driving performance, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Divided Attention Test, and immediate and delayed free recall of the Word Learning Test were significantly impaired after ethanol. The results show that zaleplon (10 and 20 mg) is a safe hypnotic devoid of next-morning residual impairment when used in the middle of

  12. Impact of mean arterial pressure on sublingual microcirculation during cardiopulmonary bypass - secondary outcome from a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, Frederik; Vedel, Anne G; Ravn, Hanne Berg

    2018-01-01

    . METHODS: Thirty-six cardiac surgery patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were included and randomised to either low (40-50 mmHg) or high (70-80 mmHg) mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass. Sidestream Dark Field video images were recorded from the sublingual mucosa. Recordings...... were analysed in a blinded fashion to quantify microcirculatory variables. RESULTS: Mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass in the low target group was 45.0 mmHg (SD 5.3) vs. 67.2 mmHg (SD 8.9) in the high target group. We found no significant difference between the two groups......OBJECTIVE: In this substudy of a randomised, clinical trial, we explored the sublingual microcirculation during cardiac surgery at two different levels of blood pressure. We hypothesised that a higher mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass would cause higher Microvascular Flow Index...

  13. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy targets the immunological cause of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma and has the potential to alter the natural course of allergic disease. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective was to investigate the effect of the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet...... compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. METHODS: A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial......, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS: There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet...

  14. New approaches for the management of bipolar disorder: role of sublingual asenapine in the treatment of mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren CG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Calvert G Warren,1 Steven L Dubovsky1,21Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; 2Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USAAbstract: Bipolar disorder is a prevalent disorder that tends to become progressive without treatment and with inadequate treatment. Second generation (atypical antipsychotic drugs have increasingly been used as adjunctive treatment or monotherapy for mania, but they have the potential for significant adverse effects and their role in maintenance treatment remains unclear. Asenapine is a new atypical antipsychotic medication formulated in a sublingual preparation that has been studied for mania but not maintenance therapy. Evidence indicating efficacy, adverse effects, and potential benefits and drawbacks of using asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder based on currently available published data are summarized.Keywords: bipolar disorder, antipsychotic drug, mania, maintenance, sublingual

  15. Efficacy and safety of 5-grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablets in patients with different clinical profiles of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Montagut, A; Melac, M

    2009-01-01

    pollen sublingual tablets of 100 IR (index of reactivity), 300 IR or 500 IR, or placebo starting 4 months before the pollen season. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this complementary analysis was to determine whether 300 IR 5-grass pollen SLIT-tablets is effective in different subtypes of patients who are allergic......BACKGROUND: The optimal dose of grass pollen tablets for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis patients was previously established in a multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 628 adults. Patients were randomized to receive once-daily 5-grass...... to grass pollen. METHODS: Different subgroups could be identified regarding comorbidities (with or without asthma during the grass-pollen season), sensitization (mono/polysensitization) and symptom severity. An additional exploratory analysis was performed within four subgroups based on pre...

  16. An evaluation of total disintegration time for three different doses of sublingual fentanyl tablets in patients with breakthrough pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalamachu, Srinivas

    2013-12-01

    Breakthrough pain is common among patients with cancer and presents challenges to effective pain management. Breakthrough pain is characterized by rapid onset, severe intensity, and duration typically lasting disintegration time of three different doses of sublingual fentanyl tablets in opioid-tolerant patients. This was a single-center, non-randomized, open-label study. Opioid-tolerant adult patients (N = 30) with chronic pain were assigned to one of three dose groups and self-administered a single 100, 200, or 300 μg sublingual fentanyl tablet (Abstral(®), Galena Biopharma, Portland, OR, USA). Time to complete disintegration was measured by each patient with a stopwatch and independently verified by study personnel. Disintegration time (mean ± SD) for sublingual fentanyl tablets (all doses) was 88.2 ± 55.1 s. Mean disintegration times tended to be slightly longer for the 200 μg (96.7 ± 57.9 s) and 300 μg doses (98.6 ± 64.8 s) compared to the 100 μg dose (69.5 ± 40.5 s). Differences were not statistically significant. Disintegration time was not significantly different between men and women and was not affected by age. Sublingual fentanyl tablets dissolved rapidly (average time <2 min) in all patients, with the higher doses taking slightly more time to dissolve.

  17. Oral myeloid cells uptake allergoids coupled to mannan driving Th1/Treg responses upon sublingual delivery in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, I; López-Relaño, J; Viñuela, M; Tudela, J-I; Angelina, A; Benito-Villalvilla, C; Díez-Rivero, C M; Cases, B; Manzano, A I; Fernández-Caldas, E; Casanovas, M; Palomares, O; Subiza, J L

    2018-04-01

    Polymerized allergoids coupled to nonoxidized mannan (PM-allergoids) may represent novel vaccines targeting dendritic cells (DCs). PM-allergoids are better captured by DCs than native allergens and favor Th1/Treg cell responses upon subcutaneous injection. Herein we have studied in mice the in vivo immunogenicity of PM-allergoids administered sublingually in comparison with native allergens. Three immunization protocols (4-8 weeks long) were used in Balb/c mice. Serum antibody levels were tested by ELISA. Cell responses (proliferation, cytokines, and Tregs) were assayed by flow cytometry in spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Allergen uptake was measured by flow cytometry in myeloid sublingual cells. A quick antibody response and higher IgG2a/IgE ratio were observed with PM-allergoids. Moreover, stronger specific proliferative responses were seen in both submandibular LNs and spleen cells assayed in vitro. This was accompanied by a higher IFNγ/IL-4 ratio with a quick IL-10 production by submandibular LN cells. An increase in CD4 + CD25 high FOXP3 + Treg cells was detected in LNs and spleen of mice treated with PM-allergoids. These allergoids were better captured than native allergens by antigen-presenting (CD45 + MHC-II + ) cells obtained from the sublingual mucosa, including DCs (CD11b + ) and macrophages (CD64 + ). Importantly, all the differential effects induced by PM-allergoids were abolished when using oxidized instead of nonoxidized PM-allergoids. Our results demonstrate for the first time that PM-allergoids administered through the sublingual route promote the generation of Th1 and FOXP3 + Treg cells in a greater extent than native allergens by mechanisms that might well involve their better uptake by oral antigen-presenting cells. © 2018 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient's satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery.

  19. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasem Soltani; Mahmood Khorsand; ALireza Sepehri Shamloo; Lida Jarahi; Nahid Zirak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They wer...

  20. Food-specific sublingual immunotherapy is well tolerated and safe in healthy dogs : a blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Maina, Elisa; Pelst, Michael; Hesta, Myriam; Cox, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background: Food allergies are increasing in prevalence but no treatment strategies are currently available to cure dogs with food allergy. Over the past decade, experimental food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (FA-SLIT) has emerged as a potential treatment for food allergies in human medicine. However, FA-SLIT has not been investigated in dogs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the safety, tolerability and dispenser sterility of FA-SLIT in healt...

  1. Photochemical Degradation of Dimethyl Phthalate by Fe(III)/tartrate/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Xie, Faping [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photochemical degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in Fe(III)/tartrate/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system was investigated utilizing fluorescent lamps as the primary light source. Effects of initial pH, light source, and initial concentration of each reactant on DMP photodegradation was examined. The results show that the system was able to effectively photodegrade DMP utilizing visible light. Fluorescent lamp, halide lamp, UV lamp and sunlight could all be used as the light sources. The optimal pH ranged among 3.0-4.0 for the system. Increases of the initial concentrations of Fe(III) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accelerated the photodegradation of DMP, whereas excessively high initial tartrate concentration resulted in the decrease of photodegradation efficiency and rate of DMP.

  2. The Influence of Low Salivary Flow Rates on the Absorption of a Sublingual Fentanyl Citrate Formulation for Breakthrough Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Andrew; Mundin, Gill; Vriens, Joanna; Webber, Kath; Buchanan, Alison; Waghorn, Melanie

    2016-03-01

    Salivary gland hypofunction may affect the absorption of drugs through the oral mucosa, which in turn may affect their clinical efficacy (e.g., onset of action). The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of a sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet (Abstral, Prostrakan Inc.) in a group of cancer patients with salivary gland hypofunction. Nine cancer patients with salivary gland hypofunction underwent a series of three pharmacokinetic studies with the sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet. In the first phase, the patients received no pretreatment; in the second phase, the patients were allowed to moisten the oral cavity before dosing; in the third phase, the patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (saliva stimulant) before dosing. Fentanyl concentrations were measured using a method of high-performance liquid chromatography with validated tandem mass spectrometric detection. The Tmax was longer, the Cmax was lower, the AUC0-30 lower, and the AUClast lower in the phase involving no pretreatment; the Tmax/Cmax/AUC0-30/AUClast were similar in the phase involving moistening of the oral cavity and the phase involving giving pilocarpine hydrochloride. The pharmacokinetics of the sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet appear to be negatively affected by the presence of salivary gland hypofunction, although the moistening of the oral cavity before dosing results in a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that seen with the giving of pilocarpine hydrochloride. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formulation and evaluation of sublingual delivery of piroxicam using thermosensitive polymer with an inverted Franz diffusion cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Arunprasad; Banga, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare a sublingual formulation for piroxicam using a thermosensitive polymer and to evaluate its permeation through porcine sublingual mucosa. Formulation technique utilized the transition property of poloxamer from solution state at room temperature to gel state at oromucosal temperature (37 °C). The permeation of the drug was evaluated using an inverted Franz diffusion cell technique that allowed the dosage form to be directly applied onto the substrate with required volume of saliva. The formulation was characterized for microscopy of the piroxicam crystals, sol-gel transition property and in-vitro diffusion study. Poloxamer-based formulation enhanced solubility and increased permeability of the piroxicam. Poloxamer formulation with 0.1% w/w piroxicam delivered a cumulative amount of 11.99 ± 7.82 and 11.23 ± 1.79 μg/cm(2), while non-poloxamer formulation delivered 3.57 ± 2.20 and 4.60 ± 6.90 μg/cm(2) with 0.1 and 0.5 ml artificial saliva, respectively, through porcine sublingual tissue in 6 h. A similar delivery profile was observed for 0.05% w/w piroxicam formulation as well. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Recombinant Mal d 1 facilitates sublingual challenge tests of birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaciyan, T; Nagl, B; Faustmann, S; Kopp, S; Wolkersdorfer, M; Bohle, B

    2016-02-01

    It is still unclear whether allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen improves birch pollen-related food allergy. One reason for this may be the lack of standardized tests to assess clinical reactions to birch pollen-related foods, for example apple. We tested the applicability of recombinant (r) Mal d 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in apple, for oral challenge tests. Increasing concentrations of rMal d 1 in 0.9% NaCl were sublingually administered to 72 birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy. The dose of 1.6 μg induced oral allergy syndromes in 26.4%, 3.2 μg in 15.3%, 6.3 μg in 27.8%, 12.5 μg in 8.3%, 25 μg in 11.1%, and 50 μg in 4.2% of the patients. No severe reactions occurred. None of the patients reacted to 0.9% NaCl alone. Sublingual administration of 50 μg of rMal d 1 induced no reactions in three nonallergic individuals. Our approach allows straight forward, dose-defined sublingual challenge tests in a high number of birch pollen-allergic patients that inter alia can be applied to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of birch pollen AIT on birch pollen-related food allergy. © 2015 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Two-chiral-component microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography-chiral surfactant and chiral oil: part 1. dibutyl tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Kimberly A; Foley, Joe P

    2007-06-01

    The first simultaneous use of a chiral surfactant and a chiral oil for microemulsion EKC (MEEKC) is reported. Six stereochemical combinations of dodecoxycarbonylvaline (DDCV: R, S, or racemic, 2.00% w/v), racemic 2-hexanol (1.65% v/v), and dibutyl tartrate (D, L, or racemic, 1.23% v/v) were examined as chiral pseudostationary phases (PSPs) for the separation of six pairs of pharmaceutical enantiomers: pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, N-methyl ephedrine, metoprolol, synephrine, and atenolol. Subtle differences were observed for three chromatographic figures of merit (alpha(enant), alpha(meth), k) among the chiral microemulsions; a moderate difference was observed for efficiency (N) and elution range. Dual-chirality microemulsions provided both the largest and smallest enantioselectivities, due to small positive and negative synergies between the chiral microemulsion components. For the ephedrine family of compounds, dual-chiral microemulsions with surfactant and oil in opposite stereochemical configurations provided higher enantioselectivities than the single-chiral component microemulsion (RXX), whereas dual-chiral microemulsions with surfactant and oil in the same stereochemical configurations provided lower enantioselectivities than RXX. Slight to moderate enantioselective synergies were confirmed using a thermodynamic model. Efficiencies observed with microemulsions comprised of racemic dibutyl tartrate or dibutyl-D-tartrate were significantly higher than those obtained with dibutyl-L-tartrate, with an average difference in plate count of about 25 000. Finally, one two-chiral-component microemulsion (RXS) provided significantly better resolution than the remaining one- and two-chiral-component microemulsions for the ephedrine-based compounds, but only slightly better or equivalent resolution for non-ephedrine compounds.

  6. Evaluation of Poly(2-Ethyl-2-Oxazoline) Containing Copolymer Networks of Varied Composition as Sustained Metoprolol Tartrate Delivery Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kostova, Bistra; Ivanova, Sijka; Balashev, Konstantin; Rachev, Dimitar; Christova, Darinka

    2014-01-01

    Segmented copolymer networks (SCN) based on poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) and containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, and/or methyl methacrylate segments have been evaluated as potential sustained release systems of the water soluble cardioselective β-blocker metoprolol tartrate. The structure and properties of the drug carriers were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron ...

  7. Formulation and Characterization of Matrix and Triple-Layer matrix tablets for Controlled Delivery of Metoprolol tartrate

    OpenAIRE

    Izhar Ahmed Syed; Lakshmi Narsu Mangamoori; Yamsani Madhusudan Rao

    2011-01-01

    In the present study matrix and triple layer matrix tablets of metoprolol tartrate were formulated by using xanthan gum as the matrix forming agent and Sodium Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (Na CMC) as barrier layers. The prepared tablets were analysed for their hardness, friability, drug content and in-vitro drug release studies. Marked differences in dissolution characteristics of (M3) and (M3L3) were observed and showed a significant difference statistically. Mean dissolution time (MDT) for M3 a...

  8. Selective complexometric determination of titanium(IV) using sodium potassium tartrate or ascorbic acid as masking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, N.V.; Bhat, N.G.; Narayana, B.; Nazareth, R.A.; Hegde, P.; Manjunatha, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate complexometric method is proposed for the determination of titanium(IV) where sodium potassium tartrate or ascorbic acid were used as masking agents. In the presence of diverse metal ions, titanium is first complexed with excess of EDTA and surplus EDTA is then titrated at pH 5-6 with zinc sulfate, xylenol orange being used as indicator. An excess of 5 % aqueous sodium potassium tartrate is then added to displace the complexed EDTA from the Ti-EDTA complex quantitatively, which is titrated with zinc sulfate. Also, ascorbic acid may be used as the releasing agent. The methods work well in the range 1-53 mg of Ti(IV) for sodium potassium tartrate with relative errors ± 0.28 % and standard deviations 0.16 mg. For ascorbic acid the range is 1.00-30.00 mg of Ti(IV) with relative errors of ± 0.40 % and standard deviations of 0.05 mg. (author)

  9. A cold active (2R,3R)-(-)-di-O-benzoyl-tartrate hydrolyzing esterase from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christian; Platz, Tanja; Cadez, Neza; Giffhorn, Friedrich; Kohring, Gert-Wieland

    2006-11-01

    In a screening procedure a pink-colored yeast was isolated from enrichment cultures with (2R,3R)-(-)-di-O-benzoyl-tartrate (benzoyl-tartrate) as the sole carbon source. The organism saar1 was identified by morphological, physiological, and 18S ribosomal DNA/internal transcribed spacer analysis as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a basidiomycetous yeast. During growth the yeast hydrolyzed the dibenzoyl ester stoichiometrically to the monoester using the separated benzoate as the growth substrate, before the monoester was further cleaved into benzoate and tartrate, which were both metabolized. The corresponding benzoyl esterase was purified from the culture supernatant and characterized as a monomeric glycosylated 86-kDa protein with an optimum pH of 7.5 and an optimum temperature of 45 degrees C. At 0 degrees C the esterase still exhibited 20% of the corresponding activity at 30 degrees C, which correlates it to psychrophilic enzymes. The esterase could hydrolyze short chain p-nitrophenyl-alkyl esters and several benzoyl esters like benzoyl-methyl ester, ethylene-glycol-dibenzoyl ester, phenyl-benzoyl ester, cocaine, and 1,5-anhydro-D: -fructose-tribenzoyl ester. However feruloyl-ethyl ester was not hydrolyzed. The activity characteristics let the enzyme appear as a promising tool for synthesis of benzoylated compounds for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, or fine chemical applications, even at low temperatures.

  10. Current issues on sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Zorica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology was the first official organization to recognize that sublingual administration could be “promising route” for allergic desensitization. A few years later, the World Health Organization recommended this therapy as “a viable alternative to the injection route in adults.” The first meta-analysis showed sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT effectiveness for allergic rhinitis and another study showed SLIT can actually help prevent the development of asthma both in adults and in children. The main goal of this review article is to present insight into the most up-to-date understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. A literature review was performed on PubMed from 1990 to 2015 using the terms “asthma,” “allergic rhinitis,” “children,” “allergen specific immune therapy.” Evaluating data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (DB-PC-RCTs, the clinical efficacy (assessed as the reduction of symptom score and the need of rescue medicament of SLIT for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, has been confirmed in various meta-analysis Outcomes such as rhinoconjunctivitis score and medication scores, combined scores, quality of life, days with severe symptoms, immunological endpoints, and safety parameters were all improved in the SLIT-tablet compared with placebo group. SLIT safety has been already proven in many DB-PC-RCTs and real-life settings. In accordance with all of the above mentioned, the goals for future trials and studies are the development of comprehensive guidelines for clinical practice on immunotherapy, embracing all the different potential participants. The importance of allergen immunotherapy is of special relevance in the pediatric age, when the plasticity and modulability of the immune system are maximal, and when

  11. Validated spectophotometric methods for the assay of cinitapride hydrogen tartrate in pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayana K.V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three simple, selective and rapid spectrophotometric methods have been established for the determination of cinitapride hydrogen tartrate (CHT in pharmaceutical tablets. The proposed methods are based on the diazotization of CHT with sodium nitrite and hydrochloric acid, followed by coupling with resorcinol, 1-benzoylacetone and 8-hydroxyquinoline in alkaline medium for methods A, B and C respectively. The formed azo dyes are measured at 442, 465 and 552 nm for methods A, B and C respectively. The parameters that affect the reaction were carefully optimized. Under optimum conditions, Beer’s law is obeyed over the ranges 2.0-32.0, 1.0-24.0 and 1.0-20.0 μg. mL-1 for methods A, B, and C, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 1.2853 x104, 1.9624 x104 and 3.92 x104 L.mol-1.cm-1 for methods A, B and C, respectively. The results of the proposed procedures were validated statistically according to ICH guidelines. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the determination of CHT in Cintapro tablets without interference from common excipients encountered.

  12. Eliglustat tartrate for the treatment of adults with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Lunawati L; Turcotte, Kelsey

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review eliglustat tartrate, a substrate reduction therapy, for the treatment of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1). GD is an rare inborn error of metabolism caused by accumulation of lipid substrates such as glucosylceramide within the monocyte-macrophage system that affects the body by causing enlargement of the spleen and liver, destruction of bone, and abnormalities of the lungs and blood, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. GD is classified into three types: GD1, a chronic and non-neuronopathic disease accounting for 95% of GD cases; and types 2 and 3 (GD2 GD3) which are more progressive diseases with no approved drugs available at this time. Treatment options for GD1 include enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Eliglustat works by inhibiting UDP-glucosylceramide synthase, the first enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, thus reducing the load of glucosylceramide influx into the lysosome. Eliglustat was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration after three Phase I, two Phase II, and two Phase III clinical trials. The dose of eliglustat is 84 mg twice a day or once daily depending on the cytochrome P450 2D6 genotype of the patient.

  13. Tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating beads for intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nikhil; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the study was to develop tapioca starch blended alginate mucoadhesive-floating beads for the intragastric delivery of Metoprolol Tartrate (MT). The beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation method using calcium chloride as crosslinker and gas forming calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as floating inducer. The alginate gel beads having 51-58% entrapped MT showed 90% release within 45 min in gastric medium (pH 1.2). Tapioca starch blending markedly improved the entrapment efficiency (88%) and sustained the release for 3-4 h. A 12% w/w HPMC coating on these beads extended the release upto 9-11 h. In vitro wash off and buoyancy test in gastric media revealed that the beads containing CaCO3 has gastric residence of more than 12 h. In vitro optimized multi-unit formulation consisting of immediate and sustained release mucoadhesive-floating beads (40:60) showed good initial release of 42% MT within 1h followed by a sustained release of over 90% for 11 h. Pharmacokinetic study performed in rabbit model showed that the relative oral bioavailability of MT after administration of oral solution, sustain release and optimized formulation was 51%, 67% and 87%, respectively. Optimized formulation showed a higher percent inhibition of isoprenaline induced heart rate in rabbits for almost 12 h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Formulation development and comparative in vitro study of metoprolol tartrate (IR) tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Tazeen; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Maboos, Madiha; Khan, Madeeha; Bashir, Lubna; Naz, Shazia

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop Immediate Release (IR) tablets of Metoprolol Tartrate (MT) and to compare trial formulations to a reference product. Six formulations (F1-F6) were designed using central composite method and compared to a reference brand (A). Two marketed products (brands B and C) were also evaluated. F1-F6 were prepared with Avicel PH101 (filler), Crospovidone (disintegrant) and Magnesium Stearate (lubricant) by direct compression. Pharmacopoeial and non-pharmacopoeial methods were used to assess their quality. Furthermore, drug profiles were characterized using model dependent and independent (f(2)) approaches. Brands B and C and F5 and F6 did not qualify the tests for content uniformity. Moreover, brand B did not meet weight variation criteria and brand C did not satisfy requirements for single point dissolution test. Of the trial formulations, F2 failed the test for uniformity in thickness while F4 did not disintegrate within time limit. Only F1 and F3 met all quality parameters and were subjected to accelerated stability testing without significant alterations in their physicochemical characteristics. Based on AIC and r(2)(adjusted) values obtained by applying various kinetic models, drug release was determined to most closely follow Hixson-Crowell cube root law. F1 was determined to be the optimized formulation.

  15. Separation of corticosteroids by microemulsion EKC with diethyl L-tartrate as the oil phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Hung; Chen, Tse-Hsien; Huang, Kuan-Pin; Wang, Guan-Ren; Liu, Chuen-Ying

    2007-10-01

    A novel microemulsion based on a mixture of diethyl L-tartrate (DET) and SDS was developed for the microemulsion EKC (MEEKC) determination of structurally related steroids. The system consisted of 0.5% w/w DET, 1.7% w/w SDS, 1.2% w/w 1-butanol, 89.6% w/w phosphate buffer (40 mM, pH 7.0), and 7% w/w ACN. With an applied voltage of +10 kV, a baseline separation of aldosterone (A), cortisone acetate (CA), dexamethasone (D), hydrocortisone (H), hydrocortisone acetate (HA), prednisolone (P), prednisolone acetate (PA), prednisone (Ps), triamcinolone (T), and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) could be achieved. Under the optimized conditions, the reproducibility of the retention time (n = 4) for most of the compounds was less than +/-0.8% with the exception of A, Ps, and T. The average number of theoretical plates was 18 800 plates/m. The results were compared with those achieved by the modified micellar EKC (MEKC). MEEKC showed obvious advantages over MEKC for the separation of highly hydrophobic substances. To further evaluate the system, we tested the MEEKC method by analyzing corticosteroids in a spiked urine sample.

  16. Optimization of bilayer floating tablet containing metoprolol tartrate as a model drug for gastric retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, C; Srinath, M S; Babu, Ganesh

    2006-04-07

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an optimized gastric floating drug delivery system (GFDDS) containing metoprolol tartrate (MT) as a model drug by the optimization technique. A 2(3) factorial design was employed in formulating the GFDDS with total polymer content-to-drug ratio (X1), polymer-to-polymer ratio (X2), and different viscosity grades of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) (X3) as independent variables. Four dependent variables were considered: percentage of MT release at 8 hours, T50%, diffusion coefficient, and floating time. The main effect and interaction terms were quantitatively evaluated using a mathematical model. The results indicate that X1 and X2 significantly affected the floating time and release properties, but the effect of different viscosity grades of HPMC (K4M and K10M) was nonsignificant. Regression analysis and numerical optimization were performed to identify the best formulation. Fickian release transport was confirmed as the release mechanism from the optimized formulation. The predicted values agreed well with the experimental values, and the results demonstrate the feasibility of the model in the development of GFDDS.

  17. Sublingual immunotherapy in patients with house dust mite allergic rhinitis: prospective study of clinical outcomes over a two-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, J Y; Thalayasingam, M; Ong, S; Loo, E X L; Shek, L P; Chao, S S

    2016-03-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis sensitised to house dust mites is safe, but its efficacy is controversial and sublingual immunotherapy with Blomia tropicalis has not yet been studied. This study sought to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite extract in children and adults with house dust mite allergic rhinitis over a period of two years. A prospective observational study was conducted of children and adults diagnosed with house dust mite allergic rhinitis who were treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2008 to 2012. Total Nasal Symptom Scores, Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life scores and medication usage scores were assessed prospectively. Thirty-nine patients, comprising 24 children and 15 adults, were studied. Total Nasal Symptom Scores and Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life scores dropped significantly at three months into therapy, and continued to improve. Medication usage scores improved at one year into immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite extracts, including B tropicalis, is efficacious as a treatment for patients with house dust mite allergic rhinitis.

