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Sample records for sublimation behavior examined

  1. The Sublime and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jamin

    2006-01-01

    The sublime is a theory of aesthetics that reached its highest popularity in British literature during the Romantic period (c. 1785-1832). This article (1) explicates philosophers' different meanings of the sublime; (2) show how the sublime is relevant to education; and (3) show how the sublime "works" in literature by analyzing William Blake's…

  2. Instant Sublime Text starter

    CERN Document Server

    Haughee, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A starter which teaches the basic tasks to be performed with Sublime Text with the necessary practical examples and screenshots. This book requires only basic knowledge of the Internet and basic familiarity with any one of the three major operating systems, Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X. However, as Sublime Text 2 is primarily a text editor for writing software, many of the topics discussed will be specifically relevant to software development. That being said, the Sublime Text 2 Starter is also suitable for someone without a programming background who may be looking to learn one of the tools of

  3. Behavior Management: Examining the Functions of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstot, Andrew E.; Alstot, Crystal D.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate student behavior is essential for the success of a physical education lesson. Despite using effective proactive management strategies, teachers may need to also use reactive techniques to reduce problem behaviors by applying suitable consequences. For these consequences to be effective, they must be aligned with the function, or cause,…

  4. Sublimation, culture, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Emily; Zeppenfeld, Veronika; Cohen, Dov

    2013-10-01

    Combining insights from Freud and Weber, this article explores whether Protestants (vs. Catholics and Jews) are more likely to sublimate their taboo feelings and desires toward productive ends. In the Terman sample (Study 1), Protestant men and women who had sexual problems related to anxieties about taboos and depravity had greater creative accomplishments, as compared to those with sexual problems unrelated to such concerns and to those reporting no sexual problems. Two laboratory experiments (Studies 2 and 3) found that Protestants produced more creative artwork (sculptures, poems, collages, cartoon captions) when they were (a) primed with damnation-related words, (b) induced to feel unacceptable sexual desires, or (c) forced to suppress their anger. Activating anger or sexual attraction was not enough; it was the forbidden or suppressed nature of the emotion that gave the emotion its creative power. The studies provide possibly the first experimental evidence for sublimation and suggest a cultural psychological approach to defense mechanisms.

  5. A sublimation heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gary G; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-03

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  6. O SUBLIME NA MODERNIDADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha de Almeida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A obra Uma investigação filosófica sobre a origem de nossas idéias do sublime e dobelo, do sensualista inglês Edmund Burke (1757, data as origens do sublime na Modernidade. Nosublime ocorre é um prazer ligado à dor, um "horror delicioso" que sentimos quando acreditamosque estamos em perigo sem que isso esteja ocorrendo realmente. Em O mundo como Vontade erepresentação Schopenhauer assume as influências que sofreu de Kant no que diz respeito à suainterpretação sobre o belo e o sublime, porém difere dele quanto à natureza dessa impressão. ParaSchopenhauer a experiência estética pressupõe a dissolução da subjetividade num movimento decontemplação das idéias livre do querer imposto pela vontade individual. As idéias deSchopenhauer influenciaram a estética do Nietzsche de O nascimento da tragédia.

  7. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  8. Los cuerpos sublimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Zangara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available La narración de crímenes en la prensa de masas y las pantallas parece constituir una versión contemporánea del magnetismo según Edgar Allan Poe. La estetización mediática (ya no la información de una serie reciente de feminicidios permite reconocer una cierta lógica de lo sublime como clave de la producción de noticias-mercancías. En su variante clásica, la ficción policial funciona como una matriz ideológica decisiva de la enunciación periodística.

  9. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates.

  10. Sublime Views and Beautiful Explanations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barry, Daved; Meisiek, Stefan; Hatch, Mary Jo

    To create a generative theory that provides beautiful explanations and sublime views requires both a crafts and an art approach to scientific theorizing. The search for generativity leads scholars to perform various theorizing moves between the confines of simple, yet eloquent beauty, and the ran......To create a generative theory that provides beautiful explanations and sublime views requires both a crafts and an art approach to scientific theorizing. The search for generativity leads scholars to perform various theorizing moves between the confines of simple, yet eloquent beauty...

  11. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  12. On the importance of sublimation to an alpine snow mass balance in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. MacDonald

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study was undertaken to evaluate the contribution of sublimation to an alpine snow mass balance in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Snow redistribution and sublimation by wind, snowpack sublimation and snowmelt were simulated for two winters over an alpine ridge transect located in the Canada Rocky Mountains. The resulting snowcover regimes were compared to those from manual snow surveys. Simulations were performed using physically based blowing snow (PBSM and snowpack ablation (SNOBAL models. A hydrological response unit (HRU-based spatial discretization was used rather than a more computationally expensive fully-distributed one. The HRUs were set up to follow an aerodynamic sequence, whereby eroded snow was transported from windswept, upwind HRUs to drift accumulating, downwind HRUs. That snow redistribution by wind can be adequately simulated in computationally efficient HRUs over this ridge has important implications for representing snow transport in large-scale hydrology models and land surface schemes. Alpine snow sublimation losses, in particular blowing snow sublimation losses, were significant. Snow mass losses to sublimation as a percentage of cumulative snowfall were estimated to be 20–32% with the blowing snow sublimation loss amounting to 17–19% of cumulative snowfall. This estimate is considered to be a conservative estimate of the blowing snow sublimation loss in the Canadian Rocky Mountains because the study transect is located in the low alpine zone where the topography is more moderate than the high alpine zone and windflow separation was not observed. An examination of the suitability of PBSM's sublimation estimates in this environment and of the importance of estimating blowing snow sublimation on the simulated snow accumulation regime was conducted by omitting sublimation calculations. Snow accumulation in HRUs was overestimated by 30% when neglecting blowing snow sublimation calculations.

  13. Of images and ills. Uses and malaises of sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Didi-Huberman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This text is published as postface to the new edition of Invention de l'hystérie. Charcot et l’iconographie photographique de l’hystérie (Macula, Paris, 2012, pp. 364-405 with the title Des images et des maux. It’s also the full version of the lecture organized by the Association Psychanalytique de France (September 24, 2011, entitled L’Usage de la sublimation. Starting from some considerations on his first book, the Author examines limits and potentials of the notion of sublimation in reference with art and artistic creation, and suggests a different way to approach it.

  14. Sublimation-Induced Shape Evolution of Silver Cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong

    2009-12-18

    The heat is on: Surface sublimation and shape transformation of silver cubes, enclosed by {100} surfaces and about 100nm in size, are examined by in situ transmission electron microscopy (see picture). High-index surfaces, such as {110}, of face-centered cubic metals are more stable when the temperature is close to the melting point.

  15. Finite agents, sublime feelings: response to Hanauer

    OpenAIRE

    Deligiorgi, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Tom Hanauer's thoughtful discussion of my article “The Pleasures of Contra-purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human” (2014) puts pressure on two important issues concerning the affective phenomenology of the sublime. My aim in that article was to present an analysis of the sublime that does not suffer from the problems identified by Jane Forsey in “Is a Theory of the Sublime Possible?” (2007). I argued that Kant's notion of reflective judgment can help with this task, because it allo...

  16. Enthalpies of sublimation of fullerenes by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Herrera, Melchor; Campos, Myriam; Torres, Luis Alfonso; Rojas, Aarón, E-mail: arojas@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enthalpies of sublimation of fullerenes were measured by thermogravimetry. • Results of enthalpies of sublimation are comparable with data reported in literature. • Not previously reported enthalpy of sublimation of C{sub 78} is supplied in this work. • Enthalpies of sublimation show a strong dependence with the number of carbon atoms in the cluster. • Enthalpies of sublimation are congruent with dispersion forces ruling cohesion of solid fullerene. - Abstract: The enthalpies of sublimation of fullerenes, as measured in the interval of 810–1170 K by thermogravimetry and applying the Langmuir equation, are reported. The detailed experimental procedure and its application to fullerenes C{sub 60}, C{sub 70}, C{sub 76}, C{sub 78} and C{sub 84} are supplied. The accuracy and uncertainty associated with the experimental results of the enthalpy of sublimation of these fullerenes show that the reliability of the measurements is comparable to that of other indirect high-temperature methods. The results also indicate that the enthalpy of sublimation increases proportionally to the number of carbon atoms in the cluster but there is also a strong correlation between the enthalpy of sublimation and the polarizability of each fullerene.

  17. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  18. Sacred Space and Sublime Sacramental Piety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2012-01-01

    Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime.......Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime....

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of sublimation in silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoro, Michael A; Kovar, Desiderio; Ferreira, Paulo J

    2013-09-24

    In situ heating experiments were performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to monitor the thermal stability of silver nanoparticles. The sublimation kinetics from isothermal experiments on individual nanoparticles was used to assess the actual temperatures of the nanoparticles by considering the localized heating from the electron beam. For isolated nanoparticles, beam heating under normal TEM operating conditions was found to increase the temperature by tens of degrees. For nominally isothermal experiments, the observed sublimation temperatures generally decreased with decreasing particle size, in agreement with the predictions from the Kelvin equation. However, sublimation of smaller nanoparticles was often observed to occur in discrete steps, which led to faceting of the nanoparticles. This discrete behavior differs from that predicted by conventional theory as well as from experimental observations in larger nanoparticles where sublimation was continuous. A hypothesis that explains the mechanism for this size-dependent behavior is proposed.

  20. Extending the Direct Behavior Rating: An Examination of Schoolwide Behavior Ratings and Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Allison; Barron, Sheila; Fernando, Josephine; Balint-Langel, Kinga

    2018-01-01

    Direct behavior ratings have been identified as a practical and feasible alternative to direct observation of behavior for monitoring behavioral progress. Despite the evidence of usability, there have been calls for further examination of direct behavior ratings using different behaviors and scales. To this end, we examined the ratings of…

  1. Debate on sublime in the end of 18th century: Burke, Kant, Schiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremić-Molnar Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the authors are examining three positions within the 18th Century aesthetic discussion on the sublime - Edmund Burke's, Immanuel Kant's and Friedrich Schiller's. They are also trying to reconstruct the political backgrounds of each of this theoretical positions: old regime conservatism (Burke, republican liberalism (Schiller and romantic longing for the 'third way' (Kant. The most sophisticated and mature theory of sublime is found in Schiller's aesthetic works, especially in those following his disappointment in French Revolution, in which the relationship between sublime and paradoxes of historical violence is most thoroughly reflected.

  2. Examination of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory Discrepancy Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashley M.; Brestan, Elizabeth V.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) "discrepancy hypothesis", which asserts that a discrepancy in score elevations on the ECBI Intensity and Problem Scales is related to problematic parenting styles. The Intensity Scale measures the frequency of child disruptive behavior, and the Problem Scale measures parent…

  3. Schopenhauer e os paradoxos do sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Arnaud

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2012v11nesp1p153A principal distinção entre a concepção schopenhaueriana e kantiana do sublime reside, segundo este artigo, no fato que o observador, no último caso, deve ser submetido a um perigo apenas possível, enquanto no primeiro caso ele deve ser realmente amedrontado. O principal impulso do sentimento do sublime é de fato, em Schopenhauer, a intervenção da vontade, que deve ser portanto realmente ameaçada. Daí resultam alguns paradoxos e originalidades da teoria do sublime de Schopenhauer, principalmente de um ponto de vista ético, cujos vestígios eu tento seguir.

  4. Three Essays Examining Household Energy Demand and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Anthony Gregory

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays examining household energy decisions and behavior. The first essay examines the adoption of energy efficient Energy Star home appliances by U.S. households. Program effectiveness requires that consumers be aware of the labeling scheme and also change their purchase decisions based on label information. The first essay examines the factors associated with consumer awareness of the Energy Star label of recently purchased major appliances and the fac...

  5. Examining consumer behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Alexa; Townsend, Ellen

    2006-06-01

    This study examined behavior toward genetically modified (GM) food in a British community-based sample. We used an equivalent gain task in which participants actually received the options they chose to encourage truthful responding. In conjunction with this, theory of planned behavior (TPB) components were evaluated so as to examine the relative importance of behavioral influences in this domain. Here, the TPB was extended to include additional components to measure self-identity, moral norms, and emotional involvement. Results indicated that the monetary amounts participants accepted in preference to GM food were significantly lower than those accepted in preference to non-GM food. However, the vast majority of participants were indifferent between GM and non-GM food options. All TPB components significantly predicted behavioral intentions to try GM food, with attitudes toward GM being the strongest predictor. Self-identity and emotional involvement were also found to be significant predictors of behavioral intentions but moral norms were not. In addition, behavioral intentions significantly predicted behavior; however, PBC did not. An additional measure of participants' propensity to respond in a socially desirable manner indicated that our results were not influenced by self-presentation issues, giving confidence to our findings. Overall, it appears that the majority of participants (74.5%) would purchase GM food at some price.

  6. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  7. Alan Paton's Sublime: Race, Landscape and the Transcendence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article develops a postcolonial reading of the sublime by suggesting that aesthetic theories of the sublime were, in their classical philosophical formulations by Edmund Burke and Immanuel Kant, founded on problematic assumptions of racial difference. In the colonial sphere, it is argued, the sublime could discursively ...

  8. Art, Terrorism and the Negative Sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Berleant

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The range of the aesthetic has expanded to cover not only a wider range of objects and situations of daily life but also to encompass the negative. This includes terrorism, whose aesthetic impact is central to its use as a political tactic. The complex of positive and negative aesthetic values in terrorism are explored, introducing the concept of the sublime as a negative category to illuminate the analysis and the distinctive aesthetic of terrorism.

  9. A Scoping Review of Observational Studies Examining Relationships between Environmental Behaviors and Health Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Hutchinson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individual lifestyles are key drivers of both environmental change and chronic disease. We undertook a scoping review of peer-reviewed studies which examined associations between environmental and health behaviors of individuals in high-income countries. We searched EconLit, Medline, BIOSIS and the Social Science Citation Index. A total of 136 studies were included. The majority were USA-based cross-sectional studies using self-reported measures. Most of the evidence related to travel behavior, particularly active travel (walking and cycling and physical activity (92 studies or sedentary behaviors (19 studies. Associations of public transport use with physical activity were examined in 18 studies, and with sedentary behavior in one study. Four studies examined associations between car use and physical activity. A small number included other environmental behaviors (food-related behaviors (n = 14, including organic food, locally-sourced food and plate waste and other health behaviors ((n = 20 smoking, dietary intake, alcohol. These results suggest that research on individual environmental and health behaviors consists largely of studies examining associations between travel mode and levels of physical activity. There appears to be less research on associations between other behaviors with environmental and health impacts, and very few longitudinal studies in any domain.

  10. Examining the Role of Perceived Leader Behavior on Temporary Employees' Organizational Commitment and Citizenship Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djibo, Idriss J. A.; Desiderio, Katie P.; Price, Noriece M.

    2010-01-01

    The attention given to the contingent segment of the workforce has significantly increased over the past decade. Investigative topics include the correlates of temporary employee work attitudes and behaviors. This study used a correlational design to examine leader behaviors outlined by the path-goal theory of leadership, as perceived by temporary…

  11. The sublime in the anthropic landscape by means of modern photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonia Blanco Arroyo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article expounds on a conceptual analysis of the sublime, employing the anthropic landscape as the field of study, and registering both projections within the discipline of photography. Therefore, a narrative is formulated with the photographic production from the last few decades, in order to address both sublime nature and the current day industrial sublime. The conceptual constants from several artistic discourses define the line of argument running through this article to establish a theoretical framework for human existence in today’s post-industrial landscape. The artists selected provide a crucial unifying thread permitting the evolution and transformation of universal concepts of landscape to be examined; providing us with an updated conceptualization of the relationship between humans and their altered environment.

  12. Sublime dinâmico e pintura: Turner e Pollock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Barboza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2012v11nesp1p105Este texto tem por objetivo mostrar como a concepção filosófica do sublime em Kant e Schopenhauer pode nos ajudar a ver algumas obras pictóricas de Turner e Pollock. Nesse sentido temos um sublime figurativo (Turner e um sublime não figurativo (Pollock na pintura.

  13. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  14. Individual-Based Compulsive Sexual Behavior Scale: Its Development and Importance in Examining Compulsive Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrati, Yaniv; Mikulincer, Mario

    2018-04-03

    Compulsive sexual behavior comprises individual-based (e.g., sexual fantasies, compulsive sexual thoughts, masturbation) and partnered (e.g., interpersonal sexual conquests, repeated infidelity) facets. Most instruments for assessing compulsive sexual behavior, however, focus less on the individual-based facet and specifically on fantasies and compulsive thoughts. In the current research, we developed and validated an individual-based compulsive sexual behavior scale (I-CSB). In Study 1 (N = 492), the factorial structure of the I-CSB was examined. In Study 2 (N = 406), we assessed I-CSB's convergent validity. In Study 3 (N = 112), we examined whether the I-CSB differentiates between individuals who suffer from compulsive sexual behavior and those who do not. Results revealed a four-factor structure for individual-based compulsive sexual behavior that is associated with an intense inner conflict regarding sexuality (high arousal contrasting with high sexual anxiety), and that accounts for approximately 75% of the differences between people with compulsive sexual behavior and controls. Results are discussed in light of the need for a broader understanding of compulsive sexual behavior.

  15. Three Essays Examining Household Energy Demand and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Anthony G.

    This dissertation consists of three essays examining household energy decisions and behavior. The first essay examines the adoption of energy efficient Energy Star home appliances by U.S. households. Program effectiveness requires that consumers be aware of the labeling scheme and also change their purchase decisions based on label information. The first essay examines the factors associated with consumer awareness of the Energy Star label of recently purchased major appliances and the factors associated with the choice of Energy Star labeled appliances. The findings suggest that eliminating identified gaps in Energy Star appliance adoption would result in house electricity cost savings of $164 million per year and associated carbon emission reductions of about 1.1 million metric tons per year. The second essay evaluates household energy security and the effectiveness of the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), the single largest energy assistance program available to poor households within the United States. Energy security is conceptually akin to the well-known concept of food security. Rasch models and household responses to energy security questions in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey are used to generate an energy insecurity index that is consistent with those found in the food insecurity literature. Participating in LIHEAP is found to significantly reduce household energy insecurity score in the index. Further, simulations show that the elimination of the energy assistance safety net currently available to households increases the number of energy insecure house- holds by over 16 percent. The third essay develops a five equation demand system to estimate household own-price, cross-price and income elasticities between electricity, natural gas, food at home, food away from home, and non-durable commodity groups. Household cross-price elasticities between energy and food commodities are of particular importance. Energy price shocks

  16. Por uma metafísica do sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha de Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The sublime has been analyzed since ancient times with a striking compared with tragedy, whether as a literary genre, whether through Poetics, Aristotle's catharsis we translate the feeling the sublime. In modernity, new names were coming to work with this theory: Hume himself, in his essay The Tragedy, was impressed by the ability of this art form has to produce such strong effects on the viewer. But who else has strengthened analysis of the sublime in modernity, providing the basis for their own Kant was Edmund Burke, with his piece A philosophical investigation on the ideas of the sublime and the beautiful. The third criticism of Kant devoted a special moment to the analysis of the sublime, which had served as basis also for Schopenhauer, however, from her built his own aesthetic that would be of paramount importance Nieztsche for the young, mainly due to the consideration of music as sublime art. Nietzsche, then built his tragic wisdom, with based on the experience of the sublime tragedy.The question this paper wants to treat it exactly: It is possible think of a metaphysics of the sublime, based on Nietzsche?

  17. The Religious-Sublime in Music, Literature and Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes-Aldunate, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    their mechanisms with other modalities of sublimeness. The sublime will be regarded as the representation (in the sens of staging) of a perception. I will demonstrate how this subjective perception - in this case 'of the divinity' - is (re)constructed by the subject in a piece of Spanish Gothic literature...

  18. Conditions for Sublimating Water Ice to Supply Ceres' Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schörghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hayne, P. O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Sykes, M. V.; Combe, J.-P.; Ermakov, A. I.; Prettyman, T.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the conditions for sublimating water ice on Ceres to explain the observed water vapor output from telescopic observations. We find that while a buried ice table cannot produce enough vapor via sublimation to explain the exosphere, exposed surface ice (given it is exposed at the right time during the Ceres day and year, and at the right location) can.

  19. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  20. [Ethical behavioral standards of medical students on examinations and studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkin, Lior; Glick, Shimon

    2007-06-01

    In recent years the medical literature has reflected an increasing interest in the medical ethics of physicians and medical students. Studies have shown that cheating in medical school is frequent enough to cause concern, that there is a positive correlation between students' ethical attitude and their ethical behavior and between cheating in school and cheating in patient care. This study aims to examine student attitudes towards cheating, their self-reported behavior, analyze cultural and sub-cultural differences, and to reach practical conclusions that might be incorporated into the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to 193 first and second year students of the Israeli and American programs at Ben-Gurion University. The questionnaire consisted of fifty three multiple choice questions. The students were asked to state their opinion on various cheating practices at medical school and dishonesty in patient care, to estimate how they would resolve various ethical dilemmas and to provide some demographic information. The results were analyzed using SPSS. T-tests, Chi-Square tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman's coefficients, all used as appropriate. Completed questionnaires were returned by 141 students (73%). The majority of the students regard cheating in an exam (93%) or on a final paper (85%) to be morally unacceptable behavior. Copying during an exam is regarded as more morally unacceptable than copying a homework exercise. The majority of the students consider faking a patient's laboratory results to be morally unacceptable behavior (98%). American students regard copying a homework exercise, reconstructing exam questions for the benefit of next year students and giving answers to a fellow student during an exam to be more morally unacceptable in comparison to the Israeli students. Married students consider cheating to be more morally unacceptable than unmarried students. A positive

  1. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  2. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  3. Examination of the Obesity Epidemic from a Behavioral Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, A. Tamlyn

    2009-01-01

    Obesity prevalence has doubled among adults and overweight has tripled among children since 1980. This article discusses behavioral approaches to the obesity epidemic, focusing on recent environmental changes, the resulting behaviors, and possible solutions. Over the last 4 decades, time spent in sedentary activities, the consumption of fast food,…

  4. Examining Subtypes of Behavioral/Emotional Risk Using Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Bridget V.; Gallagher, Emily K.; Hochbein, Craig D.; Loukas, Austin; Dai, Chenchen

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral and emotional problems among children and adolescents can lead to numerous negative outcomes without intervention. From a prevention standpoint, screening for behavioral and emotional risk is an important step toward identifying such problems before the point of diagnosis or referral. The present study conducted a k-means cluster…

  5. A Longitudinal Study Examining Changes in Students' Leadership Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Barry Z.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a leadership development program in students' first year with the subsequent leadership behaviors of those students in their senior year. Significant changes were reported in the frequency of engaging in leadership behaviors from freshman to senior years. No differences were found on the basis of gender. In…

  6. Sublimation of antimycotic agents as proved by various analytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, A; Schmelzer, C E H; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R H H

    2006-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate that the pure substances amorolfine base, amorolfine hydrochloride, two selected morpholine derivatives and terbinafine hydrochloride are clearly able to sublimate. As amorolfine hydrochloride is also capable to sublimate from galencial forms laquer and cream in this experimental setup, a clinical relevance of sublimation phenomenon at least for topical treatment of onychomycosis has to be considered. This phenomenon could be one reason for advantageous clinical and mycological cure rates of amorolfine nail laquer to comparable topical products reported in the literature.

  7. Carbon-Sublimation Production of Fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Frank Albert

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-sublimation production of fullerenes enjoys wide use in both experimental and industrial application worldwide. Although it has been nearly five years since the inception of the technique, little is known about the roles various parameters play in the production process. This work attempts to shed light, both experimentally and theoretically, on the basic processes at work in this type of fullerene production. Experimental results herein show that a functional relationship exists among the C_{60 }, C_{70}, C_{76}, C_ {78}, and C_{84} fullerenes produced in carbon arcs. This result is interpreted to mean that an equilibrium description of the production process may be valid. Theoretical calculations are then offered in support of such a view. The theory goes on to show details of an equilibrium description that reproduce essential features of fullerene mass-spectra. It is shown that equilibrium abundances of n-atom -sized clusters are highly dependent on the stoichiometric equation chosen to describe the system. However, common traits of the investigated equilibrium descriptions lead to useful conclusions.

  8. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  9. Sublimity and beauty: A view from nursing aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-González, José; Solano-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Several authors have focused on the aesthetics of nursing care from diverse perspectives; however, there are few studies about the sublime and the beautiful in nursing. To identify beautiful and sublime moments in the context of the aesthetics of nursing care. A theoretical reflection has been contemplated about sublime and beautiful values in the context of the aesthetics of nursing care from the cultural history perspective. For that purpose, a revision of this issue has been completed. The terms 'beautiful' and 'sublime' have been analysed to identify the characteristics of both in the context of nursing care. We have followed all ethical requirements regarding the sources, conducting research and authorship. There is no conflict of interest in this paper. With aesthetic knowledge, the nurse expresses the artistic nature of nursing care by appreciating the act of caring for individuals. The sublime is a complex phenomenon, since apparently contrary feelings are interwoven. Nursing care is an art with an anthropological object-subject on which the 'artist' applies their prior knowledge and skills. Feelings and emotions that develop during the clinical nursing practice - especially at times sublime and beautiful, aesthetic - constitute experiences which are professionally significant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. O Sublime explicado às crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Figueiredo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Como o próprio título indica, este ensaio pretende dialogar com a recepção do sublime kantiano pela filosofia francesa contemporânea, sobretudo com Jean-François Lyotard. Dessa forma, ao invés de ressaltar as consequências inevitável ou sistematicamente morais do sublime kantiano, como fez, de um modo geral, o comentário mais tradicional da filosofia crítica de Kant, este ensaio tenta interpretar o sublime como sendo essencialmente uma experiência da arte, seguindo assim de perto aquela tradição francesa. Mas, ao mesmo tempo, tomando alguma distância, este texto quer fazer uma objeção ao fundamento exclusivamente burkiano da concepção de sublime de Lyotard. Em suma, quero defender que é possível privilegiar o tempo (aspecto central do sublime de Edmund Burke, segundo Lyotard também na experiência do sublime kantiano.

  11. Examining the Relationship between Technology Leadership Behaviors and Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations invest substantial resources into technology initiatives intended to generate advantages associated with improved use of human resources, increased operational efficiencies, and creating new capacities within processes and products; however, there is limited knowledge regarding how technology leadership behaviors influence project…

  12. Examining Multiple Parenting Behaviors on Young Children's Dietary Fat Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Christina M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Crespo, Noe C.; Lopez, Nanette V.; Zive, Michelle Murphy; Corder, Kirsten; Wood, Christine; Elder, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To understand the association between parenting and children's dietary fat consumption, this study tested a comprehensive model of parenting that included parent household rules, parent modeling of rules, parent mediated behaviors, and parent support. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Baseline data from the "MOVE/me Muevo"…

  13. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  14. Environmental Attitudes and Behaviors: An Examination of the Antecedents of Behavior Among Air Force Members at Work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laudenslager, Mark

    1996-01-01

    .... The behaviors and intentions individuals have towards recycling, energy conservation, and carpooling were examined, with the demographic variables of gender, age, and education also investigated...

  15. O paradoxo sublime ou a alforria da arte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste texto, pretendo analisar a tese principal do ensaio “A verdade sublime” de Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, a qual poderia ser formulada do seguinte modo: a verdade sublime é o Ereignis, esse é o fundamento a partir do qual se desenvolveu uma dificílima operação que consistiu em modificar a tradição do sublime sempre apresentado negativamente naquilo que Lacoue-Labarthe chamou de "compreensão afirmativa do sublime ou da grande arte". O autor estabelece uma astuciosa aliança entre o que há de mais radical no pensamento de Heidegger e o sublime, tratado de maneira bastante polêmica, como a principal teoria da arte de Kant. Dessa articulação fundamental, pode-se concluir que ele não está apenas à procura de uma “Estética” (sequer de uma “Teoria da Arte” sublime, mas, em busca de algo que é muito mais ambicioso, a saber: de um pensamento do sublime. Portanto, na minha opinião, o ensaio lacouelabarthiano constitui, por um lado, uma referência indispensável não só a quem quer que pretenda estudar a tradição do sublime, mas, por outro, compreender o pensamento heideggeriano sobre a arte e sua tentativa de encontrar uma determinação mais essencial e, sobretudo, ousaria dizer, mais política da arte.

  16. Examining the Effects of Stereotype Threat on Test-Taking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbaum, Charles A.; Blanshetyn, Victoria; Marshall-Wolp, Elizabeth; McCue, Elizabeth; Strauss, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between stereotype threat and individual test-taking behaviors. Previous research has examined the impact of stereotype threat on test scores, but little research has examined the impact of stereotype threat on the test-taking behaviors impacting those scores. Using a pre-post experimental design, stereotype…

  17. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  18. Examining the development and sexual behavior of adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mary A

    2010-04-01

    A careful examination of young men's sexuality by health professionals in pediatrics, primary care, and reproductive health is foundational to adolescent male sexual health and healthy development. Through a review of existing published data, this article provides background and a developmental framework for sexual health services for adolescent boys. The article first defines and provides an overview of adolescent boys' sexual health, and then discusses developmentally focused research on the following topics: (1) early romantic relationships and the evolution of power and influence within these relationships; (2) developmental "readiness" for sex and curiosity; (3) boys' need for closeness and intimacy; (4) adopting codes of masculinity; (5) boys' communicating about sex; and (6) contextual influences from peers, families, and providers. This article concludes by examining the implications of these data for sexual health promotion efforts for adolescent males, including human papillomavirus vaccination.

  19. Social Contagion Theory: Examining Dynamic Social Networks and Human Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas A Christakis; Fowler, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we review the research we have done on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) in order to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a ...

  20. Vapor pressures and sublimation enthalpies of seven heteroatomic aromatic hydrocarbons measured using the Knudsen effusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, Jillian L., E-mail: JillianLGoldfarb@gmail.co [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Suuberg, Eric M., E-mail: Eric_Suuberg@brown.ed [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The vapor pressures of seven heteroatom-containing cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, ranging in molecular weight from (168.19 to 208.21) g . mol{sup -1} were measured over the temperature range of (301 to 486) K using the isothermal Knudsen effusion technique. The compounds measured include: anthraquinone, 9-fluorenone, 9-fluorenone oxime, phenoxazine, phenoxathiin, and 9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole. These solid-state sublimation measurements provided values that are compared to vapor pressures of parent aromatic compounds (anthracene and fluorene) and to others with substituent groups in order to examine the effects of alcohol, ketone, pyridine, and pyrrole functionality on this property. The enthalpies and entropies of sublimation for each compound were determined from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Though there is no consistent trend in terms of the effects of substitutions on changes in the enthalpy or entropy of sublimation, we note that the prevalence of enthalpic or entropic driving forces on vapor pressure depend on molecule-specific factors and not merely molecular weight of the substituents.

  1. Characterization of Sulfur and Nanostructured Sulfur Battery Cathodes in Electron Microscopy Without Sublimation Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Zachman, Michael J.; Werner, Jörg G.; Sahore, Ritu; Nguyen, Kayla X.; Han, Yimo; Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Wiesner, Ulrich; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Muller, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Abstract

    Lithium sulfur (Li–S) batteries have the potential to provide higher energy storage density at lower cost than conventional lithium ion batteries. A key challenge for Li–S batteries is the loss of sulfur to the electrolyte during cycling. This loss can be mitigated by sequestering the sulfur in nanostructured carbon–sulfur composites. The nanoscale characterization of the sulfur distribution within these complex nanostructured electrodes is normally performed by electron microscopy, but sulfur sublimates and redistributes in the high-vacuum conditions of conventional electron microscopes. The resulting sublimation artifacts render characterization of sulfur in conventional electron microscopes problematic and unreliable. Here, we demonstrate two techniques, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning electron microscopy in air (airSEM), that enable the reliable characterization of sulfur across multiple length scales by suppressing sulfur sublimation. We use cryo-TEM and airSEM to examine carbon–sulfur composites synthesized for use as Li–S battery cathodes, noting several cases where the commonly employed sulfur melt infusion method is highly inefficient at infiltrating sulfur into porous carbon hosts.

  2. Characterization of Sulfur and Nanostructured Sulfur Battery Cathodes in Electron Microscopy Without Sublimation Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Zachman, Michael J; Werner, Jörg G; Sahore, Ritu; Nguyen, Kayla X; Han, Yimo; Xie, Baoquan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Wiesner, Ulrich; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Muller, David A

    2017-02-01

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries have the potential to provide higher energy storage density at lower cost than conventional lithium ion batteries. A key challenge for Li-S batteries is the loss of sulfur to the electrolyte during cycling. This loss can be mitigated by sequestering the sulfur in nanostructured carbon-sulfur composites. The nanoscale characterization of the sulfur distribution within these complex nanostructured electrodes is normally performed by electron microscopy, but sulfur sublimates and redistributes in the high-vacuum conditions of conventional electron microscopes. The resulting sublimation artifacts render characterization of sulfur in conventional electron microscopes problematic and unreliable. Here, we demonstrate two techniques, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning electron microscopy in air (airSEM), that enable the reliable characterization of sulfur across multiple length scales by suppressing sulfur sublimation. We use cryo-TEM and airSEM to examine carbon-sulfur composites synthesized for use as Li-S battery cathodes, noting several cases where the commonly employed sulfur melt infusion method is highly inefficient at infiltrating sulfur into porous carbon hosts.

  3. Understanding Knowledge Sharing Behavior: An Examination of the Extended Model of Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Knowledge is recognized as one valuable asset for many organizations. Thus, knowledge-sharing is one of important activities in many organizations, including university. Knowledge sharing is defined as activities of transferring or disseminating organizationally relevant information, ideas, suggestions, and expertise with one another. This research applied Christian values as a moderating variable in the framework of theory of planned behavior. The aims of this research to assess applicability of the theory of planned behavior to predict knowledge sharing and to examine the effects of Christian values in the relationship between attitude and intention to share knowledge. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data for this study. The data was then analyzed using structural equation modeling. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. Por uma metafí­sica do sublime

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Martha de

    2010-01-01

     O sublime vem sendo analisado desde a antiguidade com uma marcante relaçáo com a tragédia, seja como gênero literário, seja por meio da Poética, de Aristóteles que nos traduz pela catarse o sentimento do sublime. Na modernidade, novos nomes foram chegando para colaborar com esta teoria: o próprio Hume, em seu ensaio Da tragédia, mostrou-se impressionado com a capacidade que esta forma de arte tem de produzir efeitos táo intensos no espectador. Porém, quem mais fortaleceu a análise do sublime...

  5. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  6. Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-20

    Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a 'three degrees of influence' property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. EXAMINATION OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP BEHAVIOR CHARACTERISTICS OF SPORT FACILITY ADMINISTRATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi YETİM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the study, transformational leadership levels of sport facility administrators were established and differences according to the demographic characteristics of participants were examined. In the study where descriptive survey model was used transformational leadership scale developed by Bass and Avolio (1995 was implemented as a data collection tool on 293 sport administrators in the Province of Ankara. In the search res ult, the fact that administrators who graduated from educational institutions related to physical education and sports have a higher kevel of transformational leadership (  =4,07 and idealized effect dimension take the place on top has been established. It was determined that Private Sport Facility administrators have higher transformational leadership levels, and significant difference in favour of private sport facility administrators in “Motivation with Prompting” and “Intellectual S timulation” sub - dimenstions, and sport facility administrators working in local authorities in “Idealized Effect (Behavior” sub - dimension was identified. The fact that gender variable and leadership levels of the participants are on the same level and, no netheless, there is a significant difference in favour of administrators who graduated from educational institutions related to physical education and sports in transformational leadership scale and “Idealized Effect (Imputed”, “Motivation with Prompting” , “Intellectual Stimulation”, “Individual Support” sub - dimensions was detected.

  8. Micro-computed tomography observation of sublimation interface and image analysis on sublimation process during freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; Tao, Le-Ren; Hua, Tse-Chao

    2007-01-01

    The freeze-drying process is complicated with complex heat and mass transfer during sublimation. The sublimation interface of freeze-drying has become more attractive and meaningful recently. In this study, apple slices undergoing sublimation were scanned by a Micro-CT scanner. The cross-sectional images were reconstructed with those scanning images respectively. The technique of grey value analysis was used to recognize the procedure. The results showed that, from direct scanning images and 2-D reconstructed images, a 3-D moving mode of sublimation interface which contracted to the centre of the sample could be seen, sublimation process proceeded from edge to center gradually. The grey value of ice crystals was determined to be 154 through gauss calculation. By comparing frozen sample with freeze-dried one, the ice crystals regions in the beginning became the porous regions after drying, grey values increased correspondingly. Samples shrunk slightly after drying for 3 to 7 hours, which could be distinguished by the change in grey values.

  9. Informant Effects on Behavioral and Academic Associations: A Latent Variable Longitudinal Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timothy R.; Shukla, Kathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies among informants' ratings of a given child's behavior complicate the study of linkages between child behavior and academic achievement. In the current study, we examined the potential moderating effect of informant type on associations between behavior and two types of achievement in a longitudinal growth model that…

  10. Oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-02-01

    Porous graphite plates, cylinders and cones with densities of 1.55-1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10 kW fiber laser at 0.075 -3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 - 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7 mm thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be re-deposited on the graphite surface. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside of the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. Visible emission spectroscopy reveals C2 Swan and CN red, CN violet bands and Li, Na, and K 2P3/2,1/2 - 2S1/2 doublets. The reacting boundary layer is observed using a mid-wave imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) at 2 cm-1 spectral resolution, 0.5 mm/pixel spatial resolution, and 0.75 Hz data cube rate. A two-layer radiative transfer model was used to determine plume temperature, CO, and CO2 concentrations from spectral signatures. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  11. The experimental investigations of peculiarities of metalorganic compounds sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochkareva Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental investigations of convective heat and mass transfer by sublimation of a single particle of metallorganic compounds mixture in an argon flow. The gas temperature is 180-290 ºС, the flow velocity is up to 2 m/s. The influence of the Zr(dpm4 and Y(dpm3 proportions on the characteristics of the transport processes was considered. An increase in the fraction of the more fusible component reduces the temperature of the particle during the sublimation process.

  12. Perceptions of Examiner Behavior Modulate Power Relations in Oral Performance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plough, India C.; Bogart, Pamela S. H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent are the discourse behaviors of examiners salient to participants of an oral performance test? This exploratory study employs a grounded ethnographic approach to investigate the perceptions of the verbal, paralinguistic and nonverbal discourse behaviors of an examiner in a one-on-one role-play task that is one of four tasks in an…

  13. Adoptive Parent Hostility and Children's Peer Behavior Problems: Examining the Role of Genetically Informed Child Attributes on Adoptive Parent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Kit K.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Gaysina, Darya; Barrett, Doug; Leve, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    Socially disruptive behavior during peer interactions in early childhood is detrimental to children's social, emotional, and academic development. Few studies have investigated the developmental underpinnings of children's socially disruptive behavior using genetically sensitive research designs that allow examination of parent-on-child and…

  14. Viscous drops bounce faster: prompt tumbling-rebound from a sublimating slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Mazloomi, M. Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    We discovered a new drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting onto tilted sublimating surfaces. By focusing on non-axisymmetric impact conditions at increasing viscosity, we demonstrate that low viscous drops show a ``slide, spread, recoil and rebound'' behavior, whereas viscous drops exhibit a ``prompt tumbling-rebound'' behavior. As such, viscous glycerol drops surprisingly rebound faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water drops. This is made possible by a small conversion of translational to rotational kinetic energy, at non-axisymmetric impact conditions, as also confirmed by additional Lattice Boltzmann simulations: a rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body, promotes a rapid rebound of more viscous drops, which are capable to rebound without recoiling. By studying drop impact dynamics, we explore the drop behavior in contactless and frictionless conditions, and identify the Ohnesorge number as the primary parameter to predict the transition between different impact regimes on tilted sublimating slopes, with tumbling observed for Ohnesorge numbers higher than unity.

  15. Feasibility study of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schach, M.O.; Oyarzun, B.A.; Schramm, H.; Schneider, R.; Repke, J.U.

    2011-01-01

    Processes for carbon capture and storage have the drawback of high energy demand. In this work the application of CO2 capture by anti-sublimation is analyzed. The process was simulated using Aspen Plus. Process description is accomplished by phase equilibria models which are able to reproduce the

  16. Vapor transport and sublimation on Mullins Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamp, J. L.; Marchant, D. R.

    2017-05-01

    We utilize an environmental chamber capable of recreating the extreme polar conditions of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica to investigate the sublimation rate of the Mullins Valley debris-covered glacier (hereafter Mullins Glacier), reportedly one of the oldest debris-covered alpine glaciers in the world. We measure ice loss via sublimation beneath sediment thicknesses ranging from 0 to 69 mm; from this, we determine an effective diffusivity for Fickian vapor transport through Mullins till of (5.2 ± 0.3) ×10-6 m2s-1 at -10 °C. We use this value, coupled with micrometeorological data from Mullins Valley (atmospheric temperature, relative humidity, and soil temperature) to model the sublimation rate of buried glacier ice near the terminus of Mullins Glacier, where the overlying till thickness approaches 70 cm. We find that the ice-lowering rate during the modeled year (2011) was 0.066 mm under 70 cm of till, a value which is in line with previous estimates for exceedingly slow rates of ice sublimation. These results provide further evidence supporting the probable antiquity of Mullins Glacier ice and overall landscape stability in upland regions of the MDV.

  17. Some attributes of snow occurrence and snowmelt/sublimation rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present attributes of snow occurrence and dissipation rates (melt and sublimation) for the Lesotho Highlands, based on remotely-sensed MODIS images from 2003–2016. Multi-temporal imagery is used, with SNOMAP and NDSI algorithms applied to MODIS Rapid Response images. The spatial extent of snow loss was ...

  18. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  19. Examination of disruptive behavior outcomes and moderation in a randomized psychotherapy trial for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Khrista; Macpherson, Heather A; Fristad, Mary A

    2013-07-01

    Multifamily psychoeducational psychotherapy (MF-PEP) is an efficacious treatment for children with mood disorders. Given the comorbidity between disruptive behaviors and mood disorders, this study examined associations between disruptive behaviors and impairment, impact of MF-PEP on disruptive behaviors, and whether disruptive behaviors affected treatment response of mood symptoms. Secondary analyses examined a randomized controlled trial of MF-PEP versus waitlist control (N = 165 children 8-11 years old with mood disorders and their parents). Comorbid behavioral diagnoses occurred in 97% of children. All participants continued treatment as usual. Greater degree of disruptive behaviors was associated with worse mood symptoms and impairment. Between-group analyses examining outcome of disruptive behaviors were nonsignificant. Within-group analyses and between-group effect sizes suggested that MF-PEP was associated with decreases in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (d = 0.39), oppositional defiant disorder (d = 0.30), and overall disruptive behavior symptoms (d = 0.30), but not conduct disorder symptoms. Baseline severity of disruptive behaviors did not affect treatment response of mood symptoms to MF-PEP. MF-PEP is an effective intervention for children with mood disorders and provides some benefit for disruptive behaviors. Given that disruptive behavior severity does not affect children's ability to experience improved mood symptoms, MF-PEP may be an important early intervention for children with comorbid mood and disruptive behavior disorders. Subsequent intervention targeting behavioral symptoms after improvement in mood may be beneficial. Studies examining treatment sequencing for children with comorbid mood and disruptive behavior disorders are needed. Clinical trial registration information-Family psychoeducation for children with mood disorders; http://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00050557. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent

  20. Sublimation of amino acids with enantiomeric excess amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Bellec, Aurelien

    The notion of chirality was first reported in 1848 by Pasteur, when he mechanically separated the two enantiomers of tartrate salts.[1] Amino acids are considered as the most important building blocks of life with sugars. On the Earth, the living systems are only composed of L- amino acids and D-sugars. Nowadays, the origin of homochirality on Earth is still unknown, and there are many theories trying to explain this phenomenon. Recently Cooks [2] and Feringa [3] reported that the sublimation of small amounts of L and D amino acid mixtures containing an excess of one of them leads to a huge enantiomeric excess (ee) enhancement of the sublimate. We reinvestigated these experiments to determine the rules leading to this enhancement. Starting from mixtures of L- and DL leucine we observed increasing and decreasing of the ee in function of the starting ratios. By the use of 13C derivatives, the origin of the sublimed enantiomers has been precised. Various parameters (L and D, or L and DL mixtures, dissolution in water before sublimation, . . . ) were studied. We also took into consideration the recently proposed hypothesis of the role played by the eutectic ee in the sublimation. [4] The application of these results to find an explanation of the enantiomeric excess in meteorites or in the Primitive Earth scenarios will be discussed. 1 Pasteur, L. Ann. Phys., 1848, 24, 442. 2 R. H. Perry, C. Wu, M. Nefliu, R. G. Cooks, Chem. Commun., 2007, 1071-1073. 3 S. P. Fletcher, R. B. C. Jagt, B. L. Feringa, Chem. Commun., 2007, 2578-2580. 4 D. G. Blackmond, M. Klussmannb Chem. Commun., 2007, 3990-3996.

  1. Health-Risk Behaviors and Dating Violence Victimization: An Examination of the Associated Risk Behaviors Among Detained Female Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dione Moultrie; Hatcher, Schnavia Smith; Blakey, Joan Marie; Mbizo, Justice

    2015-01-01

    There are many health-risk behaviors that may elevate the risk of adolescents engaging in teenage dating violence. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the health-risk behaviors that are associated with a sample of female juvenile offenders to identify the extent to which those behaviors contribute to dating violence. The survey assessed respondents' health-risk behaviors prior to incarceration, their perceptions of quality of life, post-incarceration expectations, psychosocial factors, and other social determinants. Results indicated youth exposure to dating violence, alcohol, drug, and risky sexual behaviors in the year prior to incarceration. These findings demonstrate the need to address teen dating violence with at-risk adolescents in addition to risky behaviors.

  2. Det sublime og det skjønne som estetisk kvalitet i nyere norsk bildebokkritikk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goga, Nina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses a specific number of picture book reviews on prize-winning Norwegian picture books from 1998-2008. The subject for the analysis is to examine what kind of aesthetic thinking that is expressed in the reviewer’s judgement of the book. I found that it was possible to relate the reviews to two well established concepts in classic aesthetic theory, namely the concept of the beauty and the sublime. To illustrate this I have studied more exhaustive a smaller number of reviews on two different books

  3. Examining Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Two Observational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronach, Sheri; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study of the FIRST WORDS® Project examined restricted and repetitive behaviors in a sample of 55 toddlers at a mean age of 20 months who were later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Restricted and repetitive behaviors were coded using the Repetitive Movement and Restricted Interest Scales in two video-recorded observation…

  4. An Examination of Risky Drinking Behaviors and Motivations for Alcohol Use in a College Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Brynn E.; Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Linden, Ashley N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined (1) drinking motives as a mediator of risky drinking behaviors (ie, pregaming and drinking games) and alcohol-related problems and (2) whether gender moderates the association between risky drinking behaviors and negative consequences. Participants: Participants ("N" = 368; 68% female) were drinkers…

  5. Stop Bugging Me: An Examination of Adolescents' Protection Behavior against Online Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, May O.; Li, Benjamin; Ang, Rebecca P.

    2012-01-01

    Online harassment is a widespread phenomenon with consequential implications, especially for adolescents, who tend to engage in high-risk behavior online. Through the use of Protection Motivation Theory (PMT), we examine the predictors motivating the intention of youths to adopt protection behavior against online harassment. A survey was conducted…

  6. Examining Relationships among Enabling School Structures, Academic Optimism and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, Penelope Pope

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among enabling school structures, academic optimism, and organizational citizenship behaviors. Additionally, it sought to determine if academic optimism served as a mediator between enabling school structures and organizational citizenship behaviors. Three existing survey instruments, previously tested for…

  7. Examining Adolescent Suicidal Behaviors in Relation to Gun Carrying and Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Andrea; Bauman, Sheri; Ritter, Marissa; Anand, Payal

    2017-01-01

    Guided by the interpersonal theory of suicide, this study examines the associations between gun carrying, bullying, and suicidal behaviors among high school students. Arizona Youth Risk Behavior Surveys were completed by 2,677 students in 2011; 9.0% reported suicide attempt in the past year, 5.5% carried a gun in the past 30 days, 8.5% were…

  8. Using Behavioral Mapping to Examine the Validity of the IPIP-IPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Patrick; Anderson, Juliene M.; Markey, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral mapping, a method designed to relate behaviors to circumplex models, was used to examine the predictive validity of the International Personality Item Pool-Interpersonal Circumplex (IPIP-IPC). In this study, 96 participants first completed the IPIP-IPC and then were videotaped in a social interaction with a confederate. At the…

  9. Longitudinal Examination of Adaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence of Executive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth; Strang, John F.; Dudley, Katerina; Wallace, Gregory L.; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Kenworthy, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This study characterizes longitudinal change in adaptive behavior in 64 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) without intellectual disability evaluated on multiple occasions, and examines whether prior estimate of executive function (EF) problems predicts future adaptive behavior scores. Compared to standardized estimates…

  10. Stress, Cortisol, and Externalizing Behavior in Adolescent Males: An Examination in the Context of Multisystemic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Julia C.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Foster, Sharon L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation have been associated with externalizing behavior in adolescence, but few studies have examined these factors in a treatment context. This study investigated the relationship between stress, cortisol, and externalizing behavior among 120 adolescent males (mean age = 15) receiving…

  11. Examining visitors' behavioral intentions and behaviors in a Taiwan National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh-Lu Li; Garry E. Chick

    2011-01-01

    In 2007-2008, some visitors to Taroko National Park in Taiwan were surveyed to allow testing of a behavioral prediction model in the context of national park recreation. This model includes three constructs: values (a cultural anthropology factor), perceptions of service quality (service marketing factors), and perceptions of crowding (a national park recreation factor...

  12. Factors predicting Behavior Management Problems during Initial Dental Examination in Children Aged 2 to 8 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Mittal, Vipula; Singh, Aparna; Aggarwal, Nidhi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the various background variables and its influence on behavior management problems (BMP) in children. The study included 165 children aged 2 to 8 years. During the initial dental visit, an experienced operator obtained each child's background variables from accompanying guardians using a standardized questionnaire. Children's dental behavior was rated by Frankel behavior rating scale. The behavior was then analyzed in relation to the answers of the questionnaire, and a logistic regression model was used to determine the power of the variables, separately or combined, to predict BMP. The logistic regression analysis considering differences in background variables between children with negative or positive behavior. Four variables turned out to be as predictors: Age, the guardian's expectation of the child's behavior at the dental examination, the child's anxiety when meeting unfamiliar people, and the presence and absence of toothache. The present study concluded that by means of simple questionnaire BMP in children may be expected if one of these attributes is found. Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient prior to treatment process may help the pediatric dentist plan appropriate behavior management and treatment strategy. Sharma A, Kumar D, Anand A, Mittal V, Singh A, Aggarwal N. Factors predicting Behavior Management Problems during Initial Dental Examination in Children Aged 2 to 8 Years. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):5-9.

