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Sample records for sublethal damage repair

  1. [Repair mechanism of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongmin; Lv, Haipeng; Ai, Zhilu; Wang, Na; Xie, Xinhua; Fan, Huiping; Pan, Zhili; Suo, Biao

    2015-11-04

    To study the repair mechanisms of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aurous cells. We resuscitated frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus at 37 degrees C for different time within 3 h. Meanwhile, we compared the morphological changes of the frozen sublethally damaged cells after 1 h of resuscitation using transmission electron microscopy assay (TEM). The expressions of the transcriptional attenuator MsrR (msrR), iron (Fe3+) ABC transporter ATP-binding protein (fhuC), and cytochrome b (cytB) genes were quantitatively analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) method. The content of cells outside leakage, active oxygen (ROS), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. More than 99% of the frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus repaired after 3 h. The resuscitated cells expressed an equal resistance to high concentration of NaCl. Real-time PCR results showed that the msrR and fhuC genes expressions were down-regulated, whereas the cytB gene expression was up-regulated significantly. The frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus cellar surface ultrastructure significant changed during resuscitation. The cell surface became compact and sturdy from smooth and transparent. The cell leakage rate of ultraviolet absorption material gradually decreased. Meanwhile, the intracellular ROS level declined along with the decrease of SOD activity. Frozen sublethally damaged cells may regain the capability of resistance to high salt stress by repairing cell membrane integrity, reducing the content of ROS through gene regulation, inhibiting the toxicity of active oxygen to the cells. Meanwhile, the regulation of metabolism related genes (cytB) provides the energy for the requirement of cells, therefore, the frozen sublethally damaged cells were repaired finally.

  2. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

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    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35.

  3. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Sublethal gamma irradiation affects reproductive impairment and elevates antioxidant enzyme and DNA repair activities in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus

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    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • No mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). • A reduced fecundity of Brachionus koreanus at over 150 Gy with a decrease in lifespan. • Dose-dependent ROS increase with GST enzyme activity at sub-lethal doses. • Significant impact on life table parameters, particularly fecundity. • Significant up-regulation of DNA repair-associated genes at sublethal doses. - Abstract: To examine the effects of gamma radiation on marine organisms, we irradiated several doses of gamma ray to the microzooplankton Brachionus koreanus, and measured in vivo and in vitro endpoints including the survival rate, lifespan, fecundity, population growth, gamma ray-induced oxidative stress, and modulated patterns of enzyme activities and gene expressions after DNA damage. After gamma radiation, no individuals showed any mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). However, a reduced fecundity (e.g. cumulated number of offspring) of B. koreanus at over 150 Gy was observed along with a slight decrease in lifespan. At 150 Gy and 200 Gy, the reduced fecundity of the rotifers led to a significant decrease in population growth, although in the second generation the population growth pattern was not affected even at 200 Gy when compared to the control group. At sub-lethal doses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels dose-dependently increased with GST enzyme activity. In addition, up-regulations of the antioxidant and chaperoning genes in response to gamma radiation were able to recover cellular damages, and life table parameters were significantly influenced, particularly with regard to fecundity. DNA repair-associated genes showed significantly up-regulated expression patterns in response to sublethal doses (150 and 200 Gy), as shown in the expression of the gamma-irradiated B. koreanus p53 gene, suggesting that these sublethal doses were not significantly fatal to B. koreanus but induced DNA damages leading to a decrease of the population size.

  6. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  7. DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2017-01-01

     Oxygen- and nitrogen-derived reactive species are constantly generated inliving organisms by endogenous and exogenous sources. Reactions of reactivespecies such as free radicals with DNA cause the formation of multiplemutagenic and cytotoxic lesions, leading to genetic instability, which is ahallmark of cancer. DNA repair mechanisms exist in living organisms to repairDNA lesions. Most effective cancer treatments work by causing DNA damage inmalignant tumors. Just like in normal cell...

  8. The repair mechanism for radiation damages by inorganic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Izumo, Yoshiro [Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiological Health

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies of the authors showed that the death rate for mice after radiation exposure at a sub-lethal dose was significantly decreased by administration of a large amount of inorganic element such as Zn, Co, Mn, Mg, etc. Here, the cellular metabolism of Co element was investigated to elucidate the mechanism of such repair of radiation damages. The incorporation of {sup 57}-Co into the mouse spleen and bone marrow cells in vitro exposed to X-ray was compared to that into both cells from the mouse in vivo exposed to X-ray. The administration of Co carrier into the cells from unexposed mice increased the incorporation of Co into these cells and there were no differences in Co-incorporation between the cells exposed to radiation in vitro and in vivo. The Co-incorporation into the bone marrow cells was dose-dependently increased by either of in vitro and in vivo exposure, suggesting that there exists some cellular defense mechanism. For in vivo exposure, the amount of Co incorporation and also DNA synthesizing activity in spleen and bone marrow cells both decreased as increasing the amount of Co subcutaneously injected, but not given to the culture medium. To clarify cellular distribution of Co incorporated, the cells suspension was homogenized and centrifuged for cell fractionation. About 80% of incorporated Co was found in the cytoplasmic fraction and the other was in the membrane fraction, suggesting that Co element might be incorporated into some cellular components. (M.N.)

  9. Metabolite damage and repair in metabolic engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiayi; Jeffryes, James G; Henry, Christopher S; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    The necessarily sharp focus of metabolic engineering and metabolic synthetic biology on pathways and their fluxes has tended to divert attention from the damaging enzymatic and chemical side-reactions that pathway metabolites can undergo. Although historically overlooked and underappreciated, such metabolite damage reactions are now known to occur throughout metabolism and to generate (formerly enigmatic) peaks detected in metabolomics datasets. It is also now known that metabolite damage is often countered by dedicated repair enzymes that undo or prevent it. Metabolite damage and repair are highly relevant to engineered pathway design: metabolite damage reactions can reduce flux rates and product yields, and repair enzymes can provide robust, host-independent solutions. Herein, after introducing the core principles of metabolite damage and repair, we use case histories to document how damage and repair processes affect efficient operation of engineered pathways - particularly those that are heterologous, non-natural, or cell-free. We then review how metabolite damage reactions can be predicted, how repair reactions can be prospected, and how metabolite damage and repair can be built into genome-scale metabolic models. Lastly, we propose a versatile 'plug and play' set of well-characterized metabolite repair enzymes to solve metabolite damage problems known or likely to occur in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. All rights reserved.

  10. A progression of damage repair capability in self-repairing composites

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    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    This paper covers several projects in which the author sought to determine the extent of damage against which self repair would be effective. So far no limits have been reached beyond those of the fiber/matrix itself. Starting with repair of barely visible damage in airplane wings consisting of graphite fiber/resin matrix composites progression was next to self repair of ballistic damage to vinyl ester walls and epoxy resin walls and finally blast damage self repair of walls and then blast and ballistic damage were combined.

  11. Repair of damaged supraglottic airway devices: A novel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Dheeraj

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Damage of laryngeal mask airway and other supraglottic airway devices has always been a matter of concern. Although manufacturer recommends maximum 40 uses of LMA (and its congeners but damage before 40 uses needs to be evaluated. We hereby, describe a novel method of repair of supraglottic devices when damage occurs at mask inflation line or pilot balloon valve assembly.

  12. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs.

  13. Effect of sub-lethal damage to juvenile colonies of massive Porites spp. under contrasting regimes of temperature and water flow.

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    Edmunds, Peter J; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, juvenile colonies of massive Porites spp. (a combination of P. lutea and P. lobata) from the lagoon of Moorea (W 149°50', S 17°30') were damaged and exposed to contrasting conditions of temperature and flow to evaluate how damage and abiotic conditions interact to affect growth, physiological performance, and recovery. The experiment was conducted in April and May 2008 and consisted of two treatments in which corals were either undamaged (controls) or damaged through gouging of tissue and skeleton in a discrete spot mimicking the effects of corallivorous fishes that utilize an excavating feeding mode. The two groups of corals were incubated for 10 days in microcosms that crossed levels of temperature (26.7 and 29.6°C) and flow (6 and 21 cm s-1), and the response assessed as overall colony growth (change in weight), dark-adapted quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm), and healing of the gouged areas. The influence of damage on growth was affected by temperature, but not by flow. When averaged across flow treatments, damage promoted growth by 25% at 26.7°C, but caused a 25% inhibition at 29.6°C. The damage also affected Fv/Fm in a pattern that differed between flow speeds, with a 10% reduction at 6 cm s-1, but a 4% increase at 21 cm s-1. Regardless of damage, Fv/Fm at 21 cm s-1 was 11% lower at 26.7°C than at 29.6°C, but was unaffected by temperature at 6 cm s-1. The lesions declined in area at similar rates (4-5% day-1) under all conditions, although the tissue within them regained a normal appearance most rapidly at 26.7°C and 6 cm s-1. These findings show that the response of poritid corals to sub-lethal damage is dependent partly on abiotic conditions, and they are consistent with the hypothesis that following damage, calcification and photosynthesis can compete for metabolites necessary for repair, with the outcome affected by flow-mediated mass transfer. These results may shed light upon the ways in which poritid corals respond to

  14. DNA repair, damage signaling and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christophe; Salles, Bernard; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2008-04-02

    The First joint meeting of the German DGDR (German Society for Research on DNA Repair) and the French SFTG (French Society of Genotoxicology) on DNA Repair was held in Toulouse, France, from September 15 to 19, 2007. It was organized by Lisa Wiesmüller and Bernard Salles together with the scientific committee consisting of Gilbert de Murcia, Jean-Marc Egly, Frank Grosse, Karl-Peter Hopfner, Georges Iliakis, Bernd Kaina, Markus Löbrich, Bernard Lopez, Daniel Marzin and Alain Sarasin. This report summarizes information presented by the speakers (invited lectures and oral communications) during the seven plenary sessions, which include (1) excision repair, (2) DNA repair and carcinogenesis, (3) double-strand break repair, (4) replication in repair and lesion bypass, (5) cellular responses to genotoxic stress, (6) DNA repair machinery within the chromatin context and (7) genotoxicology and testing. A total of 23 plenary lectures, 32 oral communications and 66 posters were presented in this rather intense 4 days meeting, which stimulated extensive discussions and highly interdisciplinary scientific exchanges among the approximately 250 participants.

  15. Repair of DNA damage in light sensitive human skin diseases

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    Horkay, I.; Varga, L.; Tam' asi P., Gundy, S.

    1978-12-01

    Repair of uv-light induced DNA damage and changes in the semiconservative DNA synthesis were studied by in vitro autoradiography in the skin of patients with lightdermatoses (polymorphous light eruption, porphyria cutanea tarda, erythropoietic protoporphyria) and xeroderma pigmentosum as well as in that of healthy controls. In polymorphous light eruption the semiconservative DNA replication rate was more intensive in the area of the skin lesions and in the repeated phototest site, the excision repair synthesis appeared to be unaltered. In cutaneous prophyrias a decreased rate of the repair incorporation could be detected. Xeroderma pigmentosum was characterized by a strongly reduced repair synthesis.

  16. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced damage

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    Sutherland, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed which present three major new findings in the photobiology of skin. First, detectable numbers of dimers are formed even at sub-erythymal doses. Second, excision of dimers is much more rapid than would be predicted from results obtained in cell culture. Third, comparison of the rates of excision and photoreactivation in skin indicates that in normal sunlight exposure, photoreactivation may well be the predominant repair pathway in skin. (ACR)

  17. Repair of oxidatively generated DNA damage in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobta, Andriy; Epe, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Defects in the repair of endogenously (especially oxidatively) generated DNA modifications and the resulting genetic instability can potentially explain the clinical symptoms of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a hereditary disease characterized by developmental defects and neurological degeneration. In this review, we describe the evidence for the involvement of CSA and CSB proteins, which are mutated in most of the CS patients, in the repair and processing of DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species and the implications for the induction of cell death and mutations. Taken together, the data demonstrate that CSA and CSB, in addition to their established role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, can modulate the base excision repair (BER) of oxidized DNA bases both directly (by interaction with BER proteins) and indirectly (by modulating the expression of the DNA repair genes). Both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA repair is affected by mutations in CSA and CSB genes. However, the observed retardations of repair and the resulting accumulation of unrepaired endogenously generated DNA lesions are often mild, thus pointing to the relevance of additional roles of the CS proteins, e.g. in the mitochondrial response to oxidatively generated DNA damage and in the maintenance of gene transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Queueing models of potentially lethal damage repair in irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikova, E M; Rachev, S T; Yakovlev, A Y

    1996-07-01

    Some of the ideas arising in queueing theory are applied to describe the repair mechanisms responsible for recovery of cells from potentially lethal radiation damage. Two alternative versions are presented of a queueing model of damage repair after a single dose of irradiation. The first version represents a linear misrepair model, and the second invokes the idea of spontaneous lesion fixation. They are pieced together in the third model, allowing for both mechanisms. The consistency of the proposed models with published experimental data is tested.

  20. Repair of oxidative DNA damage and cancer: recent progress in DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Timothy L; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A; Izumi, Tadahide

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA damage causes transformation of cells, recent studies have revealed how the mitochondrial deficiencies and ROS generation alter cell growth during the cancer transformation. The emphasis of this review is to highlight the importance of the cellular response to oxidative DNA damage during carcinogenesis. Oxidative DNA damage, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, play an important role during the cellular transformation. It is also becoming apparent that the unusual activity and subcellular distribution of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, an essential DNA repair factor/redox sensor, affect cancer malignancy by increasing cellular resistance to oxidative stress and by positively influencing cell proliferation. Technological advancement in cancer cell biology and genetics has enabled us to monitor the detailed DNA repair activities in the microenvironment. Precise understanding of the intracellular activities of DNA repair proteins for oxidative DNA damage should provide help in understanding how mitochondria, ROS, DNA damage, and repair influence cancer transformation.

  1. Assembly of checkpoint and repair machineries at DNA damage sites

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    Huen, Michael S.Y.; Chen, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    The remarkably coordinated nature of the DNA damage response pathway relies on numerous mechanisms that facilitate the assembly of checkpoint and repair factors at DNA breaks. Post-translational modifications on and around chromatin play critical roles in allowing the timely and sequential assembly of DNA damage responsive elements at the vicinity of DNA breaks. Notably, recent advances in forward genetics and proteomics-based approaches have enabled the identification of novel components within the DNA damage response pathway, providing a more comprehensive picture of the molecular network that assists in the detection and propagation of DNA damage signals. PMID:19875294

  2. Oxidatively damaged DNA repair defect in cockayne syndrome and its complementation by heterologous repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosina, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (complementation groups A and B) is a rare autosomal recessive DNA repair disorder characterized by photosensitive skin and severely impaired physical and intellectual development. The Cockayne syndrome A and B proteins intervene in the repair of DNA modifications that block the RNA polymerase in transcribed DNA sequences (transcription-coupled repair). Recent results suggest that they also have a more general role in the repair of oxidative DNA base modifications. Although the phenotypical consequences of defective repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in Cockayne syndrome are not determined, accumulation of oxidized lesions might contribute to delay the physical and intellectual development of these patients. To conceive new therapeutic strategies for this syndrome, we are investigating whether the oxidatively damaged DNA repair defect in Cockayne syndrome might be complemented by heterologous repair proteins, such as the Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease III. The complementation studies may shed light on the important lesions for the Cockayne syndrome phenotype and offer new tools for future therapies aimed at counteracting the consequences of oxidatively damaged DNA accumulation.

  3. A Mathematical Model for DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Crooke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In cells, DNA repair has to keep up with DNA damage to maintain the integrity of the genome and prevent mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. While the importance of both DNA damage and repair is clear, the impact of imbalances between both processes has not been studied. In this paper, we created a combined mathematical model for the formation of DNA adducts from oxidative estrogen metabolism followed by base excision repair (BER of these adducts. The model encompasses a set of differential equations representing the sequence of enzymatic reactions in both damage and repair pathways. By combining both pathways, we can simulate the overall process by starting from a given time-dependent concentration of 17β-estradiol (E2 and 2′-deoxyguanosine, determine the extent of adduct formation and the correction by BER required to preserve the integrity of DNA. The model allows us to examine the effect of phenotypic and genotypic factors such as different concentrations of estrogen and variant enzyme haplotypes on the formation and repair of DNA adducts.

  4. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged and Repaired Runways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    second papier traite d’un modele mathematique qui peut tre utilise pour le calcul de la reponse dynamique des structures d’un avion operant sur des...for the dynamic qualification process of aircraft operation on damaged /repaired runways is in- dicated. LIST OF SYMBOLS A matrix of the factors of a

  5. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

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    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  6. CC3/TIP30 affects DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Frank

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pro-apoptotic protein CC3/TIP30 has an unusual cellular function as an inhibitor of nucleocytoplasmic transport. This function is likely to be activated under conditions of stress. A number of studies support the notion that CC3 acts as a tumor and metastasis suppressor in various types of cancer. The yeast homolog of CC3 is likely to be involved in responses to DNA damage. Here we examined the potential role of CC3 in regulation of cellular responses to genotoxic stress. Results We found that forced expression of CC3 in CC3-negative cells strongly delays the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Exogenously introduced CC3 negatively affects expression levels of DDB2/XPE and p21CIP1, and inhibits induction of c-FOS after UV exposure. In addition, exogenous CC3 prevents the nuclear accumulation of P21CIP in response to UV. These changes in the levels/localization of relevant proteins resulting from the enforced expression of CC3 are likely to contribute to the observed delay in DNA damage repair. Silencing of CC3 in CC3-positive cells has a modest delaying effect on repair of the UV induced damage, but has a much more significant negative affect on the translesion DNA synthesis after UV exposure. This could be related to the higher expression levels and increased nuclear localization of p21CIP1 in cells where expression of CC3 is silenced. Expression of CC3 also inhibits repair of oxidative DNA damage and leads to a decrease in levels of nucleoredoxin, that could contribute to the reduced viability of CC3 expressing cells after oxidative insult. Conclusions Manipulation of the cellular levels of CC3 alters expression levels and/or subcellular localization of proteins that exhibit nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. This results in altered responses to genotoxic stress and adversely affects DNA damage repair by affecting the recruitment of adequate amounts of required proteins to proper cellular compartments. Excess of cellular CC3 has

  7. DNA damage and repair in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szaflik, Jacek P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Janik-Papis, Katarzyna; Synowiec, Ewelina; Ksiazek, Dominika [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Zaras, Magdalena [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Szaflik, Jerzy [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw and Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Okulistyczny, Sierakowskiego 13, 03-710 Warsaw (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz, E-mail: januszb@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-10-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal degenerative disease that is the main cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 55 in the Western world. Clinically relevant AMD results from damage to the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells thought to be mainly caused by oxidative stress. The stress also affects the DNA of RPE cells, which promotes genome instability in these cells. These effects may coincide with the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair with age. Therefore individuals with DNA repair impaired more than average for a given age may be more susceptible to AMD if oxidative stress affects their RPE cells. This may be helpful in AMD risk assessment. In the present work we determined the level of basal (measured in the alkaline comet assay) endogenous and endogenous oxidative DNA damage, the susceptibility to exogenous mutagens and the efficacy of DNA repair in lymphocytes of 100 AMD patients and 110 age-matched individuals without visual disturbances. The cells taken from AMD patients displayed a higher extent of basal endogenous DNA damage without differences between patients of dry and wet forms of the disease. DNA double-strand breaks did not contribute to the observed DNA damage as checked by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The extent of oxidative modification to DNA bases was grater in AMD patients than in the controls, as probed by DNA repair enzymes NTH1 and Fpg. Lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation and repaired lesions induced by these factors less effectively than the cells from the control individuals. We postulate that the impaired efficacy of DNA repair may combine with enhanced sensitivity of RPE cells to blue and UV lights, contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  8. UV exposed electronically activated damage and photoreactivation repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, Bary

    2007-03-01

    An investigation of the possible physics underlying the damage caused to DNA by UV radiation and its subsequent repair via a photoreactivation mechanism is presented in this study. An electronic pathway starting from the initial damage to the final repair process is proposed. UV radiation is absorbed to create a hole-excited thymine or other pyrimidine that subsequently is responsible for the formation of the thymine dimer. The negative-ion of the cofactor riboflavin, FADH-, formed by the exposure of the photolyase protein to visible light interacts with the hole-excited electronic orbital of the thymine dimer inducing a photon-less Auger transition, which restores the two thymines to the ground state, thereby detaching the lesion and repairing the DNA. Due to energy balance, the process has to involve an electronic excited state (s). The mechanism involves the least amount of energy dissipation and is charge neutral. It also avoids radiation damage in the repair process, that is, is a radiationless process.

  9. Decreased repair of gamma damaged DNA in progeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M.

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive host-cell reactivation technique was used to examine the DNA repair ability of fibroblasts from two patients with classical progeria. Fibroblasts were infected with either non-irradiated or gamma-irradiated adenovirus type 2 and at 48 hrs after infection cells were examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. The production of viral structural antigens was considerably reduced in the progeria lines as compared to normal fibroblasts when gamma-irradiated virus was used, indicating a defect in the repair of gamma ray damaged DNA in the progeria cells.

  10. Structure-based insights into the repair of UV-damaged DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth Maria

    2012-01-01

    Repair of damage in the DNA is essential for an organism. Therefore, several repair mechanisms have evolved. In this thesis, the mechanism of Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) and the UV Damage Endonuclease repair pathway (UVDE) have been studied. Central to TC-NER is the

  11. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  12. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  13. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and Cancer: Recent Progress in DNA Base Excision Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Timothy L.; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A.; Izumi, Tadahide

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. Recent Advances: In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA dama...

  14. Simulation of Self-Repair Process of Steels Damaged by Creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Yutaka; Hirose, Satoshi

    The continuum damage mechanics is extended to cover the self-repair process as well as the damage process. The repair variable and its evolution equation are newly introduced to consider the repair process. In the constitutive modeling, the equation of creep based on kinematic/isotropic hardening theory is extended to take the effect of damage into account. The evolution equation of a repair variable is proposed, based on Dyson's equation of creep cavity growth. The validity of the proposed modeling is illustrated through the simulations for the self-repair process of two kinds of steels damaged by creep.

  15. Telomeric Allelic Imbalance Indicates Defective DNA Repair and Sensitivity to DNA-Damaging Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Kim, Ji-Young

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair competency is one determinant of sensitivity to certain chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin. Cancer cells with intact DNA repair can avoid the accumulation of genome damage during growth and also can repair platinum-induced DNA damage. We sought genomic signatures indicative of defec...

  16. Repair of impact damaged utility poles with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP), phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Vehicle collisions with steel or aluminum utility poles are common occurrences that yield substantial but often repairable : damage. This project investigates the use of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite system for in situ repair that : mini...

  17. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  18. Interplay between mechanisms of damage and repair in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    The neuropathology of multiple sclerosis is characterised by focal damage to white matter. However, tissue damage is also present in the cortical grey matter, with a particularly high prevalence of cortical demyelination being observed in secondary progressive and primary progressive forms of the disease. The presence of meningeal B-cell follicle-like structures, which frequently appear during the secondary progressive phase of disease, may be involved in the formation of these subpial cortical lesions. Diffuse white matter inflammation accompanied by axonal damage can also be observed in normal appearing white matter and, again, this is more prominent in chronic progressive forms of multiple sclerosis than in acute stages of disease. Axonal damage is a particularly important component of the pathology of multiple sclerosis and appears to be a critical determinant of clinical outcome. Axons appear to become vulnerable to injury as a result of loss of their myelin sheaths. Remyelination represents an important mechanism of tissue repair in multiple sclerosis and already occurs at an early stage of lesion development and in both white and grey matter lesions. The extent of remyelination appears to be greater in cortical lesions and in lesions further from the ventricles. There is important heterogeneity between patients in terms of the extent of remyelination, which may reflect underlying differences in pathogenetic mechanisms between patients.

  19. Precast Slabs for Contingency Rigid Airfield Pavement Damage Repairs (BRIEFING SLIDES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    efficiency of using different precast concrete panel installation techniques for contingency repair of damaged airfield pavements . Fast-setting polymer ...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0055 PRECAST SLABS FOR CONTINGENCY RIGID AIRFIELD PAVEMENT DAMAGE REPAIRS (BRIEFING SLIDES) Reza Ashtiani Applied...Rigid Airfield Pavement Damage Repairs (BRIEFING SLIDES) FA4819-09-C-0028 62102F 4915 D1 4915D14E Ashtiani, Reza; *Hammons, Michael I. Applied Research

  20. DNA damage repair and response proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Howard B

    2008-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage is critical for determining whether carcinogenesis, cell death or other deleterious biological effects will ensue. Numerous cellular enzymatic mechanisms can directly repair damaged DNA, or allow tolerance of DNA lesions, and thus reduce potential harmful effects. These processes include base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, nonhomologous end joining, homologous recombinational repair and mismatch repair, as well as translesion synthesis. Furthermore, DNA damage-inducible cell cycle checkpoint systems transiently delay cell cycle progression. Presumably, this allows extra time for repair before entry of cells into critical phases of the cell cycle, an event that could be lethal if pursued with damaged DNA. When damage is excessive apoptotic cellular suicide mechanisms can be induced. Many of the survival-promoting pathways maintain genomic integrity even in the absence of exogenous agents, thus likely processing spontaneous damage caused by the byproducts of normal cellular metabolism. DNA damage can initiate cancer, and radiological as well as chemical agents used to treat cancer patients often cause DNA damage. Many genes are involved in each of the DNA damage processing mechanisms, and the encoded proteins could ultimately serve as targets for therapy, with the goal of neutralizing their ability to repair damage in cancer cells. Therefore, modulation of DNA damage responses coupled with more conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy approaches could sensitize cancer cells to treatment. Alteration of DNA damage response genes and proteins should thus be considered an important though as of yet not fully exploited avenue to enhance cancer therapy.

  1. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation......, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7......,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine...

  2. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  3. DNA damage, homology-directed repair, and DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Cuozzo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP genes (DR-GFP. A total of 2%-4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR and gene conversion. However, approximately 50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments.

  4. Repair of postirradiation damage to colorectum: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricker, E.M.; Johnston, W.D.; Patwardhan, R.V.

    1981-05-01

    The results of 21 operations for repair of rectovaginal fistula and/or stricture secondary to irradiation for pelvic cancer are presented. The operations rely on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon with normal blood supply for effecting the repair. In patients having had a previous colostomy, it is possible to use the proximal end of the bypassed colon for this purpose. There is minimal dissection of the rectal ampulla and the presacral space is never entered. Continuity is established by anastomosis to the anterior rectal wall via an abdominal approach alone, or by a combined abdominovaginal or abdominoperineal approach. It has been found that nonirradiated colon of normal vascularity can be expected to heal to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making the extensive resections associated with correction of these abnormalities unnecessary. The functional result in 18 of 19 patients who underwent this procedure was satisfactory to excellent. One patient had a poor result because of partial rectal incontinence. Two operations out of the 21 were total failures and one of these patients died of complications secondary to irradiation damage to the small intestine. One patient has not yet had final colostomy closure. The results are considered promising enough to warrant continued trial.

  5. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, 1978-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    Special work during the year concentrated on induced repair of cellular radiation damage in a number of strains of Escherchia coli. Ultraviolet and x-radiation are considered for induction of cell damage. (PCS)

  6. Odontoblast-targeted Bcl-2 Overexpression Promotes Dentin Damage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjian; Ju, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Objective Bcl-2 is widely expressed in a developing tooth organ and regulates tooth morphogenesis. However, whether Bcl-2 is related to tooth damage repair is unknown yet. Using an odontoblast-targeted Bcl-2 overexpression transgenic mouse (Col2.3Bcl-2) and artificial cavity preparation as a model system, the relationship between Bcl-2 and reparative dentinogenesis is investigated in this study. Methods The odontoblastic-like cell cultures derived from mouse molar pulps were established. The expression of transgenic human Bcl-2 (hBcl-2) and endogenous mouse Bcl-2 (mBcl-2) and mouse Bax (mBax, a Bcl-2 antagonist) was detected in vivo and in vitro by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Basal level and artificial cavity-induced odontoblast apoptosis was detected by the Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick End labeling (TUNEL) technique. Reparative dentin formation induced by artificial cavity drilled to a half dentin thickness on mesial cervical region of mandibular first molars 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-op was evaluated histologically and via micro-CT. Results The transgenic hBcl-2 was stably expressed in odontoblasts of the transgenic animals without interference with the expression of mBcl-2 and mBax. Basal level as well as artificial cavity- induced odontoblast apoptosis was prevented by the transgene. Compared to the wild type, the transgenic animals produced reparative dentin with significantly higher mineral density 6 weeks after the operation. Conclusions Bcl-2 overexpression prevents odontoblast apoptosis and promotes dentin damage repair, indicating that genetic manipulation of Bcl-2 may be a novel strategy to maintain the vitality and function of dentine-pulp complex under detrimental mechanical stimuli. PMID:21930259

  7. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  8. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, Mike [Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-07

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions ({approx}2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 {mu}m h{sup -1} for large lesions (>15 000 cells)

  9. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of pipe in a steel transmission line operating at or... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...

  10. Role of Rad54, Rad54b and Snm1 in DNA damage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to investigate the function of a number of genes involved in mammalian DNA damage repair, in particular in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Among a large number of different damages that can be introduced to DNA, DSBs are especially toxic. If

  11. Gene specific damage and repair after treatment of cells with UV and chemotherapeutical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohr, V.A. (Division of Cancer Treatment, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated preferential DNA repair of active genes in mammalian cells. The methodology involves the use of a specific endonuclease or other more direct approaches to create nicks at sites of damage followed by quantitative Southern analysis and probing for specific genes. Initially, they used pyrimidine dimer specific endonuclease to detect pyrimidine dimers after UV irradiation. They now also use the bacterial enzyme ABC excinuclease to examine the DNA damage and repair of a number of adducts other than pyrimidine dimers in specific genes. They can detect gene specific alkylation damage by creating nicks via depurination and alkaline hydrolysis. In our assay for preferential repair, they compare the efficiency of repair in the DHFR gene to that in the 3{prime} flanking, non-coding region to the gene. In CHO cells, UV induced pyrimidine dimers are efficiently repaired from the active DHFR gene, but not from the inactive region. They have demonstrated that the 6-4 photoproducts are also preferentially repaired and that they are removed faster from the regions studied than pyrimidine dimers. Using similar approaches, they find that DNA adducts and crosslinks caused by cisplatinum are preferentially repaired in the active gene compared to the inactive regions and to the inactive c-fos oncogene. Also, nitrogen mustard and methylnitrosurea damage is preferentially repaired whereas dimethylsulphate damage is not. NAAAF adducts do not appear to be preferentially repaired in this system. 32 refs.

  12. Loss of heterozygosity and DNA damage repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigaku, Yasukazu [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Endo, Kingo [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Eri [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuo [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: yamamot@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jp

    2004-11-22

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of tumor suppressor genes is a crucial step in the development of sporadic and hereditary cancer. Understanding how LOH events arise may provide an opportunity for the prevention or early intervention of cancer development. In an effort to investigate the source of LOH events, we constructed MAT{alpha} can1{delta}::LEU2 and MATa CAN1 haploid yeast strains and examined canavanine-resistance mutations in a MATa CAN1/MAT{alpha} can1{delta}::LEU2 heterozygote formed by mating UV-irradiated and nonirradiated haploids. An increase in LOH was observed when the irradiated CAN1 haploid was mated with nonirradiated can1{delta}::LEU2, while reversed irradiation only marginally increased LOH. In the rad51{delta} background, allelic crossover type LOH increased following UV irradiation but not gene conversion. In the rad52{delta} background, neither type of LOH increased. The chromosome structure following LOH and the requirement for Rad51 and Rad52 proteins indicated the involvement of gene conversion, allelic crossover and break-induced replication. We argued that LOH events could have occurred during the repair of double-strand breaks on a functional (damaged) but not nonfunctional (undamaged) chromosome through recombination.

  13. Elevated level of DNA damage and impaired repair of oxidative DNA damage in patients with recurrent depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Kacperska, Dagmara; Kawczyńska, Daria; Talarowska, Monika; Orzechowska, Agata; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Gałecki, Piotr; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2015-02-06

    Depressive disorder (DD), including recurrent DD (rDD), is a severe psychological disease, which affects a large percentage of the world population. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not known, a growing body of evidence shows that inflammation together with oxidative stress may contribute to development of DD. Since reactive oxygen species produced during stress may damage DNA, we wanted to evaluate the extent of DNA damage and efficiency of DNA repair in patients with depression. We measured and compared the extent of endogenous DNA damage--single- and double-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative damage of the pyrimidines and purines--in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from rDD patients (n=40) and healthy controls (n=46) using comet assay. We also measured DNA damage evoked by hydrogen peroxide and monitored changes in DNA damage during repair incubation. We found an increased number DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative modification of DNA bases in the patients compared to the controls. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide evoked the same increased damage in both groups. Examination of the repair kinetics of both groups revealed that the lesions were more efficiently repaired in the controls than in the patients. For the first time we showed that patients with depression, compared with non-depresses individuals, had more DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative DNA damage, and that those lesions may be accumulated by impairments of the DNA repair systems. More studies must be conducted to elucidate the role of DNA damage and repair in depression.