  18. [Breakthrough pain treatment with sublingual fentanyl in patients with chronic cutaneous ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Triadó, V; López Alarcón, M D; Villegas Estévez, F; Alba Moratillas, C; Massa Domínguez, B; Palomares Payá, F; Mínguez Martí, A; Debón Vicent, L

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of opioids in the management of pain in those patients with chronic cutaneous ulcers and breakthrough/incidental pain. An open-label, multicentre, prospective, uncontrolled study was conducted in the pain and ulcer units of 5 hospitals across the Comunidad Valenciana. Eligibility criteria were baseline pain 4 in the visual analogue scale or breakthrough procedural pain 4. Exclusion criteria were cognitive impairment, opioid intolerance, or patient refusal to provide informed consent. The protocol scheduled 5 controls: baseline (enrolment), 15 days, one month, 2 months, and 3 months. The main outcome measure of the study was the visual analogue scale score during rest, movement and procedures. Opioids were administered for release of the baseline pain, and sublingual fentanyl for breakthrough pain. A total of 32 patients (86.5%) completed the study. Baseline pain achieved a mean improvement of 3.6 visual analogue scale points (SD 2.3), movement pain improved by 3.9 points (SD 2.5) and procedural pain improved by 4.5 points (SD 2.8), and the mean pain intensity improvement was statistically significant from the first control and at all controls thereafter (PDolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Early cytokine modulation after the rapid induction phase of sublingual immunotherapy with mite monomeric allergoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioacchino, M; Perrone, A; Petrarca, C; Di Claudio, F; Mistrello, G; Falagiani, P; Dadorante, V; Verna, N; Braga, M; Ballone, E; Cavallucci, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of different treatment schedules of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in activating IL-10-producing T-cells, crucial in inducing allergen-specific tolerance, is not completely understood. The present work was designed to evaluate allergen driven interleukin release by mononuclear cells in the early phase of SLIT, after application of different induction schemes. Twenty mite-allergic patients were enrolled, 10 (group A) treated with a traditional 98 day induction scheme and 10 (group B) with a 16 day scheme with monomeric allergoid vaccine. At the end of the induction phase, the cumulative doses taken by group A and group B patients were equivalent to 50.5 and 50.3 microg of mite group 1 allergens, respectively. The release of Th1-, Th2- and Treg-related interleukins was assessed in culture supernatants of 5 microg/ml Der-p1-stimulated mononuclear cells, isolated before and after the induction phases. No relevant treatment-related side effects were observed. Interleukin release was similar in the two groups at the enrolment. Non-stimulated and Der p 1 stimulated release of studied cytokines was similar in the two groups at enrolment. Der p 1 stimulation significantly increased IL-10 release (pallergoids are utilized.

  20. Specific IgE response to different grass pollen allergen components in children undergoing sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcucci Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grass pollen is a major cause of respiratory allergy worldwide and contain a number of allergens, some of theme (Phl p 1, Phl p 2, Phl p 5, and Phl 6 from Phleum pratense, and their homologous in other grasses are known as major allergens. The administration of grass pollen extracts by immunotherapy generally induces an initial rise in specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE production followed by a progressive decline during the treatment. Some studies reported that immunotherapy is able to induce a de novo sensitisation to allergen component previously unrecognized. Methods We investigated in 30 children (19 males and 11 females, mean age 11.3 years, 19 treated with sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT by a 5-grass extract and 11 untreated, the sIgE and sIgG4 response to the different allergen components. Results Significant increases (p  Conclusions These findings confirm that the initial phase of SLIT with a grass pollen extract enhances the sIgE synthesis and show that the sIgE response concerns the same allergen components which induce IgE reactivity during natural exposure.

  1. Suppression of TIM-1 predicates clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Zhou, Lifeng; Luo, Xi; Xia, Wentong; Chen, Dehua; Xu, Rui; Wang, Jie; Luo, Renzhong; Xu, Geng; Li, Huabin

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with house-dust mite (HDM) extract and to examine the change of biomarkers (TIM-1, IL-5 and IL-10) after 6-month SLIT in children with allergic rhinitis (AR). One hundred and sixteen HDM-sensitized children with persistent AR were enrolled to assess the clinical efficacy of SLIT by determining the individual nasal symptom score (INSS) and total nasal symptom scores (TNSS) after 6-month SLIT. Moreover, the mRNA expression of TIM-1, IL-5 and IL-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was examined in 16 well-controlled and 12 uncontrolled AR patients using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). After 6-month SLIT, both TNSS and INSS scores were significantly decreased compared with the baseline value (p < 0.01). The rates for well-controlled, partly controlled and uncontrolled children were 43.1%, 32.8% and 24.1%, respectively. Accordingly, the mRNA levels of TIM-1 and IL-5 decreased significantly and IL-10 mRNA level increased significantly compared with the baseline value in well-controlled children (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest SLIT with HDM extract is effective and safe for AR children and TIM-1 may be considered as an indicator for evaluating the clinical efficacy of SLIT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Zolpidem, A Clinical Hypnotic that Affects Electronic Transfer, Alters Synaptic Activity Through Potential Gaba Receptors in the Nervous System Without Significant Free Radical Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kovacic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zolpidem (trade name Ambien has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET, pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action.

  3. Influence of weak magnetic field and tartrate on the oxidation and sequestration of Sb(III) by zerovalent iron: Batch and semi-continuous flow study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peng; Sun, Yuankui; Qiao, Junlian; Lo, Irene M C; Guan, Xiaohong

    2018-02-05

    The influence of weak magnetic field (WMF) and tartrate on the oxidation and sequestration of Sb(III) by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated with batch and semi-continuous reactors. The species analysis of antinomy in aqueous solution and solid precipitates implied that both Sb(III) adsorption preceding its conversion to Sb(V) in solid phase and Sb(III) oxidation to Sb(V) preceding its adsorption in aqueous phase occurred in the process of Sb(III) sequestration by ZVI. The application of WMF greatly increased the rate constants of Sb tot (total Sb) and Sb(III) disappearance during Sb(III)-tartrate and uncomplexed-Sb(III) sequestration by ZVI. The enhancing effect of WMF was primarily due to the accelerated ZVI corrosion in the presence of WMF, as evidenced by the influence of WMF on the change of solution and solid properties with reaction. However, tartrate greatly retarded Sb removal by ZVI. It was because tartrate inhibited ZVI corrosion, competed with Sb(III) and Sb(V) for the active surface sites, increased the negative surface charge of the generated iron (hydr)oxides due to its adsorption, and formed soluble complexes with Fe(III). The positive effect of WMF on Sb(III)-tartrate and uncomplexed-Sb(III) removal by ZVI was also verified with a magnetic semi-continuous reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relati...

  5. Preparation and characterization of metoprolol tartrate containing matrix type transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malipeddi, Venkata Ramana; Awasthi, Rajendra; Ghisleni, Daniela Dal Molim; de Souza Braga, Marina; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha; Dua, Kamal

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to develop matrix-type transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) of metoprolol tartrate using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The transdermal films were evaluated for physical parameters, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in vitro drug release, in vitro skin permeability, skin irritation test and stability studies. The films were found to be tough, non-sticky, easily moldable and possess good tensile strength. As the concentration of PVA was increased, the tensile strength of the films was also increased. Results of FTIR spectroscopy and DSC revealed the absence of any drug-polymer interactions. In vitro release of metoprolol followed zero-order kinetics and the mechanism of release was found to be diffusion rate controlled. In vitro release studies of metoprolol using Keshary-Chein (vertical diffusion cell) indicated 65.5 % drug was released in 24 h. In vitro skin permeation of metoprolol transdermal films showed 58.13 % of the drug was released after 24 h. In vitro skin permeation of metoprolol followed zero-order kinetics in selected formulations. The mechanism of release was found to be diffusion rate controlled. In a 22-day skin irritation test, tested formulation of transdermal films did not exhibit any allergic reactions, inflammation, or contact dermatitis. The transdermal films showed good stability in the 180-day stability study. It can be concluded that the TDDS of MPT can help in bypassing the first-pass effect and will provide patient improved compliance, without sacrificing the therapeutic advantages of the drugs.

  6. Titrimetric and Spectrophotometric Determination of Metaprolol tartrate in Pharmaceuticals Using N-Bromosuccinimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Basavaiah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One titrimetric and two spectrophotometric methods are presented for the assay of metaprolol tartrate (MPT in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods employ N-bromosuccinimide (NBS as the oxidimetric reagent and two dyes, methyl orange and indigo carmine as spectrophotometric reagents. In titrimetry, an acidified solution of MPT is treated with a known excess amount of NBS and after a definite time, the unreacted oxidant is determined by iodometric back titration. Spectrophotometry involves adding a measured excess of NBS to MPT in acid medium followed by determination of residual NBS by reacting with a fixed amount of either methyl orange and measuring the absorbance at 520 nm (Method A or indigo carmine and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm (Method B. In all the methods, the amount of NBS reacted corresponds to the amount of MPT. Reaction conditions have been optimized. Titrimetry allows the determination of 1 - 12 mg of MPT and the calculations are based on a 1: 4 (MPT: NBS reaction stoichiometry. In spectrophotometry, the measured absorbance is found to increase linearly with the concentration of MPT serving as basis for quantitation. The systems obey Beer’s law for 0.5 - 4.0 μg mL-1 and 1.25 - 10.0 μg mL-1 for method A and method B, respectively. The apparent absorptivities are calculated to 1.07 × 105 be and 4.22 × 104 L mol cm-1 for method A and method B, respectively. The methods developed were applied to the assay of MPT in commercial tablet formulations, and the results were compared statistically with those of a reference method. The accuracy and reliability of the methods were further ascertained by performing recovery tests via standard-addition method.

  7. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 (angstrom) resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg 2+ and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. However, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate intermediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH.

  8. Clinically significant response to zolpidem in disorders of consciousness secondary to anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis in a teenager: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appu, Merveen; Noetzel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis has been associated with a prolonged neuropsychiatric phase that may last for months to years. We report the case of a 16-year-old girl who was diagnosed with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis resulting from left ovarian mature teratoma 2 weeks after presentation with psychosis. Following tumor removal and immunotherapy, recovery from a minimally conscious state was accelerated significantly by zolpidem that was used for her sleep disturbance. Our patient was discharged home 8 weeks after admission with marked improvement in her neurological function. Zolpidem has been reported to improve arousal in disorders of consciousness but there are no previous reports of its benefit among patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis. Zolpidem would be a reasonable consideration as an adjunctive treatment in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis after tumor removal and immunotherapy to accelerate recovery and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Results from the 5-year SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet asthma prevention (GAP) trial in children with grass pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovirta, Erkka; Petersen, Thomas H; Piotrowska, Teresa; Laursen, Mette K; Andersen, Jens S; Sørensen, Helle F; Klink, Rabih

    2018-02-01

    Allergy immunotherapy targets the immunological cause of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma and has the potential to alter the natural course of allergic disease. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet compared with placebo on the risk of developing asthma. A total of 812 children (5-12 years), with a clinically relevant history of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and no medical history or signs of asthma, were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, comprising 3 years of treatment and 2 years of follow-up. There was no difference in time to onset of asthma, defined by prespecified asthma criteria relying on documented reversible impairment of lung function (primary endpoint). Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet significantly reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms or using asthma medication at the end of trial (odds ratio = 0.66, P year posttreatment follow-up, and during the entire 5-year trial period. Also, grass allergic rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were 22% to 30% reduced (P years). At the end of the trial, the use of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis pharmacotherapy was significantly less (27% relative difference to placebo, P < .001). Total IgE, grass pollen-specific IgE, and skin prick test reactivity to grass pollen were all reduced compared to placebo. Treatment with the SQ grass sublingual immunotherapy tablet reduced the risk of experiencing asthma symptoms and using asthma medication, and had a positive, long-term clinical effect on rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use but did not show an effect on the time to onset of asthma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of sublingual administration of detomidine gel for sedation of horses undergoing veterinary and husbandry procedures under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rachel B; White, Gary W; Ramsey, Deborah S; Boucher, Joseph F; Kilgore, W Randal; Huhtinen, Mirja K

    2010-12-15

    To determine whether sublingual detomidine gel administration to horses would be effective in providing an appropriate degree of sedation and restraint to facilitate completion of veterinary and husbandry procedures under field conditions. Multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study. 270 client-owned horses known to require sedation or strong restraint to enable veterinary and husbandry procedures to be performed. Horses randomly received a single dose of detomidine gel (0.04 mg/kg [0.018 mg/lb]) or placebo gel administered sublingually. Horses were sedated to facilitate cleaning the prepuce, cutting of hair with electric clippers, hoof trimming or application of shoes, manual dental floating (ie, rasping or filing of the teeth to remove irregularities), nasogastric passage of a stomach tube or endoscope, and radiography. The primary determinant of efficacy was an assessment by a veterinarian on the ability or inability to successfully conduct the procedure. 171 horses met all the study protocol criteria. One hundred twenty-nine horses were treated with detomidine. The procedure was completed successfully for 76% (98/129) of the detomidine-treated horses, while the procedure was completed successfully for only 7% (3/42) of the placebo-treated horses. The percentage of horses in which the procedure was successfully completed was significantly different between detomidine-treated horses and placebo-treated horses. No serious adverse effects were reported. Detomidine gel administered to horses sublingually at a dose of 0.04 mg/kg provided an appropriate degree of sedation and restraint to facilitate completion of veterinary and husbandry procedures in horses known to require sedation for such procedures.

  11. The vacuolar channel VvALMT9 mediates malate and tartrate accumulation in berries of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angeli, Alexis; Baetz, Ulrike; Francisco, Rita; Zhang, Jingbo; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Regalado, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. represents an economically important fruit species. Grape and wine flavour is made from a complex set of compounds. The acidity of berries is a major parameter in determining grape berry quality for wine making and fruit consumption. Despite the importance of malic and tartaric acid (TA) storage and transport for grape berry acidity, no vacuolar transporter for malate or tartrate has been identified so far. Some members of the aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) anion channel family from Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to be involved in mediating malate fluxes across the tonoplast. Therefore, we hypothesised that a homologue of these channels could have a similar role in V. vinifera grape berries. We identified homologues of the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9 through a TBLASTX search on the V. vinifera genome database. We cloned the closest homologue of AtALMT9 from grape berry cDNA and designated it VvALMT9. The expression profile revealed that VvALMT9 is constitutively expressed in berry mesocarp tissue and that its transcription level increases during fruit maturation. Moreover, we found that VvALMT9 is targeted to the vacuolar membrane. Using patch-clamp analysis, we could show that, besides malate, VvALMT9 mediates tartrate currents which are higher than in its Arabidopsis homologue. In summary, in the present study we provide evidence that VvALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel expressed in grape berries. Interestingly, in V. vinifera, a tartrate-producing plant, the permeability of the channel is apparently adjusted to TA.

  12. Effectiveness of sublingual nitroglycerin before puncture compared with conventional intra-arterial nitroglycerin in transradial procedures: a randomized trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turan, Burak, E-mail: drburakturan@gmail.com; Daşlı, Tolga; Erkol, Ayhan; Erden, İsmail

    2015-10-15

    Aim: Sublingual (SL) nitroglycerin administered before radial artery puncture can improve cannulation success and decrease the incidence of radial artery spasm (RAS) compared with intra-arterial (IA) nitroglycerin in transradial procedures. Methods: Patients undergoing diagnostic transradial angiography were randomized to IA (200 mcg) or SL (400 mcg) nitroglycerin. Primary endpoints were puncture time and puncture attempts. Secondary endpoint was the incidence of RAS. Results: Total of 101 participants (mean age 60 ± 11 years, 53% male) were randomized (51 in IA and 50 in SL groups). Puncture time (50 [36–75] vs 50 [35–90] sec), puncture attempts (1.18 ± 0.48 vs 1.20 ± 0.49), multiple punctures (13.7 vs 16.0%) and RAS (19.6 vs 24.0%) were not statistically different between IA vs SL groups respectively. A composite endpoint of all adverse events related to transradial angiography (multiple punctures, RAS, access site crossover, hypotension/bradycardia associated with nitroglycerin and radial artery occlusion) was very similar in IA vs SL groups (39 vs 40%, respectively). However puncture time was significantly longer with SL nitroglycerin in patients < 1.65 m height (47 [36–66] vs 63 [41–110] sec, p = 0.042). Multiple punctures seemed higher with SL nitroglycerin in patients with diabetes (0 vs 30%, p = 0.028) or in patients < 1.65 m height (7.4 vs 25%, p = 0.085). Likewise, RAS with SL nitroglycerin seemed more frequent in smokers compared to IA nitroglycerin (0 vs 27%, p = 0.089). Conclusions: SL nitroglycerin was not different from IA nitroglycerin in terms of efficiency and safety in overall study population. However it may be inferior to IA nitroglycerin in certain subgroups (shorter individuals, diabetics and smokers). - Highlights: • Improvement in radial artery puncture time and success with subcutaneous nitrate was reported. • Giving nitrate sublingually may have vasodilation along entire length of radial artery and may prevent RAS

  13. Effect of trimethylcolchicinic acid methyl ether d-tartrate (TMCA) on Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolinsky, D C; Jacobs, E M; Irwin, L E; Pajak, T F; Bateman, J R

    1976-01-01

    Trimethylcolchicinic acid methyl ether d-tartrate (TMCA; NSC-36351) was administered daily by mouth to 71 patients with malignant lymphomas. Partical (greater than 50%) responses were observed in eleven of 37 patients with Hodgkin's disesse, two of 22 patients with lymphocytic lymphoma, and one of two patients with mixed cell lymphoma. One complete and three partial responses were noted in nine patients with histiocytic lymphoma. Responses lasted from one to 91+ months (median: four months) and occurred in patients whose disease was resistant to alkylating agents, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone or BCNU. Toxic effects included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea, diarrhea, stomatitis, alopecia and dermatitis.

  14. New, Occasional, and Frequent Use of Zolpidem or Zopiclone (Alone and in Combination) and the Risk of Injurious Road Traffic Crashes in Older Adult Drivers: A Population-Based Case-Control and Case-Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevriana, Alicia; Möller, Jette; Laflamme, Lucie; Monárrez-Espino, Joel

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies on the effect of zolpidem or zopiclone use on the risk of road traffic crashes (RTCs) have shown mixed results. Our objective was to determine the association between zolpidem or zopiclone use (as separate drugs or combined) and the occurrence of injurious RTCs among older adult drivers. This was a population-based matched case-control and case-crossover study based on secondary data linked together from Swedish national registers. Cases were drivers aged 50-80 years involved in a vehicle crash resulting in injuries between January 2006 and December 2009 for the case-control study (n = 27,096) and from February 2006 to December 2009 for the case-crossover study (n = 26,586). For the first design, four controls were matched to each case by sex, age, and residential area, and exposure was categorized into new, occasional, and frequent use of zolpidem only, zopiclone only, and combined zolpidem and zopiclone. For the case-crossover study, newly dispensed zolpidem or zopiclone users were assessed during the 28 days prior to the crash and compared with an equally long control period using a 12-week washout period. Matched adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed using conditional logistic regression. Increased ORs for all users were observed. In the case-control study, the highest odds were seen among newly initiated zolpidem-only users involved in single-vehicle crashes (adjusted OR 2.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-4.24), followed by frequent combined zolpidem and zopiclone users [adjusted OR 2.20; CI 1.21-4.00]. In the case-crossover, newly initiated treatment with zolpidem or zopiclone showed an increased risk that was highest in the 2 weeks after the start of the treatment (OR 2.66; 95% CI 1.04-6.81). These results provide more compelling evidence for the role of zolpidem or zopiclone in the occurrence of RTCs among older adults, not only in frequent users, but also at the beginning of treatment.

  15. Efficacy of Sublingual Misoprostol versus Intramuscular Methylergometrine in Prevention of Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, R.; Ambreen, A.; Khuram, A.; Mushtaq, M.

    2013-01-01

    Post partum hemorrhage still remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Most of oxytocics like methylergometrine require parenteral administration, which requires special storage. Misoprostol is thermo stable, has a long shelf life and is widely recommended for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage. This can be a choice of oxytocic in developing countries like ours, where storage facilities and resources are limited. Objectives: To compare efficacy of sublingual Misoprostol versus intramuscular Methylergometrine in prevention of primary postpartum hemorrhage after delivery. Study Design: Quasi experimental study Place and Duration of Study: Department of Gynae/Obs, Military Hospital and Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi cantt. December 2007 to July 2008. Material and Methods: One hundred and thirty six pregnant ladies were selected. On arrival each patient was examined thoroughly along with baseline investigations. Therapeutic option was allocated to the patients simply by using a table of random numbers and dividing them in two equal groups. Informed written consent was taken. Each patient was observed for blood loss estimation and hematocrit drop. All the data was analyzed using SPSS version 10.0. Mean +- SD for age, pre-delivery and post-delivery hematocrit, percentage of drop in hematocrit and blood loss during labour was calculated. Results: Mean drop of hematocrit and blood loss were compared among two groups. At the end, it was revealed that there was no significant difference among two groups in blood loss (p=0.49) and hematocrit drop (p=0.14). Conclusion: There is no significant better effect in preventing post partum hemorrhage among the two drugs. (author)

  16. Sublingual buprenorphine is effective in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinoff, Herbert L; Barkin, Robert L; Wilson, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with chronic pain have less than optimal therapeutic outcomes after prolonged treatment with opiate analgesics. Worsening of pain perception, functional capacity, and mood often result. Medical detoxification is often undertaken in this situation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (49 men and 46 women; age range, 26-84) with chronic noncancer pain (maldynia) were referred by local pain clinics for detoxification from long-term opiate analgesic (LTOA) therapy. All patients had failed treatment as manifest by increasing pain levels, worsening functional capacity, and, in 8%, the emergence of opiate addiction. Length of prior LTOA therapy ranged from 1.5 to 27 years (mean, 8.8 years). After a minimum of 12 hours of abstinence from all opiate analgesics, patients were given low doses of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone (Reckitt Benckiser). Maintenance dosing was individualized to treat chronic pain. Daily SL dose of buprenorphine ranged from 4 to 16 mg (mean, 8 mg) in divided doses. Mean duration of treatment is 8.8 months (range, 2.4-16.6 months). At clinic appointments, patients were assessed for pain reports, functional capacity, and mood inventory. Eighty-six percent of patients experienced moderate to substantial relief of pain accompanied by both improved mood and functioning. Patient and family satisfaction was robust. Only 6 patients discontinued therapy secondary to side effects and/or exacerbation of pain. In this open-label study, SL buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were well tolerated and safe and appeared to be effective in the treatment of chronic pain patients refractory to LTOA.

  17. [Onset time and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides farinae drops in children with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiling; Qian, Yasheng; Liu, Suqin; Huang, Liqin; Xu, Shiying; Yin, Wenhua; Chen, Yanchun; Wu, Huawei; Wang, Gan

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the onset time and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with Dermatophagoides farinae drops in children with house dust mites (HDM)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR). One hundred and forty three children with perennial moderate to severe HDM-induced AR were treated by SLIT with standardized Dermatophagoides farinae extract. One hundred children who finally completed two years treatment were divided into two groups according to the age: younger children group (aged 4-8 years, n = 52) and older children group (aged 9-14 years, n = 48). Respectively, Each children was assessed before and after 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 12th, 24th months of the treatment. Total nasal symptom score (TNSS), total medication score (TMS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated at each visit. All clinical data were analyzed retrospectively with the SPSS 19.0 software. TNSS, TMS and VAS of two groups decreased significantly after three months of the treatment compared with before (younger children group: Z value was -3.843, -3.534, -3.940, older children group: Z value was -3.938, -3.405, -3.953, all P < 0.05). TNSS and VAS of younger children group decreased significantly after two months of the treatment compared with before (6.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 1.4 vs 8.6 ± 1.2, 7.9 ± 1.6, Z value was -3.843, -3.940, both P < 0.05). Five children (5%) experienced local adverse events and 2 children (2%) experienced mild systemic adverse events. No severe adverse events happened during the treatment. SLIT with Dermatophagoides farinae drops is an efficient and safe treatment for children with HDM-induced AR. Its onset of action can be observed as early as 3 months after treatment.