  13. Effects of varying obliquity on Martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Scalloped depressions in the Martian mid-latitudes are likely formed by sublimation of ice-rich ground. The stability of subsurface ice changes with the planetary obliquity, generally becoming less stable at lower axial tilt. As a result, the relative rates of sublimation and creep change over time. A landscape evolution model shows that these variations produce internal structure in scalloped depressions, commonly in the form of arcuate ridges, which emerge as depressions resume growth after pausing or slowing. In other scenarios, the formation of internal structure is minimal. Significant uncertainties in past climate and model parameters permit a range of scenarios. Ridges observed in some Martian scalloped depressions could date from obliquity lows or periods of low ice stability occurring <5 Ma, suggesting that the pits are young features and may be actively evolving.

  14. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  15. Sublimation Kinetic Studies of the Zr(tmhd4 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Arul Jeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal behaviour of tetrakis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionatozirconium(IV, [Zr(tmhd4] was investigated by nonisothermal and isothermal thermogravimetric methods in a high pure nitrogen atmosphere. The influence of the heating rate in dynamic measurements (6, 8, 10, and 12°C/min on activation energy was also studied. The nonisothermal sublimation activation energy values determined following the procedures of Arrhenius, Coats and Redfern, Kissinger, and Flynn-Wall yielded 76±5, 92±2, 81±8, and 72±7 kJ/mol, respectively, and the isothermal sublimation activation energy was found to be 87±4 kJ/mol over the temperature range of 411–462 K. Different reaction mechanisms were used to compare with this value. Analysis of the experimental results suggested that the actual reaction mechanism was an Rn deceleration type.

  16. An Examination of Self-Perceived Transformational Leadership Behaviors of Texas Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Walter Lloyd; Mixon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This study examined self-perceived transformational leadership behaviors among Texas superintendents. The purpose of this study was to examine if relationships existed between superintendents' self-perceived transformational leadership style, district size, teaching, principal, and superintendent years of experience. A review of the literature…

  17. An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

  18. An Invitation to the Ethnographic Study of University Examination Behavior: Concepts, Methodology, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albas, Cheryl; Albas, Dan

    1996-01-01

    Reports a series of ethnographic studies of student behavior concerning examinations, conducted in a Canadian university since the mid-1980s. Describes techniques of data gathering and the link between methodology and theory. Examines implications for higher education, including dealing with students' exam-related stress, factors influencing…

  19. Relationship of Body Image to Breast and Skin-Self Examination Intentions and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chait, Sari R.; Thompson, J. Kevin; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Breast self-examinations (BSE) and skin self-examinations (SSE) represent cost-effective and time-efficient approaches to cancer detections. Given their utility, it is important to determine who is likely to perform these behaviors regularly and why. Because BSE and SSE require close examination of one's body, women who are less satisfied and less comfortable with their bodies may perform these behaviors less often. This study sought to determine if a relationship exists between body image and BSE and SSE behaviors and intentions. Ninety-three women completed measures assessing body image, past performance of and future intentions to perform BSE and SSE. Results indicated that body image was related to past performance of SSE. Having greater satisfaction with overall appearance and evaluating oneself as more attractive were related to having performed SSE more frequently in the past year. Future research should further examine this relationship utilizing longitudinal designs and more diverse populations. PMID:19010096

  20. Some aspects of normal behavior: their use in understanding problems encountered by document examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, J F

    1976-01-01

    The premise that progress in document examination will depend on employing techniques useful in the more formal branches of science is not exactly logical. The correlation between the work of the document examiner and the behavioral sciences has been discussed by presenting some random thoughts which have occurred to the author over a period of years. The suggestion is made, by illustration and implication, that the unfortunate connotation of the word "behavior" with the word "graphology" has tended to direct the attention of document examiners away from a study of the behavioral sciences, a branch of science from which much can be learned. The fact that the subjective concepts of probability formed by the mature document examiner will approach mathematical expectation has been noted.

  1. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas, E-mail: valjo@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei [Max Lab, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Comparison of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC sublimation etching. • Effects of Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems on etching mechanisms. • Effect of etching ambient on surface reconstruction. • Application of etched 4H-SiC surface for the growth of graphene nanoribbons is illustrated. - Abstract: We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10{sup −5} mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  2. El Silencio de la Sirena: lo Sublime en Alejandra Pizarnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Lerman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algunas poéticas de las décadas del cincuenta y del sesenta parecerían constituirse en torno a un vacío, un silencio que a veces inspira la palabra poética y otras veces la aborta. Esa ambigüedad, característica de la poética de Alejandra Pizarnik, podemos entenderla como una “reedición” de la estética de lo sublime. Lo sublime es un concepto estético-filosófico que plantearon filósofos como Inmanuel Kant y Edmund Burke para pensar el arte romántico y, en el siglo XX, otros autores como Jean-François Lyotard, lo retomaron para analizar el arte de vanguardia. Así, lo sublime nos permite repensar la poética de Pizarnik en sus coincidencias y oposiciones a otras de la tradición moderna (como la de Charles Baudelaire o de las vanguardias latinoamericanas (como Oliverio Girondo y Vicente Huidobro.

  3. El Silencio de la Sirena: lo Sublime en Alejandra Pizarnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Lerman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2012v12n17p85 Algunas poéticas de las décadas del cincuenta y del sesenta parecerían constituirse en torno a un vacío, un silencio que a veces inspira la palabra poética y otras veces la aborta. Esa ambigüedad, característica de la poética de Alejandra Pizarnik, podemos entenderla como una “reedición” de la estética de lo sublime. Lo sublime es un concepto estético-filosófico que plantearon filósofos como Inmanuel Kant y Edmund Burke para pensar el arte romántico y, en el siglo XX, otros autores como Jean-François Lyotard, lo retomaron para analizar el arte de vanguardia. Así, lo sublime nos permite repensar la poética de Pizarnik en sus coincidencias y oposiciones a otras de la tradición moderna (como la de Charles Baudelaire o de las vanguardias latinoamericanas (como Oliverio Girondo y Vicente Huidobro.

  4. Physical properties of sublimated zinc telluride thin films for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Nazar Abbas, E-mail: nazar_abbas@comsats.edu.pk; Mahmood, Waqar

    2013-10-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films were fabricated by using closed space sublimation (CSS) technique on glass substrate under vacuum. Pre-fabricated ZnTe thin films were doped with silver (Ag) by ion exchange method. X-ray diffraction showed the preferred orientation (111) of ZnTe thin film with polycrystalline behavior. Scanning electron microscope images were taken to estimate the grain boundaries; energy dispersive X-ray results confirmed the Ag composition in doped-ZnTe samples. Electrical measurements were performed to determine the resistivity, mobility and carrier concentrations of un-doped thin films and Ag-doped samples. The electrical resistivity was of the order of 10{sup 6} Ω-cm before doping. Ag-doped ZnTe samples exhibits low resistivity of the order of 10{sup 3} Ω-cm along with a change in the carrier concentrations and mobility as well at room temperature. The angle resolved optical transmission data, taken by spectrophotometer, was used to find the optical properties before and after Ag doping. Energy band gap showed decreasing trend with increasing Ag doping time. - Highlights: • Zinc telluride thin films were grown by closed space sublimation technique. • Ag was doped, by ion exchange process. • Physical properties were investigated before and after doping.

  5. Examining externalizing behavior trajectories of youth in group homes: is there evidence for peer contagion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bethany R; Thompson, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Although concerns about peer contagion are often cited in critiques of group treatments for troubled youths, few studies have examined the effects of exposure to deviant peers in residential group care settings. This study used administrative data of youth served at Boys Town, a nationally-known group care provider. Using latent class growth analysis, this study identified the externalizing behavior trajectories of youth in group care as well as the behavior trajectory of the peers with whom they lived, assessed the relationship between youth trajectory classes and individual and peer group characteristics as well as the relationship between an individual youth's behavior pattern and the behavior pattern of proximal peers. Several results suggested the presence of peer contagion in group care: a trajectory class of gradually increasing externalizing behavior problems, the strength of deviant peer density in predicting an individual youth's externalizing behavior trajectories and significant associations between behavior patterns of youth and proximal peers. While there is some evidence that suggests an increase in problem behavior during care, results from this study indicated that over 90% of the youth did not have an increase in problem behaviors and that positive peer influences may also be protective and inhibit problem behaviors.

  6. The Sublimated Ideology of The Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Loewen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that ideologies present to us a rationality for making decisions, for getting things done, allows us to avoid the agony of choosing one world or another as a finite being, allows us to forget that it is we ourselves who must do and thus who are also to be done. Due to the work of having to live a human life with others who do not agree with us and will never be our servants, we are all ready to give up responsibilities to the political saviour; already this one presents to ourselves the One and only. By examining our private and picayune dogmatisms, we might gain some insight into why we are ever so often willing to become public fascists. We might well object to being objected to. Along with this, we are also objects in a world of objects. This is routine when compared to the dialectical intersubjectivity of voicing an objection in a throng of objections, of questioning the objectionable in a questionable politics. It is the very mundanity of acquiescence that dulls us to the danger pedestal-dwelling ideologies still represent.

  7. Teachers' Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Examining the Boundary between In-Role Behavior and Extra-Role Behavior from the Perspective of Teachers, Principals and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogolovsky, Elena; Somech, Anit

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how different stakeholders in school (principals, teachers, parents) conceptualize teachers' role breadth, i.e., whether they define given behaviors commonly assumed to be OCBs as in-role or extra-role behaviors. Drawing on a survey of 29 principals, 245 teachers and 345 parents, the results showed that principals and teachers…

  8. Combining fMRI and Behavioral Measures to Examine the Process of Human Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, Elisabeth A.; Emberson, Lauren L.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the advent of fMRI, the primary means of examining the mechanisms underlying learning were restricted to studying human behavior and non-human neural systems. However, recent advances in neuroimaging technology have enabled the concurrent study of human behavior and neural activity. We propose that the integration of behavioral response with brain activity provides a powerful method of investigating the process through which internal representations are formed or changed. Nevertheless, a review of the literature reveals that many fMRI studies of learning either (1) focus on outcome rather than process or (2) are built on the untested assumption that learning unfolds uniformly over time. We discuss here various challenges faced by the field and highlight studies that have begun to address them. In doing so, we aim to encourage more research that examines the process of learning by considering the interrelation of behavioral measures and fMRI recording during learning. PMID:24076012

  9. An examination of the construct and predictive validity of the self-reported speeding behavior model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Dragan; Šraml, Matjaž; Matović, Boško; Mićić, Spasoje

    2017-02-01

    The present study deals with the problem of speeding behavior on rural roads. The purpose of the paper is to examine the construct validity and the internal consistency and reliability of a questionnaire that measures the determinants of speeding behavior. In addition, it aimed to test the predictive validity of a modified theoretical framework of a theory of planned behavior (TPB) in relation to speeding behavior. A total of 546 car drivers from five local communities in the Republic of Srpska successfully completed the questionnaire after reading the scenario. The principal component analysis revealed seven components interpreted as: personal norm, perceived behavioral control, affective attitude toward speeding, subjective norm, habit, descriptive norm, and cognitive attitude toward speeding. A speeding behavior model was developed by structural equation modeling. Personal norm, subjective norm, and affective attitudes were shown to be important variables within the modified TPB in understanding speeding behavior. Overall, the present findings provide significant support for the concept of the modified theoretical framework of TPB in relation to speeding behavior on rural roads. Implications for a speeding behavior model and interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Experiment Examining the Relationship of Affect, Equity, and Equity Sensitivity, With Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Kalanick, Julie Lynn

    2006-01-01

    This study employed an experimental design intended to be an analog to the workplace to simultaneously examine the affect orientation and equity theory explanations of OCBs, which were evaluated as prosocial behaviors. Participants were 188 undergraduates. Participantsâ dispositional variables were measured at time 1, and at time 2, participants experienced an equity manipulation and were given the opportunity to perform prosocial behaviors. Results indicated a distinction between the decis...

  11. Sharing and giving across adolescence: an experimental study examining the development of prosocial behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Berna eGüroğlu; Wouter evan Den Bos; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we use economic exchange games to examine the development of prosocial behavior in the form of sharing and giving in social interactions with peers across adolescence. Participants from four age groups (9-, 12-, 15-, and 18-year-olds, total N = 119) played three types of distribution games and the Trust game with four different interaction partners: friends, antagonists, neutral classmates, and anonymous peers. Nine- and 12-year-olds showed similar levels of prosocial behavior t...

  12. The significance of vertical moisture diffusion on drifting snow sublimation near snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Shi, Guanglei

    2017-12-01

    Sublimation of blowing snow is an important parameter not only for the study of polar ice sheets and glaciers, but also for maintaining the ecology of arid and semi-arid lands. However, sublimation of near-surface blowing snow has often been ignored in previous studies. To study sublimation of near-surface blowing snow, we established a sublimation of blowing snow model containing both a vertical moisture diffusion equation and a heat balance equation. The results showed that although sublimation of near-surface blowing snow was strongly reduced by a negative feedback effect, due to vertical moisture diffusion, the relative humidity near the surface does not reach 100 %. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow does not stop. In addition, the sublimation rate near the surface is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that at 10 m above the surface and the mass of snow sublimation near the surface accounts for more than half of the total snow sublimation when the friction wind velocity is less than about 0.55 m s-1. Therefore, the sublimation of near-surface blowing snow should not be neglected.

  13. Emotional exhaustion, absenteeism, and turnover intentions in childcare teachers: examining the impact of physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Russell L; Baumgartner, Jennifer J; Matthews, Russell A; Tsouloupas, Costas N

    2010-09-01

    Drawing on Salmon's (2001) unifying theory of the beneficial effects of physical exercise, we examined physical activity behaviors as an important, but understudied, buffer against experiences of emotional exhaustion, absenteeism, and turnover intentions in 189 childcare teachers. Structural equation modeling revealed that workplace and leisure-time physical activity were negatively related to emotional exhaustion, which in turn, was positively related to teacher migration and attrition intentions. Post-hoc analyses revealed indirect (mediated) effects between physical activity behaviors and teacher turnover intentions via emotional exhaustion. This theoretically driven model fit the data better than an alternative model whereby emotional exhaustion predicts physical activity behaviors.

  14. Three Interventions for Financial Therapy: Fostering an Examination of Financial Behaviors and Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah J. Nelson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Three interventions that address the emotional components of handling finances are proposed. Drawn from a stepwise model of financial therapy, the three interventions introduced here have the specific aim of incorporating the emotional attributes of traditional financial behaviors and beliefs. First, the Financial Genogram identifies family of origin issues that may affect financial behaviors; second, the Financial Landscape intervention is used when emotional stress occurs in collecting and examining financial documents; and third, the Financial Mirror broadens clients’ perspectives of their financial behaviors. Issues in future research and implementation of the Five Step model are addressed in treating financially distressed clients.

  15. Prenatal examination behavior of Southeast Asian pregnant women in Taiwan: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miao-Ling; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2008-05-01

    There is growing concern about the factors affecting the prenatal examinations of immigrant women. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between the knowledge of pregnancy, attitude toward pregnancy and experience of medical services, and prenatal examination behavior of pregnant Southeast Asian women in Taiwan. This was a cross-sectional study with a structured questionnaire administered to participants. Participants were recruited from the community health centers in Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. The sampling criteria were as follows: each subject was to (a) have come from a Southeast Asian country, (b) be over 28 weeks pregnant to less than one year postpartum, (c) be able to communicate either in Mandarin or Taiwanese, and (d) be willing to participate in the research after hearing an explanation of it. As a result, 140 participants were recruited. A total of 132 participants completed the questionnaire and were used for data analysis. The participants completed structured questionnaires, which included the Demographic Inventory Scale, Knowledge of Pregnancy Scale, Attitudes toward Pregnancy Scale, Experience of Medical Services Scale and the Prenatal Examination Behavior Scale. Findings show that 80.3% of the subjects attended their first-time prenatal examination during the first trimester and 59.1% of the subjects evaluated their prenatal examinations as being adequate. Their attitude toward childbearing was significantly correlated with their prenatal examination behavior, including the initial time of prenatal examination and frequencies of prenatal examinations during pregnancy. Positive attitudes toward childbearing and prenatal examination, and the number of years spent in Taiwan were all significant predictive factors of frequencies of prenatal examinations during pregnancy. The findings of this study can not only help healthcare professionals understand the prenatal examination behavior and related factors of the participants, but

  16. Examining Factors Influencing Internet Addiction and Adolescent Risk Behaviors Among Excessive Internet Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiaolei; Huang, Xiuqin; Tao, Ran

    2017-08-29

    In China, public concern continues to mount regarding the risks of excessive Internet use among adolescents. This study investigated the factors influencing Internet addiction and adolescent risk behaviors among excessive Internet users. Proposing a conceptual model with a theoretical origin in risk behavior theory and media dependency theory, this study examined the influence of personality traits, online gaming, Internet connectedness (both the overall index and various scopes), and demographics on Internet addiction and risk behaviors (smoking, drinking, gambling, and risky sexual behaviors). Clinical data (N = 467) were retrieved from one of the earliest and largest Internet addiction clinics in China. The findings reveal that certain personality traits are significantly associated with Internet addiction and risk behaviors. Online gaming had a strong impact on both Internet addiction and risk behaviors among excessive Internet users. The study also reveals that various scopes of Internet connectedness, such as site scope, facilitate addictive Internet use, and risk behaviors among adolescents. The findings can contribute to the prevention of and intervention into Internet addiction and adolescent risk behaviors.

  17. Examining the Relationships Between the Triarchic Psychopathy Constructs and Behavioral Deviance in a Community Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, C Adam; Cox, Jennifer; Kopkin, Megan R

    2017-05-17

    Few studies have examined the extent to which psychopathic traits relate to the commission of mild to moderate acts of deviance, such as vandalism and minor traffic violations. Given that psychopathy is now studied in community populations, the relationship between psychopathic traits and less severe deviant behaviors, which are more normative among noninstitutionalized samples, warrants investigation. The current study examined the relationships between the triarchic model of psychopathy (Patrick, Fowles & Krueger, 2009) and seven forms of deviant behavior (drug use, alcohol use, theft, vandalism, school misconduct, assault, and general deviance) in a nationally representative sample. Triarchic disinhibition positively predicted each form of normative deviance. Boldness positively predicted drug and alcohol use as well as general deviance, while meanness negatively predicted school misconduct. Boldness and disinhibition also positively predicted overall lifetime engagement in deviant behavior. Implications are discussed, including support of the role of boldness within the psychopathy construct.

  18. An Examination of the Reciprocal Relationships between Adolescents' Aggressive Behaviors and Their Perceptions of Parental Nurturance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arim, Rubab G.; Dahinten, V. Susan; Marshall, Sheila K.; Shapka, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal relationships between adolescents' perceptions of parental nurturance and two types of adolescent aggressive behaviors (indirect and direct aggression) using a transactional model. Three waves of longitudinal data were drawn from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The sample included…

  19. Where Is the Syndrome? Examining Co-Occurrence among Multiple Problem Behaviors in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Busseri, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined co-occurrence among a wide range of adolescent problem behaviors: alcohol, smoking, marijuana, hard drugs, sexual activity, major and minor delinquency, direct and indirect aggression, and gambling. Using a large self-report survey of high school students, confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the problem syndrome…

  20. Examining Attachment to God and Health Risk-Taking Behaviors in College Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, J.; Horton, K.D.; Ellison, Ch.G.; Loukas, A.; Downey, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God—secure, avoidant, and anxious—were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328

  1. Teachers Matter: An Examination of Student-Teacher Relationships, Attitudes toward Bullying, and Bullying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cixin; Swearer, Susan M.; Lembeck, Paige; Collins, Adam; Berry, Brandi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of student-teacher relationships and attitudes toward bullying on middle school students' bullying behaviors. Gender and grade differences were also examined. Data were collected from 435 middle school students. Results indicated that students' attitudes toward bullying mediated the relationship between…

  2. How Does Community Service Promote Prosocial Behavior? Examining the Role of Agency and Ideology Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Gabriela; Gniewosz, Burkhard; Reinders, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    This study examines community service effects on adolescents' prosocial behaviors as mediated through experiences made during service. Based on theoretical assumptions by Youniss and Yates, we suggest that personal agency experiences and being confronted with situations that can challenge the own world views (ideology experiences) serve as…

  3. Drinking Plans and Drinking Outcomes: Examining Young Adults' Weekend Drinking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Ryan S.; Clapp, John D.; Reed, Mark B.; Shillington, Audrey; Thombs, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships among drinking intentions, environments, and outcomes in a random sample of 566 undergraduate college students. Telephone interviews were conducted with respondents before and after a single weekend assessing drinking intentions for the coming weekend related to subsequent drinking behaviors. Latent class analyses…

  4. Figure del desiderio: l'amore fra distruzione e sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Franzone

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Attraverso due racconti di Cortázar, l'analisi di due figure del desiderio ci permette esplorare due estremi seguendo una verticalità. La distruzione, doppio tenebroso della nostra anima, ci rivela un erotismo legato alla morte e al desiderio morboso di possedere l'Altro; il suo contraltare è un'ascesa vertiginosa accompagnata da un godimento estetico, dall'amore sublime prossimo all'esperienza mistica che si concluderà con una discesa progressiva e nel rispetto di questo Altro. La creazione letteraria si presenta come uno sfogo alle nostre angosce, che sono anche una sorta d'espressione dell'erotismo.

  5. The pleasures of contra-purposiveness: Kant, the sublime, and being human

    OpenAIRE

    Deligiorgi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    When Paul Guyer surveyed the literature on the sublime about twenty years ago, he noted the flourishing of psychoanalytic and deconstructionist interpretations of the sublime by literary theorists and offered his own interpretative essay on Kant’s sublime as a contribution to a sparsely populated field. Today the situation is reversed. In the field of philosophical aesthetics, understood to include analytic aesthetics as well as theoretical approaches to literary and visual culture, serious d...

  6. Preparation of 2:1 urea-succinic acid cocrystals by sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Yu, Qiushuo; Li, Xiaorui; Ma, Xiaoxun

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a sublimation method for preparing cocrystals. The 2:1 urea-succinic acid cocrystals were generated by a simple sublimation apparatus, analyzed by Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Transmission Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DCS). The role of supersaturations in vapor crystallization was also discussed in detail. This work showed sublimation was a promising method for cocrystallization.

  7. Having friends and feeling lonely: a daily process examination of transient loneliness, socialization, and drinking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, Sarah N; Mohr, Cynthia D; Brannan, Debi

    2015-05-01

    Loneliness is a well-known indicator of relationship deficits, with potentially severe consequences on health and well-being (Perlman & Peplau, 1981). Research has used cross-sectional methods to examine behavioral consequences of loneliness (e.g., Cacioppo et al., 2002). However, within-person associations between daily fluctuations in loneliness and subsequent behavioral outcomes have yet to be explored. Using a sample of community-dwelling adults, the authors examined associations between daily loneliness on daily time with others, and subsequent context-specific alcohol consumption (i.e., social and solitary consumption), and individual differences in these patterns of behavior. Daytime loneliness significantly and uniquely predicted patterns of social behavior and context-specific consumption; time with others mediated loneliness-social consumption associations, but not loneliness-solitary consumption relationships. These findings contribute to existing literature by demonstrating the unique properties of solitary versus social consumption as behavioral responses to loneliness, thus addressing inconsistent findings regarding the effects of loneliness on alcohol consumption. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  8. Sexual orientation disparities in sexually transmitted infections: examining the intersection between sexual identity and sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Bethany G

    2013-02-01

    The terms MSM (men who have sex with men) and WSW (women who have sex with women) have been used with increasing frequency in the public health literature to examine sexual orientation disparities in sexual health. These categories, however, do not allow researchers to examine potential differences in sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk by sexual orientation identity. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, this study investigated the relationship between self-reported STIs and both sexual orientation identity and sexual behaviors. Additionally, this study examined the mediating role of victimization and STI risk behaviors on the relationship between sexual orientation and self-reported STIs. STI risk was found to be elevated among heterosexual-WSW and bisexual women, whether they reported same-sex partners or not, whereas gay-identified WSW were less likely to report an STI compared to heterosexual women with opposite sex relationships only. Among males, heterosexual-identified MSM did not have a greater likelihood of reporting an STI diagnosis; rather, STI risk was concentrated among gay and bisexual identified men who reported both male and female sexual partners. STI risk behaviors mediated the STI disparities among both males and females, and victimization partially mediated STI disparities among female participants. These results suggest that relying solely on behavior-based categories, such as MSM and WSW, may mischaracterize STI disparities by sexual orientation.

  9. Where is my car? Examining wayfinding behavior in a parking lot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines wayfinding behavior in an extended parking lot belonging to one of the largest shopping malls in Santiago, Chile. About 500 people were followed while going to the mall and returning from it, and their trajectories were mapped and analyzed. The results indicate that inbound paths were, in average, 10% shorter that outbound paths, and that people stopped three times more frequently when leaving the mall than when accessing it. It is argued that these results are in line with previous research on the subject, which stress the importance of environmental information in shaping people`s behavior.

  10. D/H fractionation during the sublimation of water ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécuyer, Christophe; Royer, Aurélien; Fourel, François; Seris, Magali; Simon, Laurent; Robert, François

    2017-03-01

    Experiments of sublimation of pure water ice have been performed in the temperature range -105 °C to -30 °C and atmospheric partial pressures ranging from 10-6 to 10-1 mb. Sampling of both vapour and residual ice fractions has been performed with the use of a vacuum line designed for the extraction and purification of gases before the measurement of their D/H ratios. Sublimation was responsible for sizable isotopic fractionation factors in the range 0.969-1.123 for temperatures lying between -105 °C and -30 °C. The fractionation factor exhibits a cross-over at temperatures around -50 °C with the water vapour fraction being D-depleted relative to the residual ice fraction at T deuterium enrichment or depletion between ice and water vapour cannot explain the differences in the D/H ratios amongst Jupiter comets and long-period comets families nor those that have been documented between Earth's and cometary water.

  11. Conditions for Sublimating Water Ice to Supply Ceres' Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schörghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hayne, P. O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Sykes, M. V.; Combe, J.-P.; Ermakov, A. I.; Prettyman, T. H.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of a water vapor exosphere around Ceres suggest that the dwarf planet may be episodically outgassing at a rate of 6 kg s-1 from unknown sources. With data from the Dawn mission as constraints, we use a coupled thermal and vapor diffusion model to explore three different configurations of water ice (global buried pore-filling ice, global buried excess ice, and local exposed surface ice) that could be present on Ceres. We conclude that a buried ice table cannot alone explain the vapor production rates previously measured, but newly exposed surface ice, given the right conditions, can exceed that vapor production rate. Sublimation lag deposits form that bury and darken this surface ice over a large range of timescales (from <1 year to approximately hundreds of kyr) that depend on latitude and ice regolith content. Sublimating water vapor can loft regolith particles from the surface of exposed ice, possibly prolonging the visible lifespan of those areas. We find that this process is only effective for regolith grains smaller than approximately ones of microns.

  12. Focus-of-attention behavioral experiment: an examination of a therapeutic procedure to reduce social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Kerry A; Valentiner, David P; Holzman, Jacob B

    2017-01-01

    A clinical protocol based on contemporary cognitive behavioral treatment for social anxiety was developed and examined. Previously published instructions for conducting a focus-of-attention behavioral experiment targeting self-focused attention and safety behaviors during exposure were used to create a structured protocol. Individuals (n = 45) with high levels of social anxiety and public-speaking anxiety were randomly assigned to either a focus-of-attention behavioral experiment (FABE) or an Exposure-Only Control (EOC) condition. During four exposure trials, those in the FABE condition (n = 24) were alternately instructed to engage in self-focused attention vs. externally focused attention and to eliminate safety behaviors. Those in the EOC condition (n = 21) were not so instructed. At post-intervention, individuals in the FABE condition showed significantly less self-focused attention and anxiety, and better observed performance as rated by audience members. Focus-of-attention statistically mediated the effect of condition on anxiety. For those in the FABE condition, the degree of association between focus-of-attention and anxiety during the intervention predicted less self-focused attention post-intervention. The FABE appears to be a useful procedure for implementing part of the contemporary cognitive behavioral treatment model.

  13. Sharing and giving across adolescence: an experimental study examining the development of prosocial behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güroğlu, Berna; van den Bos, Wouter; Crone, Eveline A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we use economic exchange games to examine the development of prosocial behavior in the form of sharing and giving in social interactions with peers across adolescence. Participants from four age groups (9-, 12-, 15-, and 18-year-olds, total N = 119) played three types of distribution games and the Trust game with four different interaction partners: friends, antagonists, neutral classmates, and anonymous peers. Nine- and 12-year-olds showed similar levels of prosocial behavior to all interaction partners, whereas older adolescents showed increasing differentiation in prosocial behavior depending on the relation with peers, with most prosocial behavior toward friends. The age related increase in non-costly prosocial behavior toward friends was mediated by self-reported perspective-taking skills. Current findings extend existing evidence on the developmental patterns of fairness considerations from childhood into late adolescence. Together, we show that adolescents are increasingly better at incorporating social context into decision-making. Our findings further highlight the role of friendships as a significant social context for the development of prosocial behavior in early adolescence. PMID:24782796

  14. A Longitudinal Examination of the Relation Between Internalizing Problem Behaviors and Early Adolescent Cigarette Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise-Young, Patricia A; Zaleski, Adam C; Swaim, Randall C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the longitudinal relation between internalizing problem behaviors (measured with the anxious/depressed and somatic complaints subscales of the Achenbach Teacher's Report Form) and self-reported cigarette smoking behavior and intentions during early adolescence. In addition, a possible mediating role of perceived harm was investigated. Sixth graders and their teachers were surveyed in the sixth grade and students were surveyed again in the seventh grade. Smoking behavior and intentions were assessed with five items including lifetime use, 30-day use, tobacco user status (nonsmoker to heavy smoker), and two intentions/behavioral expectations items. In addition to perceived harm from smoking, reasons for smoking and reasons for not smoking were included on the survey. As hypothesized, teacher reports of sixth-grade internalizing problem behaviors were negatively related to seventh-grade smoking behavior and intentions. Moreover, perceived harm from smoking was negatively related to smoking and intentions. The hypothesized mediating role of perceived harm in the internalizing to smoking relationship was not supported. Potential differences in the relation between internalizing and smoking across adolescence are discussed. Specifically, the results of the present study and an examination of prior literature suggest that in early adolescence internalizing problems are negatively related to cigarette smoking, whereas in middle and late adolescence the opposite is true.

  15. Sharing and giving across adolescence: An experimental study examining the development of prosocial behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna eGüroğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we use economic exchange games to examine the development of prosocial behavior in the form of sharing and giving in social interactions with peers across adolescence. Participants from four age groups (9-, 12-, 15-, and 18-year-olds, total N=119 played three types of distribution games and the Trust game with four different interaction partners: friends, antagonists, neutral classmates, and anonymous peers. Nine- and 12-year-olds showed similar levels of prosocial behavior to all interaction partners, whereas older adolescents showed increasing differentiation in prosocial behavior depending on the relation with peers, with most prosocial behavior towards friends. The age related increase in non-costly prosocial behavior towards friends was mediated by self-reported perspective-taking skills. Current findings extend existing evidence on the developmental patterns of fairness considerations from childhood into late adolescence. Together, we show that adolescents are increasingly better at incorporating social context into decision-making. Our findings further highlight the role of friendships as a significant social context for the development of prosocial behavior in early adolescence.

  16. Sharing and giving across adolescence: an experimental study examining the development of prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güroğlu, Berna; van den Bos, Wouter; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-01-01

    In this study we use economic exchange games to examine the development of prosocial behavior in the form of sharing and giving in social interactions with peers across adolescence. Participants from four age groups (9-, 12-, 15-, and 18-year-olds, total N = 119) played three types of distribution games and the Trust game with four different interaction partners: friends, antagonists, neutral classmates, and anonymous peers. Nine- and 12-year-olds showed similar levels of prosocial behavior to all interaction partners, whereas older adolescents showed increasing differentiation in prosocial behavior depending on the relation with peers, with most prosocial behavior toward friends. The age related increase in non-costly prosocial behavior toward friends was mediated by self-reported perspective-taking skills. Current findings extend existing evidence on the developmental patterns of fairness considerations from childhood into late adolescence. Together, we show that adolescents are increasingly better at incorporating social context into decision-making. Our findings further highlight the role of friendships as a significant social context for the development of prosocial behavior in early adolescence.

  17. An Indirect Examination of the Function of Problem Behavior Associated with Fragile X Syndrome and Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are associated with a number of specific topographies of problem behavior. Very few studies have examined the function served by problem behavior in these groups. Using the Questions About Behavioral Function scale Matson and Vollmer (User's guide: questions about behavioral function…

  18. A cross-cultural examination of the relation of marital communication behavior to marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Uzma S; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy

    2007-12-01

    Numerous studies have examined the communication behaviors of Western, primarily North American, couples and have demonstrated a robust and reliable association between marital satisfaction and couple communication. However, there has been relatively less attention given to the generalizability of these findings to non-Western couples. To address this issue, the authors conducted an observational study of marital communication among couples from 3 different cultural groups: 50 White American couples, 52 Pakistani couples in Pakistan, and 48 immigrant Pakistani couples in America. The results show that positive and negative communication behaviors were associated with marital satisfaction within each of the 3 cultural groups. However, the American group's marital satisfaction was more strongly related to marital communication behaviors than was that of the Pakistani group and, to a lesser extent, the immigrant group.

  19. Study to Examine Psychological Processes in Suicidal Ideation and Behavior (STEPPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    water), smoke or brush their teeth in the 1 hour prior to arriving at the laboratory, or (ii) consume alcohol, take pain medication or engage in...be instructed to not brush their teeth , and to refrain from smoking, eating and drinking (except water) 30 minutes prior to and during sampling, as...Study to Examine Psychological Processes in Suicidal Ideation and Behavior ANNUAL REPORT (YEAR 2) 4 Introduction: The importance of

  20. Aggressive and Prosocial? Examining Latent Profiles of Behavior, Social Status, Machiavellianism, and Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christian; Batanova, Milena; Cance, Jessica Duncan

    2015-12-01

    The present study tests whether aggression and prosocial behavior can coexist as part of a socially functional and adaptive profile among early adolescents. Using a person-centered approach, the study examined early adolescents' likelihood of being classified into profiles involving aggressive and prosocial behavior, social status (popular, liked, cool), machiavellianism, and both affective and cognitive components of empathy (empathic concern and perspective taking, respectively). Participants were 1170 early adolescents (10-12 years of age; 52% male) from four schools in metropolitan Santiago, Chile. Through latent profile analysis, three profiles emerged (normative-low aggressive, high prosocial-low aggressive, and high aggressive-high popular status). Both empathic concern and perspective taking were higher in the high prosocial-low aggressive profile, whereas the high aggressive-high popular status profile had the lowest scores on both empathy components as well as machiavellianism. No profile emerged where aggressive and prosocial behaviors were found to co-exist, or to be significantly above the mean. The results underscore that aggressive behavior is highly contextual and likely culturally specific, and that the study of behavioral profiles should consider social status as well as socio-emotional adjustment indicators. These complex associations should be taken into consideration when planning prevention and intervention efforts to reduce aggression or school bullying and to promote positive peer relationships.

  1. Examining Associations Among ADHD, Homework Behavior, and Reading Comprehension: A Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W; Hart, Sara A; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2016-07-01

    Previous literature has indicated an important association between reading comprehension and both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and homework habits. This investigation sought to extend previous knowledge by providing information about how ADHD and homework behavior (i.e., completing homework regularly) may jointly influence reading comprehension. Using a genetically sensitive design, this study examined the genetic and environmental influences on and between ADHD, homework behavior and reading comprehension. Participants for this study included 691 twin pairs (351 monozygotic, 340 same-sex dizygotic) from the Florida Twin Project on Behavior and Environment (FTP-BE) and 2647 twin pairs (865 monozygotic, 1782 dizygotic) from the larger Florida Twin Project on Reading (FTP-R) in Grades 3 through 7. Three separate models, each representing a different definition of ADHD (full ADHD, inattention only, and hyperactivity/impulsivity only), showed similar patterns of results; therefore, results of the full ADHD model are discussed. Overlapping genetic influences were found between ADHD, homework behavior, and reading comprehension, but no shared environmental influences among all three. However, shared environmental influences overlapped between homework behavior and reading comprehension. Although the sources of this environmental overlap are unknown, these results have implications for improving homework practices and their subsequent influence on literacy skills through homework environments. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  2. An Examination of the Associations between ADHD, Homework Behavior and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W.; Hart, Sara A.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Previous literature has indicated an important association between reading comprehension and both ADHD and homework habits. This investigation sought to extend previous knowledge by providing information about how ADHD and homework behavior (i.e., completing homework regularly) may jointly influence reading comprehension. Using a genetically sensitive design, this study examined the genetic and environmental influences on and between ADHD, homework behavior and reading comprehension. Participants for this study included 691 twin pairs (351 monozygotic, 340 same-sex dizygotic) from the Florida Twin Project on Behavior and Environment (FTP-BE) and 2647 twin pairs (865 monozygotic, 1782 dizygotic) from the larger Florida Twin Project on Reading (FTP-R) in grades 3 through 7. Three separate models, each representing a different definition of ADHD (full ADHD, Inattention only, and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity only), showed similar patterns of results, therefore, results of the full ADHD model are discussed. Overlapping genetic influences were found between ADHD, homework behavior and reading comprehension, but no shared environmental influences among all three. However, shared environmental influences overlapped between homework behavior and reading comprehension. Although the sources of this environmental overlap are unknown, these results have implications for improving homework practices and their subsequent influence on literacy skills through homework environments. PMID:25349092

  3. Rumination, worry, cognitive avoidance, and behavioral avoidance: examination of temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kelsey S; Ciesla, Jeffrey A; Reilly, Laura C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, cross-sectional research has demonstrated that depressive rumination is significantly associated with the tendency to engage in cognitive and behavioral avoidance. This evidence suggests that rumination may be the result of attempts to avoid personally threatening thoughts, in a manner suggested by multiple contemporary theories of worry. This investigation examined the temporal relationship among daily levels of cognitive avoidance, behavioral avoidance, rumination, worry, and negative affect. Seventy-eight adolescents completed baseline questionnaires and then electronically completed daily measures of rumination, worry, behavioral avoidance, and cognitive avoidance, as well as sad and anxious affect for 7 days. Lagged-effect multilevel models indicated that increases in daily sadness were predicted by greater daily rumination and cognitive avoidance. Increases in daily anxiety were predicted by greater daily rumination, worry, and both cognitive and behavioral avoidance. Further, both daily rumination and worry were positively predicted by daily cognitive, but not behavioral, avoidance. Mediation analyses suggested that rumination mediated the effect of cognitive avoidance on both sadness and anxiety. Also, worry mediated the effect of cognitive avoidance on anxiety. Implications for models of avoidance, rumination, and worry are discussed. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Use of the Health Belief Model to examine older adults' food-handling behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jennifer A; Benedict, Jamie A

    2002-01-01

    To measure the association among Health Belief Model (HBM) variables and safe food-handling behaviors among older adults. A mail survey using Dillman's Total Design Method. In October 1999, a survey was sent to volunteers from a preexisting cohort of noninstitutionalized older adults living throughout Nevada. Data collection continued through January 2000. With a 56% response rate, the sample (n = 266) was composed mainly of women (73%) and individuals from urban counties (74%). The mean age was 68.09 years (SD = 8.27). Except for gender, sample characteristics were similar to those of the preexisting cohort. Perceived threat of foodborne illness (ie, perceived severity and perceived susceptibility), cues to action (ie, media cues and educational cues), and safe food-handling behaviors (ie, sanitation and cross-contamination). Rank order correlation coefficients were computed to measure the association among variables. Significance was set at P food-handling behaviors. Perceived severity of foodborne illness was positively related to one dimension of safe food-handling behaviors (ie, sanitation). The HBM is a useful framework for examining food-handling behaviors among older adults.

  5. Examination of value of the future and health beliefs to explain dietary and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Kimberly Bosworth; Harris, Carole V; Bolding, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown a negative association between value of the future (preference for long-term vs. short-term rewards) and harmful addictive behaviors; however, research in the area of preventive behaviors is limited and has shown conflicting results. The primary objectives were: (1) to examine the association among value of the future and diet and physical activity (PA) behaviors, and (2) to assess whether value of the future explained additional variance in behaviors after controlling for theory-based health beliefs related to coronary heart disease (CHD). An online survey was conducted in adults (N = 172) with no prior history of CHD. A delay discounting task was administered to measure value of the future. Questionnaire items were based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and included CHD knowledge, perceived risk, perceived severity, perceived benefits of and barriers to behavior change, self-efficacy, cues to action, diet and PA behaviors and demographic variables. High value of the future was associated with younger age, lower BMI, more healthful diet, and increased PA. After controlling for HBM components and demographics, value of the future did not explain any additional variance in diet or PA behaviors. Significant predictors of healthful diet included female gender (P = .013), increased age (P = .029), greater than high school education (P = .023), greater diet-related self-efficacy (P = .021), and not having received a healthcare provider recommendation to improve diet (P = .018). Significant predictors of PA level included income between $20,000 and $69,999 (P = .014), greater exercise-related self-efficacy (P health benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of oxalic acid applied by sublimation on honey bee colony fitness: a comparison with amitraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Papežíková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxalic acid is one of the organic acids used for controlling Varroa destructor, a mite parasitizing the honey bee (Apis mellifera. The aim of this work was to examine the effect of oxalic acid applied by sublimation on honey bee colony fitness, and to compare it with the effect of amitraz, a routinely used synthetic acaricide. Bee colonies of equal strength were randomly divided into two groups. In December 2014, one group was treated with amitraz in the form of aerosol, and the second group was treated with oxalic acid applied by sublimation. The colonies were monitored over winter. Dead bees found at the bottom of the hive were counted regularly and examined microscopically for infection with Nosema sp. (Microsporidia. At the end of March 2015, living foragers from each hive were sampled and individually examined for Nosema sp. infection. Colony strength was evaluated at the beginning of April. No adverse effect of oxalic acid on colony strength was observed despite the fact that the total number of dead bees was non-significantly higher in the oxalic acid-treated group. Examination of dead bees for Nosema infection did not reveal significant differences in spore numbers between the experimental groups. There was a substantial difference in living individuals, however, with a significantly higher amount of spores per bee found in the amitraz-treated colonies compared to the oxalic acid-treated colonies. Compared to amitraz, oxalic acid applied by sublimation showed no adverse effects on bee colony fitness or on successful overwintering.

  7. Effect of Aditional Brief Counselling after Periodic Health Examination on Motivation for Health Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ki Young; Lee, Cheol Min; Lym, Youl Lee; Oh, Seung Won; Chung, Wonjoo; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, DuShin; Kim, Han Suk

    2012-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of additional brief counseling by a primary care physician on lifestyle modification of examinees after a periodic health examination. 1,000 participants of the 2007 Korean national health screening program were asked to note any variation in their health behavior after participating in the screening program. The degree of comprehensive motivation for lifestyle modification was assessed in terms of stages of health behavior change. We calculated odds ratio of positive change (enhanced stage of change) with multiple logistic regression analysis and age-adjusted proportion of positive changers. Of 989 respondents, 486 and 503 received the basic and additional programs, respectively. Additional group were more likely to be positive changer than basic group (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.19-2.65), and this was more prominent in older age group (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.23-4.58). The age-adjusted proportions of positive changers were 22.7% (95% CI, 17.9-28.3) and 36.2% (95% CI, 30.4-42.4) in the basic and additional groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The additional consultation led to improvements in the stage of health behavior change after the health examination. Thus, such a consultation should be considered when designing a health-screening program. PMID:23166407

  8. Examining CAM use disclosure using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-10-01

    To improve understanding of factors that may influence disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the U.S. Cross-sectional survey. Data are from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), a nationally representative study of adults aged 18 and older living in the continental United States. Using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, we conducted multivariate logistic regressions to identify factors associated with disclosing CAM use among the sub-sample of recent CAM users (n=1995). Disclosure of CAM use. Most CAM users (71.0%) disclosed their use of CAM to their doctors. Contextual, individual, and health behavior factors were associated with CAM use disclosure. Of particular interest, disclosure was significantly more likely among those who perceived high quality relationships with their providers (AOR=1.59, CI: 1.01, 2.49) and among those who had a regular source of medical care (AOR=1.54, CI: 1.03, 2.29). The odds of disclosure were also higher among those who used practitioner-provided CAM, with (AOR=2.02, CI: 1.34, 3.06) or without (AOR=1.52, CI: 1.05, 2.20) concurrent herbal medicine use, compared to those who used herbal medicines only. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use is a useful framework for examining factors that may influence disclosure of CAM use. Further research should examine these relationships using more comprehensive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Depressive symptoms and externalizing behaviors among Hispanic immigrant adolescents: Examining longitudinal effects of cultural stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J; Castillo, Linda G; Romero, Andrea J; Huang, Shi; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Unger, Jennifer B; Zamboanga, Byron L; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Lizzi, Karina M; Soto, Daniel W; Oshri, Assaf; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2015-07-01

    This study examined longitudinal effects of cultural stress (a latent factor comprised of bicultural stress, ethnic discrimination, and negative context of reception) on depressive symptoms and a range of externalizing behaviors among recently (≤5 years in the U.S. at baseline) immigrated Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 adolescents (53% boys; mean age 14.51 years) completed baseline measures of perceived ethnic discrimination, bicultural stress, and perceived negative context of reception; and outcome measures of depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, aggressive behavior, and rule-breaking behavior six months post-baseline. A path analysis indicated that higher cultural stress scores predicted higher levels of all outcomes. These effects were consistent across genders, but varied by study site. Specifically, higher cultural stress scores increased depressive symptoms among participants in Miami, but not in Los Angeles. Findings suggest that cultural stress is a clinically relevant predictor of depressive symptoms and externalizing behaviors among Hispanic immigrant adolescents. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Smoking cessation and the Internet: a qualitative method examining online consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Genevieve; Bessell, Tracey L; Borland, Ron; Anderson, Jeremy N

    2002-01-01

    Smoking is a major preventable cause of disease and disability around the world. Smoking cessation support-including information, discussion groups, cognitive behavioral treatment, and self-help materials-can be delivered via the Internet. There is limited information about the reasons and methods consumers access smoking cessation information on the Internet. This study aims to determine the feasibility of a method to examine the online behavior of consumers seeking smoking cessation resources. In particular, we sought to identify the reasons and methods consumers use to access and assess the quality of these resources. Thirteen participants were recruited via the state-based Quit smoking cessation campaign, operated by the Victorian Cancer Council, in December 2001. Online behavior was evaluated using semi-structured interviews and Internet simulations where participants sought smoking cessation information and addressed set-case scenarios. Online interaction was tracked through pervasive logging with specialist software. Thirteen semi-structured interviews and 4 Internet simulations were conducted in January 2002. Participants sought online smoking cessation resources for reasons of convenience, timeliness, and anonymity-and because their current information needs were unmet. They employed simple search strategies and could not always find information in an efficient manner. Participants employed several different strategies to assess the quality of online health resources. Consumer online behavior can be studied using a combination of survey, observation, and online surveillance. However, further qualitative and observational research is required to harness the full potential of the Internet to deliver public health resources.

  11. Re-examination of chewing and spitting behavior: characteristics within and across eating disorder diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Nora E; Swanson, Sonja A; Crow, Scott J; Mitchell, James; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Chewing and spitting (CS) out food is a relatively understudied eating disorder behavior. The aim of this study was to examine lifetime and current frequencies of CS across eating disorder diagnostic groups and to compare the severity of eating disorder symptomatology between participants who did and did not endorse CS. A total of 972 individuals presenting for outpatient eating disorder treatment between 1985 and 1996 completed a questionnaire that included items regarding current and lifetime eating disorder behaviors, including CS. Results indicated that both lifetime and current prevalence estimates of CS varied cross-diagnostically, with CS being more common among those with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa compared to those with eating disorder not otherwise specified. CS was significantly associated with several eating disorder symptoms, including compensatory behaviors, meal restriction, and lower BMI. Those who reported CS were also younger in age compared to those who did not report CS. These findings indicate that CS is associated with more severe eating and weight pathology and is not equally prevalent across eating disorder diagnoses. These results also support the relatively high occurrence of CS and the importance of targeting this behavior in eating disorder treatment. Future research should clarify the correlates, mechanisms, and function of CS in eating disorders.

  12. Racial differences in behavioral inpatient diagnosis: examining the mechanisms using the 2004 Florida Inpatient Discharge Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Fisher, John; Studnicki, James

    2008-07-01

    This study used the 2004 Florida Inpatient Discharge Data to examine the existence and the underlying mechanisms of the African American (AA)/white differences in behavioral inpatient diagnosis across a diverse patient population. Findings suggest that discharges of AA patients in Florida were at least twice as likely to have received a primary psychotic vs. affective or substance-related diagnosis, and this held true after between-hospital differences were controlled for. Furthermore, AA (vs. white) race was associated with a ratio of 3.3 in the population rate of hospitalization with a primary psychotic diagnosis, as compared to a ratio of 0.8 and 0.7 for affective and substance-related disorders, respectively. These findings demonstrated the wide existence of racial differences in behavioral inpatient diagnosis and the important role of clinician diagnostic behaviors as opposed to systems-level factors (such as racial differences in access to care and care-seeking behaviors) in leading to observed differences.