  14. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  15. Evaluation of DNA damage in Chinese toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans) after in vivo exposure to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao Hui; Li, Shao Nan; Zhang, Le; Zhu, Guo Nian; Zhuang, Hui Sheng

    2008-05-01

    Chinese toad, Bufo bufo gargarizans, is frequently found in rice fields, muddy ponds, wetlands and other aquatic ecosystems in China. Because of its habitat, it has many chances of being exposed to pesticides, such as acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat, which are extensively used in rice or cereal fields. Amphibians may serve as model organisms for determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants contaminating these areas. In the present study DNA damage was evaluated in the Chinese toad using the comet assay, as a potential tool for the assessment of ecogenotoxicity. The first step was to determine the acute toxicity of the above-mentioned herbicides. In acute tests, tadpoles were exposed to a series of relatively high concentrations of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat for 96 h. The LC(50 )(96 h) of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl and paraquat were measured as 0.76, 1.32, 20.1 and 164 mg l(-1), respectively. Also, negative effects on the behavior of tadpoles were observed with acetochlor, butachlor, and paraquat. Secondly, the comet assay was used for detecting DNA damage in Chinese toad tadpoles exposed to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides. Significant (P Bufo bufo gargarizans for genotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  16. Rapid repair techniques for severely earthquake-damaged circular bridge piers with flexural failure mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiguo; Li, Hongnan; Bi, Kaiming; Si, Bingjun; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-04-01

    In this study, three rapid repair techniques are proposed to retrofit circular bridge piers that are severely damaged by the flexural failure mode in major earthquakes. The quasi-static tests on three 1:2.5 scaled circular pier specimens are conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed repair techniques. For the purpose of rapid repair, the repair procedure for all the specimens is conducted within four days, and the behavior of the repaired specimens is evaluated and compared with the original ones. A finite element model is developed to predict the cyclic behavior of the repaired specimens and the numerical results are compared with the test data. It is found that all the repaired specimens exhibit similar or larger lateral strength and deformation capacity than the original ones. The initial lateral stiffness of all the repaired specimens is lower than that of the original ones, while they show a higher lateral stiffness at the later stage of the test. No noticeable difference is observed for the energy dissipation capacity between the original and repaired pier specimens. It is suggested that the repair technique using the early-strength concrete jacket confined by carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets can be an optimal method for the rapid repair of severely earthquake-damaged circular bridge piers with flexural failure mode.

  17. Defective repair of ionizing radiation damage in Cockayne`s syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum group G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Leadon, S.A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Damage produced by ultraviolet light (UV) or certain chemical carcinogens is repaired more rapidly in transcriptionally active DNA than in the genome as a whole by an evolutionarily conserved process coupled to transcription and involving preferential repair of transcribed strands. The generality of strand-specific repair for damage other than UV has not been well-established, but it has generally been assumed to involve the nucleotide excision repair pathway for bulky lesions. There is little overlap in the spectrum of lesions induced by ionizing radiation and UV; consistent with the idea that to a large extent, the repair processes for these two types of damage are separable, there are very few mammalian cell mutants that are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of both.

  18. Repair of earthquake damaged bridge columns with fractured bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to repair three, half-scale RC bridge columns that will be tested to failure under slow cyclic loading. : These columns will have fractured longitudinal and transverse steel. The ultimate goal is to develop repair metho...

  19. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY OF THE COMPOSITE WING OF A LIGHT PLANE DAMAGED DURING AN AIRCRAFT CRASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej ŚWIĄTONIOWSKI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of composite structures in aircraft constructions has made it necessary to develop repair methods that will restore the component’s original design strength without compromising its structural integrity. In this paper, the complex repair technology of the composite wing of a light plane, which was damaged during an aircraft crash, is described. The applied repair scheme should meet all the original design requirements for the plane structure.

  20. Repair of earthquake-damaged bridge columns with interlocking spirals and fractured bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    During earthquakes, reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns may experience different levels of damage such as cracking, spalling, or crushing of concrete and yielding, buckling, or fracture of reinforcing bars. Although several repair options exist f...

  1. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that positive associations between age and levels of oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA may be related to an age-dependent decline in DNA repair activity. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between age and repair activity of oxidatively......, the results show an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA....... damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet...

  2. Evaluation of repair techniques for impact-damaged prestressed beams : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Collisions between over height vehicles and bridges occur about 1,000 times per year in the United States. Collision damage to : bridges can range from minor to catastrophic, potentially requiring repair or replacement of a bridge beam. For prestress...

  3. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY OF THE COMPOSITE WING OF A LIGHT PLANE DAMAGED DURING AN AIRCRAFT CRASH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ŚWIĄTONIOWSKI, Andrzej; SZOSTAK, Janusz; CHODOROWSKA, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    ... the component’s original design strength without compromising its structural integrity. In this paper, the complex repair technology of the composite wing of a light plane, which was damaged during an aircraft crash, is described...

  4. Study on Repaired Earthquake-Damaged Bridge Piers under Seismic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concrete bridge pier damaged during earthquakes need be repaired to meet the design standards. Steel tube as a traditional material or FRP as a novel material has become popular to repair the damaged reinforced concrete (RC bridge piers. In this paper, experimental and finite element (FE studies are employed to analyze the confinement effectiveness of the different repair materials. The FE method was used to calculate the hysteretic behavior of three predamaged circle RC bridge piers repaired with steel tube, basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP, and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP, respectively. Meanwhile, the repaired predamaged circle concrete bridge piers were tested by pseudo-static cyclic loading to study the seismic behavior and evaluate the confinement effectiveness of the different repair materials and techniques. The FE analysis and experimental results showed that the repaired piers had similar hysteretic curves with the original specimens and all the three repair techniques can restore the seismic performance of the earthquake-damaged piers. Steel tube jacketing can significantly improve the lateral stiffness and peak load of the damaged pier, while the BFRP and CFRP sheets cannot improve these properties due to their thin thickness.

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance of work resulting from damage sustained... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary to...

  6. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  7. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  8. Impact of two CO(2) laser heatings for damage repairing on fused silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormont, P; Gallais, L; Lamaignère, L; Rullier, J L; Combis, P; Hebert, D

    2010-12-06

    CO(2) laser is an interesting tool to repair defects on silica optics. We studied UV nanosecond laser-induced damage in fused silica after CO(2) laser heating. The localization of damage sites and the laser damage threshold are closely related to stress area in silica induced by heating. By applying a suitable second laser heating, we managed to eliminate the debris issued from redeposited silica and to modify the stress area. As a consequence, a significant increase of laser resistance has been observed. This process offers the possibility to improve damage repairing sufficiently to extend the lifetime of the silica components.

  9. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  10. How chromatin is remodelled during DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Global genome nucleotide excision repair removes DNA damage from transcriptionally silent regions of the genome. Relatively little is known about the molecular events that initiate and regulate this process in the context of chromatin. We've shown that, in response to UV radiation-induced DNA damage, increased histone H3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14 correlates with changes in chromatin structure, and these alterations are associated with efficient global genome nucleotide excision repair in yeast. These changes depend on the presence of the Rad16 protein. Remarkably, constitutive hyperacetylation of histone H3 can suppress the requirement for Rad7 and Rad16, two components of a global genome repair complex, during repair. This reveals the connection between histone H3 acetylation and DNA repair. Here, we investigate how chromatin structure is modified following UV irradiation to facilitate DNA repair in yeast. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation to measure histone acetylation levels, histone acetylase occupancy in chromatin, MNase digestion, or restriction enzyme endonuclease accessibility assays to analyse chromatin structure, and finally nucleotide excision repair assays to examine DNA repair, we demonstrate that global genome nucleotide excision repair drives UV-induced chromatin remodelling by controlling histone H3 acetylation levels in chromatin. The concerted action of the ATPase and C3HC4 RING domains of Rad16 combine to regulate the occupancy of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 on chromatin in response to UV damage. We conclude that the global genome repair complex in yeast regulates UV-induced histone H3 acetylation by controlling the accessibility of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 in chromatin. The resultant changes in histone H3 acetylation promote chromatin remodelling necessary for efficient repair of DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests that GCN5 plays a role in NER in human cells. Our work provides

  11. How chromatin is remodelled during DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirong; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond; Reed, Simon H

    2011-06-01

    Global genome nucleotide excision repair removes DNA damage from transcriptionally silent regions of the genome. Relatively little is known about the molecular events that initiate and regulate this process in the context of chromatin. We've shown that, in response to UV radiation-induced DNA damage, increased histone H3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14 correlates with changes in chromatin structure, and these alterations are associated with efficient global genome nucleotide excision repair in yeast. These changes depend on the presence of the Rad16 protein. Remarkably, constitutive hyperacetylation of histone H3 can suppress the requirement for Rad7 and Rad16, two components of a global genome repair complex, during repair. This reveals the connection between histone H3 acetylation and DNA repair. Here, we investigate how chromatin structure is modified following UV irradiation to facilitate DNA repair in yeast. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation to measure histone acetylation levels, histone acetylase occupancy in chromatin, MNase digestion, or restriction enzyme endonuclease accessibility assays to analyse chromatin structure, and finally nucleotide excision repair assays to examine DNA repair, we demonstrate that global genome nucleotide excision repair drives UV-induced chromatin remodelling by controlling histone H3 acetylation levels in chromatin. The concerted action of the ATPase and C3HC4 RING domains of Rad16 combine to regulate the occupancy of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 on chromatin in response to UV damage. We conclude that the global genome repair complex in yeast regulates UV-induced histone H3 acetylation by controlling the accessibility of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 in chromatin. The resultant changes in histone H3 acetylation promote chromatin remodelling necessary for efficient repair of DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests that GCN5 plays a role in NER in human cells. Our work provides important insight into

  12. Formation and repair of oxidative damage in the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Mori, Mateus P; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2014-07-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for only 13 polypeptides, components of 4 of the 5 oxidative phosphorylation complexes. But despite this apparently small numeric contribution, all 13 subunits are essential for the proper functioning of the oxidative phosphorylation circuit. Thus, accumulation of lesions, mutations and deletions/insertions in the mtDNA could have severe functional consequences, including mitochondrial diseases, aging and age-related diseases. The DNA is a chemically unstable molecule, which can be easily oxidized, alkylated, deaminated and suffer other types of chemical modifications, throughout evolution the organisms that survived were those who developed efficient DNA repair processes. In the last two decades, it has become clear that mitochondria have DNA repair pathways, which operate, at least for some types of lesions, as efficiently as the nuclear DNA repair pathways. The mtDNA is localized in a particularly oxidizing environment, making it prone to accumulate oxidatively generated DNA modifications (ODMs). In this article, we: i) review the major types of ODMs formed in mtDNA and the known repair pathways that remove them; ii) discuss the possible involvement of other repair pathways, just recently characterized in mitochondria, in the repair of these modifications; and iii) address the role of DNA repair in mitochondrial function and a possible cross-talk with other pathways that may potentially participate in mitochondrial genomic stability, such as mitochondrial dynamics and nuclear-mitochondrial signaling. Oxidative stress and ODMs have been increasingly implicated in disease and aging, and thus we discuss how variations in DNA repair efficiency may contribute to the etiology of such conditions or even modulate their clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA Damage Signalling and Repair Inhibitors: The Long-Sought-After Achilles’ Heel of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velic, Denis; Couturier, Anthony M.; Ferreira, Maria Tedim; Rodrigue, Amélie; Poirier, Guy G.; Fleury, Fabrice; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    For decades, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were the two only approaches exploiting DNA repair processes to fight against cancer. Nowadays, cancer therapeutics can be a major challenge when it comes to seeking personalized targeted medicine that is both effective and selective to the malignancy. Over the last decade, the discovery of new targeted therapies against DNA damage signalling and repair has offered the possibility of therapeutic improvements in oncology. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of DNA damage signalling and repair inhibitors, their molecular and cellular effects, and future therapeutic use. PMID:26610585

  14. DNA Repair and the Accumulation of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Are Affected by Fruit Intake in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Harboe, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with elevated oxidative stress and DNA damage. To achieve healthy aging, we must begin to understand how diet affects cellular processes. We postulated that fruit-enriched diets might initiate a program of enhanced DNA repair and thereby improve genome integrity. C57Bl/6 J mice...... were fed for 14 weeks a control diet or a diet with 8% peach or nectarine extract. The activities of DNA repair enzymes, the level of DNA damage, and gene expression changes were measured. Our study showed that repair of various oxidative DNA lesions was more efficient in liver extracts derived from...

  15. Integrated Microarray-based Tools for Detection of Genomic DNA Damage and Repair Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Patrick; Teng, Yumin; Bennet, Mark R; Evans, Katie E; Powell, James R; Webster, Richard M; Reed, Simon H

    2018-01-01

    The genetic information contained within the DNA molecule is highly susceptible to chemical and physical insult, caused by both endogenous and exogenous sources that can generate in the order of thousands of lesions a day in each of our cells (Lindahl, Nature 362(6422):709-715, 1993). DNA damages interfere with DNA metabolic processes such as transcription and replication and can be potent inhibitors of cell division and gene expression. To combat these regular threats to genome stability, a host of DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. When DNA lesions are left unrepaired due to defects in the repair pathway, mutations can arise that may alter the genetic information of the cell. DNA repair is thus fundamental to genome stability and defects in all the major repair pathways can lead to cancer predisposition. Therefore, the ability to accurately measure DNA damage at a genomic scale and determine the level, position, and rates of removal by DNA repair can contribute greatly to our understanding of how DNA repair in chromatin is organized throughout the genome. For this reason, we developed the 3D-DIP-Chip protocol described in this chapter. Conducting such measurements has potential applications in a variety of other fields, such as genotoxicity testing and cancer treatment using DNA damage inducing chemotherapy. Being able to detect and measure genomic DNA damage and repair patterns in individuals following treatment with chemotherapy could enable personalized medicine by predicting response to therapy.

  16. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (pindividual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (pgenetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  18. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  19. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC, for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  20. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luković, Mladena; Šavija, Branko; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2016-07-14

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions, type of repair material, etc. Numerical simulations combined with experimental observations can be of great use when determining the influence of these parameters on the performance of repair systems. In this work, a lattice type model was used to simulate first the moisture transport inside a repair system and then the resulting damage as a function of time. 3D simulations were performed, and damage patterns were qualitatively verified with experimental results and cracking tendencies in different brittle and ductile materials. The influence of substrate surface preparation, bond strength between the two materials, and thickness of the repair material were investigated. Benefits of using a specially tailored fibre reinforced material, namely strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC), for controlling the damage development due to drying shrinkage in concrete repairs was also examined.

  1. Patients with systemic sclerosis present increased DNA damage differentially associated with DNA repair gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Gustavo Martelli; Bassi, Carmen L; Wastowski, Isabela J; Xavier, Danilo J; Lucisano-Valim, Yara M; Crispim, Janaina C O; Rassi, Diane M; Marques-Neto, Joao F; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Moreau, Philippe; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) exhibit increased toxicity when exposed to genotoxic agents. In our study, we evaluated DNA damage and polymorphic sites in 2 DNA repair genes (XRCC1 Arg399Gln and XRCC4 Ile401Thr) in patients with SSc. A total of 177 patients were studied for DNA repair gene polymorphisms. Fifty-six of them were also evaluated for DNA damage in peripheral blood cells using the comet assay. Compared to controls, the patients as a whole or stratified into major clinical variants (limited or diffuse skin involvement), irrespective of the underlying treatment schedule, exhibited increased DNA damage. XRCC1 (rs: 25487) and XRCC4 (rs: 28360135) allele and genotype frequencies observed in patients with SSc were not significantly different from those observed in controls; however, the XRCC1 Arg399Gln allele was associated with increased DNA damage only in healthy controls and the XRCC4 Ile401Thr allele was associated with increased DNA damage in both patients and controls. Further, the XRCC1 Arg399Gln allele was associated with the presence of antinuclear antibody and anticentromere antibody. No association was observed between these DNA repair gene polymorphic sites and clinical features of patients with SSc. These results corroborate the presence of genomic instability in SSc peripheral blood cells, as evaluated by increased DNA damage, and show that polymorphic sites of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 DNA repair genes may differentially influence DNA damage and the development of autoantibodies.

  2. Melatonin: A pleiotropic molecule that modulates DNA damage response and repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidinia, Maryam; Sadeghpour, Alireza; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Reiter, Russel J; Khatami, Nasrin; Yousefi, Bahman

    2017-08-01

    DNA repair is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the genome. Perturbations in the DNA repair pathways have been identified in several human cancers. Thus, compounds targeting DNA damage response (DDR) hold great promise in cancer therapy. A great deal of effort, in pursuit of new anticancer drugs, has been devoted to understanding the basic mechanisms and functions of the cellular DNA repair machinery. Melatonin, a widely produced indoleamine in all organisms, is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and has multiple regulatory roles on the different aspects of the DDR and DNA repair. Herein, we have mainly discussed how defective components in different DNA repair machineries, including homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and finally DNA mismatch repair (MMR), can contribute to the risk of cancer. Melatonin biosynthesis, mode of action, and antioxidant effects are reviewed along with the means by which the indoleamine regulates DDR at the transduction, mediation, and functional levels. Finally, we summarize recent studies that illustrate how melatonin can be combined with DNA-damaging agents to improve their efficacy in cancer therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. ZMYM3 regulates BRCA1 localization at damaged chromatin to promote DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Justin W C; Makharashvili, Nodar; Agarwal, Poonam; Chiu, Li-Ya; Pourpre, Renaud; Cammarata, Michael B; Cannon, Joe R; Sherker, Alana; Durocher, Daniel; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Paull, Tanya T; Miller, Kyle M

    2017-02-01

    Chromatin connects DNA damage response factors to sites of damaged DNA to promote the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. The histone H2A variants H2AX, H2AZ, and macroH2A represent key chromatin constituents that facilitate DNA repair. Through proteomic screening of these variants, we identified ZMYM3 (zinc finger, myeloproliferative, and mental retardation-type 3) as a chromatin-interacting protein that promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR). ZMYM3 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks through bivalent interactions with both histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. We show that ZMYM3 links the HR factor BRCA1 to damaged chromatin through specific interactions with components of the BRCA1-A subcomplex, including ABRA1 and RAP80. By regulating ABRA1 recruitment to damaged chromatin, ZMYM3 facilitates the fine-tuning of BRCA1 interactions with DNA damage sites and chromatin. Consistent with a role in regulating BRCA1 function, ZMYM3 deficiency results in impaired HR repair and genome instability. Thus, our work identifies a critical chromatin-binding DNA damage response factor, ZMYM3, which modulates BRCA1 functions within chromatin to ensure the maintenance of genome integrity. © 2017 Leung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Pre-Cast Concrete Panels for Contingency Rigid Airfield Pavement Damage Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Micro- texture of the particle plays an important role in aggregate interlock. Therefore, mixes consisting of less polished aggregates are expected to...AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2010-0095 PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS FOR CONTINGENCY RIGID AIRFIELD PAVEMENT DAMAGE REPAIRS Reza S. Ashtiani, Christopher J...Final Technical Report 01-JAN-2008 -- 30-APR-2010 Pre-Cast Concrete Panels for Rapid Repair of Airfield Rigid Pavements FA4819-09-C-0028 62102F 4915 D1

  6. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  7. Photodynamic DNA damage induced by phycocyanin and its repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pádula

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we analyzed DNA damage induced by phycocyanin (PHY in the presence of visible light (VL using a set of repair endonucleases purified from Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the profile of DNA damage induced by PHY is clearly different from that induced by molecules that exert deleterious effects on DNA involving solely singlet oxygen as reactive species. Most of PHY-induced lesions are single strand breaks and, to a lesser extent, base oxidized sites, which are recognized by Nth, Nfo and Fpg enzymes. High pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection revealed that PHY photosensitization did not induce 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo at detectable levels. DNA repair after PHY photosensitization was also investigated. Plasmid DNA damaged by PHY photosensitization was used to transform a series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair mutants. The results revealed that plasmid survival was greatly reduced in rad14 mutants, while the ogg1 mutation did not modify the plasmid survival when compared to that in the wild type. Furthermore, plasmid survival in the ogg1 rad14 double mutant was not different from that in the rad14 single mutant. The results reported here indicate that lethal lesions induced by PHY plus VL are repaired differently by prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Morever, nucleotide excision repair seems to play a major role in the recognition and repair of these lesions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  8. Single-molecule live-cell imaging of bacterial DNA repair and damage tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, Harshad; Ho, Han; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2018-02-19

    Genomic DNA is constantly under threat from intracellular and environmental factors that damage its chemical structure. Uncorrected DNA damage may impede cellular propagation or even result in cell death, making it critical to restore genomic integrity. Decades of research have revealed a wide range of mechanisms through which repair factors recognize damage and co-ordinate repair processes. In recent years, single-molecule live-cell imaging methods have further enriched our understanding of how repair factors operate in the crowded intracellular environment. The ability to follow individual biochemical events, as they occur in live cells, makes single-molecule techniques tremendously powerful to uncover the spatial organization and temporal regulation of repair factors during DNA-repair reactions. In this review, we will cover practical aspects of single-molecule live-cell imaging and highlight recent advances accomplished by the application of these experimental approaches to the study of DNA-repair processes in prokaryotes. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Regulation of oxidized base damage repair by chromatin assembly factor 1 subunit A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Hegde, Pavana M.; Mitra, Joy; Jiang, Shuai; Holey, Brooke; Sarker, Altaf H.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated both endogenously and in response to exogenous stress, induce point mutations by mis-replication of oxidized bases and other lesions in the genome. Repair of these lesions via base excision repair (BER) pathway maintains genomic fidelity. Regulation of the BER pathway for mutagenic oxidized bases, initiated by NEIL1 and other DNA glycosylases at the chromatin level remains unexplored. Whether single nucleotide (SN)-BER of a damaged base requires histone deposition or nucleosome remodeling is unknown, unlike nucleosome reassembly which is shown to be required for other DNA repair processes. Here we show that chromatin assembly factor (CAF)-1 subunit A (CHAF1A), the p150 subunit of the histone H3/H4 chaperone, and its partner anti-silencing function protein 1A (ASF1A), which we identified in human NEIL1 immunoprecipitation complex, transiently dissociate from chromatin bound NEIL1 complex in G1 cells after induction of oxidative base damage. CHAF1A inhibits NEIL1 initiated repair in vitro. Subsequent restoration of the chaperone-BER complex in cell, presumably after completion of repair, suggests that histone chaperones sequester the repair complex for oxidized bases in non-replicating chromatin, and allow repair when oxidized bases are induced in the genome. PMID:27794043

  10. The EMSY threonine 207 phospho-site is required for EMSYdriven suppression of DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinic, Petar; Eccles, Laura A; Tseng, Jill; Cybulska, Paulina; Wielgos, Monicka; Powell, Simon N; Levine, Douglas A

    2017-02-21

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are essential for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, and alterations in these genes are a hallmark of breast and ovarian carcinomas. Other functionally related genes may also play important roles in carcinogenesis. Amplification of EMSY, a putative BRCAness gene, has been suggested to impair DNA damage repair by suppressing BRCA2 function. We employed direct repeat GFP (DR-GFP) and RAD51 foci formation assays to show that EMSY overexpression impairs the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that EMSY belongs to the family of BRCAness proteins. We also identified a novel phospho-site at threonine 207 (T207) and demonstrated its role in EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair. In vitro kinase assays established that protein kinase A (PKA) directly phosphorylates the T207 phospho-site. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair is a BRCA2-independent process. The data also suggest that EMSY amplification is a BRCAness feature, and may help to expand the population of patients who could benefit from targeted therapies that are also effective in BRCA1/2-mutant cancers.

  11. Fission yeast mating-type switching: programmed damage and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    only affects a single strand, which can be sealed by gap repair in situ, whether or not it serves as an imprint for subsequent switching of mating type from an appropriate donor cassette. Recent papers have linked the transient stalling of a replication fork to the generation of a site-specific nick....... This discontinuity then remains protected for a full cell cycle, until it interferes with replication in the next S-phase. It, thereby, represents a valuable model system to study the molecular safeguards to protect a replication fork at a predetermined hindrance to leading-strand extension. The versatility...

  12. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Nair

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.

  13. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  14. Dose-rate effect of ultrashort electron beam radiation on DNA damage and repair in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayan, Nelly; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Grigoryan, Bagrat; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Sarkisyan, Natalia; Tsakanova, Gohar; Haroutiunian, Samvel; Aroutiounian, Rouben

    2017-11-01

    Laser-generated electron beams are distinguished from conventional accelerated particles by ultrashort beam pulses in the femtoseconds to picoseconds duration range, and their application may elucidate primary radiobiological effects. The aim of the present study was to determine the dose-rate effect of laser-generated ultrashort pulses of 4 MeV electron beam radiation on DNA damage and repair in human cells. The dose rate was increased via changing the pulse repetition frequency, without increasing the electron energy. The human chronic myeloid leukemia K-562 cell line was used to estimate the DNA damage and repair after irradiation, via the comet assay. A distribution analysis of the DNA damage was performed. The same mean level of initial DNA damages was observed at low (3.6 Gy/min) and high (36 Gy/min) dose-rate irradiation. In the case of low-dose-rate irradiation, the detected DNA damages were completely repairable, whereas the high-dose-rate irradiation demonstrated a lower level of reparability. The distribution analysis of initial DNA damages after high-dose-rate irradiation revealed a shift towards higher amounts of damage and a broadening in distribution. Thus, increasing the dose rate via changing the pulse frequency of ultrafast electrons leads to an increase in the complexity of DNA damages, with a consequent decrease in their reparability. Since the application of an ultrashort pulsed electron beam permits us to describe the primary radiobiological effects, it can be assumed that the observed dose-rate effect on DNA damage/repair is mainly caused by primary lesions appearing at the moment of irradiation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  15. Both DNA global deformation and repair enzyme contacts mediate flipping of thymine dimer damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Alexander; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The photo-induced cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine (CPD) dimer is a frequent DNA lesion. In bacteria photolyases efficiently repair dimers employing a light-driven reaction after flipping out the CPD damage to the active site. How the repair enzyme identifies a damaged site and how the damage is flipped out without external energy is still unclear. Employing molecular dynamics free energy calculations, the CPD flipping process was systematically compared to flipping undamaged nucleotides in various DNA global states and bound to photolyase enzyme. The global DNA deformation alone (without protein) significantly reduces the flipping penalty and induces a partially looped out state of the damage but not undamaged nucleotides. Bound enzyme further lowers the penalty for CPD damage flipping with a lower free energy of the flipped nucleotides in the active site compared to intra-helical state (not for undamaged DNA). Both the reduced penalty and partial looping by global DNA deformation contribute to a significantly shorter mean first passage time for CPD flipping compared to regular nucleotides which increases the repair likelihood upon short time encounter between repair enzyme and DNA.

  16. Chromosomal landscape of UV damage formation and repair at single-nucleotide resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J; Roberts, Steven A; Wyrick, John J

    2016-08-09

    UV-induced DNA lesions are important contributors to mutagenesis and cancer, but it is not fully understood how the chromosomal landscape influences UV lesion formation and repair. Genome-wide profiling of repair activity in UV irradiated cells has revealed significant variations in repair kinetics across the genome, not only among large chromatin domains, but also at individual transcription factor binding sites. Here we report that there is also a striking but predictable variation in initial UV damage levels across a eukaryotic genome. We used a new high-throughput sequencing method, known as CPD-seq, to precisely map UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) at single-nucleotide resolution throughout the yeast genome. This analysis revealed that individual nucleosomes significantly alter CPD formation, protecting nucleosomal DNA with an inward rotational setting, even though such DNA is, on average, more intrinsically prone to form CPD lesions. CPD formation is also inhibited by DNA-bound transcription factors, in effect shielding important DNA elements from UV damage. Analysis of CPD repair revealed that initial differences in CPD damage formation often persist, even at later repair time points. Furthermore, our high-resolution data demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that CPD repair is significantly less efficient at translational positions near the dyad of strongly positioned nucleosomes in the yeast genome. These findings define the global roles of nucleosomes and transcription factors in both UV damage formation and repair, and have important implications for our understanding of UV-induced mutagenesis in human cancers.

  17. Epigenetic modifications in double-strand break DNA damage signaling and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Truman, Andrew W; Kron, Stephen J; Côté, Jacques

    2010-09-15

    Factors involved in the cellular response to double-strand break (DSB) DNA damage have been identified as potential therapeutic targets that would greatly sensitize cancer cells to radiotherapy and genotoxic chemotherapy. These targets could disable the repair machinery and/or reinstate normal cell-cycle checkpoint leading to growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. It is now clear that a major aspect of the DNA damage response occurs through specific interactions with chromatin structure and its modulation. It implicates highly dynamic posttranslational modifications of histones that are critical for DNA damage recognition and/or signaling, repair of the lesion, and release of cell-cycle arrest. Therefore, drugs that target the enzymes responsible for these modifications, or the protein modules reading them, have very high therapeutic potential. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the different chromatin modifications and their roles in each step of eukaryotic DSB DNA damage response. ©2010 AACR.

  18. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  19. Response to and recovery from acute sublethal gamma radiation in the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1979-05-01

    Acute irradiation of the Amazon molly with a sublethal dose of 1,000 rad caused some damage to the intestinal tract and to the haematopoietic system. Histologically, the intestine appeared to have regenerated by the end of a week; damage to the haematopoietic tissue appeared more slowly, but repair was almost complete some two months later. Nevertheless, recovery to the intestine cannot have been entirely completed in seven days, since the fish did not feed well for the following two weeks. After this, there were no obvious deleterious effects upon the survival and viability of the fish, although irradiated fish weighed less at the termination of the experiment.

  20. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  1. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkanen, Enni; Meyer, Urs; Dianov, Grigory L

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%-1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse) comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell's DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD.

  2. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enni Markkanen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%–1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell’s DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD.

  3. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, M. [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  5. Fructose-Rich Diet Affects Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Repair in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Federica; Senese, Rosalba; Lasala, Pasquale; Ziello, Angela; Mazzoli, Arianna; Crescenzo, Raffaella; Liverini, Giovanna; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando; Iossa, Susanna

    2017-03-24

    Evidence indicates that many forms of fructose-induced metabolic disturbance are associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative damage; however, it is not clear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and/or its lack of repair are events involved in metabolic disease resulting from a fructose-rich diet. In the present study, we evaluated the degree of oxidative damage to liver mtDNA and its repair, in addition to the state of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet. We used male rats feeding on a high-fructose or control diet for eight weeks. Our results showed an increase in mtDNA damage in the liver of rats fed a high-fructose diet and this damage, as evaluated by the expression of DNA polymerase γ, was not repaired; in addition, the mtDNA copy number was found to be significantly reduced. A reduction in the mtDNA copy number is indicative of impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, as is the finding of a reduction in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. In conclusion, a fructose-rich diet leads to mitochondrial and mtDNA damage, which consequently may have a role in liver dysfunction and metabolic diseases.

  6. DNA damage response and repair data with pharmacological modulators of Tousled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Srinivasan Timiri Shanmugam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Tousled kinase 1 (TLK1 plays an important role in chromatin remodeling, replication, and DNA damage response and repair. TLK1 activity is immediately, but transiently, downregulated after genotoxic insult, and its recovery is important for exit from checkpoint arrest and cell survival after radiation. The data in this article compliments research presented in the paper titled, “Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells” [1]. The identification of small molecule activators and inhibitors of TLK1 provided an opportunity to pharmacologically alter the protein׳s activity to elucidate its role in DNA damage response pathways. TLK1 effectors, gallic acid (GA and thioridazine (THD activate and inhibit the kinase, respectively, and the data report on the impact of these compounds and the significance of TLK1 to DNA break repair and the survival of human salivary acinar cells.

  7. Residual stress analysis of laser cladding repair for nuclear steam generator damaged tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Won Jin; Lee, Sang Cheol; Lee, Seon Ho [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Laser cladding technology was studied as a method for upgrading the present repair procedures of damaged tubes in a nuclear steam generator and Doosan subsequently developed and designed a new Laser Cladding Repair System. One of the important features of this newly developed Laser Cladding Repair System is that molten metal can be deposited on damaged tube surfaces using a laser beam and filler wire without the need to install sleeves inside the tube. Laser cladding qualification tests on the steam generator tube material, Alloy 600, were performed according to ASME Section IX. Residual stress analyses were performed for weld metal and heat affected zone of as-welded and PWHT with SYSWELD software.