  18. Clinical and immunological responses of dust mite sensitive, atopic dogs to treatment with sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Douglas J; Verbrugge, Maria; Morris, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been reported to be beneficial in people with atopic dermatitis (AD) and dust mite sensitivity. Evaluation of this therapy has not been reported in spontaneous canine AD. The objective of this study was to preliminarily evaluate the effectiveness of an established SLIT protocol, as used in human patients, in dogs with AD. Ten dust mite sensitive dogs with spontaneous AD. Dogs underwent a 6 month open trial of SLIT concurrently with decreasing dose oral methylprednisolone. Clinical evaluations and quantitative serum anti-mite IgE and IgG levels were performed every 2 months. Mean methylprednisolone use from the first 2 months of the study to the final 2 months declined from 10.2 to 4.3 mg/kg/2 months (P test); at 6 months, four dogs required no oral corticosteroid administration. Over the course of the study, median Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI)-03 scores declined from 76.5 to 59; median pruritus scores declined from 65 to 37 (P Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Pre- and post-SLIT intradermal test scores for mite allergen were not significantly different over time. Median Dermatophagoides farinae (DF)-specific IgE levels declined significantly from 150.2 × 10(3) AU/mL to 3.6 × 10(3) AU/mL (P Wilcoxon signed-rank tests). SLIT treatment produced clinical improvement in dogs with dust mite-associated AD and was associated with serological changes supporting this improvement. Further studies in larger numbers of dogs and those with polysensitization are warranted. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  19. Effects of three antagonists on selected pharmacodynamic effects of sublingually administered detomidine in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    To describe the effects of alpha2 -adrenergic receptor antagonists on the pharmacodynamics of sublingual (SL) detomidine in the horse. Randomized crossover design. Nine healthy adult horses with an average age of 7.6 ± 6.5 years. Four treatment groups were studied: 1) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL; 2) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 0.075 mg kg(-1) yohimbine intravenously (IV); 3) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 4 mg kg(-1) tolazoline IV; and 4) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 0.12 mg kg(-1) atipamezole IV. Each horse received all treatments with a minimum of 1 week between treatments. Blood samples were obtained and plasma analyzed for yohimbine, atipamezole and tolazoline concentrations by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Behavioral effects, heart rate and rhythm, glucose, packed cell volume (PCV) and plasma proteins were monitored. Chin-to-ground distance increased following administration of the antagonists, however, this effect was transient, with a return to pre-reversal values as early as 1 hour. Detomidine induced bradycardia and increased incidence of atrioventricular blocks were either transiently or incompletely antagonized by all antagonists. PCV and glucose concentrations increased with tolazoline administration, and atipamezole subjectively increased urination frequency but not volume. At the doses administered in this study, the alpha2 -adrenergic antagonistic effects of tolazoline, yohimbine and atipamezole on cardiac and behavioral effects elicited by SL administration of detomidine are transient and incomplete. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  20. Real-life compliance and persistence among users of subcutaneous and sublingual allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Menno A; Röder, Esther; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Al, Maiwenn J; Hop, Wim C J; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2013-08-01

    Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) are safe and effective treatments of allergic rhinitis, but high levels of compliance and persistence are crucial to achieving the desired clinical effects. Our objective was to assess levels and predictors of compliance and persistence among grass pollen, tree pollen, and house dust mite immunotherapy users in real life and to estimate the costs of premature discontinuation. We performed a retrospective analysis of a community pharmacy database from The Netherlands containing data from 6486 patients starting immunotherapy for 1 or more of the allergens of interest between 1994 and 2009. Two thousand seven hundred ninety-six patients received SCIT, and 3690 received SLIT. Time to treatment discontinuation was analyzed and included Cox proportional hazard models with time-dependent covariates, where appropriate. Overall, only 18% of users reached the minimally required duration of treatment of 3 years (SCIT, 23%; SLIT, 7%). Median durations for SCIT and SLIT users were 1.7 and 0.6 years, respectively (P < .001). Other independent predictors of premature discontinuation were prescriber, with patients of general practitioners demonstrating longer persistence than those of allergologists and other medical specialists; single-allergen immunotherapy, lower socioeconomic status; and younger age. Of the persistent patients, 56% were never late in picking up their medication from the pharmacy. Direct medication costs per nonpersistent patient discontinuing in the third year of treatment were €3800, an amount that was largely misspent. Real-life persistence is better in SCIT users than in SLIT users, although it is low overall. There is an urgent need for further identification of potential barriers and measures that will enhance persistence and compliance. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sublingual immunotherapy for peanut allergy: clinical and immunologic evidence of desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edwin H; Bird, J Andrew; Kulis, Michael; Laubach, Susan; Pons, Laurent; Shreffler, Wayne; Steele, Pamela; Kamilaris, Janet; Vickery, Brian; Burks, A Wesley

    2011-03-01

    There are no treatments currently available for peanut allergy. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a novel approach to the treatment of peanut allergy. We sought to investigate the safety, clinical effectiveness, and immunologic changes with SLIT in children with peanut allergy. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study subjects underwent 6 months of dose escalation and 6 months of maintenance dosing followed by a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. Eighteen children aged 1 to 11 years completed 12 months of dosing and the food challenge. Dosing side effects were primarily oropharyngeal and uncommonly required treatment. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, the treatment group safely ingested 20 times more peanut protein than the placebo group (median, 1,710 vs 85 mg; P = .011). Mechanistic studies demonstrated a decrease in skin prick test wheal size (P = .020) and decreased basophil responsiveness after stimulation with 10(-2) μg/mL (P = .009) and 10(-3) μg/mL (P = .009) of peanut. Peanut-specific IgE levels increased over the initial 4 months (P = .002) and then steadily decreased over the remaining 8 months (P = .003), whereas peanut-specific IgG4 levels increased during the 12 months (P = .014). Lastly, IL-5 levels decreased after 12 months (P = .015). No statistically significant changes were found in IL-13 levels, the percentage of regulatory T cells, or IL-10 and IFN-γ production. Peanut SLIT is able to safely induce clinical desensitization in children with peanut allergy, with evidence of immunologic changes suggesting a significant change in the allergic response. Further study is required to determine whether continued peanut SLIT is able to induce long-term immune tolerance. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Can a Positive Allosteric Modulation of GABAergic Receptors Improve Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease? The Potential Role of Zolpidem in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias. Since a high density of zolpidem binding sites is in the two main output structures of the basal ganglia which are abnormally overactive in PD (internal globus pallidus, GPi, and substantia nigra pars reticulata, SNr, it was hypothesized that in PD patients zolpidem may induce through GABAA receptors an inhibition of GPi and SNr (and, possibly, of the subthalamic nucleus also, resulting in an increased activity of motor cortical areas (such as supplementary motor area, which may give rise to improvement of motor symptoms of PD. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of zolpidem in treating motor symptoms of PD.

  3. Zolpidem, a clinical hypnotic that affects electronic transfer, alters synaptic activity through potential GABA receptors in the nervous system without significant free radical generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem (trade name Ambien) has attracted much interest as a sleep-inducing agent and also in research. Attention has been centered mainly on receptor binding and electrochemistry in the central nervous system which are briefly addressed herein. A novel integrated approach to mode of action is presented. The pathways to be discussed involve basicity, reduction potential, electrostatics, cell signaling, GABA receptor binding, electron transfer (ET), pharmacodynamics, structure activity relationships (SAR) and side effects. The highly conjugated pyridinium salt formed by protonation of the amidine moiety is proposed to be the active form acting as an ET agent. Extrapolation of reduction potentials for related compounds supports the premise that zolpidem may act as an ET species in vivo. From recent literature reports, electrostatics is believed to play a significant role in drug action. The pyridinium cation displays molecular electrostatic potential which may well play a role energetically or as a bridging mechanism. An SAR analysis points to analogy with other physiologically active xenobiotics, namely benzodiazepines and paraquat in the conjugated iminium category. Inactivity of metabolites indicates that the parent is the active form of zolpidem. Absence of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress is in line with minor side effects. In contrast, generally, the prior literature contains essentially no discussion of these fundamental biochemical relationships. Pharmacodynamics may play an important role. Concerning behavior at the blood-brain barrier, useful insight can be gained from investigations of the related cationic anesthetics that are structurally related to acetyl choline. Evidently, the neutral form of the drug penetrates the neuronal membrane, with the salt form operating at the receptor. The pathways of zolpidem have several clinical implications since the agent affects sedation, electroencephalographic activity, oxidative metabolites and

  4. Study of complex equilibria in niobium(V) and vanadium(V) systems with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol, tartrate and hydrogen peroxide using RP-HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oszwaldowski, S.; Jarosz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Complex equilibria in multiligand niobium(V) systems with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridilazo)-5-diethyl aminophenol (5-Br-PADAP), tartrate and hydrogen peroxide and vanadium(V) with 5-Br-PADP and tartrate were evaluated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using C 18 column and VIS detection at 590 nm. In Nb(V)-H 2 O 2 -tartrate-(5-Br P ADAP) system formation of multiligand niobium complex, non-reactive towards 5-Br-PADAP, was postulated. For V(V) system distribution of metal ion between V(V)-(5-Br-PADAP) binary and V(V)-tartrate-(5-Br-PADAP) ternary complexes were evaluated. On this base it was proved, that coloured ternary vanadium complex is only an intermediate stage in the formation of stable V(V)-tartrate binary complex. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs

  5. Studies of the labelling of human serum albumin with 99mTc using Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl2 as reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kolaly, M.T.; El-Asrag, H.A.; El-Wetery, A.S.; El-Mohty, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the effect of Sn(II) tartrate and Sn(II)Cl 2 on the labelling efficiency and tissue distribution of 99m Tc-human serum albumin. The effect of reductant content, reaction time (incubation time), albumin content, pH, and ascorbic acid on the efficiency of labelling and the tissue distribution of the labelled albumin has been investigated. The percentage of labelling was determined by paper and thin layer radiochromatography. Ascorbic acid shows no effect on either labelling efficiency or tissue distribution of 99m Tc-HSA prepared by Sn(II) tartrate or Sn(II)Cl 2 . (author)

  6. Social Media Impact of the Food and Drug Administration's Drug Safety Communication Messaging About Zolpidem: Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Michael S; Freifeld, Clark C; Brownstein, John S; Donneyong, Macarius M; Rausch, Paula; Lappin, Brian M; Zhou, Esther H; Dal Pan, Gerald J; Pawar, Ajinkya M; Hwang, Thomas J; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2018-01-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues drug safety communications (DSCs) to health care professionals, patients, and the public when safety issues emerge related to FDA-approved drug products. These safety messages are disseminated through social media to ensure broad uptake. The objective of this study was to assess the social media dissemination of 2 DSCs released in 2013 for the sleep aid zolpidem. We used the MedWatcher Social program and the DataSift historic query tool to aggregate Twitter and Facebook posts from October 1, 2012 through August 31, 2013, a period beginning approximately 3 months before the first DSC and ending 3 months after the second. Posts were categorized as (1) junk, (2) mention, and (3) adverse event (AE) based on a score between -0.2 (completely unrelated) to 1 (perfectly related). We also looked at Google Trends data and Wikipedia edits for the same time period. Google Trends search volume is scaled on a range of 0 to 100 and includes "Related queries" during the relevant time periods. An interrupted time series (ITS) analysis assessed the impact of DSCs on the counts of posts with specific mention of zolpidem-containing products. Chow tests for known structural breaks were conducted on data from Twitter, Facebook, and Google Trends. Finally, Wikipedia edits were pulled from the website's editorial history, which lists all revisions to a given page and the editor's identity. In total, 174,286 Twitter posts and 59,641 Facebook posts met entry criteria. Of those, 16.63% (28,989/174,286) of Twitter posts and 25.91% (15,453/59,641) of Facebook posts were labeled as junk and excluded. AEs and mentions represented 9.21% (16,051/174,286) and 74.16% (129,246/174,286) of Twitter posts and 5.11% (3,050/59,641) and 68.98% (41,138/59,641) of Facebook posts, respectively. Total daily counts of posts about zolpidem-containing products increased on Twitter and Facebook on the day of the first DSC; Google searches increased on the week of the

  7. Miniaturized membrane sensors for potentiometric determination of metoprolol tartrate and hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Nesrin K; Mohamed, Heba M; Mostafa, Azza A

    2012-06-01

    Four microsized graphite and platinum wire poly(vinyl chloride) matrix membrane electrodes responsive to some drugs affecting cardiovascular system, Metoprolol tartrate (MT) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HZ) were developed, described and characterized. These sensors were constructed by using (2-Hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (2HP β-CD) as an ionophore which has a significant influence on increasing both membrane sensitivity and selectivity. The four sensors were fabricated in a polymeric matrix of carboxylated polyvinyl chloride (PVC-COOH) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) as a plasticizer, based on the interaction between the drugs and the dissociated COOH groups in the PVC-COOH. Fast and stable Nernstian responses of 1.0 × 10-6-1.0 × 10-2 M for MT (sensors 1 and 2) and of 1.0 × 10-7-1.0 × 10-3 M for HZ (sensors 3 and 4) over pH range 3.0-9.0 and 3.0-7.0 for the MT and HZ sensors respectively were obtained. Nernstian slopes of 56.2, 54.6, 19.0 and 20.8 mV/decade for electrodes 1-4 respectively were observed. The proposed method displayed useful analytical characteristics for the determination of MT and HZ in their pure powder forms with average recoveries of 99.11 ± 0.357, 99.21 ± 0.389, 100.08 ± 0.459 and 100.28 ± 0.438% for sensors 1-4 respectively. The lower limit of detection (LOD) were 5.5 × 10-6, 4.5 × 10-6, 4.8 × 10-8 and 5.0 × 10-8 M for sensors 1-4 respectively indicated high sensitivity. The four sensors displayed a good stability over a period of 6 weeks. The selectivity coefficients of the developed sensors indicated excellent selectivity. Results obtained by the four electrodes revealed the performance characteristics of these electrodes which evaluated according to IUPAC recommendations. The method was successively applied for the determination of MT and HZ in presence of each other, in presence of Salamide (SA), the main degradation product of HZ, in their pharmaceutical formulations and in human plasma samples. Statistical comparison between the

  8. Evaluation of Anti-Trichinella spiralis Obtained by Sublingual and Conventional Immunizations with the 45kDa Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Chávez Ruvalcaba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease produced mainly by the consumption of poorly cooked swine meat. Several studies have probed the efficiency of immunotherapy as a method for the treatment of trichinellosis. In this work, a 45 kDa immunodominant antigen was characterized, and the presence of IgA, IgM and IgG anti-Trichinella spiralis antibodies was evaluated during the course of the infection. In addition, the differences between sublingual and parenteral administration of the 45 kDa T. spiralis antigen were determined. Long Evans rats were used both to purify the 45 kDa antigen and to evaluate the immune response produced in six different groups: healthy and infected controls; two groups of immunized murines (sublingually and parenterally with 4 doses of the 45 kDa T. spiralis immunogen administered at days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and challenged with 500 T. spiralis infective larvae (IL 7 days after the last immunization; and finally, two groups of murines infected with 500 IL of T. spiralis, immunized at week 4 post infection by the same two routes. The humoral response was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence by confocal microscopyin order to determine the presence of IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies.

  9. A 12-week DBPC dose-finding study with sublingual monomeric allergoid tablets in house dust mite-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, C; Dieterich, P; Singh, J; Shah-Hosseini, K; Allekotte, S; Lehmacher, W; Compalati, E; Mösges, R

    2017-01-01

    In sublingual immunotherapy, optimal doses are a key factor for therapeutic outcomes. The aim of this study with tablets containing carbamylated monomeric house dust mite allergoids was to determine the most effective and safe dose. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled dose-finding study, 131 patients with house dust mite-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were randomized to 12-week treatments with 300 UA/day, 1000 UA/day, 2000 UA/day, 3000 UA/day or placebo. Conjunctival provocation tests (CPT) were performed before, during and after treatment. The change in mean allergic severity (primary endpoint), calculated from the severity of the CPT reaction, and the proportion of patients with an improved CPT threshold (secondary endpoint) determined the treatment effect. The mean allergic severity decreased in all groups, including the placebo group. It was lower in all active treatment groups (300 UA/day: 0.14, 1000 UA/day: 0.15, 2000 UA/day: 0.10, 3000 UA/day: 0.15) than in the placebo group (0.30). However, this difference was not statistically significant (P allergoid sublingual tablets is well tolerated and reduces the CPT reaction in house dust mite-allergic patients. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT – indications, mechanism, and efficacy Position paper prepared by the Section of Immunotherapy, Polish Society of Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jutel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SLIT ( sublingual immunotherapy induces allergen-specific immune tolerance by sublingual administration of a gradually increasing dose of an allergen. The mechanism of SLIT is comparable to those during SCIT (subcutaneous immunotherapy, with the exception of local oral dendritic cells, pre-programmed to elicit tolerance. In the SLIT dose, to achieve the same efficacy as in SCIT, it should be 50–100 times higher with better safety profile. The highest quality evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT lasting 1 – 3 years has been provided by the large scale double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC trials for grass pollen extracts, both in children and adults with allergic rhinitis. Current indications for SLIT are allergic rhinitis (and conjunctivitis in both children and adults sensitized to pollen allergens (trees, grass, Parietaria , house dust mites ( Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae , cat fur, as well as mild to moderate controlled atopic asthma in children sensitized to house dust mites. There are positive findings for both asthma and new sensitization prevention. Severe adverse events, including anaphylaxis, are very rare, and no fatalities have been reported. Local adverse reactions develop in up to 70 – 80% of patients. Risk factors for SLIT adverse events have not been clearly identified. Risk factors of non-adherence to treatment might be dependent on the patient, disease treatment, physician-patient relationship, and variables in the health care system organization.

  11. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  12. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  13. Pharmacokinetics of a Prototype Formulation of Sublingual Testosterone and a Buspirone Tablet, Versus an Advanced Combination Tablet of Testosterone and Buspirone in Healthy Premenopausal Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, Kim; De Leede, Leo; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Bloemers, Jos; Poels, Saskia; Koppeschaar, Hans; Olivier, Berend; Tuiten, Adriaan

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the kinetics of two novel combination drug products for Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder (FSIAD). Thirteen women received testosterone via the sublingual route followed 2.5 hours later by a buspirone tablet, versus a single combination tablet swallowed at once. The

  14. Deposition of a model substance, Tc E-HIDA, in the oral cavity after administration of lozenges, chewing gum and sublingual tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Davis, S.S.; Melia, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The deposition and clearance of a model substance, Tc E-HIDA, in the oral cavity/upper oesophagus and in the stomach after administration of lozenges, chewing gum and sublingual tablets has been followed by gamma scintigraphy in a group of healthy male volunteers. Following administration...

  15. Pharmacokinetics and safety of fentanyl sublingual spray and fentanyl citrate intravenous: a single ascending dose study in opioid-naïve healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard; Oh, D Alexander; Parikh, Neha; Koch, Christian; Singla, Neil; Yu, Jin; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2017-11-01

    Fentanyl sublingual spray offers rapid pain relief in opioid-tolerant cancer patients, and may be useful in acute or post-operative pain. Both opioid-naïve and non-tolerant patients are likely to receive opioids in these settings. Understanding the relationship between systemic exposure of fentanyl sublingual spray and effects on respiratory function in opioid-naïve or non-tolerant populations is important to ensure patient safety. This study evaluated single-dose fentanyl sublingual spray in opioid-naïve participants. Participants were randomized to receive single-dose fentanyl sublingual spray (100, 200, 400, 600, 800 mcg) or fentanyl citrate IV in one of five cohorts. Dosing occurred following a 10-h fast, with fasting continuing for 4 h post-dose. Dose proportionality was assessed using analysis of variance and linear regression techniques. PK assessments and safety monitoring were performed through 24 h post-dose. Safety assessments, including adverse event (AE) monitoring, occurred from dosing through Day 7. Fifty participants (19-53 years) received fentanyl sublingual spray or fentanyl citrate IV. Mean maximum plasma concentrations were reached between 0.27-0.60 h post-dose for fentanyl sublingual spray. Peak (C max ) and total (AUC 0- t , AUC 0-∞ ) fentanyl exposures increased in a linear, but more than dose-proportional manner, with higher doses. The most common AEs were somnolence, nausea, and vomiting. All AEs were mild or moderate in severity. Doses at 400, 600, and 800 mcg were associated with nausea and vomiting, requiring pharmacologic intervention. Hypoxia episodes requiring nasal cannula oxygenation were observed with 600mcg and 800mcg doses. Overall, single-dose fentanyl sublingual spray (100-800 mcg) was generally well tolerated, with greater incidences of AEs (e.g. nausea, vomiting, hypoxia) at higher doses. Doses up to 200 mcg may be safely administered to healthy opioid-naïve individuals with routine monitoring; doses

  16. Sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy: patient adherence at a large German allergy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemberg M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Luise Lemberg,1 Till Berk,2 Kija Shah-Hosseini,1 Elena-Manja Kasche,1,3 Ralph Mösges1 1Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Center for Dermatology, Specific Allergology and Environmental Medicine, Hamburg, Germany Background: Many placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy (AIT is an effective therapy for treating allergies. Both commonly used routes, subcutaneous (SCIT and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT, require high patient adherence to be successful. In the literature, numbers describing adherence vary widely; this investigation compares these two routes of therapy directly.Methods: All data were retrieved from the patient data management system of a center for dermatology, specific allergology, and environmental medicine in Germany. All 330 patients (aged 13–89 years included in this study had commenced AIT between 2003 and 2011, thus allowing a full 3-year AIT cycle to be considered for each investigated patient.Results: In this specific center, SCIT was prescribed to 62.7% and SLIT to 37.3% of all included patients. The total dropout rate of the whole patient cohort was 34.8%. Overall, SLIT patients showed a higher dropout rate (39.0% than did SCIT patients (32.4%; however, the difference between these groups was not significant. Also, no significant difference between the overall dropout rates for men and for women was observed. A Kaplan–Meier curve of the patient collective showed a remarkably high dropout rate for the first year of therapy.Conclusion: The analysis presented in this single-center study shows that most patients who discontinue AIT do so during the first year of therapy. Patients seem likely to finish the 3-year therapy cycle if they manage to adhere to treatment throughout the first year. Strategies for preventing

  17. Synthesis of a Parkinson's Disease Treatment Drug, the "R,R"-Tartrate Salt "of R"-Rasagiline: A Three Week Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Noberto; Garcia, Billy; Cunningham, Mark; David, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    A synthesis of the "R,R"-tartrate salt of the popular anti-Parkinson's drug "R"-rasagiline (Azilect) was adapted to introduce the organic laboratory student to a medically relevant synthesis. It makes use of concepts found in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum, appropriately fits into three approximately 4 h lab…

  18. Radical distributions in ammonium tartrate single crystals exposed to photon and neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrale, M.; Longo, A.; Brai, M.; Barbon, A.; Brustolon, M.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation therapy carried out by means of heavy charged particles (such as carbon ions) and neutrons is rapidly becoming widespread worldwide. The success of these radiation therapies relies on the high density of energy released by these particles or by secondary particles produced after primary interaction with matter. The biological damages produced by ionising radiations in tissues and cells depend more properly on the energy released per unit pathlength, which is the linear energy transfer and which determines the radiation quality. To improve the therapy effectiveness, it is necessary to grasp the mechanisms of free radical production and distribution after irradiation with these particles when compared with the photon beams. In this work some preliminary results on the analysis of the spatial distributions of the free radicals produced after exposure of ammonium tartrate crystals to various radiation beams ( 60 Co gamma photons and thermal neutrons) were reported. Electron spin resonance analyses were performed by the electron spin echo technique, which allows the determination of local spin concentrations and by double electron-electron resonance technique, which is able to measure the spatial distance distribution (range 1.5-8 nm) among pairs of radicals in solids. The results of these analyses are discussed on the basis of the different distributions of free radicals produced by the two different radiation beams used. This paper extends to the single crystal case, a similar work done on AT powder irradiated with different beams, with assessment of microscopic radical concentration by determining the amount of ID contribution and obtaining the inter-radical distance distributions by double microwave irradiation. In this paper single crystals of AT have been exposed to 60 Co photons and neutrons. The results confirm that advanced pulse EPR techniques allow the direct measurement of the local free radical concentration and provide information about the

  19. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist AZD7371 tartrate monohydrate (robalzotan tartrate monohydrate) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossman, Douglas A; Danilewitz, Mervyn; Naesdal, Jørgen; Hwang, Clara; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of the 5-hydroxytrypamine 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor antagonist AZD7371 tartrate monohydrate (robalzotan tartrate monohydrate), termed AZD7371 here, in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients meeting the Rome II criteria for IBS (N = 402) were randomized to treatment with AZD7371 20 mg or 5 mg or matching placebo tablets twice daily for 12 wk. The patients completed daily and weekly diary assessments, reporting abdominal discomfort or pain and description of bowel movements. They also completed validated symptom and quality-of-life questionnaires. Neither AZD7371 regimen was significantly more effective than placebo in providing adequate relief from IBS symptoms in at least 2 out of 4 wk per month over the 12 wk of treatment. There was also no significant difference between the treatment groups and placebo in the change in score in the validated symptom and quality-of-life questionnaires. Overall, 22.1% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs) attributed to the study medication: 44 of 133 (33.1%) in the 20 mg AZD7371 group, 27 of 131 (20.6%) in the 5 mg AZD7371 group, and 17 of 134 (12.7%) in the placebo group. Also, 31 of 57 (54%) of AEs leading to discontinuation were central nervous system-related. Hallucinations or hallucination-like AEs were reported by eight patients taking AZD7371, and by none of the patients in the placebo group. After these events led to discontinuation in six patients, the study was prematurely terminated. In view of the AE profile and lack of efficacy in IBS, the clinical development of AZD7371 has been stopped.

  20. Enantioseparation of Racemic Flurbiprofen by Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction With Binary Chiral Selectors of L-dioctyl Tartrate and L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liping; Fan, Huajun; Wan, Qiang; Wu, Xuehao; Tang, Xunyou; Tang, James Z

    2015-09-01

    A novel method for chiral separation of flurbiprofen enantiomers was developed using aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) coupled with biphasic recognition chiral extraction (BRCE). An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was used as an extracting solvent which was composed of ethanol (35.0% w/w) and ammonium sulfate (18.0% w/w). The chiral selectors in ATPS for BRCE consideration were L-dioctyl tartrate and L-tryptophan, which were screened from amino acids, β-cyclodextrin derivatives, and L-tartrate esters. Factors such as the amounts of L-dioctyl tartrate and L-tryptophan, pH, flurbiprofen concentration, and the operation temperature were investigated in terms of chiral separation of flurbiprofen enantiomers. The optimum conditions were as follows: L-dioctyl tartrate, 80 mg; L-tryptophan, 40 mg; pH, 4.0; flurbiprofen concentration, 0.10 mmol/L; and temperature, 25 °C. The maximum separation factor α for flurbiprofen enantiomers could reach 2.34. The mechanism of chiral separation of flurbiprofen enantiomers is discussed and studied. The results showed that synergistic extraction has been established by L-dioctyl tartrate and L-tryptophan, which enantioselectively recognized R- and S-enantiomers in top and bottom phases, respectively. Compared to conventional liquid-liquid extraction, ATPE coupled with BRCE possessed higher separation efficiency and enantioselectivity without the use of any other organic solvents. The proposed method is a potential and powerful alternative to conventional extraction for separation of various enantiomers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Baixa dose de misoprostol sublingual (12,5 µg para indução do parto Low dose of sublingual misoprostol (12.5 µg for labor induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Sofia de Moraes Barros Gattás

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os resultados maternos e perinatais utilizando 12,5 µg de misoprostol sublingual para indução do parto em gestantes com feto vivo a termo. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se um estudo multicêntrico, tipo ensaio clínico, aberto e não randomizado, no período de julho a dezembro de 2009. Foram incluídas 30 gestantes com indicação de indução do parto, a termo, feto vivo, escore de Bishop menor ou igual a seis, apresentação cefálica, peso fetal estimado menor que 4.000 g e índice de líquido amniótico maior que cinco. Foram excluídas mulheres com cicatriz uterina, alteração da vitalidade fetal, anomalias congênitas, gestação múltipla, restrição de crescimento intrauterino, hemorragia genital e contraindicações ao parto vaginal. O comprimido de misoprostol sublingual 12,5 µg foi administrado a cada seis horas, até o início do trabalho de parto, máximo de oito doses. RESULTADOS: O trabalho de parto foi induzido satisfatoriamente em 90% das gestantes. As médias dos intervalos entre a primeira dose e o início das contrações uterinas e o parto foram de 14,3±11,7 horas e 25,4±13 horas, respectivamente. A frequência de parto vaginal foi de 60%. A taquissistolia ocorreu em duas gestantes, sendo revertida em ambos os casos sem necessitar de cesariana. A eliminação de mecônio foi observada em quatro pacientes e o escore de Apgar foi menor que sete no quinto minuto em um recém-nascido. CONCLUSÃO: Os desfechos maternos e perinatais foram favoráveis depois da indução do parto com misoprostol sublingual na dose de 12,5 µg a cada seis horas. No entanto, são necessários ensaios clínicos controlados comparando esse esquema posológico com outras doses e vias de administraçãoPURPOSE: To describe the maternal and perinatal outcomes after the use of 12.5 µg of sublingual misoprostol for labor induction in women with term pregnancy and a live fetus. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, open and non

  2. Case report of unexpected gastrointestinal involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease: comparison of eliglustat tartrate treatment and enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Su Bum; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-05-15

    Gastrointestinal involvement in Gaucher disease is very rare, and appears to be unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Here, we describe identical twin, splenectomized, non-neuronopathic Gaucher patients on long-term ERT for 9 years, who complained of epigastric discomfort due to Gaucher cell infiltration of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Rare compound heterozygous mutations (p.Arg48Trp and p.Arg257Gln) of the GBA gene were found in both. Improvement in the gastroduodenal infiltration and reduced chitotriosidase levels were observed in one who switched to eliglustat tartrate for 1 year, whereas the other one who maintained ERT showed no improvement of chitotriosidase level and persistent duodenal lesions. This shows that eliglustat might be an effective treatment for Gaucher disease patients having lesions resistant to ERT.