  13. Using crowdsourcing to examine behavioral economic measures of alcohol value and proportionate alcohol reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Vanessa; Amlung, Michael; Kaplan, Brent A; Reed, Derek D; Petker, Tashia; MacKillop, James

    2017-08-01

    Online crowdsourcing websites such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) are increasingly being used in addictions research. However, there is a relative paucity of such research examining the validity of administering behavioral economic alcohol-related measures, via an online crowdsourcing platform. This study sought to validate an alcohol purchase task (APT) for assessing demand and a questionnaire measure of proportionate alcohol reinforcement, using an online sample of participants recruited via MTurk. Participants (N = 865, 59% female) were recruited via MTurk to complete the APT, proportionate alcohol reinforcement questionnaire, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and demographics. Responses on the APT were highly systematic (crowdsourcing websites for investigating behavioral economic determinants of alcohol misuse. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Examining links between sexual risk behaviors and dating violence involvement as a function of sexual orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, A.E.; Stepp, S.D.; Keenan, K.; Allen, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Rottingen, L.; McAloon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective To examine the association between dating violence perpetration and victimization and sexually risky behaviors among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescent girls. Design Adolescent girls reported on sexual orientation, sexual behaviors and risk-taking, and their use of and experience with dating violence in the past year. Data were analyzed using multinomial regression adjusted for race, poverty, living in a single parent household, and gender of current partner to examine (1) whether sexual minority status was associated with sexual risk behaviors after sociodemographic correlates of sexual risk were controlled; and (2) whether dating violence context accounted for elevated risk. Setting Urban, population-based sample of girls interviewed in the home. Participants 1,647 adolescent girls (38% European American, 57% African American, and 5% other) aged 17 years. Over one third of the sample lived in poverty. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Sexual risk-taking. Results Sexual minority status differentiated girls engaging in high sexual risk-taking from those reporting none, after controlling for sociodemographic and relationship characteristics. Dating violence perpetration and victimization made unique additional contributions to this model, and did not account for the elevated risk conferred by sexual minority status. Conclusions Sexual minority girls (SMGs) were more likely than heterosexual girls to report high sexual risk-taking and teen dating violence victimization. As with heterosexual girls, sexual risk-taking among SMGs was compounded by dating violence, which was not explained by partner gender. Adolescent girls’ risky sexual behavior may be reduced by interventions for teen dating violence regardless of sexual minority status. PMID:23726138

  15. Examining links between sexual risk behaviors and dating violence involvement as a function of sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, A E; Stepp, S D; Keenan, K; Allen, A; Hoffmann, A; Rottingen, L; McAloon, R

    2013-08-01

    To examine the association between dating violence perpetration and victimization and sexually risky behaviors among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescent girls. Adolescent girls reported on sexual orientation, sexual behaviors, and risk-taking, and their use of, and experience with, dating violence in the past year. Data were analyzed using multinomial regression adjusted for race, poverty, living in a single parent household, and gender of current partner to examine (1) whether sexual minority status was associated with sexual risk behaviors after sociodemographic correlates of sexual risk were controlled; and (2) whether dating violence context accounted for elevated risk. Urban, population-based sample of girls interviewed in the home. 1,647 adolescent girls (38% European American, 57% African American, and 5% other) aged 17 years. Over one-third of the sample lived in poverty. None. Sexual risk-taking. Sexual minority status differentiated girls engaging in high sexual risk-taking from those reporting none, after controlling for sociodemographic and relationship characteristics. Dating violence perpetration and victimization made unique additional contributions to this model and did not account for the elevated risk conferred by sexual minority status. Sexual minority girls (SMGs) were more likely than heterosexual girls to report high sexual risk-taking and teen dating violence victimization. As with heterosexual girls, sexual risk-taking among SMGs was compounded by dating violence, which was not explained by partner gender. Adolescent girls' risky sexual behavior may be reduced by interventions for teen dating violence regardless of sexual minority status. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Examining Early Adolescents' Peer Climate Using Descriptive and Status Norms on Academic Engagement and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Huiyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed to gain insights into adolescents' classroom peer climate by examining descriptive and status norms of academic and social behaviors. Descriptive norm was assessed as the average score for each behavior and status norm was assessed using the correlation between each behavior and social status within each classroom. Expanded…

  17. Mothers' and fathers' attributions for adolescent behavior: an examination in families of depressed, subdiagnostic, and nondepressed youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeber, Lisa B; Johnston, Charlotte; Chen, Mandy; Leve, Craig; Hops, Hyman; Davis, Betsy

    2009-12-01

    This study examined whether parents of adolescents experiencing depressive symptoms or disorder make more negative and fewer positive attributions for their adolescents' behavior than do parents of nondepressed adolescents, and whether parental attributions for adolescents' behavior contribute to parenting behavior, above and beyond the adolescents' behavior. Parents and adolescents (76 girls and 48 boys) participated in videotaped problem-solving interactions (PSIs). Each parent subsequently watched the videotape and offered attributions for their adolescent's behavior. In addition, parent and adolescent behavior during the PSIs was coded. Mothers and fathers in families of nondepressed adolescents made significantly fewer negative attributions for their children's behavior than did parents in families of adolescents with diagnostic or subdiagnostic levels of depressive symptoms. Moreover, mothers' and fathers' negative attributions were related to greater levels of observed aggressive behavior and lower levels of observed facilitative behavior during the PSIs controlling for both demographic characteristics and the relative level of adolescent aggressive and facilitative behavior during the PSI.

  18. Individual differences in cyber security behaviors: an examination of who is sharing passwords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitty, Monica; Doodson, James; Creese, Sadie; Hodges, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the number of public advice campaigns, researchers have found that individuals still engage in risky password practices. There is a dearth of research available on individual differences in cyber security behaviors. This study focused on the risky practice of sharing passwords. As predicted, we found that individuals who scored high on a lack of perseverance were more likely to share passwords. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found younger [corrected] people and individuals who score high on self-monitoring were more likely to share passwords. We speculate on the reasons behind these findings, and examine how they might be considered in future cyber security educational campaigns.

  19. A Preliminary Examination of Emotional and Cognitive Mediators in the Relations between Violence Exposure and Violent Behaviors in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Maureen A.; Bell, Debora J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the possible mediational roles of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and acceptance of violence cognitions in the association between violence exposure and youth violent behaviors. This study also examined whether the strength of the relations between exposure and behavior varied across context of exposure and across…

  20. Examining Women's Alcohol Consumption: The Theory of Planned Behavior and Self-Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Helen M; Obst, Patricia L; Lewis, Ioni

    2018-01-02

    Changing trends demonstrate that women, in several economically developed countries, are drinking at higher levels than ever before. This study applied an extended Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), including self-identity, to examine women's intentions to consume alcohol. Women (N = 1069) aged 18-87 years, completed a questionnaire measuring their intentions to engage in binge drinking and frequent drinking. As research indicates that drinking trends are a function of age, hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted separately for four age groups (18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45, and above). Results supported the predictive utility of the TPB, (particularly Attitudes and Perceived Behavioral Control). Across the age groups, the final models explained between 48% and 62% of the variance in intentions to binge drink and between 33% and 51% of the variance in intentions to drink frequently. Subjective norms were significant associated with the youngest group (18-24 years) and the oldest group (45+ years). Self-identity was significantly associated with intentions to binge drink in younger women. Implications are discussed with regard to the predictive utility of an extended TPB to include self-identity in determining women's intentions to consume alcohol. Key factors that influence women's decisions to engage in risky drinking behaviors have been underlined to inform future interventions.

  1. Evaluating a Web-Based Educational Module on Oral Cancer Examination Based on a Behavioral Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Alvin G; Zimmerman, Lani M; Pullen, Carol H; Allen, Carl M; Lambert, Paul M; Paskett, Electra D

    2016-03-01

    Patients at risk of developing oral and/or oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) are more likely to see primary care providers (PCPs) than a dentist. Many PCPs do not regularly perform oral cancer examination (OCE). The purpose of this study was to design a web-based educational program based on a behavioral framework to encourage PCPs to conduct OCE. PCPs were solicited to provide feedback on the program and to evaluate their short-term knowledge. The integrated behavioral model was used to design the program. Fifteen PCPs (five in each group: physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) reviewed the program and took a posttest: (1) index of knowledge of risk factors for oral cancer (RiskOC) and (2) index of knowledge of diagnostic procedures for oral cancer (DiagOC). Findings from the process evaluation were mainly positive, with comments on the length of the program comprising the ten negative comments. No significant difference among groups of PCPs (physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) was detected for DiagOC (p = 0.43) or RiskOC (p = 0.201). A program on OPC for PCPs should be less than 40 min. Postviewing knowledge outcomes were similar for all PCPs. The web-based program on OPC based on a behavioral framework could have similar short-term knowledge outcomes for all PCPs and may increase the number of PCPs performing OCEs.

  2. Does mindfulness prepare adolescents for value-behavior concordance? Examining the role of value content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michael T; Wray-Lake, Laura

    2017-07-01

    Great thinkers throughout history advocated living one's values, yet little research has examined factors that contribute to adolescents' value-behavior concordance (VBC). Mindfulness may foster VBC via heightened awareness of values, but VBC for intrinsic values may be more adaptive than VBC for extrinsic values. To situate mindfulness in developmental context, we examined age and attachment security as predictors of mindfulness. We collected self- and parent-report data from 299 families (Mage-adolescents = 14.45, SD = 1.68; 51% female) from 42 US states to test these ideas. Results indicated that mindfulness was positively associated with intrinsic VBC but was negatively linked with extrinsic VBC, and both kinds of VBC partially mediated the link from mindfulness to meaning (but not life satisfaction). Attachment security was associated with higher mindfulness. Overall, mindfulness may deliver its benefits by helping young people avoid behaviors that align with extrinsic values. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective examination of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior among psychiatric adolescent inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Ewa K; Berona, Johnny; King, Cheryl A

    2015-04-01

    The challenge of identifying suicide risk in adolescents, and particularly among high-risk subgroups such as adolescent inpatients, calls for further study of models of suicidal behavior that could meaningfully aid in the prediction of risk. This study examined how well the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior (IPTS)--with its constructs of thwarted belongingness (TB), perceived burdensomeness (PB), and an acquired capability (AC) for lethal self-injury--predicts suicide attempts among adolescents (N = 376) 3 and 12 months after hospitalization. The three-way interaction between PB, TB, and AC, defined as a history of multiple suicide attempts, was not significant. However, there were significant 2-way interaction effects, which varied by sex: girls with low AC and increasing TB, and boys with high AC and increasing PB, were more likely to attempt suicide at 3 months. Only high AC predicted 12-month attempts. Results suggest gender-specific associations between theory components and attempts. The time-limited effects of these associations point to TB and PB being dynamic and modifiable in high-risk populations, whereas the effects of AC are more lasting. The study also fills an important gap in existing research by examining IPTS prospectively. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  4. Ultrasound examination and behavior scoring of captive broadnose sevengill sharks, Notorynchus cepedianus (Peron, 1807).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jonathan; Gunn, Ian; Kirby, Nick; Jones, Robert; Galloway, David

    2007-09-01

    Serial ultrasound examination of four mature female sevengill sharks (Notorynchus cepedianus) was carried out over 18 months. Monitoring the reproductive cycle and development of follicles and fetuses in sharks in a noninvasive manner using this technique has not been reported previously. Sharks were caught out of the "Oceanarium" tank by divers using a specially made catch-out bag, and brought to a holding area for examination. A behavior scoring system was used to monitor the impact of regular handling on the well-being of the animals. Ultrasound showed the growth and regression of follicles in sevengill ovaries, and allowed an approximation of the reproductive stage of these sharks. Monitoring behavior at five time points during the procedure showed that regular handling of sharks for clinical studies could be done with minimal impact on animal welfare. The ability to follow reproductive events in elasmobranches using ultrasonography is an important step in the application of assisted reproductive technology in these species. Assisted reproductive technology, such as monitoring female reproductive cycles and artificial insemination, could potentially be used to maintain genetic diversity and compliment aquaria-based breeding programs for endangered species such as the gray nurse shark (Carcharias taurus). Zoo Biol 26:383-395, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Effect of additional brief counselling after periodic health examination on motivation for health behavior change [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ki Young; Lee, Cheol Min; Cho, BeLong; Lym, Youl Lee; Oh, Seung Won; Chung, Wonjoo; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, DuShin; Kim, Han Suk

    2012-11-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of additional brief counseling by a primary care physician on lifestyle modification of examinees after a periodic health examination. 1,000 participants of the 2007 Korean national health screening program were asked to note any variation in their health behavior after participating in the screening program. The degree of comprehensive motivation for lifestyle modification was assessed in terms of stages of health behavior change. We calculated odds ratio of positive change (enhanced stage of change) with multiple logistic regression analysis and age-adjusted proportion of positive changers. Of 989 respondents, 486 and 503 received the basic and additional programs, respectively. Additional group were more likely to be positive changer than basic group (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.19-2.65), and this was more prominent in older age group (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.23-4.58). The age-adjusted proportions of positive changers were 22.7% (95% CI, 17.9-28.3) and 36.2% (95% CI, 30.4-42.4) in the basic and additional groups, respectively (P health examination. Thus, such a consultation should be considered when designing a health-screening program.

  6. On the use of semiempirical models of (solid + supercritical fluid) systems to determine solid sublimation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabernero, Antonio; Martin del Valle, Eva M., E-mail: emvalle@usal.es; Galan, Miguel A.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: We propose a method to determine sublimation properties of solids. Low deviations were produced calculating sublimation enthalpies and pressures. It is a required step to determine the vaporization enthalpy of the solid. It is possible to determine solid properties using semiempirical models solid-SCF. - Abstract: Experimental solubility data of solid-supercritical fluids have significantly increased in the last few years, and semiempirical models are emerging as one of the best choices to fit this type of data. This work establishes a methodology to calculate sublimation pressures using this type of equations. It requires the use of Bartle's equation to model equilibria data solid-supercritical fluids with the aim of determining the vaporization enthalpy of the compound. Using this method, low deviations were obtained by calculating sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies. The values of the sublimation pressures were subsequently used to successfully model different multiphasic equilibria, as solid-supercritical fluids and solid-solvent-supercritical fluids with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (without considering the sublimation pressure as an adjustable parameter). On the other hand, the sublimation pressures were also used to calculate solid sublimation properties and acetaminophen solvation properties in some solvents. Also, solubility data solid-supercritical fluids from 62 pharmaceuticals were fitted with different semiempirical equations (Chrastil, Kumar-Johnston and Bartle models) in order to present the values of solvation enthalpies in sc-CO{sub 2} and vaporization enthalpies for these compounds. All of these results highlight that semiempirical models can be used for any other purpose as well as modeling (solid + supercritical fluids) equilibria.

  7. Examining Affective-Motivational Dynamics and Behavioral Implications Within The Interpersonal Context of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina

    2017-10-01

    Emotional, motivational, and interpersonal dimensions are considered integral to pain experience but have largely been examined separately. In this focus article, we argue that an integrative theoretical account that acknowledges each of these elements is a critical next step to capture the complexity and nuance of interpersonal pain dynamics and to shape future research. The aim of this focus article is to provide a foundation for such an account by drawing upon established insights from appraisal theory of emotion, influential behavioral models, empathy/interpersonal pain research, and social psychology literature to highlight conceptual relationships, potential mechanisms of action, and avenues of inquiry that have not previously been examined in the context of pain. Specifically, we highlight the interpersonal nature of pain and the conceptual relationship between emotion and motivation in pain experience. We discuss an affective-motivational tension between self- and other-oriented goals that can arise within the interpersonal pain context, and how such dynamics may affect the nature and effectiveness of caregiving behavior. We then describe the role of emotion regulation and strategies that may facilitate optimal interpersonal pain dynamics and caregiving within a multiple goal context. Finally, we outline a foundation for an integrative theoretical model and directions for future research. Drawing upon insights from appraisal theory of emotion, empathy/interpersonal pain research, influential behavioral models, and social psychology literature, this focus article provides a foundation for an integrative affective-motivational account of interpersonal pain dynamics as a basis for theoretical and clinical advancement. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Smoking and physical activity: examining health behaviors and 15-year mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Hartoonian, Narineh; Maynard, Charles; Leipertz, Steven L; Haselkorn, Jodie K

    2015-03-01

    To examine 2 modifiable health behaviors-smoking and physical activity-and their relationship to mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Secondary analysis of Large Health Survey. Data were obtained from a linkage of the Veterans Affairs (VA) MS National Data Repository, containing information on service provision to all individuals with MS receiving health services within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; the VA 1999 Large Health Survey, containing information on smoking and physical activity; and the VA Vital Status File. All-cause mortality was examined for the 15-year period from 1999 through 2013. Participants (N=2994) with MS who completed the Large Health Survey containing information on smoking and physical activity. Not applicable. Survival. There were 1500 deaths (50.1%) during the study period. Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted to examine the association between smoking and physical activity and 15-year mortality. After adjusting for demographic factors, physical functioning, mental health, and comorbid medical conditions, baseline smoking was associated with greater mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.184-1.60). Higher levels of baseline physical activity were associated with lower mortality (activity 1-2 times/wk: HR=.64; 95% CI, .518-.798; activity ≥3 times/wk: HR=.53; 95% CI, .388-.715). Results suggest that modifiable health behaviors represent a promising opportunity for intervention to improve the lives of individuals with MS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Health Risk Behaviors and Depressive Symptoms among Hispanic Adolescents: Examining Acculturation Discrepancies and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J.; Castillo, Linda G.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Romero, Andrea J.; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Córdova, David; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Lizzi, Karina M.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel W.; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning two models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. cultural practices, values, and identities at baseline (predictors); measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement six months post-baseline (mediators); and only adolescents completed measures of smoking, binge drinking, inconsistent condom use, and depressive symptoms one year post-baseline (outcomes). Measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the fit of a latent construct for family functioning. Key findings indicate that (a) adolescent acculturation components drove the effect of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning, (b) higher levels of adolescent family functioning were associated with less HRB/DS, whereas higher levels of caregiver family functioning were associated with more adolescent HRB/DS, (c) and only adolescent reports of family functioning mediated the effects of acculturation components and caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies on HRB/DS. PMID:26301514

  10. Examination of the change in latent statuses in bullying behaviors across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Wang, Cixin; Swearer, Susan M

    2015-03-01

    Involvement in bullying and victimization has been mostly studied using cross-sectional data from 1 time point. As such, much of our understanding of bullying and victimization has not captured the dynamic experiences of youth over time. To examine the change of latent statuses in bullying and victimization, we applied latent transition analysis examining self-reported bullying involvement from 1,180 students in 5th through 9th grades across 3 time points. We identified unobserved heterogeneous subgroups (i.e., latent statuses) and investigated how students transition between the unobserved subgroups over time. For victimization, 4 latent statuses were identified: frequent victim (11.23%), occasional traditional victim (28.86%), occasional cyber and traditional victim (10.34%), and infrequent victim (49.57%). For bullying behavior, 3 latent statuses were identified: frequent perpetrator (5.12%), occasional verbal/relational perpetrator (26.04%), and infrequent perpetrator (68.84%). The characteristics of the transitions were examined. The multiple-group effects of gender, grade, and first language learned on transitions across statuses were also investigated. The infrequent victim and infrequent perpetrator groups were the most stable, and the frequent victim and frequent perpetrator groups were the least stable. These findings suggest instability in perpetration and victimization over time, as well as significant changes, especially during school transition years. Findings suggest that school-based interventions need to address the heterogeneity in perpetrator and victim experiences in adolescence.

  11. Health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms among Hispanic adolescents: Examining acculturation discrepancies and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J; Castillo, Linda G; Unger, Jennifer B; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L; Romero, Andrea J; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Córdova, David; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Lizzi, Karina M; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel W; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2016-03-01

    Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning 2 models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. cultural practices, values, and identities at baseline (predictors); measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement 6 months postbaseline (mediators); and only adolescents completed measures of smoking, binge drinking, inconsistent condom use, and depressive symptoms 1 year postbaseline (outcomes). Measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the fit of a latent construct for family functioning. Key findings indicate that (a) adolescent acculturation components drove the effect of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning; (b) higher levels of adolescent family functioning were associated with less HRB/DS, whereas higher levels of caregiver family functioning were associated with more adolescent HRB/DS; (c) and only adolescent reports of family functioning mediated the effects of acculturation components and caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies on HRB/DS. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Mimeses do sublime: a recepção de Kant pelo Romantismo e pelo Expressionismo Mimesis of sublime: the Romantism and Expressionism reception of Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Rossinetti Rufinoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Partindo das analises do criticismo kantiano, este texto investiga as concepções romântica e moderna de sublime e de imaginação. Se, por um lado, a concepção romântica inaugura o mundo moderno, por outro, a expressionista mostra os limites dessa mesma modernidade. Para ambas, entretanto, a Crítica do Juízo de Kant é o âmbito privilegiado no qual podemos precisar as distinções.Starting from the analysis of the Kantian criticism, this text investigates the romantic and the modern conceptions of sublime and imagination. On the one hand, the romantic conceptions of sublime inaugurate the modern world. On the other hand, the expressionist conceptions show the confines of this world. The Critique of Judgment is the very locus where such distinctions can be drawn with precision.

  13. Rousseau's Ethics of Truth: a sublime science of simple souls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Neildleman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ROUSSEAU’S ETHICS OF TRUTH - A SUBLIME SCIENCE OF SIMPLE SOULS Resumo: este artigo é um resumo do livro com o mesmo título, publicado pelas edições da Routledge, nos Estados Unidos. Tanto no livro quanto neste artigo, o autor pretende discutir a coerência dos textos de Rousseau, na qual é possível prospectar uma "ética da verdade" cujo objetivo seja alcançar um vínculo de comunhão com as pessoas e com as coisas. O autor tenta ainda discutir as implicações da ética da verdade de Rousseau sobre o nosso sentido de si mesmo e o sentido de existência no mundo. Palavras-chave: Rousseau. Ética. Verdade. Filosofia. Abstract: This paper is a summary of the book published by Routledge in the United States. The author aims to discuss the coherence of Rousseau’s texts thought which it is possible to prospect an “ethics of truth”, so to achieve a communion bond with people and things. The author tries also to discuss the implications of Rousseau’s ethics of truth on our sense of self and the implications in the real existence in the world. Keywords: Rousseau. Ethics. Truth. Philosophy.

  14. Medical students' attention to multiple risk behaviors: a standardized patient examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J; Gali, Kathleen; Miller, Bernie; Hauer, Karen E

    2012-06-01

    Risk behaviors tend to cluster, particularly among smokers, with negative health effects. To optimize patients' health and wellbeing, health care providers ideally would assess and intervene upon the multiple risks with which patients may present. This study examined medical students' skills in assessing and treating multiple risk behaviors. Using a randomized experimental design, medical students' counseling interactions were evaluated with a standardized patient presenting with sexual health concerns and current tobacco use with varied problematic drinking status (alcohol-positive or alcohol-negative). One hundred and fifty-six third-year medical students. Student and standardized patient completed measures evaluated student knowledge, attitudes, and clinical performance. Overall, most students assessed tobacco use (85%); fewer assessed alcohol use (54%). Relative to the alcohol-negative case, students seeing the alcohol-positive case were less likely to assess sexually transmitted disease history (80% vs. 91%, p = 0.042), or patients' readiness to quit smoking (41% vs. 60%, p = 0.025), and endorsed greater attitudinal barriers to tobacco treatment (p = 0.030). Patient satisfaction was significantly lower for the alcohol-positive than the alcohol-negative case; clinical performance ratings moderated this relationship. When presented with a case of multiple risks, medical students performed less effectively and received lower patient satisfaction ratings. Findings were moderated by students' overall clinical performance. Paradigm shifts are needed in medical education that emphasize assessment of multiple risks, new models of conceptualizing behavior change as a generalized process, and treatment of the whole patient for optimizing health outcomes.

  15. Examining attachment to God and health risk-taking behaviors in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karissa D; Ellison, Christopher G; Loukas, Alexandra; Downey, Darcy L; Barrett, Jennifer B

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God--secure, avoidant, and anxious--were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328 undergraduate college students. Contrary to prior theory, secure attachment to God is not inversely associated with recent alcohol or marijuana use, or substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. Instead, avoidant and anxious attachment to God are associated with higher levels of drinking; anxious attachment to God is associated with marijuana use; and avoidant attachment to God is associated with substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. These patterns are gender-specific; problematic attachment to God is linked with negative outcomes solely among men.

  16. An Examination of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior in Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Miller, Erin L

    2015-08-01

    Physicians are commonly reported to die by suicide more frequently than individuals in the general population. Thus far, few reasons for this elevated suicide risk have been empirically investigated. Although the interpersonal psychological theory of suicidal behavior (IPTS) has been suggested as a fruitful means of explaining physician suicidality, it has yet to be examined quantitatively. Four hundred nineteen Pennsylvania physicians were assessed on a number of demographics, as well as all components of the IPTS. Findings indicated that physician scores on IPTS components are comparable to other groups displaying increased suicidality (e.g., military populations, prior attempters). Perceived burdensomeness was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation, while thwarted belongingness predicted prior suicide attempts. Acquired capability did not distinguish between prior attempters and nonattempters. Preliminary findings indicate the IPTS may be a useful framework for understanding and predicting physician suicidality. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  17. Examining the interplay among family, culture, and latina teen suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbas, Lauren E; Zayas, Luis H

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we explore the relationships among culture, family, and attempted suicide by U.S. Latinas. We analyzed qualitative interviews conducted with Latina teen suicide attempters (n = 10) and their parents. We also incorporated data collected from adolescents with no reported history of self-harm (n = 10) and their parents to examine why some individuals turned to suicide under similar experiences of cultural conflict. Our results reveal that Latina teens who attempted suicide lacked the resources to forge meaningful social ties. Without the tools to bridge experiences of cultural contradiction, the girls in our study described feeling isolated and alone. Under such conditions, adolescents turned to behaviors aimed at self-destruction. Unlike their peers who attempted suicide, adolescent Latinas with no lifetime history of attempted suicide were able to mobilize resources in ways that balanced experiences of acculturative tension by creating supportive relationships with other individuals. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Effects of academic examination stress on eating behavior and blood lipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, T M; Steptoe, A; Canaan, L; Davies, G J; Wardle, J

    1995-01-01

    The influence of academic examination stress on eating behavior and lipid profiles and the moderating effect of dietary restraint, trait anxiety, and social support availability was assessed in university students. One hundred and seventy-nine students were divided into exam-stress groups (51 women, 64 men) and control groups (48 women, 16 men) and were assessed at baseline and then within 2 weeks of exams or an equivalent point for the control group. Perceived stress, emotional well-being, and fasting lipid profiles were measured, and dietary information was collected by interview. The exam-stress group reported significant increases in perceived stress and deterioration in emotional well-being at the exam sessions compared with baseline sessions. No general effects of exam stress on food intake were observed, and there was no interaction between stress and dietary restraint. However, students in the exam-stress group with high trait anxiety and low social support showed significant increases in total energy intake between baseline and exam sessions, whereas individuals with low trait anxiety and high social support showed a reduction in energy intake. Students with high trait anxiety and low social support showed increases between baseline and exam sessions in the amount of fat and saturated fat consumed. Women in the exam-stress group taking oral contraceptives showed a significant increase in total cholesterol between baseline and exam sessions. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of naturally occurring episodic stress on health behavior and on lipid profiles.

  19. Examining gene-environment interactions in comorbid depressive and disruptive behavior disorders using a Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Kiff, Cara; Glazner, Chris; Kohen, Ruth; Tracy, Julia Helen; Zhou, Chuan; McCauley, Elizabeth; Vander Stoep, Ann

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to apply a Bayesian statistical analytic approach that minimizes multiple testing problems to explore the combined effects of chronic low familial support and variants in 12 candidate genes on risk for a common and debilitating childhood mental health condition. Bayesian mixture modeling was used to examine gene by environment interactions among genetic variants and environmental factors (family support) associated in previous studies with the occurrence of comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders youth, using a sample of 255 children. One main effect, variants in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR, rs53576) was associated with increased risk for comorbid disorders. Two significant gene × environment and one signification gene × gene interactions emerged. Variants in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α5 subunit (CHRNA5, rs16969968) and in the glucocorticoid receptor chaperone protein FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5, rs4713902) interacted with chronic low family support in association with child mental health status. One gene × gene interaction, 5-HTTLPR variant of the serotonin transporter (SERT/SLC6A4) in combination with μ opioid receptor (OPRM1, rs1799971) was associated with comorbid depression and conduct problems. Results indicate that Bayesian modeling is a feasible strategy for conducting behavioral genetics research. This approach, combined with an optimized genetic selection strategy (Vrieze et al., 2012), revealed genetic variants involved in stress regulation (FKBP5, SERT × OPMR), social bonding (OXTR), and nicotine responsivity (CHRNA5) in predicting comorbid status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Examining Gene-Environment Interactions in Comorbid Depressive and Disruptive Behavior Disorders using a Bayesian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Kiff, Cara; Glazner, Chris; Kohen, Ruth; Tracy, Julia Helen; Zhou, Chuan; McCauley, Elizabeth; Stoep, Ann Vander

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to apply a Bayesian statistical analytic approach that minimizes multiple testing problems to explore the combined effects of chronic low familial support and variants in 12 candidate genes on risk for a common and debilitating childhood mental health condition. Method Bayesian mixture modeling was used to examine gene by environment interactions among genetic variants and environmental factors (family support) associated in previous studies with the occurrence of comorbid depression and disruptive behavior disorders youth, using a sample of 255 children. Results One main effects, variants in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR, rs53576) was associated with increased risk for comorbid disorders. Two significant gene x environment and one signification gene x gene interaction emerged. Variants in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α5 subunit (CHRNA5, rs16969968) and in the glucocorticoid receptor chaperone protein FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5, rs4713902) interacted with chronic low family support in association with child mental health status. One gene x gene interaction, 5-HTTLPR variant of the serotonin transporter (SERT/SLC6A4) in combination with μ opioid receptor (OPRM1, rs1799971) was associated with comorbid depression and conduct problems. Conclusions Results indicate that Bayesian modeling is a feasible strategy for conducting behavioral genetics research. This approach, combined with an optimized genetic selection strategy (Vrieze, Iacono, & McGue, 2012), revealed genetic variants involved in stress regulation ( FKBP5, SERTxOPMR), social bonding (OXTR), and nicotine responsivity (CHRNA5) in predicting comorbid status. PMID:26228411

  1. Fathers entering substance abuse treatment: An examination of substance abuse, trauma symptoms and parenting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Carla Smith; Hall, Chelsea; McMahon, Thomas J; Easton, Caroline J

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between fatherhood and both psychiatric distress and severity of substance abuse (SA) among men entering SA treatment has not been well explored. This study was designed to (a) examine differences in symptoms of men presenting for SA assessment based on fatherhood status and (b) determine how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and severity of SA were associated with parenting for men who were fathers. PTSD symptoms, severity of SA, and parenting data reported on structured questionnaires were collected from 126 men presenting for an SA evaluation at a forensic drug diversion clinic. There were no differences in severity of alcohol or drug use between fathers and nonfathers; however, fathers with more PTSD symptoms reported greater severity of alcohol and drug use. Among the fathers, PTSD symptoms correlated significantly and positively with negative parenting behaviors, whereas SA did not. Fathers with more significant PTSD symptoms were more likely to want help with parenting. Further exploration of the impact of trauma-related symptoms on the parenting behaviors of substance-abusing men is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate for use in Active Thermal Control System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) design sought to provide significant mass savings over a traditional pumped fluid loop by combining the functions of a...

  3. Investigation of the extruded products based on lupins, lentils and sublimated meat hydrophilic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the calorimetric method have been studied the swelling kinetics of developed vegetable-meat mixture on the basis of lentils, lupine and sublimated meat to create extruded functionality products.

  4. Blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica from 11 years of CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Kayetha, Vinay; Yang, Yuekui; Pauly, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    Blowing snow processes commonly occur over the earth's ice sheets when the 10 m wind speed exceeds a threshold value. These processes play a key role in the sublimation and redistribution of snow thereby influencing the surface mass balance. Prior field studies and modeling results have shown the importance of blowing snow sublimation and transport on the surface mass budget and hydrological cycle of high-latitude regions. For the first time, we present continent-wide estimates of blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica for the period 2006-2016 based on direct observation of blowing snow events. We use an improved version of the blowing snow detection algorithm developed for previous work that uses atmospheric backscatter measurements obtained from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) satellite. The blowing snow events identified by CALIPSO and meteorological fields from MERRA-2 are used to compute the blowing snow sublimation and transport rates. Our results show that maximum sublimation occurs along and slightly inland of the coastline. This is contrary to the observed maximum blowing snow frequency which occurs over the interior. The associated temperature and moisture reanalysis fields likely contribute to the spatial distribution of the maximum sublimation values. However, the spatial pattern of the sublimation rate over Antarctica is consistent with modeling studies and precipitation estimates. Overall, our results show that the 2006-2016 Antarctica average integrated blowing snow sublimation is about 393 ± 196 Gt yr-1, which is considerably larger than previous model-derived estimates. We find maximum blowing snow transport amount of 5 Mt km-1 yr-1 over parts of East Antarctica and estimate that the average snow transport from continent to ocean is about 3.7 Gt yr-1. These continent-wide estimates are the first of their kind

  5. Examining Teachers' Behavioral Management Charts: A Comparison of Class Dojo and Paper-Pencil Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krach, S. Kathleen; McCreery, Michael P.; Rimel, Hillary

    2017-01-01

    Many teachers report using behavioral management charts in their classrooms as a means of managing student behaviors, but little is known about exactly what behaviors teachers are charting, or specifically how. Misunderstanding over how real-world teachers maintain behavioral charts may cause miscommunication between the teacher and the school…

  6. In pursuit of truth: A critical examination of meta-analyses of cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E; Flückiger, Christoph; Del Re, A C; Yulish, Noah E; Frost, Nickolas D; Pace, Brian T; Goldberg, Simon B; Miller, Scott D; Baardseth, Timothy P; Laska, Kevin M; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    Three recent meta-analyses have made the claim, albeit with some caveats, that cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBT) are superior to other psychotherapies, in general or for specific disorders (e.g., social phobia). The purpose of the present article was to examine four issues in meta-analysis that mitigate claims of CBT superiority: (a) effect size, power, and statistical significance, (b) focusing on disorder-specific symptom measures and ignoring other important indicators of psychological functioning, (c) problems inherent in classifying treatments provided in primary studies into classes of treatments, and (d) the inclusion of problematic trials, which biases the results, and the exclusion of trials that fail to find differences among treatments. When these issues are examined, the effects demonstrating the superiority of CBT are small, nonsignificant for the most part, limited to targeted symptoms, or are due to flawed primary studies. Meta-analytic evidence for the superiority of CBT in the three meta-analysis are nonexistent or weak.

  7. Psychosocial stressors and health behaviors: examining sleep, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity in a low-income pediatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Alyssa; Nelson, Timothy D; Van Dyk, Tori R; West, Tiffany

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the relationship between psychosocial stressors and health behaviors in a low-income pediatric sample. Participants were 122 children (8-11 years old, 53.3% female) and their parents recruited from a low-income primary care clinic. Measures assessed child stressors and parental financial strain, and child sleep problems, sedentary behaviors, and physical activity. Parental financial strain and child stressors were independently associated with sleep problems and sedentary behaviors, controlling for age and gender. Though stressors in general accounted for significant variance in physical activity, results indicate a complex relationship as parental financial strain predicted more physical activity and child stressors predicted less physical activity. Stressors are associated with adverse pediatric health behaviors. Consequently, chronic stressors could negatively affect long-term health, and interventions targeting stressors and health behaviors are indicated. Pediatric health care providers play a key role in promoting health behaviors among youth experiencing significant psychosocial stressors.

  8. Adoptive Parent Hostility and Children’s Peer Behavior Problems: Examining the Role of Genetically-Informed Child Attributes on Adoptive Parent Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Elam, Kit K.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David; Daniel S Shaw; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Gaysina, Darya; Barrett, Doug; Leve, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    Socially disruptive behavior during peer interactions in early childhood is detrimental to children’s social, emotional, and academic development. Few studies have investigated the developmental underpinnings of children’s socially disruptive behavior using genetically-sensitive research designs that allow examination of parent-on-child and child-on-parent (evocative genotype-environment correlation) effects when examining family process and child outcome associations. Using an adoption-at-bi...

  9. Examining and Predicting College Students' Reading Intentions and Behaviors: An Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the recreational reading attitudes, intentions, and behaviors of college students. The theory of reasoned action provided the framework for the investigation and prediction of the students' intentions and behaviors. Two hundred and one students completed questionnaires developed according to the guidelines for the construction…

  10. Brain-behavior relations in infancy: integrative approaches to examining infant looking behavior and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Greg D; Guy, Maggie W

    2012-01-01

    This article describes three approaches to conducting integrated research on brain-behavior relations in infancy. These approaches include: conducting an integrative study that tests the same cognitive construct using behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures in separate experiments, measuring behavior and ERPs in different phases of the same experiment, and measuring behavior and ERPs simultaneously. We review studies that have utilized these approaches with a specific focus on research on infant visual attention and recognition memory, and discuss the application of cortical source localization with infant ERP data. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed and suggestions are made for future research.

  11. Bidirectional Influences in Mother-Toddler Dyads: An Examination of the Relative Influence of Mothers’ and Children’s Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Del Vecchio, Tamara; Rhoades, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined bidirectional relations between mothers’ lax and overreactive discipline and children’s misbehavior and negative affect. We examined the moment-to-moment stability of mothers’ and children’s behaviors (actor effects) and mothers’ and children’s influence on their partners’ subsequent behaviors (partner effects). Participants were 71 mothers and their 24–48-month-old children observed during a thirty-minute interaction. Both children and mothers exhibited stability in their...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF VACUUM SUBLIMATION DRYERS USING THERMOELECTRIC MODULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Barykin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The main directions of use of freeze-dryed products and ingredients are revealed. The analysis of sales markets of freeze-dryed products is provided. It is shown that introduction of innovative production technologies will allow to develop dynamically not only to the large companies, but also small firms that will create prerequisites for growth of the Russian market of freeze-dryed products. Tendencies of development of the freeze-drying equipment are analysed. Relevance of development of energy saving freeze-dryers is proved The integrated approach to creation of competitive domestic technologies and the equipment for sublimation dehydration of thermolabile products consists in use of the effective combined remedies of a power supply, a process intensification, reduction of specific energy consumption and, as a result, decrease in product cost at achievement of high quality indicators. Advantages of thermoelectric modules as alternative direction to existing vapor-compression and absorbing refrigerating appliances are given. Researches of process of freeze-drying dehydration with use of thermoelectric modules are conducted. It is scientifically confirmed, that the thermoelectric module working at Peltier effect, promotes increase in refrigerating capacity due to use of the principle of the thermal pump. Options of use of thermoelectric modules in designs of dryers are offered. Optimum operating modes and number of modules in section are defined. Ways of increase of power efficiency of freeze-dryers with use of thermoelectric modules are specified. The received results will allow to make engineering calculations and design of progressive freeze-drying installations with various ways of a power supply.

  13. Behavioral and physiological reactions in dogs to a veterinary examination: Owner-dog interactions improve canine well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoltova, Erika; Martineau, Michaël; Boissy, Alain; Gilbert, Caroline

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve well-being of dogs during veterinary visits, we aimed to investigate the effect of human social interactions on behavior and physiology during routine examination. Firstly, we assessed the impact of a standardized veterinary examination on behavioral and physiological indicators of stress in dogs. Secondly, we examined whether the owner's tactile and verbal interactions with the dog influenced behavioral and physiological stress-associated parameters. A randomized within-subjects crossover design was used to examine behavior (n=33), rectal temperature (n=33), heart rate (HR) (n=18), maximal ocular surface temperature (max OST) (n=13) and salivary cortisol concentrations (n=10) in healthy privately owned pet dogs. The study consisted of two experimental conditions: a) "contact" - owner petting and talking to the dog during the examination; b) "non-contact" - owner present during the examination but not allowed to interact with the dog. Our findings showed that the veterinary examinations produced acute stress responses in dogs during both "contact" and "non-contact" conditions, with significant increases in lip licking, HR, and max OST. A significant decrease in attempts to jump off the examination table (p=0.002) was observed during the examination in the "contact" compared to the "non-contact" condition. In addition, interactions of owners showed an attenuating effect on HR (p=0.018) and max OST (p=0.011) in their dogs. The testing order (first vs. second visit) had no impact on behavioral and physiological parameters, suggesting that dogs did not habituate or sensitize to the examination procedure. Moreover, the duration of the owner-dog interactions had no significant impact on the behavioral and physiological responses of their dogs. This study demonstrates that owner-dog interactions improve the well-being of dogs during a veterinary examination. Future research may assist in further understanding the mechanisms associated with reducing

  14. Organizational Citizenship Behaviors in Higher Education: Examining the Relationships between Behaviors and Performance Outcomes for Individuals and Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) have been described as employee behaviors that are not required by job descriptions, are not formally rewarded, and contribute positively to the organization. Previous research has shown that OCBs are related to both individual and organizational performance. Given the importance of OCBs to individual…

  15. Examination of drivers' cell phone use behavior at intersections by using naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Huimin; Bao, Shan; Sayer, James; Kato, Kazuma

    2015-09-01

    Many driving simulator studies have shown that cell phone use while driving greatly degraded driving performance. In terms of safety analysis, many factors including drivers, vehicles, and driving situations need to be considered. Controlled or simulated studies cannot always account for the full effects of these factors, especially situational factors such as road condition, traffic density, and weather and lighting conditions. Naturalistic driving by its nature provides a natural and realistic way to examine drivers' behaviors and associated factors for cell phone use while driving. In this study, driving speed while using a cell phone (conversation or visual/manual tasks) was compared to two baselines (baseline 1: normal driving condition, which only excludes driving while using a cell phone, baseline 2: driving-only condition, which excludes all types of secondary tasks) when traversing an intersection. The outcomes showed that drivers drove slower when using a cell for both conversation and visual/manual (VM) tasks compared to baseline conditions. With regard to cell phone conversations, drivers were more likely to drive faster during the day time compared to night time driving and drive slower under moderate traffic compared to under sparse traffic situations. With regard to VM tasks, there was a significant interaction between traffic and cell phone use conditions. The maximum speed with VM tasks was significantly lower than that with baseline conditions under sparse traffic conditions. In contrast, the maximum speed with VM tasks was slightly higher than that with baseline driving under dense traffic situations. This suggests that drivers might self-regulate their behavior based on the driving situations and demand for secondary tasks, which could provide insights on driver distraction guidelines. With the rapid development of in-vehicle technology, the findings in this research could lead the improvement of human-machine interface (HMI) design as well

  16. Measured and modelled sublimation on the tropical Glaciar Artesonraju, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Winkler

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Sublimation plays a decisive role in the surface energy and mass balance of tropical glaciers. During the dry season (May–September low specific humidity and high surface roughness favour the direct transition from ice to vapour and drastically reduce the energy available for melting. However, field measurements are scarce and little is known about the performance of sublimation parameterisations in glacier mass balance and runoff models.

    During 15 days in August 2005 sublimation was measured on the tongue of Glaciar Artesonraju (8°58' S, 77°38' W in the Cordillera Blanca, Perú, using simple lysimeters. Indicating a strong dependence on surface roughness, daily totals of sublimation range from 1–3 kg m−2 for smooth to 2–5 kg m−2 for rough conditions. (The 15-day means at that time of wind speed and specific humidity were 4.3 m s−1 and 3.8 g kg−1, respectively.

    Measured sublimation was related to characteristic surface roughness lengths for momentum (zm and for the scalar quantities of temperature and water vapour (zs, using a process-based mass balance model. Input data were provided by automatic weather stations, situated on the glacier tongue at 4750 m a.s.l. and 4810 m a.s.l., respectively. Under smooth conditions the combination zm=2.0 mm and zs=1.0 mm appeared to be most appropriate, for rough conditions zm=20.0 mm and zs=10.0 mm fitted best.

    Extending the sublimation record from April 2004 to December 2005 with the process-based model confirms, that sublimation shows a clear seasonality. 60–90% of the energy available for ablation is consumed by sublimation in the dry season, but only 10–15% in the wet season (October–April. The findings are finally used to evaluate the parameterisation of sublimation in the lower-complexity mass

  17. Factors predicting Behavior Management Problems during Initial Dental Examination in Children Aged 2 to 8 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Arun; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Mittal, Vipula; Singh, Aparna; Aggarwal, Nidhi

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to identify the various background variables and its influence on behavior management problems (BMP) in children. Materials and methods The study included 165 children aged 2 to 8 years. During the initial dental visit, an experienced operator obtained each child?s background variables from accompanying guardians using a standardized questionnaire. Children?s dental behavior was rated by Frankel behavior rating scale. The behavior was then analyzed in rela...

  18. Toward high-performance vacuum-deposited organic light-emitting diodes: novel sublimable cationic iridium(III) complexes with yellow and orange electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Ma, Dongxin; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Ruihuan; Qiu, Yong

    2018-01-28

    Great advances in the development of efficient luminescent materials are the driving force behind organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Sublimable ionic transition metal complexes (iTMCs) have emerged as a large family of new emissive dopants applied for vacuum-deposited OLEDs, while the achievement of excellent performance remains arduous. A series of novel sublimable cationic iridium(III) complexes is designed and synthesized, containing an imidazole-type ancillary ligand and tetraphenylborate-type negative counter-ions with large steric hindrance and well-dispersed charges. The photophysical properties, electrochemical behaviors and thermal stability are fully investigated and discussed, then demonstrated by theoretical calculations. Yellow- and orange-emitting OLEDs thereof are fabricated by vacuum evaporation deposition, realizing high external quantum efficiency up to 11 %, maximum brightness over 27.3×103 cd/m2 and low turn-on voltages below 2.4 V, among the best results of analogous phosphorescent OLEDs based on iTMCs. This work indicates the promising applications of sublimable iTMCs in state-of-the-art vacuum-deposited optoelectronic devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An Econometric Examination of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of Norwegian Retailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Kahamseh, Saeed; Gunnarsson, Didrik; Larsen, Nils Magne; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral perspective model's (BPM; Foxall, 1990) retailing literature is built on extensive empirical research and techniques that were originally refined in choice experiments in behavioral economics and behavior analysis, and then tested mostly on British consumer panel data. We test the BPM in the context of Norwegian retailing. This…

  20. Examining the Criterion-Related Validity of the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorris, Carly A.; Perry, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory is a questionnaire designed to aid in the diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders or autism spectrum disorders. The Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory assesses adaptive and maladaptive behaviors associated with pervasive developmental disorders and provides an…

  1. Behavioral Autonomy Age Expectations among Mexican-Origin Mother-Daughter Dyads: An Examination of Within-Group Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Espinosa-Hernández, Graciela; Brown, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in behavioral autonomy age expectations between Mexican-origin mothers and their adolescent daughters (N = 319 dyads); variability in behavioral autonomy age expectations as a function of nativity and maternal educational attainment also was examined. Findings indicated significant differences between mothers and daughters such that mothers reported later expectations for the timing of behavioral autonomy than did daughters. Follow-up analyses indicated that findings appeared to be driven by maternal nativity, with dyads comprised of Mexico-born mothers reporting the latest age expectations for behavioral autonomy when compared with dyads comprised of U.S.-born mothers. Findings underscore the need to examine normative development among Latino adolescents and their families with a specific focus on how sociocultural characteristics can contribute to within-family differences. PMID:22093152

  2. Activities aimed at encouraging children to suicidal behavior: judicial-psychological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safuanov F.S.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Federal law of June 7, 2017 g. № 120-FZ "On amendments to the criminal code of the Russian Federation and article 151 of the Criminal procedure code of the Russian Federation in the part of establishing additional mechanisms to counter activities aimed at encouraging children to suicidal behavior" establishes criminal liability for inducement to commit suicide or assist in its Commission (article 110.1 of the criminal code, as well as for the organization of activities aimed at encouraging citizens to commit suicide (article 110.2 of the criminal code. Two additions to the criminal code include using a publicly performed work, the media or information and telecommunications networks (including network "Internet". There are new legal consequences relevant to forensic psychological assessment related to suicide. The article analyzes the legal situation (pre-investigation check of materials and incitement to suicide that define the subject of judicial-psychological or psychological and psychiatric examinations as the mental state of the subject in the period preceding the suicide (death. Legislative innovations require expertise in psychology and linguistics. One of the subjects of psychological-linguistic expertise is the focus of the information material (text, graphic, together verbal and non-verbal information or the communicative activity of the subject to encourage the addressee to co-concluding suicide. Formulate possible questions for the ex-experts and psychologists.

  3. Examining a Stage-Based Intervention and Predictors of Exercise Behavior among Iranian Sedentary Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Ghiami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of an intervention based on Transtheoretical Model on exercise behavior and examined TTM constructs as predictors of stages of change among Iranian adolescents. Fifty-six sedentary adolescents completed an assessment at baseline, 2 months, and 4 months. Repeated measures ANOVA and logistic regression were used to analyze the data. The analysis showed a statistically significant difference in the mean scores on stages of change for the experimental group. Thus, students in the experiment group significantly improved their stages compared to the baseline. Furthermore, stages of change were found to correlate with TTM constructs, and self-efficacy was shown to be a strong predictor of stages of change. This study indicated that a stage-based intervention using TTM constructs could effectively improve adolescents’ intention to engage in physical activity. Moreover, the level of physical activity in adolescent can be improved by increasing their self-efficacy to exercise. Keywords: Physical Activity; Stage of Change; Processes of Change; Decisional Balance; Self-efficacy; Transtheoretical Model

  4. On Tackling Flash Crowds with URL Shorteners and Examining User Behavior after Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeru; Minato, Shin-Ichi

    Several web sites providing disaster-related information failed repeatedly after the Great East Japan Earthquake, due to flash crowds caused by Twitter users. Twitter, which was intensively used for information sharing in the aftermath of the earthquake, relies on URL shorteners like bit.ly to offset its strict limit on message length. In order to mitigate the flash crowds, we examine the current Web usage and find that URL shorteners constitute a layer of indirection a significant part of Web traffic is guided by them. This implies that flash crowds can be controlled by URL shorteners. We developed a new URL shortener, named rcdn.info, just after the earthquake; rcdn.info redirects users to a replica created on a CoralCDN, if the original site is likely to become overloaded. This surprisingly simple solution worked very well in the emergency. We also conduct a thorough analysis of the request log and present several views that capture user behavior in the emergency from various aspects. Interestingly, the traffic significantly grew up at previously unpopular (i.e., small) sites during the disaster; this traffic shift could lead to the failure of several sites. Finally, we show that rcdn.info has great potential in mitigating such failures. We believe that our experience will help the research community tackle future disasters.