  8. Human embryonic stem cells have enhanced repair of multiple forms of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Swistowska, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells need to maintain genomic integrity so that they can retain the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types without propagating DNA errors. Previous studies have suggested that mechanisms of genome surveillance, including DNA repair, are superior in mouse embryonic stem...... cells compared with various differentiated murine cells. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) we found that human embryonic stem cells (BG01, I6) have more efficient repair of different types of DNA damage (generated from H2O2, UV-C, ionizing radiation, or psoralen) than human primary...... fibroblasts (WI-38, hs27) and, with the exception of UV-C damage, HeLa cells. Microarray gene expression analysis showed that mRNA levels of several DNA repair genes are elevated in human embryonic stem cells compared with their differentiated forms (embryoid bodies). These data suggest that genomic...

  9. Human papillomavirus mediated inhibition of DNA damage sensing and repair drives skin carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hufbauer (Martin); J. Cooke (James); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. Pfister (Herbert); A. Storey (Alan); B. Akgül (Baki)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The failure to mount an effective DNA damage response to repair UV induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) results in an increased propensity to develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). High-risk patient groups, such as organ transplant recipients (OTRs)

  10. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  11. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  12. The BER necessities: the repair of DNA damage in human-adapted bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Stijn; Tang, Christoph M

    2015-02-01

    During colonization and disease, bacterial pathogens must survive the onslaught of the host immune system. A key component of the innate immune response is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by phagocytic cells, which target and disrupt pathogen molecules, particularly DNA, and the base excision repair (BER) pathway is the most important mechanism for the repair of such oxidative DNA damage. In this Review, we discuss how the human-specific pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria meningitidis have evolved specialized mechanisms of DNA repair, particularly their BER pathways, compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli. This specialization in DNA repair is likely to reflect the distinct niches occupied by these important human pathogens in the host.

  13. Battlefield Damage Assessment and Repair: Is Improvised Maintenance the Battlefield Solution to the Repair Parts Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-14

    decade, under Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, operations research (specifically, cost-benefit 8 analysis) became a primary tool for military...be preferable: Equating A. and CA., using x to represent the break-even BDAR capability may be represented by the equation: Ao=40%= (10 houzs - I hour...commanders to overcome the problems of non-availability of repair parts through "[scrounging] and cannibalization." 38. McFarlin, Robert P., Memorandum

  14. Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging and oxidative stress seem to be the most important factors in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a condition affecting many elderly people in the developed world. However, aging is associated with the accumulation of oxidative damage in many biomolecules, including DNA. Furthermore, mitochondria may be especially important in this process because the reactive oxygen species produced in their electron transport chain can damage cellular components. Therefore, the cellular response to DNA damage, expressed mainly through DNA repair, may play an important role in AMD etiology. In several studies the increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and mutations, and the decrease in the efficacy of DNA repair have been correlated with the occurrence and the stage of AMD. It has also been shown that mitochondrial DNA accumulates more DNA lesions than nuclear DNA in AMD. However, the DNA damage response in mitochondria is executed by nucleus-encoded proteins, and thus mutagenesis in nuclear DNA (nDNA may affect the ability to respond to mutagenesis in its mitochondrial counterpart. We reported that lymphocytes from AMD patients displayed a higher amount of total endogenous basal and oxidative DNA damage, exhibited a higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation, and repaired the lesions induced by these factors less effectively than did cells from control individuals. We postulate that poor efficacy of DNA repair (i.e., is impaired above average for a particular age when combined with the enhanced sensitivity of retinal pigment epithelium cells to environmental stress factors, contributes to the pathogenesis of AMD. Collectively, these data suggest that the cellular response to both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage may play an important role in AMD pathogenesis.

  15. Repair of base damage and genome maintenance in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Salas, María L

    2014-01-22

    Among the DNA viruses, the so-called nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) constitute a monophyletic group that currently consists of seven families of viruses infecting a very broad variety of eukaryotes, from unicellular marine protists to humans. Many recent papers have analyzed the sequence and structure of NCLDV genomes and their phylogeny, providing detailed analysis about their genomic structure and evolutionary history and proposing their inclusion in a new viral order named Megavirales that, according to some authors, should be considered as a fourth domain of life, aside from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The maintenance of genetic information protected from environmental attacks and mutations is essential not only for the survival of cellular organisms but also viruses. In cellular organisms, damaged DNA bases are removed in two major repair pathways: base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) that constitute the major pathways responsible for repairing most endogenous base lesions and abnormal bases in the genome by precise repair procedures. Like cells, many NCLDV encode proteins that might constitute viral DNA repair pathways that would remove damages through BER/NIR pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms and, specially, the biological roles of those viral repair pathways have not been deeply addressed in the literature so far. In this paper, we review viral-encoded BER proteins and the genetic and biochemical data available about them. We propose and discuss probable viral-encoded DNA repair mechanisms and pathways, as compared with the functional and molecular features of known homologs proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  17. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    CNS repair. PMID:26283909

  18. ANALYTICAL MODEL OF DAMAGED AIRCRAFT SKIN BONDED REPAIRS ASSUMING THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES DEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of optimal variants for composite repair patches allows to increase the service life of a damaged air- plane structure. To sensibly choose the way of repair, it is necessary to have a computational complex to predict the stress- strain condition of "structure-adhesive-patch" system and to take into account the damage growth considering the material properties change. The variant of the computational complex based on inclusion method is proposed.For calculation purposes the repair bonded joint is divided into two areas: a metal plate with patch-shaped hole and a "patch-adhesive layer-skin" composite plate (inclusion.Calculation stages:Evaluation of the patch influence to the skin stress-strain condition, stress distribution between skin and patch in the case of no damage. Calculation of the stress-strain condition is performed separately for the skin with hole and for the inclusion; solutions are coupled based on strain compatibility.Definition of the damage growth parameters at new stress-strain condition due to bonded patch existence. Skincrack stress intensity factors are found to identify the crack growth velocity. Patch is modelled as a set of "springs" bridging the crack.Degradation analysis of elasticity properties for the patch material.Repair effectiveness is evaluated with respect to crack growth velocity reduction in the initial material in compari- son with the case of the patch absence.Calculation example for the crack repair effectiveness depending on number of loading cycles for the 7075-T6 aluminum skin is given. Repair patches are carbon-epoxy, glass-epoxy and boron-epoxy material systems with quasi- isotropic layup and GLARE hybrid metal-polymeric material.The analysis shows the high effectiveness of the carbon-epoxy patch. Due to low stiffness, the glass-epoxy patchdemonstrates the least effectiveness. GLARE patch containing the fiberglass plies oriented across the crack has the same effectiveness as the carbon and

  19. MD study of pyrimidine base damage on DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used on the study of two specific damages of pyrimidine bases of DNA. Pyrimidine bases are major targets either of free radicals induced by ionizing radiation in DNA surrounding environment or UV radiation. Thymine dimer (TD) is UV induced damage, in which two neighboring thymines in one strand are joined by covalent bonds of C(5)-C(5) and C(6)-C(6) atoms of thymines. Thymine glycol (TG) is ionizing radiation induced damage in which the free water radical adds to unsaturated bond C(5)-C(6) of thymine. Both damages are experimentally suggested to be mutagenetic and carcinogenic unless properly repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of MD of TD, there is detected strong kink around the TD site that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed the different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-10 kcal/mol', in contrary to nearly neutral value of native thymine site. Structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seems to be important for proper recognition of TD damaged site, formation of DNA-enzyme complex and thus for subsequent repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA there is major structural distortion at the TG site, mainly the increased distance between TG and the C5' of adjacent nucleotide. This enlarged gap between the neighboring nucleotides may prevent the insertion of complementary base during replication causing the replication process to stop. In which extend this structural feature together with energy properties of TG contributes to the proper recognition of TG by repair enzyme Endonuclease III is subject of further computational MD study. (author)

  20. Mechanisms and biological impact of DNA repair pathways for UV and {gamma}-ray-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J. [MGC, Department of Cell Biology et Genetics, Erasmus Universtiy, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-03-01

    Nature has equipped all living systems with an intricate network of DNA repair pathways, to cope with damage induced by genotoxic agents (such as UV light, {gamma}-rays and numerous chemicals). These pathways ensure genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. Examples of multi-step damage repair processes are: nucleotide excision repair (NER, for removal of a wide variety of lesions, including UV) and recombination repair (for elimination of the very genotoxic radiation-induced double strand breaks). The NER pathway is understood in great detail and is associated with three human syndromes characterized by marked sun sensitivity: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and tricho-thio-dystrophy (TTD), XP patients show an over 1000 x increased risk of skin cancer, in contrast to CS and TTD. At least 25 proteins re involved some are also implicated in other cellular processes, explaining puzzling features associated with defects in these genes. NER-deficient mouse mutants have been generated, that permit evaluation of the biological impact of this process. Recombination repair is much less understood. However, recently a number of genes has been cloned based on sequence homology with yeast genes and mouse mutants are being generated. These will be invaluable to investigate e.g. radioresistance and radiation-induced tumorigenesis and for radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage: from mechanism to disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Amy M.; Schaich, Matthew A.; Smith, Mallory S.; Flynn, Tony S.; Freudenthal, Bret. D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species continuously assault the structure of DNA resulting in oxidation and fragmentation of the nucleobases. Both oxidative DNA damage itself and its repair mediate the progression of many prevalent human maladies. The major pathway tasked with removal of oxidative DNA damage, and hence maintaining genomic integrity, is base excision repair (BER). The aphorism that structure often dictates function has proven true, as numerous recent structural biology studies have aided in clarifying the molecular mechanisms used by key BER enzymes during the repair of damaged DNA. This review focuses on the mechanistic details of the individual BER enzymes and the association of these enzymes during the development and progression of human diseases, including cancer and neurological diseases. Expanding on these structural and biochemical studies to further clarify still elusive BER mechanisms, and focusing our efforts toward gaining an improved appreciation of how these enzymes form co-complexes to facilitate DNA repair is a crucial next step toward understanding how BER contributes to human maladies and how it can be manipulated to alter patient outcomes. PMID:28199214

  2. Neuromuscular damage and repair after dry needling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Ares; Mayoral, Orlando; Monterde, Sonia; Santafé, Manel M

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  3. Neuromuscular Damage and Repair after Dry Needling in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ares Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation.

  4. Human telomeres are hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA Damage and refractory to repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Rochette

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric repeats preserve genome integrity by stabilizing chromosomes, a function that appears to be important for both cancer and aging. In view of this critical role in genomic integrity, the telomere's own integrity should be of paramount importance to the cell. Ultraviolet light (UV, the preeminent risk factor in skin cancer development, induces mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD which are both mutagenic and lethal. The human telomeric repeat unit (5'TTAGGG/CCCTAA3' is nearly optimal for acquiring UV-induced CPD, which form at dipyrimidine sites. We developed a ChIP-based technique, immunoprecipitation of DNA damage (IPoD, to simultaneously study DNA damage and repair in the telomere and in the coding regions of p53, 28S rDNA, and mitochondrial DNA. We find that human telomeres in vivo are 7-fold hypersensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. In double-stranded oligonucleotides, this hypersensitivity is a property of both telomeric and non-telomeric repeats; in a series of telomeric repeat oligonucleotides, a phase change conferring UV-sensitivity occurs above 4 repeats. Furthermore, CPD removal in the telomere is almost absent, matching the rate in mitochondria known to lack nucleotide excision repair. Cells containing persistent high levels of telomeric CPDs nevertheless proliferate, and chronic UV irradiation of cells does not accelerate telomere shortening. Telomeres are therefore unique in at least three respects: their biophysical UV sensitivity, their prevention of excision repair, and their tolerance of unrepaired lesions. Utilizing a lesion-tolerance strategy rather than repair would prevent double-strand breaks at closely-opposed excision repair sites on opposite strands of a damage-hypersensitive repeat.

  5. From repairing the damaged landscape to restoration project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Granjou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The study adopts an empirical sociological approach to analyse how the objectives behind the revegetation of ski trails and runs in the French alpine resort of Alpe d’Huez have evolved since the 1970s. A revegetation programme was first introduced to repair the scars left by the works conducted to equip the resort with infrastructures, and then, over time, it became a more complex restoration project. At first, revegetation techniques were developed to fight soil erosion, but soon also became associated with the idea of “turning the mountain green again”. Now, 40 years later, revegetation is aimed at restoring both a natural ecosystem and a cultural landscape. The ski resort’s managers, local farmers, technicians, and those conducting research in the area share a common desire to promote autochthony, which in some cases runs the risk of reproducing folklore. Far from adopting an overriding ethical perspective, the study suggests that the area’s physical characteristics, specific history and configuration of local actors have shaped and continue to shape both the manner in which ecological restoration is implemented, through political choices and technical decisions, and the debates it gives rise to. The study concludes by examining the specificity of the findings for Alpe d’Huez and discussing their validity for other alpine ski resorts.A partir d’une approche sociologique empirique, ce texte propose une analyse de la mise en œuvre de la revégétalisation sur la station de l’Alpe d’Huez depuis les années 1970. Il montre comment la revégétalisation est passée d’un objectif de réparation des cicatrices provoquées par les aménagements à une entreprise plus complexe de restauration. S’il s’agissait au départ de répondre à un objectif technique de lutte contre l’érosion, la revégétalisation a pris rapidement une tournure paysagère (reverdissement ; elle a ensuite été pensée dans une perspective de

  6. Repair of DNA damage induced by anthanthrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) without bay or fjord regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Johannessen, Christian; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2009-01-01

    is known about the repair of DNA damage resulting from metabolites from PAHs without bay and fjord regions. We have investigated the six-ringed PAH anthanthrene (dibenzo[def,mno]chrysene), which does not posses bay or fjord motifs. We analyzed the repair profile of human cell extracts and of cell cultures...... in response to DNA damage induced by cytochrome P450-activated anthanthrene. In cell extracts, functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR) activities were necessary to trigger a response to anthanthrene metabolite-induced DNA damage. In cell cultures, NER was responsible...... proposed for metabolic activation of PAHs involves the cytochrome P450 enzymes. The DNA damaging potential of cytochrome P450-activated PAHs is generally associated with their bay and fjord regions, and the DNA repair response of PAHs containing such regions has been thoroughly studied. However, little...

  7. Use of Comet-FISH in the study of DNA damage and repair: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glei, Michael; Hovhannisyan, Galina; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L

    2009-01-01

    The Comet-FISH technique is a useful tool to detect overall and region-specific DNA damage and repair in individual cells. It combines two well-established methods, the Comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) and the technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Whereas the Comet assay allows separating fragmented from non-fragmented DNA, FISH helps to detect specifically labelled DNA sequences of interest, including whole chromosomes. Thus the combination of both techniques has been applied in particular for detection of site-specific breaks in DNA regions which are relevant for development of different diseases. This paper reviews the relevant literature and presents three examples on how Comet-FISH was used for studying the induction of DNA damage by genotoxic compounds related to oxidative stress in colon cancer-relevant genes (TP53, APC, KRAS) of a colon adenoma cell line. The accumulated evidence on relative sensitivity of these genes in comparison to global damage allows a more definite conclusion on the possible contribution of the genotoxic factors during colorectal carcinogenesis. Telomere fragility was compared in different cell lines treated with cytostatic agents, and revealed new patterns of biological activities through the drugs and different sensitivities of the cell lines that were found to be associated with their tumour origin. A third example relates to measuring repair of specific gene regions using Comet-FISH, a method that can be developed to biomarker application. Taken together, available data suggests that Comet-FISH helps to get further insights into sensitivity of specific DNA regions and consequently in mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Although the nature of the measured Comet-FISH endpoint precludes us from stating basically that damage and repair are occurring within the specific gene, it is at least possible to evaluate whether the damage and repair are occurring within the vicinity of the gene of interest.

  8. Rad54 and Mus81 cooperation promotes DNA damage repair and restrains chromosome missegregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghamrasni, S El; Cardoso, R; Li, L

    2016-01-01

    Rad54 and Mus81 mammalian proteins physically interact and are important for the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway; however, their functional interactions in vivo are poorly defined. Here, we show that combinatorial loss of Rad54 and Mus81 results in hypersensitivity to DNA......-damaging agents, defects on both the homologous recombination and non-homologous DNA end joining repair pathways and reduced fertility. We also observed that while Mus81 deficiency diminished the cleavage of common fragile sites, very strikingly, Rad54 loss impaired this cleavage to even a greater extent....... The inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) cells was accompanied by elevated levels of chromosome missegregation and cell death. Perhaps as a consequence, tumor incidence in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) mice remained comparable to that in Mus81(-/-) mice. Our study highlights...

  9. DNA damage and repair activity after broccoli intake in young healthy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Martini, Daniela; Møller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    compounds, including smokers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of broccoli intake on biomarkers of DNA damage and repair. Twenty-seven young healthy smokers consumed a portion of steamed broccoli (250 g/day) or a control diet for 10 days each within a crossover design with a washout period...... mRNA expression levels of repair and defence enzymes: 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X-type motif 1 (NUDT1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). After broccoli consumption, the level of oxidised DNA lesions decreased by 41% (95% confidence interval: 10%, 72......%) and the resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced DNA strand breaks increased by 23% (95% CI: 13%, 34%). Following broccoli intake, a higher protection was observed in subjects with glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1-null genotype. The expression level and activity of repair enzymes was unaltered. In conclusion, broccoli...

  10. Fission yeast Uve1 and Apn2 function in distinct oxidative damage repair pathways in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J Lee A; Neill, Erin; Davey, Scott

    2003-11-21

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the endonuclease Uve1 functions as the first step in an alternate UV photo-product repair pathway that is distinct from nucleotide excision repair (NER). Based upon the broad substrate specificity of Uve1 in vitro, and the observation that Uve1 mutants accumulate spontaneous mutations at an elevated rate in vivo, we and others have hypothesized that this protein might have a function in a mutation avoidance pathway other than UV photo-product repair. We show here that fission yeast Uve1 also functions in oxidative damage repair in vivo. We have determined the spectrum of spontaneous mutations that arise in uve1 null (uve1 degrees ) cells and have observed that both G-->T(C-->A) and T-->G(A-->C) transversions occur at an increased rate relative to wildtype cells. These mutations are indicative of unrepaired oxidative DNA damage and are very similar to the mutation spectrum observed in 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have generated an apn2 null (apn2 degrees ) strain and shown that it is mildly sensitive to H(2)O(2). Furthermore we have also shown that apn2 degrees cells have an elevated rate of spontaneous mutation that is similar to uve1 degrees. The phenotype of apn2 degrees uve1 degrees double mutants indicates that these genes define distinct spontaneous mutation avoidance pathways. While uve1 degrees cells show only a modest sensitivity to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), both uve1 degrees and apn2 degrees cells also display a marked increased in mutation rate following exposure to H(2)O(2) doses. Collectively these data demonstrate that Uve1 is a component of multiple alternate repair pathways in fission yeast and suggest a possible role for Uve1 in a general alternate incision repair pathway in eukaryotes.

  11. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB, II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR; damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS. First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage

  12. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica M; Correa, Raul; Rosenberg, Susan M; Hastings, P J

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB), II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR); damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS). First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG) in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage, caused by ROS

  13. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and DNA Repair in Female Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Grindel

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM is associated with oxidative stress which in turn can lead to DNA damage. The aim of the present study was to analyze oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in regard to hyperglycemic state and diabetes duration.Female T2DM patients (n = 146 were enrolled in the MIKRODIAB study and allocated in two groups regarding their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level (HbA1c≤7.5%, n = 74; HbA1c>7.5%, n = 72. In addition, tertiles according to diabetes duration (DD were created (DDI = 6.94±3.1 y, n = 49; DDII = 13.35±1.1 y, n = 48; DDIII = 22.90±7.3 y, n = 49. Oxidative stress parameters, including ferric reducing ability potential, malondialdehyde, oxidized and reduced glutathione, reduced thiols, oxidized LDL and F2-Isoprostane as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Damage to DNA was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood with single cell gel electrophoresis. DNA base excision repair capacity was tested with the modified comet repair assay. Additionally, mRNA expressions of nine genes related to base excision repair were analyzed in a subset of 46 matched individuals.No significant differences in oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzyme activities, damage to DNA and base excision repair capacity, neither between a HbA1c cut off />7.5%, nor between diabetes duration was found. A significant up-regulation in mRNA expression was found for APEX1, LIG3 and XRCC1 in patients with >7.5% HbA1c. Additionally, we observed higher total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL/HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, BMI and lower HDL-cholesterol in the hyperglycemic group.BMI, blood pressure and blood lipid status were worse in hyperglycemic individuals. However, no major disparities regarding oxidative stress, damage to DNA and DNA repair were present which might be due to good medical

  14. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and DNA Repair in Female Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindel, Annemarie; Guggenberger, Bianca; Eichberger, Lukas; Pöppelmeyer, Christina; Gschaider, Michaela; Tosevska, Anela; Mare, George; Briskey, David; Brath, Helmut; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is associated with oxidative stress which in turn can lead to DNA damage. The aim of the present study was to analyze oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in regard to hyperglycemic state and diabetes duration. Female T2DM patients (n = 146) were enrolled in the MIKRODIAB study and allocated in two groups regarding their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (HbA1c≤7.5%, n = 74; HbA1c>7.5%, n = 72). In addition, tertiles according to diabetes duration (DD) were created (DDI = 6.94±3.1 y, n = 49; DDII = 13.35±1.1 y, n = 48; DDIII = 22.90±7.3 y, n = 49). Oxidative stress parameters, including ferric reducing ability potential, malondialdehyde, oxidized and reduced glutathione, reduced thiols, oxidized LDL and F2-Isoprostane as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Damage to DNA was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood with single cell gel electrophoresis. DNA base excision repair capacity was tested with the modified comet repair assay. Additionally, mRNA expressions of nine genes related to base excision repair were analyzed in a subset of 46 matched individuals. No significant differences in oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzyme activities, damage to DNA and base excision repair capacity, neither between a HbA1c cut off />7.5%, nor between diabetes duration was found. A significant up-regulation in mRNA expression was found for APEX1, LIG3 and XRCC1 in patients with >7.5% HbA1c. Additionally, we observed higher total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL/HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, BMI and lower HDL-cholesterol in the hyperglycemic group. BMI, blood pressure and blood lipid status were worse in hyperglycemic individuals. However, no major disparities regarding oxidative stress, damage to DNA and DNA repair were present which might be due to good medical treatment

  15. Evaluation of radioinduced damage and repair capacity in blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Nascimento

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic damage caused by ionizing radiation and repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from 3 breast cancer patients and 3 healthy donors were investigated using the comet assay. The comets were analyzed by two parameters: comet tail length and visual classification. Blood samples from the donors were irradiated in vitro with a 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.722 Gy/min, with a dose range of 0.2 to 4.0 Gy and analyzed immediately after the procedure and 3 and 24 h later. The basal level of damage and the radioinduced damage were higher in lymphocytes from breast cancer patients than in lymphocytes from healthy donors. The radioinduced damage showed that the two groups had a similar response when analyzed immediately after the irradiations. Therefore, while the healthy donors presented a considerable reduction of damage after 3 h, the patients had a higher residual damage even 24 h after exposure. The repair capacity of blood lymphocytes from the patients was slower than that of lymphocytes from healthy donors. The possible influence of age, disease stage and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are discussed. Both parameters adopted proved to be sensitive and reproducible: the dose-response curves for DNA migration can be used not only for the analysis of cellular response but also for monitoring therapeutic interventions. Lymphocytes from the breast cancer patients presented an initial radiosensitivity similar to that of healthy subjects but a deficient repair mechanism made them more vulnerable to the genotoxic action of ionizing radiation. However, since lymphocytes from only 3 patients and 3 normal subjects were analyzed in the present paper, additional donors will be necessary for a more accurate evaluation.

  16. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Muto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI area (ball sign, injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity.

  17. DNA Damage and Repair in Atherosclerosis: Current Insights and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Andreassi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among Western populations. Over the past two decades, considerable evidence has supported a crucial role for DNA damage in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. These findings support the concept that the prolonged exposure to risk factors (e.g., dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes mellitus leading to reactive oxygen species are major stimuli for DNA damage within the plaque. Genomic instability at the cellular level can directly affect vascular function, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and premature vascular senescence. The purpose of this paper is to review current knowledge on the role of DNA damage and DNA repair systems in atherosclerosis, as well as to discuss the cellular response to DNA damage in order to shed light on possible strategies for prevention and treatment.

  18. Repair of damage to wind turbine foundations. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing; Sanierung von Fundamentschaeden. Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefung mittels Ultraschall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Hans-Peter [CONCRETE CARE, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Damage of foundations is often not visible from the surface. And even visible cracks do not show how far they reach inside the foundation. Prior to any repair measures, detailed analysis and a careful and precise description of the damage pattern are required. The biggest challenge is the detection of hidden damage and its correct description. Nondestructive methods are the method of choice. (orig.)

  19. Damage Repair Caused by Organochlorine Contamination: The Case Rhodia Cubatão -SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Vidal de Souza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the organochlorine production factory Rhodia SA, located in Cubatão-SP, responsible for the contamination of soil, surface and groundwater in the region. Thus, using the deductive and systemic methods for detailing the facts and phenomena, after a history of that plant, discusses the concept of organochlorine analyzes to repair the damage caused by industrial waste, with the most important theories for the delimitation of the damage and the risk and finally present the possibilities under critical eye, remediation of the area and overcome the current model of industrial society of risk.

  20. Photosystem II reaction center damage and repair cycle: chloroplast acclimation strategy to irradiance stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilikiotis, C; Melis, A

    1994-01-01

    A daily occurrence in the life of a plant is the function of a photosystem II (PSII) damage and repair cycle in chloroplasts. This unique phenomenon involves the frequent turnover of D1, the 32-kDa reaction-center protein of PSII (chloroplast psbA gene product). In the model organism Dunaliella salina (a green alga), growth under low light (100 mol of photons per m2 per sec) entails damage, degradation, and replacement of D1 every 7 hr. Growth under irradiance stress (2200 micromol of photons...

  1. Maintenance and Preservation of Concrete Structures. Report 2. Repair of Erosion-Damaged Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    REPORTS PUBLISHEDUNDER TECHNICAL REPORT C-76-4, S’MAINTENAN" AND PRESERVATION’ OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES "’ Title Date Report 1: Annotated Bibliography; 1927...MAINTENANCE AND PRESERVATION OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES ; Report 2, REPAIR OF EROSION-DAMAGED Report 2 of a series STRUCTURES s. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...Concrete erosion Stilling basins Concrete slabs Concrete structures Erosion resistance (Concrete) 20. ABSTRACT (contJ am re rv ere. .s~ f necoeey mad

  2. Maintaining Genetic Integrity Under Extreme Conditions: Novel DNA Damage Repair Biology in the Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-23

    MacNeill, undergraduate students Agnieszka Janska and Jason Woodier) In bacteria , RecJ has an important role in DNA damage repair, in particular in...is an NAD-dependent enzyme the gene for which was apparently acquired by lateral gene transfer from bacteria . Biochemical analysis of LigN function...required for native purification from H. volcanii cell extracts. The cellulose binding domain from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome protein replaced

  3. The Mitochondria-targeted Nitroxide JP4-039 Augments Potentially Lethal Irradiation Damage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    RAJAGOPALAN, MALOLAN S.; GUPTA, KANIKA; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; FRANICOLA, DARCY; ZHANG, XICHEN; WANG, HONG; ZHAO, HONG; TYURIN, VLADIMIR A.; PIERCE, JOSHUA G.; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; WIPF, PETER; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G1-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves...

  4. Influence of LET on repair of DNA damages in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kikuchi, M.; Shimizu, T.; Watanabe, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Cao, J.P.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    1997-03-01

    Inactivation caused by heavy ions was studied in dry cells of radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. All survival curves were characterized by a large shoulder of the curves. No final slopes of the exponential part of survival curves for heavy ion irradiation were steeper than that for 2.0 MeV electron irradiation. The plots of RBE versus LET showed no obvious peaks, suggesting that this bacterium can repair not only DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) but also clustered damage in DNA which may be induced by heavy ions. The genomic DNA of D. radiodurans was cleaved into large fragments with restriction enzyme Not I after post-irradiation incubation and the fragments were separated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). DSBs induction and rejoining process were analyzed by detection of the reappearance of ladder pattern of DNA fragments. The required repair time after heavy ions irradiation was longer than the repair time for electrons at the same dose of irradiation, however, the rate of repair enzyme induction was almost similar to each other between electrons and heavy ions, suggesting that the same repair system is likely to be used after both low and high LET irradiations. (author)

  5. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameena H El-Bibany

    Full Text Available The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2, and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2 cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2% but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  6. Comparative DNA damage and repair in echinoderm coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bibany, Ameena H; Bodnar, Andrea G; Reinardy, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0-100 mM) and UV-C (0-9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6 ± 1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2 ± 9.2% to 70.8 ± 16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4 ± 3.2% to 79.8 ± 9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment.

  7. DNA damage and repair in plants – from models to crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilissa eManova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The genomic integrity of every organism is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. Mutagenic agents cause reduced stability of plant genome and have a deleterious effect on development, and in the case of crop species lead to yield reduction. It is crucial for all organisms, including plants, to develop efficient mechanisms for maintenance of the genome integrity. DNA repair processes have been characterized in bacterial, fungal and mammalian model systems. The description of these processes in plants, in contrast, was initiated relatively recently and has been focused largely on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, our knowledge about DNA repair in plant genomes- particularly in the genomes of crops plants- is by far more limited. However, the relatively small size of the Arabidopsis genome, its rapid life cycle and availability of various transformation methods make this species an attractive model for the study of eukaryotic DNA repair mechanisms and mutagenesis. Moreover, abnormalities in DNA repair which proved to be lethal for animal models are tolerated in plant genomes, although sensitivity to DNA damaging agents is retained. Due to the high conservation of DNA repair processes and factors mediating them among eukaryotes, genes and proteins that have been identified in model species may serve to identify homologous sequences in other species, including crop plants, in which these mechanisms are poorly understood. Crop breeding programs have provided remarkable advances in food quality and yield over the last century. Although the human population is predicted to peak by 2050, further advances in yield will be required to feed this population. Breeding requires genetic diversity. The biological impact of any mutagenic agent used for the creation of genetic diversity depends on the chemical nature of the induced lesions and on the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. More recent targeted

  8. DNA-damage foci to detect and characterize DNA repair alterations in children treated for pediatric malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. CONCLUSIONS: Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies.

  9. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. (Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  10. Study of damage and repair of blades of a 300 kW wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, J.C.; Barroso, A.; Paris, F.; Canas, J. [School of Engineering, University of Seville, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The inspection of damages detected in some blades of 300 kW wind turbines revealed that the nature of these damages was probably due to a fatigue mechanism. The causes that had originated the failure (superficial cracks, geometric concentrator, abrupt change of thickness) have been studied, verifying, by means of the simplified evaluation procedure of fatigue life of the ''Germanischer Lloyd'' (GL) standard, that these causes can explain the failure detected in the period of time in which it happened. A suitable configuration for the repair of the damaged blades has been studied, by means of a finite element model. The proposed modifications repair the cracks and in addition contribute to relaxing the stress state in the affected zone. The introduction of a triangular reinforcement, which smoothes the re-entrant corner existing in the original design, incorporating a laminate of reinforcement, produces a significant decrease in the stress level in the damaged zone of the blades. (author)

  11. Stationary-Phase Persisters to Ofloxacin Sustain DNA Damage and Require Repair Systems Only during Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völzing, Katherine G; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    Chronic infections are a serious health care problem, and bacterial persisters have been implicated in infection reoccurrence. Progress toward finding antipersister therapies has been slow, in part because of knowledge gaps regarding the physiology of these rare phenotypic variants. Evidence shows that growth status is important for survival, as nongrowing cultures can have 100-fold more persisters than growing populations. However, additional factors are clearly important, as persisters remain rare even in nongrowing populations. What features, beyond growth inhibition, allow persisters to survive antibiotic stress while the majority of their kin succumb to it remains an open question. To investigate this, we used stationary phase as a model nongrowing environment to study Escherichia coli persistence to ofloxacin. Given that the prevailing model of persistence attributes survival to transient dormancy and antibiotic target inactivity, we anticipated that persisters would suffer less damage than their dying kin. However, using genetic mutants, flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and persistence assays, we discovered that nongrowing ofloxacin persisters experience antibiotic-induced damage that is indistinguishable from that of nonpersisters. Consistent with this, we found that these persisters required DNA repair for survival and that repair machinery was unnecessary until the posttreatment recovery period (after ofloxacin removal). These findings suggest that persistence to ofloxacin is not engendered solely by reduced antibiotic target corruption, demonstrate that what happens following antibiotic stress can be critical to the persistence phenotype, and support the notion that inhibition of DNA damage repair systems could be an effective strategy to eliminate fluoroquinolone persisters. In the absence of resistant mutants, infection reoccurrences can still occur because of persisters, rare bacterial cells that survive antibiotic treatments to

  12. Threats to repair injury caused by judicial errors and criminal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntean Vasilisa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The grounds for the occurrence of punitive damages are related to the illicit actions of the persons with responsibilities in the courts and the criminal prosecution bodies. In order to provide protection against such unfair situations, there are a number of legal guarantees. The legislator has highlighted both the specific circle of reasons (illegal detention, unlawful criminal prosecution, unlawful sentencing, etc. necessary to ensure that the damage caused to the person can be repaired, as well as the circle of conditions for the right to reparation (the acquittal, the order for termination of the criminal proceedings or for the prosecution, etc.. The reparation of the damage caused by judicial and criminal prosecution errors arises at the time when the act whereby the person was convicted or illegally arrested, ie at the time when the rehabilitation act became irrevocable, was found to be illegal.