  3. Determination of lead in water by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a nickel(II)-ammonium tartrate modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekerka, I.; Lechner, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of low concentrations of lead in water samples. Atomic absorption spectrometry is used with a tungsten ribbon furnace and Zeeman background correction. Interferences are eliminated by the addition of ammonium tartrate and nickel(II) nitrate to the samples to act as a matrix modifier and adjust the pH. The results show the superior performance of this modifier over other types used conventionally. The detection limit is 1 μg l -1 relative standard deviation of -1 can be obtained. The instrumentation is simple and the method is efficient for the determination of lead in various water samples. 25 refs.; 7 figs.; 6 tabs

  4. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of metoprolol tartrate and ramipril in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, K Veeran; Mandal, Uttam; Senthamil Selvan, P; Sam Solomon, W D; Ghosh, Animesh; Sarkar, Amlan Kanti; Agarwal, Sangita; Nageswar Rao, T; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2007-10-15

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of metoprolol tartrate (MT) and ramipril, in human plasma. Both the drugs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with diethyl ether-dichloromethane (70:30, v/v). The chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed-phase C8 column with a mobile phase of 10 mM ammonium formate-methanol (3:97, v/v). The protonated analyte was quantitated in positive ionization by multiple reaction monitoring with a mass spectrometer. The method was validated over the concentration range of 5-500 ng/ml for metoprolol and ramipril in human plasma. The precursor to product ion transitions of m/z 268.0-103.10 and m/z 417.20-117.20 were used to measure metoprolol and ramipril, respectively.

  5. The influence of Metolose structure on the free volume and the consequent metoprolol tartrate release of patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, József; Marton, Sylvia; Süvegh, Károly; Zelkó, Romána

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-type patches containing Metoprolol tartrate were prepared from two types of Metolose and acrylate polymers. Metolose SM 4000 and Metolose 90SH 100.000SR were applied in different proportions in the patches where the total polymer content was kept constant in each sample. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of Metolose structure on the free volume of the patches and the consequent drug release profile. The drug release profiles were characterized by zero-order and first-order models. The results indicate that Metolose, containing hydroxypropyl ether groups and methyl ether groups, enables the formation of H-bonds, thus increasing the free volume holes and the consequent extent and rate of drug release of patches.

  6. Safety of sublingual immunotherapy Timothy grass tablet in subjects with allergic rhinitis with or without conjunctivitis and history of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maloney, J; Durham, S; Skoner, D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with asthma may be more susceptible to adverse events (AEs) with sublingual immunotherapy tablet (SLIT-tablet) treatment, such as severe systemic reactions and asthma-related events. Using data from eight trials of grass SLIT-tablet in subjects with allergic rhinitis with....../without conjunctivitis (AR/C), AE frequencies were determined in adults and children with and without reported asthma. METHODS: Data from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of Timothy grass SLIT-tablet MK-7243 (2800 BAU/75 000 SQ-T, Merck/ALK-Abelló) were pooled for post hoc analyses. Subjects...... with asthma treated with grass SLIT-tablet versus subjects without asthma in or outside of pollen season. There were 6/120 asthma-related TRAEs assessed as severe with grass SLIT-tablet and 2/60 with placebo, without a consistent trend among subjects with and without asthma (5 and 3 events, respectively...

  7. Phenotype and cell proliferation activity of duct-like structures in human sublingual glands: a histological and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen de Souza TOLENTINO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several age-related microscopic changes in the salivary glands, including the increase in the number of duct-like structures (DLS. However, the true origin and the phenotype of the DLS are not known. Objective To evaluate the phenotype and the cell proliferation index of the DLS of human sublingual glands. Material and Methods Sixty sublingual glands obtained from human cadavers were divided into two groups - 0-30 and 61-90 years old. The phenotype was estimated by immunostaining for cytokeratin 19 (CK 19 and the S-100 protein as well as by the presence of mucin and glycogen. The cell proliferation index was determined by the Ki-67 antibody. The histochemical techniques used periodic acid-Schiff (PAS and Alcian Blue. In each captured microscopic field, the DLS were counted to establish a percentage for the staining profile. The statistical analysis was accomplished using Student's t-test, the Mann-Whitney test and Pearson's correlation coefficient (p<0.05. Results Comparing both groups, only CK 19 showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.033, with the strongest expression in the elderly group. There was no significant difference between PAS and Alcian Blue (p=0.270. In both groups, the immunostaining for CK 19 was stronger than that for S-100 (p=0.004;p<0.001, but there was no correlation between the two immunomarkers (ρ=-0.163; p=0.315. There was no immunostaining for Ki-67. Conclusions DLS demonstrate a ductal phenotypic profile and do not present cell proliferation activity. DLS may represent a regressive process arising from acini or represent the result of metaplasia.

  8. Sublingual misoprostol versus standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in five sub-Saharan African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shochet Tara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low-resource settings, where abortion is highly restricted and self-induced abortions are common, access to post-abortion care (PAC services, especially treatment of incomplete terminations, is a priority. Standard post-abortion care has involved surgical intervention but can be hard to access in these areas. Misoprostol provides an alternative to surgical intervention that could increase access to abortion care. We sought to gather additional evidence regarding the efficacy of 400 mcg of sublingual misoprostol vs. standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in the environments where need for economical non-surgical treatments may be most useful. Methods A total of 860 women received either sublingual misoprostol or standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in a multi-site randomized trial. Women with confirmed incomplete abortion, defined as past or present history of vaginal bleeding during pregnancy and an open cervical os, were eligible to participate. Participants returned for follow-up one week later to confirm clinical status. If abortion was incomplete at that time, women were offered an additional follow-up visit or immediate surgical evacuation. Results Both misoprostol and surgical evacuation are highly effective treatments for incomplete abortion (misoprostol: 94.4%, surgical: 100.0%. Misoprostol treatment resulted in a somewhat lower chance of success than standard surgical practice (RR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.89-0.92. Both tolerability of side effects and women’s satisfaction were similar in the two study arms. Conclusion Misoprostol, much easier to provide than surgery in low-resource environments, can be used safely, successfully, and satisfactorily for treatment of incomplete abortion. Focus should shift to program implementation, including task-shifting the provision of post-abortion care to mid- and low- level providers, training and assurance of drug availability. Trial

  9. Sublingual immunization with the phosphate-binding-protein (PstS) reduces oral colonization by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, E L; Batista, M T; Cavalcante, R C M; Pegos, V R; Passos, H M; Silva, D A; Balan, A; Ferreira, L C S; Ferreira, R C C

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a crucial role in the physiology and pathogenicity of different bacterial species. Components of ABC transporters have also been tested as target antigens for the development of vaccines against different bacterial species, such as those belonging to the Streptococcus genus. Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries, and previous studies have demonstrated that deletion of the gene encoding PstS, the substrate-binding component of the phosphate uptake system (Pst), reduced the adherence of the bacteria to abiotic surfaces. In the current study, we generated a recombinant form of the S. mutans PstS protein (rPstS) with preserved structural features, and we evaluated the induction of antibody responses in mice after sublingual mucosal immunization with a formulation containing the recombinant protein and an adjuvant derived from the heat-labile toxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Mice immunized with rPstS exhibited systemic and secreted antibody responses, measured by the number of immunoglobulin A-secreting cells in draining lymph nodes. Serum antibodies raised in mice immunized with rPstS interfered with the adhesion of bacteria to the oral cavity of naive mice challenged with S. mutans. Similarly, mice actively immunized with rPstS were partially protected from oral colonization after challenge with the S. mutans NG8 strain. Therefore, our results indicate that S. mutans PstS is a potential target antigen capable of inducing specific and protective antibody responses after sublingual administration. Overall, these observations raise interesting perspectives for the development of vaccines to prevent dental caries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and safety of fentanyl sublingual spray and fentanyl citrate intravenous: a multiple ascending dose study in opioid-naïve healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Oh, D Alexander; Singla, Neil; Koch, Christian; Parikh, Neha; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Wilson, Daniel; Yu, Jin; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2017-11-01

    Fentanyl sublingual spray, with its rapid onset for pain relief, may be efficacious in the management of acute or post-operative pain. Because patients in these settings may be opioid-naïve, the study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administration of fentanyl sublingual spray in an opioid-naïve population. Fentanyl sublingual spray (100 mcg, 200 mcg, and 400 mcg) and fentanyl citrate intravenous (IV; 50 mcg) were administered every 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 h for up to three doses per cohort in opioid-naïve subjects (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02641340). Eight subjects in each cohort were randomly assigned (six subjects received fentanyl sublingual spray; two subjects received fentanyl citrate IV). Pharmacokinetic and safety-related pharmacodynamic assessments were performed through 24 h post-first dose. Safety assessments were collected through Day 7. Ninety-six opioid-naïve subjects, aged 20-55 years, with a body mass index of 18.7-31.5 kg/m 2 , participated in the study. Multiple doses of fentanyl sublingual spray (100, 200, and 400 mcg) were generally well tolerated. Hypoxia, observed in the 200-mcg and 400-mcg dose groups, increased with increasing doses and higher dosing frequency, but was readily managed by nasal cannula oxygenation. Overall, nausea increased with increasing doses, and ∼52.6% (10 out of 19) cases of nausea that occurred at the highest dose of 400 mcg were treated with concomitant medication. Overall, the reported adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of fentanyl. Fentanyl sublingual spray (100 mcg, 200 mg, and 400 mcg) administered every 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h was generally well tolerated in an opioid-naïve population. The results suggest that doses of 200 mcg or lower may be safe for use in an opioid-naïve population.

  11. Zolpidem, a selective GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit agonist, induces comparable Fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and accessory but not supraoptic nuclei in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, Alexander; Søderman, Andreas; Bundzikova, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Functional activation of oxytocinergic (OXY) cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei was investigated in response to acute treatment with Zolpidem (a GABA(A) receptor agonist with selectivity for alpha(1) subunits) utilizing dual Fos/OXY immun...

  12. The effect of X-ray irradiation on the function and saliva composition of rat parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashida, Tatsuo; Kamemoto, Hiromasa; Fuchihata, Hajime; Ooshima, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    Radiation therapy to the head and neck area frequently causes severe salivary gland dysfunction and xerostomia. Morphological studies of irradiated salivary glands have suggested that the submandibular/sublingual gland may be less radiosensitive than the parotid gland. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation on major salivary gland functions in rats with radiation-induced xerostomia. The effect of salivary gland irradiation on salivary function was examined in specific pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were irradiated with a single exposure of either 22 Gy or 32 Gy. Stimulated saliva excretion time was measured for the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands, and the total protein in saliva was analysed. Our results showed that the saliva flow rate and protein concentration of parotid saliva were significantly reduced in the 32 Gy-irradiated rats. (author)

  13. Formulation and Characterization of Fast-Dissolving Sublingual Film of Iloperidone Using Box-Behnken Design for Enhancement of Oral Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhe, Vaishali; Shirsat, Rucha

    2018-04-01

    Iloperidone is a second-generation antipsychotic drug which is used for the treatment of schizophrenia and has very low aqueous solubility and bioavailability. This drug also undergoes first-pass metabolism. The aim of this work is to formulate fast-dissolving sublingual films of iloperidone to improve its bioavailability. Sublingual films were prepared by solvent casting method. Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E5, propylene glycol 400, and transcutol HP were optimized using Box-Behnken three-level statistical design on the basis of disintegration time and folding endurance of films. Iloperidone:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin kneaded complex was used in films instead of plain drug due to its low solubility. Optimized film was further evaluated for drug content, pH, dissolution studies, ex vivo permeation studies, and pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The optimized film disintegrated within 30 s. The in vitro dissolution of the film showed 80.3 ± 3.4% drug dissolved within first 5 min. In ex vivo permeation studies using sublingual tissue, flux achieved within first 15 min by film was around 117.1 ± 0.35 (mcg/cm 2 /h) which was ten times more than that of plain drug. This formulation showed excellent uniformity. AUC and C max of film were significantly higher (p films was 148% when compared to the plain drug. Thus, this study showed optimized fast-dissolving sublingual film to improve permeation and bioavailability of iloperidone. Fast-dissolving films will be customer-friendly approach for geadiatric schizophrenic patients.

  14. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshizawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis.

  15. Transdermal buprenorphine, opioid rotation to sublingual buprenorphine, and the avoidance of precipitated withdrawal: a review of the literature and demonstration in three chronic pain patients treated with butrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Howard; Reetz, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid, used in the United States and abroad for both analgesia and addiction, with unique opioid receptor binding properties. There are several pharmacological features of buprenorphine that make it an emerging option for the long-term treatment of chronic pain-its respiratory suppression ceiling effect, its efficacy in neuropathic pain and hyperalgesic states, and its decreased suppression of the immune and endocrine systems compared with other long-acting opioids. Previous studies have shown that high-dose sublingual buprenorphine is an effective treatment of chronic pain patients not responding to other opioids. Guidelines for the introduction of sublingual buprenorphine, termed buprenorphine induction, include an opioid-free "withdrawal" period of 12-48 hours to avoid an anticipated and accelerated opioid withdrawal, a syndrome described in this article as precipitated withdrawal. The requirement of a period of opioid abstinence before buprenorphine use may present a significant barrier to its adoption for chronic pain. We present a case series of a novel method of sublingual buprenorphine introduction without an induction period, using the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved low-dose transdermal buprenorphine (Butrans; Purdue Pharma L.P.) as a bridge medication. In these cases, buprenorphine was started in opioid-dependent chronic noncancer pain patients who had taken short-acting opioid medications within hours of the initiation of the rotation. This method avoids the painful abstinence period and did not result in precipitated withdrawal or other significant adverse effects.

  16. Development and Characterization of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Furosemide in the Form of a Sublingual Bioadhesive Film to Enhance Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Viviana; Ajovalasit, Alessia; Sutera, Flavia Maria; Murgia, Denise; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Dispenza, Clelia

    2017-06-24

    Administered by an oral route, Furosemide (FUR), a diuretic used in several edematous states and hypertension, presents bioavailability problems, reported as a consequence of an erratic gastrointestinal absorption due to various existing polymorphic forms and low and pH-dependent solubility. A mucoadhesive sublingual fast-dissolving FUR based film has been developed and evaluated in order to optimize the bioavailability of FUR by increasing solubility and guaranteeing a good dissolution reproducibility. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analyses confirmed that the film prepared using the solvent casting method entrapped FUR in the amorphous state. As a solid dispersion, FUR increases its solubility up to 28.36 mg/mL. Drug content, thickness, and weight uniformity of film were also evaluated. The measured Young's Modulus, yield strength, and relative elongation of break percentage (EB%) allowed for the classification of the drug-loaded film as an elastomer. Mucoadhesive strength tests showed that the force to detach film from mucosa grew exponentially with increasing contact time up to 7667 N/m². FUR was quickly discharged from the film following a trend well fitted with the Weibull kinetic model. When applied on sublingual mucosa, the new formulation produced a massive drug flux in the systemic compartment. Overall, the proposed sublingual film enhances drug solubility and absorption, allowing for the prediction of a rapid onset of action and reproducible bioavailability in its clinical application.

  17. LC-MS analysis in the e-beam and gamma radiolysis of metoprolol tartrate in aqueous solution: Structure elucidation and formation mechanism of radiolytic products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slegers, Catherine [Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, Universite Catholique de Louvain, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200, Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: catherine.slegers@skynet.be; Maquille, Aubert [Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, Universite Catholique de Louvain, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200, Brussels (Belgium); Deridder, Veronique [Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, Universite Catholique de Louvain, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200, Brussels (Belgium); Sonveaux, Etienne [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Habib Jiwan, Jean-Louis [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Tilquin, Bernard [Unite d' Analyse Chimique et Physico-chimique des Medicaments, Universite Catholique de Louvain, CHAM 72.30, Avenue E. Mounier, 72, B-1200, Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-09-15

    E-beam and gamma products from the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ({+-})-metoprolol tartrate, saturated in nitrogen, are analyzed by HPLC with on-line mass and UV detectors. The structures of 10 radiolytic products common to e-beam and gamma irradiations are elucidated by comparing their fragmentation pattern to that of ({+-})-metoprolol. Two of the radiolytic products are also metabolites. Different routes for the formation of the radiolytic products are proposed.

  18. LC-MS analysis in the e-beam and gamma radiolysis of metoprolol tartrate in aqueous solution: Structure elucidation and formation mechanism of radiolytic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slegers, Catherine; Maquille, Aubert; Deridder, Veronique; Sonveaux, Etienne; Habib Jiwan, Jean-Louis; Tilquin, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    E-beam and gamma products from the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of (±)-metoprolol tartrate, saturated in nitrogen, are analyzed by HPLC with on-line mass and UV detectors. The structures of 10 radiolytic products common to e-beam and gamma irradiations are elucidated by comparing their fragmentation pattern to that of (±)-metoprolol. Two of the radiolytic products are also metabolites. Different routes for the formation of the radiolytic products are proposed

  19. Efeitos do tartarato de metoprolol em pacientes portadores de insuficiência cardíaca Effects of metoprolol tartrate therapy in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albuquerque de Figueiredo Neto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os efeitos do tartarato de metoprolol em pacientes portadores de insuficiência cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados em estudo prospectivo, 50 pacientes (36 homens com insuficiência cardíaca, classe funcional II a IV, com 52±14,8 anos, e fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo (FEVE 0,05. A freqüência cardíaca apresentou redução de 78,84±batimentos por minuto para 67,48±1,86 batimentos por minuto (pOBJECTIVE: To study the effects of metoprolol tartrate therapy in patients with heart failure. METHODS: Fifty patients (36 males aged 52±14.8 yrs, with functional class II to IV heart failure (HF and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVFE 0.05. Cardiac frequency decreased from 78.84±1.68 to 67.48±1.86 b.p.m. (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The adding of metoprolol tartrate to the usual heart failure therapy is followed by an increase of ejection fraction, functional class improvement, and decrease of ventricular diameters and cardiac frequency. These results suggest anti-remodeling effects in patients with HF who utilize metoprolol tartrate in addition to the usual therapy.

  20. Role of Combining Peripheral with Sublingual Perfusion on Evaluating Microcirculation and Predicting Prognosis in Patients with Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pan; Liu, Da-Wei; Su, Long-Xiang; He, Huai-Wu; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Yu, Chao

    2018-05-20

    Measurement of general microcirculation remains difficult in septic shock patients. The peripheral perfusion index (PI) and sublingual microcirculation monitoring are thought to be possible methods. This study was performed to determine whether assessing microcirculation by PI and a new parameter, proportion of perfusion vessel change rate (△PPV) from sublingual microcirculation monitoring, can be associated with patients' outcome. A prospective observational study was carried out, including 74 patients with septic shock in a mixed intensive care unit. Systemic hemodynamic variables were obtained at T0 and 6 h after (T6). PI and sublingual microcirculation indicators were obtained using a bedside monitor and a sidestream dark-field device, respectively. The t-test, analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the Hanley-McNeil test, survival curves using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test were used to statistical analysis. Systemic hemodynamics and microcirculation data were obtained and analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the first 6 h lactate clearance (LC) was ≥20%; PI and △PPV were lower at T6 in the LC <20% group compared with LC ≥20% (PI: 1.52 [0.89, 1.98] vs. 0.79 [0.44, 1,81], Z = -2.514, P = 0.012; △PPV: 5.9 ± 15.2 vs. 17.9 ± 20.0, t = -2.914, P = 0.005). The cutoff values of PI and △PPV were 1.41% and 12.1%, respectively. The cutoff value of the combined indicators was 1.379 according to logistic regression. Area under the curve demonstrated 0.709 (P < 0.05), and the sensitivity and specificity of using combined indicators were 0.622 and 0.757, respectively. Based on the PI and △PPV cutoff, all the participants were divided into the following groups: (1) high PI and high △PPV group, (2) high PI and low △PPV group, (3) low PI and high △PPV group, and (4) low PI and low △PPV group. The highest Sequential

  1. Correction of vitamin D deficiency using sublingually administered vitamin D2 in a Crohn's disease patient with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Patrick; Heaney, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to be associated with many adverse health problems. Studies have shown that patients with Crohn's disease who have low vitamin D levels have a poorer quality of life than those with more adequate levels. It has also been shown that patients with mal-absorption problems have a difficult time achieving normal vitamin D levels in spite of aggressive supplementation, and that exposure to UVB radiation may be the most effective treatment option for these patients. We present a case in which 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were normalized within 2 weeks in a severely vitamin D deficient patient with Crohn's disease with mal-absorption and a new ileostomy, utilizing sublingually administered vitamin D2. A 58 year-old white female was admitted with a new ileostomy following partial bowel resection due to complications from Crohn's disease. She was found to be severely vitamin D deficient at the time of admission, with a level of 6.1ng/ml on hospital day 3. Her treatment with vitamin D was delayed for a few days. She was initially treated with 5000 units of vitamin D3 orally twice a day for 3days (days 7-10). After discussion with the patient and obtaining her consent, vitamin D3 was stopped, and she was then treated with a total of 8 doses of 50,000 units of vitamin D2 administered sublingually. She was given the first 3 doses on alternating days (days 11, 13, 15), and then 5 more doses on consecutive days (days 17-21). The rise in her 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in response to treatment with sublingual vitamin D2 was significant. On day 10, after receiving 3days of orally administered vitamin D3, her level was 9.8ng/ml. One week later, after receiving 3 sublingual doses of vitamin D2, it rose to 20.3ng/ml. It was then measured on alternating days twice over the next 4days, and it rose to 45.5ng/ml, and then to 47.4ng/ml on the day of discharge to home. The major finding of this study is that sublingual administration of vitamin D2 appears to

  2. Encapsulation and release of the hypnotic agent zolpidem from biodegradable polymer microparticles containing hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Giuseppe; Lopedota, Angela; Boghetich, Giancarlo; Latrofa, Andrea; Franco, Massimo; Sanna, Enrico; Liso, Gaetano

    2003-12-11

    The goal of this study was to design a prolonged release system of the hypnotic agent zolpidem (ZP) useful for the treatment of insomnia. In this work, ZP alone or in the presence of HP-beta-CD was encapsulated in microparticles constituted by poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) and poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and the drug release from these systems was evaluated. ZP alone-loaded microparticles were prepared by the classical O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Conversely, ZP/HP-beta-CD containing microparticles were prepared by the W/O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method following two different procedures (i.e. A and B). Following procedure A, the previously produced ZP/HP-beta-CD solid complex was added to the water phase of primary emulsion. In the procedure B, HP-beta-CD was added to the aqueous phase and ZP to the organic phase. The resulting microparticles were characterized about morphology, size, encapsulation efficiency and release rates. FT-IR, X-ray, and DSC results suggest the drug is in an essentially amorphous state within the microparticles. The release profiles of ZP from microparticles were in general biphasic, being characterized by an initial burst effect and a subsequent slow ZP release. It resulted that co-encapsulating ZP with or without HP-beta-CD in PDLLA and PLGA the drug release from the corresponding microparticles was protracted. Moreover, in a preliminary pharmacological screening, the ataxic activity in rats was investigated and it was found that intragastric administration of the ZP/HP-beta-CD/PLGA microparticles prepared according to procedure B produced the same ataxic induction time as the one induced by the currently used formulation Stilnox. Interestingly moreover, there was a longer ataxic lasting and a lower intensity of ataxia produced by the ZP/HP-beta-CD/PLGA-B-formulation already after 60 min following the administration. However, a need for further pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies resulted to fully evaluate

  3. Effects of daily pyrantel tartrate on strongylid population dynamics and performance parameters of young horses repeatedly infected with cyathostomins and Strongylus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemeyer, C R; Prado, J C; Andersen, U V; Nielsen, M K; Schricker, B; Kennedy, T

    2014-08-29

    Strongylid infections are ubiquitous in grazing horse populations. Infections with cyathostomin (small strongyle) and strongylin (large strongyle) nematodes have long been associated with clinical disease in horses, but little is known about their subclinical impact. A masked, randomized, controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of daily administration of pyrantel tartrate on body condition scores, weight gain, fecal egg counts, and total worm counts of young horses repeatedly inoculated with strongylid larvae. Twenty eight immature horses were treated with larvicidal anthelmintic regimens and randomly allocated to two groups. Group 1 horses were given a pelleted placebo product once daily, and those in Group 2 received pyrantel tartrate once daily at ∼ 2.64 mg/kg body weight. On five days during each week, ∼ 5000 infective cyathostomin larvae were administered to each horse. In addition, horses received ∼ 25 infective Strongylus vulgaris larvae once weekly. Horses were maintained on pasture for 154 days and had ad libitum access to grass hay throughout. At approximate, 14-day intervals, body weights were measured, body condition scores were assigned, fecal samples were collected for egg counts, and blood samples were collected for measurement of S. vulgaris antibodies and various physiologic parameters. After 22 weeks at pasture and 14-17 days in confinement, horses were euthanatized and necropsied. Nematodes were recovered and counted from aliquots of organ contents, representative samples of large intestinal mucosa, and the root of the cranial mesenteric artery. Daily treatment with pyrantel tartrate at the recommended dosage significantly reduced numbers of adult cyathostomins in the gut lumen and early third-stage larvae in the cecal mucosa, increased the proportions of fourth-stage larvae in the gut contents, and was accompanied by significant improvements in body condition scores. Fecal egg counts of horses receiving daily pyrantel

  4. Solving manufacturing problems for L-carnitine-L-tartrate to improve the likelihood of successful product scale-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badawi Aliaa A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available L-carnitine-L-tartrate, a non-essential amino acid, is hygroscopic. This causes a problem in tablet production due to pronounced adhesion of tablets to punches. A 33 full factorial design was adopted to suggest a tablet formulation. Three adsorbents were suggested (Aerosil 200, Aerosil R972, talc to reduce stickiness at three concentrations (1, 3 and 5 %, and three fillers (mannitol, Avicel PH 101, Dibasic calcium phosphate were chosen to prepare 27 formulations. Micromeritic properties of formulations were studied, and tablets were prepared by wet granulation. Absence of picking, sticking or capping, recording of sufficient hardness, acceptable friability and tablet ejection force indicated formulation success. The resulting formulation prepared using Avicel PH 101 and 1 % Aerosil 200 was submitted to further investigation in order to choose the most suitable compression conditions using a 33 full factorial design. Variables included compression force, tableting rate and magnesium stearate (lubricant concentration. The formulation prepared at compression force of 25 kN, using 2 % magnesium stearate, at a production rate of 30 tablets/ minute, was found to be the most appropriate scale up candidate.