  5. Examining the relationship between alcohol-energy drink risk profiles and high-risk drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Marzell, Miesha; Turrisi, Rob; Mallett, Kimberly A; Cleveland, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    The mixing of alcohol and energy drinks (AMEDs) is a trend among college students associated with higher rates of heavy episodic drinking and negative alcohol-related consequences. The goals of this study were to take a person-centered approach to identify distinct risk profiles of college students based on AMED-specific constructs (expectancies, attitudes, and norms) and examine longitudinal associations between AMED use, drinking, and consequences. A random sample of incoming freshmen (n = 387, 59% female) completed measures of AMED use, AMED-specific expectancies, attitudes, and normative beliefs, and drinking quantity and alcohol-related consequences. Data were collected at 2 occasions: spring semester of freshmen year and fall semester of sophomore year. Latent profile analysis identified 4 subgroups of individuals: occasional AMED, anti-AMED, pro-AMED, and strong peer influence. Individuals in the pro-AMED group reported the most AMED use, drinking, and consequences. There was a unique association between profile membership and AMED use, even after controlling for drinking. Findings highlighted the importance of AMED-specific expectancies, attitudes, and norms. The unique association between AMED risk profiles and AMED use suggests AMED use is a distinct behavior that could be targeted by AMED-specific messages included in existing brief interventions for alcohol use. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. A LONGITUDINAL EXAMINATION OF TODDLERS' BEHAVIORAL CUES AS A FUNCTION OF SUBSTANCE-ABUSING MOTHERS' DISENGAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Hannah F; Borelli, Jessica L; Decoste, Cindy; Suchman, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    As a group, substance-abusing parents are at risk for maladaptive parenting. The association between substance abuse and parenting may result, in part, from parents' emotional disengagement from the parent-child relationship, which makes perceiving and responding to children's cues more challenging. In this study, we examined whether substance-abusing mothers' levels of disengagement from their relationship with their children (ages 2-44 months), operationalized in two different ways using parenting narratives (representational and linguistic disengagement), prospectively predicted children's engagement and disengagement cues during a structured mother-child interaction. Within a sample of 29 mothers, we tested the hypotheses that greater maternal disengagement at Time 1 would predict a decrease in children's engagement and an increase in children's disengagement at Time 2. Results indicated that representational disengagement predicted a decrease in children's engagement cues whereas linguistic disengagement predicted an increase in children's disengagement cues. Results provide partial support for a reciprocal, iterative process in which mothers and children mutually adjust their emotional and behavioral disengagement with one another. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. Examining the Role of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender on Social and Behavioral Ratings within the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ashley J.; Long, Kristin A.; Tommet, Douglas C.; Jones, Richard N.

    2017-01-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) is widely used to assess symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Given well-documented differences in social behaviors across cultures, this study examined whether item-level biases exist in ADOS scores across sociodemographic groups (race, ethnicity, and gender). We examined a subset of ten…

  8. The his and hers of prosocial behavior: an examination of the social psychology of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H

    2009-11-01

    Prosocial behavior consists of behaviors regarded as beneficial to others, including helping, sharing, comforting, guiding, rescuing, and defending others. Although women and men are similar in engaging in extensive prosocial behavior, they are different in their emphasis on particular classes of these behaviors. The specialty of women is prosocial behaviors that are more communal and relational, and that of men is behaviors that are more agentic and collectively oriented as well as strength intensive. These sex differences, which appear in research in various settings, match widely shared gender role beliefs. The origins of these beliefs lie in the division of labor, which reflects a biosocial interaction between male and female physical attributes and the social structure. The effects of gender roles on behavior are mediated by hormonal processes, social expectations, and individual dispositions. Copyright 2009 by the American Psychological Association

  9. Skin examination behavior: the role of melanoma history, skin type, psychosocial factors, and region of residence in determining clinical and self-conducted skin examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Nadine A; Bränström, Richard; Chang, Yu-mei; Affleck, Paul; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Tibben, Aad; Azizi, Esther; Baron-Epel, Orna; Battistuzzi, Linda; Bruno, William; Chan, May; Cuellar, Francisco; Debniak, Tadeusz; Pjanova, Dace; Ertmanski, Slawomir; Figl, Adina; Gonzalez, Melinda; Hayward, Nicholas K; Hocevar, Marko; Kanetsky, Peter A; Leachman, Sancy; Bergman, Wilma; Heisele, Olita; Palmer, Jane; Peric, Barbara; Puig, Susana; Schadendorf, Dirk; Gruis, Nelleke A; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2012-10-01

    To examine the frequency and correlates of skin examination behaviors in an international sample of individuals at varying risk of developing melanoma. A cross-sectional, web-based survey. Data were collected from the general population over a 20-month period on behalf of the Melanoma Genetics Consortium (GenoMEL). A total of 8178 adults from Northern (32%), Central (33%), and Southern (14%) Europe, Australia (13%), and the United States (8%). Self-reported frequency of skin self-examination (SSE) and clinical skin examination (CSE). After adjustment for age and sex, frequency of skin examination was higher in both Australia (odds ratio [OR]SSE=1.80 [99% CI, 1.49-2.18]; ORCSE=2.68 [99% CI, 2.23-3.23]) and the United States (ORSSE=2.28 [99% CI, 1.76-2.94]; ORCSE=3.39 [99% CI, 2.60-4.18]) than in the 3 European regions combined. Within Europe, participants from Southern Europe reported higher rates of SSE than those in Northern Europe (ORSSE=1.61 [99% CI, 1.31-1.97]), and frequency of CSE was higher in both Central (ORCSE=1.47 [99% CI, 1.22-1.78]) and Southern Europe (ORCSE=3.46 [99% CI, 2.78, 4.31]) than in Northern Europe. Skin examination behavior also varied according to melanoma history: participants with no history of melanoma reported the lowest levels of skin examination, while participants with a previous melanoma diagnosis reported the highest levels. After adjustment for region, and taking into account the role of age, sex, skin type, and mole count, engagement in SSE and CSE was associated with a range of psychosocial factors, including perceived risk of developing melanoma; perceived benefits of, and barriers to, skin examination; perceived confidence in one's ability to engage in screening; and social norms. In addition, among those with no history of melanoma, higher cancer-related worry was associated with greater frequency of SSE. Given the strong association between psychosocial factors and skin examination behaviors, particularly among people with

  10. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-02

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI.

  11. Examination of environmentally friendly "green" logistics behavior of managers in the pharmaceutical sector using the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Miray; Şar, Sevgi

    2017-12-11

    Logistics activities play a prominent role in enabling manufacturers, distribution channels, and pharmacies to work in harmony. Nowadays these activities have become increasingly striking in the pharmaceutical industry and seen as a development area for this sector. Additionally, green practices are beginning to be more attracting particularly in decreasing costs and increasing image of pharmaceutical companies. The main objective of this study was modeling green logistics (GL) behavior of the managers in the pharmaceutical sector in the theory of planned behavior (TPB) frame via structural equation modeling (SEM). A measurement tool was developed according to TPB. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to determine subfactors of GL behavior. In the second step, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted for confirming whether there is a relationship between the observed variables and their underlying latent constructs. Finally, structural equation model was conducted to specify the relationships between latent variables. In the proposed green logistics behavior (GLB) model, the positive effect of environmental attitude towards GL, perceived behavioral control related GL, and subjective norm about GL on intention towards GL were found statistically significant. Nevertheless, the effect of attitude towards costs of GL on intention towards GL was not found statistically significant. Intention towards GL has been found to have a positive statistically significant effect on the GL behavior. Based on the results of this study, it is possible to say that TPB is an appropriate theory for modeling green logistics behavior of managers. This model can be seen as a guide to the companies in the pharmaceutical sector to participate in green logistics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting externalizing and internalizing behavior in kindergarten: examining the buffering role of early social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Amy E; Krill, Sarah C; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Carter, Alice S

    2015-01-01

    This study tested an ecological model predicting children's behavior problems in kindergarten from risk and protective factors (parent psychological distress, parenting behavior, and social support) during early childhood. Study participants were 1,161 sociodemographically diverse mother-child pairs that participated in a longitudinal birth cohort study. The predictor variables were collected at two separate time points and based on parent reports; children were an average of 2 years old at Time 1 and 3 years old at Time 2. The outcome measures were collected when children reached kindergarten and were 6 years old on average. Our results show that early maternal psychological distress, mediated by suboptimal parenting behavior, predicts children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors in kindergarten. Moreover, early social support buffers the relations between psychological distress and later suboptimal parenting behavior and between suboptimal parenting behavior and later depressive/withdrawn behavior. Our findings have several implications for early intervention and prevention efforts. Of note, informal social support appears to play an important protective role in the development of externalizing and internalizing behavior problems, weakening the link between psychological distress and less optimal parenting behavior and between suboptimal parenting behavior and children's withdrawal/depression symptoms. Increasing social support may be a productive goal for family and community-level intervention.

  13. Examining the function of problem behavior in fragile X syndrome: preliminary experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; O'Reilly, Mark F; Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Rispoli, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual and developmental disability. The influence of environmental variables on behaviors associated with the syndrome has received only scant attention. The current study explored the function served by problem behavior in fragile X syndrome by using experimental functional analysis methodology with 8 children with fragile X. No child met criteria for attention-maintained problem behavior, 5 children met criteria for escape-maintained problem behavior, and 4 children met criteria for tangible-maintained problem behavior. Results are discussed and compared with previous findings on the function of problem behavior in fragile X syndrome, and implications for intervention are discussed. It is noted that the external validity of these findings is limited by the small sample size.

  14. Isothermal and non-isothermal sublimation kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl{sub 4}) for producing nuclear grade Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Hong [Department of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mi Sun [Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (RIST), Pohang 790-330 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Dong Joon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joo Hyun, E-mail: basicity@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-14

    Sublimation of ZrCl{sub 4} is important for the production of nuclear grade metallic Zr in Kroll's process. The sublimation kinetics of ZrCl{sub 4} was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis under both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The sublimation rate of ZrCl{sub 4} increased with increasing temperature under isothermal conditions. ZrCl{sub 4} sublimation was confirmed to be a zero-order process under isothermal conditions, whereas it was first-order kinetics under non-isothermal conditions. The activation energy of ZrCl{sub 4} sublimation under isothermal conditions was 21.7 kJ mol{sup −1}. The activation energy for non-isothermal sublimation was 101.4 kJ mol{sup −1} and 108.1 kJ mol{sup −1} with the Kissinger method and Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method, respectively. These non-isothermal activation energies were very close to the heat of sublimation (103.3 kJ mol{sup −1}). Sublimation occurs by two elementary steps: surface reaction and desorption. Therefore, the overall activation energy of ZrCl{sub 4} sublimation is 104.8 (±3.4) kJ mol{sup −1}. The activation energy of the surface reaction and desorption steps are proposed to be 83.1 kJ mol{sup −1} and 21.7 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • Sublimation kinetics of ZrCl{sub 4} was quantitatively analyzed using TGA method. • Isothermal and non-isothermal sublimation kinetics were quantitatively evaluated. • Activation energies of isothermal and non-isothermal kinetics were obtained. • Sublimation mechanism was proposed from kinetic analyses and SEM observations. • This kinetic information will be very useful in production of nuclear grade Zr.

  15. Re-examining the relationship between mortality salience and prosocial behavior in Chinese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianguo; He, Weijie; Zhu, Yi

    2017-04-01

    Given the mixed findings regarding the relationship between mortality salience (MS) and prosocial behavior, the present research retested how MS influences prosocial behaviors in Chinese culture. Results showed that although participants have different levels of death thought accessibility between an organ donation scenario and a general charity scenario, their willingness for prosocial behaviors were not significantly different between the two scenarios, indicating that under the influence of Chinese culture MS did not decrease prosocial behaviors. The findings point to the importance of uncovering the role of Chinese philosophy about death and life in shaping people's positive death reflection.

  16. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-08

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  17. Understanding gender differences in childhood injuries: Examining longitudinal relations between parental reactions and boys' versus girls' injury-risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; McArthur, Brae Anne; Spence, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine gender differences in children's hazard-directed behaviors when the parent was absent and determine whether parent reactions when present differentially influences boys' and girls' subsequent behaviors. Children and parents were video recorded in their home when a contrived burn hazard ('Gadget') was within view and reach of the child and the parent was sometimes present and absent. Videos were coded for teaching- and discipline-focused reactions by parents when children approached the Gadget in the parent's presence and children's hazard-directed behaviors when the parent was absent. Data were gathered monthly for a period of up to 6 months. Multilevel regression analyses examining temporal relationships between parents' reactions (teaching, discipline) and children's hazard-directed behaviors when the parent was absent revealed significant gender differences. For boys, reductions in hazard-directed behaviors over time were predicted from high teaching or low discipline reactions, with low teaching and high discipline reactions maintaining injury-risk behaviors over time. For girls, reductions in hazard-directed behaviors over time were predicted from low teaching or high discipline reactions, with high teaching and low discipline reactions maintaining injury-risk behaviors over time. To moderate young boys' injury-risk behaviors, caregivers should avoid frequent discipline-focused reactions in favor of frequent teaching when the child engages in injury-risk behaviors. For girls, however, frequent discipline-focused reactions reduced injury-risk behaviors over time more effectively than frequent teaching-focused reactions that sustained girls' interest in the hazard. Implications for injury prevention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The Protective Behavioral Strategies for Marijuana Scale: Further examination using item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R; Huang, Wenjing; Dvorak, Robert D; Prince, Mark A; Hummer, Justin F

    2017-08-01

    Given recent state legislation legalizing marijuana for recreational purposes and majority popular opinion favoring these laws, we developed the Protective Behavioral Strategies for Marijuana scale (PBSM) to identify strategies that may mitigate the harms related to marijuana use among those young people who choose to use the drug. In the current study, we expand on the initial exploratory study of the PBSM to further validate the measure with a large and geographically diverse sample (N = 2,117; 60% women, 30% non-White) of college students from 11 different universities across the United States. We sought to develop a psychometrically sound item bank for the PBSM and to create a short assessment form that minimizes respondent burden and time. Quantitative item analyses, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses with item response theory (IRT) and evaluation of differential item functioning (DIF), revealed an item bank of 36 items that was examined for unidimensionality and good content coverage, as well as a short form of 17 items that is free of bias in terms of gender (men vs. women), race (White vs. non-White), ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic), and recreational marijuana use legal status (state recreational marijuana was legal for 25.5% of participants). We also provide a scoring table for easy transformation from sum scores to IRT scale scores. The PBSM item bank and short form associated strongly and negatively with past month marijuana use and consequences. The measure may be useful to researchers and clinicians conducting intervention and prevention programs with young adults. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotis eThanos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, have shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working / recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0 mg/kg, 20.0 mg/kg, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26 or vehicle during a conditioned placed preference (CPP paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests (open field, novel object recognition (NOR, and social interaction (SI and novelty (SN paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce conditioned placed preference or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose, and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested.

  20. Alcohol expectancies, perceived norms, and drinking behavior among college students: examining the reciprocal determinism hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jeffrey D; Read, Jennifer P

    2013-03-01

    Social learning mechanisms, such as descriptive norms for drinking behavior (norms) and positive alcohol expectancies (PAEs), play a major role in college student alcohol use. According to the principle of reciprocal determinism (Bandura, 1977), norms and PAEs should be reciprocally associated with alcohol use, each influencing one another over time. However, the nature of these prospective relationships for college students is in need of further investigation. This study provided the first examination of the unique reciprocal associations among norms, PAEs, and drinking together in a single model. PAEs become more stable with age, whereas norms are likely to be more dynamic upon college entry. Thus, we hypothesized that alcohol use would show stronger reciprocal associations with norms than with PAEs for college students. Students (N = 557; 67% women) completed online measures of PAEs, norms, and quantity and frequency of alcohol use in September of their first (T1), second (T2), and third (T3) years of college. Reciprocal associations were analyzed using a cross-lagged panel design. PAEs had unidirectional influences on frequency and quantity of alcohol use, with no prospective effects from alcohol use to PAEs. Reciprocal associations were observed between norms and alcohol use, but only for quantity and not for frequency. Specifically, drinking quantity prospectively predicted quantity norms and quantity norms prospectively predicted drinking quantity. This effect was observed across both years in the model. These findings support the reciprocal determinism hypothesis for norms but not for PAEs in college students and may help to inform norm-based interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menzel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986–2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071–2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm. The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.

  2. Experimental Study of influence on The Moving of Sublimation Interface by Precooling Rate and Drying Temperature During Freeze-drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; Tao, Le-Ren

    2007-06-01

    For complex heat and mass transfer during freeze-drying, the shape and the moving rate of sublimation interface have not been clearly recognized yet. In this paper, Micro-CT scanner was used to follow the moving interface during sublimation. Apple slices cut into 16mm in diameter and 8mm in thickness were used as experimental samples, they were scanned every two hours during sublimation. The scanning images were analyzed and measured, then variation curves of grey value and curves of sublimation rate in two directions were obtained. The moving rates of sublimation interface under various precooling rates and primary drying temperatures were compared. The results show that, heat and mass transfer happens both at the upper and the under surface of the sample. Also it happens at the side surface to some extent. The interface shows as a three-dimensional moving mode, contracts to the geometric centre of the sample and presents an approximately spheral shape. Apple samples frozen at low rate sublimated more quickly than those by high rate. While drying temperature was higher, the sublimation interface moved more quickly. Under slow precooling condition, the sublimation rate rose quickly near the end of sublimation not only in vertical direction, but in horizontal direction.

  3. The role of sublimation and condensation in the formation of ice sheet surface at Mizuho Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Kusunoki, Kou

    1982-05-01

    Three methods were used to determine the sublimation and condensation at Mizuho Station in 1977-1978, that is, direct observations with an evaporimeter filled with ice and repeated measurements of offset stakes and indirect estimation using an empirical formula derived from meteorological parameters. A comparison of three methods shows satisfactory agreement, especially in the weekly average of sublimation in the 1977-1978 summer, while condensation is insignificantly small. Condensation prevailed from the middle of April to the middle of September and sublimation in the remainder of 1977. The annual amounts of condensation and sublimation in 1977 are estimated to be 0.6 g cm-2 and 5.4 g cm-2, respectively. The daily amount of sublimation showed its maximum of 92 mg cm-2 on December 22, 1977, at the summer solstice. The annual amount of sublimation much affected the annual net accumulation of 5.8 g. The sublimation and condensation contributed in the formation of glazed surface consisting of multilayered ice crusts. This glazed surface is representative in the katabatic wind region in Mizuho Plateau, and the structure of the ice crust reflects the mass balance due to sublimation and condensation on both sides of the crust. Sublimation rate varies with the direction of the sloping faces of sastrugi, being the maximum on the north-facing slope, which receives the maximum solar radiation.

  4. Adoptive Parent Hostility and Children’s Peer Behavior Problems: Examining the Role of Genetically-Informed Child Attributes on Adoptive Parent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Kit K.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David; Shaw, Daniel S.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Gaysina, Darya; Barrett, Doug; Leve, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    Socially disruptive behavior during peer interactions in early childhood is detrimental to children’s social, emotional, and academic development. Few studies have investigated the developmental underpinnings of children’s socially disruptive behavior using genetically-sensitive research designs that allow examination of parent-on-child and child-on-parent (evocative genotype-environment correlation) effects when examining family process and child outcome associations. Using an adoption-at-birth design, the present study controlled for passive genotype-environment correlation and directly examined evocative genotype-environment correlation (rGE) while examining the associations between family processes and children’s peer behavior. Specifically, the present study examined the evocative effect of genetic influences underlying toddler low social motivation on mother-child and father-child hostility, and the subsequent influence of parent hostility on disruptive peer behavior during the preschool period. Participants were 316 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children. Path analysis showed that birth mother low behavioral motivation predicted toddler low social motivation, which predicted both adoptive mother-child and father-child hostility, suggesting the presence of an evocative genotype-environment association. In addition, both mother-child and father-child hostility predicted children’s later disruptive peer behavior. Results highlight the importance of considering genetically-influenced child attributes on parental hostility that in turn link to later child social behavior. Implications for intervention programs focusing on early family processes and the precursors of disrupted child social development are discussed. PMID:24364829

  5. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Contextual Behavioral Science: Examining the Progress of a Distinctive Model of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Steven C.; Levin, Michael E.; Plumb-Vilardaga, Jennifer; Villatte, Jennifer L.; Pistorello, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent authors have compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present article describes ACT as a distinct and unified model of behavior change, linked to a specific strategy of scientific development, which we term “contextual behavioral science.” We outline the empirical progress of ACT and describe its distinctive development strategy. A contextual behavioral science approach is an inductive attempt to build more adequate psychological systems based on philosophical clarity; the development of basic principles and theories; the development of applied theories linked to basic ones; techniques and components linked to these processes and principles; measurement of theoretically key processes; an emphasis on mediation and moderation in the analysis of applied impact; an interest in effectiveness, dissemination, and training; empirical testing of the research program across a broad range of areas and levels of analysis; and the creation of a more effective scientific and clinical community. We argue that this is a reasonable approach, focused on long-term progress, and that in broad terms it seems to be working. ACT is not hostile to traditional CBT, and is not directly buoyed by whatever weaknesses traditional CBT may have. ACT should be measured at least in part against its own goals as specified by its own developmental strategy. PMID:23611068

  6. Examining the effects of turnover intentions on organizational citizenship behaviors and deviance behaviors: A psychological contract approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ke Michael; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Christian, Jessica Siegel; Porter, Christopher O L H

    2016-08-01

    Although turnover intentions are considered the most proximal antecedent of organizational exit, there is often temporal separation between thinking about leaving and actual exit. Using field data from 2 diverse samples of working adults, we explore a causal model of the effects of turnover intentions on employee behavior while they remain with the organization, focusing specifically on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) and deviance behaviors (DBs). Utilizing expectancy theory as an explanatory framework, we argue that turnover intentions result in high levels of transactional contract orientation and low levels of relational contract orientation, which in turn lead to a decrease in the incidence of OCBs and an increase in the incidence of DBs. We first used a pilot study to investigate the direction of causality between turnover intentions and psychological contract orientations. Then, in Study 1, we tested our mediated model using a sample of employees from a large drug retailing chain. In Study 2, we expanded our model by arguing that the mediated effects are much stronger when the organization is deemed responsible for potential exit. We then tested our full model using a sample of employees from a large state-owned telecommunications corporation in China. Across both studies, results were generally consistent and supportive of our hypotheses. We discuss the implications of our findings for future theory, research, and practice regarding the management of both the turnover process and discretionary behaviors at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Examining the Function of Problem Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Rispoli, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual and developmental disability. The influence of environmental variables on behaviors associated with the syndrome has received only scant attention. The current study explored the function served by problem behavior in fragile X syndrome by using experimental functional analysis…

  8. Suicidal Behavior in Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder: Examining the Role of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; Venarde, David F.; Mann, J. John

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between depression and suicidal behavior among individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder can aid assessment and treatment. In this study, 86 individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder were assessed for past and current suicidal behavior, depression, hopelessness, and reasons for…

  9. An Examination of Social Desirability Bias in Measures of College Students' Financial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Nicole; Harpel, Tammy; Fontes, Angela; Walters, Connor; Murphy, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the role of socially desirable responding (SDR) in responses to survey questions about financial behavior among college students. Data was collected via an online survey from 1,159 students enrolled at a Midwestern university. Participants reported on credit card and savings behaviors and attitudes by answering direct…

  10. Youth Residing in Out-of-Home Placements: Examination of Behavior and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Calli G.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2016-01-01

    A data set from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II was analyzed to determine if significant relationships existed between participants' internalizing and externalizing scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and their (a) scores on assessments of academic achievement and (b) behavior problems leading to suspension or…

  11. Examining Approval and Disapproval Behaviors of Teachers Working in Inclusive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin GÜNER YILDIZ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine frequency of approval and disapproval behaviors of teachers working in inclusive classrooms during lessons and to investigate whether teachers’ approval and disapproval behaviors differ in terms of their demographical characteristics. The study group consisted of 45 teachers who worked in three public schools in Ankara and who had students with special needs in their classrooms. In order to determine approval and disapproval behaviors teachers used, one hour video recordings in the classrooms of teachers in the study group were done and data of this study were analyzed by reviewing video recordings using Teacher Behaviors Observation Form and Demographical Information form was used to determine demographical characteristics of teachers. In terms of the analysis of data, mean of approval behaviors used by teachers per minute in one lesson was 0.42 whereas mean of disapproval behaviors was found to be 1.41 and the difference between these two values was statistically significant. The frequency of approval and disapproval behaviors teachers used did not differ significantly in terms of their gender, age, experience, and departments they graduated however these behaviors changed significantly in terms of teachers’ grade levels they were working in.

  12. Private Black Colleges' Encouragement of Student Giving and Volunteerism: An Examination of Prosocial Behavior Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezner, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and university missions often espouse ideals such as creating an active and engaged citizen. The concept, principles and manifestation of citizenship can take many forms. One such form is that of prosocial behavior, or voluntary actions towards others. Philanthropy is one example of prosocial behavior. This study enhances our knowledge of…

  13. Examining the Associations Among Home–School Dissonance, Amotivation, and Classroom Disruptive Behavior for Urban High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M.; Graves, Scott L.; Thomas, Deneia; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Mulder, Shambra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the association among home–school dissonance, amotivation, and classroom disruptive behavior among 309 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools in the Southern region of the country. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Learning Activities Scales (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). ANCOVA analyses revealed significant differences in classroom disruptive behaviors for the gender independent variable. Control...

  14. EXAMINATION OF THE INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIORS DISPLAYED BY PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS THROUGH DIGITAL DEVICES IN TERMS OF CERTAIN VARIABLES

    OpenAIRE

    SİNCAR, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the inappropriate behaviors displayed by prospective teachers through digital devices in terms of certain variables, and to reveal the causes of these inappropriate behaviors. Employing quantitative and qualitative research methods, the study was carried out during the 2011-2012 academic year with participation of 185 prospective teachers from a faculty of education in Turkey. Quantitative data were analyzed by use of multiple linear regression analysis...

  15. [Knowledge, attitude and behavior on blood lipid among people participated in health examination in Changsha and the influential factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Huiwu; Zhao, Liqun; Yu, Renhe; Chen, Nengfeng; Liu, Yun; He, Lianxiang; Xiao, Ying; Zhou, Shi

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and behavior on blood lipid among people in Changsha and to provide evidences for prevention and control of blood lipid abnormality. A total of 400 cases were randomly selected on the questionnaire of the knowledge, attitude and behavior on blood lipid in ordinary adults who participate in health examination in Xiangya Hospital. Blood lipid related physical examination was conducted at the same time. The health examination participants were divided into several groups according to their sex, age, degree of education, marriage and family income. The influential factors for knowledge, attitude and behavior were analyzed. The knowledge score of blood lipid for health examination participants was 18.33±8.67 (total score 37), the attitude score was 6.63±2.45 (total score 9) and the behavior score was 8.32±2.65 (total score 16). The scores of female was higher than that of male in the terms of knowledge and behavior (both Pattitude of blood lipid was influenced by four factors such as education background, systemic blood pressure, blood sugar and triglyceride(all Pattitude and behavior on blood lipid among health examination participants were mostly influenced by education background, gender and ages. Thus, clinical medical staff should prevent the blood lipid abnormality through the health education and improve the knowledge in normal people. The group of 40-49 age male should be thought as the primary intervention subjects. The knowledge, attitude and behavior on blood lipid among the general population is also related to individual's blood pressure, blood sugar and triglyceride. So the clinical medical staff should also improve the knowledge of blood lipid, blood pressure and blood sugar in general population for improving their attitude and unhealthy habits. In addition, the active control of blood sugar and blood pressure can enhance the overall health status of the general population.

  16. "It's like big mama's house": examining extended family influences on the dietary behaviors of African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natasha A; Thornton, Rachel L J; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Surkan, Pamela J; Levine, David M

    2014-01-01

    The family environment plays an important role in influencing children's dietary behaviors. Traditionally, African American extended family members play a key role in child socialization. We examine the role of extended families in how children are socialized to adopt dietary norms. We conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 24 individuals across eight family units to elicit information regarding the influences of culture and families on children's dietary behaviors. Findings suggest that families teach children to value activities that combine quality time and enjoying food together; adults are inconsistent in how they teach children to adopt desired dietary behaviors. This work has implications for improving family-based interventions for African American children through promoting healthful behaviors that are also respectful of family dietary traditions, improving communication between adults and children, and leveraging family members as attitudinal and behavioral referents.

  17. Incarceration and sexual risk: examining the relationship between men's involvement in the criminal justice system and risky sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Andrea K; Snow, Rachel C; Griffith, Derek M; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we used data from Add Health Waves II and III to compare men who had been incarcerated to those who had not, and examined whether incarceration was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners and increased odds of concurrent partnerships. We used multivariate regression and propensity-score matching to compare sexual behavior of Wave III male respondents who had been incarcerated with those who had not, and compared sexual behavior at Wave II to identify differences in sexual behavior prior to incarceration. Incarceration was associated with an increased rate of lifetime sexual partnership, but this was attenuated by substance use. Criminal justice involvement was associated with increased odds of having partners who report concurrent partnerships, but no further increase was seen with incarceration. There were no significant sexual behavior differences prior to incarceration. These results suggest that the criminal justice system and substance use may interact to shape sexual behavior.

  18. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  19. Numerical modeling and analytical modeling of cryogenic carbon capture in a de-sublimating heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhitao; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John M.

    2017-12-01

    Both a numerical and analytical model of the heat and mass transfer processes in a CO2, N2 mixture gas de-sublimating cross-flow finned duct heat exchanger system is developed to predict the heat transferred from a mixture gas to liquid nitrogen and the de-sublimating rate of CO2 in the mixture gas. The mixture gas outlet temperature, liquid nitrogen outlet temperature, CO2 mole fraction, temperature distribution and de-sublimating rate of CO2 through the whole heat exchanger was computed using both the numerical and analytic model. The numerical model is built using EES [1] (engineering equation solver). According to the simulation, a cross-flow finned duct heat exchanger can be designed and fabricated to validate the models. The performance of the heat exchanger is evaluated as functions of dimensionless variables, such as the ratio of the mass flow rate of liquid nitrogen to the mass flow rate of inlet flue gas.

  20. Traumatic Sublime: Genealogy of the Term and Relation to Contemporary Art and Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Jankov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prolonging the concept in art theory related to Andy Warhol’s art, whose (photographic series are characterized by “traumatic”, id est repetitive, operation of technique, Hal Foster introduces the term traumatic sublime to describe Bill Viola’s video works. The term relates not only to themes presented in the videos, but also to the media presenting them. Through his HD installation Ocean Without Shore at the 52nd Venice Biennale, Viola emphasised how important technical specifications of media are for his work, defining the colour saturation on the video with water curtains. This paper gives an overview of the technical evolution of Bill Viola’s works and of the term sublime, from Longinus, over Immanuel Kant, to Hal Foster and Jean-François Lyotard. It concludes that traumatic sublime can be related to several forms of new media art, not exclusively to Bill Viola’s work.

  1. Validity of Retrospective Reports of Eating Behavior from the Eating Disorder Examination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Jay M

    1999-01-01

    .... The EDE relies on retrospective self-report to obtain eating behavior information. However, there is growing evidence that retrospective self-reports are prone to errors arising from autobiographical memory...

  2. Paying Memories of Past Kindness Forward: Examining the Impact of Power and Memory on Prosocial Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katina Kulow; Kara Bentley; Priyali Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    .... Across two studies, we show that when individuals reflect on memories of receiving (vs. giving) help, individuals low in power were more likely to engage in prosocial behavior, particularly in contexts allowing for a potential increase in power.

  3. Mass removal by oxidation and sublimation of porous graphite during fiber laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Grady T.; Bauer, William A.; Fox, Charles D.; Gonzales, Ashley E.; Herr, Nicholas C.; Gosse, Ryan C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    The various effects of laser heating of carbon materials are key to assessing laser weapon effectiveness. Porous graphite plates, cylinders, and cones with densities of 1.55 to 1.82 g/cm3 were irradiated by a 10-kW fiber laser at 0.075 to 3.525 kW/cm2 for 120 s to study mass removal and crater formation. Surface temperatures reached steady state values as high as 3767 K. The total decrease in sample mass ranged from 0.06 to 6.29 g, with crater volumes of 0.52 to 838 mm3, and penetration times for 12.7-mm-thick plates as short as 38 s. Minor contaminants in the graphite samples produced calcium and iron oxide to be redeposited on the graphite surface. Dramatic graphite crystalline structures are also produced at higher laser irradiances. Significantly increased porosity of the sample is observed even outside the laser-irradiated region. Total mass removed increases with deposited laser energy at a rate of 4.83 g/MJ for medium extruded graphite with an apparent threshold of 0.15 MJ. At ˜3.5 kW/cm2, the fractions of the mass removed from the cylindrical samples in the crater, surrounding trench, and outer region of decreased porosity are 38%, 47%, and 15%, respectively. Graphite is particularly resistant to damage by high power lasers. The new understanding of graphite combustion and sublimation during laser irradiation is vital to the more complex behavior of carbon composites.

  4. Trans-modern AesthesiS In The Eurasian Borderlands And The Decolonial Anti-sublime

    OpenAIRE

    Madina Tlostanova

    2011-01-01

    El artículo estudia la aesthesis transmoderna en relación con la agenda de liberar la esfera estética de los mitos de la modernidad occidental. La autora ofrece un resumen crítico de las principales corrientes estéticas occidentales frente al anti-sublime decolonial como modelo alternativo analizado en el artículo. Se presta especial atención al mecanismo de este sublime, fundado en una hermenéutica pluritópica y una “comunidad de sentido” decolonial que une a quienes fueron marcados por la “...

  5. How the sublime became "now": time, modernity and aesthetics in Lyotard's rewriting of Kant

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Writing in the late 1980s, Nancy gives as examples of the "recent fashion for the sublime" not only the theoreticians of Paris, but the artists of Los Angeles, Berlin, Rome, and Tokyo. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the sublime may of course no longer seem quite so "now" as it did back then, whether in North America, Europe, or Japan. Simon Critchley, for one, has suggested that, at least as regards the issue of its conceptual coupling to "postmodernism," the "debate" concernin...

  6. Examining the Relationship between Superstitious Behavior in Sport and Trait Anxiety Levels among College Students Engaged in Active Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utku Işık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between superstitious behavior in sport and trait anxiety levels among college students engaged in active sports. 166 Pamukkale University and Ege University of School of Physical Education and Sports students who are selected simple random sampling method voluntarily participated (61 females and 105 males for the study. In the study for gathering data “Superstitious Ritual Questionnaire” and “Trait Anxiety Inventory” were used together. To examine the relationship between superstitious behavior in sport and trait anxiety levels the Pearson product-moment coefficients of correlation was used. The results indicated that the relationship between superstitious behavior in sport and trait anxiety level is positive and statistically significant (r=.208; p=.007. To explain whether there are significant differences between participants’ superstitious behavior in sport according to gender, Independent Sample T-test was used. Result of this analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between male and female students tendency to superstitious behaviors according to gender (t=1.15; p=.251. In conclusion study findings showed that anxiety is a factor that increases university students, engaging in active sport, superstitions behavior.

  7. Health behaviors among short- and long- term ex-smokers: results from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangthong, Rassamee; Wichaidit, Wit; McNeil, Edward; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Putwatana, Panwadee; Aekplakorn, Wichai

    2012-07-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the health behaviors of ex-smokers to be better than those in regular smokers, the differences in health behaviors among ex-smokers at varying durations of cessation have not been investigated. This study aims to examine the relationship between different durations of smoking cessation and health behaviors. Data on dietary intake, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and smoking behavior from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV for subjects aged 15-98 years (n=19 371) were included in the analysis. Trends between health behaviors among regular smokers, ex-smokers with different durations of smoking (10 years), and never smokers were tested. Logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, and economic status were used. The prevalences of regular smoking, ex-smoking, and never smoking were 22.3%, 12% , and 65.7%, respectively. A trend was found for consumption of fruit, beans and meats, dairy and soy milk, whole-grain products, nutritional supplements, and eating habits. Average daily alcohol consumption (g) was lowest among ex-smokers who had quit for>10 years ex-smokers (16.4) followed by 1-10 years ex-smokers (27.2), and <1 year ex-smokers (33.7). A longer duration of smoking cessation correlated with better health behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Credit with Health Education in Benin: A Cluster Randomized Trial Examining Impacts on Knowledge and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlan, Dean; Thuysbaert, Bram; Gray, Bobbi

    2017-02-08

    We evaluate whether health education integrated into microcredit lending groups reduces health risks by improving health knowledge and self-reported behaviors among urban and rural borrowers in eastern Benin. In 2007, we randomly assigned 138 villages in the Plateau region of Benin to one of four variations of a group liability credit product, varying lending groups' gender composition and/or inclusion of health education using a 2 × 2 design. Women in villages receiving health education, regardless of gender composition of the groups, showed improved knowledge of malaria and of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), but not of childhood illness danger signs. No significant changes in health behavior were observed except an increase in HIV/AIDS prevention behavior, a result predominantly driven by an increase in respondents' self-reported ability to procure a condom, likely an indicator of increased perceived access rather than improved preventative behavior. Women in villages assigned to mixed-gender groups had significantly lower levels of social capital, compared with villages assigned to female-only groups. This suggests there may be an important trade-off to consider for interventions seeking improved health outcomes and social capital through provision of services to mixed-gender groups. Although bundling health education with microcredit can expand health education coverage and lower service-delivery costs, the approach may not be sufficient to improve health behaviors. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Newcomer adjustment: Examining the role of managers' perception of newcomer proactive behavior during organizational socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Allison M; Nifadkar, Sushil S; Bauer, Talya N; Erdogan, Berrin

    2017-06-01

    Separate streams of organizational socialization research have recognized the importance of (a) newcomer proactivity and (b) manager support in facilitating newcomer adjustment. However, extant research has largely focused on the newcomers' experience, leaving the perspectives of managers during socialization relatively unexplored-a theoretical gap that has implications both for newcomer adjustment and manager-newcomer interactions that may serve as a basis for future relationship development. Drawing from the "interlocked" employee behavior argument of Weick (1979), we propose that managers' perception of newcomers' proactive behaviors are associated with concordant manager behaviors, which, in turn, support newcomer adjustment. Further, we investigate a cognitive mechanism-managers' evaluation of newcomers' commitment to adjust-which we expect underlies the proposed relationship between newcomers' proactive behaviors and managers' supportive behaviors. Using a time-lagged, 4-phase data collection of a sample of new software engineers in India and their managers, we were able to test our hypothesized model as well as rule out alternative explanations via multilevel structural equation modeling. Results broadly supported our model even after controlling for manager-newcomer social exchange relationship, proactive personalities of both newcomers and managers, and potential effects of coworker information providing. The implications of our findings for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Examining the role of vasopressin in the modulation of parental and sexual behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josi Maria eZimmermann-Peruzatto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasopressin (VP and VP-like neuropeptides are evolutionarily stable peptides found in all vertebrate species. In non-mammalian vertebrates, vasotocin (VT plays a role similar to mammalian VP, whereas mesotocin and isotocin are functionally similar to mammalian oxytocin (OT. Here, we review the involvement of VP in brain circuits, synaptic plasticity, evolution, and function, highlighting the role of VP in social behavior. In all studied species, VP is encoded on chromosome 20p13, and in mammals, VP is produced in specific hypothalamic nuclei and released by the posterior pituitary. The role of VP is mediated by the stimulation of the V1a, V2, and V1b receptors, as well as the oxytocinergic and purinergic receptors. VT and VP functions are usually related to osmotic and cardiovascular homeostasis when acting peripherally. However, these neuropeptides are also critically involved in the central modulation of social behavior displays, such as pairing recognition, pair-bonding, social memory, sexual behavior, parental care, maternal and aggressive behavior. Evidence suggests that these effects are primarily mediated by V1a receptor in specific brain circuits that provide important information for the onset and control of social behaviors in normal and pathological conditions.

  11. Body Composition, Fitness Status, and Health Behaviors upon Entering College: An Examination of Female College Students from Diverse Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda A. Price

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although poor health-related behaviors that impact development of chronic diseases begin much earlier than when actual disease is evident, few studies have examined health behaviors in college students, who may be at an important transitional period where early intervention could prevent development of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine health-related factors in female college students ( N = 61 by race/ethnicity and weight status. We found significant differences in health profiles between non-Hispanic White (White and African American students, including greater physical fitness and healthier diets among White students. Overweight/obese students had worse health profiles than healthy BMI students. Furthermore, weight status was significantly associated with cardiovascular fitness. This supports a focus on PA promotion for interventions in the period of emerging adulthood, alongside the other healthy behaviors, to elicit improvements in weight status and potential reduction of chronic disease risks.

  12. Relationship Between Self-Injurious Behaviors and Levels of Aggression in Children and Adolescents Who Were Subject to Medicolegal Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Sait; Kara, Koray; Teke, Hacer Y; Turker, Turker; Congologlu, Mehmet A; Sezigen, Sermet; Renklidag, Tulay; Karapirli, Mustafa; Javan, Gulnaz T

    2016-03-01

    Aggression, which is defined as a behavior causing harm or pain, is a behavioral pattern typically expected in children and adolescents who are involved in criminal activities. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between aggression and self-injurious behavior (SIB) in children and adolescents. The study was performed in 295 cases which were sent for medicolegal examination. The mean age of the subjects was 14.27 ± 1.05 years (age range 10-18 years). The aggression levels of the subjects were determined using the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), which is an updated form of the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory. The mean total AQ score of the subjects with and without SIB was 78.04 ± 21.0 and 62.75 ± 18.05, respectively (p aggression increased in children and adolescents who were involved in criminal activities when the SIBs increased. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. "Just how graphic are graphic novels?" An examination of aggression portrayals in manga and associations with aggressive behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Callister, Mark; Stockdale, Laura; Coutts, Holly; Collier, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Manga, a type of graphic novel, represent a widely popular literary genre worldwide and are one of the fastest growing areas of the publishing arena aimed at adolescents in the United States. However, to our knowledge, there has been almost no empirical research examining content or effects of reading manga. This article consists of 2 studies. Study 1 represents a content analysis of aggressive behavior in best-selling manga aimed at adolescents. Results revealed that aggression was common and was often portrayed in ways that may influence subsequent behavior. Study 2 examined the relationship between reading manga and aggressive behavior in 223 adolescents. Manga readers were more physically aggressive than non-manga readers and also reported more peer relationships with lonely individuals and smaller groups. In addition, reading manga with particularly high levels of aggression was associated with physical aggression even after controlling for media violence exposure in other media. Implications regarding these findings are discussed.

  14. Training and Dissemination of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression in Adults: A Preliminary Examination of Therapist Competence and Client Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Anne D.; Padesky, Christine A.; Montemarano, Jeremy; Lewis, Cara C.; Murakami, Jessica; Lamb, Kristen; DeVinney, Sharon; Reid, Mark; Smith, David A.; Beck, Aaron T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the authors examined the feasibility and effectiveness of training community therapists to deliver cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for depression. Method: Participants were therapists (n = 12) and clients (n = 116; mean age = 41 years, 63% women) presenting for treatment of depression at a not-for-profit and designated…

  15. An examination of program integrity and recidivism of a cognitive-behavioral program for incarcerated youth in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, P.; Overbeek, G.; Brugman, D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined whether the cognitive behavioral program EQUIP for incarcerated youth would reduce recidivism and whether higher levels of program integrity - the extent to which a program is implemented as intended - would strengthen the effectiveness of EQUIP on recidivism. Program

  16. Examining Behavioral, Relational, and Cognitive Engagement in Smaller Learning Communities: A Case Study of Reform in One Suburban District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A.; Chang, Mei-Lin; Andrzejewski, Carey E.; Poirier, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the impact of Smaller Learning Community reform on students' behavioral, relational, and cognitive engagement in a suburban school district experiencing urbanization. We describe a project in which we evaluated the engagement of a cohort of 8th grade students as they transitioned to high school (n = 605).…

  17. Examination of Bidirectional Relationships between Parent Stress and Two Types of Problem Behavior in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Mirenda, Pat; Duku, Eric; Szatmari, Peter; Georgiades, Stelios; Volden, Joanne; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Bryson, Susan; Smith, Isabel; Fombonne, Eric; Roberts, Wendy; Waddell, Charlotte; Thompson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Path analysis within a structural equation modeling framework was employed to examine the relationships between two types of parent stress and children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors over a 4-year period, in a sample of 184 mothers of young children with autism spectrum disorder. Parent stress was measured with the Parenting Stress…

  18. Attachment in young children with autism spectrum disorders: an examination of separation and reunion behaviors with both mothers and fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzadzinski, Rebecca L; Luyster, Rhiannon; Spencer, Amelia Gunn; Lord, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Most studies examining attachment in children with autism spectrum disorder used a strange situation paradigm and have found few significant group differences between children with autism spectrum disorder and comparisons. However, these studies predominantly used formal attachment categorizations (e.g. secure vs insecure), a method that may obscure more nuanced differences between groups. In this study, we utilized a qualitative approach to examine attachment behaviors in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Based on the results of previous studies, we looked at (a) parental gender, (b) child diagnosis, and (c) child cognitive skills to examine the role of these three factors on attachment behaviors elicited during a modified strange situation paradigm. Participants were 2- to 3-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (n = 166) or nonspectrum disorders (n = 45), as well as a sample of 56 children with typical development. Over the three groups, 393 observations of a modified strange situation paradigm with mothers and 127 observations with fathers were collected. Parental gender, child diagnosis, and child cognitive skills each had significant main effects on attachment behaviors elicited during reunion. These results underscore the importance of the father's role in parent-child interactions, with implications for both clinical and research efforts. In addition, the results emphasize the importance of considering a child's diagnosis and cognitive skills when examining attachment behaviors.

  19. Examining the Efficacy of Self-Regulated Strategy Development for Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losinski, Mickey; Cuenca-Carlino, Yojanna; Zablocki, Mark; Teagarden, James

    2014-01-01

    Two previous reviews have indicated that self-regulated strategy instruction (SRSD) is an evidence-based practice that can improve the writing skills of students with emotional and behavioral disorders. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to extend the findings and analytic methods of previous reviews by examining published studies regarding…

  20. Peer Rejection, Aggressive or Withdrawn Behavior, and Psychological Maladjustment from Ages 5 to 12: An Examination of Four Predictive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    Findings yielded a comprehensive portrait of the predictive relations among children's aggressive or withdrawn behaviors, peer rejection, and psychological maladjustment across the 5-12 age period. Examination of peer rejection in different variable contexts and across repeated intervals throughout childhood revealed differences in the timing,…

  1. Behavioral versus Cognitive Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Examination of Outcome and Mediators of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Rosenfield, David; Tart, Candyce D.; Cottraux, Jean; Powers, Mark B.; Smits, Jasper A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine symptom change over time, the effect of attrition on treatment outcome, and the putative mediators of cognitive therapy (CT) versus behavior therapy (BT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using archival data. Method: Sixty-two adults with OCD were randomized to 20 sessions of CT (N = 30) or BT (N = 32) that consisted of…

  2. The relationship between line manager behavior, perceived HRM practices and individual performance : Examining the mediating role of engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfes, K.; Truss, C.; Soane, E.; Rees, C.; Gatenby, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the role played by line managers in the link between HRM practices and individual performance outcomes. Drawing on social exchange theory, the authors test a mediated model linking perceived line manager behavior and perceived human resource management practices with employee

  3. The Role of Youth Problem Behaviors in the Path from Child Abuse and Neglect to Prostitution: A Prospective Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-01-01

    Behaviors beginning in childhood or adolescence may mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and involvement in prostitution. This paper examines 5 potential mediators: early sexual initiation, running away, juvenile crime, school problems, and early drug use. Using a prospective cohort design, abused and neglected children (ages…

  4. Understanding the Association between Maltreatment History and Adolescent Risk Behavior by Examining Popularity Motivations and Peer Group Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Wolfe, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how peer group processes of pressure and control and individual motivations for popularity would add to, and moderate the relationship between, childhood maltreatment and risky behavior in adolescence. A total of 1558 youth (804 girls) from three high schools in Ontario, Canada (M age = 15.02 years,…

  5. Examining the Associations Among Home–School Dissonance, Amotivation, and Classroom Disruptive Behavior for Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M.; Graves, Scott L.; Thomas, Deneia; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Mulder, Shambra

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the association among home–school dissonance, amotivation, and classroom disruptive behavior among 309 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools in the Southern region of the country. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Learning Activities Scales (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). ANCOVA analyses revealed significant differences in classroom disruptive behaviors for the gender independent variable. Controlling for gender in the multiple hierarchical regression analyses, it was revealed that home–school dissonance significantly predicted both amotivation and classroom disruptive behavior. In addition, a Sobel mediation analysis showed that amotivation was a significant mediator of the association between home–school dissonance and classroom disruptive behavior. Findings and limitations are discussed. PMID:27081213

  6. A comprehensive examination of the health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brenda D; Holliday, Rhonda Conerly; Wade, Bruce H; Trawick, Cynthia; Hodge, Michael; Caplan, Lee; Younge, Sinead; Quarshie, Alexander; Satcher, David

    2009-05-01

    There is limited information about African American students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the areas of health behavior, health knowledge, and attitudes. To fill this gap, a comprehensive examination offirst-year students was undertaken at a consortium of HBCUs. A non-random sample of 1115 freshmen were administered a survey that assessed several domains including: (1) demographics, (2) general health, (3) smoking habits, (4) disease risk, (5) weight perception, (6) physical activity, (7) perceived stress, (8) eating habits, (9) social support, (10) personal/family medical history, (11) leadership, (12) domestic violence, (13) substance use, and (14) sexual behavior. In general, most students knew about health behaviors and disease risk. Areas that warrant further exploration include physical activity, sexual behavior, and drug use. The analyses provide key information for health education and prevention.

  7. Ülev ei Kivisildniku luules. Üks lugemisviis. The Sublime „No” in Kivisildnik’s Poetry: A Way of Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Luks

    2012-04-01

    three possible types of no-ing poetry, without pretending to any comprehensiveness in this list: metaphysical poetry; poetry that is undergoing weakening or decline, and the poetry of destruction. I then discuss the poetry of Kivisildnik in the framework of this typology, and come to the conclusion that for Kivisildnik, what dominates is the poetry of destruction. In the sixth section, („Great viperous lines...”, I briefly consider the three key motifs of Kivisildnik’s sublime poetry of destruction: terror, abortion, and Estonia as an empty signifier. In the concluding section I demonstrate that the question raised by postmodern art – what is art? is also relevant to Kivisildnik’s poetry. I examine four stylistic figures through which Kivisildnik’s poetry falls into essential uncertainty: mechanicalness, the dispersal of authorship, the turning-into-itself of poetry, and the text’s transmissions into emptiness.