  13. Dietary phytochemicals, HDAC inhibition, and DNA damage/repair defects in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Praveen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomic instability is a common feature of cancer etiology. This provides an avenue for therapeutic intervention, since cancer cells are more susceptible than normal cells to DNA damaging agents. However, there is growing evidence that the epigenetic mechanisms that impact DNA methylation and histone status also contribute to genomic instability. The DNA damage response, for example, is modulated by the acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins, and by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes. Many HDACs overexpressed in cancer cells have been implicated in protecting such cells from genotoxic insults. Thus, HDAC inhibitors, in addition to unsilencing tumor suppressor genes, also can silence DNA repair pathways, inactivate non-histone proteins that are required for DNA stability, and induce reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks. This review summarizes how dietary phytochemicals that affect the epigenome also can trigger DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Where such data is available, examples are cited from studies in vitro and in vivo of polyphenols, organosulfur/organoselenium compounds, indoles, sesquiterpene lactones, and miscellaneous agents such as anacardic acid. Finally, by virtue of their genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, cancer chemopreventive agents are being redefined as chemo- or radio-sensitizers. A sustained DNA damage response coupled with insufficient repair may be a pivotal mechanism for apoptosis induction in cancer cells exposed to dietary phytochemicals. Future research, including appropriate clinical investigation, should clarify these emerging concepts in the context of both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms dysregulated in cancer, and the pros and cons of specific dietary intervention strategies.

  14. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  15. NEIL3 Repairs Telomere Damage during S Phase to Secure Chromosome Segregation at Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to telomere DNA compromises telomere integrity. We recently reported that the DNA glycosylase NEIL3 preferentially repairs oxidative lesions in telomere sequences in vitro. Here, we show that loss of NEIL3 causes anaphase DNA bridging because of telomere dysfunction. NEIL3 expression increases during S phase and reaches maximal levels in late S/G2. NEIL3 co-localizes with TRF2 and associates with telomeres during S phase, and this association increases upon oxidative stress. Mechanistic studies reveal that NEIL3 binds to single-stranded DNA via its intrinsically disordered C terminus in a telomere-sequence-independent manner. Moreover, NEIL3 is recruited to telomeres through its interaction with TRF1, and this interaction enhances the enzymatic activity of purified NEIL3. Finally, we show that NEIL3 interacts with AP Endonuclease 1 (APE1 and the long-patch base excision repair proteins PCNA and FEN1. Taken together, we propose that NEIL3 protects genome stability through targeted repair of oxidative damage in telomeres during S/G2 phase.

  16. Salt crystallization and freeze-thaw damage of repair mortars and porous limestone; a laboratory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2017-04-01

    Durability of porous limestone and repair mortars were tested parallel. The specimens were subjected to salt weathering and freeze-thaw to understand the coeval behaviour and adherence of these materials. The tests were evaluated according to European Norms, salt crystallization (EN 12370) and freeze-thaw resistance (EN 12371). Three types of commercial available repair mortars and four types of laboratory mixed mortars were used for the tests. A Miocene porous limestone was also tested 40x40x40mm in size. 18 different mortars were placed next to limestone cubes in the 40x40x160mm stainless steel moulds (4 in one mould). Another 30 samples were prepared as control ones. Adhesion between the limestone and repair mortars reduced due to external stresses (freeze-thaw, salt). The results clearly show that durability of commercially available repair mortars is higher than that of the laboratory mixed mortars. Significant differences between the damage caused by freeze-thaw and salt crystallization cycles were recorded. Commercial available mortars have shown stronger adhesion during the tests. Most of the commercial samples kept the contact with the limestone interface until the end of the cyclic tests (30th cycle). At the same time, laboratory mixed mortars detached earlier (after the 8th cycle). Commercial mortars with 50m% limestone aggregate showed decreased durability, since detachment was observed after the 23rd cycle. The financial support of NKFI Fund (ref. no. K 116532) is appreciated.

  17. Electron Tunneling Pathway and Role of Adenine in Repair of Damaged DNA by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Tan, Chuang; Guo, Xunmin; Kao, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. We observed the complete dynamics of the reactants, all intermediates and final products, and determined their reaction time scales. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, Y.-T. Kao, J. Li, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 14831 (2011) J. Li, Z. Liu, C. Tan, X. Guo, L. Wang, A. Sancar, and D. Zhong, Nature 466, 887 (2010)

  18. Dynamics and pathway of electron tunneling in repair of damaged DNA by photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyun; Guo, Xunmin; Tan, Chuang; Li, Jiang; Kao, Ya-Ting; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-03-01

    Through electron tunneling, photolyase, a photoenzyme, restores damaged DNA into normal bases. Here, we report our systematic characterization and analyses of three electron transfer processes in thymine dimer restoration by following the entire dynamical evolution during enzymatic repair with femtosecond resolution. Using (deoxy)uracil and thymine as dimer substrates, we unambiguously determined the electron tunneling pathways for the forward electron transfer to initiate repairing and for the final electron return to restore the active cofactor and complete the repair photocycle. Significantly, we found that the adenine moiety of the unusual bent cofactor is essential to mediating all electron-transfer dynamics through a super-exchange mechanism, leading to a delicate balance of time scales. The active-site structural integrity, unique electron tunneling pathways and the critical role of adenine assure these elementary dynamics in synergy in this complex photorepair machinery to achieve the maximum repair efficiency close to unity. The authors thank Drs. Chaitanya Sexana, Yi Yang, and Chen Zang for the initial help with experiment, and Prof. Sherwin Singer and Dr. Ali Hassanali for discussion.

  19. Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1’s Interactions with Downstream Repair Proteins Is Critical for Efficient Repair of Oxidized DNA Base Damage and Enhanced Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Boldogh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available NEIL1 is unique among the oxidatively damaged base repair-initiating DNA glycosylases in the human genome due to its S phase-specific activation and ability to excise substrate base lesions from single-stranded DNA. We recently characterized NEIL1’s specific binding to downstream canonical repair and non-canonical accessory proteins, all of which involve NEIL1’s disordered C-terminal segment as the common interaction domain (CID. This domain is dispensable for NEIL1’s base excision and abasic (AP lyase activities, but is required for its interactions with other repair proteins. Here, we show that truncated NEIL1 lacking the CID is markedly deficient in initiating in vitro repair of 5-hydroxyuracil (an oxidative deamination product of C in a plasmid substrate compared to the wild-type NEIL1, thus suggesting a critical role of CID in the coordination of overall repair. Furthermore, while NEIL1 downregulation significantly sensitized human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS, ectopic wild-type NEIL1, but not the truncated mutant, restored resistance to ROS. These results demonstrate that cell survival and NEIL1-dependent repair of oxidative DNA base damage require interactions among repair proteins, which could be explored as a cancer therapeutic target in order to increase the efficiency of chemo/radiation treatment.

  20. Hereditary Disorders with Defective Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Moriwaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is an essential system for correcting ultraviolet (UV–-induced DNA damage. Lesions remaining in DNA due to reduced capacity of NER may result in cellular death, premature aging, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis of the skin. So, NER is an important protection against these changes. There are three representative genodermatoses resulting from genetic defects in NER: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, Cockayne syndrome (CS, and trichothiodystrophy (TTD. In Japan, CS is similarly rare but XP is more common and TTD is less common compared to Western countries. In 1998, we established the system for the diagnosis of these disorders and we have been performing DNA repair and genetic analysis for more than 400 samples since then. At present, there is no cure for any human genetic disorder. Early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment of neurological, ocular and dermatological abnormalities should contribute to prolonging life and elevating QOL in patients.

  1. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2010-01-01

    -dependent chromatin-remodeling protein CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) as a factor that becomes transiently immobilized on chromatin after IR. Knockdown of CHD4 triggers enhanced Cdc25A degradation and p21(Cip1) accumulation, which lead to more pronounced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition...... and extended cell cycle delay. At DNA double-strand breaks, depletion of CHD4 disrupts the chromatin response at the level of the RNF168 ubiquitin ligase, which in turn impairs local ubiquitylation and BRCA1 assembly. These cell cycle and chromatin defects are accompanied by elevated spontaneous and IR......-induced DNA breakage, reduced efficiency of DNA repair, and decreased clonogenic survival. Thus, CHD4 emerges as a novel genome caretaker and a factor that facilitates both checkpoint signaling and repair events after DNA damage....

  2. Genome-wide maps of alkylation damage, repair, and mutagenesis in yeast reveal mechanisms of mutational heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Brown, Alexander J; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Smerdon, Michael J; Roberts, Steven A; Wyrick, John J

    2017-10-01

    DNA base damage is an important contributor to genome instability, but how the formation and repair of these lesions is affected by the genomic landscape and contributes to mutagenesis is unknown. Here, we describe genome-wide maps of DNA base damage, repair, and mutagenesis at single nucleotide resolution in yeast treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Analysis of these maps revealed that base excision repair (BER) of alkylation damage is significantly modulated by chromatin, with faster repair in nucleosome-depleted regions, and slower repair and higher mutation density within strongly positioned nucleosomes. Both the translational and rotational settings of lesions within nucleosomes significantly influence BER efficiency; moreover, this effect is asymmetric relative to the nucleosome dyad axis and is regulated by histone modifications. Our data also indicate that MMS-induced mutations at adenine nucleotides are significantly enriched on the nontranscribed strand (NTS) of yeast genes, particularly in BER-deficient strains, due to higher damage formation on the NTS and transcription-coupled repair of the transcribed strand (TS). These findings reveal the influence of chromatin on repair and mutagenesis of base lesions on a genome-wide scale and suggest a novel mechanism for transcription-associated mutation asymmetry, which is frequently observed in human cancers. © 2017 Mao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Oxidative Genome Damage and Its Repair in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Function of Transition Metals as a Double-Edged Sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Rao, K.S.J.; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-01-01

    The neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) with high O2 consumption and prolonged life span are chronically exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulation of ROS-induced genome damage in the form of oxidized bases and single-strand breaks (SSBs) as well as their defective or reduced repair in the brain has been implicated in the etiology of various neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD). Although inactivating mutations in some DNA repair genes have been linked to hereditary neurodegenerative diseases, the underlying mechanisms of repair deficiencies for the sporadic diseases is not understood. The ROS-induced DNA damages are predominantly repaired via highly conserved and regulated base excision/SSB repair (BER/SSBR) pathway. We recently made an interesting discovery that transition metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) which accumulate excessively in the brains of AD, PD and other neurodegenerative diseases, act as a ‘double-edged sword’ by inducing genotoxic ROS and inhibiting DNA damage repair at the same time. These metals inhibit the base excision activity of NEIL family DNA glycosylases by oxidizing them, changing their structure, and inhibiting their binding to downstream repair proteins. Metal chelators and reducing agents partially reverse the inhibition, while curcumin with both chelating and reducing activities reverses the inhibition nearly completely. In this review, we have discussed the possible etiological linkage of BER/SSBR defects to neurodegenerative diseases and therapeutic potential of metal chelators in restoring DNA repair capacity. PMID:21441656

  4. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  5. Involvement of recQ in the ultraviolet damage repair pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Xiaoting [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Huang Lifen [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)]|[Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology of Jiangsu Province, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Tian Bing [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China); Hua Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Agriculture for Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Nuclear-Agricultural Sciences, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan RD 268, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)], E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2008-05-10

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium which can survive extremely DNA damage. To investigate the relationship between recQ and the ultraviolet radiation (UV) damage repair pathway, we created a four mutant strain by constructing recQ knockout mutants in uvrA1, uvrA2, and uvsE backgrounds. Using the rpoB/Rif{sup r} system, we measured the mutation frequencies and rates in wild type, recQ (MQ), uvsE uvrA1 uvrA2 (TNK006), and uvsE uvrA1 uvrA2 recQ (TQ). We then isolated Rif{sup r} mutants of these strains and sequenced the rpoB gene. The mutation frequency of TQ was 6.4, 10.1, and 2.43 times that of wild type, MQ, and TNK006, respectively, and resulted in rates of 4.7, 6.71, and 2.15 folds higher than that of wild type, MQ, and TNK006, respectively. All the strains demonstrated specific mutational hotspots. Furthermore, the TQ strain showed a transversion bias that was different from the other three strains. The results indicate that recQ is involved in the ultraviolet damage repair pathway via the interaction between recQ and uvrA1, uvrA2, and uvsE in D. radiodurans.

  6. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  7. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  8. Digital Restoration from Start to Finish How to repair old and damaged photographs

    CERN Document Server

    Ctein,

    2010-01-01

    Digital Restoration: Start to Finish 2nd edition guides you step-by-step through the entire process of restoring old photographs and repairing new ones using Adobe Photoshop, Picture Window, and now Elements. Nothing is left out, from choosing the right hardware and software and getting the photographs into the computer, to getting the finished photo out of the computer and preserving it for posterity.  LEARN HOW TO: Scan faded and damaged prints or films Improve snapshots with Shadow/Highlight adjustment Correct uneven exposure Fix color and skin tones quickly with Curves, plug-ins, a

  9. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low

  10. Coupling of Human DNA Excision Repair and the DNA Damage Checkpoint in a Defined in Vitro System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A.; Kemp, Michael G.; Reardon, Joyce T.; DeRocco, Vanessa; Iyer, Ravi R.; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoints work in concert to help maintain genomic integrity. In vivo data suggest that these two global responses to DNA damage are coupled. It has been proposed that the canonical 30 nucleotide single-stranded DNA gap generated by nucleotide excision repair is the signal that activates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response and that the signal is enhanced by gap enlargement by EXO1 (exonuclease 1) 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity. Here we have used purified core nucleotide excision repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1), core DNA damage checkpoint proteins (ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, RPA), and DNA damaged by a UV-mimetic agent to analyze the basic steps of DNA damage checkpoint response in a biochemically defined system. We find that checkpoint signaling as measured by phosphorylation of target proteins by the ATR kinase requires enlargement of the excision gap generated by the excision repair system by the 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity of EXO1. We conclude that, in addition to damaged DNA, RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, XPF-ERCC1, ATR-ATRIP, TopBP1, and EXO1 constitute the minimum essential set of factors for ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response. PMID:24403078

  11. Factors that influence telomeric oxidative base damage and repair by DNA glycosylase OGG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, David B; Ghosh, Avik; Lu, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes at the ends of linear chromosomes in eukaryotes, and are essential in preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as broken DNA ends. Telomere shortening has been linked to cellular senescence and human aging, with oxidative stress as a major...... contributing factor. 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxogaunine (8-oxodG) is one of the most abundant oxidative guanine lesions, and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) is involved in its removal. In this study, we examined if telomeric DNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative base damage and if telomere-specific factors...... affect the incision of oxidized guanines by OGG1. We demonstrated that telomeric TTAGGG repeats were more prone to oxidative base damage and repaired less efficiently than non-telomeric TG repeats in vivo. We also showed that the 8-oxodG-incision activity of OGG1 is similar in telomeric and non...

  12. Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huaxian; Wang, Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by ~1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and ~1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was ~1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was ~1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of mutagenic oxidative DNA lesions

  13. DNA damage and radical reactions: Mechanistic aspects, formation in cells and repair studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadet, J.; Ravanat, J.L. [CEA Grenoble, Inst Nanosci and Cryogenie, SCIB-UMR-E 3, Lab Les Acides Nucl, UJF, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Carell, T. [Univ Munich, Dept Chem and Biochem, Ctr Integrat Prot Sci, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Cellai, L. [CNR, Ist Cristalog, Monterotondo Stn, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Chatgilialoglu, Ch. [CNR, ISOF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Gimisis, Th. [Univ Athens, Dept Chem, Organ Chem Lab, Athens 15784, (Greece); Miranda, M. [Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Technol Quim, Dept Quim, Valencia 46022 (Spain); O' Neill, P. [Univ Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Robert, M. [Univ Paris 07, CNRS, UMR 7591, Electrochim Mol Lab, F-75251 Paris 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several examples of oxidative and reductive reactions of DNA components that lead to single and tandem modifications are discussed in this review. These include nucleophilic addition reactions of the one-electron oxidation-mediated guanine radical cation and the one-electron reduced intermediate of 8-bromo-purine 2'-de-oxy-ribo-nucleosides that give rise to either an oxidizing guanine radical or related 5',8-cyclo-purine nucleosides. In addition, mechanistic insights into the reductive pathways involved in the photolyase induced reversal of cyclo-buta-cli-pyrimidine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts are provided. Evidence for the occurrence and validation in cellular DNA of (OH){sup {center_dot}} radical degradation pathways of guanine that have been established in model systems has been gained from the accurate measurement of degradation products. Relevant information on biochemical aspects of the repair of single and clustered oxidatively generated damage to DNA has been gained from detailed investigations that rely on the synthesis of suitable modified probes. Thus the preparation of stable carbocyclic derivatives of purine nucleoside containing defined sequence oligonucleotides has allowed detailed crystallographic studies of the recognition step of the base damage by enzymes implicated in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Detailed insights are provided on the BER processing of non-double strand break bi-stranded clustered damage that may consist of base lesions, a single strand break or abasic sites and represent one of the main deleterious classes of radiation-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  14. The amino-terminal tails of histones H2A and H3 coordinate efficient base excision repair, DNA damage signaling and postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.; Wyrick, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Histone amino-terminal tails (N-tails) are required for cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents; therefore, we examined the role of histone N-tails in regulating DNA damage response pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Combinatorial deletions reveal that the H2A and H3 N-tails are important for the removal of MMS-induced DNA lesions due to their role in regulating the basal and MMS-induced expression of DNA glycosylase Mag1. Furthermore, overexpression of Mag1 in a mutant lacking the H2A and H3 N-tails rescues base excision repair (BER) activity but not MMS sensitivity. We further show that the H3 N-tail functions in the Rad9/Rad53 DNA damage signaling pathway, but this function does not appear to be the primary cause of MMS sensitivity of the double tailless mutants. Instead, epistasis analyses demonstrate that the tailless H2A/H3 phenotypes are in the RAD18 epistasis group, which regulates postreplication repair. We observed increased levels of ubiquitylated PCNA and significantly lower mutation frequency in the tailless H2A/H3 mutant, indicating a defect in postreplication repair. In summary, our data identify novel roles of the histone H2A and H3 N-tails in (i) regulating the expression of a critical BER enzyme (Mag1), (ii) supporting efficient DNA damage signaling and (iii) facilitating postreplication repair. PMID:25897129

  15. Role of the immune system in cardiac tissue damage and repair following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saparov, Arman; Ogay, Vyacheslav; Nurgozhin, Talgat; Chen, William C W; Mansurov, Nurlan; Issabekova, Assel; Zhakupova, Jamilya

    2017-09-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in the initiation, development, and resolution of inflammation following myocardial infarction (MI). The lack of oxygen and nutrients causes the death of cardiomyocytes and leads to the exposure of danger-associated molecular patterns that are recognized by the immune system to initiate inflammation. At the initial stage of post-MI inflammation, the immune system further damages cardiac tissue to clear cell debris. The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by immune cells and the inability of the anti-oxidant system to neutralize ROS cause oxidative stress that further aggravates inflammation. On the other hand, the cells of both innate and adaptive immune system and their secreted factors are critically instrumental in the very dynamic and complex processes of regulating inflammation and mediating cardiac repair. It is important to decipher the balance between detrimental and beneficial effects of the immune system in MI. This enables us to identify better therapeutic targets for reducing the infarct size, sustaining the cardiac function, and minimizing the likelihood of heart failure. This review discusses the role of both innate and adaptive immune systems in cardiac tissue damage and repair in experimental models of MI.

  16. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, South Mimms, (United Kingdom))

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  18. Impact damage and repair in shells of the limpet Patella vulgata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David

    2016-12-15

    Experiments and observations were carried out to investigate the response of the Patella vulgata limpet shell to impact. Dropped-weight impact tests created damage that usually took the form of a hole in the shell's apex. Similar damage was found to occur naturally, presumably as a result of stones propelled by the sea during storms. Apex holes were usually fatal, but small holes were sometimes repaired, and the repaired shell was as strong as the original, undamaged shell. The impact strength (energy to failure) of shells tested in situ was found to be 3.4-times higher than that of empty shells found on the beach. Surprisingly, strength was not affected by removing the shell from its home location, or by removing the limpet from the shell and allowing the shell to dry out. Sand abrasion, which removes material from the apex, was found to have a strong effect. Shells were also subjected to repeated impacts, which caused failure after 2-120 repetitions. In situ shells performed poorly in this test. It is proposed that the apex acts as a kind of sacrificial feature, which confers increased resistance but only for a small number of impacts. Microscopy showed that damage initiates internally as delamination cracks on low-energy interfaces, leading to loss of material by spalling. This mode of failure is a consequence of the layered structure of the shell, which makes it vulnerable to the tensile and shear stresses in the impact shock wave. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. XRCC1 coordinates disparate responses and multiprotein repair complexes depending on the nature and context of the DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Sundheim, Ottar

    2011-01-01

    short patch (SP) and long patch (LP) base excision repair (BER). We show that POLß and PNK colocalize with XRCC1 in replication foci and that POLß and PNK, but not PCNA, colocalize with constitutively present XRCC1-foci as well as damage-induced foci when low doses of a DNA-damaging agent are applied....... We demonstrate that the laser dose used for introducing DNA damage determines the repertoire of DNA repair proteins recruited. Furthermore, we demonstrate that recruitment of POLß and PNK to regions irradiated with low laser dose requires XRCC1 and that inhibition of PARylation by PARP......-inhibitors only slightly reduces the recruitment of XRCC1, PNK, or POLß to sites of DNA damage. Recruitment of PCNA and FEN-1 requires higher doses of irradiation and is enhanced by XRCC1, as well as by accumulation of PARP-1 at the site of DNA damage. These data improve our understanding of recruitment of BER...

  20. Dynamics and mechanism of UV-damaged DNA repair in indole-thymine dimer adduct: molecular origin of low repair quantum efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xunmin; Liu, Zheyun; Song, Qinhua; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-02-26

    Many biomimetic chemical systems for repair of UV-damaged DNA showed very low repair efficiency, and the molecular origin is still unknown. Here, we report our systematic characterization of the repair dynamics of a model compound of indole-thymine dimer adduct in three solvents with different polarity. By resolving all elementary steps including three electron-transfer processes and two bond-breaking and bond-formation dynamics with femtosecond resolution, we observed the slow electron injection in 580 ps in water, 4 ns in acetonitrile, and 1.38 ns in dioxane, the fast back electron transfer without repair in 120, 150, and 180 ps, and the slow bond splitting in 550 ps, 1.9 ns, and 4.5 ns, respectively. The dimer bond cleavage is clearly accelerated by the solvent polarity. By comparing with the biological repair machine photolyase with a slow back electron transfer (2.4 ns) and a fast bond cleavage (90 ps), the low repair efficiency in the biomimetic system is mainly determined by the fast back electron transfer and slow bond breakage. We also found that the model system exists in a dynamic heterogeneous C-clamped conformation, leading to a stretched dynamic behavior. In water, we even identified another stacked form with ultrafast cyclic electron transfer, significantly reducing the repair efficiency. Thus, the comparison of the repair efficiency in different solvents is complicated and should be cautious, and only the dynamics by resolving all elementary steps can finally determine the total repair efficiency. Finally, we use the Marcus electron-transfer theory to analyze all electron-transfer reactions and rationalize all observed electron-transfer dynamics.

  1. Slow mitochondrial repair of 5'-AMP renders mtDNA susceptible to damage in APTX deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-01-01

    elucidated. Here, we monitored the repair of 5'-AMP DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts from human APTX(+/+) and APTX(-/-) cells. The efficiency of repair of 5'-AMP DNA was much lower in mitochondrial than in nuclear protein extracts, and resulted in persistent DNA repair intermediates in APTX...... deficient cells. Moreover, the removal of 5'-AMP from DNA was significantly slower in the mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines and mouse tissues compared with their corresponding nuclear extracts. These results suggest that, contrary to nuclear DNA repair, mitochondrial DNA repair is not able......Aborted DNA ligation events in eukaryotic cells can generate 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA termini that can be removed from DNA by aprataxin (APTX). Mutations in APTX cause an inherited human disease syndrome characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia with ocular motor apraxia (AOA1). APTX...

  2. Optimization and standardization of the ``comet assay`` for analyzing the repair of DNA damage in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauch, T.; Boecker, W.; Mallek, U.; Mueller, W.U.; Streffer, C. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    1999-07-01

    Human tumor cells or isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were analyzed in the experiments. The amount of DNA damage and the effectiveness of DNA repair was measured after X-irradiation using the `comet assay` technique. Results: In this presentation the influences of different methodological factors like agarose concentration, buffer pH, electrophoresis time, electric field strength on the applicability of the `comet assay` are described in detail and optimum conditions for `comet assay` experiments have been evaluated. Additionally the authors will show a comparison of different fluorescent DNA dyes pointing out their advantages or disadvantages for `comet` analysis. The usefulness of this technique and its capabilities are exemplified by showing DNA repair kinetics of human lymphocytes of different healthy or radiosensitive donors after in-vitro irradiation with 2 Gy X-rays. Conclusions: This paper presents data on the optimization and standardization of the original `comet assay` leading to an extremely fast and practicable protocol in the field of single cell gel electrophoresis. After irradiation with 0.1 Gy an increase in the amount of DNA damage can be measured with high statistical significance and the DNA repair capacity of individual cells after X-ray doses of 2 Gy can be analyzed with high reproducibility. The results comparing DNA repair capacities of different donors point out that the `comet assay` may have the potential for the estimation of individual radiosensitivity. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Humane Tumorzellen oder isolierte menschliche Lymphozyten wurden in den Experimenten untersucht. Der DNS-Schaden und die Effektivitaet der DNS-Reparatur nach Roentgenbestrahlung wurden mit Hilfe des `Comet Assay` bestimmt. Ergebnisse: Die Einfluesse unterschiedlicher methodischer Faktoren wie Agarosekonzentration, pH-Werte der Pufferloesungen, Elektrophoresezeit, Staerke des elektrischen Feldes auf die Anwendung des `Comet Assay` werden zusammengefasst und

  3. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  4. Photosystem II reaction center damage and repair cycle: chloroplast acclimation strategy to irradiance stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilikiotis, C; Melis, A

    1994-07-19

    A daily occurrence in the life of a plant is the function of a photosystem II (PSII) damage and repair cycle in chloroplasts. This unique phenomenon involves the frequent turnover of D1, the 32-kDa reaction-center protein of PSII (chloroplast psbA gene product). In the model organism Dunaliella salina (a green alga), growth under low light (100 mol of photons per m2 per sec) entails damage, degradation, and replacement of D1 every 7 hr. Growth under irradiance stress (2200 micromol of photons per m2 per sec) entails damage to D1 every 20 min. The rate of de novo D1 biosynthesis under conditions of both low light and irradiance stress was found to be fairly constant on a per chloroplast or cell basis. The response of D. salina to the enhanced rate of damage entails an accumulation of photodamaged centers (80% of all PSII) and the formation of thylakoid membranes containing a smaller quantity of photosystem I (PSI) centers (about 10% of that in cells grown under low light). These changes contribute to a shift in the PSII/PSI ratio from 1.4:1 under low-light conditions to 15:1 under irradiance stress. The accumulation of photodamaged PSII under irradiance stress reflects a chloroplast inability to match the rate of D1 degradation or turnover with the rate of damage for individual PSII complexes. The altered thylakoid membrane organization ensures that a small fraction of PSII centers remains functional under irradiance stress and sustains electron flow from H2O to ferredoxin with rates sufficient for chloroplast photosynthesis and cell growth.

  5. Normal reconstruction of DNA supercoiling and chromatin structure in cockayne syndrome cells during repair of damage from ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, J E

    1982-07-01

    The chromatin of human cells undergoes structural rearrangements during excision repair of ultraviolet damage in DNA that were detected by transient relaxation of DNA supercoiling and increased staphylococcal nuclease digestibility of repaired sites. Inhibition of polymerization and/or ligation of repaired regions with inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha (cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin) resulted in the accumulation of single-strand breaks, delayed reconstruction of DNA supercoiling, and maintenance of the staphylococcal nuclease digestibility. These observations suggest that reconstruction of the native chromatin state requires completion of repaired regions with covalent ligation into the DNA strands. Although previous claims have been made that a late stage associated with ligation of repaired regions may be defective in cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome, complete reconstruction of the native chromatin occurred in cells from three unrelated patients after ultraviolet irradiation. No abnormality in repair was therefore detected in Cockayne syndrome cells. The hypersensitivity of cell survival and semiconservative DNA replication to damage by ultraviolet light in this human disorder must therefore be regarded as features of a primary defect in DNA metabolism unrelated to DNA repair.

  6. The EMSY threonine 207 phospho-site is required for EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinic, Petar; Eccles, Laura A.; Tseng, Jill; Cybulska, Paulina; Wielgos, Monicka; Powell, Simon N.; Levine, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are essential for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, and alterations in these genes are a hallmark of breast and ovarian carcinomas. Other functionally related genes may also play important roles in carcinogenesis. Amplification of EMSY, a putative BRCAness gene, has been suggested to impair DNA damage repair by suppressing BRCA2 function. We employed direct repeat GFP (DR-GFP) and RAD51 foci formation assays to show that EMSY overexpression impairs the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that EMSY belongs to the family of BRCAness proteins. We also identified a novel phospho-site at threonine 207 (T207) and demonstrated its role in EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair. In vitro kinase assays established that protein kinase A (PKA) directly phosphorylates the T207 phospho-site. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that EMSY-driven suppression of DNA damage repair is a BRCA2-independent process. The data also suggest that EMSY amplification is a BRCAness feature, and may help to expand the population of patients who could benefit from targeted therapies that are also effective in BRCA1/2-mutant cancers. PMID:28099152

  7. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent or Embryonic Stem Cells Decreases the DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Mujoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO-cyclic GMP pathway contributes to human stem cell differentiation, but NO free radical production can also damage DNA, necessitating a robust DNA damage response (DDR to ensure cell survival. How the DDR is affected by differentiation is unclear. Differentiation of stem cells, either inducible pluripotent or embryonic derived, increased residual DNA damage as determined by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, with increased S-phase-specific chromosomal aberration after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting reduced homologous recombination (HR repair as supported by the observation of decreased HR-related repair factor foci formation (RAD51 and BRCA1. Differentiated cells also had relatively increased fork stalling and R-loop formation after DNA replication stress. Treatment with NO donor (NOC-18, which causes stem cell differentiation has no effect on double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining but reduced DSB repair by HR. Present studies suggest that DNA repair by HR is impaired in differentiated cells.

  8. miRNA regulation is important for DNA damage repair and recognition in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairinger, Fabian Dominik; Werner, Robert; Flom, Elena; Schmeller, Jan; Borchert, Sabrina; Wessolly, Michael; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Hager, Thomas; Mairinger, Thomas; Kollmeier, Jens; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Walter, Robert Fred Henry

    2017-06-01

    Platin-containing regimes are currently considered as state-of-the-art therapies in malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) but show dissatisfying response rates ranging from 6 to 16% only. Still, the reasons for the rather poor efficacy remain largely unknown. A clear stratification of patients based on new biomarkers seems to be a promising approach to enhance clinical management, which would be a long-needed improvement for MPM patients but does not seem likely soon unless new biomarkers can be validated. Twenty-four formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour specimens were subjected to a miRNA expression screening of 800 important miRNAs using digital quantification via the nCounter technique (NanoString). We defined a small subset of miRNAs regulating the key enzymes involved in the repair of platin-associated DNA damage. Particularly, the TP53 pathway network for DNA damage recognition as well as genes related to the term "BRCAness" are the main miRNA targets within this context. The TP53 pathway network for DNA damage recognition as well as genes related to the term "BRCAness" are the main players for risk stratification in patients suffering from this severe disease. Taking the specific molecular profile of the tumour into account can help to enhance the clinical management prospectively and to smooth the way to better response prediction.