  5. The human tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP): involvement of the hemin responsive elements (HRE) in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, E C; Dirks, W G; Drexler, H G

    2000-02-01

    The biochemical properties and protein structure of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), an iron-containing lysosomal glycoprotein in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system, are well known. In contrast, little is known about the physiology and genic structure of this unique enzyme. In some diseases, like hairy cell leukemia, Gaucher's disease and osteoclastoma, cytochemically detected TRAP expression is used as a disease-associated marker. In order to begin to elucidate the regulation of this gene we generated different deletion constructs of the TRAP 5'-flanking region, placed them upstream of the luciferase reporter gene and assayed them for their ability to direct luciferase expression in human 293 cells. Treatment of these cells with the iron-modulating reagents transferrin and hemin causes opposite effects on the TRAP promoter activity. Two regulatory GAGGC tandem repeat sequences (the hemin responsive elements, HRE) within the 5'-flanking region of the human TRAP gene were identified. Studies with specific HRE-deletion constructs of the human TRAP 5'-flanking region upstream of the luciferase reporter gene document the functionality of these HRE-sequences which are apparently responsible for mediating transcriptional inhibition upon exposure to hemin. In addition to the previously published functional characterization of the murine TRAP HRE motifs, these results provide the first description of a new iron/hemin-responsive transcriptional regulation in the human TRAP gene.

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigations of non-centrosymmetric 8-hydroxyquinolinium dibenzoyl-(L)-tartrate methanol monohydrate single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudharsana, N.; Krishnakumar, V.; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ORTEP diagram of HQDBT. - Highlights: • Single crystal XRD and NMR studies confirm the formation of the title compound. • SHG efficiency was found to be 0.6 times that of KDP. • First-order hyperpolarizability (β) was calculated using HF and B3LYP methods. - Abstract: A novel 8-hydroxyquinolinium dibenzoyl-(L)-tartrate methanol monohydrate crystal has been grown by slow evaporation technique. The single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis has been done for the title compound and is found to crystallize in orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 . The optical absorption cut-off wavelength is found to be 440 nm. The vibrational analysis has been carried out to assess the functional groups present in the title compound. The molecular structure of the title compound has been confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric and differential thermal analyses reveal the melting point and thermal stability of the title compound. The second harmonic generation efficiency is confirmed by Kurtz–Perry powder technique. Further quantum chemical calculations are performed using Gaussian 03 software

  7. Optimization of biodiesel production process from soybean oil using the sodium potassium tartrate doped zirconia catalyst under Microwave Chemical Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihuai; Ye, Bin; Shen, Jiaowen; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Lijun; Zhu, Luping; Ma, Teng; Yang, Dongya; Qiu, Fengxian

    2013-06-01

    A solid base catalyst was prepared by the sodium potassium tartrate doped zirconia and microwave assisted transesterification of soybean oil was carried out for the production of biodiesel. It was found that the catalyst of 2.0(n(Na)/n(Zr)) and calcined at 600°C showed the optimum activity. The base strength of the catalysts was tested by the Hammett indicator method, and the results showed that the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was related to their total basicity. The catalyst was also characterized by FTIR, TGA, XRD and TEM. The experimental results showed that a 2.0:1 volume ratio of methanol to oil, 65°C reaction temperature, 30 min reaction time and 10 wt.% catalyst amount gave the highest the yield of biodiesel. Compared to conventional method, the reaction time of the way of microwave assisted transesterification was shorter. The catalyst had longer lifetime and maintained sustained activity after being used for four cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of degradation products and process related impurities of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual tablets by UPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Sangeetha, D.; Kalyanraman, L.

    2017-11-01

    For determination of process related impurities and degradation products of asenapine maleate in asenapine sublingual Tablets, a reversed phase, stability indicating UPLC method was developed. Acetonitrile, methanol and potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer with tetra-n- butyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate as ion pair (pH 2.2; 0.01 M) at flow rate of 0.2 ml/min were used in gradient elution mode. Separation was achieved by using acquity BEH Shield RP18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm×100 mm) at 35 ºC. UV detection was performed at 228 nm. Subsequently the liquid chromatography method was validated as per ICH. The drug product was exposed to the stress conditions of acid hydrolysis, base hydrolysis, water hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal, and photolytic. In oxidative stress and thermal stress significant degradation was observed. All the degradation products were well separated from analyte peak and its impurities. Stability indicating nature of the method was proved by demonstrating the peak purity of Asenapine peak in all the stressed samples. The mass balance was found >95% for all the stress conditions. Based on method validation, the method was found specific, linear, accurate, precise, rugged and robust.

  9. [Physical performance and sedation: comparative study of the effects of a benzodiazepine (temazepam) and of a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic (zolpidem)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremion, G; Sutter-Weyrich, C; Rostan, A; Forster, A

    1992-09-01

    It is well-known that many athletes experience some form of precompetition stress that may result in insomnia during the night before their competition. Yet, sleep withdrawal even if only partial, has a negative influence on performance, particularly when the type of exercise requires good psychomotor performance The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the intake of a hypnotic drug would have negative effects on physical performance capacity. The authors have compared the effects of oral temazepam, a medium half-life benzodiazepine vs oral zolpidem, a short half-life non-benzodiazepine drug, vs placebo. A randomized double-blind trial was used to assess endurance, resistance, strength and coordination in 26 athletes. The results did not show any differences between the three groups, neither in physical performance characteristic nor in coordination. It is concluded that as regards the performance capacity, there is no risk for stressed athletes to use sleep inducers the night before their competition.

  10. Highway driving performance and cognitive functioning the morning after bedtime and middle-of-the-night use of gaboxadol, zopiclone and zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leufkens, Tim R M; Lund, Jesper S; Vermeeren, Annemiek

    2009-12-01

    Gaboxadol is a selective extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist previously in development for the treatment of insomnia. Due to its short half-life (1.5-2 h) it is expected to be free from residual effects the next morning. The present study assessed the residual effects of evening and middle-of-the-night administration of 15 mg of gaboxadol on cognitive, psychomotor and driving performance. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers entered the study with 25 (12 women; mean age 31.4 years) completing a double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-referenced five-way cross-over study. Each treatment night subjects ingested one capsule at 23:00 hours and one at 04:00 hours. Treatments were placebo at both times, 15 mg gaboxadol or 7.5 mg zopiclone followed by placebo, and placebo followed by 15 mg gaboxadol or 10 mg zolpidem. Effects on cognition and psychomotor performance were assessed between 07:30 and 08:30 hours and on driving between 09:00 and 10:00 hours. Driving, as measured by standard deviation of lateral position in an on-the-road driving test, was almost significantly (P driving were significant. Evening administration of gaboxadol had minor effects on divided attention only, whereas middle-of-the-night administration impaired performance significantly in all tests except memory. Zolpidem and zopiclone impaired performance significantly in every test except tracking after zopiclone; 15 mg of gaboxadol can produce minor residual effects on driving after evening administration. Administration later at night is associated with moderately impairing residual effects on driving and psychomotor performance but not on memory.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of butorphanol tartrate in a long-acting poloxamer 407 gel formulation administered to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniesse, Delphine; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K; Smith, Dale A; Mosley, Cornelia; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R; Beaufrère, Hugues

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics of butorphanol tartrate incorporated into poloxamer 407 (P407) after SC administration to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). ANIMALS 11 adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (6 males and 5 females; 11 to 27 years old). PROCEDURES A sterile formulation of butorphanol in P407 (But-P407) 25% (percentage determined as [weight of P407/weight of diluent] × 100]) was created (8.3 mg/mL). Five preliminary experiments (2 birds/experiment) were performed to determine the ideal dose for this species. The formulation then was administered (12.5 mg/kg, SC) to 8 birds. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and 0.08, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after drug administration. Some birds were used more than once, with a washout period of ≥ 3 months between subsequent treatments. Butorphanol concentrations were quantitated by use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed by use of noncompartmental analysis. RESULTS Maximal plasma butorphanol concentration was reached at 1.31 hours. Plasma concentrations of butorphanol remained > 100 ng/mL for > 3 hours (all birds) or > 4 hours (5/8 birds) but Amazon parrots, and absorption followed a pharmacokinetic profile compatible with a sustained-release drug. A dose of 12.5 mg/kg, SC, would theoretically provide analgesia for 4 to 8 hours. No adverse effects were detected. Studies on the pharmacodynamics of this formulation are necessary to confirm the degree and duration of analgesia.

  12. Effect of permeation enhancers on the iontophoretic transport of metoprolol tartrate and the drug retention in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anroop; Vyas, Hiral; Shah, Jigar; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of chemical penetration enhancers in conjunction with iontophoresis is regarded as the most effective method to enhance the passage of molecules across the skin barrier. A systematic approach to enhance the transdermal delivery of metoprolol tartrate and the subsequent release of the drug depot in the skin was investigated. Gel formulations with proximate viscosity were prepared and assessed for the effect of polymers (carbopol, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, and methyl cellulose), permeation enhancers (5% w/w, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), dimethyl formamide, n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and polyethylene glycol 400), and the combination approach (permeation enhancers with iontophoresis-0.5 mA/cm² on the drug delivery. The flux values observed in passive (4.59-5.89 µg/cm²/h) and iontophoresis (37.99-41.57 µg/cm²/h) processes revealed that the permeation of metoprolol was not influenced by the polymers studied, under similar conditions, and further studies were carried out using carbopol gel as a representative polymer. Appreciable enhancement (~5-fold) in drug delivery was observed with SLS in the passive process while the optimum iontophoretic delivery condition ensured better delivery (~7-fold). Combination of iontophoresis with SLS further enhanced the drug delivery (~9-fold) and leads to noticeable drug retention in the skin as well. Moreover, the drug retained in the cutaneous layer of the skin eventually released over a period of time (5 days) and followed a near first order profile. This study concludes that the combination of iontophoresis with SLS augmented the metoprolol delivery and rendered skin drug depot, which eventually released over a period of time.

  13. Contractile Response of Bovine Lateral Saphenous Vein to Ergotamine Tartrate Exposed to Different Concentrations of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj B. Kudupoje

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ergot alkaloids, in their active isomeric form, affect animal health and performance, and adsorbents are used to mitigate toxicities by reducing bioavailability. Adsorbents with high specificity (molecularly imprinted polymers: MIP adsorb ergot alkaloids in vitro, but require evaluation for biological implications. Using ex vivo myography, synthetic polymers were evaluated for effects on the bioactivity of ergotamine tartrate (ETA. Polymers were first evaluated using isotherms. Lateral saphenous veins were collected from 17 steers for four independent studies: dose response of ETA, adsorbent dose response, validation of pre-myograph incubation conditions and MIP/ non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP comparison. Norepinephrine normalized percent contractile response to increasing ETA exhibited a sigmoidal dose response (max: 88.47 and log of the effective molar concentration (EC50 (−log [ETA] of 6.66 ± 0.17 M. Although sample preparation time affected contractile response (p < 0.001, pre-myograph incubation temperature (39 vs. 21 °C, 1 h had no effect (p > 0.05. Isothermal adsorption showed a maximum adsorption of 3.27E-008 moles·mg−1 and affinity between 0.51 and 0.57 mg (R2: 0.83–0.92 for both polymers, with no significant difference between polymers (p > 0.05. No significant differences in maximum inhibitory (p = 0.96 and IC50 responses (p = 0.163 between MIP and NIP were noticed. Normalized percent contraction could be predicted from the in vitro adsorption data (R2 = 0.87, p < 0.01, for both polymers. These studies indicate that synthetic polymers are potentially effective adsorbents to mitigate ergot toxicity caused by ergot alkaloids, with little evidence of significant differences between MIP and NIP in aqueous media.

  14. Synergistic effect of iontophoresis and chemical enhancers on transdermal permeation of tolterodine tartrate for the treatment of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The objective of the study was to evaluate the synergistic transdermal permeation effect of chemical enhancers and iontophoresis technique on tolterodine tartrate (TT transdermal gel and to evaluate its pharmacokinetic properties. Materials and Methods Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of formulations. Skin permeation rates were evaluated using the Keshary-chein type diffusion cells in order to optimize the gel formulation. In-vivo studies of the optimized formulation were performed in a rabbit model and histopathology studies of optimized formulation were performed on rats. Results Transdermal gels were formulated successfully using Taguchi robust design method. The type of penetration enhancer, concentration of penetration enhancer, current density and pulse on/off ratio were chosen as independent variables. Type of penetration enhancer was found to be the significant factor for all the responses. Permeation parameters were evaluated when maximum cumulative amount permeated in 24 hours (Q24 was 145.71 ± 2.00µg/cm2 by CIT4 formulation over control (91.89 ± 2.30µg/cm2. Permeation was enhanced by 1.75 fold by CIT4 formulation. Formulation CIT4 containing nerolidol (5% and iontophoretic variables applied (0.5mA/cm2 and pulse on/off ratio 3:1 was optimized. In vivo studies with optimized formulation CIT4 showed increase in AUC and T1/2 when compared to oral suspension in rabbits. The histological studies showed changes in dermis indicating the effect of penetration enhancers and as iontophoresis was continued only for two cycles in periodic fashion so it did not cause any skin damage observed in the slides. Conclusion Results indicated that iontophoresis in combination with chemical enhancers is an effective method for transdermal administration of TT in the treatment of overactive bladder.

  15. The influence of sublingual immunotherapy on several parameters of immunological response in children suffering from atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis depending on asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepiela, Olga; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Kotuła, Iwona; Demkow, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has already been proven and is known to be high. Its influence on the immunological system of patients suffering from bronchial asthma was also examined. However, it is still unclear how the polysensitisation, coexistence of other atopic disease and asthma treatment step influence the response to treatment with specific immunotherapy. Herein we evaluate the impact of one-year SLIT on selected markers of immunological response depending on different individual and clinical factors of children suffering from atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis. Twenty-five patients aged 8.1 ± 3.1 years (range 5-15 years), 21 boys and 4 girls, suffering from asthma and allergic rhinitis with polysensitisation to seasonal and non-seasonal allergens, shortlisted for SLIT, were included in the study. Th1 cell and Th2 cell percentages, Bcl-2 expression in T cells, and basophil activation after allergen challenge (house dust mite and/or grass pollen antigen in solution used for skin prick tests) in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometry. The association between clinical features of asthma and the influence of SLIT on immunological parameters was evaluated with exact Fisher test. No association between the influence of one-year sublingual immunotherapy on immunological system and patients' age, polysensitisation, asthma treatment step, or coexistence of any other atopic diseases was observed. However, an increase of the Th1 percentage in children sensitised against more than three allergens was found more often (at the limit of statistical significance) than in the group of children sensitised against three or less allergens. Based on our results, we cannot point to any subgroup isolated in the study, in which the response of the immunological system to sublingual immunotherapy is more satisfactory than any other. Nevertheless, the increase of Th1 cells may be more specific for polysensitised children.

  16. Comparison between 0.5% timolol maleate and 0.2% brimonidine tartrate in controlling increase in intraocular pressure after neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser capsulotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyab, H.; Azhar, M.N.; Haider, M.A.; Jahangir, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of prophylactically given 0.5% Timolol maleate and 0.2% Brimonidine tartrate in controlling increase in intraocular pressure after neodymium (Nd) : yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser capsulotomy. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at Ophthalmology Department, Jinnah Hospital, Lahore from 15-05-2009 to 14-05-2010 for a duration of 12 months. Material and Methods: In this study, 90 consecutive patients were referred from outpatient department for Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy. Hospital ethical committee's approval for this research proposal and the informed consent was taken. These patients were equally divided into two groups A and B, comprising of 45 patients in each group. Group A was control group which received 0.5% Timolol maleate. Group B was experimental group which received 0.2% Brimonidine tartrate. Intraocular pressure was measured using Goldmann tonometer before instilling these topical medications. These medications were administered topically 1 hour before the laser procedure. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was recorded 1 and 3 hours after laser capsulotomy. Results: In patients belonging to group A, 42 (93.3%) patients had effective control of IOP (raise of less than or equal to 5 mmHg from the baseline) after 3 hours of Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy whereas 28 (62.2%) patients had effective control of IOP after the same period of time in group-B with significant difference (p<0.001). Conclusion: Use of prophylactic topical antiglaucoma medications before doing Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy is a effective way to reduce post laser spike of intraocular pressure. Present study showed that the use of 0.5% timolol maleate was safe and more effective than 0.2% brimonidine tartrate when given 1 hour before laser capsulotomy. (author)

  17. Sequential Treatment Initiation with Timothy Grass and Ragweed Sublingual Immunotherapy Tablets Followed by Simultaneous Treatment Is Well Tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Jennifer; Berman, Gary; Gagnon, Remi; Bernstein, David I; Nelson, Harold S; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaur, Amarjot; Li, Qing; Nolte, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Dual treatment with grass and ragweed sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablets has not been studied. To characterize the safety and tolerability of dual grass and ragweed SLIT-tablet administration. This open-label, multicenter trial (NCT02256553) enrolled North American adults (N = 102) allergic to grass and ragweed. The trial had 3 periods, each of 2 weeks duration. In period 1, subjects received once-daily timothy grass SLIT tablet (2800 bioequivalent allergen unit; Merck, Inc, Kenilworth, NJ/ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark). In period 2, subjects received a short ragweed SLIT tablet (12 Ambrosia artemisiifolia 1-U; Merck/ALK) every morning and a grass SLIT tablet every evening. In period 3, subjects received once-daily grass and ragweed SLIT tablets within 5 minutes (simultaneous intake). The primary end point was the proportion of subjects with 1 or more local swelling events in each period. Secondary end points were the proportion of subjects with 1 or more local adverse events (AEs), that discontinued the treatment because of AEs, and subjects with 1 or more local AEs requiring treatment. No severe swellings, systemic allergic reactions, asthma attacks, or reactions requiring epinephrine were reported. Most (99%) AEs were graded mild to moderate. The proportions of subjects with 1 or more local swelling events were 14%, 22%, and 15% for periods 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For periods 1, 2, and 3, the proportions of subjects with 1 or more local AEs were 71%, 69%, and 56%, respectively; the proportions discontinuing the treatment because of treatment-related AEs were 5%, 1%, and 2%, and the proportions with 1 or more local AEs requiring treatment were 4%, 4%, and 1%. In this trial, a 4-week sequential SLIT-tablet dosing schedule followed by simultaneous intake of timothy grass and ragweed tablets was well tolerated. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cine MR enterography grading of small bowel peristalsis: evaluation of the antiperistaltic effectiveness of sublingual hyoscyamine sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Peter M; Neuberger, Ilana; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Parker, Laurence; O'Kane, Patrick L; Roth, Christopher G; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Borowski, Allison

    2014-01-01

    To use a cine balanced steady-state free precession magnetic resonance enterography (cine MRE) pulse sequence to assess the effectiveness of a sublingual (SL) antiperistaltic agent, hyoscyamine sulfate. Institutional review board approval was granted with an exemption for informed consent in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, retrospective, single-institution study. Of the 288 MRE examinations performed between October 1, 2007 and January 15, 2011, 92 using SL hyoscyamine sulfate for antiperistalsis were included for review, each with cine MRE before and after medication. These 184 cine MRE data sets were randomized, blinded for treatment, and independently reviewed by five attending abdominal radiologists, who rated the degree of whole abdomen bowel motility on each cine MRE data set on a 5-point scale. Pre- and postmedication mean peristalsis ratings, standard deviation, mean difference, and treatment effect sizes were calculated. A repeated measures analysis of variance test was performed using a significance threshold of P = .05. Interobserver reliabilities were also calculated. Mean peristalsis ratings ranged 2.63-3.34 and 2.36-3.03, before and after medication administration, respectively. The mean differences ranged from 0.22 to 0.46, which are treatment effect sizes of 0.20 to 0.37. The decrease in peristalsis observed by the five reviewing radiologists after SL hyoscyamine sulfate administration was significant (df = 1/182, f = 7.35, P cine MRE sequences show decreased bowel peristalsis after the use of SL hyoscyamine sulfate, the small size of the observed treatment effect is likely insufficient to justify its use for MRE. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sublingual Buprenorphine and Methadone Maintenance Treatment: A Three-Year Follow-Up of Quality of Life Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore M. Giacomuzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare long-term outcome effects on the quality of life (QOL of oral methadone with sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment. The QOL status of opioid-dependent patients was assessed using the German version (“Berlin Quality of Life Profile” of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. Physical symptoms were measured using the Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OWS. Urine tests were carried out randomly to detect additional consumption. In the first study period, 53 opioid-dependent subjects were enrolled and 25 could be reached after 3 years. The retention rate was 50% for methadone and 45% for buprenorphine (p = 0.786. Baseline values of the total sample (completers and noncompleters QOL and somatic complaints did not show significant differences between the two treatment groups. QOL characteristics at 6 months of treatment of the buprenorphine completer and noncompleter groups differed significantly regarding job (p = 0.013, family, and total score of physical symptoms (p = 0.002, in which the completer group showed the more favorable values. Concerning physical symptoms at 36 months, logistic regression revealed significantly less stomach cramps (p = 0.037 and fatigue and tiredness (p = 0.034 in buprenorphine compared to the methadone. Moreover, the buprenorphine-maintained group showed significantly less additional consumption of benzodiazepines (p = 0.015 compared with methadone participants. It is concluded that opioid addicts improved their QOL and health status when treated with methadone or buprenorphine. In summary, regarding QOL and health status, the present data indicate that buprenorphine is also a useful long-term alternative for maintenance treatment of opioid-dependent patients.

  20. Cyclopamine tartrate, an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, strongly interferes with mitochondrial function and suppresses aerobic respiration in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Sohoni, Sagar; Kalainayakan, Sarada Preeta; Garrossian, Massoud; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is associated with the development of many cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and basal cell carcinoma. The Hh signaling pathway has been one of the most intensely investigated targets for cancer therapy, and a number of compounds inhibiting Hh signaling are being tested clinically for treating many cancers. Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three most common cancers (colon, breast, and prostate) combined. Cyclopamine was the first compound found to inhibit Hh signaling and has been invaluable for understanding the function of Hh signaling in development and cancer. To find novel strategies for combating lung cancer, we decided to characterize the effect of cyclopamine tartrate (CycT), an improved analogue of cyclopamine, on lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. The effect of CycT on oxygen consumption and proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines was quantified by using an Oxygraph system and live cell counting, respectively. Apoptosis was detected by using Annexin V and Propidium Iodide staining. CycT’s impact on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial morphology in NSCLC cells was monitored by using fluorometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy were used to detect the levels and localization of Hh signaling targets, mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and heme-related proteins in various NSCLC cells. Our findings identified a novel function of CycT, as well as another Hh inhibitor SANT1, to disrupt mitochondrial function and aerobic respiration. Our results showed that CycT, like glutamine depletion, caused a substantial decrease in oxygen consumption in a number of NSCLC cell lines, suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis. Further, we found that CycT increased ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and

  1. O-Alkyl Hydroxamates as Metaphors of Enzyme-Bound Enolate Intermediates in Hydroxy Acid Dehydrogenases. Inhibitors of Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase, Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, and Tartrate Dehydrogenase(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrung, Michael C.; Han, Hyunsoo; Chen, Jrlung

    1996-07-12

    The inhibition of Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase by O-methyl oxalohydroxamate was studied for comparison to earlier results of Schloss with the Salmonella enzyme. It is a fairly potent (1.2 &mgr;M), slow-binding, uncompetitive inhibitor against isopropylmalate and is far superior to an oxamide (25 mM K(i) competitive) that is isosteric with the ketoisocaproate product of the enzyme. This improvement in inhibition was attributed to its increased NH acidity, which presumably is due to the inductive effect of the hydroxylamine oxygen. This principle was extended to the structurally homologous enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase from E. coli, for which the compound O-(carboxymethyl) oxalohydroxamate is a 30 nM inhibitor, uncompetitive against isocitrate. The pH dependence of its inhibition supports the idea that it is bound to the enzyme in the anionic form. Another recently discovered homologous enzyme, tartrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida, was studied with oxalylhydroxamate. It has a relatively low affinity for the enzyme, though it is superior to tartrate. On the basis of these leads, squaric hydroxamates with increased acidity compared to squaric amides directed toward two of these enzymes were prepared, and they also show increased inhibitory potency, though not approaching the nanomolar levels of the oxalylhydroxamates.