  8. A factor-analytic examination of sexual behaviors and attitudes and marihuana usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdsal, C; Greenberg, G; Bell, M; Reynolds, S

    1975-07-01

    A questionnaire that pertains to sexual attitudes and behaviors, family relationships, and marihuana usage was administered to 358 undergraduates at Wichita State University. A factor analysis performed upon the results yielded 12 factors related to sexual behavior: (1) Liberal vs. Conservative Attitudes; (2) Age-Experience; (3) Symbolic Sexual Preoccupation; (4) Romantic Love vs. Cynicism; (5) Experience-linked Drug Effects; (6) Affectual Dependence; (7) Mature Satisfaction; (8) Conservative vs. Liberal Sexual Practices; (9) High vs. Low Sexual Activity; (10) Sexual Revolution; (11) Sex; (12) Traditional vs. Cynical Love Roles.

  9. Relationships between young stallions' temperament and their behavioral reactions during standardized veterinary examinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Marie; Verwilghen, Denis; Serteyn, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Horse handling and veterinary examination can induce hazardous stress reactions. Such reactions occur especially in young and less-trained horses, particularly stallions, and make their handling a risk for breeders, grooms, and medical staff. Moreover, these stressful situations will affect...... young stallions' temperament and its comparison with their stress reactions during a standardized veterinary examination for studbook admission. The assessment consists of a general examination, a lameness examination including flexion tests, an endoscopy of the upper airway, and a standardized...... in charge of the examination filled in a short questionnaire about the horse's temperament and the " easiness of manipulation" for the performed examinations. Breeders were asked to complete a longer questionnaire about their horse's temperament. The assessments of " aggressiveness," " sociability...

  10. Retrospective analysis of the behavioral interview and other preadmission variables to predict licensure examination outcomes in physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, John H; Rindflesch, Aaron B; Youdas, James W; Krause, David A; Hellyer, Nathan J; Kinlaw, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of personal interviews in admissions decisions for health professions programs is conflicting. This retrospective study was intended to (1) quantify interrater reliability for assessing performance on a particular type of structured interview, the behavioral interview, and (2) examine the ability of multiple preadmission variables, including performance on the behavioral interview, to predict first-time performance on the national physical therapy licensing examination (NPTE). Data from 89 interviewees during the 2006-07 admissions cycle were used to examine inter-rater reliability. Data from 141 students who graduated from 2001 to 2005 were used to examine predictive validity of multiple preadmission variables on NPTE performance, including undergraduate cumulative grade point average (GPA), preprofessional science GPA, performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (including its analytical, quantitative, and verbal subscales), and performance on the behavioral interview. Inter-rater reliability for assessing interview performance was quantified with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1,1). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and associated validity indices were used to analyze variables that distinguished graduates who did and did not pass the NPTE on their first attempt (alpha = 0.05). The ICC1,1 for assessing interview performance was 0.749. Performance on the verbal subscale of the GRE (ROC curve area = 0.734, p = 0.007) and behavioral interview (ROC curve area = 0.685, p = 0.034) were statistically significant predictors of NPTE performance. This study provides evidence supporting the contributions of the behavioral interview and verbal subscale of the GRE to predict NPTE performance and assist admissions decisions.

  11. Examining the Academic Achievement of Latino Adolescents: The Role of Parent and Peer Beliefs and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, DeMarquis; Blake, Jamilia J.; Darensbourg, Alicia; Castillo, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    The achievement gap between Latino and White youth is well documented. This is of particular concern as children enter middle school because of the decline in school engagement and achievement noted in many students. The impact parent and peer beliefs and behaviors have on academic achievement, engagement, and achievement values of Latino middle…

  12. Examination of Lifestyle Behaviors and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in University Students Enrolled in Kinesiology Degree Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, Gina M; Lutsch, Andrea; Connors, Kimberly E; Shearer, Jane; Brown, Haley C; Ash, Garrett; Pescatello, Linda S; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Barfield, Whitney; Dubis, Gabriel; Houmard, Joseph A; Hoffman, Eric P; Hittel, Dustin S

    2016-04-01

    Preventing physical inactivity and weight gain during college is critical in decreasing lifelong obesity and associated disease risk. As such, we sought to compare cardiometabolic risk factors and lifestyle behaviors between college students enrolled in kinesiology and non-kinesiology degree programs to assess whether health and exercise degree programs may influence health behaviors and associated disease risk outcomes. Anthropometrics, fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid profiles and HbA1c%, blood pressure, and peak oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) were assessed in 247 healthy college students. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA) was calculated using glucose and insulin levels. Self-reported physical activity from the Paffenbarger questionnaire was collected to estimate the average caloric expenditure due to different types of physical activities. Despite no significant differences in body mass index or waist circumference between groups, kinesiology majors presented with ∼20% lower fasting insulin levels and HOMA (p = 0.01; p Kinesiology majors reported increased weekly participation in vigorous-intensity sport and leisure activities and, on average, engaged in >300 metabolic equivalent-h·wk, whereas non-kinesiology majors engaged in kinesiology degree programs display improved healthy behaviors and associated outcomes (parameters of glucose homeostasis). Practical outcomes of this research indicate that implementing components of a comprehensive kinesiology curriculum encourages improved health behaviors and associated cardiometabolic risk factors.

  13. Examining Implicit and Explicit Evaluations of Sexual Aggression and Sexually Aggressive Behavior in Men Recruited Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Chantal A; Nunes, Kevin L; Maimone, Sacha

    2016-12-05

    The purpose of the current study was to explore the relationship between implicit and explicit evaluations of sexual aggression and indicators of sexually aggressive behavior in samples of students and community men recruited online. Participants were male undergraduate students recruited online from a Canadian University (N = 150) and men recruited from the community via an online panel (N = 378). Participants completed measures of implicit and explicit evaluations of sexual aggression, cognitive distortions regarding rape, self-reported past sexually aggressive behavior, and self-reported proclivity to commit sexually aggressive behavior. We found that more positive explicit evaluations and more cognitive distortions were moderately to strongly associated with sexual aggression; however, this was not the case for implicit evaluations of rape. Our results suggest that explicit evaluations of sexual aggression and cognitive distortions may be relevant for understanding sexual aggression against adults, and that more research is needed exploring whether or not implicit evaluations are associated with sexually aggressive behavior. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy for Disruptive Behavior Problems in Very Young Children: A Meta-Analytic Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Chow, Candice; Chan, Priscilla T.; Cooper-Vince, Christine; Wilson, Lianna A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Service use trends showing increased off-label prescribing in very young children and reduced psychotherapy use raise concerns about quality of care for early disruptive behavior problems. Meta-analysis can empirically clarify best practices and guide clinical decision making by providing a quantitative synthesis of a body of…

  15. Examining the Efficacy of a Basic Functional Behavioral Assessment Training Package for School Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Sheldon L.; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of manualized training in "Basic" functional behavioral assessment (FBA) for typical school professionals on the ability of these professionals to complete technically adequate FBAs. Twelve school professionals participated in four 1-hr training sessions using the Basic FBA training handbook. After…

  16. Assessing DUI risk: examination of the Behaviors & Attitudes Drinking & Driving Scale (BADDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Jeremy D; Hupp, Stephen D A; Segrist, Daniel J

    2008-07-01

    Despite research findings indicating attitudinal differences among drivers with and without a history of driving under the influence (DUI) offenses, there are no well-established instruments specifically designed to clinically assess drinking and driving attitudes and behaviors among adults. The purpose of this current series of three studies was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Behaviors & Attitudes Drinking & Driving Scale (BADDS). The BADDS was developed in previous studies by the authors and assesses respondents' rationalizations for drinking and driving, likelihood of future drinking and driving, drinking and driving behaviors, and riding with a drinking driver behavior in the previous month. Study 1 (N=179) and Study 2 (N=338) assessed college participants, while Study 3 gathered data from adult DUI offenders (N=160) and non-DUI offenders (N=166). Results indicate good to excellent test-retest reliability and internal consistency estimates for BADDS scale scores. Support for the construct validity as well as concurrent and predictive criterion validity of BADDS scores was also demonstrated. Potential applications for the measure, as well as need for future research are described.

  17. Reconsidering examining cannabis subtypes together due to opposing effects on brain, cognition and behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Callesen, Mette Buhl; Ewing, Sarah W. Feeldstein

    Cannabis use represents a major public health issue throughout the globe. Yet, we still lack the most fundamental of knowledge on long-term effects of cannabis on neural, cognitive, and behavioral function. Part of this stems from how cannabis has been measured. To this end, most empirical...

  18. Examining Trends in Adolescent Environmental Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors across Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Flanagan, Constance A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Since the Environmental Movement began, adolescents' views have been largely ignored in studies of public opinion. The article presents a descriptive analysis of trends in the environmental attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of high school seniors from 1976 to 2005 using data from the Monitoring the Future study. Across a range of indicators,…

  19. Parental Depression and Child Behavior Problems: A Pilot Study Examining Pathways of Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangmu; Neece, Cameron L.; Parker, Kathleen H.

    2014-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have higher rates of depressive symptoms than parents of typically developing children and parents of children with other developmental disorders. Parental depressive symptoms are strongly associated with problem behaviors in children; however, the mechanisms through which parental…

  20. Examining the Relationship between Holistic/Analytic Style and Classroom Learning Behaviors of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Shu-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how high school students' cognitive tendencies in holistic/analytic style relate to their active or passive behavioral patterns observed in the classroom. It was speculated that academic intrinsic motivation might play the role as a moderator and learning approach (the structure-oriented…

  1. Comprehensive examination of the trans-diagnostic cognitive behavioral model of eating disorders in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Timko, C Alix; Clerici, Massimo; Zanetti, M Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-diagnostic Model (TM) of eating pathology describes how one or more of four hypothesized mechanisms (i.e., mood intolerance, core low self-esteem, clinical perfectionism and interpersonal difficulties) may interrelate with each other and with the core psychopathology of eating disorders (i.e., over-evaluation of weight and shape) to maintain the disordered behaviors. Although a cognitive behavioral treatment based on the TM has shown to be effective in treating eating disorders, the model itself has undergone only limited testing. This is the first study to both elaborate and test the validity of the TM in a large sample (N=605) of undergraduate men. Body mass index was controlled within structural equation modeling analyses. Although not all expected associations for the maintenance variables were significant, overall the validity of the model was supported. Concern about shape and weight directly led to exercise behaviors. There was a direct path from binge eating to exercise and other forms of compensatory behaviors (i.e., purging); but no significant path from restriction to binge eating. Of the maintaining factors, mood intolerance was the only maintaining variable directly linked to men's eating disorder symptoms. The other three maintaining factors of the TM indirectly impacted restriction through concerns about shape and weight, whereas only interpersonal difficulties predicted low self-esteem and binge eating. Potential implications for understanding and targeting eating disturbances in men are discussed. © 2013.

  2. Factors Influencing Agricultural Leadership Students' Behavioral Intentions: Examining the Potential Use of Mobile Technology in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Irby, Travis L.; Dooley, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is pervasive at institutions across the U.S. The study was framed with self-efficacy theory, self-directed learning theory, and the unified theory for acceptance and use of technology. The purpose of this study was to assess undergraduate students' behavioral intention towards mobile technology acceptance in agricultural…

  3. Online Academic Integrity: An Examination of MBA Students' Behavioral Intent of Engaging in Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rashad A.

    2017-01-01

    With the proliferation of online graduate enrollment by 35.7% from 2003 to 2014, the literature indicates the number of reported academic integrity cases is on the rise. A quantitative correlational study was used to determine which determinants, if any, had a relationship to the behavioral intent to engage in plagiarism among MBA students…

  4. Examining the Dynamic Structure of Daily Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior at Multiple Levels of Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan G.C. Wright

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric diagnostic covariation suggests that the underlying structure of psychopathology is not one of circumscribed disorders. Quantitative modeling of individual differences in diagnostic patterns has uncovered several broad domains of mental disorder liability, of which the Internalizing and Externalizing spectra have garnered the greatest support. These dimensions have generally been estimated from lifetime or past-year comorbidity patters, which are distal from the covariation of symptoms and maladaptive behavior that ebb and flow in daily life. In this study, structural models are applied to daily diary data (Median = 94 days of maladaptive behaviors collected from a sample (N = 101 of individuals diagnosed with personality disorders. Using multilevel and unified structural equation modeling, between-person, within-person, and person-specific structures were estimated from 16 behaviors that are encompassed by the Internalizing and Externalizing spectra. At the between-person level (i.e., individual differences in average endorsement across days we found support for a two-factor Internalizing-Externalizing model, which exhibits significant associations with corresponding diagnostic spectra. At the within-person level (i.e., dynamic covariation among daily behavior pooled across individuals we found support for a more differentiated, four-factor, Negative Affect-Detachment-Hostility-Impulsivity structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the person-specific structures of associations between these four domains are highly idiosyncratic.

  5. Examining Adolescent Student Photography and Related Processes to Inform Day Treatment School Curricula and Behavioral Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbel, Jason E.

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent students with psychiatric disorders who are educated in day treatment school classrooms manifest cognitive limitations, maladaptive behaviors, and social functioning deficits that often lead to academic failure, impeding their productivity when they become adults and causing them to run afoul of the criminal justice system. Informed by…

  6. Exploring Narcissism, Psychopathy, and Machiavellianism in Youth: Examination of Associations with Antisocial Behavior and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to explore the differential associations of callous-unemotional (CU) traits, narcissistic traits, and Machiavellian traits with overt aggression, relational aggression, delinquency, behavioral dysregulation, and emotional dysregulation in a community sample of boys and girls (ages 11-17). Results indicated that the three personality…

  7. An Empirical Study Examining the Impact of Gambling Advertisements on Adolescent Gambling Attitudes and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevensky, Jeffrey; Sklar, Alissa; Gupta, Rina; Messerlian, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Based upon a previous qualitative study a questionnaire ascertaining adolescents' awareness of gambling advertisements and their impact upon their behavior was developed and administered to 1,147 youth between the ages of 12 and 19. The findings suggest that almost all youth report being exposed to advertising with many individuals indicating…

  8. Examining Gender Differences in Adolescent Substance Abuse Behavior: Comparisons and Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sumin; Hollister, C. David

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates gender differences in adolescent substance abuse behavior, treatment effectiveness, and the associated relationships with pre-, during-, and post-treatment groups of variables. Analyses were performed using 6-month post-treatment follow-up data from over two thousand subjects. T-test analysis showed that females exhibited…

  9. Interrelated harms: Examining the associations between victimization, accidents, and criminal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; van der Heijden, Peter; Keane, Carl

    2001-01-01

    Problem. This study investigated the existence of positive associations between criminal behavior (‘offending’), traffic accidents, falls and tripping, and being the victim of a crime. The motivation for the study was that the finding of positive associations would support the thesis that there may

  10. Examining Associations among ADHD, Homework Behavior, and Reading Comprehension: A Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W.; Hart, Sara A.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature has indicated an important association between reading comprehension and both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and homework habits. This investigation sought to extend previous knowledge by providing information about how ADHD and homework behavior (i.e., completing homework regularly) may jointly influence…

  11. Perceived influence and college students' diet and physical activity behaviors: an examination of ego-centric social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Brook E; Forthofer, Melinda; Bantum, Erin O; Nigg, Claudio R

    2016-06-06

    Obesity is partially a social phenomenon, with college students particularly vulnerable to changes in social networks and obesity-related behaviors. Currently, little is known about the structure of social networks among college students and their potential influence on diet and physical activity behaviors. The purpose of the study was to examine social influences impacting college students' diet and physical activity behaviors, including sources of influence, comparisons between sources' and students' behaviors, and associations with meeting diet and physical activity recommendations. Data was collected from 40 students attending college in Hawaii. Participants completed diet and physical activity questionnaires and a name generator. Participants rated nominees' influence on their diet and physical activity behaviors as well as compared nominees' behaviors to their own. Descriptive statistics were used to look at perceptions of influence across network groups. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between network variables and odds of meeting recommendations. A total of 325 nominations were made and included: family (n = 116), college friends (n = 104), high school friends (n = 87), and significant others (n = 18). Nearly half of participants were not from Hawaii. Significant others of non-Hawaii students were perceived to be the most influential (M(SD) = 9(1.07)) and high school friends the least influential (M(SD) = 1.31(.42)) network. Overall, perceived influence was highest for diet compared to physical activity, but varied based on comparisons with nominees' behaviors. Significant others were most often perceived has having similar (44 %) or worse (39 %) eating behaviors than participants, and those with similar eating behaviors were perceived as most influential (M(SD) = 9.25(1.04)). Few associations were seen between network variables and odds of meeting recommendations. Among the groups nominated, high

  12. Examining Contextual Influences on Classroom-Based Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Strategies: Findings from a Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T; Waasdorp, Tracy E; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-11-01

    Although it is widely recognized that variation in implementation fidelity influences the impact of preventive interventions, little is known about how specific contextual factors may affect the implementation of social and behavioral interventions in classrooms. Theoretical research highlights the importance of multiple contextual influences on implementation, including factors at the classroom and school level (Domitrovich et al., Advances in School Mental Health Promotion, 1, 6-28, 2008). The current study used multi-level modeling to empirically examine the influence of teacher, classroom, and school characteristics on the implementation of classroom-based positive behavior support strategies over the course of 4 years. Data were collected in the context of a 37-school randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Multi-level results identified several school-level contextual factors (e.g., school size, behavioral disruptions) and teacher-level factors (perceptions of school organizational health and grade level taught) associated with variability in the implementation of classroom-based positive behavior supports. Implications for prevention research and practice are discussed.

  13. Laughing in the Face of Fear (of Disease Detection): Using Humor to Promote Cancer Self-Examination Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Robin L

    2016-07-01

    This research examines the possible benefit of using humor to reduce anxiety associated with performing cancer self-examination behaviors. In Study 1, 187 undergraduates read a humorous public service announcement (PSA) script promoting either breast or testicular self-exams. Results suggest that perception of humor reduced anxiety about self-exams, which, in turn, related to more positive self-exam attitudes. Simultaneously, humor perception associated with greater message processing motivation, which, in turn, associated with more supportive self-exam attitudes. Self-exam attitudes also positively associated with self-exam intentions. These results were largely replicated in Study 2. Further, self-exam intentions predicted self-exam behavior 1 week later. However, consistent with past research, the humorous and serious messages did not generate differences in subsequent self-exam behavior, though the intention-behavior relationship was stronger and significant for those exposed to the humorous versus the serious messages. In light of these findings, and given that humor has the advantage of attracting and holding attention in real message environments, the use of carefully constructed humor appeals may be a viable message strategy to promote health detection behaviors.

  14. Effectiveness of training on preventative nutritional behaviors for type-2 diabetes among the female adolescents: Examination of theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Farzaneh; Hosseini Nodeh, Zahra; Rahnavard, Zahra; Arab, Masoume

    2016-01-01

    Since type-2 diabetes is the most common chronic disease among Iranian female adolescents, we applied theory of planned behavior to examine the effect of training to intention to preventative nutritional behaviors for type-2 diabetes among female adolescents. In this experimental study 200 (11-14 year old) girls from 8 schools of Tehran city (100 in each intervention and control group) were recruited based on cluster sampling method during two stages. For intervention group, an educational program was designed based on the theory of planned behavior and presented in 6 workshop sessions to prevent type-2 diabetes. The data were collected before and two months after the workshops using a valid and reliable (α=0.72 and r=0.80) authormade questionnaire based on Ajzens TPB questionnaire manual. The data were analyzed using t-test, chi-square test and analysis of covariance. Findings indicate that the two groups were homogeneous regarding the demographic characteristics before education, but the mean score of the theory components (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention) was higher in the control group. Also, results showed all of the theory components significantly increased after the education in the intervention group (p=0.000). Training based on the theory of planned behavior enhances the intention to adherence preventative nutritional behaviors for type-2 diabetes among the studied female adolescents.

  15. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) on psychological and behavioral outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausenblas, Heather Ann; Heekin, Kacey; Mutchie, Heather Lee; Anton, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Throughout the past three decades, increased scientific attention has been given to examining saffron's (Crocus sativus L.) use as a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for a number of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and depression. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine and categorize the current state of scientific evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding the efficacy of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes. Electronic and non-electronic systematic searches were conducted to identify all relevant human clinical research on saffron. The search strategy was extensive and was designed according to the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)." Reference lists of articles that met the inclusion criteria were searched. Only English language studies were reviewed. Saffron trials in combination with other substances and saffron safety studies were considered, in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Included studies must have a control group. Included studies must measure a physiological and/or a behavioral outcome. The methodological quality of all included studies was independently evaluated by two reviewers using the Jadad score. Mean scores and P-values of measures were compared both inter- and intra-study for each parameter (i.e., depression). Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies examined the effects of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes of: major depressive disorder (n=6), premenstrual syndrome (n = 1), sexual dysfunction and infertility (n=4), and weight loss/snacking behaviors (n=1). The data from these studies support the efficacy of saffron as compared to placebo in improving the following conditions: depressive symptoms (compared to anti-depressants and placebo), premenstrual symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. In addition, saffron use was also effective in reducing excessive snacking behavior. Findings from initial

  16. Surface energy balance, melt and sublimation at Neumayer Station, East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.; König-Langlo, G.; Picard, G.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A surface energy balance model is forced by 13 years of high-quality hourly observations from the Antarctic coastal station Neumayer. The model accurately reproduces observed surface temperatures. Surface sublimation is significant in summer, when absorbed solar radiation heats the surface.

  17. How to Kill a Journalism School: The Digital Sublime in the Discourse of Discontinuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Michael; Sindorf, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that journalism's uncertain identity in academia has made it vulnerable to unreflective instrumentalism in the digital era. They show how instrumentalism intertwined with the digital sublime constitutes a rhetorically resonate rationale for closing a journalism school. Evidence comes from documents and testimony associated with…

  18. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  19. Estimation of Continental-Basin-Scale Sublimation in the Lena River Basin, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Suzuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lena River basin in Siberia produces one of the largest river inflows into the Arctic Ocean. One of the most important sources of runoff to the river is spring snowmelt and therefore snow ablation processes have great importance for this basin. In this study, we simulated these processes with fine resolution at basin scale using MicroMet/SnowModel and SnowAssim. To assimilate snow water equivalent (SWE data in SnowAssim, we used routine daily snow depth data and Sturm’s method. Following the verification of this method for SWE estimation in the basin, we evaluated the impact of snow data assimilation on basin-scale snow ablation. Through validation against MODIS snow coverage data and in situ snow survey observations, we found that SnowAssim could not improve on the original simulation by MicroMet/SnowModel because of estimation errors within the SWE data. Vegetation and accumulated snowfall control the spatial distribution of sublimation and we established that sublimation has an important effect on snow ablation. We found that the ratio of sublimation to snowfall in forests was around 26% and that interannual variation of sublimation modulated spring river runoff.

  20. Examining Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Externalizing and Internalizing Disorders in Urban Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiraldi, Ricardo; Power, Thomas J; Schwartz, Billie S; Keiffer, Jackie N; McCurdy, Barry L; Mathen, Manju; Jawad, Abbas F

    2016-07-01

    This article presents outcome data of the implementation of three group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) interventions for children with externalizing behavior problems, anxiety, and depression. School counselors and graduate students co-led the groups in two low-income urban schools. Data were analyzed to assess pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in diagnostic severity level. Results of the exploratory study indicated that all three GCBT protocols were effective at reducing diagnostic severity level for children who had a primary diagnosis of an externalizing disorder, anxiety disorder, or depressive disorder at the clinical or intermediate (at-risk) level. All three GCBT protocols were implemented with relatively high levels of fidelity. Data on the effectiveness of the interventions for reducing diagnostic severity level for externalizing and internalizing spectrum disorders and for specific disorders are presented. A discussion of implementation of mental health evidence-based interventions in urban schools is provided. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Alcohol Expectancies, Perceived Norms and Drinking Behavior among College Students: Examining the Reciprocal Determinism Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wardell, Jeffrey D.; Read, Jennifer P

    2012-01-01

    Social learning mechanisms, such as descriptive norms for drinking behavior (norms) and positive alcohol expectancies (PAEs), play a major role in college student alcohol use. According to the principle of reciprocal determinism (Bandura, 1977), norms and PAEs should be reciprocally associated with alcohol use, each influencing one another over time. However, the nature of these prospective relationships for college students is in need of further investigation. This study provided the first e...

  2. Activities aimed at encouraging children to suicidal behavior: judicial-psychological examination

    OpenAIRE

    Safuanov F.S.; Sekerazh T.N.

    2017-01-01

    Federal law of June 7, 2017 g. № 120-FZ "On amendments to the criminal code of the Russian Federation and article 151 of the Criminal procedure code of the Russian Federation in the part of establishing additional mechanisms to counter activities aimed at encouraging children to suicidal behavior" establishes criminal liability for inducement to commit suicide or assist in its Commission (article 110.1 of the criminal code), as well as for the organization of activities aimed at encouraging c...

  3. Examining the effect of task on viewing behavior in videos using saliency maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alers, Hani; Redi, Judith A.; Heynderickx, Ingrid

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that when viewing still images, people will look at these images in a different manner if instructed to evaluate their quality. They will tend to focus less on the main features of the image and, instead, scan the entire image area looking for clues for its level of quality. It is questionable, however, whether this finding can be extended to videos considering their dynamic nature. One can argue that when watching a video the viewer will always focus on the dynamically changing features of the video regardless of the given task. To test whether this is true, an experiment was conducted where half of the participants viewed videos with the task of quality evaluation while the other half were simply told to watch the videos as if they were watching a movie on TV or a video downloaded from the internet. The videos contained content which was degraded with compression artifacts over a wide range of quality. An eye tracking device was used to record the viewing behavior in both conditions. By comparing the behavior during each task, it was possible to observe a systematic difference in the viewing behavior which seemed to correlate to the quality of the videos.

  4. Educational Intervention on Breast Self-Examination Behavior in Women Referred to Health Centers: Application of Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiyali, Zahra; Aliyan, Farzaneh; Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan; Mansourian, Morteza; Khani Jeihooni, Ali

    2017-10-26

    Introduction and aims: Screening can play a major role in reducing deaths associated with cancer. Breast selfexamination (BSE) is a cheap, non-complicated and non-invasive method for breast cancer screening. This study aimed to examine the effects of an educational intervention based on the health belief model (HBM) on BSE behavior in women referred to health centers in Fasa, Iran. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 92 women, divided into an experimental and a control group. Data were collected using a validated questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, knowledge, HBM constructs and breast self-examination performance. An educational program was performed in five sessions through group discussion with questions and answers and training videos for participants in the experimental group. Questionnaires were filled before and three months after the intervention in the two groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS-22 software for descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The results of this study showed that the mean scores for knowledge, HBM constructs and self-examination behavior in the experimental group were elevated compared to the control group after the intervention (PEducation based on the HBM is effective in promoting breast self-examination behavior. Thus development and implementation of training programs based on the model are proposed for officers involved in education and health promotion in Iran. Creative Commons Attribution License

  5. Glacier mass balance reconstruction by sublimation induced enrichment of chemical species on Cerro Tapado (Chilean Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ginot

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 m long ice core down to bedrock from the Cerro Tapado glacier (5536 m a.s.l, 30°08' S, 69°55' W was analyzed to reconstruct past climatic conditions for Northern Chile. Because of the marked seasonality in the precipitation (short wet winter and extended dry summer periods in this region, major snow ablation and related post-depositional processes occur on the glacier surface during summer periods. They include predominantly sublimation and dry deposition. Assuming that, like measured during the field campaign, the enrichment of chloride was always related to sublimation, the chemical record along the ice core may be applied to reconstruct the history of such secondary processes linked to the past climatic conditions over northern Chile. For the time period 1962–1999, a mean annual net accumulation of 316 mm water equivalent (weq and 327 mm weq loss by sublimation was deduced by this method. This corresponds to an initial total annual accumulation of 539 mm weq. The annual variability of the accumulation and sublimation is related with the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI: higher net-accumulation during El-Niño years and more sublimation during La Niña years. The deepest part of the ice record shows a time discontinuity; with an ice body deposited under different climatic conditions: 290 mm higher precipitation but with reduced seasonal distribution (+470 mm in winter and –180 mm in summer and –3°C lower mean annual temperature. Unfortunately, its age is unknown. The comparison with regional proxy data however let us conclude that the glacier buildup did most likely occur after the dry mid-Holocene.

  6. An experimental examination of peers' influence on adolescent girls' intent to engage in maladaptive weight-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Diana; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Cohen, Geoffrey L; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2014-07-01

    Social psychological theories provide bases for understanding how social comparison processes may impact peer influence. This study examined two peer characteristics that may impact peer influence on adolescent girls' weight-related behavior intentions: body size and popularity. A school-based sample of 66 9th grade girls (12-15 years old) completed an experimental paradigm in which they believed they were interacting with other students (i.e., "e-confederates"). The body size and popularity of the e-confederates were experimentally manipulated. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions in which they were exposed to identical maladaptive weight-related behavior norms communicated by ostensible female peers who were either: (1) Thin and Popular; (2) Thin and Average Popularity; or (3) Heavy and Average Popularity. Participants' intent to engage in weight-related behaviors was measured pre-experiment and during public and private segments of the experiment. A significant effect of condition on public conformity was observed. Participants exposed to peers' maladaptive weight-related behavior norms in the Heavy and Average condition reported significantly less intent to engage in weight-related behaviors than participants in either of the thin-peer conditions (F(2) = 3.93, p = .025). Peer influence on private acceptance of weight-related behavior intentions was similar across conditions (F(2) = .47, p = .63). Body size comparison may be the most salient component of peer influence processes on weight-related behaviors. Peer influence on weight-related behavior intention also appears to impact private beliefs. Considering peer norms in preventive interventions combined with dissonance-based approaches may be useful. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Factors influencing voluntary premarital medical examination in Zhejiang province, China: a culturally-tailored health behavioral model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaming; Li, Lu; Zhou, Chi; Yang, Tingzhong; Dong, Hengjin

    2014-06-28

    Premarital medical examination (PME) compliance rate has dropped drastically since it became voluntary in China in 2003. This study aimed to establish a prediction model to be a theoretic framework for analyzing factors affecting PME compliance in Zhejiang province, China. A culturally-tailored health behavioral model combining the Health Behavioral Model (HBM) and the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) was established to analyze the data from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey (n = 2,572) using the intercept method at the county marriage registration office in 12 counties from Zhejiang in 2010. Participants were grouped by high (n = 1,795) and low (n = 777) social desirability responding tendency (SDRT) by Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS). A structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate behavioral determinants for their influences on PME compliance in both high and low SDRT groups. 69.8% of the participants had high SDRT and tended to overly report benefits and underreport barriers, which may affect prediction accuracy on PME participation. In the low SDRT group, the prediction model showed the most influencing factor on PME compliance was behavioral intention, with standardized structural coefficients (SSCs) being 0.75 (P norms (SSCs = 0.22, P norms were more crucial predictors for PME compliance than perceived threat (SSCs = 0.36, 0.269, and -0.06, respectively). County environmental factors played a role in PME compliance while less influential than behavioral determinates (16% vs. 84% in across factor variance partition coefficient). PME compliance might be influenced by demographic, behavioral, and social environmental factors. The verified prediction model was tested to be an effective theoretic framework for the prediction of factors affecting voluntary PME compliance. It also should be noted that internationally available behavioral theories and models need to be culturally tailored to adapt to particular populations. This

  8. Behavioral and physiological correlates of stress related to examination performance in college chemistry students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, M; Koone, T; Mewaldt, S; O'Connor, K

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to assess physiological and behavioral correlates of academic stress during a college course in organic chemistry in the USA. Participants (45 females, 46 males, mean age 19.88 years) were screened for their basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity using saliva samples collected at the beginning of the course and after each major test. Displacement activities (DAs) were observed during each test by videotaping students' behavior when they were taking the tests. These variables were then used as predictors of the students' achievement as measured by their grade point average (GPA) scores, American College Testing (ACT) scores, and their final grade in the class. Ninety-one students, enrolled in Organic Chemistry I at Marshall University during the summer of 2009, were recruited for this study. It was found that individual differences in the physiological stress responses are a factor in predicting the students' ability to pass a challenging class. A logistic model built on GPA, DAs during stress, and salivary hormone (cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone) concentrations was able to correctly classify almost 90% of the students passing the class. The same model was not nearly as successful in determining the possible factors behind failing the class, because the classification success was just 52%, a figure close to chance. We conclude that a clear set of characteristics related to the students' ability and resilience to psychological stress are necessary to succeed in a challenging class. The reason behind dropping or failing a class could be less defined. These data indicated that investigating the physiological and behavioral propensities associated with psychological stress can help us better understand an individual's coping responses to a long-term challenging situation.

  9. Sexual Experience Among Emotionally and Behaviorally Disordered Students in Therapeutic Day Schools: An Ecological Examination of Adolescent Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Erin; Brown, Larry K.; Houck, Christopher; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined gender differences in family, peer, partner, and mental health characteristics related to sexual experience among emotionally and behaviorally disordered students in therapeutic day schools, a population at elevated risk for negative sexual health outcomes. Methods A total of 417 13- to 20-year-old adolescents reported on their family functioning, peer and partner relationship characteristics, mental health problems, and self-reported sexual behavior. Results For boys and girls, peer influence and conduct problems predicted sexual experience, and family dysfunction was related to negative peer influence. Greater rejection sensitivity was related to less sexual experience for boys and girls. The final path model revealed indirect effects of family dysfunction on boys’ but not girls’ sexual experiences. Conclusions Findings underscore the utility of an ecological approach to understand social and personal mechanisms that increase risk and mitigate negative outcomes among emotionally and behaviorally disordered boys and girls in therapeutic day schools. PMID:22467883

  10. Meaning made of stress among veterans transitioning to college: examining unique associations with suicide risk and life-threatening behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Jason M; Malott, Jesse; Currier, Joseph M

    2014-04-01

    Meaning made of stress has been shown to be a unique predictor of mental and physical health. In this study, we examined the unique associations between two facets of meaning made of stress (comprehensibility and footing in the world) and suicide risk and life-threatening behavior among military veterans who have transitioned to college were examined, controlling for demographic factors, religiousness, combat-related physical injury, combat exposure, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Findings suggest that comprehensibility (having “made sense” of a stressor) is uniquely associated with lower suicide risk and a lower likelihood of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and engaging in self-mutilating behaviors.

  11. Social anhedonia and affiliation: examining behavior and subjective reactions within a social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, Katiah; Park, Stephanie G; Couture, Shannon M; Blanchard, Jack J

    2012-12-30

    Social anhedonia is a promising indicator for the vulnerability towards developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and is an important determinant of the social impairment associated with these disorders. It is unknown if social anhedonia is associated with true deficits in experiential reactions or if lower social functioning in social anhedonia reflects behavioral deficits in social skill or initiation of social contact. Using a novel social interaction task, the current study compared controls (n=60) to individuals elevated on social anhedonia (n=49) on observer-rated social skill and facial affect and participant self-reports of their experiential reactions to an affiliative interaction. Compared to the control group, the social anhedonia group was rated as behaviorally less affiliative and less socially skilled during the affiliative interaction. In response to the social interaction, the social anhedonia group reported less change in positive affect, less willingness to engage in future social interactions with the interaction partner, and less positive reactions toward the interaction partner compared to controls. There were no group differences in facial displays of emotion. Using a standardized affiliative stimulus, it was demonstrated that individuals high in social anhedonia have alterations in both their social skill and in their self-reported experiential reactions during a social interaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are Suicidal Behaviors Contagious in Adolescence?: Using Longitudinal Data to Examine Suicide Suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrutyn, Seth; Mueller, Anna S.

    2015-01-01

    Though Durkheim argued that strong social relationships protect individuals from suicide, we posit that these relationships have the potential to increase individuals’ vulnerability when they expose them to suicidality. Using three waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we evaluate whether new suicidal thoughts and attempts are in part responses to exposure to the suicide attempts of role models, specifically friends and family. We find that the suicide attempts of role models do in fact trigger new suicidal thoughts and in some cases attempts, even after significant controls are introduced. Moreover, we find that these effects fade with time, that girls are more vulnerable to them than boys, and that the relationship to the role model—for teenagers at least—matters. Friends appear to be more salient role models for both boys and girls. Our findings suggest that exposure to suicidal behaviors in significant others may teach individuals new ways to deal with emotional distress, namely by becoming suicidal. This reinforces the idea that the structure – and content – of social networks conditions their role in preventing suicidality. Specifically, social ties can be conduits of not just social support, but also anti-social behaviors, like suicidality. PMID:26069341

  13. Are Suicidal Behaviors Contagious in Adolescence?: Using Longitudinal Data to Examine Suicide Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrutyn, Seth; Mueller, Anna S

    2014-04-01

    Though Durkheim argued that strong social relationships protect individuals from suicide, we posit that these relationships have the potential to increase individuals' vulnerability when they expose them to suicidality. Using three waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we evaluate whether new suicidal thoughts and attempts are in part responses to exposure to the suicide attempts of role models, specifically friends and family. We find that the suicide attempts of role models do in fact trigger new suicidal thoughts and in some cases attempts, even after significant controls are introduced. Moreover, we find that these effects fade with time, that girls are more vulnerable to them than boys, and that the relationship to the role model-for teenagers at least-matters. Friends appear to be more salient role models for both boys and girls. Our findings suggest that exposure to suicidal behaviors in significant others may teach individuals new ways to deal with emotional distress, namely by becoming suicidal. This reinforces the idea that the structure - and content - of social networks conditions their role in preventing suicidality. Specifically, social ties can be conduits of not just social support, but also anti-social behaviors, like suicidality.

  14. An examination of the misuse of prescription stimulants among college students using the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Andrew; Martin, Ryan; Beaujean, Alex; Usdan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The misuse of prescription stimulants (MPS) is an emergent adverse health behavior among undergraduate college students. However, current research on MPS is largely atheoretical. The purpose of this study was to validate a survey to assess MPS-related theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs (i.e. attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control) and determine the relationship between these constructs, MPS-related risk factors (e.g. gender and class status), and current MPS (i.e. past 30 days use) among college students. Participants (N = 978, 67.8% female and 82.9% Caucasian) at a large public university in the southeastern USA completed a survey assessing MPS and MPS-related TPB constructs during fall 2010. To examine the relationship between MPS-related TPB constructs and current MPS, we conducted (1) confirmatory factor analyses to validate that our survey items assessed MPS-related TPB constructs and (2) a series of regression analyses to examine associations between MPS-related TPB constructs, potential MPS-related risk factors, and MPS in this sample. Our factor analyses indicated that the survey items assessed MPS-related TPB constructs and our multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that perceived behavioral control was significantly associated with current MPS. In addition, analyses found that having a prescription stimulant was a protective factor against MPS when the model included MPS-related TPB variables.

  15. Examining the relationship between typical drinking behavior and 21st birthday drinking behavior among college students: implications for event-specific prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Melissa A; Lindgren, Kristen P; Fossos, Nicole; Neighbors, Clayton; Oster-Aaland, Laura

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to: (i) compare 21st birthday drinking with typical drinking; (ii) assess the prevalence of negative consequences and risk behaviors experienced during the 21st birthday week; and (iii) examine the role of typical drinking and 21st birthday drinking in explaining 21st birthday week negative consequences and risk behaviors. Participants (n = 306; 50% male) included college students turning 21 at a Midwestern public university in the United States. Approximately 1 week prior to their 21st birthday, students completed measures of typical past 3-month alcohol consumption via a web-based survey. Following their birthday, students (n = 296; 50% male) completed measures of 21st birthday week drinking as well as negative consequences and risk behaviors. Findings indicated that students consumed considerably larger amounts of alcohol during the week of their 21st birthdays in comparison to typical weekly consumption. Additionally, students experienced a variety of negative consequences and risk behaviors during the week of their 21st birthday, including hangovers, vomiting and not remembering part of the previous evening. Negative binomial regression results indicated that those most likely to experience more negative consequences and risk behaviors associated with 21st birthday drinking were those who consumed heavy amounts of alcohol the week of their birthday, but who did not typically drink excessively. Findings underscore the need to develop event-specific prevention approaches for occasions associated with extreme drinking and provide direction for considering who may be at greatest risk for problems associated with celebratory drinking.

  16. Examining the Factors Influencing Participants' Knowledge Sharing Behavior in Virtual Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irene Y. L.; Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk

    2009-01-01

    Increasing organizations and educational institutions have implemented virtual learning communities to encourage knowledge sharing. However, this task can not be accomplished simply by grouping people together and telling them "sharing your knowledge will make you learn better". This research attempts to examine the factors influencing knowledge…

  17. Examining Associations between Narcissism, Behavior Problems, and Anxiety in Non-Referred Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.; Kunimatsu, Melissa M.; Fassnacht, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined associations between narcissism (total, adaptive, and maladaptive), self-esteem, and externalizing and internalizing problems in 157 non-referred adolescents (aged 14 to 18). Consistent with previous research, narcissism was positively associated with self-reported delinquency, overt aggression, and relational…

  18. Examining the Relationships between Primary School Principals' Power Styles and Teachers' Professional Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Serkan; Kilinç, Ali Çagatay; Er, Emre; Ögdem, Zeki; Savas, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between primary school principals' power styles and teacher professionalism. A total of 264 teachers employed in 10 primary schools in Kastamonu, Turkey, participated in this study. Kosar's (2008) "Power Styles Scale,"and the "Teacher Professionalism Scale"--originally…

  19. Interpreting the Intentions of Internet Predators: An Examination of Online Predatory Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Catherine D.

    2007-01-01

    Internet predators are finding new ways to prey on the vulnerabilities of youth in chat rooms and lure them into sexual activities. This study will examine three chat room transcripts between adult predators and adult volunteers of the group "Perverted Justice" posing as youth. These conversations will be analyzed to interpret the underlying…

  20. Between Resistance and Assimilation: A Critical Examination of American Muslim Educational Behaviors in Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Muhammad; Gooden, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the relationship between religious identities of African American Muslims and school performance. We examined how understandings of religion inform how American Muslims view, behave, and imagine their role in school. The first author conducted interviews over the course of a year with four American Muslims, two of whom…

  1. Maternal Sensitivity and Children's Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Stephanie; Bernier, Annie; Carrier, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine infant sleep duration as a moderator of the relations between maternal sensitivity and child externalizing and internalizing symptoms, in a prospective longitudinal design. Fifty-five Caucasian infants (33 girls) took part in 2 assessments, at 1 and 4 years. Maternal sensitivity was rated at 1 year, based on…

  2. Use of Protective Behavioral Strategies and Reduced Alcohol Risk: Examining the Moderating Effects of Mental Health, Gender and Race

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Shannon R.; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research indicates that protective behavioral strategies (PBS)—previously established as effective self-regulating tools for reducing alcohol risk among college students—may be especially useful for students with poor mental health, who are shown to be at heightened risk for alcohol-related harm. The current study examined the moderating influence of mental health (depression and anxiety severity), gender, and race (White, Asian) in the relationship between PBS use and alcohol-related ...

  3. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, T. L.; Eddings, K. E.; Krukowski, R. A.; Love, S. J.; Harvey-Berino, J. R.; West, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n = 92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46 ? 10 years; mean BMI: 38 ? 6) were grou...

  4. The Role of Youth Problem Behaviors in the Path From Child Abuse and Neglect to Prostitution: A Prospective Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-01-01

    Behaviors beginning in childhood or adolescence may mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and involvement in prostitution. This paper examines five potential mediators: early sexual initiation, running away, juvenile crime, school problems, and early drug use. Using a prospective cohort design, abused and neglected children (ages 0–11) with cases processed during 1967–1971 were matched with non-abused, non-neglected children and followed into young adulthood. Data are from i...

  5. An Examination of the Influence of Consumer Motivation on Salesperson Appraisal and Emotional Response to Salesperson Behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallalieu, Lynnea Anne

    2000-01-01

    This research examines the effects of consumer motivation during an interpersonal sales encounter. The research proposes that a consumer's motivational mind-set affects the consumer's cognitive appraisal of the salesperson and the consumer's subsequent emotional response. Of primary interest is the interaction between a consumer's motivation and a salesperson's behavior. A main thesis of this research is that a congruency mechanism operates between the consumer and the salesperson during a...

  6. The Relationship between Health Behavior and General Health Status: Based on 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Cheon, Chunhoo; Oh, So-Mi; Jang, Soobin; Park, Jeong-Su; Park, Sunju; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; SHIN, YONG-CHEOL; KO, SEONG-GYU

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between health behavior and general health status. Methods We used data from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Mental health was measured by stress recognition and depression. Dietary habit was measured by mixed grain diet. Life pattern was measured by sleeping time and working pattern. Physical activity was measured by walking and exercise. We defined general health status as Euro Qualit...

  7. Which maltreated children are at greatest risk of aggressive and criminal behavior? An examination of maltreatment dimensions and cumulative risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wert, Melissa; Mishna, Faye; Trocmé, Nico; Fallon, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    This paper explores the well-documented relationship between child maltreatment and aggressive and criminal behavior, specifically examining several dimensions of maltreatment and cumulative child and family risk. Using data from the provincially representative Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (OIS-2013), this paper utilizes a developmental lens to examine whether maltreatment dimensions and cumulative risk can differentiate maltreated young people who exhibit aggressive and criminal behaviors and those who do not. A total unweighted sample of 1837 substantiated maltreatment investigations was examined in this analysis using chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression. The findings indicate that 13% of maltreated children and youth served by the Ontario child welfare system exhibited aggression and 6% of maltreated adolescents were involved in the youth justice system. Aggressive children and youth were more likely to experience severe and co-occurring forms of maltreatment and to experience higher levels of cumulative child risk. In adolescence, youth exhibiting aggressive and/or criminal behavior commonly were investigated because of neglect, specifically because their caregivers were no longer willing or able to remain in a caregiving role. Implications for child welfare policy and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Examining whether the information-motivation-behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (Pmedication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; Pmedication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence.

  9. Mechanisms linking violence exposure and school engagement among african american adolescents: examining the roles of psychological problem behaviors and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Dexter R; Neilands, Torsten B; Hunnicutt, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether the relationship between violence exposure and school engagement is mediated by psychological problem behaviors and whether such relationships are gendered. Five hundred and sixty-three high school African American adolescents (ages 13-19 years) completed questionnaires that assessed two types of violence exposure (community violence and marital conflict), psychological problem behaviors (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, anxiety, withdrawal, and aggressive behaviors), and school engagement (i.e., student-teacher connectedness and grade point average [GPA] obtained from school records). For male adolescents, psychological problem behaviors collectively mediated the relationship between community violence exposure and student-teacher connectedness. For female adolescents, both community violence and marital conflict exposure were negatively related to both GPA and student-teacher connectedness via aggressive behavior. Findings suggest that the differential impact of type of violence exposure and its sequela based on gender should be considered when addressing low school engagement among African American youth. © 2011 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  10. Does Sex Really Matter? Examining the Connections Between Spouses' Nonsexual Behaviors, Sexual Frequency, Sexual Satisfaction, and Marital Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Elizabeth A; Loving, Timothy J; Pope, Mark T; Huston, Ted L; Štulhofer, Aleksandar

    2017-02-01

    We examined the interplay between husbands' and wives' positive and negative nonsexual interpersonal behaviors, frequency of sexual intercourse, sexual satisfaction, and feelings of marital satisfaction. To do this, we conducted an in-depth face-to-face interview and completed a series of telephone diaries with 105 couples during their second, third, and fourteenth years of marriage. Consistent with the argument that women's sexual response is tied to intimacy (Basson, 2000), multilevel analyses revealed that husbands' positive interpersonal behaviors directed toward their wives-but not wives' positivity nor spouses' negative behaviors (regardless of gender)-predicted the frequency with which couples engaged in intercourse. The frequency of sexual intercourse and interpersonal negativity predicted both husbands' and wives' sexual satisfaction; wives' positive behaviors were also tied to husbands' sexual satisfaction. When spouses' interpersonal behaviors, frequency of sexual intercourse, and sexual satisfaction were considered in tandem, all but the frequency of sexual intercourse were associated with marital satisfaction. When it comes to feelings of marital satisfaction, therefore, a satisfying sex life and a warm interpersonal climate appear to matter more than does a greater frequency of sexual intercourse. Collectively, these findings shed much-needed light on the interplay between the nonsexual interpersonal climate of marriage and spouses' sexual relationships.

  11. Singing under the influence: examining the effects of nutrition and addiction on a learned vocal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Peter V; Olson, Christopher R; Mello, Claudio V

    2011-10-01

    The songbird model is widely established in a number of laboratories for the investigation of the neurobiology and development of vocal learning. While vocal learning is rare in the animal kingdom, it is a trait that songbirds share with humans. The neuroanatomical and physiological organization of the brain circuitry that controls learned vocalizations has been extensively characterized, particularly in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Recently, several powerful molecular and genomic tools have become available in this organism, making it an attractive choice for neurobiologists interested in the neural and genetic basis of a complex learned behavior. Here, we briefly review some of the main features of vocal learning and associated brain structures in zebra finches and comment on some examples that illustrate how themes related to nutrition and addiction can be explored using this model organism.

  12. Examining the relationship among emotional intelligence, organizational communications and organizational citizenship behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarifeh Eynollahzadeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the relationship between emotional intelligence, organizational communications and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB for a case study of Islamic Azad University, Gorgan Branch, and Sama Institution in Iran. Statistical population includes all heads and assistants and employees of Islamic Azad University and Sama Institution in city of Gorgan, Iran as 300 people. Sample size was determined as 169 people according to Korjesi and Morgan table. This research is operational by goal, and survey and correlation by method. To determine questionnaire reliability and questionnaire validity, Cronbach Alpha coefficient for emotional intelligence questionnaire, organizational communications questionnaire, and OCB questionnaire were calculated as 0.86, 0.86, 0.87 and 0.85, respectively. To analyze data and information, Pearson correlation coefficient by inferential level was used. Results indicate that there was a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational communication and OCB.