  9. The comet assay, DNA damage, DNA repair and cytotoxicity: hedgehogs are not always dead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Yolanda; Costa, Solange; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage is commonly measured at the level of individual cells using the so-called comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). As the frequency of DNA breaks increases, so does the fraction of the DNA extending towards the anode, forming the comet tail. Comets with almost all DNA in the tail are often referred to as 'hedgehog' comets and are widely assumed to represent apoptotic cells. We review the literature and present theoretical and empirical arguments against this interpretation. The level of DNA damage in these comets is far less than the massive fragmentation that occurs in apoptosis. 'Hedgehog' comets are formed after moderate exposure of cells to, for example, H2O2, but if the cells are incubated for a short period, 'hedgehogs' are no longer seen. We confirm that this is not because DNA has degraded further and been lost from the gel, but because the DNA is repaired. The comet assay may detect the earliest stages of apoptosis, but as it proceeds, comets disappear in a smear of unattached DNA. It is clear that 'hedgehogs' can correspond to one level on a continuum of genotoxic damage, are not diagnostic of apoptosis and should not be regarded as an indicator of cytotoxicity.

  10. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    OAK B202 Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of

  11. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'-ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the

  12. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Guzder, S N; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1993-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A-G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. We have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from ...

  13. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yanming [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States)], E-mail: yanming.wang@case.edu; Liu Lili [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Wu Chunying [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Bulgar, Alina [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Somoza, Eduardo; Zhu Wenxia [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Science, Case Center for Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States); Gerson, Stanton L. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44122 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([{sup 11}C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [{sup 11}C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [{sup 11}C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [{sup 11}C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

  15. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paralysis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST-which establishes connectional specificity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals-informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spinal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C 4 contusion rat model.

  16. DNA damage, repair monitoring and epigenetic DNA methylation changes in seedlings of Chernobyl soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Mariyana; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study was carried out to assess the effect of radio-contaminated Chernobyl environment on plant genome integrity 27 years after the accident. For this purpose, nuclei were isolated from root tips of the soybean seedlings harvested from plants grown in the Chernobyl area for seven generations. Neutral, neutral-alkaline, and methylation-sensitive comet assays were performed to evaluate the induction and repair of primary DNA damage and the epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation mechanisms. An increased level of single and double strand breaks in the radio-contaminated Chernobyl seedlings at the stage of primary root development was detected in comparison to the controls. However, the kinetics of the recovery of DNA breaks of radio-contaminated Chernobyl samples revealed that lesions were efficiently repaired at the stage of cotyledon. Methylation-sensitive comet assay revealed comparable levels in the CCGG methylation pattern between control and radio-contaminated samples with a slight increase of approximately 10% in the latter ones. The obtained preliminary data allow us to speculate about the onset of mechanisms providing an adaptation potential to the accumulated internal irradiation after the Chernobyl accident. Despite the limitations of this study, we showed that comet assay is a sensitive and flexible technique which can be efficiently used for genotoxic screening of plant specimens in natural and human-made radio-contaminated areas, as well as for safety monitoring of agricultural products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Fanconi anemia pathway: Repairing the link between DNA damage and squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E. [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Division of Oncology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited recessive disease caused by mutations in one of fifteen genes known to encode FA pathway components. In response to DNA damage, nuclear FA proteins associate into high molecular weight complexes through a cascade of post-translational modifications and physical interactions, followed by the repair of damaged DNA. Hematopoietic cells are particularly sensitive to the loss of these interactions, and bone marrow failure occurs almost universally in FA patients. FA as a disease is further characterized by cancer susceptibility, which highlights the importance of the FA pathway in tumor suppression, and will be the focus of this review. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common cancer type, often subsequent to bone marrow failure. However, FA patients are also at an extreme risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck and gynecological tract, with an even greater incidence in those individuals who have received a bone marrow transplant and recovered from hematopoietic disease. FA tumor suppression in hematopoietic versus epithelial compartments could be mechanistically similar or distinct. Definition of compartment specific FA activities is now critical to assess the effects of today's bone marrow failure treatments on tomorrow's solid tumor development. It is our hope that current therapies can then be optimized to decrease the risk of malignant transformation in both hematopoietic and epithelial cells. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of action of the Fanconi anemia pathway as it contributes to stress responses, DNA repair and squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility.

  18. Defective transcription-coupled repair of oxidative base damage in Cockayne syndrome patients from XP group G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P K; Nouspikel, T; Clarkson, S G; Leadon, S A

    1997-02-14

    In normal human cells, damage due to ultraviolet light is preferentially removed from active genes by nucleotide excision repair (NER) in a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) process that requires the gene products defective in Cockayne syndrome (CS). Oxidative damage, including thymine glycols, is shown to be removed by TCR in cells from normal individuals and from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A, XP-F, and XP-G patients who have NER defects but not from XP-G patients who have severe CS. Thus, TCR of oxidative damage requires an XPG function distinct from its NER endonuclease activity. These results raise the possibility that defective TCR of oxidative damage contributes to the developmental defects associated with CS.

  19. The amino-terminal tails of histones H2A and H3 coordinate efficient base excision repair, DNA damage signaling and postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J; Wyrick, John J

    2015-05-26

    Histone amino-terminal tails (N-tails) are required for cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents; therefore, we examined the role of histone N-tails in regulating DNA damage response pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Combinatorial deletions reveal that the H2A and H3 N-tails are important for the removal of MMS-induced DNA lesions due to their role in regulating the basal and MMS-induced expression of DNA glycosylase Mag1. Furthermore, overexpression of Mag1 in a mutant lacking the H2A and H3 N-tails rescues base excision repair (BER) activity but not MMS sensitivity. We further show that the H3 N-tail functions in the Rad9/Rad53 DNA damage signaling pathway, but this function does not appear to be the primary cause of MMS sensitivity of the double tailless mutants. Instead, epistasis analyses demonstrate that the tailless H2A/H3 phenotypes are in the RAD18 epistasis group, which regulates postreplication repair. We observed increased levels of ubiquitylated PCNA and significantly lower mutation frequency in the tailless H2A/H3 mutant, indicating a defect in postreplication repair. In summary, our data identify novel roles of the histone H2A and H3 N-tails in (i) regulating the expression of a critical BER enzyme (Mag1), (ii) supporting efficient DNA damage signaling and (iii) facilitating postreplication repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Red yeast rice repairs kidney damage and reduces inflammatory transcription factors in rat models of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mei; Si, Daoyuan; Zhang, Wenqi; Feng, Zhaohui; He, Min; Yang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Xuezhikang (XZK), an extract of red yeast rice, has been widely used for the management of hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease (CHD); however, the effects of XZK treatment on kidney injury have not yet been fully identified. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of XZK on the kidneys and investigate the related mechanisms in a rat model of hyperlipidemia. Thus, the effect on inflammatory transcription factors and kidney damage was investigated with in vitro and in vivo experiments on hyperlipidemic rats following XZK treatment. The results revealed that the plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly decreased, while the levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) were significantly upregulated in the XZK treatment group, as compared with those in the hyperlipidemia group (P<0.05). In addition, the results demonstrated that XZK was able to repair the kidney damage caused by hyperlipidemia. Furthermore, the expression levels of the inflammatory transcription factors, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, were shown to be reduced in the XZK group when compared with the hyperlipidemia group. In summary, XZK reduces kidney injury, downregulates the levels of TG, TC and LDL-C, as well as the expression levels of inflammatory transcription factors, and upregulates HDL-C. These results further the understanding of the molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying hyperlipidemia and aid the development of XZK as an effective therapeutic agent for hyperlipidemia.

  1. Regenerative Repair of Damaged Meniscus with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are defined as pluripotent cells found in numerous human tissues, including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Such MSCs, isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue, have been shown to differentiate into bone and cartilage, along with other types of tissues. Therefore, MSCs represent a promising new therapy in regenerative medicine. The initial treatment of meniscus tear of the knee is managed conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. When such conservative treatment fails, an arthroscopic resection of the meniscus is necessary. However, the major drawback of the meniscectomy is an early onset of osteoarthritis. Therefore, an effective and noninvasive treatment for patients with continuous knee pain due to damaged meniscus has been sought. Here, we present a review, highlighting the possible regenerative mechanisms of damaged meniscus with MSCs (especially adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs, along with a case of successful repair of torn meniscus with significant reduction of knee pain by percutaneous injection of autologous ASCs into an adult human knee.

  2. In situ repair of vagus nerve stimulator lead damage: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Ashley; Ogden, Patti; Kohrman, Michael H; Frim, David M

    2016-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulators (VNSs) are currently an accepted treatment for intractable epilepsy not amenable to ablative surgery. Battery death and lead damage are the main reasons for reoperation in patients with VNSs. In general, any damage to the lead requires revision surgery to remove the helical electrodes from the vagus nerve and replace the electrode array and wire. The electrodes are typically scarred and difficult to remove from the vagus nerve without injury. The authors describe 6 patients with VNSs who presented with low lead impedance on diagnostic testing, leading to the intraoperative finding of lead insulation disruption, or who were found incidentally at the time of implantable pulse generator battery replacement to have a tear in the outer insulation of the electrode wire. Instead of replacement, the wire insulation was repaired and reinforced in situ, leading to normal impedance testing. All 6 devices remained functional over a follow-up period of up to 87 months, with 2 of the 6 patients having a relatively shorter follow-up of only 12 months. This technique, applicable in a subset of patients with VNSs requiring lead exploration, obviates the need for lead replacement with its attendant risks.

  3. Application of a clay-slag geopolymer matrix for repairing damaged concrete: Laboratory and industrial-scale experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Boura, P.; Lučaník, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 10 (2017), s. 929-937 ISSN 0025-5300 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : blast-furnace slag * geopolymer * scanning electron microscopy (SEM) * damaged concrete repair * long-term monitoring Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2016

  4. Recruitment of the nucleotide excision repair endonuclease XPG to sites of UV-induced DNA damage depends on functional TFIIH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zotter (Angelika); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); D.O. Warmerdam (Daniël); S.M. Ibrahim (Shehu); A.L. Nigg (Alex); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. van Driel; W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe structure-specific endonuclease XPG is an indispensable core protein of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. XPG cleaves the DNA strand at the 3′ side of the DNA damage. XPG binding stabilizes the NER preincision complex and is essential for the 5′ incision by the

  5. Importance of cell proliferative state and potentially lethal damage repair on radiation effectiveness: implications for combined tumor treatments (review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendsen, G. W.; van Bree, C.; Franken, N. A.

    2001-01-01

    The dependence of parameters of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model on cell proliferation kinetics of tumors in relation to potentially lethal damage (PLD) and its repair is evaluated. The influence of sensitizing agents on these parameters during fractionated radiotherapy is assessed. Suggestions for

  6. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Mitra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause(s of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases.

  7. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  8. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  9. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2013-05-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) protects from ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced carcinogenesis in mice and from UV-induced immunosuppression in mice and humans. Recent double-blinded randomized controlled Phase 2 studies in heavily sun-damaged individuals have shown that oral nicotinamide significantly reduces premalignant actinic keratoses, and may reduce new non-melanoma skin cancers. Nicotinamide is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), an essential coenzyme in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Previously, we showed that nicotinamide prevents UV-induced ATP decline in HaCaT keratinocytes. Energy-dependent DNA repair is a key determinant of cellular survival after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV radiation. Hence, in this study we investigated whether nicotinamide protection from cellular energy loss influences DNA repair. We treated HaCaT keratinocytes with nicotinamide and exposed them to low-dose solar-simulated UV (ssUV). Excision repair was quantified using an assay of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Nicotinamide increased both the proportion of cells undergoing excision repair and the repair rate in each cell. We then investigated ssUV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxoG) formation and repair by comet assay in keratinocytes and with immunohistochemistry in human skin. Nicotinamide reduced CPDs and 8oxoG in both models and the reduction appeared to be due to enhancement of DNA repair. These results show that nicotinamide enhances two different pathways for repair of UV-induced photolesions, supporting nicotinamide's potential as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention.

  10. DNA Damage Repair Factors have a Tumor Promoting Role in MLL-fusion Leukemia | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancers develop when cells accumulate DNA mutations that allow them to grow and divide inappropriately. Thus, proteins involved in repairing DNA damage are generally suppressors of cancer formation, and their expression is often lost in the early stages of cancer initiation. In contrast, cancer stem cells, like their normal counterparts, must retain their ability to self-renew, which necessitates maintenance of DNA integrity. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), for example, double strand breaks and oxidative damage exhaust their regenerative ability. André Nussenzweig, Ph.D., Chief of CCR’s Laboratory of Genome Integrity and his colleagues wondered whether leukemic stem cells might be similarly constrained by DNA damage.

  11. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzder, S N; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A-G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. We have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. We also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair.

  12. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  13. A Novel Histone Crosstalk Pathway Important for Regulation of UV-Induced DNA Damage Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoures, Anna L; Pfeil, Jacob J; Steenkiste, Elizabeth M; Hoffman, Rachel A; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Wilkes, Sara E; Higdon, Sarah K; Thompson, Jeffrey S

    2017-07-01

    Histone post-translational modifications play vital roles in a variety of nuclear processes, including DNA repair. It has been previously shown that histone H3K79 methylation is important for the cellular response to DNA damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with evidence that specific methylation states play distinct roles in UV repair. Here, we report that H3K79 methylation is reduced in response to UV exposure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae This reduction is specific to the dimethylated state, as trimethylation levels are minimally altered by UV exposure. Inhibition of this reduction has a deleterious effect on UV-induced sister chromatid exchange, suggesting that H3K79 dimethylation levels play a regulatory role in UV repair. Further evidence implicates an additional role for H3K79 dimethylation levels in error-free translesion synthesis, but not in UV-induced G1/S checkpoint activation or double-stranded break repair. Additionally, we find that H3K79 dimethylation levels are influenced by acetylatable lysines on the histone H4 N-terminal tail, which are hyperacetylated in response to UV exposure. Preclusion of H4 acetylation prevents UV-induced reduction of H3K79 dimethylation, and similarly has a negative effect on UV-induced sister chromatid exchange. These results point to the existence of a novel histone crosstalk pathway that is important for the regulation of UV-induced DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Effect of gadolinium-based nanoparticles on nuclear DNA damage and repair in glioblastoma tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefančíková, Lenka; Lacombe, Sandrine; Salado, Daniela; Porcel, Erika; Pagáčová, Eva; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Depeš, Daniel; Kozubek, Stanislav; Falk, Martin

    2016-07-28

    Tumor targeting of radiotherapy represents a great challenge. The addition of multimodal nanoparticles, such as 3 nm gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GdBNs), has been proposed as a promising strategy to amplify the effects of radiation in tumors and improve diagnostics using the same agents. This singular property named theranostic is a unique advantage of GdBNs. It has been established that the amplification of radiation effects by GdBNs appears due to fast electronic processes. However, the influence of these nanoparticles on cells is not yet understood. In particular, it remains dubious how nanoparticles activated by ionizing radiation interact with cells and their constituents. A crucial question remains open of whether damage to the nucleus is necessary for the radiosensitization exerted by GdBNs (and other nanoparticles). We studied the effect of GdBNs on the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the nuclear DNA of U87 tumor cells irradiated with γ-rays. For this purpose, we used currently the most sensitive method of DSBs detection based on high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy coupled with immunodetection of two independent DSBs markers. We show that, in the conditions where GdBNs amplify radiation effects, they remain localized in the cytoplasm, i.e. do not penetrate into the nucleus. In addition, the presence of GdBNs in the cytoplasm neither increases induction of DSBs by γ-rays in the nuclear DNA nor affects their consequent repair. Our results suggest that the radiosensitization mediated by GdBNs is a cytoplasmic event that is independent of the nuclear DNA breakage, a phenomenon commonly accepted as the explanation of biological radiation effects. Considering our earlier recognized colocalization of GdBNs with the lysosomes and endosomes, we revolutionary hypothesize here about these organelles as potential targets for (some) nanoparticles. If confirmed, this finding of cytoplasmically determined radiosensitization

  15. Induction and repair of DNA base damage studied in X-irradiated CHO cells using the M. luteus extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehe, C.; Dikomey, E. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biophysik und Strahlenbiologie

    1994-12-01

    DNA base damage was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells X-irradiated under aerobic conditions using an extract of the bacterium Micrococcus luteus. The glycosylases and endonucleases present in this extract recognize damaged bases and convert them into strand breaks (termed endonuclease-sensitive sites, enss). Strand breaks were detected by the alkaline unwinding technique. The induction of enss was measured for X-ray doses ranging up to 45 Gy. The relative frequency of all enss related to all radiation induced strand breaks was 1.7 {+-} 0.4. Repair of enss was studied for a radiation dose of 45 Gy. The number of enss was found to decrease exponentially with time after irradiation with a half-time of {tau}{sub enss} = 37 {+-} 8 min. The repair kinetics that were also measured for all X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks were found to consist of three phases: fast, intermediate and slow. The intermediate phase was fitted under the assumption that this phase results from the information and repair of secondary single-strand breaks generated by enzymatic incision at the sites of base damage repair. (author).

  16. Does a role for selenium in DNA damage repair explain apparent controversies in its use in chemoprevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The trace element selenium is an essential micronutrient that has received considerable attention for its potential use in the prevention of cancer. In spite of this interest, the mechanism(s) by which selenium might function as a chemopreventive remain to be determined. Considerable experimental evidence indicates that one possible mechanism by which selenium supplementation may exert its benefits is by enhancing the DNA damage repair response, and this includes data obtained using cultured cells, animal models as well as in human clinical studies. In these studies, selenium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in reducing the frequency of DNA adducts and chromosome breaks, consequentially reducing the likelihood of detrimental mutations that ultimately contribute to carcinogenesis. The benefits of selenium can be envisioned as being due, at least in part, to it being a critical constituent of selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases, proteins that play important roles in antioxidant defence and maintaining the cellular reducing environment. Selenium, therefore, may be protective by preventing DNA damage from occurring as well as by increasing the activity of repair enzymes such as DNA glycosylases and DNA damage repair pathways that involve p53, BRCA1 and Gadd45. An improved understanding of the mechanism of selenium’s impact on DNA repair processes may help to resolve the apparently contradicting data obtained from decades of animal work, human epidemiology and more recently, clinical supplementation studies. PMID:23204505

  17. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Joo Mi [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Hong, E-mail: thkang@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  18. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leadon, S.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Copper, P.K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  19. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, S A; Cooper, P K

    1993-11-15

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribed genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, we examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. We found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. Our results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions.

  20. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Overexpression of PCNA Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Caused Delay of Gap-Filling during Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available UVC irradiation-caused DNA lesions are repaired in mammalian cells solely by nucleotide excision repair (NER, which consists of sequential events including initial damage recognition, dual incision of damage site, gap-filling, and ligation. We have previously shown that gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions may be delayed by a subsequent treatment of oxidants or prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, flavonoids, and colcemid. We considered the delay as a result of competition for limiting protein/enzyme factor(s during repair synthesis between NER and base excision repair (BER induced by the oxidative chemicals. In this report, using colcemid as oxidative stress inducer, we showed that colcemid-caused delay of gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions was attenuated by overexpression of PCNA but not ligase-I. PCNA knockdown, as expected, delayed the gap-filling of NER but also impaired the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Fen-1 knockdown, however, did not affect the repair of oxidative DNA damage, suggesting repair of oxidative DNA damage is not of long patch BER. Furthermore, overexpression of XRCC1 delayed the gap-filling, and presumably increase of XRCC1 pulls PCNA away from gap-filling of NER for BER, consistent with our hypothesis that delay of gap-filling of NER attributes the competition between NER and BER.

  2. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  3. Chromatin relaxation-mediated induction of p19INK4d increases the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Ogara

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies.

  4. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  5. Low level occupational exposure to styrene: its effects on DNA damage and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongvijitsuk, Sirilak; Navasumrit, Panida; Vattanasit, Udomratana; Parnlob, Varabhorn; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2011-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of styrene exposure at levels below the recommended standards of the Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA(8)) of 20 ppm (ACGIH, 2004) in reinforced-fiberglass plastics workers. Study subjects comprised 50 exposed workers and 40 control subjects. The exposed workers were stratified by styrene exposure levels, i.e. group I (20 ppm, >84.40 mg/m(3)). The mean styrene exposure levels of exposed workers were significantly higher than those of the control workers. Biomarkers of exposure to styrene, including blood styrene and the urinary metabolites, mandelic acid (MA) and phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA), were significantly increased with increasing levels of styrene exposure, but were not detected in the control group. DNA damage, such as DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and DNA repair capacity, were used as biomarkers of early biological effects. DNA strand breaks and 8-OHdG/10(5)dG levels in peripheral leukocytes of exposed groups were significantly higher compared to the control group (Prisk from occupational styrene exposure, even at levels below the recommended TLV-TWA(8) of 20 ppm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring oxidative damage to DNA and its repair with the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew R

    2014-02-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, was devised as a sensitive method for detecting DNA strand breaks, at the level of individual cells. A simple modification, incorporating a digestion of DNA with a lesion-specific endonuclease, makes it possible to measure oxidised bases. With the inclusion of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase to recognise oxidised purines, or Nth (endonuclease III) to detect oxidised pyrimidines, the comet assay has been used extensively in human biomonitoring to monitor oxidative stress, usually in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. There is evidence to suggest that the enzymic approach is more accurate than chromatographic methods, when applied to low background levels of base oxidation. However, there are potential problems of over-estimation (because the enzymes are not completely specific) or under-estimation (failure to detect lesions that are close together). Attempts have been made to improve the inter-laboratory reproducibility of the comet assay. In addition to measuring DNA damage, the assay can be used to monitor the cellular or in vitro repair of strand breaks or oxidised bases. It also has applications in assessing the antioxidant status of cells. In its various forms, the comet assay is now an invaluable tool in human biomonitoring and genotoxicity testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Current methods to study reactive oxygen species - pros and cons and biophysics of membrane proteins. Guest Editor: Christine Winterbourn. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA damage checkpoint and recombinational repair differentially affect the replication stress tolerance of smc6 mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Szakal, Barnabas; Castellucci, Federica; Branzei, Dana; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoint and recombinational repair are both important for cell survival of replication stress. Because these two processes influence each other, isolation of their respective contributions is challenging. Research in budding yeast shows that removal of the DNA helicase Mph1 improves survival of cells with defective Smc5/6 complex under replication stress. mph1∆ is known to reduce the levels of recombination intermediates in smc6 mutants. Here, we show that mph1∆ also hyperactivates the Mec1 checkpoint. We dissect the effects of recombination regulation and checkpoint hyperactivation by altering the checkpoint circuitry to enhance checkpoint signaling without reducing recombination intermediate levels. We show that these approaches, similar to mph1∆, lead to better survival of smc6 cells upon transient replication stress, likely by ameliorating replication and chromosomal segregation defects. Unlike mph1∆, however, they do not suppress smc6 sensitivity to chronic stress. Conversely, reducing the checkpoint response does not impair survival of smc6 mph1∆ mutants under chronic stress. These results suggest a two-phase model in which smc6 mutant survival upon transient replication stress can be improved by enhancing Mec1 checkpoint signaling, whereas smc6 sensitivity to chronic stress can be overcome by reducing recombination intermediates. PMID:23783034

  8. Damage-induced hydrolyses modelling of biodegradable polymers for tendons and ligaments repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André C; Guedes, Rui M; Tita, Volnei

    2015-09-18

    The use of biodegradable synthetic grafts to repair injured ligaments may overcome the disadvantages of other solutions. Apart from biological compatibility, these devices shall also be functionally compatible and temporarily displayed, during the healing process, adequate mechanical support. Laxity of these devices is an important concern. This can cause failure since it may result in joint instability. Laxity results from a progressive accumulation of plastic strain during the cyclic loading. The functional compatibility of a biodegradable synthetic graft and, therefore, the global mechanical properties of the scaffold during degradation, can be optimised using computer-aiding and numerical tools. Therefore, in this work, the ability of numerical tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of the device during its degradation is discussed. Computational approaches based on elastoplastic and viscoplastic constitutive models are also presented. These models enable to simulate the plastic strain accumulation. These computational approaches, where the material model parameters depend on the hydrolytic degradation damage, are calibrated using experimental data measured from biodegradable suture fibres at different degradation steps. Due to durability requirements the selected materials are polydioxone (PDO) and polylactic acid and poly-caprolactone blend (PLA-PCL). Computational approaches investigated are able to predict well the experimental results for both materials, in full strain range until rupture and for different degradation steps. These approaches can be further used in more complex fibrous structures, to predict its global mechanical behaviour during degradation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. Material/Methods Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). Results We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. Conclusions The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease. PMID:27866211

  10. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  11. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-11-20

    BACKGROUND Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. MATERIAL AND METHODS Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). RESULTS We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. CONCLUSIONS The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease.

  12. Repair Effect of Seaweed Polysaccharides with Different Contents of Sulfate Group and Molecular Weights on Damaged HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bhadja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure–activity relationships and repair mechanism of six low-molecular-weight seaweed polysaccharides (SPSs on oxalate-induced damaged human kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 were investigated. These SPSs included Laminaria japonica polysaccharide, degraded Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide, degraded Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide, degraded Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide, Eucheuma gelatinae polysaccharide, and degraded Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharide. These SPSs have a narrow difference of molecular weight (from 1968 to 4020 Da after degradation by controlling H2O2 concentration. The sulfate group (–SO3H content of the six SPSs was 21.7%, 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, 7.0%, and 5.5%, respectively, and the –COOH contents varied between 1.0% to 1.7%. After degradation, no significant difference was observed in the contents of characteristic –SO3H and –COOH groups of polysaccharides. The repair effect of polysaccharides was determined using cell-viability test by CCK-8 assay and cell-morphology test by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results revealed that these SPSs within 0.1–100 μg/mL did not express cytotoxicity in HK-2 cells, and each polysaccharide had a repair effect on oxalate-induced damaged HK-2 cells. Simultaneously, the content of polysaccharide –SO3H was positively correlated with repair ability. Furthermore, the low-molecular-weight degraded polysaccharides showed better repair activity on damaged HK-2 cells than their undegraded counterpart. Our results can provide reference for inhibiting the formation of kidney stones and for developing original anti-stone polysaccharide drugs.

  13. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  14. The nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location, and protein stoichiometry influence the base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E; Wilson, David M; Merienne, Karine

    2012-05-08

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >14 genetic disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases, the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights into how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, the repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely because of the lower level of APE1, FEN1, and LIG1. Damage located toward the 5' end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired, with the accumulation of incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the center or at the 3' end of the repeats or within control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5' end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly at the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that the BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence, and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome and suggest that a suboptimal long-patch BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability.

  15. Association between DNA damage response and repair genes and risk of invasive serous ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joellen M Schildkraut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed the association between 53 genes related to DNA repair and p53-mediated damage response and serous ovarian cancer risk using case-control data from the North Carolina Ovarian Cancer Study (NCOCS, a population-based, case-control study. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis was restricted to 364 invasive serous ovarian cancer cases and 761 controls of white, non-Hispanic race. Statistical analysis was two staged: a screen using marginal Bayes factors (BFs for 484 SNPs and a modeling stage in which we calculated multivariate adjusted posterior probabilities of association for 77 SNPs that passed the screen. These probabilities were conditional on subject age at diagnosis/interview, batch, a DNA quality metric and genotypes of other SNPs and allowed for uncertainty in the genetic parameterizations of the SNPs and number of associated SNPs. Six SNPs had Bayes factors greater than 10 in favor of an association with invasive serous ovarian cancer. These included rs5762746 (median OR(odds ratio(per allele = 0.66; 95% credible interval (CI = 0.44-1.00 and rs6005835 (median OR(per allele = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.53-0.91 in CHEK2, rs2078486 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.21-2.25 and rs12951053 (median OR(per allele = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.20-2.26 in TP53, rs411697 (median OR (rare homozygote = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.35 - 0.79 in BACH1 and rs10131 (median OR( rare homozygote = not estimable in LIG4. The six most highly associated SNPs are either predicted to be functionally significant or are in LD with such a variant. The variants in TP53 were confirmed to be associated in a large follow-up study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, further follow-up of the DNA repair and response pathways in a larger dataset is warranted to confirm these results.

  16. Effect of the Space Environment on the Induction of DNA-repair Related Proteins and Recovery from Radiation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Kikuchi, M.; Narumi, I.

    Recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage and the effects of microgravity were examined in an STS-79 Shuttle/Mir Mission-4 experiment using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space-Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under microgravity. No difference was observed for the survival of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells whether incubated in space or on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, the product of a newly found gene related to the DNA repair mechanism of D. radiodurans, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls

  17. A ubiquitylation site in Cockayne syndrome B required for repair of oxidative DNA damage, but not for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranes, Michael; Boeing, Stefan; Wang, Yuming; Wienholz, Franziska; Menoni, Hervé; Walker, Jane; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Stewart, Aengus; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Vermeulen, Wim; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-06-20

    Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), contains a ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD), but the functional connection between protein ubiquitylation and this UBD remains unclear. Here, we show that CSB is regulated via site-specific ubiquitylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of CSB identified lysine (K) 991 as a ubiquitylation site. Intriguingly, mutation of this residue (K991R) does not affect CSB's catalytic activity or protein stability, but greatly affects genome stability, even in the absence of induced DNA damage. Moreover, cells expressing CSB K991R are sensitive to oxidative DNA damage, but proficient for TC-NER. K991 becomes ubiquitylated upon oxidative DNA damage, and while CSB K991R is recruited normally to such damage, it fails to dissociate in a timely manner, suggesting a requirement for K991 ubiquitylation in CSB activation. Interestingly, deletion of CSB's UBD gives rise to oxidative damage sensitivity as well, while CSB ΔUBD and CSB K991R affects expression of overlapping groups of genes, further indicating a functional connection. Together, these results shed new light on the regulation of CSB, with K991R representing an important separation-of-function-mutation in this multi-functional protein. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Selective base excision repair of DNA damage by the non-base-flipping DNA glycosylase AlkC

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    Shi, Rongxin; Mullins, Elwood A.; Shen, Xing; #8208; Xing; Lay, Kori T.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Rokas, Antonis; Eichman, Brandt F. (UCD); (Vanderbilt)

    2017-10-20

    DNA glycosylases preserve genome integrity and define the specificity of the base excision repair pathway for discreet, detrimental modifications, and thus, the mechanisms by which glycosylases locate DNA damage are of particular interest. Bacterial AlkC and AlkD are specific for cationic alkylated nucleobases and have a distinctive HEAT-like repeat (HLR) fold. AlkD uses a unique non-base-flipping mechanism that enables excision of bulky lesions more commonly associated with nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, AlkC has a much narrower specificity for small lesions, principally N3-methyladenine (3mA). Here, we describe how AlkC selects for and excises 3mA using a non-base-flipping strategy distinct from that of AlkD. A crystal structure resembling a catalytic intermediate complex shows how AlkC uses unique HLR and immunoglobulin-like domains to induce a sharp kink in the DNA, exposing the damaged nucleobase to active site residues that project into the DNA. This active site can accommodate and excise N3-methylcytosine (3mC) and N1-methyladenine (1mA), which are also repaired by AlkB-catalyzed oxidative demethylation, providing a potential alternative mechanism for repair of these lesions in bacteria.