  2. Identification, characterization and quantification of new impurities by LC-ESI/MS/MS and LC-UV methods in rivastigmine tartrate active pharmaceutical ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Saji; Shandilya, Sanjeev; Bharati, Amber; Paul, Saroj Kumar; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Mathela, Chandra S

    2012-01-05

    Six impurities were detected at trace level in rivastigmine tartrate drug substance by a newly developed high performance liquid chromatography method. Three impurities were characterized rapidly and three impurities were found to be unknown. The unknown impurities were enriched and identified with a combination of semi-preparative HPLC and LC/MS/MS techniques. Proposed structures were further confirmed by characterization using NMR, FT-IR, and EA techniques of impurity standards. Based on the spectroscopic, spectrometric and elemental analysis data unknown impurities were characterized as 3-[1-(dimethylamino)ethyl]phenyl N-ethyl-N-methyl carbamate N-oxide, ethyl-methyl-carbamic acid 4-(1-dimethylamino-ethyl)-phenyl ester and ethyl-methyl-carbamic acid 2-(1-dimethylamino-ethyl)-phenyl ester. A plausible mechanism for the formation of these impurities is also proposed. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines for fourteen impurities to demonstrate specificity, precision, linearity, accuracy and stability indicating nature of the method. Regression analysis showed correlation coefficient value greater than 0.999 for rivastigmine tartrate and its impurities. Accuracy of the method was established based on the recovery obtained between 93.41 and 113.33% for all impurities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Food-specific sublingual immunotherapy is well tolerated and safe in healthy dogs: a blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, E; Pelst, M; Hesta, M; Cox, E

    2017-01-18

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence but no treatment strategies are currently available to cure dogs with food allergy. Over the past decade, experimental food allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (FA-SLIT) has emerged as a potential treatment for food allergies in human medicine. However, FA-SLIT has not been investigated in dogs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the safety, tolerability and dispenser sterility of FA-SLIT in healthy dogs before testing it in food allergic dogs. Eight experimental healthy beagle dogs, never orally exposed to peanut, were randomized in two groups to receive SLIT with peanut or placebo for 4 months. Subjects were monitored daily for local and systemic adverse effects. Blood samples for complete blood count and serum biochemistry, and urine for urinalysis were collected and the dogs' body weight was recorded at day 0, 35 and 119 of the SLIT treatment. Sera for the determination of peanut-specific IgG and IgE were collected at day 0, 35, 49, 70, 91, 105 and 119. Intradermal tests were performed before (day 0) and after (day 119) the experiment. The content of each dispenser used to administer treatment or placebo was tested for sterility after usage. In order to assess the presence or absence of sensitization, dogs were challenged 6 months after the end of the study with 2000 μg of peanut extract daily for 7 to 14 days. All dogs completed the study. The treatment did not provoke either local or systemic side-effects. Peanut-specific IgG significantly increased in treatment group. Even though a significant increase in peanut-specific IgE was also seen, intradermal tests were negative in all dogs before and after the experiment, and the challenge test did not trigger any adverse reactions in the treated dogs, which shows the protocol did not cause sensitization to peanut, but nevertheless primed the immune system as indicated by the humoral immune response. All dispenser solutions

  4. SQ house dust mite sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK) improves allergic rhinitis in patients with house dust mite allergic asthma and rhinitis symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Holger; Canonica, G Walter; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: House dust mite (HDM) allergy is associated with persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of a SQ HDM sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) in adults and adolescents with HDM respiratory...... allergic disease and report the AR results. METHODS: Six hundred four subjects at least 14 years old with HDM AR and mild to moderate HDM allergic asthma were randomized 1:1:1:1 to double-blinded daily treatment with 1, 3, 6 SQ-HDM or placebo. End-of-treatment rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication...... score were predefined extrapulmonary end points. A subgroup analysis was conducted post hoc in subjects with a total combined rhinitis score (TCRS) > 0 (ie, with AR symptoms and/or AR medication use during the 4-week baseline period). The subgroup was comprised of 498 subjects (82%). RESULTS...

  5. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Xin; Ren, Yu-Shan; Lv, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Gui-Min; Liu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin ( AG ) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro . In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v), hypodermic injection (i.h), and sublingual (s.l) administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate 100%), and a strong elimination ability ( t 1/2 beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24%) > rat (15.7 ± 9%) > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%). This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG) in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  6. Deposition and characterization of ZnS thin films using chemical bath deposition method in the presence of sodium tartrate as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassim, A.; Tee, T.W.; Min, H.S.; Nagalingam, S.

    2011-01-01

    ZnS thin films were deposited on indium tin oxide glass substrate using the chemical bath deposition method. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The influence of bath temperature on the structure and morphology of the thin films was investigated at three different bath temperatures of 60, 70 and 80 deg. C in the presence of sodium tartrate as a complexing agent. The XRD results indicated that the deposited ZnS thin films exhibited a polycrystalline cubic structure. The number of ZnS peaks increased from three to four peaks as the bath temperature was increased from 60 to 80 deg. C based on the XRD patterns. From the AFM measurements, the film thickness and surface roughness were found to be dependent on the bath temperature. The grain size increased as the bath temperature was increased from 60 to 80 deg. C. (author)

  7. Pseudo-first-order alkaline hydrolysis of diethyl tartrate: a baseline study for a polymer matrix used in controlled-release delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, D S; Simonelli, A P

    1990-04-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of a bifunctional group compound, diethyl tartrate, was studied as a function of temperature and pH in the alkaline region. A pH-stat was used to maintain constant pH conditions in the alkaline region. This allowed the studies to be carried out at low ionic strengths and without the use of buffers. The results indicate that the hydrolysis for both steps followed specific base catalysis. The ratio of the two rate constants was 13.31, which was attributed to a strong charge effect in the second step. The results also show that the use of an overall average rate constant may not be acceptable for multifunctional group compounds.

  8. Photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate in suspensions of two TiO2-based photocatalysts with different surface area. Identification of intermediates and proposal of degradation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramović, Biljana; Kler, Sanja; Šojić, Daniela; Laušević, Mila; Radović, Tanja; Vione, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinetics and efficiency of photocatalytic degradation of the β 1 -blocker metoprolol tartrate (MET). ► Two TiO 2 specimens employed. ► Faster degradation of MET, but slower mineralization, obtained with the TiO 2 specimen having lower surface area. ► Photocatalytic transformation pathways of MET including mineralization. - Abstract: This study investigates the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate (MET), a widely used β 1 -blocker, in TiO 2 suspensions of Wackherr's “Oxyde de titane standard” and Degussa P25. The study encompasses transformation kinetics and efficiency, identification of intermediates and reaction pathways. In the investigated range of initial concentrations (0.01–0.1 mM), the photocatalytic degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first order kinetics. The TiO 2 Wackherr induced a significantly faster MET degradation compared to TiO 2 Degussa P25 when relatively high substrate concentrations were used. By examining the effect of ethanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), it was shown that the reaction with ·OH played the main role in the photocatalytic degradation of MET. After 240 min of irradiation the reaction intermediates were almost completely mineralized to CO 2 and H 2 O, while the nitrogen was predominantly present as NH 4 + . Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC–MS/MS (ESI+), which allowed the proposal of a tentative pathway for the photocatalytic transformation of MET as a function of the TiO 2 specimen.

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate in suspensions of two TiO{sub 2}-based photocatalysts with different surface area. Identification of intermediates and proposal of degradation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramovic, Biljana, E-mail: biljana.abramovic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Kler, Sanja, E-mail: sanja.kler@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Sojic, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.sojic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Lausevic, Mila, E-mail: milal@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Radovic, Tanja, E-mail: tradovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Analitica, Universita di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics and efficiency of photocatalytic degradation of the {beta}{sub 1}-blocker metoprolol tartrate (MET). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two TiO{sub 2} specimens employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Faster degradation of MET, but slower mineralization, obtained with the TiO{sub 2} specimen having lower surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic transformation pathways of MET including mineralization. - Abstract: This study investigates the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate (MET), a widely used {beta}{sub 1}-blocker, in TiO{sub 2} suspensions of Wackherr's 'Oxyde de titane standard' and Degussa P25. The study encompasses transformation kinetics and efficiency, identification of intermediates and reaction pathways. In the investigated range of initial concentrations (0.01-0.1 mM), the photocatalytic degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first order kinetics. The TiO{sub 2} Wackherr induced a significantly faster MET degradation compared to TiO{sub 2} Degussa P25 when relatively high substrate concentrations were used. By examining the effect of ethanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH), it was shown that the reaction with {center_dot}OH played the main role in the photocatalytic degradation of MET. After 240 min of irradiation the reaction intermediates were almost completely mineralized to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the nitrogen was predominantly present as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC-MS/MS (ESI+), which allowed the proposal of a tentative pathway for the photocatalytic transformation of MET as a function of the TiO{sub 2} specimen.

  10. Crystal structure of the NADP+ and tartrate-bound complex of L-serine 3-dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2018-05-01

    A gene encoding L-serine dehydrogenase (L-SerDH) that exhibits extremely low sequence identity to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens L-SerDH was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 36% identity with that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa L-SerDH, suggesting that P. calidifontis L-SerDH is a novel type of L-SerDH, like Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. The overexpressed enzyme appears to be the most thermostable L-SerDH described to date, and no loss of activity was observed by incubation for 30 min at temperatures up to 100 °C. The enzyme showed substantial reactivity towards D-serine, in addition to L-serine. Two different crystal structures of P. calidifontis L-SerDH were determined using the Se-MAD and MR method: the structure in complex with NADP + /sulfate ion at 1.18 Å and the structure in complex with NADP + /L-tartrate (substrate analog) at 1.57 Å. The fold of the catalytic domain showed similarity with that of Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. However, the active site structure significantly differed between the two enzymes. Based on the structure of the tartrate, L- and D-serine and 3-hydroxypropionate molecules were modeled into the active site and the substrate binding modes were estimated. A structural comparison suggests that the wide cavity at the substrate binding site is likely responsible for the high reactivity of the enzyme toward both L- and D-serine enantiomers. This is the first description of the structure of the novel type of L-SerDH with bound NADP + and substrate analog, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding mechanism of L-SerDH. The results obtained here may be very informative for the creation of L- or D-serine-specific SerDH by protein engineering.

  11. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medication, and who are tolerant (used to the effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl ... medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Tegretol, Teril), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); modafinil (Provigil); nalbuphine; ...

  12. Comparative effects of melatonin, zolpidem and diazepam on sleep, body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate measured by radiotelemetry in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailliet, F; Galloux, P; Poisson, D

    2001-08-01

    The role of melatonin (MLT) in mediating the sleep-wake cycle has been previously suspected of indicating that this substance could be a candidate for a new generation of hypnotics. We investigated whether MLT acted as a sleep promoter or a modulator of sleep temporal timing related to cardiovascular and body temperature (Tb) adaptations to sleep induction. The pharmacological effects of MLT on sleep were compared with zolpidem (ZP) and diazepam (DZ). The radiotelemetry system was used to record the electrocorticogram [slow wave sleep (SWS), paradoxical sleep (PS)], Tb, blood pressure and heart rate in six Wistar rats. DZ (3 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg), ZP (1, 3, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and MLT (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) were delivered intraperitoneally during light (L) and dark (D) periods. MLT increased the number of sleep cycles (L: 30%, D: 110%) and total duration (P<0.05) of PS (L: 70%, D: 150%). In return, ZP (10 mg/kg) presented no effect during L but increased total (40%) and mean duration (37%) of SWS during the D period. DZ modified mean duration of SWS (L: -27%, D: +26%) and increased total duration of SWS (+47%). ZP and DZ induced a more pronounced decrease in Tb than MLT but only DZ induced tachycardia and hypertension. We showed that MLT could not promote sleep and its cardiovascular adaptations despite hypothermia, but modulated the period of ultradian sleep cycles. DZ and ZP promoted sleep and induced hypothermia during the D period. Only DZ disrupted sleep architecture and induced adverse effects on cardiovascular parameters.

  13. Effect of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B12 on cobalamin nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a marginal deficiency: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Gardana, Claudio; Brusamolino, Antonella; Battezzati, Alberto; Ciappellano, Salvatore

    2018-02-15

    Vegetarians and vegans are more vulnerable to vitamin B 12 deficiency with severe risks of megaloblastic anemia, cognitive decline, neuropathy, and depression. An easy and simple method of supplementation consists of taking one weekly dosage of 2000 μg. However, single large oral doses of vitamin B 12 are poorly absorbed. The present research evaluates the ability of two different sublingual dosages of vitamin B 12 (350 μg/week vs 2000 μg/week) in improving cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12 ) nutritional status in vegans and vegetarians with a marginal deficiency. A 12-week randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel intervention trial was performed. Forty subjects with marginal vitamin B 12 deficiency were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: test group Ld (low dose, 350 μg/week) and control group Hd (high dose, 2000 μg/week) vitamin B 12 supplementation. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 15, 30, 60, and 90 days from the intervention for the determination of vitamin B 12 , related metabolic markers, and blood cell counts. Two-way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of time (P < 0.0001) and of time × treatment interaction (P = 0.012) on serum concentration of vitamin B 12 that increased after 90-day supplementation (Ld and Hd) compared to baseline. Both the supplements increased (P < 0.0001, time effect) the levels of holotranscobalamin, succinic acid, methionine and wellness parameter, while decreased (P < 0.0001, time effect) the levels of methylmalonic acid, homocysteine and folate compared to baseline. No difference was observed between groups (LdvsHd). No effect was detected for vitamin B 6 and blood cell count. In our experimental conditions, both supplements were able to restore adequate serum concentrations of vitamin B 12 and to improve the levels of related metabolic blood markers in subjects with a marginal deficiency. The results support the use of a sublingual dosage of 50 μg/day (350

  14. Analytical method (HPLC, validation used for identification and assay of the pharmaceutical active ingredient, Tylosin tartrate for veterinary use and its finite product Tilodem 50, hydrosoluble powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Neagu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In SC DELOS IMPEX ’96 SRL the quality of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API for the finite product Tilodem 50 - hydrosoluble powder was acomkplished in the respect of last European Pharmacopoeia.The method for analysis used in this purpose was the compendial method „Tylosin tartrate for veterinary use” in EurPh. in vigour edition and represent a variant developed and validation „in house”.The parameters which was included in the methodology validation for chromatographic method are the followings: Selectivity, Linearity, Linearity range, Detection and Quantification limits, Precision, Repeatability (intra day, Inter-Day Reproductibility, Accuracy, Robustness, Solutions’ stability and System suitability. According to the European Pharmacopoeia, the active pharmaceutical ingredient is consistent, in terms of quality, if it contains Tylosin A - minimum 80% and the amount of Tylosin A, B, C, D, at minimum 95%. Identification and determination of each component separately (Tylosin A, B, C, D is possible by chromatographic separation-HPLC. Validation of analytical methods is presented below.

  15. Serum Bone Resorption Markers after Parathyroidectomy for Renal Hyperparathyroidism: Correlation Analyses for the Cross-Linked N-telopeptide of Collagen I and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase

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    Kuo-Chin Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients on long-term dialysis may develop secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT with increased serum concentrations of bone resorption markers such as the cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX and type-5b tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP. When SHPT proves refractory to treatment, parathyroidectomy (PTX may be needed. Renal patients on maintenance HD who received PTX for refractory SHPT (n=23 or who did not develop refractory SHPT (control subjects; n=25 were followed prospectively for 4 weeks. Serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, NTX, TRAP, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP concentrations were measured serially and correlation analyses were performed. iPTH values decreased rapidly and dramatically. BAP values increased progressively with peak increases observed at 2 weeks after surgery. NTX and TRAP values decreased concurrently and progressively through 4 weeks following PTX. A significant correlation between TRAP and NTX values was observed before PTX but not at 4 weeks after PTX. Additionally, the fractional changes in serum TRAP were larger than those in serum NTX at all times examined after PTX. Serum iPTH, TRAP, and NTX values declined rapidly following PTX for SHPT. Serum TRAP values declined to greater degrees than serum NTX values throughout the 4-week period following PTX.

  16. Experimental and density functional theory (DFT): A dual approach to probe the key properties of creatininium L-tartrate monohydrate single crystal for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurugan, R.; Babu, B.; Anitha, K.; Chandrasekaran, J.

    2017-12-01

    A novel organic nonlinear optical (NLO) material, creatininium L-tartrate monohydrate (CTM) was synthesized and it was grown as single crystals with optical quality. 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies were performed and molecular structure of synthesized CTM compound was confirmed. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) analysis confirmed that CTM was crystallized in orthorhombic system with non-centrosymmetric (NCS), P212121, space group. The grown crystal exhibited admirable properties such as second harmonic generation efficiency (SHG) (1.9 times KDP), and high laser damage threshold (LDT) value of 3.7 GW cm-2. CTM crystal displayed high transparency (∼60%) in the visible and near-IR region with low cut-off wavelength at 249 nm. Photoluminescence study confirmed blue wavelength emission (∼463 nm) of grown crystal. Thermal and mechanical behaviours have been successfully analysed for grown crystals. The dielectric studies were carried out for grown crystal as a function of frequencies at different temperatures. Hirshfeld surface and fingerprint plots provided the percentage of individual interactions contributed by each atom. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed to probe the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and first hyperpolarizability (β) analysis of the optimized CTM structure. These results validated CTM as a suitable NLO candidate and were discussed in this work.

  17. Stereoselective and stereospecific effects in the formation of heteronuclear tartrate complexes of 3d- and 4f-elements from proton magnetic relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sal'nikov, Yu.I.; Chevela, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach to identification of stereoselective and stereospecific effects in the formation of heteronuclear tartrate complexes of 3d- and 4f-elements according to proton magnetic relaxation data is developed. At the first stage comparison of experimental dependences of the property measured (relaxation efficiency coefficient, Bjerrum function etc.) on the consentrational parameters is conducted. Their different course in systems with dH 4 L (d-tartaric acid) and dlH 4 L (dl-tartaric acid) points out to the presence of stereoeffects. Then, using mathematical simulation the most true stoichiometry of complex particles is determined as well as optimized values of their stability constants and intensity factors. The method is used when investigating the following systems: Fe 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L), Ln 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L), Fe 3+ -Ln 3+ -dH 4 L(dlH 4 L)(Ln 3+ -Gd 3+ , Ho 3+ , Er 3+ , Tm 3+ )

  18. Sublingual Immunotherapy with a Five-Grass Pollen Tablet in Adult Patients with Allergic Rhinitis: An Open, Prospective, Noninterventional, Multicenter Study

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    Oliver Pfaar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the safety and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet have been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials (RCTs, these outcomes must always be evaluated in real-life medical practice. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, noninterventional, “real-life” study in Germany, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet in adults with grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Results. 808 adults were enrolled between September 2008 and December 2009. 35.3% of the participants experienced at least one adverse drug reaction (ADR, the most common of which were mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders. Serious ADRs considered causally related to SLIT treatment occurred in four patients. Overall, the five-grass pollen tablet was considered to have good or very good tolerability by most investigators and patients. Treatment was associated with the relief of nasal, ocular, and bronchial symptoms and decreased symptomatic medication use. However, interpretation of clinical improvements was limited by lower atmospheric grass pollen levels during the study season (relative to the preceding season. Conclusions. In a large population of patients treated in real-life medical practice, SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet was safe and well tolerated. The patient-reported symptom relief suggests that SLIT was associated with clinical benefits.

  19. Histometría de la glándula sublingual de ratones (Mus musculus machos y hembras infectados con la cepa RAL del parásito de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de Albuquerque

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Analizamos morfológica e histométricamente la glándula sublingual de ratones infectados con la cepa RAL del Trypanosoma cruzi, en machos y hembras. Usamos ratones albinos (Mus musculus, variedad Swiss, inoculados con 2x104 tripomastigotes sanguíneos de la cepa RAL del T. cruzi.. Sacrificamos los animales en el pico de la parasitemia (12º día y fijamos las glándulas sublinguales en ALFAC. Los cortes histológicos teñidos con HE fueron evaluados histométricamente (cariometría y estereología. La parasitemia fue más elevada en las hembras. Histopatológicamente, los "ácinos" (acini de los animales infectados eran menores, con escasa secreción, y conductos estriados menores. Los núcleos de las "medialunas" eran menores y había nidos de amastigotes en el citoplasma. Cariométricamente, los núcleos de los ácinos, medialunas y conductos estriados eran menores en los ratones infectados. Estereológicamente, los volúmenes relativos ocupados por ácinos y conductos estriados fueron menores e, inversamente, fue mayor el volumen para el tejido conjuntivo de los machos infectados. Las densidades de superficie de ácinos y conductos fueron mayores, y el diámetro y el espesor de la pared menores, en este grupo. Por otro lado, la densidad de ácinos fue menor, y las de los conductos estriados y tejido conjuntivo, fueron mayores en las hembras infectadas. Las densidades de superficie de ácinos y conductos estriados fueron mayores, mientras que el diámetro y espesor de la pared de los ácinos fueron menores (y las de los conductos estriados mayores, en este grupo. La cepa RAL del T. cruzi causó un cuadro general de atrofia general en la glándula sublingual, con numerosos nidos de parásitos.Histometry of the sublingual gland in male and female mice (Mus musculus infected with the RAL strain of the Chagas parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyze histologically and histometrically the sublingual gland of mice infected

  20. Quality of life improvement after a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy in patients with house dust mite and grass pollen induced allergic rhinitis: results from real-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Silviya Mihaylova; Staevska, Maria Toncheva; Novakova, Plamena Ivanova; Yoncheva, Manuela Dimitrova; Bratoycheva, Maria Stoykova; Musurlieva, Nina Mihaylova; Tzekov, Valeri Dimitrov; Nicolov, Dimitar Georgiev

    2017-09-29

    Along with its high prevalence, the burden of allergic rhinitis rests upon the serious impact on quality of life of patients. Allergic rhinitis is associated with impairments in daily activities, work and school performance, and practical problems. Patients suffer from sleep disorders and emotional problems. Тhe advantages of sublingual immunotherapy on quality of life have only recently begun to emerge. The objective of this prospective real-life study was to evaluate the effect of a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite (HDM) and grass pollen extracts on quality of life in adults with allergic rhinitis. A total number of 191 adult patients [105 (54,979%) men; mean age 27.3 years (SD-6.14)] with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis and clinically relevant sensitization to house dust mites or grass pollen were prospectively evaluated in the course of management of their disease. Health-related quality of life was assessed by Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire at baseline and after three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy. The mean overall Qol score assessed at baseline and at the end of the third year of treatment decreased significantly in patients treated with HDM extract (from 2.95 to 0.76) as well as with Grass pollen extract (from 2.83 to 1.22) (р life provided evidence that a three-year course of SLIT with HDM extract as well as with grass pollen extract significantly increased QoL in patients with allergic rhinitis.

  1. Increased amount of phosphorylated proinflammatory osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis synovia is associated to decreased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5B/5A ratio.

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    Jani Luukkonen

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is an immunoregulatory protein which production increases in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. Phosphorylated osteopontin (Phospho-OPN is known to increase macrophage and osteoclast activation, this process is controlled by extracellular tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP, also a biomarker for RA. Here, we evaluated the phosphorylation status of OPN in RA and OA synovia, as well as its correlation with TRAcP isoforms.Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from 24 RA (14 seropositive and 10 seronegative and 24 OA patients. Western blotting was used to analyze the extent of OPN phosphorylation. TRAcP isoforms were measured in synovial fluid using ELISA; immunohistochemistry assessed the distribution of OPN and TRAcP expressing cells in the synovial tissue, especially distinguishing between the TRAcP isoforms.Full-length OPN was more phosphorylated in RA than in OA (p<0.05. The thrombin cleaved C-terminal end of OPN was also more phosphorylated in RA (p<0.05. RA patients had a lower concentration of TRAcP 5B and higher concentration of less active 5A in their synovial fluid compared to OA patients. The TRAcP 5B/5A ratio was decreased in RA and correlated negatively with the amount of phospho-OPN (p<0.05. TRAcP positive cells for both isoforms were found all along the synovial lining; OPN antibody staining was localized in the extracellular matrix.Our data suggests that in RA the synovial fluid contains insufficient amounts of TRAcP 5B which increase levels of the proinflammatory phospho-OPN. This may lead to increased macrophage and osteoclast activation, resulting in the increased local inflammation and bone resorption present in RA joints.

  2. Validated spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods for the determination of brimonidine tartrate in ophthalmic solutions via derivatization with NBD-Cl. Application to stability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, F; El-Enany, N; El-Shaheny, R N; Mikhail, I E

    2015-05-01

    Two simple, selective and accurate methods were developed and validated for the determination of brimonidine tartrate (BT) in pure state and pharmaceutical formulations. Both methods are based on the coupling of the drug with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole in borate buffer (pH 8.5) at 70 °C and measurement of the reaction product spectrophotometrically at 407 nm (method I) or spectrofluorimetrically at 528 nm upon excitation at 460 nm (method II). The calibration graphs were rectilinear over the concentration ranges of 1.0-16.0 and 0.1-4.0 µg/mL with lower detection limits of 0.21 and 0.03, and lower quantification limits of 0.65 and 0.09 µg/mL for methods I and II, respectively. Both methods were successfully applied to the analysis of commercial ophthalmic solution with mean recovery of 99.50 ± 1.00 and 100.13 ± 0.71%, respectively. Statistical analysis of the results obtained by the proposed methods revealed good agreement with those obtained using a comparison method. The proposed spectrofluorimetric method was extended to a stability study of BT under different ICH-outlined conditions such as alkaline, acidic, oxidative and photolytic degradation. Furthermore, the kinetics of oxidative degradation of the drug was investigated and the apparent first-order reaction rate constants, half-life times and Arrhenius equation were estimated. The proposed methods are practical and valuable for routine applications in quality control laboratories for the analysis of BT. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Foals raised on pasture with or without daily pyrantel tartrate feed additive: comparison of parasite burdens and host responses following experimental challenge with large and small strongyle larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, C M; Chapman, M R; Taylor, H W; French, D D; Klei, T R

    1997-12-31

    Three groups of foals were raised under different management programs in this study: Group 1 (n = 6) and Group 2 (n = 6) were raised with their dams on pasture; Group 3 foals (n = 5) were raised under parasite-free conditions. Mares and foals of Group 1 received daily pyrantel tartrate (PT) treatment with their pelleted feed ration, whereas mares and foals of Groups 2 and 3 received only the pelleted ration. Pasture-reared foals were weaned and moved to a heavily contaminated pasture for 5 weeks. Group 1 foals continued to receive daily PT treatment whereas Group 2 foals received only the pelleted feed ration. Following this period, all foals were moved into box stalls. Half of each group was challenged with 10(3) Strongylus vulgaris infective third-stage larvae (L3), 5 x 10(3) Strongylus edentatus L3 and 10(5) mixed cyathostome L3; the remaining half served as unchallenged controls. Necropsy examinations were performed 6-week post-challenge for evaluation of parasite burdens and lesions. Daily PT treatment of Group 1 reduced the patent cyathostome infections of both mares and foals and was effective in reducing pasture burdens of infective larvae. Daily treatment of Group 1 foals during weaning continued to suppress EPG levels; however, it did not prevent large strongyle infections during the weaning period. Group 1 foals were more sensitive to challenge than Group 2 foals, which did not exhibit any post-challenge disturbances. Group 1 foals were equally susceptible to challenge as parasite-free foals.