  13. Examining the Correlates of Online Health Information-Seeking Behavior Among Men Compared With Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoloudakis, Irene A; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Rebar, Amanda L; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Alley, Stephanie; Duncan, Mitch J; Short, Camille E

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to identify and compare the demographic, health behavior, health status, and social media use correlates of online health-seeking behaviors among men and women. Cross-sectional self-report data were collected from 1,289 Australian adults participating in the Queensland Social Survey. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the correlates of online health information seeking for men and women. Differences in the strength of the relation of these correlates were tested using equality of regression coefficient tests. For both genders, the two strongest correlates were social media use (men: odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.78, 3.71]; women: OR = 2.93, 95% CI [1.92, 4.45]) and having a university education (men: OR = 3.63, 95% CI [2.37, 5.56]; women: OR = 2.74, 95% CI [1.66, 4.51]). Not being a smoker and being of younger age were also associated with online health information seeking for both men and women. Reporting poor health and the presence of two chronic diseases were positively associated with online health seeking for women only. Correlates of help seeking online among men and women were generally similar, with exception of health status. Results suggest that similar groups of men and women are likely to access health information online for primary prevention purposes, and additionally that women experiencing poor health are more likely to seek health information online than women who are relatively well. These findings are useful for analyzing the potential reach of online health initiatives targeting both men and women. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The evolution of science literacy: Examining intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchi-Verrino, Carol J.

    A call for a new perspective of science literacy has been marked as the impetus of change in science education, suggesting that a meaning-making approach to literacy and inquiry are central to learning science. This research study explored how science literacy evolved in a classroom where this reconceptualized view of science literacy guided curriculum design and instruction. The teacher/researcher incorporated Interactive Science Notebooks (ISNs) and Interactive Reading Organizers and Comprehension Strategies (IROCS) into instructional materials. In a class consisting of 20 mainstream and special education students, this 7-week study collected data using Likert scales, stimulated recall interviews, a teacher/researcher journal, and students¡¦ position papers. A systematic design framework was used for the three-phase analysis. Hyperresearch RTM software facilitated the identification of open codes, an axial code, and frequency graphs. In order to develop insight into the relationship between questions, methods, and curriculum design recent recommendations for quality research in science education were considered in the methodology. The hypothesis formulated from the data suggests that science literacy evolves on a continuum, and the degree to which science literacy evolves on the continuum seems to be contingent upon their uses of intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors. Several notable insights emerged from the data which were used to guide curriculum, instruction, and assessment that promotes the development of science literacy in the middle school classroom. The study suggests a possible correlation between the use of intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors, and the use of a continuum in measuring the emergence of science literacy.

  15. Examining overlap in behavioral and neural representations of morals, facts, and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriault, Jordan; Waytz, Adam; Heiphetz, Larisa; Young, Liane

    2017-11-01

    Metaethical judgments refer to judgments about the information expressed by moral claims. Moral objectivists generally believe that moral claims are akin to facts, whereas moral subjectivists generally believe that moral claims are more akin to preferences. Evidence from developmental and social psychology has generally favored an objectivist view; however, this work has typically relied on few examples, and analyses have disallowed statistical generalizations beyond these few stimuli. The present work addresses whether morals are represented as fact-like or preference-like, using behavioral and neuroimaging methods, in combination with statistical techniques that can (a) generalize beyond our sample stimuli, and (b) test whether particular item features are associated with neural activity. Behaviorally, and contrary to prior work, morals were perceived as more preference-like than fact-like. Neurally, morals and preferences elicited common magnitudes and spatial patterns of activity, particularly within the dorsal-medial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), a critical region for social cognition. This common DMPFC activity for morals and preferences was present across whole-brain conjunctions, and in individually localized functional regions of interest (targeting the theory of mind network). By contrast, morals and facts did not elicit any neural activity in common. Follow-up item analyses suggested that the activity elicited in common by morals and preferences was explained by their shared tendency to evoke representations of mental states. We conclude that morals are represented as far more subjective than prior work has suggested. This conclusion is consistent with recent theoretical research, which has argued that morality is fundamentally about regulating social relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Understanding sustainable seafood consumption behavior: an examination of the Ocean Wise (OW initiative in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Dolmage

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable seafood labeling programs have been developed as one of several efforts to address the current dire trends in fish stocks. The Ocean Wise (OW program, started at the Vancouver Aquarium (Canada, works with restaurateurs and suppliers to simplify sustainable purchasing decisions. By aiding restaurateurs with responsible purchasing, OW hopes to shift demand to sustainable seafood products. OW has grown in numbers and spread across Canada quickly; we examine the factors associated with individual and organizational decisions to participate in the program, including personal, business, and program-related factors. These factors were examined in relation to OW membership by Vancouver restaurateurs. Results show that restaurateurs with greater knowledge of seafood issues and restaurants with greater commitment to a range of green initiatives are more likely to participate in the OW program. By focusing efforts on education and incorporating a range of green values into marketing, OW can maximize their limited resources to grow membership.

  17. Examining the Interplay Among Family, Culture, and Latina Teen Suicidal Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbas, Lauren E.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we explored the relationships among culture, family, and attempted suicide by U.S. Latinas. We analyzed qualitative interviews conducted with Latina teen suicide attempters (n = 10) and their parents. We also incorporated data collected from adolescents with no reported history of self-harm (n = 10) and their parents to examine why some individuals turned to suicide under similar experiences of cultural conflict. Our results revealed that Latina teens who attempted suicide la...

  18. Nurses’ Assessment and Teaching Behaviors Regarding Breast Self-Examination with Reasons for Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    breast 6w1% % %* 24 cancer, prior personal history of breast cancer/ fibrocystic disease , present age and age at first parity, administration of exogenous...decrease mortality and morbidity resulting from this disease . Despite the fact that women find over 90% of breast cancers themselves, many are not found...of breast self-exam practices and physical examination on extent of disease at diagnosis. Preventive Medicine 9, 409-417. Stevens, P., & Conkling, V

  19. Examining human behavior in video games: The development of a computational model to measure aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard; Annetta, Leonard; Hoston, Douglas; Shapiro, Marina; Matthews, Benjamin

    2017-04-24

    Video games with violent content have raised considerable concern in popular media and within academia. Recently, there has been considerable attention regarding the claim of the relationship between aggression and video game play. The authors of this study propose the use of a new class of tools developed via computational models to allow examination of the question of whether there is a relationship between violent video games and aggression. The purpose of this study is to computationally model and compare the General Aggression Model with the Diathesis Mode of Aggression related to the play of violent content in video games. A secondary purpose is to provide a method of measuring and examining individual aggression arising from video game play. Total participants examined for this study are N = 1065. This study occurs in three phases. Phase 1 is the development and quantification of the profile combination of traits via latent class profile analysis. Phase 2 is the training of the artificial neural network. Phase 3 is the comparison of each model as a computational model with and without the presence of video game violence. Results suggest that a combination of environmental factors and genetic predispositions trigger aggression related to video games.

  20. La libertad entre lo visible y lo invisible: límites y alcances de lo sublime katiano.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Amaya Villarreal .

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The following essay is a view of the Kantian refection on the sublime in light of an interpretation that understands the Critique of Judgement as a project that is born from a concern for the relationship that appears within the sensible and suprasensible dimension of the human being. Influenced by the view presented by Lyotard in Lessons on the analytics of the sublime, I explore some of the consequences brought on for the comprehension of Kantian morality and freedom by its contact with the category of the sublime.

  1. "Back-fire to lust": G. Stanley Hall, sex-segregated schooling, and the engine of sublimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebner, William

    2006-08-01

    G. Stanley Hall was an advocate of sex-segregated schooling long after most Americans had accepted coeducation. His position was based in part on personal experience: observations of his father and mother, a repressed and guilt-ridden boyhood sexuality, and his conviction that his own career success was a product of sublimated sexual desire, of erotic energy converted into mental energy. Hall theorized that coeducation put sublimation at risk, and that sex-segregated schools, by contributing to proper gendered development and by prolonging and sublimating the sexual tensions of adolescence, would produce social progress.

  2. Examining political mobilization of online communities through e-petitioning behavior in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Dumas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to reveal patterns of e-petition co-signing behavior that are indicative of the political mobilization of online “communities”. We discuss the case of We the People , a US national experiment in the use of social media technology to enable users to propose and solicit support for policy suggestions to the White House. We apply Baumgartner and Jones's work on agenda setting and punctuated equilibrium, which suggests that policy issues may lie dormant for periods of time until some event triggers attention from the media, interest groups, and elected representatives. In the case study presented, we focus on 21 petitions initiated during the week after the Sandy Hook shooting (14–21 December 2012 in opposition to gun control or in support of policy proposals that are alternatives to gun control, which we view as mobilized efforts to maintain stability and equilibrium in a policy system threatening to change. Using market basket analysis and social network analysis we found a core group of petitions in the “support law-abiding gun owners” theme that were highly connected and four “communities” of e-petitioners mobilizing in opposition to change in gun control policies and in favor of alternative proposals.

  3. Romance of Experience, Satisfaction and Behavioral Intentions: An Empirical Examination of International Delegates in Academic Conferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Faizan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing attention placed on experiences can be regarded as a mega-trend, and has given currency to the proposition that experiences are important for consumer’s self-perception and satisfaction with a specific visit. In order to assess this assumption, this study empirically examines the applicability of Pine and Gilmore’s ‘experience economy’ concept and examines the impact of its four dimensions i.e., education, escapism, esthetics, and entertainment on delegates’ satisfaction and behavioural intentions. Based on convenience sampling, 210 questionnaires are distributed to the delegates of 2 international academic conferences out of which 188 were deemed fit for further analysis 89% response rate. The results indicate that Pine and Gilmore’s model can further our understanding of the experience market. However, the findings in contrast with previous studies show that different experiential dimensions influence the delegates’ overall satisfaction in different contexts. For instance, the dimension of education has a relatively higher significant effect on the delegates’ overall satisfaction and behavioural intentions in the context of international academic conferences. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are also discussed.

  4. Examination of the population attributable risk of different risk factor domains for suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruffaerts, Ronny; Kessler, Ronald C; Demyttenaere, Koen; Bonnewyn, Anke; Nock, Matthew K

    2015-11-15

    Despite the fact that suicide is an important public health problem, the etiology is still not well understood. Especially lacking is a societal-level approach that takes into account the extent to which several risk factor domains are attributable to new onset of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB). Data stem from a cross-sectional population study of the non-institutionalized adult (18+) population from Belgium (N=2419). The third version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-3.0) was administered to assess lifetime STB and risk factor domains. Multivariate approaches, expressed in population attributable risk proportions, were used to estimate the proportion of new onset cases of STB related to the occurrence of different risk factors. Approximately 38% of cases of suicidal ideation onset were attributable to mental disorders, 20% to chronic physical conditions, and another 13% to parental psychopathology. Suicide attempts in the general population were attributable to mental disorders (PARP=48%), but attempts among persons with suicidal ideation were unrelated to mental disorders, but rather to trauma (PARP=17%) and childhood adversities (PARP=12%). This is an explorative study using multivariate additive general models that generates specific hypotheses on the development of STB onset rather than testing specific pathways in the process of STB. New onset STB is mostly attributable to proximal risk factors such as mental disorders. However, distal risk factors like childhood adversities or trauma also play a considerable role in the new onset of STB, especially in the transition from suicide ideation to suicide attempt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bicellar mixture phase behavior examined by variable-pressure deuterium NMR and ambient pressure DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Nasir; Morrow, Michael R

    2010-07-20

    Variable-pressure deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) has been used to study the pressure-temperature phase diagram of bicellar mixtures containing 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). Spectra were obtained for DMPC-d(54)/DHPC (3:1), DMPC-d(54)/DHPC (4.4:1), DMPC/DHPC-d(22) (3:1), and DMPC/DHPC-d(22) (4.4:1) in the range 10-68 degrees C at ambient pressure, 66 MPa, 102 MPa, and 135 MPa. Isotropic-to-nematic and nematic-to-lamellar transition temperatures were found to rise with pressure at approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.14 degrees C/MPa, respectively, for DMPC-d(54)/DHPC (3:1) and at at approximately 0.19 and approximately 0.18 degrees C/MPa, respectively, for DMPC-d(54)/DHPC (4.4:1). Pressure had little effect on the range of DMPC-d(54) chain orientational order through the nematic phase temperature range, but the behavior of chain orientational order at the nematic-to-lamellar transition was found to vary slightly with pressure. Comparison of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) observations with ambient-pressure (2)H NMR observations of DMPC-d(54) in the bicellar mixtures suggests that absorption of heat persists for a few degrees above the onset of axially symmetric DMPC-d(54) reorientation.

  6. An in-depth examination into pharmacy technician worklife through an organizational behavior framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are a vital part of the health care workforce. Little is known about perceptions of their own work environment that would engender more effective recruitment, retention, and management strategies by pharmacists and employers. The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of certified pharmacy technician worklife. Specific objectives included the identification of themes of worklife phenomena to assist with the development of appropriate responses by other pharmacy stakeholders and to ascertain the contribution of various factors engendering or discouraging career commitment of pharmacy technicians. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of pharmacy technicians in one U.S. state, who varied by their work settings and level of experience. The interview guide and corresponding participant responses were framed from around an organizational cultural basis rooted in organizational behavior theory. Notes from the interviews were analyzed thematically using directed content analysis. Four primary themes emerged, including: career impetus, job responsibilities, quality of work life, and equitable partnership. The data revealed pharmacy technicians' need for self-actualization and recognition of the value they bring to the organization. The participants identified primary responsibilities that contribute to their sense of worth and those that if not managed adequately potentially detract from their well-being and effectiveness. Findings in regard to rate of pay corroborate previous work on wages as both an intrinsic and extrinsic motivator. Pharmacy technicians seek equity among each other (their peers) and in a mutually beneficial relationship with their employing organization. This study provides the impetus for interventions and further study that should serve to enhance pharmacy technician effectiveness, quality of work life, and longevity in an emerging profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  7. A Research Agenda to Examine the Efficacy and Relevance of the Transtheoretical Model for Physical Activity Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Claudio R; Geller, Karly S; Motl, Rob W; Horwath, Caroline C; Wertin, Kristin K; Dishman, Rodney K

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) decreases the risk of several chronic diseases including some cancers, type II diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease; however, the majority of US adults are not meeting the recommended levels to experience these benefits. To address this public health concern, the underlying mechanisms for behavior change need to be understood, translated and disseminated into appropriately tailored interventions. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) provides a framework for both the conceptualization and measurement of behavior change, as well as facilitating promotion strategies that are individualized and easily adapted. The purpose of this manuscript is to present the constructs of the TTM as they relate to PA behavior change. We begin with a brief synopsis of recent examinations of the TTM constructs and their application. Subsequent to its introduction, we specifically present the TTM within the PA context and discuss its application and usefulness to researchers and practitioners. Criticisms of the TTM are also noted and presented as opportunities for future research to enhance the valid application of the TTM. We offer general study design recommendations to appropriately test the hypothesized relationships within the model. With further examinations using appropriate study design and statistical analyses, we believe the TTM has the potential to advance the public health impact of future PA promotion interventions.

  8. Examining the Adoption and Use of Mobile Data Services: A Consumer Behavior Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobbin, Peter Ebo

    to bring financial services to the rural unbanked is referred to as mobile money. However, the consumer acceptance and use of the technology have been varied in different countries with similar socio-economic factors. Whereas, the implementation of mobile money (M-PESA) was successful in Kenya, the same...... implementation in Tanzania did not attract large acceptance. The interaction between consumers and technology takes place within a social environment where existing social practices, norms and cultures exist. The aim of this research is to examine how these environmental factors interact with the technological...... to the understanding of mobile data services acceptance, use, and the process by which consumers make the decision to adopt technology in their everyday life. It introduces an integrated mobile money adoption model (iMoMAM) which provides an understanding of consumers' socially influenced decision processes that guide...

  9. Examining a momentary mediation model of appearance-related stress, anxiety, and eating disorder behaviors in adult anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tyler B; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Le Grange, Daniel; Peterson, Carol B

    2017-06-06

    Appearance-related stress may result from appearance-focused events such as seeing one's reflection, seeing media images, and shopping for clothes. The purpose of this study was to examine the prospective association between momentary appearance-related stress and eating disorder (ED) behaviors (i.e., binge eating and vomiting) among women with anorexia nervosa (AN) using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). We hypothesized that appearance-related stress at Time 1 would predict binge eating and vomiting at Time 2, and that this prospective association would be mediated by momentary anxiety at Time 2 (controlling for anxiety at Time 1). Women with AN completed a 2-week EMA protocol involving repeated daily assessments of experiences and behaviors. Momentary appearance-related stress preceded binge eating and vomiting, and momentary anxiety mediated the prospective association between appearance-related stress and ED behaviors. Targeted momentary interventions delivered in the natural environment that address appearance-related stress may have utility in the treatment of ED behaviors.

  10. From the macro to the micro: a geographic examination of the community context and early adolescent problem behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, Sarah M

    2011-12-01

    This study examined how multiple dimensions and levels of the community context associated with early adolescent problem behaviors in rural communities. Four thousand, five hundred and nine eighth-grade students in 28 rural and small town school districts in two states participated in surveys regarding substance use and delinquency in 2005. Locations of alcohol retailers, tobacco retailers, youth-serving organizations, and student residences were geocoded. Associations of the number of proximal alcohol and tobacco retailers, and youth-serving organizations with an early-adolescent problem behavior index were tested in Nonlinear Mixed Models that controlled for multiple district-level and individual characteristics. Multi-level model results demonstrated that the number of alcohol and tobacco retail locations within a one-mile radius of each adolescent's home positively associated with student-reported problem behaviors above and beyond the influence of school district and individual characteristics. Results suggest that the proximal community context added significantly to the district context when understanding the occurrence of early adolescent problem behaviors. Recognizing this variability in geographically determined risk within a community will likely enhance the effectiveness of community prevention activities.

  11. Ethiopian origin high-risk youth: a cross-cultural examination of alcohol use, binge drinking, and problem behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use among underage youth has a major impact on public health, accidents, fatalities, and other problem behaviors. In Israel, alcohol use, binge drinking, and related problem behaviors are a growing concern. The purpose of this study was to examine underserved and underreported Ethiopian origin youth by comparing their substance use patterns and behavior with other high-risk youth. Data were collected from a purposive sample of boys of Ethiopian, former Soviet Union, and Israeli origin who were receiving treatment for drug use. Youth were asked to complete a simply worded self-report questionnaire developed for monitoring substance use and related problem behaviors. Ethiopian youth reported higher rates of family unemployment and public welfare dependence, last 30-day consumption of beer and hard liquor, serious fighting, and achievement decline when in school compared with the other youths. Findings highlight the need for ethno-cultural specific prevention and intervention efforts and further research of this high-risk, underserved group of immigrant origin youth.

  12. Examining the relative importance of social context referents in predicting intention to change substance abuse behavior using the EASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly; Miller, Keith A; Spera, Christopher

    2007-09-01

    There is growing consensus across literatures that more than individual motivation and "will to change" influence whether a client will be able to make and sustain recovery-related changes to prevent drug relapse post-treatment. New areas of inquiry in the substance abuse field have proposed conceptual models that promote an integration of both individual and social context factors, which offer the opportunity for important developments in clinical practice. This study examined the influence of social context referents on clients' intention to change substance abusing behaviors. The Ecological Assessment of Substance abuse Experiences (EASE), an instrument that measures the influence of social context referents on addiction and recovery behaviors, was administered to 302 inpatient and outpatient adults in treatment for substance abuse. Results showed that the number of people in his/her social network favorable towards recovery (Beta=.222); the extent to which one personally identifies with being in recovery (Beta=.339); the perceived importance of people in the client's social network encouraging recovery-related behaviors (Beta=.369); weak beliefs that drugs will lead to positive outcomes (Beta=-.220); and strong beliefs that recovery will lead to positive outcomes (Beta=.307) were all associated with intention to change substance abusing behavior.

  13. Fast crystalline ice formation at extremely low temperature through water/neon matrix sublimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Kimura, Yuki; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Sugimoto, Toshiki; Pirronello, Valerio

    2017-07-21

    Crystalline ice formation requires water molecules to be sufficiently mobile to find and settle on the thermodynamically most stable site. Upon cooling, however, diffusion and rearrangement become increasingly kinetically difficult. Water ice grown by the condensation of water vapor in laboratory is thus generally assumed to be in a metastable amorphous form below 100 K. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of crystalline ice formation at extremely low temperature using a water/neon matrix (1/1000, 30 000 monolayers) prepared at 6 K, which is subsequently warmed to 11-12 K. In situ infrared spectroscopy revealed the assembly of the dispersed water molecules, forming crystalline ice I during the sublimation of the neon matrix for 40-250 seconds. This finding indicates that the high mobility of the water molecules during matrix sublimation can overcome the kinetic barrier to form crystals even at extremely low temperature.

  14. Isothermal close space sublimation for II-VI semiconductor filling of porous matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal close space sublimation, a simple and low-cost physical vapour transport technique, was used to infiltrate ZnTe and CdSe semiconductors in porous silicon. The structure of the embedded materials was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis while Rutherford backscattering spectra allowed determining the composition profiles of the samples. In both cases, a constant composition of the II-VI semiconductors throughout the porous layer down to the substrate was found. Resonance Raman scattering of the ZnTe samples indicates that this semiconductor grows in nanostructured form inside the pores. Results presented in this paper suggest that isothermal close space sublimation is a promising technique for the conformal growth of II-VI semiconductors in porous silicon. PMID:22823959

  15. Water Drops Dancing on Ice: How Sublimation Leads to Drop Rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C.; Bernagozzi, I.; Jung, S.; Poulikakos, D.; Marengo, M.

    2013-07-01

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on hydrophobic or superhydrophobic surfaces but can also be induced through the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Here we demonstrate that drop rebound can also originate from another physical phenomenon, the solid substrate sublimation. Through drop impact experiments on a superhydrophobic surfaces, a hot plate, and solid carbon dioxide (commonly known as dry ice), we compare drop rebound based on three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation, and sublimation), but lead to the same rebound phenomenon in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300°C down to even below -79°C. The formation and unprecedented visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop are also reported.

  16. Darwin's sublime: the contest between reason and imagination in On the Origin of Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Benjamin Sylvester

    2011-01-01

    Recent Darwin scholarship has provided grounds for recognising the Origin as a literary as well as a scientific achievement. While Darwin was an acute observer, a gifted experimentalist and indefatigable theorist, this essay argues that it was also crucial to his impact that the Origin transcended the putative divide between the scientific and the literary. Analysis of Darwin's development as a writer between his journal-keeping on HMS Beagle and his construction of the Origin argues the latter draws on the pattern of the Romantic or Kantian sublime. The Origin repeatedly uses strategies which challenge the natural-theological appeal to the imagination in conceiving nature. Darwin's sublime coaches the Origin's readers into a position from which to envision nature that reduces and contains its otherwise overwhelming complexity. As such, it was Darwin's literary achievement that enabled him to fashion a new 'habit of looking at things in a given way' that is the centrepiece of the scientific revolution bearing his name.

  17. Considering Meta-Analysis, Meaning, and Metaphor: A Systematic Review and Critical Examination of "Third Wave" Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidjian, Sona; Arch, Joanna J; Schneider, Rebecca L; Desormeau, Philip; Felder, Jennifer N; Segal, Zindel V

    2016-11-01

    In this review, we examine common usage of the term "third wave" in the scientific literature, systematically review published meta-analyses of identified "third wave" therapies, and consider the implications and options for the use of "third wave" as a metaphor to describe the nature of and relationships among cognitive and behavioral therapies. We demonstrate that the "third wave" term has grown in its use over time, that it is commonly linked with specific therapies, and that the majority of such therapies have amassed a compelling evidence base attesting to their clinical and public health value. We also consider the extent to which the "third wave" designation is an effective guide for the future, and we encourage scientific inquiry and self-reflection among those concerned with cognitive and behavioral therapies and the scientific basis of psychotherapy more broadly. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The impact of near-miss events on betting behavior: An examination of casino rapid roulette play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Sundali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine how almost winning in roulette affects subsequent betting behavior. Our main finding is heterogeneity in gambler behavior with some gamblers less likely to bet on numbers that were near misses on the prior spin and other gamblers more likely to bet on near miss numbers. Using a unique data set from the game rapid roulette, we model the likelihood of a gambler betting on a near miss number while controlling for the favorite number bias and the likelihood of a number being a near miss. We also find no evidence that near misses in roulette leads to gamblers extending the time spent gambling or to the placing of more bets.

  19. It's the nature of the work: examining behavior-based sources of work-family conflict across occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierdorff, Erich C; Ellington, J Kemp

    2008-07-01

    The consequences of work-family conflict for both individuals and organizations have been well documented, and the various sources of such conflict have received substantial attention. However, the vast majority of extant research has focused on only time- and strain-based sources, largely neglecting behavior-based sources. Integrating two nationally representative databases, the authors examine 3 behavior-based antecedents of work-family conflict linked specifically to occupational work role requirements (interdependence, responsibility for others, and interpersonal conflict). Results from multilevel analysis indicate that significant variance in work-family conflict is attributable to the occupation in which someone works. Interdependence and responsibility for others predict work-family conflict, even after controlling for several time- and strain-based sources.

  20. Examination of smoking inflexibility as a mechanism linking anxiety sensitivity and severity of smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Charles; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Schmidt, Norman B; Sharp, Carla; Zvolensky, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with smoking processes and poorer clinical outcomes. Yet, the specific mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Smoking-specific avoidance and inflexibility (AIS) is a construct implicated in multiple manifestations of mood regulation that may underlie smoking severity. The current study examined whether AIS accounted for (ie, statistically mediated) the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and multiple indices of smoking severity. Baseline self-report data were collected among treatment-seeking smokers (N = 396; 48% female; Mage  = 37.8 years) taking part in a larger intervention study. Gender, smoking-related medical history, Axis I diagnoses, hazardous alcohol use, substance abuse/dependence, and negative affectivity were statistically controlled in analyses. Anxiety sensitivity was indirectly related to all smoking severity variables, with the exception of nicotine dependence, through its relation with AIS. These findings provide initial evidence suggesting AIS may be an important construct in better understanding anxiety sensitivity-smoking relations. Results suggest the importance of AIS as a malleable target for smoking cessation intervention. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. Designing Incentives to Change Behaviors: Examining College Student Intent Toward Healthy Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara; Jones, Carmen; Smith, Alison; Collins, William; Pope, Brandon

    2016-09-01

    College is a time when young adults establish lifestyle habits. This research examines how personalization and limited resources might be balanced most effectively when designing incentives to shift college students' intentions toward positive dietary changes. A randomized 2 × 2 experiment (Coaching/Coupons × Fruits and Vegetables/Low Fat) was conducted, where respondents were exposed to virtual interventions and asked pre- and post-intervention about their intent to eat healthy. Results suggest that interventions may incentivize students, but are dependent on student characteristics. On-campus students and students with more knowledge about healthy diets were more likely to increase their intent when offered coaching; students living off campus and those with less knowledge resonated with coupons. On- and off-campus students differed in their positive responses to eating fruits and vegetables versus low fat foods, respectively. Younger students may be more susceptible to interventions. Findings may be useful in designing meaningful incentives for college students. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Examining the gambling behaviors of Chinese online lottery gamblers: are they rational?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia

    2015-06-01

    In this research, we explore a unique Chinese peer to peer (P2P) online lottery gambling data (n = 388,123) and examine the rationality of Chinese online lottery gamblers. We show that Chinese online lottery gamblers are irrational in the sense that they are significantly affected by the lottery winning history of others even though this winning history is shown to be merely an exogenous random shock. Specifically, in this Chinese P2P online lottery gambling game, some of the lottery gamblers (named the proposers) propose lottery packages first, and then, other lottery gamblers (named the followers) will follow by choosing among the different packages and deciding on how much to purchase. The past lottery winning return rate of each proposer is provided as public information and calculated as the ratio between her past winning money and wager. It is shown that this past return rate is merely a random shock because winning in the past cannot predict anything about the performance in the future. However, we find that Chinese online P2P lottery gamblers are significantly more likely to join a lottery package if it is proposed by proposers with higher return rates.

  3. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms sublimated from isolation matrix of solid Ne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, R L; Scudeller, L A; Lambo, R; Crivelli, P; Cesar, C L

    2011-10-07

    We have studied, via laser absorption spectroscopy, the velocity distribution of (7)Li atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures. The Li atoms are implanted into the Ne matrix by laser ablation of a solid Li precursor. A heat pulse is then applied to the sapphire substrate sublimating the matrix together with the isolated atoms at around 12 K. We find interesting differences in the velocity distribution of the released Li atoms from the model developed for our previous experiment with Cr [R. Lambo, C. C. Rodegheri, D. M. Silveira, and C. L. Cesar, Phys. Rev. A 76, 061401(R) (2007)]. This may be due to the sublimation regime, which is at much lower flux for the Li experiment than for the Cr experiment, as well as to the different collisional cross sections between those species to the Ne gas. We find a drift velocity compatible with Li being thermally sublimated at 11-13 K, while the velocity dispersion around this drift velocity is low, around 5-7 K. With a slow sublimation of the matrix we can determine the penetration depth of the laser ablated Li atoms into the Ne matrix, an important information that is not usually available in most matrix isolation spectroscopy setups. The present results with Li, together with the previous results with Cr suggest this to be a general technique for obtaining cryogenic atoms, for spectroscopic studies, as well as for trap loading. The release of the isolated atoms is also a useful tool to study and confirm details of the matrix isolated atoms which are masked or poorly understood in the solid. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  4. EL AMOR SUBLIME EN EL AMOR EN LOS TIEMPOS DEL CÓLERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morgunova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El artículo se centra en la argumentación de la estructura de la metáfora humorística del humor sublime garciamarqueño. Se abordan los mecanismos de la generación de la connotación axiológica a la luz de la indagación en el resquebrajamiento de las fronteras entre los distintos valores estéticos.

  5. A Case Study Examining Egypt, Nigeria, and Venezuela and their Flaring Behavior Utilizing VIIRS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, J. G.; Austin, A. T.; Brandt, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The need to quantify flaring by oil and gas fields is receiving more scrutiny, as there has been scientific and regulatory interest in quantifying the greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of oil and gas production. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed a method to track flaring activity using a Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellite.[1] This reports data on the average size, power, and light intensity of each flare. However, outside of some small studies, the flaring intensity has generally been estimated at the country level.[2]While informative, country-level assessments cannot provide guidance about the sustainability of particular crude streams or products produced. In this work we generate detailed oil-field-level flaring intensities for a number of global oilfield operations. We do this by merging the VIIRS dataset with global oilfield atlases and other spatial data sources. Joining these datasets together with production data allows us to provide better estimates for the GHG intensity of flaring at the field level for these countries.[3]First, we compute flaring intensities at the field level for 75 global oil fields representing approximately 25% of global production. In addition, we examine in detail three oil producing countries known to have high rates of flaring: Egypt, Nigeria, and Venezuela. For these countries we compute the flaring rate for all fields in the country and explore within-and between-country variation. The countries' fields will be analyzed to determine the correlation of flare activity to a certain field type, crude type, region, or production method. [1] Cao, C. "Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)." NOAA NPP VIIRS. NOAA, 2013. Web. 30 July 2016. [2] Elvidge, C. D. et al., "A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data," Energies, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 595-622, Aug. 2009. [3] World Energy Atlas. 6th ed. London: Petroleum Economist, 2011. Print.

  6. False Consensus and Adolescent Peer Contagion: Examining Discrepancies between Perceptions and Actual Reported Levels of Friends' Deviant and Health Risk Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Wang, Shirley S.

    2005-01-01

    Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' behavior strongly predict adolescents' own behavior, however, these perceptions often are erroneous. This study examined correlates of discrepancies between adolescents' perceptions and friends' reports of behavior. A total of 120 11th-grade adolescents provided data regarding their engagement in deviant…

  7. Cognitive, behavioral and psychological functioning in children with metopic synostosis: a meta-analysis examining the impact of surgical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, A J; Roberts, R M; Mathias, J L; Anderson, P J; Flapper, W J

    2018-02-26

    Neurodevelopmental delays are known to occur in children with metopic synostosis, but it is presently unclear whether the cognitive, behavioral and psychological outcomes of children with metopic synostosis differ to those of their healthy peers. This meta-analysis consolidated data from 17 studies (published prior to August 2017) that examined the cognitive, behavioral and psychological outcomes of children (n = 666; aged ≤19 yrs) with metopic synostosis. Hedges'g (g w ) effect sizes compared the outcomes of samples with metopic synostosis (unoperated, operated) to healthy controls or normative data and, where available, the prevalence of problems/disorders was calculated. Children with unoperated metopic synostosis performed significantly worse than their healthy peers on measures of: general cognition (g w  = -.38), motor functioning, (g w  = -.81), and verbal (g w  = -.82) and visuospatial (g w  = -.92) abilities. Children with operated metopic synostosis performed significantly worse on measures of motor functioning (g w  = -.45), visuospatial skills (g w  = -.32), attention (g w  = -.50), executive functioning (g w  = -.36), arithmetic ability (g w  = -.37), and behavior (g w  = -.34). Cognitive, behavioral, and psychological problems were prevalent, but variable. Overall, the cognitive, behavioral, and psychological outcomes of children with metopic synostosis are generally worse than their healthy peers, regardless of surgical status. However, research is sparse, samples small, controls are rarely recruited, and the severity of metopic synostosis often not stated. Nevertheless, the findings suggest that children with metopic synostosis are likely to experience a variety of negative outcomes and should therefore receive ongoing monitoring and support.

  8. Matrix sublimation/recrystallization for imaging proteins by mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-07-15

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high-quality MALDI mass spectra and high-spatial-resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area, and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of the tissue section and the amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20, and 10 μm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology-directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section.

  9. He Said, She Said: Examining Parental Concordance on Home Environment Factors and Adolescent Health Behaviors and Weight Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; MacLehose, Richard F; Meyer, Craig; Didericksen, Katharine; Loth, Katie A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have examined concordance/discordance between caregivers to identify whether caregivers see familial and parental factors in the home environment similarly or differently and whether the agreement or disagreement is related to adolescent obesity risk. Answers to these questions are important and may inform whether family-based childhood obesity interventions need to target both parents. Objective The main objective of the study is to examine whether and how parental concordance/discordance on factors in the home environment (e.g., importance of family meals, parent feeding practices, encouraging child physical activity, limit setting on child screen time) are associated with adolescent health behaviors and weight status. Design Data from two linked population-based studies were used in cross-sectional analyses. Linear regression models examined associations between parental concordance/discordance on home environment factors and adolescents’ health behaviors and weight status. Participant/Settings Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=1,052; 54% girls; mean age = 14.3 years) and their parents (n=2,104; 52% female; mean age = 41.0 years) from Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota participated in the study. Anthropometric assessments and surveys were completed at school by adolescents and surveys were completed at home by parents. Results Parental concordance on home environment factors was high for some factors (e.g., 68% concordance on not pressuring adolescent to eat) and low for other factors (e.g., 2% concordance on parent engaging in physically activity with child 4+ hours/week). Parental concordance on positive home environment factors (e.g., frequency of family meals) was associated with more adolescent healthful eating patterns and hours of physical activity (p food and more unhealthy weight control behaviors (p environment factors, however the results were inconsistent and approximately one third of

  10. AN EMPIRICAL EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SERVICE QUALITY, SATISFACTION AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS IN HIGHER EDUCATION SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Dado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to examine the relationship between service quality and customersatisfaction and their impact on behavioral intentions in higher education setting in Serbia. Twocompeting models, revealed during the literature review, have been tested on a sample of EngineeringManagement students by means of structural equation modeling, performed via LISREL 8. Resultsof the study indicate that satisfaction is influenced by service quality and directly related tobehavioral intentions, thus offering support for Oliver’s (1999 cognition-affect-conation sequenceof causal relationships in loyalty formation. Implications of the study have been discussed andlimitations and directions for future research are outlined.

  11. He Said, She Said: Examining Parental Concordance on Home Environment Factors and Adolescent Health Behaviors and Weight Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; MacLehose, Richard F; Meyer, Craig; Didericksen, Katharine; Loth, Katie A; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined concordance/discordance between caregivers to identify whether caregivers see familial and parental factors in the home environment similarly or differently and whether the agreement or disagreement is related to adolescent obesity risk. Answers to these questions are important and may inform whether family-based childhood obesity interventions need to target both parents. The main objective of the study was to examine whether and how parental concordance/discordance on factors in the home environment (eg, importance of family meals, parent feeding practices, encouraging child physical activity, and limit setting on child screen time) are associated with adolescent health behaviors and weight status. Data from two linked population-based studies were used in cross-sectional analyses. Linear regression models examined associations between parental concordance/discordance on home environment factors and adolescents' health behaviors and weight status. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=1,052; 54% girls; mean age=14.3 years) and their parents (n=2,104; 52% women; mean age=41.0 years) from Minneapolis and St Paul, MN, participated in the study. Anthropometric assessments and surveys were completed at school by adolescents and surveys were completed at home by parents. Parental concordance on home environment factors was high for some factors (eg, 68% concordance on not pressuring adolescent to eat) and low for other factors (eg, 2% concordance on parent engaging in physically activity with child 4+ hours per week). Parental concordance on positive home environment factors (eg, frequency of family meals) was associated with more adolescent healthful eating patterns and hours of physical activity (Pparents were discordant, adolescents had higher consumption of fast food and more unhealthy weight control behaviors (Pparental concordance on home environment factors; however, the results were inconsistent and

  12. World Literature and the Figurative Push to Sublimate Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Giguere

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influence of Aristotle’s theory of place (topos on the conceptualization of cultural universality. Its main focus is in reinvesting the thought of Baruch Spinoza and Henri Bergson surrounding the fossilized spatial boundaries that limit understanding in order to scrutinize both the virtual and figurative processes inherent to the sketching of a universal human plane outside of local custom in certain literary works. This investigation yields a concept of “figurative agency” that is then delineated in the Tao Te Ching and Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in order to demonstrate how the concept might serve as a bridge between the extended space of a national culture and the virtual plane invested by world literature.Keywords: world literature, Henri Bergson, Spinoza, figurative agency, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Tao Te-Ching, literary epistemology

  13. Thermal Stability and Anisotropic Sublimation of Two-Dimensional Colloidal Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Buha, Joka; Castillo, Antonio Esau Del Rio; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2016-01-01

    The structural and compositional stabilities of two dimensional 2D Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanocrystals, produced by both colloidal synthesis and by liquid phase exfoliation, were studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy TEM during annealing at temperatures between 350 and 500 C. The sublimation process induced by annealing is structurally and chemically anisotropic and takes place through the preferential dismantling of the prismatic 011-0 type planes, and through the preferential sublimation of Te or Se.

  14. Acetamidobenzoic acid isomers: Studying sublimation and fusion processes and their relation with crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manin, Alex N.; Voronin, Alexander P.; Perlovich, German L., E-mail: glp@isc-ras.ru

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Thermodynamic characteristics of sublimation process were investigated for 2-, 3- and 4-acetamidobenzoic acids. • Thermophysic parameters of melting processes were determined and enthalpies of vaporization were calculated for the isomers. • Sublimation thermodynamic parameters were compared with crystal structures of the isomers. - Abstract: Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure for i-acetamidobenzoic acids (i = 2, 3 and 4) were obtained by flow inert gas-carrier transfer method. Thermodynamic parameters of sublimation were calculated for 2-acetamidobenzoic acid (2-AcAm-BA), 3-acetamidobenzoic acid (3-AcAm-BA) and 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (4-AcAm-BA) (2-AcAm-BA: ΔG{sub sub}{sup 298}=54.4 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔH{sub sub}{sup 298}=116±1 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔS{sub sub}{sup 298}=205±4 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}; 3-AcAm-BA: ΔG{sub sub}{sup 298}=73.2 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔH{sub sub}{sup 298}=137±1 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔS{sub sub}{sup 298}=215±4 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}; 4-AcAm-BA: ΔG{sub sub}{sup 298}=72.3 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔH{sub sub}{sup 298}=138±1 kJ mol{sup −1}; ΔS{sub sub}{sup 298}=221±8 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}). Thermochemical parameters of fusion process for investigated substances were obtained, and vaporization enthalpies were estimated from fusion and sublimation enthalpies. The thermal data obtained in all experiments were used to find relationships between the thermal properties of these compounds and other benzoic acid derivatives and their structural properties. A correlation between enthalpy of sublimation and melting point was obtained. The influence of size and position of substituents on crystal lattice energy was discussed.

  15. The Longitudinal Associations between Perceived Descriptive Peer Norms and Eating and Drinking Behavior: An Initial Examination in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew; Robinson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Experimental and cross-sectional studies indicate that perceptions of the eating and drinking behavior of one's peers (perceived descriptive peer norms) are associated with the types, frequency and quantity of food, and beverages a person chooses to consume. At present, we know very little about the longitudinal association between perceived descriptive peer norms and future eating or drinking behavior. In this study, we examined whether perceived descriptive peer norms for different food/beverage types predicted frequency of consumption of food/beverages in university students. Three hundred and forty participants completed measures at baseline and follow-up for frequency of consumption of cakes/pastries, sugar containing beverages, and alcoholic beverages, as well as measures of perceived descriptive peer norms at both time points. Perceived descriptive peer norms predicted consumption of pastries/cakes at follow up when controlling for changes in these perceptions over time; believing that one's peers frequently consumed cakes/pastries was associated with an increased frequency of consumption over time, although the magnitude of this effect was small. There was no significant association between perceived descriptive peer norms and changes in frequency of consumption of sugar containing beverages or alcohol over time. In the present longitudinal study of young adults, beliefs about how often one's peers eat or drink specific food and beverages types had limited effect on future eating and drinking behavior.

  16. A Quasi-Experimental Study Examining New York State's Tobacco-Free Regulation: Effects on Clinical Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschober, Tanja C.

    2013-01-01

    Background On July 24, 2008, New York State (NYS) became the first state to require all state-funded or state-certified substance use disorder (SUD) treatment organizations to be 100% tobacco-free and offer tobacco cessation (TC) treatment. Methods The current study used a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group design with a pretest and posttest to examine the effect of the NYS tobacco-free regulation on three clinical practice behaviors (use of TC-related intake procedures, use of guideline recommended counseling for TC, and pharmacotherapy availability) in a diverse sample of SUD treatment programs. Repeated cross-sectional data were collected from NYS counselors (experimental group) and non-NYS counselors (control group) approximately 4 months pre-regulation (N = 282 and 659, respectively) and 10-12 months post-regulation (N = 364 and 733, respectively). Results Using mixed-effects models, results at pre-regulation indicate no group differences in the three clinical practice behaviors. However, significant post-regulation effects were found such that the experimental group reports greater use of TC-related intake procedures, guideline recommended counseling, and availability of pharmacotherapy than the control group. Additionally, the experimental but not the control group shows increases in all three clinical practice behaviors from pre-regulation to post-regulation. Conclusions We conclude that the NYS tobacco-free regulation had a significant and positive effect on promoting patient TC efforts among counselors. PMID:23428317

  17. Validation of a Theory of Planned Behavior-Based Questionnaire to Examine Factors Associated With Milk Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yeon K; Dinour, Lauren M

    2017-11-01

    A proper assessment of multidimensional needs for breastfeeding mothers in various settings is crucial to facilitate and support breastfeeding and its exclusivity. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used frequently to measure factors associated with breastfeeding. Full utility of the TPB requires accurate measurement of theory constructs. Research aim: This study aimed to develop and confirm the psychometric properties of an instrument, Milk Expression on Campus, based on the TPB and to establish the reliability and validity of the instrument. In spring 2015, 218 breastfeeding (current or in the recent past) employees and students at one university campus in northern New Jersey completed the online questionnaire containing demography and theory-based items. Internal consistency (α) and split-half reliability ( r) tests and factor analyses established and confirmed the reliability and construct validity of this instrument. Milk Expression on Campus showed strong and significant reliabilities as a full scale (α = .78, r = .74, p theory construct subscales. Validity was confirmed as psychometric properties corresponded to the factors extracted from the scale. Four factors extracted from the direct construct subscales accounted for 79.49% of the total variability. Four distinct factors from the indirect construct subscales accounted for 73.68% of the total variability. Milk Expression on Campus can serve as a model TPB-based instrument to examine factors associated with women's milk expression behavior. The utility of this instrument extends to designing effective promotion programs to foster breastfeeding and milk expression behaviors in diverse settings.

  18. Family Consumer Behaviors, Adolescent Prediabetes and Diabetes in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sairaman; Khokhar, Aditi; Holmes, Danielle Sweetnam; Chandwani, Sheenu

    2017-01-01

    Prediabetes or diabetes (characterized by hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels ≥ 5.7 gm%) has been associated with numerous long-term complications. Family consumer behaviors are important risk factors that lead to impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. However, few studies have studied the association between the family consumer environment and prediabetes and diabetes in adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the association between family consumer behaviors (healthy food availability and supermarket spending) and adolescent prediabetes and diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier #NCT03136289.) Methods: Data from a nationwide survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES] 2007-2010 data) were used for these analyses. Adolescents aged 12-19 years were selected for this study. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression models assessed the relationship between family consumer behaviors and the prevalence of adolescent prediabetes and diabetes. Multivariable models adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, physical activity, education, income, and household size. A total of 2520 adolescents were eligible for this study. Adolescents with healthier household food availability had negative odds (odds ratio [OR] = 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-1.00), as did higher log supermarket spending (OR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.85). Interaction models demonstrated that adolescent females had more negative odds of prediabetes/diabetes for both healthier food availability (OR = 0.79, 95% CI, 0.39-1.29) and for greater log supermarket spending (OR = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.57-0.85). This study shows that both healthy food availability and an increase in supermarket spending were associated with a decreased adjusted prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in adolescents, with a greater effect in females. These results suggest the need for policy and dietary interventions targeting the consumer

  19. Short-term spatial and temporal forecast of dry snow avalanches of sublimation recrystallization and mixed origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. B. Andreev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of space-temporary short-term forecast-diagnosis of dry sublimative recrystallization and mixed (recrystallization plus fresh snow avalanches is under consideration. The special discriminate analog–macrophysical models of the short-term background forecast is verified on correlation degree with probabilistic zoning of avalanche site № 22 in Khibiny. Аs a result we have correlation coefficients of order –(0.6÷0.7. The statistical significance of correlation coefficients (an order of 0.02–0.07 are checked and a conclusion on likelihood of assumed hypothesis is made. So by the current and predicted meteorological data such kind of forecast for such genetic avalanche types release in concrete sites becomes possible. The short-term forecast function transformation of the examined in the article avalanche types into long-term ones by averaging perennial realized forecast function values on slipping optimal 5-years intervals shows avalanche activity trend with probable 8–10 and 32-years harmonics during selected observation period. But in comparison with purely dry and wet fresh snow avalanches forecast analysed before the examined here above types are less precisely predicted. So it is needed an improvement of correspondent forecast functions on the base of theory contribution and future observations by increasing their series

  20. Examining the Course of Suicidal and Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors in Outpatient and Inpatient Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzillo, Elizabeth C.; Esposito, Erika C.; Santee, Angela C.; Nock, Matthew K.; Auerbach, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) among youth are major public health concerns. Although a growing body of research has focused on the complex association between nonsuicidal and suicidal self-injury, the temporal relationship between these two classes of behaviors is unclear. The current study addresses this empirical gap by examining the course of SITBs in adolescents receiving outpatient (N = 106; 82.1 % female) and inpatient (N = 174; 75.9 % female) treatment. SITBs (co-occurrence, age-of-onset, and time lag between SITBs) and major psychiatric disorders were assessed at a single time point with well-validated structured interviews. Adolescents in both clinical samples reported high co-occurrence of SITBs: most adolescents reported both lifetime nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal thoughts. A similar temporal pattern of SITBs was reported in the two samples: thoughts of NSSI and suicide ideation had the earliest age-of-onset, followed by NSSI behaviors, suicide plans, and suicide attempts. However, the age-of-onset for each SITB was younger in the inpatient sample than in the outpatient sample. In terms of time lag between SITBs, suicide ideation occurred on average before initial engagement in NSSI, suggesting that pathways to NSSI and suicidal behavior may occur simultaneously rather than in succession from nonsuicidal to suicidal self-injury. Results also indicated that the time to transition between SITBs was relatively fast, and that a key period for intervention and prevention is within the first 6–12 months after the onset of suicidal thinking. Taken together, these findings have important implications for understanding the time-lagged relationship between nonsuicidal and suicidal self-injury. PMID:27761783

  1. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Carson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n=92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46±10 years; mean BMI: 38±6 were grouped based upon whether or not they reported a social contact enrolled previously/concurrently in our behavioral weight-control studies. Primary outcomes were 6-month weight change and treatment adherence (session attendance and self-monitoring. Half of the participants (53% indicated that they had a social contact; black women were more likely to report a social contact than white women (67.3% versus 39.5%; P<0.01. Among participants with a social contact, 67% reported at least one contact as instrumental in the decision to enroll in the program. Those with a contact lost more weight (5.9 versus 3.7 kg; P=0.04, attended more group sessions (74% versus 54%; P<0.01, and submitted more self-monitoring journals (69% versus 54%; P=0.01 than those without a contact. Participants' weight change was inversely associated with social contacts' weight change (P=0.04. There was no association between participant and contact’s group attendance or self-monitoring. Social networks may be a promising vehicle for recruiting and engaging women in a behavioral weight-loss program, particularly black women. The role of a natural social contact deserves further investigation.

  2. The Relationship Between Domestic Partner Violence and Suicidal Behaviors in an Adult Community Sample: Examining Hope Agency and Pathways as Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward C; Yu, Elizabeth A; Kahle, Emma R; Du, Yifeng; Chang, Olivia D; Jilani, Zunaira; Yu, Tina; Hirsch, Jameson K

    2017-10-01

    We examined an additive and interactive model involving domestic partner violence (DPV) and hope in accounting for suicidal behaviors in a sample of 98 community adults. Results showed that DPV accounted for a significant amount of variance in suicidal behaviors. Hope further augmented the prediction model and accounted for suicidal behaviors beyond DPV. Finally, we found that DPV significantly interacted with both dimensions of hope to further account for additional variance in suicidal behaviors above and beyond the independent effects of DPV and hope. Implications for the role of hope in the relationship between DPV and suicidal behaviors are discussed.

  3. EXAMINING THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG SERVICE QUALITY, CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES - COMPARISON BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR BANKS OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahab Alam Malik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship among service quality, customer satisfaction and behavioral responses across public and private banks in Pakistan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted and data was gathered from 437 customers of public and private sector banks located in Islamabad city, the Capital of Pakistan. Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted to measure frequency, ranking of services, and correlation and multiple regression analyses. Findings of this study revealed that service quality is a significant determinant of customer satisfaction across public and private sector banks. However different dimensions of service quality were found significant in both public and private sector banks. Customer satisfaction has a positive impact on propensity to recommend whereas no significant relationship is found between customer satisfaction and switching intention. The study is unique in its finding and provides insightful thoughts for determinants of favourable customer’s responses across public and private sector banks of Pakistan.