  19. Alternative Excision Repair of Ultraviolet B- and C-Induced DNA Damage in Dormant and Developing Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guadiana, Fernando H.; Barraza-Salas, Marcelo; Ramírez-Ramírez, Norma; Ortiz-Cortés, Mayte; Setlow, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) and spore photoproduct lyase DNA repair pathways are major determinants of Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to UV radiation. We report here that a putative ultraviolet (UV) damage endonuclease encoded by ywjD confers protection to developing and dormant spores of B. subtilis against UV DNA damage. In agreement with its predicted function, a His6-YwjD recombinant protein catalyzed the specific incision of UV-irradiated DNA in vitro. The maximum expression of a reporter gene fusion to the ywjD opening reading frame occurred late in sporulation, and this maximal expression was dependent on the forespore-specific RNA polymerase sigma factor, σG. Although the absence of YwjD and/or UvrA, an essential protein of the NER pathway, sensitized developing spores to UV-C, this effect was lower when these cells were treated with UV-B. In contrast, UV-B but not UV-C radiation dramatically decreased the survival of dormant spores deficient in both YwjD and UvrA. The distinct range of lesions generated by UV-C and UV-B and the different DNA photochemistry in developing and dormant spores may cause these differences. We postulate that in addition to the UvrABC repair system, developing and dormant spores of B. subtilis also rely on an alternative excision repair pathway involving YwjD to deal with the deleterious effects of various UV photoproducts. PMID:22961846

  20. NR1D1 Recruitment to Sites of DNA Damage Inhibits Repair and Is Associated with Chemosensitivity of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Na-Lee; Na, Tae-Young; Na, Hyelin; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Han-Su; Hwang, Sewon; Kim, Il Yong; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Mi-Ock

    2017-05-01

    DNA repair capacity is critical for survival of cancer cells upon therapeutic DNA damage and thus is an important determinant of susceptibility to chemotherapy in cancer patients. In this study, we identified a novel function of nuclear receptor NR1D1 in DNA repair, which enhanced chemosensitivity in breast cancer cells. NR1D1 inhibited both nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination double-strand breaks repair, and delayed the clearance of γH2AX DNA repair foci that formed after treatment of doxorubicin. PARylation of NR1D1 by PARP1 drove its recruitment to damaged DNA lesions. Deletion of the ligand binding domain of NR1D1 that interacted with PARP1, or treatment of 6-(5H)-phenanthridinone, an inhibitor of PARP1, suppressed the recruitment of NR1D1 to DNA damaged sites, indicating PARylation as a critical step for the NR1D1 recruitment. NR1D1 inhibited recruitment of the components of DNA damage response complex such as SIRT6, pNBS1, and BRCA1 to DNA lesions. Downregulation of NR1D1 in MCF7 cells resulted in resistance to doxorubicin, both in vitro and in vivo Analysis of four public patient data sets indicated that NR1D1 expression correlates positively with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients who received chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and its ligands provide therapeutic options that could enhance the outcomes of chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. Cancer Res; 77(9); 2453-63. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Comparison of the Tendon Damage Caused by Four Different Anchor Systems Used in Transtendon Rotator Cuff Repair

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    Qing-Song Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this study was to compare the damage to the rotator cuff tendons caused by four different anchor systems. Methods. 20 cadaveric human shoulder joints were used for transtendon insertion of four anchor systems. The Healix Peek, Fastin RC, Bio-Corkscrew Suture, and Healix Transtend anchors were inserted through the tendons using standard transtendon procedures. The areas of tendon damage were measured. Results. The areas of tendon damage (mean ± standard deviation, n=7 were 29.1 ± 4.3 mm2 for the Healix Peek anchor, 20.4 ± 2.3 mm2 for the Fastin RC anchor, 23.4 ± 1.2 mm2 for the Bio-Corkscrew Suture anchor, 13.7 ± 3.2 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted directly, and 9.1 ± 2.1 mm2 for the Healix Transtend anchor inserted through the Percannula system (P<0.001 or P<0.001, compared to other anchors. Conclusions. In a cadaver transtendon rotator cuff repair model, smaller anchors caused less damage to the tendon tissues. The Healix Transtend implant system caused the least damage to the tendon tissues. Our findings suggest that smaller anchors should be considered when performing transtendon procedures to repair partial rotator cuff tears.

  2. Electrochemical characteristics of five quinolone drugs and their effect on DNA damage and repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A; Tocher, J; Edwards, D I

    1990-05-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether 4-quinolone antimicrobials were reduced under biologically attainable redox conditions and whether they had any effect on DNA in the absence of the DNA gyrase enzyme. Electrochemical characteristics of the drugs were investigated using d c polarography, differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry. The ability of the drugs to interact with, and cause damage to, naked DNA was investigated by a phi X174 DNA double transfection assay. Induction of DNA SOS repair was assessed using a stain of Escherichia coli in which the synthesis of beta-galactosidase was under the control of the su1A gene. Growth studies were performed using a conductimetric method in a Malthus system. All five 4-quinolones examined had redox potentials lower (more negative) than -1.2 V and thus were incapable of being reduced in biological systems, even under strict anaerobiosis. Exposure of all drugs to single-stranded phi X174 DNA for up to 50 h engendered no detectable damage. However, all the drugs induced DNA SOS repair, in the order ciprofloxacin greater than fleroxacin = pefloxacin greater than norfloxacin greater than nalidixic acid. This rank order corresponds approximately with antibacterial efficiency. The growth studies indicated that redoxyendonuclease III and excision repair enzymes may be involved in the fixation of quinolone-induced damage.

  3. Effect of Amalaki rasayana on DNA damage and repair in randomized aged human individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanatha, Udupi; Guruprasad, Kanive P; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Acharya, Raviraj V; Prasanna, Bokkasa V; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Ganesh, Rajeshwari; Rao, Jayalaxmi; Shree, Rashmi; Anchan, Suchitra; Raghu, Kothanahalli S; Joshi, Manjunath B; Paladhi, Puspendu; Varier, Panniampilly M; Muraleedharan, Kollath; Muraleedharan, Thrikovil S; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2016-09-15

    Preparations from Phyllanthus emblica called Amalaki rasayana is used in the Indian traditional medicinal system of Ayurveda for healthy living in elderly. The biological effects and its mechanisms are not fully understood. Since the diminishing DNA repair is the hallmark of ageing, we tested the influence of Amalaki rasayana on recognized DNA repair activities in healthy aged individuals. Amalaki rasayana was prepared fresh and healthy aged randomized human volunteers were administrated with either rasayana or placebo for 45 days strictly as per the traditional text. The DNA repair was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after rasayana administration and after 45 days post-rasayana treatment regimen. UVC-induced DNA strand break repair (DSBR) based on extent of DNA unwinding by fluorometric analysis, nucleotide excision repair (NER) by flow cytometry and constitutive base excision repair (BER) by gap filling method were analyzed. Amalaki rasayana administration stably maintained/enhanced the DSBR in aged individuals. There were no adverse side effects. Further, subjects with different body mass index showed differential DNA strand break repair capacity. No change in unscheduled DNA synthesis during NER and BER was observed between the groups. Intake of Amalaki rasayana by aged individuals showed stable maintenance of DNA strand break repair without toxic effects. However, there was no change in nucleotide and base excision repair activities. Results warrant further studies on the effects of Amalaki rasayana on DSBR activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular ageing of alpha- and Beta-synucleins: protein damage and repair mechanisms.

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    Vasanthy Vigneswara

    Full Text Available Abnormal α-synuclein aggregates are hallmarks of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Alpha synuclein and β-synucleins are susceptible to post-translational modification as isoaspartate protein damage, which is regulated in vivo by the action of the repair enzyme protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT. We aged in vitro native α-synuclein, the α-synuclein familial mutants A30P and A53T that give rise to Parkinsonian phenotypes, and β-synuclein, at physiological pH and temperature for a time course of up to 20 days. Resolution of native α-synuclein and β-synuclein by two dimensional techniques showed the accumulation of a number of post-translationally modified forms of both proteins. The levels of isoaspartate formed over the 20 day time course were quantified by exogenous methylation with PIMT using S-Adenosyl-L-[(3H-methyl]methionine as a methyl donor, and liquid scintillation counting of liberated (3H-methanol. All α-synuclein proteins accumulated isoaspartate at ∼1% of molecules/day, ∼20 times faster than for β-synuclein. This disparity between rates of isoaspartate was confirmed by exogenous methylation of synucleins by PIMT, protein resolution by one-dimensional denaturing gel electrophoresis, and visualisation of (3H-methyl esters by autoradiography. Protein silver staining and autoradiography also revealed that α-synucleins accumulated stable oligomers that were resistant to denaturing conditions, and which also contained isoaspartate. Co-incubation of approximately equimolar β-synuclein with α-synuclein resulted in a significant reduction of isoaspartate formed in all α-synucleins after 20 days of ageing. Co-incubated α- and β-synucleins, or α, or β synucleins alone, were resolved by non-denaturing size exclusion chromatography and all formed oligomers of ∼57.5 kDa; consistent with tetramerization. Direct association of α-synuclein with β-synuclein in column fractions or from in vitro ageing co

  5. Repair of traumatic plasmalemmal damage to neurons and other eukaryotic cells

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    George D Bittner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair (sealing of plasmalemmal damage, consisting of small holes to complete transections, is critical for cell survival, especially for neurons that rarely regenerate cell bodies. We first describe and evaluate different measures of cell sealing. Some measures, including morphological/ultra-structural observations, membrane potential, and input resistance, provide very ambiguous assessments of plasmalemmal sealing. In contrast, measures of ionic current flow and dye barriers can, if appropriately used, provide more accurate assessments. We describe the effects of various substances (calcium, calpains, cytoskeletal proteins, ESCRT proteins, mUNC-13, NSF, PEG and biochemical pathways (PKA, PKC, PLC, Epac, cytosolic oxidation on plasmalemmal sealing probability, and suggest that substances, pathways, and cellular events associated with plasmalemmal sealing have undergone a very conservative evolution. During sealing, calcium ion influx mobilizes vesicles and other membranous structures (lysosomes, mitochondria, etc. in a continuous fashion to form a vesicular plug that gradually restricts diffusion of increasingly smaller molecules and ions over a period of seconds to minutes. Furthermore, we find no direct evidence that sealing occurs through the collapse and fusion of severed plasmalemmal leaflets, or in a single step involving the fusion of one large wound vesicle with the nearby, undamaged plasmalemma. We describe how increases in perikaryal calcium levels following axonal transection account for observations that cell body survival decreases the closer an axon is transected to the perikaryon. Finally, we speculate on relationships between plasmalemmal sealing, Wallerian degeneration, and the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG to seal cell membranes and rejoin severed axonal ends – an important consideration for the future treatment of trauma to peripheral nerves. A better knowledge of biochemical pathways and cytoplasmic structures

  6. Repair of traumatic plasmalemmal damage to neurons and other eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, George D; Spaeth, Christopher S; Poon, Andrew D; Burgess, Zachary S; McGill, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The repair (sealing) of plasmalemmal damage, consisting of small holes to complete transections, is critical for cell survival, especially for neurons that rarely regenerate cell bodies. We first describe and evaluate different measures of cell sealing. Some measures, including morphological/ultra-structural observations, membrane potential, and input resistance, provide very ambiguous assessments of plasmalemmal sealing. In contrast, measures of ionic current flow and dye barriers can, if appropriately used, provide more accurate assessments. We describe the effects of various substances (calcium, calpains, cytoskeletal proteins, ESCRT proteins, mUNC-13, NSF, PEG) and biochemical pathways (PKA, PKC, PLC, Epac, cytosolic oxidation) on plasmalemmal sealing probability, and suggest that substances, pathways, and cellular events associated with plasmalemmal sealing have undergone a very conservative evolution. During sealing, calcium ion influx mobilizes vesicles and other membranous structures (lysosomes, mitochondria, etc.) in a continuous fashion to form a vesicular plug that gradually restricts diffusion of increasingly smaller molecules and ions over a period of seconds to minutes. Furthermore, we find no direct evidence that sealing occurs through the collapse and fusion of severed plasmalemmal leaflets, or in a single step involving the fusion of one large wound vesicle with the nearby, undamaged plasmalemma. We describe how increases in perikaryal calcium levels following axonal transection account for observations that cell body survival decreases the closer an axon is transected to the perikaryon. Finally, we speculate on relationships between plasmalemmal sealing, Wallerian degeneration, and the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to seal cell membranes and rejoin severed axonal ends - an important consideration for the future treatment of trauma to peripheral nerves. A better knowledge of biochemical pathways and cytoplasmic structures involved in

  7. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers photolyase from extremophilic microalga: Remarkable UVB resistance and efficient DNA damage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chongjie [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Ma, Li [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Mou, Shanli [Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao (China); Wang, Yibin, E-mail: wangyibin@fio.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Zheng, Zhou; Liu, Fangming; Qi, Xiaoqing; An, Meiling; Chen, Hao [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); Miao, Jinlai, E-mail: miaojinlai@163.com [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioactive Substance, The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biological Fermentation Engineering of Beer (In Preparation), Qingdao (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L photolyase gene PHR2 is first cloned and expressed in E. coli. • PHR2 complemented E. coli could efficiently survival from UV radiation. • Expressed PHR2 photolyase has distinct photo-reactivation activity in vitro. - Abstract: Bacteria living in the Antarctic region have developed several adaptive features for growth and survival under extreme conditions. Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-Lis well adapted to high levels of solar UV radiation. A putative photolyase was identified in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L transcriptome. The complete cDNA sequence was obtained by RACE-PCR. This PHR encoding includes a polypeptide of 579 amino acids with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class II CPD-photolyases, sharing a high degree of homology with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (68%). Real-time PCR was performed to investigate the potential DNA damage and responses following UVB exposure. CPD photolyase mRNA expression level increased over 50-fold in response to UVB radiation for 6 h. Using photolyase complementation assay, we demonstrated that DNA photolyase increased photo-repair more than 116-fold in Escherichia coli strain SY2 under 100 μw/cm{sup 2} UVB radiation. To determine whether photolyase is active in vitro, CPD photolyase was over-expressed. It was shown that pyrimidine dimers were split by the action of PHR2. This study reports the unique structure and high activity of the enzyme. These findings are relevant for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of photo-reactivation, and will accelerate the utilization of photolyase in the medical field.

  8. Contributions of DNA repair and damage response pathways to the non-linear genotoxic responses of alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapacz, Joanna; Pottenger, Lynn H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Johnson, George E.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2016-01-01

    From a risk assessment perspective, DNA-reactive agents are conventionally assumed to have genotoxic risks at all exposure levels, thus applying a linear extrapolation for low-dose responses. New approaches discussed here, including more diverse and sensitive methods for assessing DNA damage and DNA repair, strongly support the existence of measurable regions where genotoxic responses with increasing doses are insignificant relative to control. Model monofunctional alkylating agents have in vitro and in vivo datasets amenable to determination of points of departure (PoDs) for genotoxic effects. A session at the 2013 Society of Toxicology meeting provided an opportunity to survey the progress in understanding the biological basis of empirically-observed PoDs for DNA alkylating agents. Together with the literature published since, this review discusses cellular pathways activated by endogenous and exogenous alkylation DNA damage. Cells have evolved conserved processes that monitor and counteract a spontaneous steady-state level of DNA damage. The ubiquitous network of DNA repair pathways serves as the first line of defense for clearing of the DNA damage and preventing mutation. Other biological pathways discussed here that are activated by genotoxic stress include post-translational activation of cell cycle networks and transcriptional networks for apoptosis/cell death. The interactions of various DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways provide biological bases for the observed PoD behaviors seen with genotoxic compounds. Thus, after formation of DNA adducts, the activation of cellular pathways can lead to the avoidance a mutagenic outcome. The understanding of the cellular mechanisms acting within the low-dose region will serve to better characterize risks from exposures to DNA-reactive agents at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:27036068

  9. A modelling study of drying shrinkage damage in concrete repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems (Martinola, Sadouki et al. 2001, Beushausen and Alexander 2007). Magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the amount of restraint,

  10. A 3D Lattice Modelling Study of Drying Shrinkage Damage in Concrete Repair Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Ye, G.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Differential shrinkage between repair material and concrete substrate is considered to be the main cause of premature failure of repair systems. The magnitude of induced stresses depends on many factors, for example the degree of restraint, moisture gradients caused by curing and drying conditions,

  11. Equivalency of the quality of sublethal lesions after photons and high-linear energy transfer ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Yoshiya; Nakano-Aoki, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki

    2017-11-01

    The quality of the sublethal damage (SLD) after irradiation with high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion beams was investigated with low-LET photons. Chinese hamster V79 cells and human squamous carcinoma SAS cells were first exposed to a priming dose of different ion beams at different LETs at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in the Chiba facility. The cells were kept at room temperature and then exposed to a secondary test dose of X-rays. Based on the repair kinetics study, the surviving fraction of cells quickly increased with the repair time, and reached a plateau in 2-3 h, even when cells had received priming monoenergetic high-LET beams or spread-out Bragg peak beams as well as X-ray irradiation. The shapes of the cell survival curves from the secondary test X-rays, after repair of the damage caused by the high-LET irradiation, were similar to those obtained from cells exposed to primary X-rays only. Complete SLD repairs were observed, even when the LET of the primary ion beams was very high. These results suggest that the SLD caused by high-LET irradiation was repaired well, and likewise, the damage caused by the X-rays. In cells where the ion beam had made a direct hit in the core region in an ion track, lethal damage to the domain was produced, resulting in cell death. On the other hand, in domains that had received a glancing hit in the low-LET penumbra region, the SLD produced was completely repaired. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. Specific Inhibition of NEIL-initiated Repair of Oxidized Base Damage in Human Genome by Copper and Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Holthauzen, Luis M. F.; Hazra, Tapas K.; Rao, K. S. Jagannatha; Mitra, Sankar

    2010-01-01

    Dyshomeostasis of transition metals iron and copper as well as accumulation of oxidative DNA damage have been implicated in multitude of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. These metals oxidize DNA bases by generating reactive oxygen species. Most oxidized bases in mammalian genomes are repaired via the base excision repair pathway, initiated with one of four major DNA glycosylases: NTH1 or OGG1 (of the Nth family) or NEIL1 or NEIL2 (of the Nei family). Here we show that Fe(II/III) and Cu(II) at physiological levels bind to NEIL1 and NEIL2 to alter their secondary structure and strongly inhibit repair of mutagenic 5-hydroxyuracil, a common cytosine oxidation product, both in vitro and in neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell extract by affecting the base excision and AP lyase activities of NEILs. The specificity of iron/copper inhibition of NEILs is indicated by a lack of similar inhibition of OGG1, which also indicated that the inhibition is due to metal binding to the enzymes and not DNA. Fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance studies show submicromolar binding of copper/iron to NEILs but not OGG1. Furthermore, Fe(II) inhibits the interaction of NEIL1 with downstream base excision repair proteins DNA polymerase β and flap endonuclease-1 by 4–6-fold. These results indicate that iron/copper overload in the neurodegenerative diseases could act as a double-edged sword by both increasing oxidative genome damage and preventing their repair. Interestingly, specific chelators, including the natural chemopreventive compound curcumin, reverse the inhibition of NEILs both in vitro and in cells, suggesting their therapeutic potential. PMID:20622253

  13. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Katiyar

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum, inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells.

  14. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair. Technical progress report, May 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.S. [Vermont Univ., Burlington, VT (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Erlanger, B.F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  15. Modulation of DNA-induced damage and repair capacity in humans after dietary intervention with lutein-enriched fermented milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Herrero-Barbudo

    Full Text Available Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers.

  16. Modulation of DNA-Induced Damage and Repair Capacity in Humans after Dietary Intervention with Lutein-Enriched Fermented Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Barbudo, Carmen; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Pérez-Sacristán, Belén; Blanco-Navarro, Inmaculada; Herrera, Mercedes; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Domínguez, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    Dietary factors provide protection against several forms of DNA damage. Additionally, consumer demand for natural products favours the development of bioactive food ingredients with health benefits. Lutein is a promising biologically active component in the food industry. The EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies considers that protection from oxidative damage may be a beneficial physiological effect but that a cause and effect relationship has not been established. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the safety and potential functional effect of a lutein-enriched milk product using the Comet Assay in order to analyze the baseline, the induced DNA-damage and the repair capacity in the lymphocytes of 10 healthy donors before and after the intake of the mentioned product. Our data suggest that the regular consumption of lutein-enriched fermented milk results in a significant increase in serum lutein levels and this change is associated with an improvement in the resistance of DNA to damage and the capacity of DNA repair in lymphocytes. Our results also support the lack of a genotoxic effect at the doses supplied as well as the absence of interactions and side effects on other nutritional and biochemicals markers. PMID:24040187

  17. Adult Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Primed for fhe Repair of Damaged Cardiac Tissue After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Edward D.

    The burden of cardiovascular disease around the world is growing, despite improvements in hospital care and time to treatment. As more people survive an initial myocardial infarction (MI), the decompensated heart tissue is strained, leading to heart failure (HF) and an increased risk for a second MI. While extensive progress has been made in treating the symptoms after MI, including HF and angina, little success has come from repairing the damaged heart tissue to alleviate the progression to these end- stage symptoms. One promising area of regenerative research has been the use of adult stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow (BMSCs). These cells can differentiate towards the cardiac cell lineage in vitro while producing trophic factors that can repair damaged tissue. When placed in the heart after MI though, BMSCs have mixed results, producing profound changes in some patients but zero or even negative effects in others. In this report, we used BMSCs as a stem cell base for a regenerative medicine system for the repair of damaged cardiac tissue. These cells are seeded on a polycaprolactone nanoscaffolding support system, which provides a growth substrate for in vitro work, as well as a housing system for protected in vivo delivery. When the nanoscaffold is pre-coated with a novel combination of a cardiac protein, thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4), and a small molecule effector of the WNT protein pathway, IWP-2, BMSCs differentiated towards the cardiac lineage in as little as 24hours. When injected into rat hearts that have been given an ischemic MI, the nanoscaffolding system slowly dissolves, leaving the cells in place of the damaged cardiac tissue. After two weeks of monitoring, BMSCs are present within the damaged hearts, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and nanoparticle tracking. Injections of the nanoscaffolding/cell system led to robust healing of the rat hearts that had been given small- and medium- damage heart attacks, outperforming PBS sham and cell

  18. Photo-enzymatic repair of UVB-induced DNA damage in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yasumasa; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation induces lethal effects in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, whereas photoreactivation by irradiation with ultraviolet-A and visible light (VIS) plays an important role to increase survival of mites irradiated by UVB. The physiological mechanisms and ecological significance of photoreactivation in terrestrial arthropods have not been shown clearly. We verified the biological impact and accumulation of DNA lesions by UVB irradiation and the repair of them by photoreactivation in T. urticae larvae. Survival of UVB-irradiated larvae decreased with increasing UVB dose, but recovered remarkably with VIS exposure after UVB irradiation (photoreactivation). The DNA lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidine photoproducts (6-4PPs) linearly increased with the UVB dose. The CPDs were repaired after exposure to VIS, whereas the frequency of 6-4PPs was unaffected by VIS; CPD photolyase genes, but not (6-4) photolyase genes, have been found in the T. urticae genome. Therefore, DNA damage and CPD photo enzymatic repair (PER) is significant for survival in this mite under ambient UVB radiation. Unexpectedly, gene expression of CPD photolyase was unaffected by irradiation with UVB and VIS. Instead, expression of xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA) was increased by irradiation. XPA is a core factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is a repair system unrelated to photo energy. The relationship between gene expression and enzymatic repair remains unclear. To elucidate the PER process in T. urticae, further study will be necessary on the gene expression patterns and molecular functions of CPD photolyase in PER and of XPA in NER.

  19. Protecting DNA from errors and damage: an overview of DNA repair mechanisms in plants compared to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Claudia P

    2017-05-01

    The genome integrity of all organisms is constantly threatened by replication errors and DNA damage arising from endogenous and exogenous sources. Such base pair anomalies must be accurately repaired to prevent mutagenesis and/or lethality. Thus, it is not surprising that cells have evolved multiple and partially overlapping DNA repair pathways to correct specific types of DNA errors and lesions. Great progress in unraveling these repair mechanisms at the molecular level has been made by several talented researchers, among them Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich, all three Nobel laureates in Chemistry for 2015. Much of this knowledge comes from studies performed in bacteria, yeast, and mammals and has impacted research in plant systems. Two plant features should be mentioned. Plants differ from higher eukaryotes in that they lack a reserve germline and cannot avoid environmental stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different strategies to sustain genome fidelity through generations and continuous exposure to genotoxic stresses. These strategies include the presence of unique or multiple paralogous genes with partially overlapping DNA repair activities. Yet, in spite (or because) of these differences, plants, especially Arabidopsis thaliana, can be used as a model organism for functional studies. Some advantages of this model system are worth mentioning: short life cycle, availability of both homozygous and heterozygous lines for many genes, plant transformation techniques, tissue culture methods and reporter systems for gene expression and function studies. Here, I provide a current understanding of DNA repair genes in plants, with a special focus on A. thaliana. It is expected that this review will be a valuable resource for future functional studies in the DNA repair field, both in plants and animals.

  20. Application of a molecular biology concept for the detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, Jacqueline; Volz, Sabrina; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As nucleic acids are major targets in bacteria during standardised UV disinfection (254 nm), inactivation rates also depend on bacterial DNA repair. Due to UV-related DNA modifications, PCR-based approaches allow for a direct detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection. By applying different primer sets, the correlation between amplicon length and PCR amplification became obvious. The longer the targeted DNA fragment was, the more UV-induced DNA lesions inhibited the PCR. Regeneration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and complex wastewater communities was recorded over a time period of 66 h. While phases of intensive repair and proliferation were found for P. aeruginosa, no DNA repair was detected by qPCR in E. faecium. Cultivation experiments verified these results. Despite high UV mediated inactivation rates original wastewater bacteria seem to express an enhanced robustness against irradiation. Regeneration of dominant and proliferation of low-abundant, probably UV-resistant species contributed to a strong post-irradiation recovery accompanied by a selection for beta-Proteobacteria.

  1. Organisms posses enzymes that function in the repair of DNA damaged by radiations, chemicals and metabolic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuma, Nagayo [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1998-01-01

    This report briefly describes the studies on the mechanism of in vivo DNA repairing by the author in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ. for the past 30 years. First, the ability of UV radiation to induce transformation was investigated with viral DNA. The formation of thymine-thymine dimer was found harmful to organisms and such dimers were removable by UV-radiation at a low frequency. The mutability was determined in three different E.coli strains with mutator gene, mutT, mutS or mutL. The ability to excise 8-oxoguanin developed in primer DNA was deficient in mutT and miss-pairing left after DNA replication could not be recovered in mutL and mutS strains. Further, DNA repairing mechanism was investigated in other microorganisms; single-strand cleavage caused by exposure to BNCB radiation (boron-neutron-captured beam) could not be repaired in E. coli. Whereas for Deinococcus radiodurans, of which survival rate was not decreased by {gamma}-ray radiation at 5 kGy or less, it was found that its single-strand DNA was damaged by {gamma}-radiation to smaller molecules, but it was mended to the similar size to that in the non-irradiated cells during incubation. In addition, the transformation frequency was also recovered in the actinomycetes. Thus, it was demonstrated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the repairing system of recombination. (M.N.)

  2. Repair of impact damaged utility poles with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP), phase II : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The aluminum and steel utility poles which support traffic signals, lighting, or mast-arm signs : are vulnerable to collisions from vehicles because of proximity to roadways. Removing these : poles for repair is costly and time-consuming, and removal...

  3. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report: third new contract year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress for 1979-1980 is reported. Projects discussed include the process of radiation-induced repair, Weigle-reactivation, induced radioresistance, the induction of the recA gene product, uv mutagenesis, and the induction of lambda. (ACR)

  4. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P. Rastogi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is one of the prime molecules, and its stability is of utmost importance for proper functioning and existence of all living systems. Genotoxic chemicals and radiations exert adverse effects on genome stability. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR (mainly UV-B: 280–315 nm is one of the powerful agents that can alter the normal state of life by inducing a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs, 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs, and their Dewar valence isomers as well as DNA strand breaks by interfering the genome integrity. To counteract these lesions, organisms have developed a number of highly conserved repair mechanisms such as photoreactivation, base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, and mismatch repair (MMR. Additionally, double-strand break repair (by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, SOS response, cell-cycle checkpoints, and programmed cell death (apoptosis are also operative in various organisms with the expense of specific gene products. This review deals with UV-induced alterations in DNA and its maintenance by various repair mechanisms.

  6. DNA damage response and cancer therapeutics through the lens of the Fanconi Anemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Nandi, Saikat

    2017-10-10

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare, inherited genomic instability disorder, caused by mutations in genes involved in the repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs). The FA signaling network contains a unique nuclear protein complex that mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FANCD2 and FANCI heterodimer, and coordinates activities of the downstream DNA repair pathway including nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis, and homologous recombination. FA proteins act at different steps of ICL repair in sensing, recognition and processing of DNA lesions. The multi-protein network is tightly regulated by complex mechanisms, such as ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation signals that are critical for the maintenance of genome integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how the FA proteins participate in ICL repair and regulation of the FA signaling network that assures the safeguard of the genome. We further discuss the potential application of designing small molecule inhibitors that inhibit the FA pathway and are synthetic lethal with DNA repair enzymes that can be used for cancer therapeutics.

  7. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.

    2003-01-01

    In several epidemiological studies, high intakes of fruits and vegetables have been associated with a lower incidence of cancer. Theoretically, intake of antioxidants by consumption of fruits and vegetables should protect against reactive oxygen species and decrease the formation of oxidative DNA...... damage. We set up a parallel 24-day dietary placebo-controlled intervention study in which 43 subjects were randomized into three groups receiving an antioxidant-free basal diet and 600 g of fruits and vegetables, or a supplement containing the corresponding amounts of vitamins and minerals, or placebo......-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine was measured in urine. The expressions of oxoguanine glycosylase I and excision repair cross complementing I DNA repair genes, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR of mRNAs, were investigated in leukocytes. Consumption of fruits and vegetables or vitamins and minerals...

  8. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair: Study of the contribution of sub-processes using competitive gene-set analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Sørensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  9. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  10. Damage escape and repair in dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from hot and cold deserts exposed to simulated space and martian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3 mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  11. Essential and distinct roles of the F-box and helicase domains of Fbh1 in DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinagawa Hideo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are induced by exogenous insults such as ionizing radiation and chemical exposure, and they can also arise as a consequence of stalled or collapsed DNA replication forks. Failure to repair DSBs can lead to genomic instability or cell death and cancer in higher eukaryotes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbh1 gene encodes an F-box DNA helicase previously described to play a role in the Rhp51 (an orthologue of S. cerevisiae RAD51-dependent recombinational repair of DSBs. Fbh1 fused to GFP localizes to discrete nuclear foci following DNA damage. Results To determine the functional roles of the highly conserved F-box and helicase domains, we have characterized fbh1 mutants carrying specific mutations in these domains. We show that the F-box mutation fbh1-fb disturbs the nuclear localization of Fbh1, conferring an fbh1 null-like phenotype. Moreover, nuclear foci do not form in fbh1-fb cells with DNA damage even if Fbh1-fb is targeted to the nucleus by fusion to a nuclear localization signal sequence. In contrast, the helicase mutation fbh1-hl causes the accumulation of Fbh1 foci irrespective of the presence of DNA damage and confers damage sensitivity greater than that conferred by the null allele. Additional mutation of the F-box alleviates the hypermorphic phenotype of the fbh1-hl mutant. Conclusion These results suggest that the F-box and DNA helicase domains play indispensable but distinct roles in Fbh1 function. Assembly of the SCFFbh1 complex is required for both the nuclear localization and DNA damage-induced focus formation of Fbh1 and is therefore prerequisite for the Fbh1 recombination function.

  12. Induction and repair of DNA damage measured by the comet assay in human T lymphocytes separated by immunomagnetic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2014-11-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage in whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents. Cytogenetic assays with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured T lymphocytes are also frequently performed in human biomonitoring. Cytogenetic effects (micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges) may be induced in vivo but also occur ex vivo during the cultivation of lymphocytes as a consequence of DNA damage present in lymphocytes at the time of sampling. To better understand whether DNA damage measured by the comet assay in PBMC is representative for DNA damage in T cells, we comparatively investigated DNA damage and its repair in PBMC and T cells obtained by immunomagnetic cell sorting. PBMC cultures and T cell cultures were exposed to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action and DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after the end of a 2h exposure and after 18h post-incubation. The mutagens tested were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), styrene oxide and potassium bromate. MMS and potassium bromate were also tested by the modified comet assay with formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein. The results indicate that the mutagens tested induce DNA damage in PBMC and T cells in the same range of concentrations and removal of induced DNA lesions occurs to a comparable extent. Based on these results, we conclude that the comet assay with PBMC is suited to predict DNA damage and its removal in T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell cycle stage-specific roles of Rad18 in tolerance and repair of oxidative DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Durando, Michael; Smith-Roe, Stephanie L.; Sproul, Chris; Greenwalt, Alicia M.; Kaufmann, William; Oh, Sehyun; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 mediates tolerance of replication fork-stalling bulky DNA lesions, but whether Rad18 mediates tolerance of bulky DNA lesions acquired outside S-phase is unclear. Using synchronized cultures of primary human cells, we defined cell cycle stage-specific contributions of Rad18 to genome maintenance in response to ultraviolet C (UVC) and H2O2-induced DNA damage. UVC and H2O2 treatments both induced Rad18-mediated proliferating cell nuclear antigen mono-ubiquitination during G0, G1 and S-phase. Rad18 was important for repressing H2O2-induced (but not ultraviolet-induced) double strand break (DSB) accumulation and ATM S1981 phosphorylation only during G1, indicating a specific role for Rad18 in processing of oxidative DNA lesions outside S-phase. However, H2O2-induced DSB formation in Rad18-depleted G1 cells was not associated with increased genotoxin sensitivity, indicating that back-up DSB repair mechanisms compensate for Rad18 deficiency. Indeed, in DNA LigIV-deficient cells Rad18-depletion conferred H2O2-sensitivity, demonstrating functional redundancy between Rad18 and non-homologous end joining for tolerance of oxidative DNA damage acquired during G1. In contrast with G1-synchronized cultures, S-phase cells were H2O2-sensitive following Rad18-depletion. We conclude that although Rad18 pathway activation by oxidative lesions is not restricted to S-phase, Rad18-mediated trans-lesion synthesis by Polη is dispensable for damage-tolerance in G1 (because of back-up non-homologous end joining-mediated DSB repair), yet Rad18 is necessary for damage tolerance during S-phase. PMID:23295675

  14. Expression of a human cytochrome p450 in yeast permits analysis of pathways for response to and repair of aflatoxin-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D; Eaton, David L

    2005-07-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in strains defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) (rad14), postreplication repair (PRR) (rad6, rad18, mms2, and rad5), homologous recombinational repair (HRR) (rad51 and rad54), base excision repair (BER) (apn1 apn2), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (yku70), mismatch repair (MMR) (pms1), translesion synthesis (TLS) (rev3), and checkpoints (mec1-1, mec1-1 rad53, rad9, and rad17). Together our data suggest the involvement of homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair, postreplication repair, and checkpoints in the repair and/or tolerance of AFB1-induced DNA damage in the yeast model. Rev3 appears to mediate AFB1-induced mutagenesis when error-free pathways are compromised. The results further suggest unique roles for Rad5 and abasic endonuclease-dependent DNA intermediates in regulating AFB1-induced mutagenicity.