  4. In vitro characterization of a formulation of butorphanol tartrate in a poloxamer 407 base intended for use as a parenterally administered slow-release analgesic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniesse, Delphine; Smith, Dale A; Knych, Heather K; Mosley, Cornelia; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Beaufrère, Hugues

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess rheological properties and in vitro diffusion of poloxamer 407 (P407) and butorphanol-P407 (But-P407) hydrogels and to develop a sustained-release opioid formulation for use in birds. SAMPLE P407 powder and a commercially available injectable butorphanol tartrate formulation (10 mg/mL). PROCEDURES P407 and But-P407 gels were compounded by adding water or butorphanol to P407 powder. Effects of various concentrations of P407 (20%, 25% and 30% [{weight of P407/weight of diluent} × 100]), addition of butorphanol, and sterilization through a microfilter on rheological properties of P407 were measured by use of a rheometer. In vitro diffusion of butorphanol from But-P407 25% through a biological membrane was compared with that of a butorphanol solution. RESULTS P407 20% and 25% formulations were easily compounded, whereas it was difficult to obtain a homogenous P407 30% formulation. The P407 was a gel at avian body temperature, although its viscosity was lower than that at mammalian body temperature. The But-P407 25% formulation (butorphanol concentration, 8.3 mg/mL) was used for subsequent experiments. Addition of butorphanol to P407 as well as microfiltration did not significantly affect viscosity. Butorphanol diffused in vitro from But-P407, and its diffusion was slower than that from a butorphanol solution. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE But-P407 25% had in vitro characteristics that would make it a good candidate for use as a sustained-release analgesic medication. Further studies are needed to characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of But-P407 25% in vivo before it can be recommended for use in birds.

  5. Efficacy and safety of 4 months of sublingual immunotherapy with recombinant Mal d 1 and Bet v 1 in patients with birch pollen-related apple allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaciyan, Tamar; Nagl, Birgit; Faustmann, Sandra; Frommlet, Florian; Kopp, Stephan; Wolkersdorfer, Martin; Wöhrl, Stefan; Bastl, Katharina; Huber, Hans; Berger, Uwe; Bohle, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    Birch pollen-related apple allergy is among the most prevalent food allergies in adolescent/adult subjects and mainly results from sensitization to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and subsequent cross-reaction with the apple protein Mal d 1. However, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen has inconsistent effects on apple allergy. We sought to compare the safety and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with 2 formulations containing either rMal d 1 or rBet v 1 on birch pollen-related apple allergy. Sixty participants with birch pollen-related apple allergy were randomized to daily sublingual application of placebo (n = 20) or 25 μg of rMal d 1 (n = 20) or rBet v 1 (n = 20) for 16 weeks. Adverse events were regularly recorded. Sublingual challenges with standardized doses of rMal d 1, skin prick tests with recombinant allergens, and measurements of allergen-specific IgE and IgG 4 antibodies were performed before and after treatment. Both formulations caused comparable, mainly local adverse events. No systemic reactions occurred. Compared with the placebo and rBet v 1-treated groups, SLIT with rMal d 1 reduced rMal d 1-induced oral symptoms (P = .001 and P = .038) accompanied by longitudinally reduced rMal d 1-specific cutaneous reactions (P = .022) and enhanced IgG 4 /IgE ratios (P = .012). SLIT with rBet v 1 neither improved the clinical reactivity to rMal d 1 nor enhanced rMal d 1-specific IgG 4 /IgE ratios. Participants receiving placebo showed no allergen-specific changes. Sublingual treatment with a recombinant food allergen was safe and clinically effective, as determined by using standardized challenges. We present a promising approach for the effective treatment of birch pollen-related apple allergy. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formulation and Evaluation of Fast-Disintegrating Sublingual Tablets of Atropine Sulfate: the Effect of Tablet Dimensions and Drug Load on Tablet Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aodah, Alhussain; Bafail, Rawan S; Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we formulated and evaluated the effects of tablet dimensions and drug load on the characteristics of atropine sulfate (AS) fast-disintegrating sublingual tablets (FDSTs). We aim to develop AS FDSTs as an alternative non-invasive and portable dosage form for the emergency treatment of organophosphate (OP) toxicity. AS autoinjector, AtroPen®, is the only self-administered dosage form available as an antidote for-out-of-hospital emergency use, but it is associated with several limitations and drawbacks. Seven FDST formulations of two tablet sizes, 150 mg (A) and 50 mg (B), and of several AS loads, 0 mg (A1, B1), 2 mg (A2, B2), 4 mg (B3), and 8 mg (B4a, B4b), were formulated and manufactured by direct compression. AS FDST characteristics were evaluated using USP and non-USP tests. Results were statistically compared at p < 0.05. All FDSTs passed the USP content uniformity and friability tests, disintegrated and released AS in ≤30 and 60 s. B1 and B2 were significantly harder than A1 and A2. Water uptake of A1 was significantly the highest. However, B1 and B2 had shorter disintegration and wetting times and higher amounts of AS dissolved than did A1 and A2 (p < 0.05). Increasing AS negatively affected FDST tensile strength (p < 0.05 for B4a) and water uptake (p < 0.05 for B3, B4a and B4b), however, without affecting AS dissolution. Formulation of AS up to 16% into smaller FDSTs was successful. Smaller FDSTs were harder and disintegrated more quickly. These AS FDSTS have the potential for further in vivo testing to evaluate their OP antidote potential.

  7. Evaluation of stability of allergen extracts for sublingual immunotherapy during transport under unfavourable temperature conditions with an innovative thermal insulating packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinelli, P; Natoli, V; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Incorvaia, C; Barbieri, S; Masieri, S; Frati, F

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical and biotechnological products are temperature-sensitive and should normally be kept at a controlled temperature, particularly during transport, in order to prevent the loss of their stability and activity. Therefore, stability studies should be performed for temperature-sensitive products, considering product characteristics, typical environmental conditions, and anticipating environmental extremes that may occur during product transport in a specific country. Staloral products for sublingual immunotherapy are temperature sensitive and are labelled for maintenance under refrigerated conditions (2-8°C). Given the peculiar climatic context of Italy and the great temperature fluctuations that may occur during transport, this study was aimed at evaluating the impact of a new engineered thermal insulating packaging for Staloral. In particular, the purpose was to assess whether the new packaging could create a container condition able to preserve the stability and immunological activity of the product during the transport phase throughout Italy. The results showed that the range of temperatures that can affect the product, in the area surrounding the product packaging, may reach a peak of 63°C during transport under the most unfavourable climatic conditions, i.e. in a non-refrigerated van during the summer season, from the site of production in France to the patient's house in Catania, the city with the highest temperatures in Italy. However, the highest temperature reached inside the vaccine did not exceed 45°C over a period of about 2 h. The ELISA inhibition test on samples subjected to the extreme temperature conditions previously defined (45°C) showed an immunological activity higher than 75% of that initially measured and was comparable to those obtained with samples stored at controlled temperature (5°C). This means that, even in the worst case scenario, the structure of the allergen extracts is not influenced and the vaccine potency is

  8. Efficacy and safety of sublingual ramelteon as an adjunctive therapy in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults: A phase 3, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Calabrese, Joseph R; Macek, Thomas A; Budur, Kumar; Adefuye, Adedeji; Dong, Xinxin; Hanson, Elizabeth; Sachs, Gary S

    2017-10-15

    The optimal long-term management strategy for bipolar I disorder patients is not yet established. Evidence supports the rationale for circadian rhythm regulation to prevent mood episode relapse in bipolar patients. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new sublingual formulation of the melatonin receptor agonist ramelteon (ramelteon SL) as adjunctive therapy in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I patients. In a double-blinded trial in the United States and Latin America, adult bipolar I disorder patients stable for ≥ 8 weeks before baseline and with a mood episode 8 weeks to 9 months before screening, were randomized to once-daily ramelteon SL 0.1mg (n = 164), 0.4mg (n = 160), or 0.8mg (n = 154), or placebo (n = 164), in addition to their existing treatment. The primary endpoint was time from randomization to relapse of symptoms. The prespecified futility criterion in a planned, unblinded, independent interim analysis was the failure of all ramelteon SL doses to achieve a conditional power ≥ 30% compared with placebo. No significant differences between any dose of ramelteon SL and placebo were observed. The study was terminated after meeting the futility criteria. Ramelteon SL was well tolerated, with a safety profile consistent with that for oral ramelteon. A low rate of relapse events precluded detection of any statistically significant difference between groups. The study failed to demonstrate the efficacy of ramelteon SL as adjunctive maintenance therapy for bipolar disorder. Interim analyses for futility in clinical studies are valuable in preventing unnecessary exposure of subjects to interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although arctigenin (AG has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro. In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v, hypodermic injection (i.h, and sublingual (s.l administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate < 1 h, a high absorption degree (absolute bioavailability > 100%, and a strong elimination ability (t1/2 < 2 h. The tissue distributions of AG at different time points after i.h showed that the distribution of AG in rat tissues is rapid (2.5 h to reach the peak and wide (detectable in almost all tissues and organs. The AG concentration in the intestine was the highest, followed by that in the heart, liver, pancreas, and kidney. In vitro, AG were incubated with human, monkey, beagle dog and rat liver microsomes. The concentrations of AG were detected by UPLC-MS/MS at different time points (from 0 min to 90 min. The percentages of AG remaining in four species’ liver microsomes were human (62 ± 6.36% > beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24% > rat (15.7 ± 9% > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%. This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  10. The influence of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy on the TSLP-OX40L signaling pathway in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingxiang; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Peng; He, Long; Xie, Jinghua; Gao, Xionghui; Wu, Xiaozhong; Su, Fang; Liang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with house dust mite (HDM) extract and to examine T helper 2 (Th2)-type immune responses mediated by the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP-OX40L) signaling pathway in patients with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis (AR) after 12-month HDM SLIT. Forty-six cases of HDM-sensitized patients with persistent AR in southern China were enrolled in this study. Clinical efficacy of SLIT was assessed by determining the individual nasal symptom score (INSS) and total nasal symptom score (TNSS) after 12-month HDM SLIT. Moreover, the TSLP-OX40L signaling pathway was investigated through measurements of TSLP by enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and OX40L by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and flow cytometry. After 12 months of HDM SLIT, TNSS and INSS were significantly decreased overall compared with baseline values (p < 0.001). By the end of the 12-month HDM SLIT, TNSS had declined by ∼50% compared with baseline, and the corresponding level of TSLP in nasal lavage decreased significantly (p < 0.05). The level of OX40L messenger RNA (mRNA) in blood was markedly decreased significantly after 12-month HDM SLIT compared with baseline (t = 12.300, p < 0.05). Furthermore, significant decreases in OX40L expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (t = 13.100, p < 0.05) and OX40L expression on the surface of CD11c+CD86+ cells in PBMCs (t = 9.946, p < 0.05) after 12-month HDM SLIT were observed. HDM SLIT downregulated Th2-type immune responses mediated by the TSLP-OX40L signaling pathway in patients with persistent moderate to severe AR. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. Urinary tract infections in women with stress urinary incontinence treated with transobturator suburethral tape and benefit gained from the sublingual polibacterial vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Gómez, María F; Collazos Robles, Rafael E; Virseda Rodríguez, Álvaro J; García Cenador, María B; Mirón Canelo, José A; Padilla Fernández, Bárbara

    2015-08-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) are highly prevalent diseases. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between RUTIs and surgical correction of SUI with transobturator suburethral tape (TOT) and to describe the benefit gained from a sublingual polibacterial preparation on RUTIs developed after TOT. A retrospective study was performed on 420 women who underwent TOT surgery due to SUI between April 2003 and October 2011. Group A: patients without urinary tract infections (UTIs) before TOT (n = 294). Group B: patients with UTIs before TOT (n = 126). age, personal history, number of UTIs/month prior to and after surgery, appearance of urgent urinary incontinence (UUI) with or without UTIs, response to International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-SF) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires. Group A: 85% dry; 5% UUI; 4% de novo UTIs with good response to antibiotics over 6 days. No RUTIs during the follow-up period, 2% with sporadic UTIs. Group B: 47.61% RUTIs; 52.39% sporadic UTIs; greater incidence of diabetes mellitus (p < 0.0025) and smoking (p < 0.0031) than group A. After TOT: 79.36% dry; 10% RUTIs. After treatment with antibiotics for 6 days and bacterial preparation for 3 months, 82% of patients did not have a UTI anymore. Postoperative cystourethrogram revealed 38% of nondiagnosed cystoceles before TOT. No patient had a postvoiding volume greater than 100 cm(3) after TOT. Improvement of ICIQ-SF (p < 0.001) and SF-36 (p < 0.0004) in both groups. After eliminating bias associated with the tape, the technique and the surgeon's skills, SUI correction may decrease the number of UTIs and improve the quality of life. UTIs disappeared in 82% of patients with RUTIs after TOT.

  12. Prophylactic Sublingual Immunization with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Subunit Vaccine Incorporating the Natural Killer T Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide Enhances Protective Immunity to Limit Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Bacterial Burden in Mice

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    Arshad Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a major global concern and the available Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine is poorly efficacious in adults. Therefore, alternative vaccines and delivery strategies focusing on Mtb antigens and appropriate immune stimulating adjuvants are needed to induce protective immunity targeted to the lungs, the primary sites of infections and pathology. We present here evidence in support of mucosal vaccination by the sublingual route in mice using the subunit Mtb antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 adjuvanted with the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a potent natural killer T (NKT cell agonist. Vaccinated animals exhibited strong antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells responses in the spleen, cervical lymph nodes and lungs. In general, inclusion of the α-GalCer adjuvant significantly enhanced these responses that persisted over 50 days. Furthermore, aerosolized Mtb infection of vaccinated mice resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial load of the lungs and spleens as compared to levels seen in naïve controls or those vaccinated with subunit proteins, adjuvant , or BCG alone. The protection induced by the Mtb antigens and-GalCer vaccine through sublingual route correlated with a TH1-type immunity mediated by antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 producing T cells.

  13. Age-related changes of serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and the relationship with bone mineral density in Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-juan QIN; Zhen-lin ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Wei-wei HU; Yu-juan LIU; Yun-qiu HU; Miao LI; Jie-mei GU; Jin-wei HE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Ostcoclastic activity is mainly assessed by measurement of urinary markers (eg C-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen, N-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen etc), the levels of which could often be affected by renal clearance. Recently, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) has been used as an alternative serum marker to evaluate osteoclastic activity. We investigated the age-related changes of TRACP5b level and its association with bone mineral density (BMD) in Chinese women. Methods: Seven-hundred and twenty-two Chinese mainland women aged 20-79 years were recruited in the study. Serum TRACP5b level was measured using immunoassay to evaluate the state of bone resorption. Bone mineral density (BMD) (g/cm2) at lumbar spine 1-4 and proximal femur were measured by duel-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: The serum TRACP5b level reached a bottom value in premenopausal women aged 30-39, gradually increased in women aged 40-49, rapidly rose in women aged 50-59, and culminated with a maximum value in women aged 60-69 before a slow drop in women aged 70-79. The average level of TRACPSb was significantly higher in postmenopausal women [(3.29±1.07) U/L] than in premenopausal women ([1.70±0.59] U/L). The levels of TRACP5b were inversely correlated with BMD at all measured sites (P<0.001). Furthermore, the level of TRACP5b was obviously higher in women with osteoporosis and osteopenia than those with normal bone mass (P<0.001). Conclusion: We have established the reference values of serum TRACPSb in Chinese mainland women, and found that postmenopausal women had higher TRACP5b concentration than younger women. The results showed that serum TRACPSb was a sensitive and useful parameter for the evaluation of age-related changes of bone absorption.

  14. Increase in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase of bone at the early stage of ascorbic acid deficiency in the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, A; Tsukamoto, I

    2003-08-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on bone metabolism was evaluated using the ascorbate-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi (ODS) rat model. Ascorbic acid (Asc)-deficient rats gained body weight in a manner similar to Asc-supplemented rats (control) during 3 weeks, but began to lose weight during the 4th week of Asc deficiency. The tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity in serum increased to about 2-fold the control value in the rats fed the Asc-free diet for 2, 3, and 4 weeks (AscD2, AscD3, and AscD4), while a decrease in the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was observed only in AscD4 rats. The serum pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) level significantly increased to 1.3-, 1.4-, and 1.9-fold of that in the controls in AscD2, D3, and D4, respectively. The ALP activity in the distal femur was unchanged in AscD1, D2, and D3, but decreased to 50% of the control level in AscD4 rats. The TRAP activity in the distal femur increased to about 2-fold of that in the controls in the AscD2 and D3 and decreased to the control level in the AscD4 rats. The amount of hydroxyproline in the distal femur significantly decreased to about 80%, 70%, and 60% of the control in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats, respectively. These decreases were associated with a similar reduction in the calcium content of the distal femur. Histochemical analysis of the distal femur showed an increase in TRAP-positive cells in AscD2 and AscD3 rats and a decrease in the trabecular bone in AscD2, D3, and D4 rats. These results suggested that a deficiency of Asc stimulated bone resorption at an early stage, followed by a decrease in bone formation in mature ODS rats which already had a well-developed collagen matrix and fully differentiated osteoblasts.

  15. The effect of amino acid backbone length on molecular packing: crystalline tartrates of glycine, β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and DL-α-aminobutyric acid (AABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, Evgeniy; Boldyreva, Elena

    2018-02-01

    We report a novel 1:1 cocrystal of β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, C 3 H 7 NO 2 ·C 4 H 6 O 6 , (II), and three new molecular salts of DL-tartaric acid with β-alanine {3-azaniumylpropanoic acid-3-azaniumylpropanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (III)}, γ-aminobutyric acid [3-carboxypropanaminium DL-tartrate, C 4 H 10 NO 2 + ·C 4 H 5 O 6 - , (IV)] and DL-α-aminobutyric acid {DL-2-azaniumylbutanoic acid-DL-2-azaniumylbutanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 4 H 9 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (V)}. The crystal structures of binary crystals of DL-tartaric acid with glycine, (I), β-alanine, (II) and (III), GABA, (IV), and DL-AABA, (V), have similar molecular packing and crystallographic motifs. The shortest amino acid (i.e. glycine) forms a cocrystal, (I), with DL-tartaric acid, whereas the larger amino acids form molecular salts, viz. (IV) and (V). β-Alanine is the only amino acid capable of forming both a cocrystal [i.e. (II)] and a molecular salt [i.e. (III)] with DL-tartaric acid. The cocrystals of glycine and β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, i.e. (I) and (II), respectively, contain chains of amino acid zwitterions, similar to the structure of pure glycine. In the structures of the molecular salts of amino acids, the amino acid cations form isolated dimers [of β-alanine in (III), GABA in (IV) and DL-AABA in (V)], which are linked by strong O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the three crystal structures comprise different types of dimeric cations, i.e. (A...A) + in (III) and (V), and A + ...A + in (IV). Molecular salts (IV) and (V) are the first examples of molecular salts of GABA and DL-AABA that contain dimers of amino acid cations. The geometry of each investigated amino acid (except DL-AABA) correlates with the melting point of its mixed crystal.

  16. Comparação entre nifedipina por via sublingual e clonidina por via venosa no controle de hipertensão arterial peri-operatória em cirurgias de catarata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocche Renato Mestriner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Estudo recente mostra que a clonidina por via venosa apresenta-se eficaz e segura no tratamento de crises hipertensivas durante cirurgia de catarata. Este estudo visa comparar o uso de nifedipina, droga amplamente utilizada por via sublingual, e clonidina por via venosa no controle da hipertensão arterial em cirurgias de catarata. MÉTODO: Setenta e cinco pacientes submetidos à facectomia foram distribuídos de forma aleatória e encoberta em: Grupo A, que recebeu nifedipina e Grupos C2 e C3, que receberam, respectivamente, 2 e 3 µg.kg-1 de clonidina por via venosa. Todos os pacientes apresentavam hipertensão arterial (PAS > 170 mmHg ou PAD > 110 mmHg. As PAS, PAD e freqüência cardíaca (FC foram medidas e comparadas nos momentos: 0 (antes do tratamento e de 2 em 2 minutos até o final do procedimento. Os eventos adversos foram anotados. RESULTADOS: Após o tratamento ocorreram diminuições da PAS e PAD nos 3 grupos (p <0,001. Houve controle da pressão arterial (<160 mmHg em 32%, 64% e 72% dos pacientes nos grupos A, C2 e C3, respectivamente (p < 0,05. No grupo C3 ocorreu maior incidência de efeitos colaterais que nos grupos C2 e A (p < 0,05. CONCLUSÕES:A clonidina por via venosa é mais eficaz que a nifedipina, por via sublingual, no controle de crises hipertensivas no peri-operatório de cirurgias de catarata. Contudo, a dose de 3 µg.kg-1 pode estar relacionada a efeitos colaterais, devendo-se iniciar o tratamento com 2 µg.kg-1.

  17. Carbamylated monomeric allergoids as a therapeutic option for sublingual immunotherapy of dust mite- and grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: a systematic review of published trials with a meta-analysis of treatment using Lais® tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösges, R; Ritter, B; Kayoko, G; Allekotte, S

    2010-10-01

    Lais® allergoid tablets contain allergens that are modified by carbamylation. Due to their modified chemical structure, they are suitable for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) (13, 16, 17, 24). Based on their small molecule size of 12 to 40 kDa, they can be easily absorbed via the oral mucosa (1). In this review, we studied the efficacy of SLIT with carbamylated monomeric allergoid tablets in the treatment of grass pollen- and dust mite-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis on the basis of symptom and medication score improvements. Following a selective internet and databank search, six trials-some placebo-controlled-regarding the treatment of grass pollen- (n = 266) and dust mite-induced (n = 241) allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were used to draw conclusions regarding the clinical efficacy of allergoid tablets. The primary endpoints in these trials were decreases in the need for allergy medications and/or reductions in the occurrence of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms. Data was recorded from patient diaries regarding their symptoms and medications used and conclusions were then drawn about the effectiveness and tolerabieity of Lais® tablets. The average improvement in symptom score in three trials of grass pollen allergy treatment was 34% in comparison to the placebo group. The treatment of dust mite-induced rhinoconjunctivitis produced an average symptom score improvement of 22% compared to the placebo or control groups. The intake of symptomatic rescue medication during allergoid tablet therapy declined. Treatment of grass pollen allergies and dust mite-induced rhinoconjunctivitis showed an average medication score improvement of 49% and 24%, respectively. Few side effects were documented in the trials and predominantly local effects were observed. Severe systemic side effects did not occur. On the basis of the trial results summarized in this review, we suggest that SLIT using Lais® sublingual tablets is an effective and well-tolerated form of treatment.

  18. Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection. Vol. 47/No. RR-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-17

    suppression. • The following drugs may increase ZDV concentration (and therefore potential toxicity): probenecid, atovaquone, methadone , valproic acid...antihistamines (e.g., astemizole orterfenadine); certain cardiac drugs (e.g., amiodarone, bepridil hydrochloride , encainide hydrochlo- ride, flecainide...flurazepam hydrochloride , midazolam, triazolam, or zolpidem tartrate); certain psychotropic drugs (e.g., bupropion hydrochloride , clozapine, or pimoz

  19. Improved detection of fill-in using sublingual nitroglycerin in technetium-99m tetrofosmin exercise/rest single photon emission computed tomography one day protocol for old myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanaga, Hajime; Kunieda, Yasufumi; Oguni, Atsuhiko; Kamitani, Tadaaki; Kawasaki, Shingo; Takahashi, Toru

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with old myocardial infarction underwent repeated 99m Tc-tetrofosmin ( 99m Tc) exercise/rest same day protocols with and without the administration of sublingual nitroglycerin (NTG) 5 min before the second injection of 99m Tc for rest SPECT. Twelve of these patients also underwent ordinary exercise/redistribution 201 Tl SPECT. The control study protocol images showed decreased uptake of 99m Tc on exercise in 157 of 420 segments and the presence of fill-in at rest in 58 segments. Images obtained with administration of NTG showed decreased uptake of 99m Tc on exercise in 163 of 420 segments and fill-in in 74 segments at rest. The frequency of fill-in was greater in the NTG protocol than in the control protocol. The segments were scored as different grades according to 99m Tc uptake between 2 protocols. Fill-in was only present or more remarkable in 31 segments in the NTG protocol than in the control protocol. Fill-in was only present or more remarkable in 10 segments in the control protocol than in the NTG protocol. In the NTG protocol, the mean defect score of the exercise images, calculated from the bull's eye image automatically, was higher than that of the rest images. The mean severity score of the exercise images, also calculated from the bull's eye image automatically, was likewise higher than that of the rest images, whereas the mean severity score of the stress images and rest images in the control protocol was not significantly different. Moreover, the mean defect score and severity score of the rest images from the NTG protocol were significantly lower than those obtained from the control protocol. Sublingual NTG administration before the injection of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin at the rest study in the one day exercise/rest studies enhanced fill-in, so may enhance the detection of viable myocardium, allowing more informed decisions regarding cardiac revascularization in patients with chronic coronary artery disease. (K.H.)