  4. Examination of effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on rheological behavior of engine oil (10W40

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    Mohammad Hemmat Esfe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effects of multi walled carbon nanotubes and temperature on rheological behavior of engine oil (10W40 have been examined. For this purpose, the experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 5-55°C for several suspensions with solid volume fractions of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 0.75%. The viscosity of all samples was measured in the shear rate range of 666s-1 to 13333 s-1 at all temperatures considered. The viscosity measurements at different shear rates revealed that all nanofluid samples showed non-Newtonian behavior. The results also revealed that for an increase in the solid volume fraction from 0 to 0.75%, the viscosity increases to 2.5 times. The consistency and the power law index were attained by curve-fitting method for all samples and temperatures. Furthermore, the curve-fitting results revealed that the consistency index and apparent viscosity of nanofluid increases with augmenting the solid volume fraction and diminishes with growing temperature.

  5. The Relationship between Health Behavior and General Health Status: Based on 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chunhoo; Oh, So-Mi; Jang, Soobin; Park, Jeong-Su; Park, Sunju; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between health behavior and general health status. We used data from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Mental health was measured by stress recognition and depression. Dietary habit was measured by mixed grain diet. Life pattern was measured by sleeping time and working pattern. Physical activity was measured by walking and exercise. We defined general health status as Euro Quality of Life-5 Dimension (EQ-5Dindex), Euro Quality of Life Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5Dvas), number of people experienced lying in a sickbed for the last one month, number of days lying in a sickbed for the last one month, and activity limitations. Mental health, dietary habit, life pattern, and physical activity have seven factors. Most of the factors have a significant correlation with EQ-5Dindex, EQ-5Dvas, number of people experienced lying in a sickbed for the last one month, number of days lying in a sickbed for the last one month, and activity limitations. Health behavior and general health status have a positive correlation.

  6. Oh baby! Motivation for healthy eating during parenthood transitions: a longitudinal examination with a theory of planned behavior perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Transitioning to parenthood is a major life event that may impact parents’ personal lifestyles, yet there is an absence of theory-based research examining the impact of parenthood on motives for dietary behaviour. As a result, we are unaware of the social cognitive variables that predict eating behaviour among those transitioning to parenthood. The purpose of the study was to examine eating behaviour motives across 12 months within the framework of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and compare these across groups of new parents, non-parents, and established parents. Methods Non-parents (n = 92), new parents (n = 135), and established parents (n = 71) completed TPB questionnaires assessing attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control (PBC), and intentions and three day food records at baseline, and 6- and 12-months post-delivery (for parents) and 6- and 12-months post-baseline (for non-parents). Results Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that among men, new- and established-parents had greater intentions to eat healthy compared to non-parents, F(2) = 3.59, p = .03. Among women, established parents had greater intentions than new- and non-parents, F(2) = 5.33, p = .01. Among both men and women during the first 6-months post-delivery, new-parents experienced decreased PBC, whereas established parents experienced increased PBC. Overall, affective attitudes were the strongest predictor of intentions for men (β = 0.55, p behaviour. Interventions should target affective attitudes and PBC to motivate healthy eating and may need to be intensified during parenthood. PMID:23829582

  7. Measuring Enthalpy of Sublimation of Volatiles by Means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, Fabrizio; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Zampetti, Emiliano

    2017-12-01

    Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM's) are widely used to study the chemical processes involving volatile compounds in any environment, such as condensation process. Since PCM's are miniaturized sensor, they are very suitable for planetary in situ missions, where can be used to detect and to measure the mass amount of astrobiologically significant compounds, such as water and organics. This work focuses on the realization and testing of a new experimental setup, able to characterize volatiles which can be found in a planetary environment. In particular the enthalpy of sublimation of some dicarboxylic acids has been measured. The importance of dicarboxylic acids in planetology and astrobiology is due to the fact that they have been detected in carbonaceous chondritic material (e.g. Murchinson), among the most pristine material present in our Solar System. In this work, a sample of acid was heated in an effusion cell up to its sublimation. For a set of temperatures (from 30 °C to 75 °C), the deposition rate on the PCM surface has been measured. From these measurements, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. ΔH = 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ/mol and Succinic acid, i.e. ΔH = 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ/mol. This technique has so demonstrated to be a good choice to recognise a single compound or a mixture (with an analysis upstream) even if some improvements concerning the thermal stabilization of the system will be implemented in order to enhance the results' accuracy. The experiment has been performed in support of the VISTA (Volatile In Situ Thermogravimetry Analyzer) project, which is included in the scientific payload of the ESA MarcoPolo-R mission study.

  8. Wasting the Future: The Technological Sublime, Communications Technologies, and E-waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebine Label

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literally speaking, e-waste is the future of communications. E-waste is the fastest growing waste stream in the world, much of it communications technologies from cell phones to laptops, televisions to peripherals. As a result of policies of planned obsolescence working computers, cell phones, and tablets are routinely trashed. One of the most powerful and enduring discourses associated with emerging technologies is the technological sublime, in which technology is seen as intellectually, emotionally, or spiritually transcendent. It comprises a contradictory impulse that elevates technology with an almost religious fervor, while simultaneously overlooking some of the consequences of industrialism, as well as ignoring the necessity of social, economic, and governmental infrastructures necessary to the implementation and development of new technologies. The idea that a new technology will not pollute or harm the environment is a persistent, though often quickly passed over, theme in the technological sublime, echoed in discourses about emerging technologies such as the silicon chip, the internet, and other ICTs. In this paper, I make connections between the discourse of newness, the practice of planned obsolescence, and the mountains of trashed components and devices globally. Considering the global context demonstrates the realities of the penetration of ICTs and their enduring pollution and negative implications for the health of humans and nonhumans, including plants, animals, waterways, soil, air and so on. I use the discourse of the technological sublime to open up and consider the future of communications, to argue that this discourse not only stays with us but also contains within it two important and related components, the promise of ecological harmony and a future orientation. I argue that these lingering elements keep us from considering the real future of communications – e-waste – and that, as communications scholars, we must also

  9. Origin and effective reduction of inversion domains in aluminum nitride grown by a sublimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigetoh, Keisuke; Horibuchi, Kayo; Nakamura, Daisuke

    2017-11-01

    Owing to the large differences in the chemical properties between Al and N polarities in aluminum nitride (AlN), the choice of the polar direction for crystal growth strongly affects not only the quality but also the shape (facet formation) of the grown crystal. In particular, N-polar (0 0 0 -1) has been considered to be a more preferable direction than Al-polar (0 0 0 1) for sublimation growth because compared to Al-polar (0 0 0 1), N-polar (0 0 0 -1) exhibits better stability at high growth rate (high supersaturation) conditions and enables easier lateral enlargement of the crystal. However, some critical growth conditions induce polarity inversion and hinder stable N-polar growth. Furthermore, the origin of the polarity inversion in AlN growth by the sublimation method is still unclear. To ensure stable N-polar growth without polarity inversion, the formation mechanism of the inversion domain during AlN sublimation growth must be elucidated. Therefore, herein, we demonstrate homoepitaxial growth on an N-polar seed and carefully investigate the obtained crystal that shows polarity inversion. Annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that polarity is completely converted to the Al polarity via the formation of a 30 nm thick mixed polar layer (MPL) just above the seed. Moreover, three-dimensional atom probe tomography shows the segregation of the oxygen impurities in the MPL with a high concentration of about 3 atom%. Finally, by avoiding the incorporation of oxygen impurity into the crystal at the initial stage of the growth, we demonstrate an effective reduction (seven orders of magnitude) of the inversion domain boundary formation.

  10. Symptôme, sublimation, sexuation: les prolongements du symptôme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève More

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available à partir du commentaire de Lacan sur Joyce, j'ai développé une thèse lacanienne fondamentale pour penser la transmission entre les générations avec un autre concept que celui de l'identification : le prolongement du symptôme. De plus, l'accent mis sur le sinthome par Lacan, n'empêche pas de situer la sublimation comme l'un des autres prolongements possibles du symptôme initial de Joyce.

  11. “Quedarán siempre las afueras”: hacia un nuevo sublime periférico

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    Cristina Gutiérrez Valencia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentro de la variedad de poéticas en el actual panorama español hay un grupo de autores (Alberto Santamaría, García Casado, Mercedes Díaz Villarías y Fernández Mallo que, aunque diferentes, tienen en común un nuevo romanticismo de ascendencia americana caracterizado por la búsqueda de un nuevo sublime basado en lo periférico de su escenario y su nueva mirada sobre la realidad.

  12. A Bayesian Analysis Shows That a Spruce Beetle Outbreak Reduces Snow Interception and Sublimation in a Subalpine Spruce-Fir Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Sublimation is a key component in the water cycle of cold, snow dominated ecosystems. In many high elevation spruce-fir forests of western North America, recent spruce beetle outbreaks have caused widespread tree mortality, opened the canopy, and potentially altered the processes that control sublimation. This study evaluates three hypotheses: in these ecosystems the dominant source for sublimation originates from canopy intercepted snow, the loss of canopy following a beetle disturbance leads to significantly less sublimation, and major sublimation events are driven by the flow of sensible heat into the canopy. Bayesian analysis is used to evaluate a two source energy and canopy mass model that explains seventeen years (2000-2016) of winter eddy-covariance flux data at the GLEES AmeriFlux sites where a spruce beetle outbreak caused 75-85% basal area mortality. The model estimated that the resistance to snow sublimation from the canopy was an order of magnitude less than from the snowpack and that the maximum snow loading in the canopy was reduced to 25-56% of its pre-outbreak capacity. Comparing model results obtained using the observed decrease in leaf area index versus a "no beetle" condition, there has been a significant decrease in ecosystem sublimation since 2011. In the past few years, a 5-11% increase in snowpack sublimation has been offset by 28-32% less sublimation from canopy intercepted snow, with the net being 17-25% less total sublimation. This is equivalent to 3-6% of the total precipitation. Informing the model with information other than the above-canopy fluxes indicates that a near snowpack eddy covariance system decreases the canopy contribution to sublimation, including observed sensible heat fluxes requires a correction to resolve the surface energy imbalance, and stable isotopes of water vapor extend sublimation events. Because tree growth and ecological succession are slow in spruce-fir forests, these results could persist for decades.

  13. Can I Use Marijuana Safely? An Examination of Distal Antecedents, Marijuana Protective Behavioral Strategies, and Marijuana Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Adrian J; Prince, Mark A; Pearson, Matthew R

    2017-03-01

    Given the high prevalence of marijuana use among college students, it is imperative to determine the factors that may reduce risk of problematic marijuana use and/or the development of cannabis use disorder. We examined marijuana protective behavioral strategies (PBS) as a proximal predictor of marijuana-related outcomes and a mediator of the associations between other known risk/protective factors and marijuana-related outcomes. Using data from a sample of 2,129 past-month marijuana users, collected from 11 universities in the United States, we examined marijuana PBS use as a mediator of the effects of sex, age at first use, impulsivity-like traits, and marijuana use motives on marijuana use frequency and marijuana related consequences. Marijuana PBS was identified as a robust negative predictor of marijuana use frequency and marijuana-related consequences. Further, Marijuana PBS use fully or partially mediated the effects of sex, premeditation, perseverance, coping motives, enhancement motives, conformity motives, and expansion motives on marijuana outcomes. Our results suggest that marijuana PBS use is a good candidate to be considered as a mechanism by which marijuana users moderate their marijuana use and attenuate their risk of experiencing marijuana-related consequences.

  14. A paradigm for examining stress effects on alcohol-motivated behaviors in participants with alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S; Weerts, Elise M; Xu, Xiaoqiang

    2017-04-17

    Although epidemiological research has shown an increase in drinking following stressors and trauma, limited paradigms have been validated to study the relationship between stress and drinking in the human laboratory. The current study developed a progressive ratio (PR) operant procedure to examine the effects of psychosocial stress on alcohol craving and several alcohol-motivated behaviors in persons with alcohol use disorder. Current heavy, nontreatment-seeking drinkers (N = 30) were media-recruited and completed a comprehensive assessment of recent drinking, mood and health. Participants were admitted to the clinical research unit and underwent 4-day, physician-monitored alcohol abstinence. On days 4 and 5, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test or a neutral session in random order followed by the alcohol-motivated response (AMR) procedure in which subjects worked for money or alcohol under a PR operant procedure. Subjects received earned money vouchers or alcohol at the conclusion of the session. The Trier Social Stress Test increased alcohol craving and rate of responding and decreased the number of changeovers between alcohol versus money reinforcers on the PR schedule. There was a positive relationship between alcohol craving and drinks earned during the stress session. This novel paradigm provides an experimental platform to examine motivation to drink without confounding by actual alcohol ingestion during the work session, thereby setting the stage for future studies of alcohol interventions. © 2017 The Authors.Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Protective behavioral strategies as a mediator between depressive symptom fluctuations and alcohol consumption: a longitudinal examination among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Braitman, Abby L; Henson, James M

    2015-01-01

    Use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS) has been shown to be associated with alcohol outcomes among college students in general. Only a few studies, however, have examined how mental health is related to PBS and alcohol use. Furthermore, research has not yet investigated these associations in a longitudinal framework. Consequently, the present study aimed to examine PBS as a mediator of depressive symptom fluctuations and alcohol consumption in a longitudinal weekly diary design. Participants were 260 (70.8% women) undergraduate college student drinkers who completed four weekly self-report assessments of their depressive symptoms, PBS use, and alcohol outcomes experienced in the past week. RESULTS indicated significant indirect effects such that increases in depressive symptoms were associated with higher alcohol consumption (i.e., quantity, frequency, peak drinking) through reduced PBS use. PBS did not mediate the association between depressive symptoms and alcohol-related problems. These findings suggest that experiencing an increase in depressive symptoms was associated with a failure to use PBS and, in turn, engagement in heavier alcohol consumption. College students with greater depressive symptoms may benefit from harm-reduction alcohol intervention programs that emphasize the use of PBS in drinking contexts.

  16. Examination of the core cognitive components of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy: an analogue investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovel, Iftah; Mor, Nilly; Shakarov, Hagit

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to examine the core elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy that target distressing negative cognitions, cognitive restructuring (CR) and cognitive defusion (CD), respectively. Participants (N=142) recalled a saddening autobiographical event, identified a distressing thought it triggered, and completed a task that induced rumination on these cognitions. They then completed one of four brief interventions that targeted these emotionally charged cognitions: analogue versions of CR and CD, and two control interventions. The personal negative cognitions were then reactivated to examine the protective effects of these interventions. CR and CD were similarly efficacious in alleviating distress, compared to a control intervention that focused on participants' negative thoughts. Mood improvement was associated with state levels of reappraisal and not with acceptance in CR, whereas the reverse was observed in CD. Improvement was associated with perceived efficacy of the intervention in CR but not in CD. The present findings suggest that although CR and CD effectively promote different types of cognitive strategies, they may share important features that set them both apart from maladaptive forms of coping. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors about Breast Self-Examination and Mammography among Female Primary Healthcare Workers in Diyarbakır, Turkey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdem, Özgür; Toktaş, İzzettin

    2016-01-01

      Aim. This study aims to determine the knowledge level of the female primary healthcare workers about breast cancer and to reveal their attitude and behaviors about breast self-examination and mammography. Methods...

  18. Maternal Depression and Adolescent Behavior Problems: An Examination of Mediation among Immigrant Latino Mothers and Their Adolescent Children Exposed to Community Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Trickett, Penelope K.; Mennen, Ferol E.; Saltzman, William; Zayas, Luis H.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the psychological and behavioral effects of exposure to community violence of 47 Latino mothers and their young adolescent children. Using data gathered from multiple sources, this study tests the associations between lifetime exposure to community violence, maternal depression, and child behavior problems. More than 80% of the…

  19. Examining the Relationship between Heart Rate and Problem Behavior: A Case Study of Severe Skin Picking in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S.; Hammond, Jennifer L.; Hustyi, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between heart rate and self-injurious behavior (SIB) shown by individuals with IDD (intellectual and developmental disabilities). In this single-case study, we simultaneously monitored heart rate and activity levels during a functional analysis of severe skin picking behavior exhibited by a young man with…

  20. A Study of the Influence of Organizational Learning on Employees' Innovative Behavior and Work Engagement by a Cross-Level Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Yuan-Duen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of organizational learning on employee's innovative behavior, and further proposed the mediation effect of work engagement between the relationship of organizational learning and employee's innovative behavior. The study targets on executives and their subordinates by paired samples within the…

  1. Interparental conflict, parent psychopathology, hostile parenting, and child antisocial behavior: examining the role of maternal versus paternal influences using a novel genetically sensitive research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Gordon T; Elam, Kit K; Lewis, Gemma; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita

    2012-11-01

    Past research has linked interparental conflict, parent psychopathology, hostile parenting, and externalizing behavior problems in childhood. However, few studies have examined these relationships while simultaneously allowing the contribution of common genetic factors underlying associations between family- and parent-level variables on child psychopathology to be controlled. Using the attributes of a genetically sensitive in vitro fertilization research design, the present study examined associations among interparental conflict, parents' antisocial behavior problems, parents' anxiety symptoms, and hostile parenting on children's antisocial behavior problems among genetically related and genetically unrelated mother-child and father-child groupings. Path analyses revealed that for genetically related mothers, interparental conflict and maternal antisocial behavior indirectly influenced child antisocial behavior through mother-to-child hostility. For genetically unrelated mothers, effects were apparent only for maternal antisocial behavior on child antisocial behavior through mother-to-child hostility. For both genetically related and genetically unrelated fathers and children, interparental conflict and paternal antisocial behavior influenced child antisocial behavior through father-to-child hostility. Effects of parental anxiety symptoms on child antisocial behavior were apparent only for genetically related mothers and children. Results are discussed with respect to the relative role of passive genotype-environment correlation as a possible confounding factor underlying family process influences on childhood psychopathology.

  2. Factors associated with alcohol drinking behavior of cancer survivors: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyeonyoung; Song, Yun-Mi; Shin, Jin-Young

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with drinking behavior of cancer survivors after cancer diagnosis. The study subjects were 906 adult cancer survivors who had reportedly drunk alcohol before cancer diagnosis and participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted from 2007 to 2013. Among them, 360 abstained from alcohol drinking after cancer diagnosis. We categorized remaining 546 persistent drinkers into high-risk drinker (consuming≥7 glasses of alcohol for men and≥5 glasses of alcohol for women at one sitting at the frequency of at least once a month) or moderate drinker. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate risk factors associated with drinking behavior. The high-risk drinkers occupied 27.1% (148 survivors) of the persistent alcohol drinking survivors. Age increase (OR=0.96; 95% CI 0.93-0.99), female sex (OR=0.15; 95% CI 0.08-0.28), and increase of time lapse (by 1-year) after cancer diagnosis (OR=0.94; 95% CI 0.92-0.97) were associated with a lower risk of high-risk drinking as compared with moderate drinking. Meanwhile,≤9years of education (OR=1.99; 95% CI 1.10-3.60), alcohol-related cancer (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.23-3.56), and current smoking (OR=1.92; 95% CI 1.03-3.59) were associated with increased risk of high-risk drinking of cancer survivors. These findings suggest that greater efforts for preventing high-risk drinking should be laid on the cancer survivors, with consideration of individual sociodemographic characteristics, especially when the survivors had been diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Examining the Causes and Consequences of Short-Term Behavioral Change during the Middle Stone Age at Sibudu, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Nicholas J; Will, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sibudu in KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) with its rich and high-resolution archaeological sequence provides an ideal case study to examine the causes and consequences of short-term variation in the behavior of modern humans during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). We present the results from a technological analysis of 11 stratified lithic assemblages which overlie the Howiesons Poort deposits and all date to ~58 ka. Based on technological and typological attributes, we conducted inter-assemblage comparisons to characterize the nature and tempo of cultural change in successive occupations. This work identified considerable short-term variation with clear temporal trends throughout the sequence, demonstrating that knappers at Sibudu varied their technology over short time spans. The lithic assemblages can be grouped into three cohesive units which differ from each other in the procurement of raw materials, the frequency in the methods of core reduction, the kind of blanks produced, and in the nature of tools the inhabitants of Sibudu made and used. These groups of assemblages represent different strategies of lithic technology, which build upon each other in a gradual, cumulative manner. We also identify a clear pattern of development toward what we have previously defined as the Sibudan cultural taxonomic unit. Contextualizing these results on larger geographical scales shows that the later phase of the MSA during MIS 3 in KwaZulu-Natal and southern Africa is one of dynamic cultural change rather than of stasis or stagnation as has at times been claimed. In combination with environmental, subsistence and contextual information, our high-resolution data on lithic technology suggest that short-term behavioral variability at Sibudu can be best explained by changes in technological organization and socio-economic dynamics instead of environmental forcing.

  4. Trans-modern AesthesiS In The Eurasian Borderlands And The Decolonial Anti-sublime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madina Tlostanova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El artículo estudia la aesthesis transmoderna en relación con la agenda de liberar la esfera estética de los mitos de la modernidad occidental. La autora ofrece un resumen crítico de las principales corrientes estéticas occidentales frente al anti-sublime decolonial como modelo alternativo analizado en el artículo. Se presta especial atención al mecanismo de este sublime, fundado en una hermenéutica pluritópica y una “comunidad de sentido” decolonial que une a quienes fueron marcados por la “herida colonial”. El artículo se enfoca en la reformulación decolonial de problemáticas estéticas usuales, como la correlación de belleza y aesthesis, la relación de conocimiento y arte, de la esfera moral y la estética, etc. Finalmente, una larga sección se dedica a la aesthesis decolonial de la zona fronteriza euroasiática, los territorios en el Este (Asia Central y Sur (Cáucaso del continente euroasiático, que antes eran colonias rusas/soviéticas, y producen hoy instancias complejas de arte decolonial en las obras de Saule Suleymenova, Zorito Dorzhiev y otros.

  5. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results and Development of Second Generation SDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Furthermore, the Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases. The previously developed SDC technology cannot be used for long mission phases due to the fact that it requires a consumable feedwater for heat rejection. Adding a coolant loop also provides for dissimilar redundancy on the Altair Lander ascent module thermal control system, which is the target application for this technology. Tests were performed on an Engineering Development Unit at NASA s Johnson Space Center to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. Correlated thermal math models were developed to help explain the test data. The paper also outlines the preliminary results of an ISDC concept being developed.

  6. Verdad sublime y madre asesina en Christine V., versión de Marguerite Duras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana González Holguín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Todo relato es ficción, versión y, así mismo, verdad, bajo una u otra concepción de la misma, es decir, desde una perspectiva que se enfoca según la intención y la subjetividad de uno o más actores, de uno o más narradores. El texto de Marguerite Duras intitulado Sublime forcément sublime Christine V. involucra, por su contenido y su contexto, varias versiones que contrastan y se interrogan entre sí. La escritora se posiciona de tal manera que, a través de recursos propios del oficio literario, desentraña una verdad que puede no ajustarse a la realidad o al saber, pero que nos enfrenta a los límites de lo pulsional y lo ominoso.

  7. How drops bounce and dance on ice: the role of sublimating surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Carlo; Bernagozzi, Ilaria; Jung, Stefan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Marengo, Marco; Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies Team; Themal Physics Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on superhydrophobic surfaces, due to low drop-solid substrate adhesion, and on hot substrates in Leidenfrost conditions, thanks to a vapor layer forming at the liquid-substrate interface, caused by drop evaporation. However, at temperatures below water freezing temperature, i.e. 0C, even superhydrophobicity can get lost. In the present work, we demonstrate that drop rebound can also be originated by another physical phenomenon, i.e. the solid substrate sublimation, at temperatures as low as -79C. To prove this mechanism, drop impact experiments were conducted on solid carbon dioxide, commonly known as dry ice. Drop dynamics and rebound were analyzed, together with the cases of drop impacting on a superhydrophobic surface and on a hot plate, to show how three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common, i.e. superhydrophobicity, evaporation and sublimation, can all lead to drop rebound, in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300C down to even below -79C. Additional glycol drop impact tests proved the independence of the observed phenomena from the chosen liquid. Finally, the formation and visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop is also reported. The authors acknowledge funding from Regione Lombardia and European Community (Marie Curie Fellowship).

  8. Formulation and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of cinnarizine using superdisintegrant blends and subliming material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablet of cinnarizine. A combination of super disintegrants, i.e., sodium starch glycolate (SSG and crosscarmellose sodium (CCS were used along with camphor as a subliming material. An optimized concentration of camphor was added to aid the porosity of the tablet. A 3 2 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: Amount of SSG and CCS. Infrared (IR spectroscopy was performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and polymer. IR spectroscopy showed that there is no interaction of drug with polymer. In the present study, direct compression was used to prepare the tablets. The powder mixtures were compressed into tablet using flat face multi punch tablet machine. Camphor was sublimed from the tablet by exposing the tablet to vacuum drier at 60°C for 12 hours. All the formulations were evaluated for their characteristics such as average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, dispersion time (DT, and dissolution rate. An optimized tablet formulation (F 9 was found to have good hardness of 3.30 ± 0.10 kg/cm 2 , wetting time of 42.33 ± 4.04 seconds, DT of 34.67 ± 1.53 seconds, and cumulative drug release of not less than 99% in 16 minutes.

  9. An examination of eating behaviors, physical activity, and obesity in african american adolescents: gender, socioeconomic status, and residential status differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Nutrena H; Dillaway, Heather E; Yarandi, Hossein N; Jones, Lenette M; Wilson, Feleta L

    2015-01-01

    African American adolescents experience higher rates of obesity and have an increased risk of obesity-related diseases than do White American adolescents. Despite culturally sensitive obesity preventive interventions, obesity rates are increasing within the African American adolescent population. Current obesity interventions do not usually address the heterogeneity (e.g., socioeconomic status [SES], gender, and residential status differences) within the African American adolescent community that can affect the efficacy of these interventions. To examine the gender, SES, and residential status differences related to obesity and weight behaviors in African American adolescents. A descriptive correlational study was conducted with 15- to 17-year-old African American adolescents (n = 145) from community clinics, youth organizations, churches, and social networks in metropolitan and inner-city Detroit. Data were collected through use of survey methods and analyzed with use of descriptive statistics, independent sample t tests, and multiple regression equations. Female adolescents consumed foods higher in fat and calories (t = -2.36, p = .019) and had more body fat (t = -9.37, p = .000) than did males. Adolescents of lower SES consumed food higher in fat and calories (t = -2.23, p = .027) and had higher body mass (t = -2.57, p = .011) than did adolescents of higher SES. Inner-city African American adolescents had higher levels of physical activity (t = -2.39, p = .018) and higher body mass (t = 2.24, p = .027) than did suburban African American adolescent counterparts. Gender, SES, and residential status were statistically significant predictors of eating behaviors, physical activity, body mass index, and body fat. The initial findings from the study will assist in better understanding the obesity epidemic that affects African American adolescents in disparate proportions. Further examination of the study variables is essential to serve as a basis for

  10. Examining multiple sleep behaviors and diurnal salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase: Within- and between-person associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lenten, Scott A; Doane, Leah D

    2016-06-01

    Sleep has been linked to the daily patterns of stress-responsive physiological systems, specifically the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and autonomic nervous system (ANS). However, extant research examining sleep and diurnal patterns of cortisol, the primary end product of the HPA axis, has primarily focused on sleep duration with limited attention on other facets of sleep. For example, it is not clear how specific aspects of sleep (e.g., sleep quality, sleep duration variability) are related to specific components of diurnal cortisol rhythms. Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been recognized as a surrogate marker of ANS activity, but limited research has explored relations between sleep and sAA diurnal rhythms. The current study utilized an ecological momentary assessment protocol to examine within- and between-person relations between several facets of sleep behavior using multiple methods (e.g., subjective report, actigraphy) and salivary cortisol and sAA. Older adolescents (N=76) provided saliva samples and diary entries five times per day over the course of three days. Sleep was assessed via questionnaire, through daily diaries, and monitored objectively using actigraphy over a four day period. Between-person results revealed that shorter average objective sleep duration and greater sleep duration variability were related to lower levels of waking cortisol and flatter diurnal slopes across the day. Within-person results revealed that on nights when individuals slept for shorter durations than usual they also had lower levels of waking cortisol the next day. Sleep was not related to the cortisol awakening response (CAR) or diurnal patterns of sAA, in either between-person or within-person analyses. However, typical sleep behaviors measured via questionnaire were related to waking levels of sAA. Overall, this study provides a greater understanding of how multiple components of sleep, measured in naturalistic environments, are related to cortisol and s

  11. Examining Sexual Assault Victimization and Loneliness as Risk Factors Associated With Nonlethal Self-Harm Behaviors in Female College Students: Is It Important to Control for Concomitant Suicidal Behaviors (and Vice Versa)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward C; Lee, Jerin; Wright, Kaitlin M; Najarian, Alexandria S-M; Yu, Tina; Chang, Olivia D; Hirsch, Jameson K

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined sexual assault victimization and loneliness as predictors of self-harm behaviors in a sample of 224 female college students. Results from conducting regression analysis indicated that both sexual assault victimization and loneliness were unique and significant predictors of self-harm behaviors. This pattern remained even after controlling for concomitant suicidal behaviors. Interestingly, in a post hoc analysis predicting suicidal behaviors, it was found that loneliness, but not sexual assault victimization, was the only unique and significant predictor after controlling for self-harm behaviors. Some implications of the present findings for understanding self-harm behaviors in female college students and the importance of controlling for suicidal behaviors in studies of self-harm behaviors (and vice versa) are discussed.

  12. Implicit and explicit measures of spider fear and avoidance behavior: Examination of the moderating role of working memory capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effting, M.; Salemink, E.; Verschuere, B.; Beckers, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Avoidance behavior is central to several anxiety disorders. The current study tested whether avoidance behavior for spiders depends on a dynamic interplay between implicit and explicit processes, moderated by the availability to exert control through working memory

  13. Differences between Actual and Perceived Student Norms: An Examination of Alcohol Use, Drug Use, and Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Matthew P.; Page, Jennifer C.; Mowry, Emily S.; Damann, Krista M.; Taylor, Kari K.; Cimini, M. Dolores

    2006-01-01

    Researchers in the social norms area have previously focused primarily on alcohol consumption, paying comparatively less attention to drug use and sexual behavior. The major purposes of this study were to (1) compare perceptions of peer norms in the areas of alcohol use, drug use, and sexual behavior with actual behavior and (2) determine if a…

  14. Use of a simulation intervention to examine differences in nursing students' hand hygiene knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konicki, Tara; Miller, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    Although hand hygiene remains an essential aspect of quality care, adherence to best patient safety practices continues to pose major challenges. The objectives of this study are to examine hand hygiene knowledge, beliefs, practices, perceived importance and behaviors using Social Cognitive Theory and simulation-based intervention. Participants were taken from a convenience sample of 131 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a nursing fundamentals course at an urban university in the midwestern United States, and then randomly assigned to their respective groups. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, control and intervention groups received the same lecture pertaining to hand hygiene and 3 data collection points where van de Mortel's Hand Hygiene Questionnaire (HHQ) was administered. In addition, the intervention group viewed a 6.5min video related to healthcare acquired infection and participated in 4 simulated situations requiring hand hygiene, based on World Health Organization guidelines. For all students, the hand hygiene technique was assessed through the use of Glo Germ, followed by handwashing and photography under ultraviolet light (posttest only). Image illumination was analyzed using image processing software. Microbiological sampling plates (pretest-posttest) were assessed quantitatively by colony counting. Study findings did not support differences in the intervention group for the 5 hypothesized relationships. Social desirability responding and negative item confusion were found to occur with the HHQ in the student population. There was a significant difference in the UV hand photographs, with students in the afternoon having lower values than students in the morning. Given the study results, there were no definitive educational recommendations to teach hand hygiene to nursing students. Future research should continue to further examine multi-focal modalities to enhance adherence to hand hygiene practices, as well as control for

  15. The Effect of Peer Education upon Breast Self-Examination Behaviors and Self-Esteem among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayran, Gulsun; Fırat, Meryem; Kucukakca, Gulden; Cuneydioğlu, Beyazıt; Tahta, Kubra; Avcı, Esra

    2017-07-01

    The current study was semi-experimentally designed in order to identify the effect of peer education upon breast self-examination (BSE) behaviors and self-esteem among university students. The study was undertaken with 100 female students who studied at Erzincan University. Peer educators were recruited from the 4th year students. The data were collected with a questionnaire form, BSE skill form and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale in two phases one month before and after the BSE peer education. For the data assessment; percentage distributions, frequency, mean, standard deviation and Simple T test were employed. The mean age of the participant students was 20.45±1.67 year and all of them were single. It was found that during the first data collection phase, only 16 % of the students performed BSE while during the final data collection phase, the rate of the students performing BSE rose to 77 %. During the first data collection phase, students received a mean score of 2.36±4.13 from BSE skill form while during the last data collection phase they had a mean score of 10.70±3.40 from BSE skill form. When the scores obtained from Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale by the students were examined, it was seen that they received a mean score of 1.20±1.34 during the first data collection phase while they had a mean score of 0.84±1.07 during the final data collection phase. Although short-term feedback was obtained, it was noted that students' BSE knowledge and skills increased considerably.

  16. Use of Protective Behavioral Strategies and Reduced Alcohol Risk: Examining the Moderating Effects of Mental Health, Gender and Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R.; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that protective behavioral strategies (PBS)—previously established as effective self-regulating tools for reducing alcohol risk among college students—may be especially useful for students with poor mental health, who are shown to be at heightened risk for alcohol-related harm. The current study examined the moderating influence of mental health (depression and anxiety severity), gender, and race (White, Asian) in the relationship between PBS use and alcohol-related negative consequences. Participants were 1,782 undergraduate students from two West Coast universities who reported past month incidence of heavy episodic drinking. Students reported on their drinking, experience of alcohol-related consequences, use of PBS, and depression and anxiety symptomatology. Overall, results demonstrated that among participants experiencing depression or anxiety, greater PBS utilization was associated with significantly lower levels of alcohol-related consequences, even after controlling for drinking and other predictors. However, findings also revealed important distinctions in the potential effectiveness of PBS by depression/anxiety severity and racial-gender subgroup, such that Asian men with poor mental health appeared to garner unique and substantial benefit (i.e., lesser consequences) from increased PBS use. Further, PBS were found to offer substantial protective benefit for White females, irrespective of mental health. This study points to the potential for targeted PBS-specific skills training and interventions to minimize alcohol-related risks faced by the growing subpopulation of college students experiencing psychological distress, and further highlights important race-gender differentials. PMID:24079648

  17. Examining the online reading behavior and performance of fifth-graders: evidence from eye-movement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ting eSung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Online reading is developing at an increasingly rapid rate, but the debate concerning whether learning is more effective when using hypertexts than when using traditional linear texts is still persistent. In addition, several researchers stated that online reading comprehension always starts with a question, but little empirical evidence has been gathered to investigate this claim. This study used eye-tracking technology and retrospective think aloud technique to examine online reading behaviors of fifth-graders (N = 50. The participants were asked to read four texts on the website. The present study employed a three-way mixed design: 2 (reading ability: high vs. low  2 (reading goals: with vs. without  2 (text types: hypertext vs. linear text. The dependent variables were eye-movement indices and the frequencies of using online reading strategy. The results show that fifth-graders, irrespective of their reading ability, found it difficult to navigate the nonlinear structure of hypertexts when searching for and integrating information. When they read with goals, they adjusted their reading speed and the focus of their attention. Their offline reading ability also influenced their online reading performance. These results suggest that online reading skills and strategies have to be taught in order to enhance the online reading abilities of elementary-school students.

  18. Perceptions of postgraduate trainees on the impact of objective structured clinical examinations on their study behavior and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoka, Robert O; Kiguli, Sarah; Ssemata, Andrew S; Govaerts, Marjan; Driessen, Erik W

    2015-01-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is a commonly used method of assessing clinical competence at various levels, including at the postgraduate level. How the OSCE impacts on learning in higher education is poorly described. In this study, we evaluated the perceptions of postgraduate trainees regarding the impact of the OSCE on their study and clinical behavior. We employed an explorative qualitative research design by conducting focus group discussions with 41 pediatric postgraduate trainees at the College of Health Science, Makerere University. A semi-structured tool was used to obtain the views and experiences of the trainees. Transcripts from the discussion were analyzed in an iterative manner using thematic content analysis. The trainees reported the OSCEs as a fair and appropriate tool for assessing clinical competency at the postgraduate level. However, they noted that whereas OSCEs assess a broad range of skills and competencies relevant to their training, there were areas that they did not adequately assess. In particular, OSCEs did not adequately assess in-depth clinical knowledge or detailed history-taking skills. Overall, the majority of the trainees reported that the OSCEs inspired them to study widely and improve their procedural and communication skills. OSCEs are a useful tool for assessing clinical competencies in postgraduate education. However, the perceived limitations in their ability to assess complex skills raises concerns about their use as a standalone mode of assessment at the postgraduate level. Future studies should evaluate how use of OSCEs in combination with other assessment tools impacts on learning.

  19. A Multilevel Analysis Examining the Association between School-Based Smoking Policies, Prevention Programs and Youth Smoking Behavior: Evaluating a Provincial Tobacco Control Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, D. A.; Leatherdale, S. T.; Sihvonen, M.; Kekki, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examined how smoking policies and programs are associated with smoking behavior among Grade 10 students (n = 4709) between 1999 and 2001. Data from the Tobacco Module from the School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System were examined using multilevel logistic regression analyses. We identified that (i) attending a school with…

  20. A Preliminary Examination of the Role of Emotion Differentiation in the Relationship between Borderline Personality and Urges for Maladaptive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Chapman, Alexander L; Weiss, Nicole H; Rosenthal, M Zachary

    2014-12-01

    Impulsive, maladaptive, and potentially self-damaging behaviors are a hallmark feature of borderline personality (BP) pathology. Difficulties with emotion regulation have been implicated in both BP pathology and maladaptive behaviors. One facet of emotion regulation that may be particularly important in the relation between BP pathology and urges for maladaptive behaviors is emotion differentiation. Over one day, 84 participants high ( n = 34) and low ( n = 50) in BP pathology responded to questions regarding state emotions and urges to engage in maladaptive behaviors using handheld computers, in addition to a measure of emotion-related difficulties controlling impulsive behaviors. Results revealed that individuals high in BP pathology reported greater emotion-related impulsivity as well as daily urges to engage in maladaptive behaviors. However, the association between BP group and both baseline emotion-related impulsivity and daily urges for maladaptive behaviors was strongest among individuals who had low levels of positive emotion differentiation. Conversely, negative emotion differentiation did not significantly moderate the relationships between BP group and either emotion-related difficulties controlling impulsive behaviors or state urges for maladaptive behaviors. Limitations to the present study include the reliance upon an analogue sample and the relatively brief monitoring period. Despite limitations, these results suggest that, among individuals with high BP pathology, the ability to differentiate between positive emotions may be a particularly important target in the reduction of maladaptive behaviors.

  1. Use of protective behavioral strategies and reduced alcohol risk: examining the moderating effects of mental health, gender, and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2013-12-01

    Recent research indicates that protective behavioral strategies (PBS)-previously established as effective self-regulating tools for reducing alcohol risk among college students-may be especially useful for students with poor mental health, who are shown to be at heightened risk for alcohol-related harm. The current study examined the moderating influence of mental health (depression and anxiety severity), gender, and race (White, Asian) in the relationship between PBS use and alcohol-related negative consequences. Participants were 1,782 undergraduate students from two West Coast universities who reported past-month incidence of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Students reported on their drinking, experience of alcohol-related consequences, use of PBS, and depression and anxiety symptomatology. Overall, results demonstrated that among participants experiencing depression or anxiety, greater PBS utilization was associated with significantly lower levels of alcohol-related consequences, even after controlling for drinking and other predictors. However, findings also revealed important distinctions in the potential effectiveness of PBS by depression/anxiety severity and racial-gender subgroup, such that Asian men with poor mental health appeared to garner unique and substantial benefit (i.e., lesser consequences) from increased PBS use. Further, PBS were found to offer substantial protective benefit for White females, irrespective of mental health. This study points to the potential for targeted PBS-specific skills training and interventions to minimize alcohol-related risks faced by the growing subpopulation of college students experiencing psychological distress, and further highlights important race and gender differentials. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Subacute toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in male rats: emotional behavior and pathophysiological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Naima Rihane Ben; Amara, Salem; Mrad, Imen; Ben-Slama, Imen; Jeljeli, Mustapha; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have a wide range of applications in many fields (paint, industry, medicine, additives in food colorants, and nutritional products). Over the past decade research, TiO2 NPs have been focused on the potential toxic effects of these useful materials. In the present study, we investigated the effects of subacute exposure to TiO2 NPs on emotional behavior in adult Wistar rats, the biochemical parameters, and the histology of organs. Animals were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with TiO2 NPs (20 mg/kg body weight) every 2 days for 20 days. The elevated plus-maze test showed that subacute TiO2 NPs treatment increased significantly the anxious index (AI) compared to control group. The toxicological parameters were assessed 24 h and 14 days after the last injection of TiO2 NPs. Subacute exposure to nanoparticles increased the AST/ALT enzyme ratio and LDH activity. However, the blood cell count remained unchanged, except the platelet count increase. Histological examination showed a little inflammation overall. Moreover, our results provide strong evidence that the TiO2 NPs can induce the liver pathological changes of rats. The intraperitoneal injection of TiO2 NPs increased the accumulation of titanium in the liver, lung, and the brain. The results suggest that TiO2 NPs could alter the neurobehavioral performance of adult Wistar rats and promotes alterations in hepatic tissues.

  3. A Closer Examination of the Joint Behavior of Dark Spots and their Companion Clouds on the Ice Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Beau, Raymond P.; Warning, S. W.; Palotai, C.; Deng, X.

    2012-10-01

    Starting with the Voyager observations of the Great Dark Spot-Bright Companion duo on Neptune, discrete cloud features have been linked to vortices on the Ice Giants. Building on these observations, numerical simulations of these features have begun to reveal a complex physical interaction in which the vortex can generate clouds which in turn influence the behavior of the vortex. For example, simulations in the EPIC general circulation model of a vortex similar to the Uranian Dark Spot can generate companion clouds from a cloud-free initial condition. These clouds are generated orographically, with a region of upwelling on the leading edge of vortex lifting methane from the warmer lower atmosphere to cooler conditions above the vortex. This increases the local humidity to the point where condensation can occur. The upwelling is perceptible in some simulations a scale height above the vortex with vertical velocities on the order of 0.01-0.1 m/s. The strength of this upwelling is dependent on the local humidity as well as the vortex characteristics; likewise, the meridional drift rate of these vortices is affected by the changes in methane distribution. While the described UDS simulation provides an illustration of the interactive physics underlying vortex-cloud phenomena, there are other, more perplexing observations that require further explanation. These range from the changing shape of the original bright companion cloud above and about the drifting, oscillating Great Dark Spot to the meridional drift and time-varying cloud structure of the “Berg” on Uranus. Ongoing numerical examination of these vortex-cloud pairings will provide further insight into these features and the overall atmospheric physics of the Ice Giants. This research is supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX11AC01G.

  4. Examining the Case for Functional Behavior Assessment as an Evidence-Based Practice for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in General Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Terrance M.; Alter, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    This article is a review of functional behavior assessment studies in general education setting for students with emotional and behavioral disorders. The studies were assessed in accordance with published standards for evidence-based practices. Overall, few studies met criteria for inclusion in this review and even fewer studies included all three…

  5. Examining the Impact of a Positive Behavior Support Program and Direct Instruction of Social and Emotional Learning Skills on the Externalizing Behaviors of Disruptive Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Darla Renee

    2014-01-01

    Many adolescent disruptive youth in Pennsylvania are removed from traditional school settings for externalizing behaviors including aggression, defying authority, poor relationships with peers and adults, disruptive behaviors, and bullying. Post-school outcomes of adolescent disruptive youth remain dismal, and these students are the most…

  6. Predicting risky sexual behavior in emerging adulthood: examination of a moderated mediation model among child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather L; Grills, Amie E; Drum, Katherine B

    2014-01-01

    Although having a sexual victimization history is associated with engaging in sexual risk behavior, the mechanisms whereby sexual victimization increases risk behavior are unclear. This study examined use of sex as an affect regulation strategy as a mediator of the relationship between depressive symptoms and sexual risk behavior among 1,616 sexually active college women as well as examined having a history of child sexual abuse (CSA), adolescent/adult sexual assault (ASA), or both (CSA/ASA) as moderators. Results supported the mediated model as well as moderated mediation, where depressive symptoms were more strongly associated with use of sex as an affect regulation strategy among ASA victims, and sex as an affect regulation strategy was more strongly related to sexual risk behavior for CSA/ASA victims.

  7. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons and EDU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a more traditional thermal control system. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement and/or short transport distances. Tests were performed on coupons and an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at NASA s Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit test results.

  8. Optimized heat exchange in a CO2 de-sublimation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Larry; Terrien, Paul; Tessier, Pascal; Hoeger, Christopher

    2017-09-19

    The present invention is a process for removing carbon dioxide from a compressed gas stream including cooling the compressed gas in a first heat exchanger, introducing the cooled gas into a de-sublimating heat exchanger, thereby producing a first solid carbon dioxide stream and a first carbon dioxide poor gas stream, expanding the carbon dioxide poor gas stream, thereby producing a second solid carbon dioxide stream and a second carbon dioxide poor gas stream, combining the first solid carbon dioxide stream and the second solid carbon dioxide stream, thereby producing a combined solid carbon dioxide stream, and indirectly exchanging heat between the combined solid carbon dioxide stream and the compressed gas in the first heat exchanger.

  9. Main-belt comets: sublimation-driven activity in the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of main-belt comets (MBCs), which exhibit comet-like activity likely due to the sublimation of volatile ices, yet orbit in the main asteroid belt, has increased greatly since the discovery of the first known MBC, 133P/Elst-Pizarro, in 1996, and their recognition as a new class of solar system objects after the discovery of two more MBCs in 2005. I review work that has been done over the last 10 years to improve our understanding of these enigmatic objects, including the development of systematic discovery methods and diagnostics for distinguishing MBCs from disrupted asteroids (which exhibit comet-like activity due to physical disruptions such as impacts or rotational destabilization). I also discuss efforts to understand the dynamical and thermal properties of these objects.

  10. Paths of the Sublime: Alain de Botton’s The Art of Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Mendes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind the central place of literary, academic, and religious tourism in Cultural Studies and in Alain de Botton’s The Art of Travel (2002, the paper seeks: 1 to identify some remarkable travels of famous writers – the British Wordsworth; the French Karl-Joris Huysmans, Gustave Flaubert, and Charles Baudelaire; 2 to show that in the analysis of such authors’ itineraries (from Europe to the East, there is a search for cultural roots, a mapping of spaces and people, and a deconstruction of labels often related to the Other; 3 to point out that the tourist is also a storyteller, a protagonist, and a creator of fictional worlds; 4 to bring together literary tourism and artistic tourism, through the identification of allusions to other cultural events (painting, music, and architecture; 5 to characterize tourism as a literary and aesthetic experience of the Sublime.

  11. Effect of Zn doping on the sublimation rate of pentaerythritol tetranitrate using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridha, Subrata; Weeks, Brandon L

    2009-01-01

    A series of Zn ion-doped pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) nanoislands in the form of thin films were prepared on Si substrates using spin coating. The effect of Zn concentrations on the sublimation energy was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The pure and Zn-doped nanoislands are imaged by AFM in contact mode at room temperature after annealing isothermally for a given time. The volume of the islands starts to decrease after annealing at 45 degrees C for pure PETN, whereas Zn-doped nanoislands start to decrease in height and volume after annealing at 55-58 degrees C. The minimum activation energy is found to be 29.7 Kcal/mol for 1,000 ppm Zn concentration. These studies are important for the long-term stabilization of PETN.

  12. Characteristics of Vacuum Freeze Drying with Utilization of Internal Cooling and Condenser Waste Heat for Sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Alhamid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum freeze drying is an excellent drying method, but it is very energy-intensive because a relatively long drying time is required. This research investigates the utilization of condenser waste heat for sublimation as a way of accelerating the drying rate. In addition, it also investigates the effect of internal cooling combined with vacuum cooling in the pressure reduction process. Jelly fish tentacles were used as the specimen, with different configurations for condenser heat waste and internal cooling valve opening. The results show that heating with condenser heat waste can accelerate the drying rate up to 0.0035 kg/m2.s. In addition, pre-freezing by internal cooling prevents evaporation until the mass of the specimen is 0.47 g and promotes transition of the specimen into the solid phase.

  13. Formation of the molecular crystal structure during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2015-04-01

    The results from structural and thermal studies on the formation of molecular crystals during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol from its vapor phase are given. It is established that the vapor-crystal phase transition proceeds in a complicated way as the superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with a change in density, and a second-order phase transition with a change in ordering. It is shown that the latter is a smeared phase transition that proceeds with the formation of a pretransitional phase that is irreversibly dissipated during phase transformation, leading to the formation of crystals of the rhombic syngony. Data from differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis are presented along with microphotographs.

  14. Ethnic variation in environmental belief and behavior: An examination of the new ecological paradigm in a social psychological context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandra Y. Johnson; J. Michael Bowker; H. Ken Cordell

    2004-01-01

    We use national-level data to test a modified version of Stern, Dietz, & Guagnano's causal model of environmental belief and behavior. We focus on ethnic variation for four environmental behaviors: environmental reading, household recycling, environmental group joining, and participation in nature-based outdoor recreation. Blacks and foreign-born Latinos were...