  15. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Soliymani, Rabah [Protein Chemistry Unit, Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Radiation and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Ahtiainen, Laura [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Hemminki, Akseli, E-mail: akseli.hemminki@helsinki.fi [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  16. Endonuclease IV Is the Main Base Excision Repair Enzyme Involved in DNA Damage Induced by UVA Radiation and Stannous Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen S. Motta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stannous chloride (SnCl2 and UVA induce DNA lesions through ROS. The aim of this work was to study the toxicity induced by UVA preillumination, followed by SnCl2 treatment. E. coli BER mutants were used to identify genes which could play a role in DNA lesion repair generated by these agents. The survival assays showed (i The nfo mutant was the most sensitive to SnCl2; (ii lethal synergistic effect was observed after UVA pre-illumination, plus SnCl2 incubation, the nfo mutant being the most sensitive; (iii wild type and nfo mutants, transformed with pBW21 plasmid (nfo+ had their survival increased following treatments. The alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis assays pointed that (i UVA induced DNA breaks and fpg mutant was the most sensitive; (ii SnCl2-induced DNA strand breaks were higher than those from UVA and nfo mutant had the slowest repair kinetics; (iii UVA+SnCl2 promoted an increase in DNA breaks than SnCl2 and, again, nfo mutant displayed the slowest repair kinetics. In summary, Nfo protects E. coli cells against damage induced by SnCl2 and UVA+ SnCl2.

  17. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  18. Controlled damaging and repair of self-organized nanostructures by atom manipulation at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurlu, O.; van Houselt, Arie; Thijssen, W.H.A.; van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of controlled local demolition and repair of the recently discovered self-organized Pt nanowires on Ge(001) surfaces has been explored. These nanowires are composed of Pt dimers, which are found to be rather weakly bound to the underlying substrate. Using this property, we

  19. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

    2005-08-12

    DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

  2. U. V. -induced DNA damage and its repair in human skin in vivo studied by sensitive immunohistochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggset, G.; Volden, G.; Krokan, H.

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies specific for u.v.-induced DNA damage were raised in rabbits, and used to study damage and repair of nuclear DNA in nude mouse and human skin in vivo by immuno-fluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques. Purification of the antibodies by affinity chromatography strongly reduced unspecific background staining. In situ denaturation of nuclear DNA with 70 mM NaOH in 70% ethanol increased the sensitivity of the assay approximately 10-fold. Absorption experiments indicated that the specificity of the antibodies was primarily directed against pyrimidine dimers in single stranded DNA. Immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase staining were essentially equally sensitive and positive responses using these techniques were already apparent in epidermal cell nuclei after 0.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of u.v. light. At higher doses, such as 2 MED, the staining was strong in all the epidermal layers and could also be observed in dermis. Even so, removal of antibody binding sites was well under way at 4-5 h post-irradiation and essentially complete after 24 h. Visible light increased the rate of repair, indicating the involvement of a photoreactivation enzyme in human skin in vivo.

  3. Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Trudy G.; Mercer, Kim L.; Sayles, Leanne C.; Burke, James R.; Mendus, Diana; Lovejoy, Katherine S.; Cheng, Mei-Hsin; Subramanian, Aravind; Mu, David; Powers, Scott; Crowley, Denise; Bronson, Roderick T.; Whittaker, Charles A.; Bhutkar, Arjun; Lippard, Stephen J.; Golub, Todd; Thomale, Juergen; Jacks, Tyler; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined the dynamics of response to a mainstay chemotherapeutic, cisplatin, in multiple mouse models of human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show that lung tumors initially respond to cisplatin by sensing DNA damage, undergoing cell cycle arrest, and inducing apoptosis—leading to a significant reduction in tumor burden. Importantly, we demonstrate that this response does not depend on the tumor suppressor p53 or its transcriptional target, p21. Prolonged cisplatin treatment promotes the emergence of resistant tumors with enhanced repair capacity that are cross-resistant to platinum analogs, exhibit advanced histopathology, and possess an increased frequency of genomic alterations. Cisplatin-resistant tumors express elevated levels of multiple DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest-related genes, including p53-inducible protein with a death domain (Pidd). We demonstrate a novel role for PIDD as a regulator of chemotherapy response in human lung tumor cells. PMID:20395368

  4. Effect of the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism on the repair of vinyl chloride metabolite-induced DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yongliang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that the common polymorphism at amino acid residue 399 of the x-ray cross complementing-1 (XRCC1 protein, a key component of the base excision repair (BER pathway for DNA damage, plays a significant role in the genetic variability of individuals in terms of the mutagenic damage they experience following exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride (VC. The aim of this study was to provide support for the biological plausibility of these epidemiologic observations with experimental data derived from cell lines in culture from individuals who were either homozygous wild-type or homozygous variant for this XRCC1 polymorphism following exposure to chloroethylene oxide (CEO, the active metabolite of VC, with measurement of the induced etheno-DNA adducts before and after repair. Materials and Methods: Immortalized lymphoblast cell lines from seven VC workers (four homozygous wild-type and three homozygous variant for the 399 XRCC1 polymorphism were exposed to CEO, and etheno-adenosine (εA adduct levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA pre-exposure and at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h following exposure. Results: The average εA adduct levels were statistically significantly higher in the variant cells compared to the wild-type cells at 8 and 24 h following exposure (P< 0.05 with an overall average repair efficiency of 32% in the variant cells compared to 82% in the wild-type cells. Conclusion: These results are consistent with the epidemiologic findings of the types of VC-induced biomarkers observed in exposed individuals and the mutational spectra found in the resultant tumors as well as the key role that BER, especially XRCC1, plays in this carcinogenic pathway.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of base and nucleotide excision repair of clustered DNA damage sites. I. Model properties and predicted trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenenko, Vladimir; Stewart, Robert D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2005-12-31

    Single-cell irradiators and new experimental assays are rapidly expanding our ability to quantify the molecular mechanisms responsible for phenomena such as toxicant-induced adaptations in DNA repair and signal-mediated changes to the genome stability of cells not directly damaged by radiation (i.e., bystander cells). To advance our understanding of, and ability to predict and mitigate, the potentially harmful effects of radiological agents, effective strategies must be devised to incorporate information from molecular and cellular studies into mechanism-based, hierarchical models. A key advantage of the hierarchical modeling approach is that information from DNA repair and other in vitro assays can be systematically integrated into higher-level cell transformation and, eventually, carcinogenesis models. This presentation will outline the hierarchical modeling strategy used to integrate information from in vitro studies into the Virtual Cell (VC) radiobiology software (see Endnote). A new multi-path genomic instability model will be introduced and used to link biochemical processing of double strand breaks (DSBs) to neoplastic cell transformation. Bystander and directly damaged cells are treated explicitly in the model using a microdosimetric approach, although many of the details of the bystander response model are of a necessarily preliminary nature. The new model will be tested against several published radiobiological datasets. Results illustrating how hypothesized bystander mechanisms affect the shape of dose-response curves for neoplastic transformation as a function of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) will be presented. EndNote: R.D. Stewart, Virtual Cell (VC) Radiobiology Software. PNNL-13579, July 2001. Available at http://www.pnl.gov/berc/kbem/vc/ The DNA repair model used in the VC computer program is based on the Two-Lesion Kinetic (TLK) model [Radiat. Res. 156(4), 365-378 October 2001].

  6. The proline rich domain of p53 is dispensable for MGMT-dependent DNA repair and cell survival following alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Katherine; Yang, Mao; Dillon, Christopher P; Samson, Leona L; Green, Douglas R

    2017-11-01

    In addition to promoting cell death and senescence, p53 also has important cellular survival functions. A mutant p53, lacking a proline-rich domain (p53ΔP), that is deficient in controlling both cell death and cell cycle arrest, was employed to determine the biological means by which p53 mediates survival upon DNA damage. While p53ΔP and p53-/- cells were equally resistant to many DNA damaging agents, p53ΔP cells showed an exquisite resistance to high doses of the alkylating agent Diazald (N-Methyl-N-(p-tolylsulfonyl)nitrosamide), as compared to cells completely deficient for p53 function. We determined that p53ΔP was capable of transcribing the repair gene, MGMT (O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) after irradiation or alkylation damage, resulting in DNA repair and cell survival. Consistent with these observations, p53ΔP mice show enhanced survival after IR relative to p53-/- mice. Suppression or deletion of MGMT expression in p53ΔP cells inhibited DNA repair and survival after alkylation damage, whereas MGMT overexpression in p53-deficient cells facilitated DNA repair and conferred survival advantage. This study shows that when cell death and cell cycle arrest pathways are inhibited, p53 can still mediate MGMT-dependent repair, to promote cell survival upon DNA damage.

  7. UV damage and repair in the domain of the human c-myc oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, N.O.; Bianchi, M.S.; Alitalo, K.; De La Chapelle, A. (IMBICE, La Plata (Argentina))

    1991-03-01

    We have used a modification of the Southern hybridization method to analyze the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers from the domain of the c-myc oncogene. The study was performed in human COLO320HSR cells, which exhibit a 30- to 40-fold amplification of c-myc that is maintained in a marker chromosome as a homogeneously staining region. Intron 2 and the region upstream from the gene showed better dimer removal than intron 1 or the region downstream from the c-myc gene. Regions showing less repair coincide with regions that are hotspots for mutations and chromosome translocations. Therefore, it is proposed that the inefficiency of DNA repair may play an important role in the origin of c-myc rearrangements.

  8. Recruitment Kinetics of DNA Repair Proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but Not 53BP1 Depend on Damage Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hable, Volker; Drexler, Guido A.; Brüning, Tino; Burgdorf, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Derer, Anja; Seel, Judith; Strickfaden, Hilmar; Cremer, Thomas; Friedl, Anna A.; Dollinger, Günther

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET = 370 keV/µm) to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET  = 2.6 keV/µm) to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times τ1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T0 = 17±2 s, τ1 = 98±11 s) than 53BP1 (T0 = 77±7 s, τ1 = 310±60 s) after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T0 = 73±16 s, τ1 = 1050±270 s) after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time τ1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies. PMID:22860035

  9. Recruitment kinetics of DNA repair proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but not 53BP1 depend on damage complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Hable

    Full Text Available The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET = 370 keV/µm to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET = 2.6 keV/µm to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T(0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times τ(1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T(0 = 17 ± 2 s, τ(1 = 98 ± 11 s than 53BP1 (T(0 = 77 ± 7 s, τ(1 = 310 ± 60 s after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T(0 = 73 ± 16 s, τ(1 = 1050 ± 270 s after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time τ(1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies.

  10. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA Repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, Peter M; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J; Sellers, Thomas A; Witte, John S; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E; Gruber, Stephen B; Hunter, David J; Garber, Judy E; Joshi, Amit D; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 single nucleotide polymorphisms, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (P associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Only three susceptibility loci were identified, which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. The genetic defect in Cockayne syndrome is associated with a defect in repair of UV-induced DNA damage in transcriptionally active DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venema, J.; Mullenders, L.H.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mayne, L.V. (State Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands))

    1990-06-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to UV-irradiation but have an apparently normal ability to remove pyrimidine dimers from the genome overall. We have measured the repair of pyrimidine dimers in defined DNA sequences in three normal and two CS cell strains. When compared to a nontranscribed locus, transcriptionally active genes were preferentially repaired in all three normal cell strains. There was no significant variation in levels of repair between various normal individuals or between two constitutively expressed genes, indicating that preferential repair may be a consistent feature of constitutively expressed genes in human cells. Neither CS strain, from independent complementation groups, was able to repair transcriptionally active DNA with a similar rate and to the same extent as normal cells, indicating that the genetic defect in CS lies in the pathway for repair of transcriptionally active DNA. These results have implications for understanding the pleiotropic clinical effects associated with disorders having defects in the repair of DNA damage. In particular, neurodegeneration appears to be associated with the loss of preferential repair of active genes and is not simply correlated with reduced levels of overall repair.

  12. The Modified Human DNA Repair Enzyme O6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Is a Negative Regulator of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription upon Alkylation DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, Alvin K. C.; Oh, Hue Kian; Ali, Rahmen B.; Li, Benjamin F. L.

    2001-01-01

    Cell proliferation requires precise control to prevent mutations from replication of (unrepaired) damaged DNA in cells exposed spontaneously to mutagens. Here we show that the modified human DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (R-MGMT), formed from the suicidal repair of the mutagenic O6-alkylguanine (6RG) lesions by MGMT in the cells exposed to alkylating carcinogens, functions in such control by preventing the estrogen receptor (ER) from transcription activation that me...

  13. Generation of Spectra and Stress Histories for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance Analysis of Fuselage Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    AD-A250 390liI] II1 il il l ii I DOT-VNTSC-FAA-91-16 Generation of Spectra and Stress Histories FAA Technical Center for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance...Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date Generation of Spectra and Stress Histories for October 1991 Fatigue ...PUBLIC THROUGH Stress Histories, Stress Analysis THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE, Damage Tolerance, Fatigue SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 19

  14. Use of the comet-FISH assay to compare DNA damage and repair in p53 and hTERT genes following ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J McKenna

    Full Text Available The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay can be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH methodology in order to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within an individual cell. The number and position of the fluorescent signal(s provides information about the relative damage and subsequent repair that is occurring in the targeted gene domain(s. In this study, we have optimised the comet-FISH assay to detect and compare DNA damage and repair in the p53 and hTERT gene regions of bladder cancer cell-lines RT4 and RT112, normal fibroblasts and Cockayne Syndrome (CS fibroblasts following γ-radiation. Cells were exposed to 5Gy γ-radiation and repair followed for up to 60 minutes. At each repair time-point, the number and location of p53 and hTERT hybridisation spots was recorded in addition to standard comet measurements. In bladder cancer cell-lines and normal fibroblasts, the p53 gene region was found to be rapidly repaired relative to the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, a phenomenon that appeared to be independent of hTERT transcriptional activity. However, in the CS fibroblasts, which are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR, this rapid repair of the p53 gene region was not observed when compared to both the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, proving the assay can detect variations in DNA repair in the same gene. In conclusion, we propose that the comet-FISH assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting differences in DNA damage and repair between different gene regions in individual cells in response to radiation. We suggest this increases its potential for measuring radiosensitivity in cells and may therefore have value in a clinical setting.

  15. Use of the Comet-FISH Assay to Compare DNA Damage and Repair in p53 and hTERT Genes following Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Declan J.; Doherty, Bernadette A.; Downes, C. Stephen; McKeown, Stephanie R.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay can be combined with fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) methodology in order to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within an individual cell. The number and position of the fluorescent signal(s) provides information about the relative damage and subsequent repair that is occurring in the targeted gene domain(s). In this study, we have optimised the comet-FISH assay to detect and compare DNA damage and repair in the p53 and hTERT gene regions of bladder cancer cell-lines RT4 and RT112, normal fibroblasts and Cockayne Syndrome (CS) fibroblasts following γ-radiation. Cells were exposed to 5Gy γ-radiation and repair followed for up to 60 minutes. At each repair time-point, the number and location of p53 and hTERT hybridisation spots was recorded in addition to standard comet measurements. In bladder cancer cell-lines and normal fibroblasts, the p53 gene region was found to be rapidly repaired relative to the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, a phenomenon that appeared to be independent of hTERT transcriptional activity. However, in the CS fibroblasts, which are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR), this rapid repair of the p53 gene region was not observed when compared to both the hTERT gene region and the overall genome, proving the assay can detect variations in DNA repair in the same gene. In conclusion, we propose that the comet-FISH assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting differences in DNA damage and repair between different gene regions in individual cells in response to radiation. We suggest this increases its potential for measuring radiosensitivity in cells and may therefore have value in a clinical setting. PMID:23145163

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Aymeric P; Freeman, Alasdair; Hall, Julie; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Alpi, Arno; Lilley, David M J; Ahmed, Shawn; Gartner, Anton

    2010-07-15

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR), which can involve Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  17. The Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Gen1/Yen1 resolvases links DNA damage signaling to DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric P Bailly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR, which can involve Holliday junction (HJ intermediates that are ultimately resolved by nucleolytic enzymes. An N-terminal fragment of human GEN1 has recently been shown to act as a Holliday junction resolvase, but little is known about the role of GEN-1 in vivo. Holliday junction resolution signifies the completion of DNA repair, a step that may be coupled to signaling proteins that regulate cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Using forward genetic approaches, we identified a Caenorhabditis elegans dual function DNA double-strand break repair and DNA damage signaling protein orthologous to the human GEN1 Holliday junction resolving enzyme. GEN-1 has biochemical activities related to the human enzyme and facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but is not essential for DNA double-strand break repair during meiotic recombination. Mutational analysis reveals that the DNA damage-signaling function of GEN-1 is separable from its role in DNA repair. GEN-1 promotes germ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a pathway that acts in parallel to the canonical DNA damage response pathway mediated by RPA loading, CHK1 activation, and CEP-1/p53-mediated apoptosis induction. Furthermore, GEN-1 acts redundantly with the 9-1-1 complex to ensure genome stability. Our study suggests that GEN-1 might act as a dual function Holliday junction resolvase that may coordinate DNA damage signaling with a late step in DNA double-strand break repair.

  18. Accelerated repair and reduced mutagenicity of DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke in human bronchial cells transfected with E.coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Foresta

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is associated to a number of pathologies including lung cancer. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects are partially linked to the presence of reactive oxygen species and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH inducing DNA damage. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG repairs both oxidized bases and different types of bulky DNA adducts. We investigated in vitro whether FPG expression may enhance DNA repair of CS-damaged DNA and counteract the mutagenic effects of CS in human lung cells. NCI-H727 non small cell lung carcinoma cells were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing FPG fused to the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP. Cells expressing the fusion protein EGFP-FPG displayed accelerated repair of adducts and DNA breaks induced by CS condensate. The mutant frequencies induced by low concentrations of CS condensate to the Na(+K(+-ATPase locus (oua(r were significantly reduced in cells expressing EGFP-FPG. Hence, expression of the bacterial DNA repair protein FPG stably protects human lung cells from the mutagenic effects of CS by improving cells' capacity to repair damaged DNA.

  19. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  1. Effects of combined physical exercise training on DNA damage and repair capacity: role of oxidative stress changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Jorge Pinto; Silva, Amélia M; Oliveira, Maria Manuel; Peixoto, Francisco; Gaivão, Isabel; Mota, Maria Paula

    2015-06-01

    Regular physical exercise has been shown to be one of the most important lifestyle influences on improving functional performance, decreasing morbidity and all causes of mortality among older people. However, it is known that acute physical exercise may induce an increase in oxidative stress and oxidative damage in several structures, including DNA. Considering this, the purpose of this study was to identify the effects of 16 weeks of combined physical exercise in DNA damage and repair capacity in lymphocytes. In addition, we aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress involved in those changes. Fifty-seven healthy men (40 to 74 years) were enrolled in this study. The sample was divided into two groups: the experimental group (EG), composed of 31 individuals, submitted to 16 weeks of combined physical exercise training; and the control group (CG), composed of 26 individuals, who did not undergo any specifically orientated physical activity. We observed an improvement of overall physical performance in the EG, after the physical exercise training. A significant decrease in DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites was found after the physical exercise training, with no significant changes in 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase enzyme activity. An increase was observed in antioxidant activity, and a decrease was found in lipid peroxidation levels after physical exercise training. These results suggest that physical exercise training induces protective effects against DNA damage in lymphocytes possibly related to the increase in antioxidant capacity.

  2. Hypothermia postpones DNA damage repair in irradiated cells and protects against cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Brandon J.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Nakamura, Asako J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Parekh, Palak [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Griko, Yuri V. [Radiation and Space Biotechnology Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G. [Biology Department, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Bonner, William M. [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Martin, Olga A., E-mail: sedelnio@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, CCR, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Hibernation is an established strategy used by some homeothermic organisms to survive cold environments. In true hibernation, the core body temperature of an animal may drop to below 0 {sup o}C and metabolic activity almost cease. The phenomenon of hibernation in humans is receiving renewed interest since several cases of victims exhibiting core body temperatures as low as 13.7 {sup o}C have been revived with minimal lasting deficits. In addition, local cooling during radiotherapy has resulted in normal tissue protection. The experiments described in this paper were prompted by the results of a very limited pilot study, which showed a suppressed DNA repair response of mouse lymphocytes collected from animals subjected to 7-Gy total body irradiation under hypothermic (13 {sup o}C) conditions, compared to normothermic controls. Here we report that human BJ-hTERT cells exhibited a pronounced radioprotective effect on clonogenic survival when cooled to 13 {sup o}C during and 12 h after irradiation. Mild hypothermia at 20 and 30 {sup o}C also resulted in some radioprotection. The neutral comet assay revealed an apparent lack on double strand break (DSB) rejoining at 13 {sup o}C. Extension of the mouse lymphocyte study to ex vivo-irradiated human lymphocytes confirmed lower levels of induced phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) and persistence of the lesions at hypothermia compared to the normal temperature. Parallel studies of radiation-induced oxidatively clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) revealed partial repair at 13 {sup o}C compared to the rapid repair at 37 {sup o}C. For both {gamma}-H2AX foci and OCDLs, the return of lymphocytes to 37 {sup o}C resulted in the resumption of normal repair kinetics. These results, as well as observations made by others and reviewed in this study, have implications for understanding the radiobiology and protective mechanisms underlying hypothermia and potential opportunities for exploitation in terms of protecting normal tissues against

  3. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and association with cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Schurman, Shepherd H; Harboe, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Aging has been associated with damage accumulation in the genome and with increased cancer incidence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced from endogenous sources, most notably the oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, and from exogenous sources, such as ionizing radiation. ROS attack DNA...... recently, BER was shown to also exist in the mitochondria. Here, we review the association of BER of oxidative DNA damage with aging, cancer and other diseases....... readily, generating a variety of DNA lesions, such as oxidized bases and strand breaks. If not properly removed, DNA damage can be potentially devastating to normal cell physiology, leading to mutagenesis and/or cell death, especially in the case of cytotoxic lesions that block the progression of DNA...

  4. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...

  5. Participation of gap junction communication in potentially lethal damage repair and DNA damage in human fibroblasts exposed to low- or high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not fully explained how different types of ionizing radiation (IR) modulate the responses of cell populations or tissues. In our previous work, we showed that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) mediates the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, in which almost every cells is traversed by an IR track. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth study of the role of GJIC in modulating the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) and micronuclei formation in cells exposed to low- or high-LET IR. Confluent human fibroblasts were exposed in the presence or absence of a gap junction inhibitor to 200 kV X rays (LET ∼ 1.7 keV/µm), carbon ions (LET ∼ 76 keV/µm), silicon ions (LET ∼ 113 keV/µm) or iron ions (LET ∼ 400 keV/µm) that resulted in isosurvival levels. The fibroblasts were incubated for various times at 37 °C. As expected, high-LET IR were more effective than were low-LET X rays at killing cells and damaging DNA shortly after irradiation. However, when cells were held in a confluent state for several hours, PLDR associated with a reduction in DNA damage, occurred only in cells exposed to X rays. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC eliminated the enhancement of toxic effects, which resulted in an increase of cell survival and reduction in the level of micronucleus formation in cells exposed to high, but not in those exposed to low-LET IR. The experiment shows that gap-junction communication plays an important role in the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high-LET IR while GJIC has only a minimal effect on PLDR and DNA damage following low-LET irradiation. Together, our results show that PLDR and induction of DNA damage clearly depend on gap-junction communication and radiation quality. PMID:23867854

  6. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. A miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b Axis Regulates DNA Damage Repair during mESC Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs enable rapid proliferation that also causes DNA damage. To maintain genomic stabilization during rapid proliferation, ESCs must have an efficient system to repress genotoxic stress. Here, we show that withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which maintains the self-renewal capability of mouse ESCs (mESCs, significantly inhibits the cell proliferation and DNA damage of mESCs and upregulates the expression of miR-590. miR-590 promotes single-strand break (SSB and double-strand break (DSB damage repair, thus slowing proliferation of mESCs without influencing stemness. miR-590 directly targets Activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a to mediate Activin signaling. We identified the homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR gene, Rad51b, as a downstream molecule of the miR-590/Acvr2a pathway regulating the SSB and DSB damage repair and cell cycle. Our study shows that a miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b signaling axis ensures the stabilization of mESCs by balancing DNA damage repair and rapid proliferation during self-renewal.

  8. Synergistic Roles of Helicobacter pylori Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase and GroEL in Repairing Oxidant-damaged Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Manish; Tran, ViLinh; Sharp, Joshua S.; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced via the enzyme myeloperoxidase is a major antibacterial oxidant produced by neutrophils, and Met residues are considered primary amino acid targets of HOCl damage via conversion to Met sulfoxide. Met sulfoxide can be repaired back to Met by methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr). Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme; we show it constitutes 4–5% of the total Helicobacter pylori protein levels. msr and katA strains were about 14- and 4-fold, respectively, more susceptible than the parent to killing by the neutrophil cell line HL-60 cells. Catalase activity of an msr strain was much more reduced by HOCl exposure than for the parental strain. Treatment of pure catalase with HOCl caused oxidation of specific MS-identified Met residues, as well as structural changes and activity loss depending on the oxidant dose. Treatment of catalase with HOCl at a level to limit structural perturbation (at a catalase/HOCl molar ratio of 1:60) resulted in oxidation of six identified Met residues. Msr repaired these residues in an in vitro reconstituted system, but no enzyme activity could be recovered. However, addition of GroEL to the Msr repair mixture significantly enhanced catalase activity recovery. Neutrophils produce large amounts of HOCl at inflammation sites, and bacterial catalase may be a prime target of the host inflammatory response; at high concentrations of HOCl (1:100), we observed loss of catalase secondary structure, oligomerization, and carbonylation. The same HOCl-sensitive Met residue oxidation targets in catalase were detected using chloramine-T as a milder oxidant. PMID:21460217

  9. TPhP exposure disturbs carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongkun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Guowei; Peng, Jianbiao; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-02-01

    Triphenyl phosphate is a high production volume organophosphate flame retardant that has been detected in multiple environmental media at increasing concentrations. The environmental and health risks of triphenyl phosphate have drawn attention because of the multiplex toxicity of this chemical compound. However, few studies have paid close attention to the impacts of triphenyl phosphate on liver metabolism. We investigated hepatic histopathological, metabolomic and transcriptomic responses of zebrafish after exposure to 0.050 mg/L and 0.300 mg/L triphenyl phosphate for 7 days. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant changes in the contents of glucose, UDP-glucose, lactate, succinate, fumarate, choline, acetylcarnitine, and several fatty acids. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that related pathways, such as the glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, PPAR signaling pathway and fatty acid elongation, were significantly affected. These results suggest that triphenyl phosphate exposure markedly disturbs hepatic carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in zebrafish. Moreover, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and non-homologous end-joining and base excision repair were strongly affected, thus indicating that triphenyl phosphate hinders the DNA damage repair system in zebrafish liver cells. The present study provides a systematic analysis of the triphenyl phosphate-induced toxic effects in zebrafish liver and demonstrates that low concentrations of triphenyl phosphate affect normal metabolism and cell cycle.

  10. NBS1 Functions as a Multifaceted Protein in DNA Damage Repair and Gametogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.L. Brugmans (Linda)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Proper maintenance of the genome is crucial for survival of all organisms. It is of major importance for reproduction and development, that the information encoded in the genome is replicated correctly. However, endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging agents

  11. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage is differently repaired during the cell cycle by non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Campos-Nebel

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II (Top2 is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB. In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2alpha was largely responsible for the induction of gammaH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR, we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells.

  13. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne

    2004-01-01

    , inactivation of the MMR system in an AGT-defective background causes resistance to the killing effects of O(6)-alkylating agents, but not to the mutagenic effect. Bifunctional alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil or carmustine (BCNU), are commonly used anti-cancer drugs. DNA lesions caused by these agents......Alkylation lesions in DNA and RNA result from endogenous compounds, environmental agents and alkylating drugs. Simple methylating agents, e.g. methylnitrosourea, tobacco-specific nitrosamines and drugs like temozolomide or streptozotocin, form adducts at N- and O-atoms in DNA bases. These lesions......-8). These have distinct locations in subcellular compartments and their functions are only starting to become understood. Surprisingly, AlkB and hABH3 also repair RNA. An evaluation of the biological effects of environmental mutagens, as well as understanding the mechanism of action and resistance to alkylating...

  14. Nicotinamide Enhances Repair of Arsenic and Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in HaCaT Keratinocytes and Ex Vivo Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin C.; Halliday, Gary M.; Damian, Diona L.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy ...

  15. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen......-consuming tissue. Muscle biopsies from seven healthy humans were obtained at sea level and after 2 and 8 weeks of hypoxia at 4100 m.a.s.l. We found increased levels of strand breaks and endonuclease III-sensitive sites after 2 weeks of hypoxia, whereas oxidative DNA damage detected by formamidopyrimidine DNA......) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite...

  16. ZTF-8 interacts with the 9-1-1 complex and is required for DNA damage response and double-strand break repair in the C. elegans germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Min Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in DNA repair genes are linked to tumor progression. Furthermore, failure in either activating a DNA damage checkpoint or repairing programmed meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs can impair chromosome segregation. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis for DNA damage response (DDR and DSB repair (DSBR within the germline is highly important. Here we define ZTF-8, a previously uncharacterized protein conserved from worms to humans, as a novel factor involved in the repair of both mitotic and meiotic DSBs as well as in meiotic DNA damage checkpoint activation in the C. elegans germline. ztf-8 mutants exhibit specific sensitivity to γ-irradiation and hydroxyurea, mitotic nuclear arrest at S-phase accompanied by activation of the ATL-1 and CHK-1 DNA damage checkpoint kinases, as well as accumulation of both mitotic and meiotic recombination intermediates, indicating that ZTF-8 functions in DSBR. However, impaired meiotic DSBR progression partially fails to trigger the CEP-1/p53-dependent DNA damage checkpoint in late pachytene, also supporting a role for ZTF-8 in meiotic DDR. ZTF-8 partially co-localizes with the 9-1-1 DDR complex and interacts with MRT-2/Rad1, a component of this complex. The human RHINO protein rescues the phenotypes observed in ztf-8 mutants, suggesting functional conservation across species. We propose that ZTF-8 is involved in promoting repair at stalled replication forks and meiotic DSBs by transducing DNA damage checkpoint signaling via the 9-1-1 pathway. Our findings define a conserved function for ZTF-8/RHINO in promoting genomic stability in the germline.

  17. Red yeast rice repairs kidney damage and reduces inflammatory transcription factors in rat models of hyperlipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    DING, MEI; SI, DAOYUAN; ZHANG, WENQI; FENG, ZHAOHUI; HE, MIN; YANG, PING

    2014-01-01

    Xuezhikang (XZK), an extract of red yeast rice, has been widely used for the management of hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease (CHD); however, the effects of XZK treatment on kidney injury have not yet been fully identified. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of XZK on the kidneys and investigate the related mechanisms in a rat model of hyperlipidemia. Thus, the effect on inflammatory transcription factors and kidney damage was investigated with in vitro and in viv...