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NEW DRUG OF LONG ACTING METOPROLOL TARTRATE - EGILOK RETARD AND ORIGINAL DRUG OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE – BETALOC ZOK IN PATIENTS WITH MILD TO MODERATE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Lukina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study efficiency and safety of new drug of long acting metoprolol tartrate, “Egilok retard” (ER in patients with mild to moderate arterial hypertension (AH in comparison with the original drug of metoprolol succinat, “Betaloc ZOK” (BZ, possibility of reaching target blood pressure (BP level with treatment with each drug.Material and methods. 30 patients (11 men and 19 women with mild to moderate AH took part in randomized, open, cross over study. Previous antihypertensive treatment had been canceled for all the patients 10-14 days before the study started. Each patient by turns was treated during 6 weeks with ER and BZ 50-100 mg daily. After cancellation of the previous antihypertensive therapy, BZ and ER were prescribed (according to the randomization table in dose 50 mg daily. Drugs were taken once per day. 29 patients completed therapy with the first drug of randomization, 25 patients – with the second. After 2 weeks efficiency of treatment was assessed by target BP level achievement (< 140/90 mmHg. If efficiency of beta-adrenoblocker (BB was not sufficient, the dose of the drug was doubled to 100 mg daily, if target level was reached – the dose remained unchanged. Treatment with the settled dose was held within next 4 weeks. After 6-week treatment with the first randomized drug antihypertensive therapy was canceled for 10-14 days depending on the BB dose. At each visit office BP and heart rate were assessed, EKG was registered. Side-effects were registered according to the self-control diary, questionnaire results, examination and EKG data.Results. After 6-week treatment with ER and BZ average level of systolic BP reduced by 15,7 and 15,2 mmHg, of diastolic BP – by 8,0 and 4,5 mmHg, heart rate – by 4,1 and 4,3 beat/min respectively. Differences between antihypertensive and heart rate lowering effect of the studied drugs were not significant. Target BP level with treatment with both drugs was reached in approximately

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NEW DRUG OF LONG ACTING METOPROLOL TARTRATE - EGILOK RETARD AND ORIGINAL DRUG OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE – BETALOC ZOK IN PATIENTS WITH MILD TO MODERATE ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Lukina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study efficiency and safety of new drug of long acting metoprolol tartrate, “Egilok retard” (ER in patients with mild to moderate arterial hypertension (AH in comparison with the original drug of metoprolol succinat, “Betaloc ZOK” (BZ, possibility of reaching target blood pressure (BP level with treatment with each drug.Material and methods. 30 patients (11 men and 19 women with mild to moderate AH took part in randomized, open, cross over study. Previous antihypertensive treatment had been canceled for all the patients 10-14 days before the study started. Each patient by turns was treated during 6 weeks with ER and BZ 50-100 mg daily. After cancellation of the previous antihypertensive therapy, BZ and ER were prescribed (according to the randomization table in dose 50 mg daily. Drugs were taken once per day. 29 patients completed therapy with the first drug of randomization, 25 patients – with the second. After 2 weeks efficiency of treatment was assessed by target BP level achievement (< 140/90 mmHg. If efficiency of beta-adrenoblocker (BB was not sufficient, the dose of the drug was doubled to 100 mg daily, if target level was reached – the dose remained unchanged. Treatment with the settled dose was held within next 4 weeks. After 6-week treatment with the first randomized drug antihypertensive therapy was canceled for 10-14 days depending on the BB dose. At each visit office BP and heart rate were assessed, EKG was registered. Side-effects were registered according to the self-control diary, questionnaire results, examination and EKG data.Results. After 6-week treatment with ER and BZ average level of systolic BP reduced by 15,7 and 15,2 mmHg, of diastolic BP – by 8,0 and 4,5 mmHg, heart rate – by 4,1 and 4,3 beat/min respectively. Differences between antihypertensive and heart rate lowering effect of the studied drugs were not significant. Target BP level with treatment with both drugs was reached in approximately

  2. Observation of stimulated Raman scattering in polar tetragonal crystals of barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J.; Lux, Oliver [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Nemec, Ivan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Yoneda, Hitoki; Shirakawa, Akira [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan); Becker, Petra; Bohaty, Ladislav [Section Crystallography, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The non-centrosymmetric polar tetragonal (P4{sub 1}) barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O, was found to be an attractive novel semi-organic crystal manifesting numerous χ{sup (2)}- and χ{sup (3)}-nonlinear optical interactions. In particular, with picosecond single- and dual-wavelength pumping SHG and THG via cascaded parametric four-wave processes were observed. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes lasing related to two SRS-promoting vibration modes of the crystal, with ω{sub SRS1} ∼ 575 cm{sup -1} and ω{sub SRS2} ∼ 2940 cm{sup -1}, takes place. Basing on a spontaneous Raman investigation an assignment of the two SRS-active vibration modes is discussed. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. [ANALYSIS OF BACKGROUNDS AND LEVEL OF UNDERSTANDING OF TREATMENT OF POOR ADHERENCE AND DROPOUT CASES ON SUBLINGUAL IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR JAPANESE CEDAR POLLINOSIS IN THE FIRST FOLLOW-UP YEAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Sayaka; Kamijo, Atsushi; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Soma, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Takehito; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Morita, Eiji; Nagata, Makoto; Inoue, Tomoe; Kase, Yasuhiro

    We considered the factors of poor adherence to and dropout from sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) by verifying patient backgrounds 1 year after start of treatment. We recruited 38 patients who began SLIT between November 2014 and September 2015. We analyzed their attributes and level of understanding of the treatment, and conducted a self-reported survey on factors behind dropout cases and poor adherence cases. Four patients dropped out 1 year after start of treatment. Three left for reasons related to anxiety about side effects. There were five cases of poor adherence. There was no significant difference between good adherence, poor adherence, and dropout regarding level of understanding of the treatment (p=0.59). In the comparison between good and poor adherence groups, except four dropout patients, the adherence tended to be poor in patients with short duration of disease, smoking patients, and young patients. Continuous rate of SLIT achieved about 90%, suggesting relatively high level of adherence. It appears possible that anxiety related to side effects could be a factor affecting dropout from SLIT. There was no significant difference regarding level of understanding of the treatment. The adherence tended to be poor in patients with short duration of disease, smoking patients, and young patients.

  4. Utilization of Snail (Achatina fulica Shell Waste for Synthesis of Calcium Tartrate Tetrahydrate (CaC4H4O6.4H2O Single Crystals in Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sakdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Snail (Achatina fulica shell waste is massively produced by many home industries in Indonesia, especially in East Java. The snail shell is known for high calcium; therefore it is potential to be used as calcium source of supernatant in the synthesis of piezoeletric material, such as single crystal of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate (CaTT. The aim of this research is to study the synthesis and characterization of CaTT or CaC4H4O6.4H2O from snail shell waste in silica gel. Supernatant solution of CaCl2 was prepared from CaO, which previously made by calcinating the shell at 1000°C, and then reacted with HCl 1,5M. Synthesis of CaTT was conducted in a single-tube reaction at room temperature in which silica gel was used as growth medium with gelling time of 10 days and growth time of 2 weeks. The pH of gel and CaCl2 concentration were varied, 3.00; 3.50; 4.00; 4.50; 5.00; and 0.27; 0.36; 0.45; 0.54 M respectively, in order to obtain optimum condition of the synthesis, which is indicated from crystal yields. The synthesized crystals were characterized by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (AAS, infrared spectroscopy (IR and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD. Experimental data shows that optimum condition was obtained at pH of 3.50 and [CaCl2] of 0.45M with yield of 69.37%. The obtained single crystal has clear color and octahedral-like shape with size ranged between 4 – 9 mm. Analysis data by FTIR and powder XRD confirmed that the obtained crystal was CaTT single crystals with crystal system of orthorhombic.

  5. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP/ACP5) promotes metastasis-related properties via TGFβ2/TβR and CD44 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmeier, Anja; Panizza, Elena; Krumpel, Michael; Orre, Lukas M; Branca, Rui M M; Lehtiö, Janne; Ek-Rylander, Barbro; Andersson, Göran

    2017-09-15

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP/ACP5), a metalloenzyme that is characteristic for its expression in activated osteoclasts and in macrophages, has recently gained considerable focus as a driver of metastasis and was associated with clinically relevant parameters of cancer progression and cancer aggressiveness. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with different TRAP expression levels (overexpression and knockdown) were generated and characterized for protein expression and activity levels. Functional cell experiments, such as proliferation, migration and invasion assays were performed as well as global phosphoproteomic and proteomic analysis was conducted to connect molecular perturbations to the phenotypic changes. We identified an association between metastasis-related properties of TRAP-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and a TRAP-dependent regulation of Transforming growth factor (TGFβ) pathway proteins and Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44). Overexpression of TRAP increased anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent cell growth and proliferation, induced a more elongated cellular morphology and promoted cell migration and invasion. Migration was increased in the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins osteopontin and fibronectin and the basement membrane proteins collagen IV and laminin I. TRAP-induced properties were reverted upon shRNA-mediated knockdown of TRAP or treatment with the small molecule TRAP inhibitor 5-PNA. Global phosphoproteomics and proteomics analyses identified possible substrates of TRAP phosphatase activity or signaling intermediates and outlined a TRAP-dependent regulation of proteins involved in cell adhesion and ECM organization. Upregulation of TGFβ isoform 2 (TGFβ2), TGFβ receptor type 1 (TβR1) and Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 2 (SMAD2), as well as increased intracellular phosphorylation of CD44 were identified upon TRAP perturbation. Functional antibody-mediated blocking and chemical

  6. 21 CFR 558.485 - Pyrantel tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. For the reduction in severity of swine mycoplasma pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae; aid in the prevention of migration and establishment of large roundworms (Ascaris suum...

  7. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treximet), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); mirtazapine (Remeron); muscle relaxants; opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control and cough; rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifater, in Rifamate); medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol, Teril, others), phenobarbital, ...

  8. Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-22

    May 22, 2016 ... and autumn when the level of outdoor allergens, i.e. pollen, is elevated ... Atopic dermatitis has an impact on health-related quality of life,. Abstract .... and SLIT consistently demonstrated benefit when compared to placebo ...

  9. NUT Carcinoma of the Sublingual Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; French, C A; Josiassen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NUT carcinoma (NC) is a recently described, rare and extremely aggressive cancer primarily located to supradiaphragmatic structures and affecting young individuals. NC is characterized by translocations involving the NUT gene on 15q14 with the most common translocation partner gene being BRD4 on ...

  10. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Röder (Esther)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAllergic rhinitis is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in Europe. Besides nose symptoms such as sneezing and a blocked nose, patients also suffer from general complaints like fatigue, sleeping problems and difficulty concentrating. Allergic rhinitis can have a serious impact on

  11. 21 CFR 520.2045 - Pyrantel tartrate powder; pyrantel tartrate pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pounds and over are administered 5 pounds of ration per animal. (iii) Fast pigs over night for optimum results. Water should be made available to animals during fasting and treatment periods. Consult...

  12. Mouth floor enlargements related to the sublingual glands in edentulous or partially edentulous patients: a microscopic study Tumefações do soalho bucal relacionadas às glândulas sublinguais em pacientes edêntulos ou parcialmente edêntulos: estudo microscópico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liogi Iwaki Filho

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouth floor enlargements (MFE are observed in edentulous and partially edentulous patients, impairing denture fitting, and have recently been described in the literature as hyperplasias of the sublingual glands. OBJECTIVE: This study aims at describing the microscopic aspects of MFE that contribute to their final diagnosis. METHODS: Twenty-four specimens were surgically removed from the enlarged mouth floor of 19 patients (15 females and 4 males. Patient age ranged from 48 to 74 years, with a mean of 57 years. The main surgical indication was to permit or improve the fitting of dentures. Six patients were completely edentulous and 13 were partially edentulous. The material was processed for microscopic examination and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Mallory's trichrome and periodic-acid Schiff (PAS. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The epithelium of the mouth floor was normal in 17 cases, hyperplastic in 4 and atrophic in 3. Six of the 24 sublingual glands removed were microscopically normal, while the other specimens presented acinar atrophy with hyperplasia of duct-like structures. Interstitial fibrosis was observed in 18 cases and was accompanied by adipose tissue infiltration in 15. Decreased lymphoid tissue was observed in 16 samples and oncocytosis was present in 5 cases. We suggest that MFE in edentulous or partially edentulous patients should be considered as an entity for the text books.Tumefações do soalho bucal (TSB são observadas em pacientes edêntulos ou parcialmente edêntulos, prejudicando a adaptação de próteses, e têm sido descritas recentemente na literatura como hiperplasias das glândulas sublinguais. OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo é descrever os aspectos microscópicos das TSB a fim de contribuir para o seu diagnóstico final. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram removidos cirurgicamente 24 espécimes de 19 pacientes (15 mulheres e 4 homens que possuíam TSB. A idade variou de 48 a 74 anos, com média de 57 anos. A principal

  13. Effects of (-)-S-2,8-dimethyl-3-methylene-1-oxa-8-azaspiro[4,5]decane L-tartrate monohydrate (YM796), a novel muscarinic agonist, on disturbance of passive avoidance learning behavior in drug-treated and senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Yamaguchi, T; Ozawa, Y; Ohyama, M; Yamamoto, M

    1995-11-01

    Effects of YM796 (-)-S-2,8-dimethyl-3-methylene-1-oxa-8-azaspiro[4,5]decane L-tartrate monohydrate; a novel muscarinic agonist, were observed on disturbance of passive avoidance learning behavior in drug- (protein synthesis inhibitor and anticholinergic drugs) treated and senescence-accelerated mice in comparison with those of a muscarinic agonist (AF102B) and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (E2020 (1-benzyl-4-[(5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone-2-yl) methyl] piperidene hydrochloride), NIK247 [9-amino-2,3,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1H-cyclopenta(b)-quinoline monohydrate hydrochloride], THA (9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine) and physostigmine). All tested drugs administered before training significantly prolonged the shortened latency of step-through induced by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (150 mg/kg s.c.). This shortened latency was also significantly prolonged when YM796 was administered immediately after training, but not when administered before the test trial. The ameliorating effect of YM796 on the impairment in learning behavior by cycloheximide was significantly suppressed by pirenzepine (0.1 micrograms/mouse i.c.v.). When administered before training, all test drugs prolonged the shortened latency of step-through induced by treatment with the anticholinergic drugs [scopolamine (1 mg/kg s.c.) and hemicholinium-3 (0.3 microgram/mouse i.c.v.)], suggesting that they ameliorated the impairment of learning behavior. This shortened latency in scopolamine-treated mice was also significantly prolonged by YM796, AF102B, E2020, NIK247 and physostigmine when administered immediately after training, but not when administered before the test trial. The pharmacological actions of YM796 administered immediately after training and before the test trial in hemicholinium-3-treated mice were similar to those in scopolamine-treated mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The grown crystals were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), microhardness measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results obtained are compared with the ...

  15. Arformoterol Tartrate: A Review of Pharmacology, Analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    suggest the potentially enhanced efficacy of this drug in the treatment of COPD including ... pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical studies, analytical techniques, drug-drug interactions, ..... accordance with the United States Food and. Drug ...

  16. Comparison of the analgesic effects of dihydrocodeine tartrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and thirty five patients (age 18 –70 years) with baseline pain of varying degrees in the post operative period, had their pain treated with dihydrocodeine, paracetamol and phenytoin sodium. At the end of 48 hours from commencement of treatment, the patients were asked to give an assessment of pain relief, ...

  17. 21 CFR 520.246 - Butorphanol tartrate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....246 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Conditions of use. The drug is used for the treatment of dogs as follows: (1) Amount. 0.25 milligram of... associated with inflammatory conditions of the upper respiratory tract. (3) Limitations. For oral use in dogs...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2604 - Trimeprazine tartrate and prednisolone tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 520.2604 Section 520.2604 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) The drug is administered orally to dogs for the relief of itching regardless of cause; reduction of inflammation commonly associated with most skin disorders of dogs such as...

  19. Characterization of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FTIR), .... rotational and vibrational energy levels of the ground electronic energy state. ..... Vidyalaya College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore, India for the timely help ... Head, Marketing, Pricol Castings Ltd., Coimbatore for the support during the ...

  20. Dielectric and thermal studies on gel grown strontium tartrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    frequencies (110–700 kHz) of the applied a.c. field. It increases ... lytical studies. It is explained that crystallographic change due to polymorphic phase transition may be occur- ... inexpensive and unique method for growing crystals that show poor ... on dielectric and thermal characteristics of this material are described. 2.

  1. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Calcium formate mixed with formic acid was taken as the supernatant solution. It was observed that the nucleation density was reduced and the size of the crystals was improved to a large extent compared to the conventional way of growing ...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2605 - Trimeprazine tartrate and prednisolone capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2605...) Amount. Administer either capsule orally once daily to dogs as follows: Animal weight (pounds) Number of... dermatitis (allergic, parasitic, pustular, and nonspecific). It is also used in dogs as adjunctive therapy in...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1450b - Morantel tartrate cartridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... grazing season. (2) Indications for use. For control of the adult stage of the following gastrointestinal... dosing gun to all cattle that will be grazing the same pasture. Effectiveness of the drug product is dependent upon continuous control of the gastrointestinal parasites for approximately 90 days following...

  4. Determination of Tolterodine Tartrate in Bulk and Formulation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Double distilled water was used to prepare all solutions. Freshly prepared solutions were used for method development and validation. Tablets containing 4 ..... Table 3: Results of precision and accuracy of the method. Conc. (μg mL-1). Precision. Accuracy. Inter-day. Intra-day. Spike level (%). %. Recoverya. %RSDa.

  5. Sublingual atropine for the treatment of severe and hyoscine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comley C, Galletly C, Ash D. Use of atropine eye drops for clozapine induced hypersalivation. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2000 ; 34(6):1033-. 1034. 6. Sharma A, Ramaswamy S, Dahl E, Dewan V. Intraoral application of atropine sulphate ophthalmic solution for clozapine-induced sialorrhea. Ann Pharmacother 2004 ; 38(9):1538.

  6. Sublingual Delivery of Frovatriptan: An Indication of Potential Alternative Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surajpal; Prasad, Shyam Baboo

    2014-01-01

    Frovatriptan, a 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of acute migraine attack. This molecule is classified into second line therapy because of its slow onset of action (peak response obtained after 4 hours of administration) and low bioavailability (25%). Moreover, its therapy is the most costly among all triptans. Attempt has been made in present work to suggest a way out to fasten its onset of action and to enhance its bioavailability. Prepared tablets were evaluated by physicochemical tests, in vitro permeation studies, ex vivo permeation studies, and histopathological studies. Suitable mathematical calculations were performed to calculate the minimum amount of bioavailability that could be enhanced. Tablets containing chitosan (5% w/w) were found to give optimum results. Prepared tablets can double the bioavailability of frovatriptan and can initiate its response within 10 minutes of its administration. Suggestive alternative has the potential to increase the efficacy of frovatriptan for treating acute migraine attack. PMID:27433492

  7. Sublingual immunotherapy for the treatment of allergies | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of allergies often involves pharmacological therapy and recommendations by healthcare workers that the allergen should be avoided. Allergen-specific immunotherapy has emerged as an alternative to effectively decrease the immunoglobulin (Ig) E:IgG4 ratio. Two routes of administration are described, ...

  8. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation...

  9. [Appropriate use of benzodiazepines zolpidem and zopiclone in diseases attended in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Menéndez, M Isabel; Salinero Fort, Miguel Angel; Palomo Ancillo, Marta; Aliaga Gutiérrez, Laura; García Escalonilla, Carmen; Ortega Orcos, Rebeca

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the proportion of benzodiazepine prescriptions that comply with the guidelines for appropriate prescription. To identify the variables associated with appropriate prescription. Observational, cross-sectional study. Monóvar Health Centre in Area IV, Madrid, Spain. Random sample of 270 active benzodiazepine prescriptions in adult patients from the prescriptions record of the OMI-AP V. 5.0 computer system. The chosen dimensions for appropriate prescription were: a) correct diagnostic indication; b) absence of benzodiazepines with long half-life in the elderly; c) existence of support or monitoring visits; d) overall appropriateness or coexistence of correct diagnostic indications and monitoring visits. Independent variables were recorded in relation to patient, person prescribing and prescription. Diagnostic indication, 75.6%; absence of benzodiazepines with long half-life in the elderly, 79.8%; existence of support visits, 63.3%; overall appropriateness, 53%. Main diagnoses: pure anxiety, 29%; anxiety related to other illness, 18.6%; insomnia, 14.8%; cardiovascular illness, 14.8%; alcohol and drug abuse, 4.5%; osteo-muscular illness, 4.4%; schizophrenia, 4.4%. Most prescribed substances: lorazepam, 27.8%; bromazepam, 23.7%. Average life of prescriptions: 18.58 months. Origins: health centre, 68.5%; out-patient psychiatry, 10%; hospital, 10%. The variable that is most closely associated with overall appropriateness, fitted with the rest of the variables, is out-patient psychiatry prescription (OR, 6.67; 95% CI, 1.92-23.18). The mean duration of the prescriptions infringes all standards. The overall appropriateness or correct coexistence of adequate diagnostic indication with follow-up visits is associated with out-patient Psychiatry prescription.

  10. Evaluation of a new computerized psychometric test battery: Effects of zolpidem and caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Raveendranadh Pilli; MUR Naidu; Usharani Pingali; J C Shobha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of centrally active drugs using a new indigenously developed automated psychometric test system and compare the results with that obtained using pencil- and paper-based techniques. Materials and Methods: The tests were standardized in 24 healthy participants. Reproducibility of the test procedure was evaluated by performing the tests by a single experimenter on two occasions (interday reproducibility). To evaluate the sensitivity of the tests, the effects of...

  11. Residual effects of zolpidem, zopiclone and flunitrazepam on the processing of visual information in driving context

    OpenAIRE

    BERTHELON, C; DE LONCAMP, A; COQUEREL, A; DENISE, P

    2008-01-01

    La surreprésentation des conducteurs qui ont ingéré des médicaments hypnotiques, tels que les benzodiazépines dans les accidents de la route a conduit à réaliser des études expérimentales qui montrent que, même le lendemain de la prise, ces médicaments induisent une dégradation du comportement de conduite en situation simulée et en situation naturelle. Pour remédier à ces effets indésirables, de nouvelles familles d'hypnotiques ont été développées pou rlesquels peu d'études sur leurs effets r...

  12. Major conformations of the ligand skeleton of a tetranuclear dysprosium (3) tartrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevela, V.V.; Semenov, V.Eh.; Bezryadin, S.G.; Savitskaya, T.V.; Kolesar, I.R.; Matveev, S.N.; Shamov, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    By the molecular mechanics method (MIND program, stoichiometry was studied and basic conformations of ligand frame of dysprosium (3) tetranuclear complex bis-(d-tartrato) bis-(l-tartrato)tetradysprosiate (3) - anion Dy 4 (d-L) 2 (l-L) 2 4- (1) (d-H 4 L = d-tartaric acid, l-H 4 L = l - tartaric acid) were revealed. It is shown that theoretically calculated mP τ constants for so-called compact conformations of 1, where tartratoligands are in gosh conformation, agree with experimentally obtained constant of paramagnetic birefringence (mP e ) of complex 1 [ru

  13. Safety Measures of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Supplementation in Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Martyn R.; Volek, Jeff S.; Gomez, Ana L.; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; French, Duncan N.; Sharman, Matthew J.; Kraemer, William J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effects of ingesting the dietary supplement L- CARNIPURE on liver and renal function and blood hematology among healthy men. Analysis of blood samples indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the L-CARNIPURE and placebo conditions for any variables examined, suggesting there are no safety concerns…

  14. Eliglustat tartrate for the treatment of adults with type 1 Gaucher disease [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett LL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bennett LL, Turcotte K. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:4639–4647.On page 4642, left column, 2nd word, the drug name Cardelga® should have been Cerdelga®.On page 4643, Table 2, the drug name Cardelga® should have been Cerdelga®.Read the original article

  15. Studies on the crystal structure and arrangement of water in sitagliptin L-tartrate hydrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tieger, E.; Kiss, V.; Pokol, G.; Finta, Z.; Dušek, Michal; Rohlíček, Jan; Skořepová, E.; Brázda, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 21 (2016), s. 3819-3831 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603; GA ČR GA16-10035S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : sitagliptin tartarate * crystal structure * channel hydrates * hydration * dehydration Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016

  16. High-pressure structural and dielectric studies of the phase transition in lithium thallium tartrate monohydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamba, S.; Kulda, Jiří; Petříček, V.; McIntyre, G.; Kiat, JP.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 15 (2002), s. 4045-4055 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Keywords : rochelle salt * soft-mode * litlC4H4O6-center-DOT-H20 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.775, year: 2002

  17. High-pressure structural and dielectric studies of the phase transitions in lithium thallium tartrate monohydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamba, Stanislav; Kulda, J.; Petříček, Václav; McIntyre, G.; Kiat, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 15 (2002), s. 4045-4054 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0612; GA AV ČR IAA1010213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : lithium thalim tartarate monohzdrate * phase transitions * neutrom diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.775, year: 2002

  18. Inhibition of microbial metabolism in anaerobic lagoons by selected sulfonamides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, and tylosin tartrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A.; Henny, Cynthia; Adams, Craig D.; Surampali, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotics are used to maintain healthy livestock and to promote weight gain in concentrated animal feed operations. Antibiotics rarely are metabolized completely by livestock and, thus, are often present in livestock waste and in waste-treatment lagoons. The introduction of antibiotics into anaerobic lagoons commonly used for swine waste treatment has the potential for negative impacts on lagoon performance, which relies on a consortium of microbes ranging from fermentative microorganisms to methanogens. To address this concern, the effects of eight common veterinary antibiotics on anaerobic activity were studied. Anaerobic microcosms, prepared from freshly collected lagoon slurries, were amended with individual antibiotics at 10 mg/L for the initial screening study and at 1, 5, and 25 mg/L for the dose-response study. Monitored metabolic indicators included hydrogen, methane, and volatile fatty acid concentrations as well as chemical oxygen demand. The selected antibiotics significantly inhibited methane production relative to unamended controls, thus indicating that antibiotics at concentrations commonly found in swine lagoons can negatively impact anaerobic metabolism. Additionally, historical antibiotic usage seems to be a potential factor in affecting methane production. Specifically, less inhibition of methane production was noted in samples taken from the lagoon with a history of multiple-antibiotic use.

  19. Inhibition of microbial metabolism in anaerobic lagoons by selected sulfonamides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, and tylosin tartrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A; Henny, Cynthia; Adams, Craig D; Surampali, Rao; Mormile, Melanie R

    2005-04-01

    Antibiotics are used to maintain healthy livestock and to promote weight gain in concentrated animal feed operations. Antibiotics rarely are metabolized completely by livestock and, thus, are often present in livestock waste and in waste-treatment lagoons. The introduction of antibiotics into anaerobic lagoons commonly used for swine waste treatment has the potential for negative impacts on lagoon performance, which relies on a consortium of microbes ranging from fermentative microorganisms to methanogens. To address this concern, the effects of eight common veterinary antibiotics on anaerobic activity were studied. Anaerobic microcosms, prepared from freshly collected lagoon slurries, were amended with individual antibiotics at 10 mg/L for the initial screening study and at 1, 5, and 25 mg/L for the dose-response study. Monitored metabolic indicators included hydrogen, methane, and volatile fatty acid concentrations as well as chemical oxygen demand. The selected antibiotics significantly inhibited methane production relative to unamended controls, thus indicating that antibiotics at concentrations commonly found in swine lagoons can negatively impact anaerobic metabolism. Additionally, historical antibiotic usage seems to be a potential factor in affecting methane production. Specifically, less inhibition of methane production was noted in samples taken from the lagoon with a history of multiple-antibiotic use.

  20. Efficacy of a House Dust Mite Sublingual Allergen Immunotherapy Tablet in Adults With Allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virchow, Johann Christian; Backer, Vibeke; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    moderate or severe asthma exacerbation during the ICS reduction period. Secondary outcomes were deterioration in asthma symptoms, change in allergen-specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4), change in asthma control or asthma quality-of-life questionnaires, and adverse events. RESULTS: Among 834 randomized...... in allergen-specific IgG4. However, there was no significant difference for change in asthma control questionnaire or asthma quality-of-life questionnaire for either dose. There were no reports of severe systemic allergic reactions. The most frequent adverse events were mild to moderate oral pruritus (13...... corticosteroid (ICS) reduction period. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted between August 2011 and April 2013 in 109 European trial sites. The trial included 834 adults with HDM allergy-related asthma not well controlled by ICS or combination products...