  15. An Examination of the Effect of Coach Leadership Behaviors on the Psychosocial Development of Division III College Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary P.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between student athlete development and coach leadership behaviors in NCAA Division III football players. Three key elements support this study. The first, Thelma Horn's model of coaching effectiveness, provided the framework for the impact of coaching behaviors on student athlete development. The second,…

  16. Challenging Temperament, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Behavior Problems in Urban Low-Income Children: A Longitudinal Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Meghan P.; Turbeville, Ashley R.; Barnes, Sophie P.; McClowry, Sandee G.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Racial/ethnic minority low-income children with temperaments high in negative reactivity are at heightened risk for developing disruptive behavior problems. Teacher-child relationships characterized by high levels of closeness and low levels of conflict may protect against the development of disruptive behaviors in school. The…

  17. Taking a Hike and Hucking the Stout: The Troublesome Legacy of the Sublime in Outdoor Recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Drennig

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As Henry Thoreau noted in the 1850s, the simple act of walking can be loaded with political and spiritual meaning. Today, taking a hike as an act of engaging in outdoor recreation is equally non-trivial, and therefore subject of the following analysis. As this paper argues, outdoors recreation is still influenced by the legacy of the Sublime and its construction of wilderness. This troublesome legacy means that the cultural self-representation of outdoor sports – and the practice itself – lays claim to the environment in ways that are socially and sometimes even ethni-cally exclusive. This essay uses William Cronon’s critique of the cultural constructedness of wilderness as a point of departure to see how Western notions of sublime nature have an impact on spatial practice. The elevation of specific parts of the environ-ment into the category of wilderness prescribes certain uses and meanings as na-ture is made into an antidote against the ills of industrial civilization, and a place where the alienated individual can return to a more authentic self. This view then has become a troublesome legacy, informing the cultural self-representation of those uses of “wilderness” that are known as outdoor recreation. In its cultural production, outdoors recreation constructs “healthy” and “athlet-ic” bodies exercising in natural settings and finding refuge from the everyday al-ienation of postmodern society. Yet these bodies are conspicuously white, and the obligatory equipment and fashion expensive. Outdoor recreation is a privileged assertion of leisure, often denoting an urban, affluent, and white, background of the practitioner. These practitioners then lay exclusive claim on the landscapes they use. As trivial as taking a hike or any other form of outdoors recreation may thus seem, they put a cultural legacy into practice that is anything but trivial.

  18. Mass spectrometric study of molecular and ionic sublimation of lanthanum triiodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunaev, A.M., E-mail: amdunaev@ro.ru [Research Institute of Thermodynamics and Kinetics, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, Ivanovo 153000 (Russian Federation); Kudin, L.S.; Motalov, V.B.; Ivanov, D.A.; Butman, M.F. [Research Institute of Thermodynamics and Kinetics, Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, Ivanovo 153000 (Russian Federation); Krämer, K.W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-12-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lanthanum triiodide was investigated by the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. • (LaI{sub 3}){sub n} molecules (n = 1–3) and [I(LaI{sub 3}){sub n}]{sup −} ions (n = 0–4) were registered in the saturated vapor. • The sublimation enthalpy was found by the second and third law of thermodynamics. • The enthalpies of ion-molecular reactions with cluster ions were calculated. • The electron work function of the crystalline LaI{sub 3} was obtained. - Abstract: The molecular and ionic composition of saturated vapor over lanthanum triiodide was studied by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. The (LaI{sub 3}){sub n} molecules (n = 1–3) and the [I(LaI{sub 3}){sub n}]{sup −} ions (n = 0–4) were observed. The partial pressures of the molecules were determined and the enthalpies of sublimation, Δ{sub s}H° (298.15 K) in kJ mol{sup −1}, in the form of monomers (304 ± 7), dimers (428 ± 25), and trimers (455 ± 50) were obtained by the second and third laws of thermodynamics. The enthalpy of formation, Δ{sub f}H° (298.15 K) in kJ mol{sup −1}, of the LaI{sub 3} (−376 ± 10), La{sub 2}I{sub 6} (−932 ± 25), La{sub 3}I{sub 9} (−1585 ± 50) molecules and the LaI{sub 4}{sup −} (−841 ± 24), La{sub 2}I{sub 7}{sup −} (−1486 ± 32) ions were determined. The electron work function, φ{sub e} = 3.5 ± 0.3 eV, for the LaI{sub 3} crystal was calculated from the thermochemical cycle.

  19. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  20. Formulation design and optimization of fast dissolving clonazepam tablets by sublimation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsand, S B; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V; Swamy, P V

    2011-09-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t(50%) 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t(50%) 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05).

  1. The fate of meteoric metals in ice particles: Effects of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Frankland, V. L.; Murray, B. J.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-08-01

    The uptake and potential reactivity of metal atoms on water ice can be an important process in planetary atmospheres and on icy bodies in the interplanetary and interstellar medium. For instance, metal atom uptake affects the gas-phase chemistry of the Earth's mesosphere, and has been proposed to influence the agglomeration of matter into planets in protoplanetary disks. In this study the fate of Mg and K atoms incorporated into water-ice films, prepared under ultra-high vacuum conditions at temperatures of 110-140 K, was investigated. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that Mg- and K-containing species do not co-desorb when the ice sublimates, demonstrating that uptake on ice particles causes irreversible removal of the metals from the gas phase. This implies that uptake on ice particles in terrestrial polar mesospheric clouds accelerates the formation of large meteoric smoke particles (≥1 nm radius above 80 km) following sublimation of the ice. Energetic sputtering of metal-dosed ice layers by 500 eV Ar+ and Kr+ ions shows that whereas K reacts on (or within) the ice surface to form KOH, adsorbed Mg atoms are chemically inert. These experimental results are consistent with electronic structure calculations of the metals bound to an ice surface, where theoretical adsorption energies on ice are calculated to be -68 kJ mol-1 for K, -91 kJ mol-1 for Mg, and -306 kJ mol-1 for Fe. K can also insert into a surface H2O to produce KOH and a dangling H atom, in a reaction that is slightly exothermic.

  2. Examining parents' behaviors and supervision of their children in the presence of an unfamiliar dog: does The Blue Dog intervention improve parent practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Schwebel, David C; Stewart, Julia; Bell, Melissa; Davis, Aaron L; Corbett, Michael R

    2013-05-01

    Young children are at particular risk for dog bite injuries. This study examined parents' supervision of and reactions to their children in the vicinity of an unfamiliar dog. A pre/post intervention/control group randomized design assessed whether exposure to The Blue Dog, a dog bite prevention and education program, positively impacted parent behaviors. No group differences in pre or post-intervention measures emerged, indicating that The Blue Dog did not evoke improvements in parents' behaviors. Generally, parents showed risky reactions and encouraged children to interact with the dog, even though they knew very little about the dog's safety or disposition. Supervision measures (proximity, watching) remained unchanged (watching) or more lax (proximity) across sessions. The results highlight the importance of targeting parent behavior, not just child behavior, in programs that aim to reduce risk of childhood dog bites. The Blue Dog did not effectively change parent behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. "It’s like Big Mama’s house": Examining Extended Family Influences on the Dietary Behaviors of African American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natasha A.; Thornton, Rachel L. J.; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Surkan, Pamela J.; Levine, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The family environment plays an important role in influencing children’s dietary behaviors. Traditionally, African American extended family members play a key role in child socialization. We examine the role of extended families in how children are socialized to adopt dietary norms. We conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 24 individuals across eight family units to elicit information regarding the influences of culture and families on children’s dietary behaviors. Findings suggest that families teach children to value activities that combine quality time and enjoying food together; adults are inconsistent in how they teach children to adopt desired dietary behaviors. This work has implications for improving family-based interventions for African American children through promoting healthful behaviors that are also respectful of family dietary traditions, improving communication between adults and children, and leveraging family members as attitudinal and behavioral referents. PMID:24564191

  4. Incarceration and Sexual Risk: Examining the Relationship Between Men’s Involvement in the Criminal Justice System and Risky Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Rachel C.; Griffith, Derek M.; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used data from Add Health Waves II and III to compare men who had been incarcerated to those who had not, and examined whether incarceration was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners and increased odds of concurrent partnerships. We used multivariate regression and propensity-score matching to compare sexual behavior of Wave III male respondents who had been incarcerated with those who had not, and compared sexual behavior at Wave II to identify differences in sexual behavior prior to incarceration. Incarceration was associated with an increased rate of lifetime sexual partnership, but this was attenuated by substance use. Criminal justice involvement was associated with increased odds of having partners who report concurrent partnerships, but no further increase was seen with incarceration. There were no significant sexual behavior differences prior to incarceration. These results suggest that the criminal justice system and substance use may interact to shape sexual behavior. PMID:23392910

  5. Psychological intimate partner violence and sexual risk behavior: examining the role of distinct posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in the partner violence-sexual risk link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M; Willie, Tiara C; Hellmuth, Julianne C; Sullivan, Tami P

    2015-01-01

    Research has examined how physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization increases sexual risk behavior, yet research is lacking on 1) the effect of psychological IPV on sexual risk behavior and 2) factors through which psychological IPV may be linked to sexual risk behavior. The current study examined the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior controlling for other forms of IPV (i.e., physical and sexual) in a sample of 186 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative community women currently experiencing IPV. Further, this study examined the potential mediating effects of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) on this relationship. Results revealed that greater severity of psychological IPV was uniquely and directly related to greater sexual risk behavior. Additionally, of the four PTSD symptom severity clusters, only avoidance symptom severity mediated the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior. Implications for addressing psychological IPV and PTSD to improve women's sexual health outcomes are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychological Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Risk Behavior: Examining the Role of Distinct PTSD Symptoms in the Partner Violence-sexual Risk Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Nicole M.; Willie, Tiara C.; Hellmuth, Julianne C.; Sullivan, Tami P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research has examined how physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization increases sexual risk behavior, yet research is lacking on 1) the effect of psychological IPV on sexual risk behavior and 2) factors through which psychological IPV may be linked to sexual risk behavior. METHODS The current study examined the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior controlling for other forms of IPV (i.e., physical and sexual) in a sample of 186 HIV-negative community women currently experiencing IPV. Further, this study examined the potential mediating effects of four posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity clusters (i.e., re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) on this relationship. FINDINGS Results revealed that greater severity of psychological IPV was uniquely and directly related to greater sexual risk behavior. Additionally, of the four PTSD symptom severity clusters, only avoidance symptom severity mediated the relationship between psychological IPV and sexual risk behavior. CONCLUSION Implications for addressing psychological IPV and PTSD to improve women’s sexual health outcomes are discussed. PMID:25498762

  7. The Examination of the Effectiveness of an Educational Intervention based on the Planned Behavior Theory on Improving Pubertal Health Behavior in Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Eslamimehr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Puberty is a period of psychological, physical, mental, emotional and social growth that stability and development of personality occurs in this period. This study aimed to determine the effect of planned behavior theory on improving pubertal health behavior in female first grade high school students. Materials and Methods:  A quasi-experimental intervention was conducted in female high school in Khamir city, Iran in 2015. One of the schools were randomly assigned to the control group and other to the experimental group. Using the formula sample, 60 students were selected from each school. Samples were evaluated in two stages through pre-test and two months later via post-test by administered questionnaire including questions about demographic characteristics and structures of planned behavior theory. The content of training was presented through lecture group discussion with teaching aids such as booklet and pamphlet. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. Results: The intervention group mean age at first menstrual period was 12.30 ± 0.84 years old and for control group was 12.25 ± 0.79 years old. The results showed that two months after the intervention, health behaviors, subjective norms, behavioral intention, perceived behavioral control, and attitude, were significantly higher than pre- intervention (P

  8. Sex Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Examination of Developmental Functioning, Autistic Symptoms, and Coexisting Behavior Problems in Toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Sikora, Darryn M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the female presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during early childhood. We investigated sex differences in developmental profiles using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, autistic symptoms on the ADOS-G, and coexisting behavior problems on the CBCL in 157 boys and 42 girls with ASD aged 1.5–3.9 years. Overall, boys and girls evidenced a markedly similar pattern of developmental profiles, autism symptoms, and coexisting behavior problems, although subtle diffe...

  9. Examining the Cultural Leadership Behaviors of Schoo l Principal s within the Context of Symmetric and Asymmetric School Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül BALKAR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of teachers on contributions of school principals’ cultural leadership behaviors to forming symmetric and asymmetric culture. The participants of the study consisted of 27 secondary school teachers working in Gaziantep province. Data of the study were collected through semi - structured interviews and analyzed through content analysis. Contributions of each cultural leader ship behavior to symmetric and asymmetric culture types were determined by taking relations between cultural leadership behaviors and symmetric and asymmetric cultures into consideration in the process of content analysis. According to the findings of the study ; supporting development of teachers and reflecting developments and innovations on schools are among the cultural leadership behaviors contributing to forming asymmetric culture at schools. Interpreting tasks and missions of school and ensuring neces sary environment for keeping social values alive at schools are among the cultural leadership behaviors contributing to forming symmetric culture at schools. Based on the results of the study, it is suggested that school principals should follow developmen ts in educational issues and transfer these developments into school practices. They should place more importance on supporting innovative behaviors of teachers in order to create asymmetric culture at schools.

  10. Representing the sublime in the VIMAP and empirical aesthetics: Reviving Edmund Burke's A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. Comment on "Move me, astonish me... delight my eyes and brain: The Vienna Integrated Model of top-down and bottom-up processes in Art Perception (VIMAP) and corresponding affective, evaluative, and neurophysiological correlates" by Matthew Pelowski et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Y.-J.; McManus, I. C.

    2017-07-01

    This commentary considers the role of the sublime in the Vienna Integrated Model of Art Perception (VIMAP; Pelowski, Markey, Forster, Gerger, & Leder [17]), and suggest that it is not precisely conceptualised in the model. In part that reflects different views and usages of the sublime in the literature, and here it is recommended that Burke's [2] view of the sublime is used as a primary framework for empirical research on the sublime.

  11. Validity and reliability analysis of the planned behavior theory scale related to the testicular self-examination in a Turkish context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyigun, Emine; Tastan, Sevinc; Ayhan, Hatice; Kose, Gulsah; Acikel, Cengizhan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability levels of the Planned Behavior Theory Scale as related to a testicular self-examination. The study was carried out in a health-profession higher-education school in Ankara, Turkey, from April to June 2012. The study participants comprised 215 male students. Study data were collected by using a questionnaire, a planned behavior theory scale related to testicular self-examination, and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). The sub-dimensions of the planned behavior theory scale, namely those of intention, attitude, subjective norms and self-efficacy, were found to have Cronbach's alpha values of between 0.81 and 0.89. Exploratory factor analysis showed that items of the scale had five factors that accounted for 75% of the variance. Of these, the sub-dimension of intention was found to have the highest level of contribution. A significant correlation was found between the sub-dimensions of the testicular self-examination planned behavior theory scale and those of CHBMS (p Behavior Theory Scale is a valid and reliable measurement for Turkish society.

  12. Brief report: Examining children's disruptive behavior in the wake of trauma - A two-piece growth curve model before and after a school shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yue; Shonkoff, Eleanor T; Barnett, Elizabeth; Wen, C K Fred; Miller, Kimberly A; Eddy, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    School shootings may have serious negative impacts on children years after the event. Previous research suggests that children exposed to traumatic events experience heightened fear, anxiety, and feelings of vulnerability, but little research has examined potential aggressive and disruptive behavioral reactions. Utilizing a longitudinal dataset in which a local school shooting occurred during the course of data collection, this study sought to investigate whether the trajectory of disruptive behaviors was affected by the shooting. A two-piece growth curve model was used to examine the trajectory of disruptive behaviors during the pre-shooting years (i.e., piece one) and post-shooting years (i.e., piece two). Results indicated that the two-piece growth curve model fit the data better than the one-piece model and that the school shooting precipitated a faster decline in aggressive behaviors. This study demonstrated a novel approach to examining effects of an unexpected traumatic event on behavioral trajectories using an existing longitudinal data set. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of HIV-risk sexual behavior: examining lifetime sexual and physical abuse histories in relation to substance use and psychiatric problem severity among ex-offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, John M; Rodriguez, Jaclyn; Bloomer, Craig; Jason, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    Lifetime histories of sexual and physical abuse have been associated with increased HIV-risk sexual behavior, and some studies have identified other variables associated with these relationships. However, there is a dearth of literature that has critically examined abuse histories and HIV-risk sexual behavior in relation to these other variables. Predictors of HIV-risk sexual behavior were analyzed among a sample of ex-offenders who were completing inpatient substance dependence treatment to identify factors related to increases in HIV-risk sexual behavior beyond that of abuse histories. Hierarchical linear regression was conducted to examine sociodemographic characteristics, recent substance use, and current psychiatric problem severity in addition to lifetime histories of sexual/physical abuse in a cross-sectional design. Gender, substance use, and psychiatric problem severity predicted increases in HIV-risk sexual behavior beyond what was predicted by abuse histories. Proportionately more women than men reported abuse histories. In addition, significantly more unprotected sexual than safer sexual practices were observed, but differences in these practices based on lifetime abuse histories and gender were not significant. Findings suggest recent substance use and current psychiatric problem severity are greater risk factors for HIV-risk sexual behavior than lifetime abuse histories among persons who have substance use disorders.

  14. Aggressive behavior of children exposed to intimate partner violence: an examination of maternal mental health, maternal warmth and child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Megan R

    2013-08-01

    Over 4.5 million children each year are exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). Furthermore, IPV rarely occurs without other forms of violence and aggression in the home. IPV is associated with mental health and parenting problems in mothers, and children experience a wide variety of short-term social adjustment and emotional difficulties, including behavioral problems. The current study investigated the influence of IPV exposure on children's aggressive behavior, and tested if this relation was mediated by poor maternal mental health, and, in turn, by maternal warmth and child maltreatment, and moderated by children's age and gender. Study findings highlight the indirect consequences of IPV in the home on children's aggressive behavior. Secondary data analysis using structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted with the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). Children were between the ages of 3-8 (n = 1,161). Mothers reported past year frequency of phsycial assualt by their partner, frequency of child psychological and physical abuse, maternal mental health, and children's aggressive behavior problems. Maternal warmth was measured by observation. IPV was significantly related to poor maternal mental health. Poor maternal mental health was associated with more child aggressive behavior, lower maternal warmth, and more frequent child physical and psychological abuse. Psychological abuse and low maternal warmth were directly related to more aggressive behavior while IPV exposure and physical abuse were not directly associated with aggressive behavior. Neither age nor gender moderated the modeled paths. Expanding knowledge about child outcomes is especially critical for children who were involved in investigations of child maltreatment by child protective services (CPS) in order to identify relevant risk factors that can lead to interventions. The results identified maternal mental health as an important variable in mediating the

  15. An Examination of the Effects of Children's Gender and Behavioral Problems on the Quality of Teacher-Children Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to examine and provide exploratory findings regarding the effects of child gender, gender socialization perspective, and child behavioral problems (i.e., internalizing and externalizing) on the quality of teacher-child relationship. Gender socialization perspective posits that girls tend to be more develop relationships…

  16. A Longitudinal Examination of Coach and Peer Motivational Climates in Youth Sport: Implications for Moral Attitudes, Well-Being, and Behavioral Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, Nikos; Taylor, Ian M.; Thogersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    Embedded in achievement goal theory (Ames, 1992; Meece, Anderman, & Anderman, 2006), this study examined how perceptions of coach and peer motivational climate in youth sport predicted moral attitudes, emotional well-being, and indices of behavioral investment in a sample of British adolescents competing in regional leagues. We adopted a…

  17. An Examination of Some Behavioral Correlates of Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training through the Use of the Porter and Lawler Performance/Satisfaction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, David P.

    The study tested the applicability of portions of the Porter and Lawler model in a cognitive training environment and examined the relationships among some behavioral variables in Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training. The variables analyzed were the Maslow need hierarchy, effort, abilities, role perceptions, performance, satisfaction and the…

  18. Maternal Control Behavior and Locus of Control: Examining Mechanisms in the Relation between Maternal Anxiety Disorders and Anxiety Symptomatology in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Domingues, Janine; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    This study tested components of a proposed model of child anxiety and examined the mediational roles of (1) maternal control behavior, (2) maternal external locus of control, and (3) child external locus of control in the association between maternal and child anxiety. Thirty-eight clinically anxious mothers and 37 nonanxious mothers participated…

  19. Teens and Their Parents in the 21st Century: An Examination of Trends in Teen Behavior and the Role of Parental Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Economic Advisers, Washington, DC.

    This report by the Council of Economic Advisers analyzes key trends in teen behavior, and investigates the role of parents' involvement in their teenagers' lives. The report uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a study of a nationally representative sample of seventh through twelfth graders, to examine the…

  20. Improve Knowledge, Beliefs and Behavior of Undergraduate Female Nursing Students in Al-Alzhar University toward Breast Self-Examination Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohsen, Afaf S. Abd; El-Maksoud, Mona M. Abd

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a public health problem that is most common form of cancer among females in both developed and developing world, The Health Belief Model (HBM) has been used as a theoretical framework to study Breast Self-Examination and other breast cancer detection behaviors. The aim of this study: Was to improve knowledge, beliefs and behavior…

  1. Using Social Modeling to Inform Community College Student Behavior: A Case Study Examining Embedded Interventions in a Basic Skills Math Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito-Noy, Celia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of students enrolled in a basic skills math class at a California community college and the role of the peer model in informing their college-going behaviors. There is significant interest in increasing the number of students who complete basic skills courses and make progress towards a…

  2. What We Can Learn from the Data: A Multiple-Case Study Examining Behavior Patterns by Students with Different Characteristics in Using a Serious Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Lee, Jaejin; Kang, Jina; Liu, Sa

    2016-01-01

    Using a multi-case approach, we examined students' behavior patterns in interacting with a serious game environment using the emerging technologies of learning analytics and data visualization in order to understand how the patterns may vary according to students' learning characteristics. The results confirmed some preliminary findings from our…

  3. Examining the Intention to Use Technology among Pre-Service Teachers: An Integration of the Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' self-reported intention to use technology. One hundred fifty-seven participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to six constructs from a research model that integrated the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Structural equation modeling was…

  4. An Examination of Successful Leadership Behaviors Exhibited by Middle School Principals in Stimulating and Sustaining African-American Students' Achievement on the California Standards Test in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine leadership behaviors of middle school principals who have been successful in stimulating and sustaining African-American students' mathematics achievement on the California Standards Test. Specifically, this research sought to answer the following questions: 1) How do middle school principal…

  5. Measuring parent attributes and supervision behaviors relevant to child injury risk: examining the usefulness of questionnaire measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, B A; House, K

    2004-04-01

    This study aimed to identify self report questionnaire measures of parent attributes and behaviors that have relevance for understanding injury risk among children 2-5 years of age, and test a new Parent Supervision Attributes Profile Questionnaire (PSAPQ) that was developed to measure aspects of protectiveness and parent supervision. Naturalistic observations were conducted of parents' supervision of children on playgrounds, with questionnaires subsequently completed by the parent to measure parent education, family income, parent personality attributes, attributes relevant to parent supervision, and beliefs about parents' control over the child's health status. These measures were then related to children's risk taking and injury history. Visual supervision, auditory supervision, and physical proximity were highly intercorrelated, indicating that parents employed all types of behaviors in service of supervision, rather than relying predominantly on one type of supervisory behavior. Physical proximity was the only aspect of supervision behavior that served a protective function and related to children's risk taking behaviors: parents who remained close to their children had children who engaged in less risk taking. On questionnaires, parents who reported more conscientiousness, protectiveness, worry about safety, vigilance in supervision, confidence in their ability to keep their child safe, and belief in control over their child's health had children who showed less risk taking and/or experienced fewer injuries. The new PSAPQ measure was associated with specific aspects of supervision as well as children's risk taking and injury history. This study reveals several parent attributes and behaviors with relevance for child injury risk that can be measured via self report questionnaires, including the new PSAPQ.

  6. The Good Behavior Game Is No Longer Just an Effective Intervention for Students: An Examination of the Reciprocal Effects on Teacher Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elswick, Susan; Casey, Laura Baylot

    2011-01-01

    Positive educational outcomes often include success in reading, math, and writing, which are beneficial skills that will assist students in school and beyond. However, in education it is important that the classroom focus not only on subject and content-specific learning, but also on behavior and societal expectations for following rules. When…

  7. Parenting Specificity: An Examination of the Relation between Three Parenting Behaviors and Child Problem Behaviors in the Context of a History of Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Rakow, Aaron; Reeslund, Kristen; Roland, Erin; Hardcastle, Emily; Compas, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the relations between three specific parenting behaviors (warmth, monitoring, and discipline) and two child outcomes (internalizing and externalizing problems) within the context of parental depression. Using an approach recommended by A. Caron, B. Weiss, V. Harris, and T. Carron (2006),…

  8. How wilderness therapy works: an examination of the wilderness therapy process to treat adolescents with behavioral problems and addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith C. Russell; John C. Hendee; Dianne Phillips-Miller

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes findings from a detailed study of the processes employed by four leading wilderness therapy programs focusing on how wilderness therapy works, the kinds of behavioral problems to which it is commonly applied, expected outcomes and the role of wilderness in the intervention and treatment process (Russell, 1999). Wilderness therapy is an emerging...

  9. Examining the relation between the therapeutic alliance, treatment adherence, and outcome of cognitive behavioral therapy for children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liber, J.M.; McLeod, B.D.; van Widenfelt, B.M.; Goedhart, A.W.; van der Leeden, A.J.M.; Utens, E.M.W.J.; Treffers, P.D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the contribution of technical and relational factors to child outcomes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety disorders. This study investigated the association between treatment adherence, the child-therapist alliance, and child clinical outcomes in

  10. An Examination of the Relationships between Ego Development, Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration, and the Behavioral Characteristics of Gifted Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Carrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Literature exploring the experiences of gifted individuals has often focused on asynchronous development, particularly during childhood and adolescence. Also discussed in the literature are the unique social, emotional, and behavioral characteristics associated with giftedness. However, there is still an unclear picture concerning the implications…

  11. Examining Culture's Impact on the Learning Behaviors of International Students from Confucius Culture Studying in Western Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of shared understanding of how culture impacts learning in online environment. Utilizing document analysis, the authors in this research study culture's impact on the learning behaviors of student sojourners from Confucius culture studying in Western online learning context. The shared understandings of Confucius culture and…

  12. Examining the Relation between the Therapeutic Alliance, Treatment Adherence, and Outcome of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Juliette M.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Goedhart, Arnold W.; van der Leeden, Adelinde J. M.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Treffers, Philip D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the contribution of technical and relational factors to child outcomes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with anxiety disorders. This study investigated the association between treatment adherence, the child-therapist alliance, and child clinical outcomes in manual-guided individual- and group-based CBT for…

  13. Examining Structural Relationships between Work Engagement, Organizational Procedural Justice, Knowledge Sharing, and Innovative Work Behavior for Sustainable Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woocheol Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of the human/social dimension of organizational sustainability, this area of scholastic endeavor has received relatively little attention when compared to the economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. On the basis of social exchange theory, this study posited the important role that employee work engagement is a key component for improving human performance for organizational sustainability. In order to do so, it suggests the important role that employee work engagement has on the relationships among various factors in the organization, including organizational procedural justice, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behaviors. A total of 400 complete responses from full-time employees in Korean organizations were used for the purpose of data analysis with structural equation modeling (SEM. The results demonstrated that organizational procedural justice is positively related with employee work engagement, knowledge sharing, and innovative work behavior. In addition, work engagement enhances employee knowledge sharing and innovative work behavior, and knowledge sharing enhances innovative work behavior. With regard to the mechanisms of these relationships, work engagement and knowledge sharing acted as significant mediators. Based on the findings, we suggested relevant research implications and recommendations for future research on sustainable organizations.

  14. Sex Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Examination of Developmental Functioning, Autistic Symptoms, and Coexisting Behavior Problems in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Sikora, Darryn M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the female presentation of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during early childhood. We investigated sex differences in developmental profiles using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, autistic symptoms on the ADOS-G, and coexisting behavior problems on the CBCL in 157 boys and 42 girls with ASD aged 1.5-3.9 years. Overall,…

  15. Early Disparities in Mathematics Gains among Poor and Non-Poor Children: Examining the Role of Behavioral Engagement in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to investigate the relationship between poverty status, mathematics achievement gains, and behavioral engagement in learning over kindergarten. Data included information on 11,680 poor, low-income, and non-poor kindergartners from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). Results…

  16. Examining the Effects of Displaying Clicker Voting Results on High School Students' Voting Behaviors, Discussion Processes, and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Ta; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Li, Tsung-Yen; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between students' clicking behaviors, discussion processes, learning outcomes, and a prominent feature of clicker systems--the whole class' response results aggregated by clickers in real time. The results indicate that, while teaching Newton's laws of motion, displaying the real-time responses of the whole…

  17. An Examination of Specific Child Behavior Problems as Predictors of Parenting Stress among Families of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allyson L.; Neece, Cameron L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have shown that parents of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) exhibit higher levels of stress than parents of typically developing children or children with other types of developmental delays (DD). This relationship appears to be mediated by elevated levels of behavior problems observed in children with…

  18. An Examination of the Effects of School-Based Varsity Sport Participation and Parental Involvement on Male Academic Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Simone Travis; Braddock, Jomills Henry, II; Dawkins, Marvin P.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002), we developed and empirically tested a conceptual model to assess the longitudinal impact of school-based athletic participation and parental involvement, along with other factors, on the college-bound behaviors of male high school seniors attending public schools in the U.S. The…

  19. Examination of pharmacists' intention to report serious adverse drug events (ADEs) to the FDA using the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaza, Paul; Brown, Carolyn M; Lawson, Kenneth A; Rascati, Karen L; Wilson, James P; Steinhardt, Mary

    2011-12-01

    Adverse drug event (ADE) reporting by pharmacists is an indispensable part of the drug safety system. U.S. pharmacists may submit reports of serious ADEs that they encounter to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through MedWatch. However, underreporting of serious ADEs is a common problem. Little is known about pharmacists' decision making with respect to ADE reporting. This study explored the utility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) model in predicting Texas pharmacists' intention to report serious ADEs to the FDA. Data were collected from practicing Texas pharmacists using a mail questionnaire. A total of 1500 surveys were mailed, and 377 usable responses were obtained for a response rate of 26.4%. A majority (70.2%) of the 377 respondents were white/Caucasian, and 52.9% were male. Overall, pharmacists intended to report serious ADEs (mean=15.87±4.22; possible range: 3-21), had a positive attitude toward reporting (mean=4.62±4.92; possible range: -15 to +15), perceived that important others wanted them to report (subjective norm [SN] score=5.65±2.99; possible range: -9 to +9), and believed that they had control over their reporting behavior (perceived behavioral control [PBC] score=3.54±2.69; possible/actual range: -6 to +6). Attitude (β=0.221, P.05) did not. Attitude, SN, and PBC together accounted for 34.0% of the variance in intention to report serious ADEs (Preporting behavior (P=.021) and perceived moral obligation (Preport serious ADEs to the FDA. Strategies to increase pharmacists' intentions to report serious ADEs should focus on helping them see the value of reporting and altering their perception of social pressure toward reporting. The TPB may have utility in predicting ADE-reporting behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting user adherence to behavioral eHealth interventions in the real world: examining which aspects of intervention design matter most.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumel, Amit; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2018-02-17

    Existing frameworks have identified a range of intervention design features that may facilitate adherence to eHealth interventions; however, empirical data are lacking on whether intervention design features can predict user adherence in the real world-where the public access available tools-and whether some design aspects of behavioral eHealth interventions are more important than others in predicting adherence. This study examined whether intervention design qualities predict user adherence to behavioral eHealth interventions in real-world use and which qualities matter the most. We correlated the online activities of users of 30 web-based behavioral interventions-collected from a proprietary data set of anonymized logs from consenting users of Microsoft Internet Explorer add-on-with interventions' quality ratings obtained by trained raters prior to empirical examination. The quality ratings included: Usability, Visual Design, User Engagement, Content, Therapeutic Persuasiveness (i.e., persuasive design and incorporation of behavior change techniques), and Therapeutic Alliance. We found Therapeutic Persuasiveness (i.e., the incorporation of persuasive design/behavior change principles) to be the most robust predictor of adherence (i.e., duration of use, number of unique sessions; 40 ≤ rs ≤ .58, ps ≤ .005), explaining 42% of the variance in user adherence in our regression model. Results indicated up to six times difference in the percentage of users utilizing the interventions for more than a minimum amount of time and sessions based on Therapeutic Persuasiveness. Findings suggest the importance of persuasive design and behavior change techniques incorporation during the design and evaluation of digital behavioral interventions.

  1. Putting the "You" in "Thank You": Examining Other-Praising Behavior as the Active Relational Ingredient in Expressed Gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algoe, Sara B; Kurtz, Laura E; Hilaire, Nicole M

    2016-09-01

    Although positive emotions as a class can build interpersonal resources, recent evidence suggests a unique and direct role for gratitude. In the current research, we shine the spotlight on what happens between a grateful person and the benefactor to illuminate what can build a bridge between them. Specifically, we draw on work calling gratitude an "other-praising" emotion. In an original study and a conceptual replication that included two independent samples, couples had video-recorded conversations in which one member expressed gratitude to the other ( n = 370). Expresser's other-praising behavior was robustly positively associated with the benefactor's postinteraction perception of expresser responsiveness, personal good feelings in general, and felt loving in particular. Several practical and theoretical alternative explanations are ruled out. By clarifying the specific behavioral and subjective psychological mechanisms through which expressed gratitude promotes relationships, this work advances affective and relationship science, two domains that cut across disciplines within psychology.

  2. Can personality close the intention-behavior gap for healthy eating? An examination with the HEXACO personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monds, Lauren A; MacCann, Carolyn; Mullan, Barbara A; Wong, Cara; Todd, Jemma; Roberts, Richard D

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive and moderating effects of HEXACO personality factors, in addition to theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables, on fruit and vegetable consumption. American college students (N = 1036) from 24 institutions were administered the TPB, HEXACO and a self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption measure. The TPB predicted 11-17% of variance in fruit and vegetable consumption, with greater variance accounted for in healthy weight compared to overweight individuals. Personality did not significantly improve the prediction of behavior above TPB constructs; however, conscientiousness was a significant incremental predictor of intention in both healthy weight and overweight/obese groups. While support was found for the TPB as an important predictor of fruit and vegetable consumption in students, little support was found for personality factors. Such findings have implications for interventions designed to target students at risk of chronic disease.

  3. An examination of the relationships among uncertainty, appraisal, and information-seeking behavior proposed in uncertainty management theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Stephen A; Tukachinsky, Riva

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty management theory (UMT; Brashers, 2001, 2007) is rooted in the assumption that, as opposed to being inherently negative, health-related uncertainty is appraised for its meaning. Appraisals influence subsequent behaviors intended to manage uncertainty, such as information seeking. This study explores the connections among uncertainty, appraisal, and information-seeking behavior proposed in UMT. A laboratory study was conducted in which participants (N = 157) were primed to feel and desire more or less uncertainty about skin cancer and were given the opportunity to search for skin cancer information using the World Wide Web. The results show that desired uncertainty level predicted appraisal intensity, and appraisal intensity predicted information-seeking depth-although the latter relationship was in the opposite direction of what was expected.

  4. Are Negative Peer Influences Domain Specific? Examining the Influence of Peers and Parents on Externalizing and Drug Use Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ronald B; Criss, Michael M; Harrist, Amanda W; Zapata-Roblyer, Martha

    2017-10-01

    Most studies tend to characterize peer influences as either positive or negative. In a sample of 1815 youth from 14 different schools in Caracas, Venezuela, we explored how two types of peer affiliations (i.e., deviant and drug-using peers) differentially mediated the paths from positive parenting to youth's externalizing behavior and licit and illicit drug use. We used Zero Inflated Poisson models to test the probability of use and the extent of use during the past 12 months. Results suggested that peer influences are domain specific among Venezuelan youth. That is, deviant peer affiliations mediated the path from positive parenting to youth externalizing behaviors, and peer drug-using affiliations mediated the paths to the drug use outcomes. Mediation effects were partial, suggesting that parenting explained unique variance in the outcomes after accounting for both peer variables, gender, and age. We discuss implications for the development of screening tools and for prevention interventions targeting adolescents from different cultures.

  5. [Educational effectiveness of a group health education program in the workplace and an examination of educational methods to promote behavior modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Makoto; Odagiri, Keiichi; Suzuki, Naoko; Honda, Kumiko; Onoue, Kazue; Yamamoto, Makoto; Mizuta, Isagi; Uehara, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that health education programs carried out in the work place are useful for employees' health promotion. However, the effectiveness of group health education programs for workers as a population approach is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a group health education program in the workplace, and to investigate educational methods which support workers modifying their health behaviors. A total of 289 workers who received a group health education program in the manufacturing industry (mean age, 42.1 ± 11.3 years old; 175 males and 114 females) were enrolled in this study. The group health education program was carried out to educate the subjects about periodontitis, oral health actions and lifestyle behaviors to prevent oral diseases. Participants were required to fill out a self-administered questionnaire which included information about oral health knowledge, oral health actions, lifestyle behaviors and symptoms of periodontitis before, immediately after and one month after the education. We used McNemar's test for the paired comparison of questionnaire responses. The relation between acquiring knowledge about periodontitis and subjects' modification of oral health action, behavior modification and symptoms of periodontitis were examined using the chi-squared test. The relationships of knowledge retention about periodontitis, the modification of the oral health actions and lifestyle behaviors (i.e., cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and eating between meals), were examined with participants' characteristics (i.e., age, gender and occupational category) using Fisher's exact test. Knowledge about periodontitis significantly improved immediately after receiving the health education, and this effect of education was evident one month later. However, not all of the knowledge was sufficiently retained one month after the education session. The proportion of participants undertaking desirable oral health actions

  6. Development and Empirical Examination of a Management/Behavioral Model Depicting William G. Ouchi’s Theory Z Management Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    which you have seen your organizacion demonstrate a concern for tie velfare of its enployees. For example: If your orgarization appecred "flexible... Psychological Reports, 1977, 40, 75-80. Davis, K. Human behavior at work, 5th ed. New York: McGraw- Hill, 1977. Deutsch, C.C. Trust: the new...personal effectiveness in the work environment. Psychological Reports, 1977, 40, 454. Hulin, C.L., & Smith, P.C. A linear model of job satisfaction

  7. Pathways from maternal distress and child problem behavior to adolescent depressive symptoms: a prospective examination from early childhood to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Wendy; Gustavson, Kristin; Røysamb, Espen; Kjeldsen, Anne; Karevold, Evalill

    2013-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify the pathways from maternal distress and child problem behaviors (i.e., internalizing and externalizing problems) across childhood and their impact on depressive symptoms during adolescence among girls and boys. Data from families of 921 Norwegian children in a 15-year longitudinal community sample were used. Using structural equation modeling, the authors explored the interplay between maternal-reported distress and child problem behaviors measured at 5 time points from early (ages 1.5, 2.5, and 4.5 years) and middle (age 8.5 years) childhood to early adolescence (age 12.5 years), and their prediction of self-reported depressive symptoms during adolescence (ages 14.5 and 16.5 years). The findings revealed paths from internalizing and externalizing problems throughout the development for corresponding problems (homotypic paths) and paths from early externalizing to subsequent internalizing problems (heterotypic paths). The findings suggest 2 pathways linking maternal-rated risk factors to self-reported adolescent depressive symptoms. There was a direct path from early externalizing problems to depressive symptoms. There was an indirect path from early maternal distress going through child problem behavior to depressive symptoms. In general, girls and boys were similar, but some gender-specific effects appeared. Problem behaviors in middle childhood had heterotypic paths to subsequent problems only for girls. The findings highlight the developmental importance of child externalizing problems, as well as the impact of maternal distress as early as age 1.5 years for the development of adolescent depressive symptoms. Findings also indicate a certain vulnerable period in middle childhood for girls. NOTE: See Supplemental Digital Content 1, at http://links.lww.com/JDBP/A45, for a video introduction to this article.

  8. Examining the Efficacy of a Brief Group Protective Behavioral Strategies Skills Training Alcohol Intervention With College Women

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Shannon R.; Napper, Lucy E.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Martens, Matthew. P.

    2014-01-01

    College students’ use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS; e.g., determining not to exceed a set number of drinks, avoiding drinking games) is related to lower levels of alcohol consumption and problems. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a novel brief, single-session group PBS skills training intervention aimed at increasing college students’ use of PBS and reducing risky drinking and consequences. Participants (N = 226) were heavy-drinking incoming first-year college women ran...

  9. An application of the theory of planned behavior to examine the impact of classroom inclusion on elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Classroom inclusion serves as the most discussed service delivery model in the debate over the most appropriate way to provide education for students with disabilities. Integrating students with disabilities with nondisabled peers may increase attitudes of acceptance, but the literature also indicates that placement alone does not yield an increase in interaction between these two groups of peers (Brinker & Thorpe, 1986; Fryexe & Kennedy, 1995; Kennedy, Shulka, & Fryxell, 1997). This study investigated the impact of classroom inclusion on nondisabled students. Using survey research methods and guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior (Aizen, I. [1985]. From intentions to actions: A theory of planned behavior. In J. Kuhl & J. Beckman [Eds.], Action-control: From cognition to behavior [pp. 11-39]. Heidelberg: Springer), 593 responses were obtained from a convenience sample of 936 third, fourth, and fifth grade students and their parents from 52 classrooms spread across six different schools. Survey results were also collected from these students' parents and their teachers and used to add a richer depth to the data analysis. Implications for policy and practice are drawn. Limitations and recommendations for future research are also indicated.

  10. Goal setting as a health behavior change strategy in overweight and obese adults: a systematic literature review examining intervention components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erin S

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes goal setting components used for behavior change specific to diet and physical activity in community-based interventions targeting overweight and obese adults. A systematic literature review was conducted. Studies were evaluated using the S.T.A.R.T. (Specificity, Timing, Acquisition, Rewards and feedback, and Tools) criteria which were developed for the purposes of this paper in order to elucidate which intervention features elicit optimal health behavior outcomes. Eighteen studies were included. Based on the S.T.A.R.T. criteria, it was determined that developing specific goals that are in close proximity, involve the participant in acquisition, and incorporate regular feedback, are common features in this context. Goal setting can be useful for effecting health behavior changes in this population. However, as different intervention components were often implemented concurrently (e.g., education sessions, self-monitoring records), it was not possible to ascertain which were responsible for positive changes independently. Goal setting shows promise as a tool that can be incorporated into weight reduction programs by health care professionals and researchers. Studies are warranted to identify the specific mechanisms through which individuals with overweight or obesity can apply the S.T.A.R.T. criteria with respect to goal setting for the purposes of weight loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Associations between young adult romantic relationship quality and problem behaviors : An examination of personality-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Meeus, W.H.J.

    This longitudinal study examined person–environment interplay by testing interaction effects between adolescent personality type (i.e., overcontrollers, undercontrollers, and resilients) and young adult romantic relationship quality on young adult delinquency and anxiety. The study employed six

  12. Growth of ZnSe(1-x)Tex epilayers by isothermal closed space sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larramendi, Erick M.; Gutiérrez Z-B, Karla; Arens, Christof; Woggon, Ulrike; Schikora, Detlef; Lischka, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    ZnSe(1-x)Tex (x ˜0.06) epilayers were grown on GaAs(001) substrates at 350 °C by isothermal closed space sublimation (ICSS) technique. The epitaxial growth was performed in low-pressure helium atmosphere (˜0.1 mbar) by sequential exposures of the substrate to vapors of a solid solution of selenium-tellurium and elemental zinc. The use of a mixed source is proposed in order to regulate the partial vapor pressure of the constituents by composition. Strain and composition of the ZnSe(1-x)Tex epilayers were extracted from high resolution x-ray reciprocal space mapping. Structural investigations show a reasonably good crystalline quality of the epilayers. Good reproducibility of composition and control of thickness were obtained although atomic layer epitaxy regimen was not achieved. A growth rate of 1.3 monolayers/cycle was ascribed to multilayer adsorption and the existence of an efficient transport of SeTe in graphite under thermodynamic conditions of ICSS. Both Raman and photoluminescence characterizations suggest the existence of random alloy epilayers with larger composition disorder in the mesoscopic scale than those obtained by molecular beam epitaxy.

  13. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drifting snow sublimation (DSS is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass–energy balance of snow cover.

  14. Ag doped ZnTe films prepared by closed space sublimation and an ion exchange process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqili, Akram K.S., E-mail: akramaq@hu.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); Saleh, Ahmad J. [Department of Physics, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); Ali, Zulfiqar [Optics Laboratories, Islamabad (Pakistan); Al-Omari, S. [Department of Physics, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnTe thin films are prepared by low-cost simple technique (CSS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver doping is achieved by an ion exchange process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small peaks appear in the XRD diffraction pattern related to Ag{sub 2}Te. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of the films refractive index and shift of optical band was observed. - Abstract: ZnTe thin films were deposited by closed space sublimation (CSS) technique on amorphous glass substrate. The deposited films were immersed in AgNO{sub 3} solution for different time periods, then heated in vacuum. The resistivity of the film, immersed for 30 min, was reduced by less than six orders of magnitudes. The films structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to detect the surface morphology of the films. The films thickness, the optical properties, such as refractive index, absorption coefficient and the optical band gap were determined from transmittance spectra in the wavelength range of 400-2500 nm. The dark electrical conductivities of the films were studied as function of temperature to determine the conductivity activation energy.

  15. Modelling of the sublimation of icy grains in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Shi, X.; Sierks, H.; Rose, M.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.

    2015-10-01

    The ESA (European Space Agency) Rosetta spacecraft was launched on 2 March 2004, to reach comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. Since March 2014, images of the nucleus and the coma (gas and dust) of the comet have been acquired by the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) camera system [1] using both, the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The orbiter will be maintained in the vicinity of the comet until perihelion (Rh=1.3 AU) or even until Rh=1.8 AU post-perihelion (December 2015). Nineteen months of uninterrupted, close-up observations of the gas and dust coma will be obtained and will help to characterize the evolution of comet gas and dust activity during its approach to the Sun. Indeed, for the first time, we will follow the development of a comet's coma from a close distance. Also the study of the dust-gas interaction in the coma will highlight the sublimation of icy grains. Even if the sublimation of icy grains is known, it is not yet integrated in a complete dust-gas model. We are using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study the gas flow close to the nucleus. The code called PI-DSMC (www.pidsmc. com) can simulate millions of molecules for multiple species.When the gas flow is simulated, we inject the dust particle with a zero velocity and we take into account the 3 forces acting on the grains in a cometary environment (drag force, gravity and radiative pressure). We used the DLL (Dynamic Link Library) model to integrate the sublimation of icy grains in the gas flowand allow studying the effect of the additional gas on the dust particle trajectories. For a quantitative analysis of the sublimation of icy, outflowing grains we will consider an ensemble of grains of various radii with different compositions [2] The evolution of the grains, once they are ejected into the coma, depends on their initial size, their composition and the heliocentric distance (because the temperature of

  16. Behaviorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, J

    2011-01-01

    .... Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the observational methods common to all sciences...

  17. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Virginia pharmacists' intention to utilize a prescription drug monitoring program using the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaza, Paul; Fleming, Marc; Barner, Jamie C

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the main drivers of pharmacists' intention to utilize prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) when making care decisions and the actual contribution of these factors in explaining intention and behavior. This study examined what theory of planned behavior (TPB) model constructs (i.e., attitude, subjective norm [SN], perceived behavioral control [PBC]), past utilization behavior (PUB) and perceived moral obligation (PMO) were significant predictors of Virginia community pharmacists' intention to utilize a PDMP. A cover letter with a link to a 28-item online survey was e-mailed to 600 members of the Virginia Pharmacists Association. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine the association between pharmacists' intention to utilize the PDMP database and attitude, SN, PBC, PUB and PMO. Ninety-seven usable responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. A majority of the respondents were Caucasian (96.4%), female (50.5%), working in independent community pharmacies (60.4%) with an average age of 49.5 ± 13.4 years. Overall, pharmacists intended to utilize a PDMP (mean = 5.3 ± 4.6; possible range: -9 to 9), had a positive attitude toward utilizing PDMP (mean = 6.3 ± 5.3; possible range: -12 to 12), perceived that others wanted them to utilize a PDMP (SN score = 3.7 ± 2.4; range: -6 to 6), and believed that they had control over utilization behavior (PBC score = 4.5 ± 4.0; range: -9 to 9). Attitude (β = 0.723, P behavioral control and perceived moral obligation were significant predictors of intention but past utilization behavior was not. The TPB is a useful theoretical framework when predicting PDMP utilization behavior of community pharmacists, accounting for 56.7% of the variance in intention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of Monolithic Fe2O3-Al2O3 Composite Aerogels via Organic Solvent Sublimation Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic Fe2O3-Al2O3 composite aerogels have been prepared successfully via organic solvent sublimation drying method. The results show that a new phase forms when the right amount of ferric oxide is added to the alumina aerogel. From the TEM pictures we can see a shuttle-type structure with the length of about 15 nm forms, which leads to the high surface areas of composited aerogel.

  19. Relationship between Health-Seeking Behavior by Basic Health Examination and Subsequent Health Expenditure among Remote Island Inhabitants of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Aya; Myoga, Yoshinori; Osaki, Yoneatsu

    2014-09-01

    Convincing evidence has not been obtained as to whether having a basic health examination in the prime of life inhibits the surge of health expenditure in old age. Data on participants in the basic health examination from 1996 to 2000 among residents of a remote island in Japan, and individual health care expenditure data from March 2005 to February 2008. A community-based retrospective study. Japanese residents who were subscribers to the National Health Insurance Scheme of Chibu Town from March 1996 to March 2007 and were aged 40 to 64 years in March 1996 (n = 179) were divided into 3 groups depending on the frequency of participating in the basic health examination over 5 years: 0 times (nontakers), 1 to 3 times (occasional takers), or 4 to 5 times (regular takers). The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison. Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004). Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

  20. Trust Me, I'm a Doctor: Examining Changes in How Privacy Concerns Affect Patient Withholding Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M; Johnson, Tyler; Ford, Eric W; Huerta, Timothy R

    2017-01-04

    As electronic health records (EHRs) become ubiquitous in the health care industry, privacy breaches are increasing and being made public. These breaches may make consumers wary of the technology, undermining its potential to improve care coordination and research. Given the developing concerns around privacy of personal health information stored in digital format, it is important for providers to understand how views on privacy and security may be associated with patient disclosure of health information. This study aimed to understand how privacy concerns may be shifting patient behavior. Using a pooled cross-section of data from the 2011 and 2014 cycles of the Health Information and National Trends Survey (HINTS), we tested whether privacy and security concerns, as well as quality perceptions, are associated with the likelihood of withholding personal health information from a provider. A fully interacted multivariate model was used to compare associations between the 2 years, and interaction terms were used to evaluate trends in the factors that are associated with withholding behavior. No difference was found regarding the effect of privacy and security concerns on withholding behavior between 2011 and 2014. Similarly, whereas perceived high quality of care was found to reduce the likelihood of withholding information from a provider in both 2011 (odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.94) and 2014 (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48-0.76), no difference was observed between years. These findings suggest that consumers' beliefs about EHR privacy and security, the relationship between technology use and quality, and intentions to share information with their health care provider have not changed. These findings are counter to the ongoing discussions about the implications of security failures in other domains. Our results suggest that providers could ameliorate privacy and security by focusing on the care quality benefits EHRs provide.