  18. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G.; Craven, Rolf [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States); Kaetzel, David M. [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0298 (United States)], E-mail: dmkaetz@uky.edu

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6 h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1{delta} strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  19. YNK1, the yeast homolog of human metastasis suppressor NM23, is required for repair of UV radiation- and etoposide-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengmeng; Jarrett, Stuart G; Craven, Rolf; Kaetzel, David M

    2009-01-15

    In humans, NM23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor whose expression is reduced in metastatic melanoma and breast carcinoma cells, and which possesses the ability to inhibit metastatic growth without significant impact on the transformed phenotype. NM23-H1 exhibits three enzymatic activities in vitro, each with potential to maintain genomic stability, a 3'-5' exonuclease and two kinases, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), and protein histidine kinase. Herein we have investigated the potential contributions of NM23 proteins to DNA repair in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which contains a single NM23 homolog, YNK1. Ablation of YNK1 delayed repair of UV- and etoposide-induced nuclear DNA damage by 3-6h. However, YNK1 had no impact upon the kinetics of MMS-induced DNA repair. Furthermore, YNK1 was not required for repair of mitochondrial DNA damage. To determine whether the nuclear DNA repair deficit manifested as an increase in mutation frequency, the CAN1 forward assay was employed. An YNK1 deletion was associated with increased mutation rates following treatment with either UV (2.6x) or MMS (1.6 x). Mutation spectral analysis further revealed significantly increased rates of base substitution and frameshift mutations following UV treatment in the ynk1Delta strain. This study indicates a novel role for YNK1 in DNA repair in yeast, and suggests an anti-mutator function that may contribute to the metastasis suppressor function of NM23-H1 in humans.

  20. Transient ER retention as stress response: conformational repair of heat-damaged proteins to secretion-competent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saris, N; Makarow, M

    1998-06-01

    Mechanisms to acquire tolerance against heat, an important environmental stress condition, have evolved in all organisms, but are largely unknown. When Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are pre-conditioned at 37 degrees C, they survive an otherwise lethal exposure to 48-50 degrees C, and form colonies at 24 degrees C. We show here that incubation of yeast cells at 48-50 degrees C, after pre-conditioning at 37 degrees C, resulted in inactivation of exocytosis, and in conformational damage and loss of transport competence of proteins residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Soon after return of the cells to 24 degrees C, membrane traffic was resumed, but cell wall invertase, vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y and a secretory beta-lactamase fusion protein remained in the ER for different times. Thereafter their transport competence was resumed very slowly with widely varying kinetics. While the proteins were undergoing conformational repair in the ER, their native counterparts, synthesized after shift of the cells to 24 degrees C, folded normally, by-passed the heat-affected copies and exited rapidly the ER. The Hsp70 homolog Lhs1p was required for acquisition of secretion competence of heat-damaged proteins. ER retention and refolding of heat-denatured glycoproteins appear to be part of the cellular stress response.

  1. The Holliday junction resolvase RecU is required for chromosome segregation and DNA damage repair in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Ana R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Staphylococcus aureus RecU protein is homologous to a Bacillus subtilis Holliday junction resolvase. Interestingly, RecU is encoded in the same operon as PBP2, a penicillin-binding protein required for cell wall synthesis and essential for the full expression of resistance in Methicillin Resistant S. aureus strains. In this work we have studied the role of RecU in the clinical pathogen S. aureus. Results Depletion of RecU in S. aureus results in the appearance of cells with compact nucleoids, septa formed over the DNA and anucleate cells. RecU-depleted cells also show increased septal recruitment of the DNA translocase SpoIIIE, presumably to resolve chromosome segregation defects. Additionally cells are more sensitive to DNA damaging agents such as mitomycin C or UV radiation. Expression of RecU from the ectopic chromosomal spa locus showed that co-expression of RecU and PBP2 was not necessary to ensure correct cell division, a process that requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and septal cell wall synthesis. Conclusions RecU is required for correct chromosome segregation and DNA damage repair in S. aureus. Co-expression of recU and pbp2 from the same operon is not required for normal cell division.

  2. Repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA and telomere length in human lung epithelial cells after exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghini, Andrea; Roursgaard, Martin; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    the cells toward replicative senescence, assessed by attrition of telomeres. To investigate this, H2O2 and KBrO3 were used to induce DNA damage in the cells and the effect of pre-exposure to MWCNT tested for a change in repair activity inside the cells or in the extract of treated cells. The effect of MWCNT...... at times longer than 24h, but this decrease was not concentration dependent. The results suggest that the seemingly low mutagenicity of CNTs in cultured cells may be associated with an increased DNA repair activity and a replicative senescence, which may counteract the manifestation of DNA lesions...... in cultured cells, whereas these materials appear to induce low or no mutagenicity. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether in vitro exposure of cultured airway epithelial cells (A549) to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) could increase the DNA repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA and drive...

  3. Cell-cycle-dependent repair of potentially lethal damage in the XR-1 gamma-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamato, T D; Dipatri, A; Giaccia, A

    1988-08-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was investigated in a gamma-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutant, XR-1, and its parent by comparing survival of plateau-phase cells plated immediately after irradiation with cells plated after a delay. Previous work indicated that XR-1 cells are deficient in repair of double-strand DNA breaks and are gamma-ray sensitive in G1 but have near normal sensitivity and repair capacity in late S phase. At irradiation doses from 0 to 1.0 Gy (100 to 10% survival), the delayed- and immediate-plating survival curves of XR-1 cells were identical; however, at doses greater than 1.0 Gy a significant increase in survival was observed when plating was delayed (PLD repair), approaching a 20-fold increase at 8 Gy. Elimination of S-phase cells by [3H]thymidine suicide dramatically increased gamma-ray sensitivity of plateau-phase XR-1 mutant cells and reduced by 600-fold the number of cells capable of PLD repair after a 6-Gy dose. In contrast, elimination of S-phase cells in plateau-phase parental cells did not alter PLD repair. These results suggest that the majority of PLD repair observed in plateau-phase XR-1 cells occurs in S-phase cells while G1 cells perform little PLD repair. In contrast, G1 cells account for the majority of PLD repair in plateau-phase parental cells. Thus, in the XR-1 mutant, a cell's ability to repair PLD seems to depend upon the stage of the cell cycle at which the irradiation is delivered. A possible explanation for these findings is discussed.

  4. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  5. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrane Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    reduces liposome permeability at high magnesium concentrations. Liposomes were incubated in Assay Buffer with 1.0, 3.5, or 5.0 mM MgCl2 as marked...annexins on disruption of the membrane permeability barrier by amylin In Type 2 diabetes there is a buildup of insoluble, fibrillar deposits of...cause or severity of beta cell destruction in diabetes by a mechanism similar to that proposed for the action of A-beta on nerve cells, damaging the beta

  6. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  7. Repairs of Damaged Castings Made of Graphitic Cast Iron by Means of Brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mičian M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the theoretical knowledge from the field of brazing of graphitic cast iron, especially by means of conventional flame brazing using a filler metal based on CuZn (CuZn40SnSi – brass alloy. The experimental part of the thesis presents the results of performance assessment of brazed joints on other than CuZn basis using silicone (CuSi3Mn1 or aluminium bronze (CuAl10Fe. TIG electrical arc was used as a source of heat to melt these filler materials. The results show satisfactory brazed joints with a CuAl10Fe filler metal, while pre-heating is not necessary, which favours this method greatly while repairing sizeable castings. The technological procedure recommends the use of AC current with an increased frequency and a modified balance between positive and negative electric arc polarity to focus the heat on a filler metal without melting the base material. The suitability of the joint is evaluated on the basis of visual inspection, mechanic and metallographic testing.

  8. Photoprotective role of epidermal melanin granules against ultraviolet damage and DNA repair in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T.; Kodama, K.; Matsumoto, J.; Takayama, S.

    1984-11-01

    We previously developed a quantitative autoradiographic technique with special forceps for measuring unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mouse skin after treatment with ultraviolet light in vivo. By this method, we investigated the relationship between the protective role of melanin and UV-induced DNA repair in black-and-white guinea pigs. Flat areas containing a sharp border between pigmented and unpigmented skin were selected. The skin of the selected areas was shaved and irradiated with short-wave UV (254 nm) or UV-AB (270 to 440 nm, emission peak at 312 nm) at various doses. Immediately after irradiation, the skin was clamped off with forceps, and an isotonic aqueous solution of (methyl-/sup 3/H)thymidine was injected s.c. into the clamped off portion. UDS was clearly demonstrated as silver grains in this portion of the skin after irradiation with 254 nm UV or UV-AB. Errors due to individual differences were avoided by comparing the intensities of UDS in basal cells from pigmented skin and unpigmented skin of the same animals. Unexpectedly, in groups of animals treated with 254 nm UV or UV-AB, no difference in UDS in pigmented and unpigmented skin was seen at any UV dose. These results suggested that epidermal melanin granules do not significantly protect DNA of basal cells against 254 nm UV or UV-AB irradiation. Results of a study on the effect of the wavelength of irradiation on the UDS response of albino guinea pigs are also reported.

  9. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taichi [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Takahashi, Akihisa [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Kondo, Natsuko [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Eiichiro [Department of Biology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Okamoto, Noritomo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yosuke [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ohnishi, Ken [Department of Biology, Ibaraki Prefectual University of Health Sciences, 4669-2 Ami, Ami-mati, Inasiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus-Copernicus-University in Torun, ul. Sklodowskiej-Curie 9, 85-094 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Thompson, Larry H. [Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, L452, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Helleday, Thomas [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Off Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Asada, Hideo [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  10. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    following irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of repair capability showed that the cells irradiated with 1 and 2 Gy almost completely recovered from the damage, but not, however, 3 Gy treated cells in which DNA damage was not recovered. In addition, the results indicate the importance of the use of an appropriate control in radiobiological in vitro analysis.

  11. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    following irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of repair capability showed that the cells irradiated with 1 and 2 Gy almost completely recovered from the damage, but not, however, 3 Gy treated cells in which DNA damage was not recovered. In addition, the results indicate the importance of the use of an appropriate control in radiobiological in vitro analysis.

  12. The sub-lethal effects of repeated freezing in the woolly bear caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katie E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-04-01

    Repeated freeze-thaw cycles are common and are increasing in frequency with climate change in many temperate locations, yet understanding of their impact on freeze-tolerant insects is extremely limited. We investigated the effects of repeated freezing and thawing on the freeze-tolerant final instar caterpillars of the moth Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) by subjecting individuals to either a single sustained 35 h freeze or five 7 h freezes. Sub-lethal effects were quantified with changes in three broad groups of measures: (1) cold hardiness, (2) metabolic rate and energy reserves and (3) survival after challenge with fungal spores. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased mortality to almost 30% and increased tissue damage in Malpighian tubules and hemocytes. Repeated freezing increased caterpillar glycerol concentration by 0.82 mol l(-1). There were no changes in metabolic rate or energy reserves with repeated freezing. For the first time, we report increased survival after immune challenge in caterpillars after freezing and suggest that this may be linked to wounding during freezing. We suggest that little repair of freezing damage is possible in P. isabella caterpillars and repeated freeze-thaw cycles may present significant challenges to survival in this species.

  13. Seasonal variation of DNA damage and repair in patients with non-melanoma skin cancer and referents with and without psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Frentz, G

    1998-01-01

    Quadruples of skin cancer patients with and without psoriasis and referents with and without psoriasis (4 x 20 study persons) were identified and examined for DNA damage by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet-assay) and DNA-repair by UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mononuclear...... blood cells (lymphocytes and monocytes). DNA damage (strand breaks and alkaline labile sites) as assessed by the comet assay and DNA repair as assessed by UDS were significantly associated with the season in which blood sampling took place. This variation might be explained by an increased exposure...... to solar radiation. When the comet tail moment data were stratified by sampling period, an interaction between psoriasis and skin cancer was detected, with patients with psoriasis and skin cancer exhibiting more DNA damage. Patients with psoriasis and skin cancer also had lower UDS compared to healthy...

  14. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation in sensory ganglion neurons: organization and dynamics of nuclear compartments of DNA damage/repair and their relationship with transcription and cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casafont, Iñigo; Palanca, Ana; Lafarga, Vanesa; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2011-10-01

    Neurons are very sensitive to DNA damage induced by endogenous and exogenous genotoxic agents, as defective DNA repair can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders, brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases with severe clinical manifestations. Understanding the impact of DNA damage/repair mechanisms on the nuclear organization, particularly on the regulation of transcription and cell cycle, is essential to know the pathophysiology of defective DNA repair syndromes. In this work, we study the nuclear architecture and spatiotemporal organization of chromatin compartments involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) in rat sensory ganglion neurons exposed to X-ray irradiation (IR). We demonstrate that the neuronal DDR involves the formation of two categories of DNA-damage processing chromatin compartments: transient, disappearing within the 1 day post-IR, and persistent, where unrepaired DNA is accumulated. Both compartments concentrate components of the DDR pathway, including γH2AX, pATM and 53BP1. Furthermore, DNA damage does not induce neuronal apoptosis but triggers the G0-G1 cell cycle phase transition, which is mediated by the activation of the ATM-p53 pathway and increased protein levels of p21 and cyclin D1. Moreover, the run on transcription assay reveals a severe inhibition of transcription at 0.5 h post-IR, followed by its rapid recovery over the 1 day post-IR in parallel with the progression of DNA repair. Therefore, the response of healthy neurons to DNA damage involves a transcription- and cell cycle-dependent but apoptosis-independent process. Furthermore, we propose that the segregation of unrepaired DNA in a few persistent chromatin compartments preserves genomic stability of undamaged DNA and the global transcription rate in neurons.

  16. Polo-like Kinase 1 Activated by the Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Attenuates Both the DNA Damage Checkpoint and DNA Repair Resulting in Partial Polyploidy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studach, Leo; Wang, Wen-Horng; Weber, Gregory; Tang, Jiabin; Hullinger, Ronald L.; Malbrue, Raphael; Liu, Xiaoqi; Andrisani, Ourania

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (pX), implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis, induces DNA damage because of re-replication and allows propagation of damaged DNA, resulting in partial polyploidy and oncogenic transformation. The mechanism by which pX allows cells with DNA damage to continue proliferating is unknown. Herein, we show pX activates Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in the G2 phase, thereby attenuating the DNA damage checkpoint. Specifically, in the G2 phase of pX-expressing cells, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 was inactive despite DNA damage, and protein levels of claspin, an adaptor of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related protein-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation, were reduced. Pharmacologic inhibition or knockdown of Plk1 restored claspin protein levels, Chk1 activation, and p53 stabilization. Also, protein levels of DNA repair protein Mre11 were decreased in the G2 phase of pX-expressing cells but not with Plk1 knockdown. Interestingly, in pX-expressing cells, Mre11 co-immunoprecipitated with transfected Plk1 Polo-box domain, and inhibition of Plk1 increased Mre11 stability in cycloheximide-treated cells. These results suggest that pX-activated Plk1 by down-regulating Mre11 attenuates DNA repair. Importantly, concurrent inhibition of Plk1, p53, and Mre11 increased the number of pX-expressing cells with DNA damage entering mitosis, relative to Plk1 inhibition alone. By contrast, inhibition or knockdown of Plk1 reduced pX-induced polyploidy while increasing apoptosis. We conclude Plk1, activated by pX, allows propagation of DNA damage by concurrently attenuating the DNA damage checkpoint and DNA repair, resulting in polyploidy. We propose this novel Plk1 mechanism initiates pX-mediated hepatocyte transformation. PMID:20624918

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 activated by the hepatitis B virus X protein attenuates both the DNA damage checkpoint and DNA repair resulting in partial polyploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studach, Leo; Wang, Wen-Horng; Weber, Gregory; Tang, Jiabin; Hullinger, Ronald L; Malbrue, Raphael; Liu, Xiaoqi; Andrisani, Ourania

    2010-09-24

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (pX), implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis, induces DNA damage because of re-replication and allows propagation of damaged DNA, resulting in partial polyploidy and oncogenic transformation. The mechanism by which pX allows cells with DNA damage to continue proliferating is unknown. Herein, we show pX activates Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in the G(2) phase, thereby attenuating the DNA damage checkpoint. Specifically, in the G(2) phase of pX-expressing cells, the checkpoint kinase Chk1 was inactive despite DNA damage, and protein levels of claspin, an adaptor of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related protein-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation, were reduced. Pharmacologic inhibition or knockdown of Plk1 restored claspin protein levels, Chk1 activation, and p53 stabilization. Also, protein levels of DNA repair protein Mre11 were decreased in the G(2) phase of pX-expressing cells but not with Plk1 knockdown. Interestingly, in pX-expressing cells, Mre11 co-immunoprecipitated with transfected Plk1 Polo-box domain, and inhibition of Plk1 increased Mre11 stability in cycloheximide-treated cells. These results suggest that pX-activated Plk1 by down-regulating Mre11 attenuates DNA repair. Importantly, concurrent inhibition of Plk1, p53, and Mre11 increased the number of pX-expressing cells with DNA damage entering mitosis, relative to Plk1 inhibition alone. By contrast, inhibition or knockdown of Plk1 reduced pX-induced polyploidy while increasing apoptosis. We conclude Plk1, activated by pX, allows propagation of DNA damage by concurrently attenuating the DNA damage checkpoint and DNA repair, resulting in polyploidy. We propose this novel Plk1 mechanism initiates pX-mediated hepatocyte transformation.

  18. Chromatid damage after G2 phase x-irradiation of cells from cancer-prone individuals implicates deficiency in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshad, R; Sanford, K K; Jones, G M

    1983-09-01

    Ten lines of skin fibroblasts from individuals with genetic disorders predisposing to a high risk of cancer were compared with nine lines from normal adult donors with respect to chromatid damage after x-irradiation [25, 50, and 100 rad (0.25, 0.50, and 1 gray)] during G2 phase. The 10 cell lines represented five genetic disorders: Bloom syndrome, familial polyposis, Fanconi anemia, Gardner syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation groups A(XP-A), C(XP-C), E(XP-E), and variant (XP-Va). The incidence of chromatid breaks in all cancer-prone lines except XP-E and XP-A was significantly higher than in the normal lines. The incidence of chromatid gaps in all cancer-prone lines except XP-A and XP-Va was significantly higher than in the normal lines. Because each chromatid apparently contains a single continuous DNA double strand, chromatid breaks and gaps represent unrepaired DNA strand breaks arising directly or indirectly during excision repair of x-ray-induced DNA damage. These cytogenetic data together with results from use of the DNA repair inhibitor arabinofuranosyl cytosine (cytosine arabinoside) suggest that cells from all of these cancer-prone individuals are deficient in some step of DNA repair, predominantly excision repair operative during the G2-prophase period of the cell cycle. It appears that these DNA repair deficiencies are associated with a genetic predisposition to a high risk of cancer.

  19. DNA damage repair and survival outcomes in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with first-line chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchetti, Livia; Melucci, Elisa; De Nicola, Francesca; Goeman, Frauke; Casini, Beatrice; Sperati, Francesca; Pallocca, Matteo; Terrenato, Irene; Pizzuti, Laura; Vici, Patrizia; Sergi, Domenico; Di Lauro, Luigi; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Gallo, Enzo; Diodoro, Maria Grazia; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Vitale, Ilio; Barba, Maddalena; Buglioni, Simonetta; Mottolese, Marcella; Fanciulli, Maurizio; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2017-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) network is exploited by cancer cells to withstand chemotherapy. Gastric cancer (GC) carries deregulation of the DDR and harbors genetic defects that fuel its activation. The ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1-Wee1 axes are deputed to initiate DNA repair. Overactivation of these pathways in cancer cells may represent an adaptive response for compensating genetic defects deregulating G1 -S transition (e.g., TP53) and ATM/ATR-initiated DNA repair (e.g., ARID1A). We hypothesized that DDR-linked biomarkers may predict clinical outcomes in GC patients treated with chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical assessment of DDR kinases (pATM, pChk2, pChk1 and pWee1) and DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX and pRPA32) was performed in biological samples from 110 advanced GC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy, either in phase II trials or in routine clinical practice. In 90 patients, this characterization was integrated with targeted ultra-deep sequencing for evaluating the mutational status of TP53 and ARID1A. We recorded a positive association between the investigated biomarkers. The combination of two biomarkers (γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) ) was an adverse factor for both progression-free survival (multivariate Cox: HR 2.23, 95%CI: 1.47-3.40) and overall survival (multivariate Cox: HR: 2.07, 95%CI: 1.20-3.58). The relationship between the γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) model and progression-free survival was consistent across the different TP53 backgrounds and was maintained in the ARID1A wild-type setting. Conversely, this association was no longer observed in an ARID1A-mutated subgroup. The γ-H2AX(high) /pATM(high) model negatively impacted survival outcomes in GC patients treated with chemotherapy. The mutational status of ARID1A, but apparently not TP53 mutations, affects its predictive significance. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Significant accumulation of persistent organic pollutants and dysregulation in multiple DNA damage repair pathways in the electronic-waste-exposed populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaobo; Jing, Yaqing; Wang, Jianhai; Li, Keqiu [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Yang, Qiaoyun [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhao, Yuxia [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Li, Ran [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ge, Jie [Department of Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060 (China); Qiu, Xinghua, E-mail: xhqiu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environment and Health, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: lig@tijmu.edu.cn [Basic Medical College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Electronic waste (e-waste) has created a worldwide environmental and health problem, by generating a diverse group of hazardous compounds such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Our previous studies demonstrated that populations from e-waste exposed region have a significantly higher level of chromosomal aberrancy and incidence of DNA damage. In this study, we further demonstrated that various POPs persisted at a significantly higher concentration in the exposed group than those in the unexposed group. The level of reactive oxygen species and micronucleus rate were also significantly elevated in the exposed group. RNA sequencing analysis revealed 31 genes in DNA damage responses and repair pathways that were differentially expressed between the two groups (Log 2 ratio >1 or <−1). Our data demonstrated that both females and males of the exposed group have activated a series of DNA damage response genes; however many important DNA repair pathways have been dysregulated. Expressions of NEIL1/3 and RPA3, which are critical in initiating base pair and nucleotide excision repairs respectively, have been downregulated in both females and males of the exposed group. In contrast, expression of RNF8, an E3 ligase involved in an error prone non-homologous end joining repair for DNA double strand break, was upregulated in both genders of the exposed group. The other genes appeared to be differentially expressed only when the males or females of the two groups were compared respectively. Importantly, the expression of cell cycle regulatory gene CDC25A that has been implicated in multiple kinds of malignant transformation was significantly upregulated among the exposed males while downregulated among the exposed females. In conclusion, our studies have demonstrated significant correlations between e-waste disposing and POPs accumulation, DNA lesions and dysregulation of multiple DNA damage repair mechanisms in the residents of the e-waste exposed region. - Highlights:

  1. [DNA damage and repair induced by acute exposure of microwave from mobile phone on cultured human lens epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-xia; Yao, Ke; Jiang, Huai; He, Ji-liang; Lu, De-qiang; Wang, Kai-jun; Li, Hong-wu

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the effects of acute exposure of low-power 217 Hz modulated 1. 8 GHz microwave radiation on the DNA damage of human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) and repair. Cultured hLECs were exposed to 217 Hz modulated 1. 8 GHz microwave radiation at SAR (specific absorption rate) of 1. 0, 2. 0, 3. O0 and 4. 0 W/kg for 2 hours in an sXc-1800 incubator and irradiate system, the DNA single strand breaks were detected with comet assay ( single-cell gel electrophoresis) in sham-irradiated cells and irradiated cells incubated for varying periods: 0, 30 and 60 minutes after irradiation. Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using an Imagine-pro plus software, and the indexes used in this study were tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM). BrdU was added into the medium with additional one hour incubation after radiation, the cell proliferation rate was determined using a BrdU-kit. The difference of DNA-breaks between the exposure and sham exposure groups induced by 1.0 and 2.0 W/kg irradiation were not significant in each time points (P > 0.05) ; there were significant difference in both groups at the exposure dose of 3. 0 and 4. 0 W/kg immediately and at the time of 30 minutes after irradiation (P detected in 3.0 W/kg group (P > 0. 05) compared with control, but the evidence of significant DNA damage still existed in 4. 0 W/kg group at the same time point. Cell proliferation rate had no significant difference when the application of SAR was 0. 05) , however the cell proliferation was decreased significantly at the dose of 4. 0 W/kg irradiation ( P DNA damage was induced using comet assay after 2 hours irradiation of 1. 8 GHz microwave on hLECs at the dose SAR DNA damage and inhibition of hLECs proliferation.

  2. UvrD Participation in Nucleotide Excision Repair Is Required for the Recovery of DNA Synthesis following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley N. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UvrD is a DNA helicase that participates in nucleotide excision repair and several replication-associated processes, including methyl-directed mismatch repair and recombination. UvrD is capable of displacing oligonucleotides from synthetic forked DNA structures in vitro and is essential for viability in the absence of Rep, a helicase associated with processing replication forks. These observations have led others to propose that UvrD may promote fork regression and facilitate resetting of the replication fork following arrest. However, the molecular activity of UvrD at replication forks in vivo has not been directly examined. In this study, we characterized the role UvrD has in processing and restoring replication forks following arrest by UV-induced DNA damage. We show that UvrD is required for DNA synthesis to recover. However, in the absence of UvrD, the displacement and partial degradation of the nascent DNA at the arrested fork occur normally. In addition, damage-induced replication intermediates persist and accumulate in uvrD mutants in a manner that is similar to that observed in other nucleotide excision repair mutants. These data indicate that, following arrest by DNA damage, UvrD is not required to catalyze fork regression in vivo and suggest that the failure of uvrD mutants to restore DNA synthesis following UV-induced arrest relates to its role in nucleotide excision repair.

  3. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  4. Effects of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its metabolites on DNA damage and repair under in vitro conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcagli, Eren; Alpertunga, Buket; Fenga, Concettina; Berktas, Mehmet; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Wilks, Martin F; Tsatsakis, Αristidis M

    2016-03-01

    3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a food contaminant that occurs during industrial production processes and can be found mainly in fat and salt containing products. 3-MCPD has exhibited mutagenic activity in vitro but not in vivo, however, a genotoxic mechanism for the occurrence of kidney tumors has not so far been excluded. The main pathway of mammalian 3-MCPD metabolism is via the formation of β--chlorolactatic acid and formation of glycidol has been demonstrated in bacterial metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxic and oxidative DNA damaging effects of 3-MCPD and its metabolites, and to provide a better understanding of their roles in DNA repair processes. DNA damage was assessed by alkaline comet assay in target rat kidney epithelial cell lines (NRK-52E) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293). Purine and pyrimidine base damage, H2O2 sensitivity and DNA repair capacity were assessed via modified comet assay. The results revealed in vitro evidence for increased genotoxicity and H2O2 sensitivity. No association was found between oxidative DNA damage and DNA repair capacity with the exception of glycidol treatment at 20 μg/mL. These findings provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the in vitro genotoxic potential of 3-MCPD and metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deficiency in the repair of UV and. gamma. -ray damaged DNA in fibroblasts from Cockayne's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J.; Howes, M. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Radiology)

    1982-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of V antigen production for irradiated adenovirus was examined in fibroblasts from 5 unrelated patients with Cockayne's syndrome (CS) and 2 CS heterozygotes. The fibroblast cultures were infected with either irradiated or non-irradiated adenovirus and subsequently examined for the presence of viral structural antigens using immunofluorescent staining. All CS-homozygous strains showed a reduced host-cell reactivation (HCR) of this viral function for both UV-and ..gamma..-irradiated virus. For UV-irradiation of the virus, D/sub 37/ values expressed as a percentage of that obtained on normal strains, ranged from 14 to 35%. For ..gamma..-irradiation of the virus these values ranged from 61 to 80%. These results indicate some defect in the repair of both UV- and ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA damage for CS. 1 CS-heterozygote strain tested also showed a reduced HCR for UV-irradiated adenovirus intermediate between that of the patient strain and normal, whereas another CS-heterozygote strain showed an apparently normal HCR level.

  6. Cell cycle control, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis-related pathways control pre-ameloblasts differentiation during tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Niu, Yulong; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Xin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-08-12

    Ameloblast differentiation is the most critical stepwise process in amelogenesis, and it is controlled by precise molecular events. To better understand the mechanism controlling pre-ameloblasts (PABs) differentiation into secretory ameloblasts (SABs), a more precise identification of molecules and signaling networks will elucidate the mechanisms governing enamel formation and lay a foundation for enamel regeneration. We analyzed transcriptional profiles of human PABs and SABs. From a total of 28,869 analyzed transcripts, we identified 923 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with p  2. Among the DEGs, 647 genes showed elevated expression in PABs compared to SABs. Notably, 38 DEGs displayed greater than eight-fold changes. Comparative analysis revealed that highly expressed genes in PABs were involved in cell cycle control, DNA damage repair and apoptosis, while highly expressed genes in SABs were related to cell adhesion and extracellular matrix. Moreover, coexpression network analysis uncovered two highly conserved sub-networks contributing to differentiation, containing transcription regulators (RUNX2, ETV1 and ETV5), solute carrier family members (SLC15A1 and SLC7A11), enamel matrix protein (MMP20), and a polymodal excitatory ion channel (TRPA1). By combining comparative analysis and coexpression networks, this study provides novel biomarkers and research targets for ameloblast differentiation and the potential for their application in enamel regeneration.

  7. Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Härtlova, Anetta; Sloniecka, Marta; Raffi, Faizal A M; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Edgren, Tomas; Rofougaran, Reza; Resch, Ulrike; Fällman, Maria; Ek, Torben; Gekara, Nelson O

    2016-07-19

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome-dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  9. In what extent classic radiation biology can be understand at the molecular level? Biological effects of ionizing radiation and repair mechanism of double strand breaks of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2000-09-01

    This review revealed that classic radiation biology phenomena not based on substantial concept, such as lethal damage, sublethal damage, potentially lethal damage, recoveries from them, variation of radiation sensitivity due to cell cycle, RBE/LET relationships and mathematical expression of survival curve, can be described only at the levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and its repair mechanism. Authors investigated chicken cells with DSB repair-defect, analyzed the molecular mechanisms of 'Elkind recovery' where cell survival rates are higher after fractionated irradiation than after single irradiation at a fixed dose, and showed that the phenomenon was derived from the cell revival resulting from homologous recombination repair of DSB yielded on homologous chromosome DNA. Investigations using HIMAC also revealed the molecular mechanisms of RBE/LET in those cells. Findings indicate that biological effects of ionizing radiation can be described at the molecular level.(K.H.)

  10. DNA damage and repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy individuals and cancer patients: a pilot study on the implications in the clinical response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Silvina Beatriz; Vargas-Roig, Laura M; Drago, Gisela; Ibarra, Jorge; Ciocca, Daniel R

    2006-07-28

    Drug resistance is considered the main impediment to successful cancer chemotherapy. The quest for a method useful to predict individual responses to chemotherapy prior to treatment is highly desired. This study was designed to determine the individual influences of doxorubicin and cisplatin on the degree of DNA damage, DNA repair and hMSH2 and the hMLH1 protein expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and their correlations with the clinical response. PBL were obtained from 25 cancer patients (pre- and post-chemotherapy) and from 10 healthy persons, cultured and exposed to doxorubicin or cisplatin. Cells were collected at T0 (immediately after drug treatment) and 24h after damage (T24). The alkaline comet assay was employed to assess the DNA damage and repair function, and immunocytochemistry to study hMLH1 and hMSH2 expression. Clinical response was evaluated after three cycles of chemotherapy. Pre-chemotherapy PBL from cancer patients showed significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage than healthy persons, with appreciable interindividual variations between them. The in vivo administration of antineoplasic drugs was accompanied by significant DNA damage, and an increased in the number of apoptotic cells. Cancer patients with complete response showed a high number of apoptotic cells. The DNA migration increased at T0 and at T24 in cisplatin-treated patients, reflecting a decreased rate of cisplatin adducts repair than that observed in healthy individuals. The ability to repair DNA lesions in doxorubicin-damaged cells was very similar between healthy individuals and cancer patients. Cisplatin-treated patients that died by the disease showed lower DNA migration than the mean value. The expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2 was practically identical between healthy individuals and cancer patients. Nevertheless, chemotherapy induced a depletion mostly of hMLH1. In 83% of cisplatin-treated patients with CR the hMLH1 and hMSH2 expression at T24 was higher than the

  11. DNA damage and decreased DNA repair in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in individuals exposed to arsenic and lead in a mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasso-Pineda, Yolanda; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Calderón, Jaqueline; Yáñez, Leticia; Carrizales, Leticia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage and the capacity for DNA repair in children exposed to arsenic and lead. During 2006, we studied a total of 85 healthy children (aged 4-11 years) who were residents of Villa de la Paz (community A), Matehuala (community B), and Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (community C) in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The quantification of arsenic in urine (AsU) and lead in blood (PbB) was performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage and DNA repair. The highest levels of AsU and PbB in children were found in community A (44.5 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 11.4 μg/dL for lead), followed by community B (16.8 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 7.3 μg/dL for lead) and finally by children living in community C (12.8 μg/g creatinine for arsenic and 5.3 μg/dL for lead). When DNA damage was assessed, children living in community A had the highest DNA damage. Analysis of these same cells 1 h after a challenge with H(2)O(2) 10 μM showed a dramatic increase in DNA damage in the cells of children living in community B and community C, but not in the cells of children living in community A. Moreover, significantly higher levels of DNA damage were observed 3 h after the challenge ended (repair period) in cells from individuals living in community A. Our results show that children exposed to metals might be more susceptible to DNA alterations.

  12. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Thompson

    Full Text Available Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2 solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  13. Nicotinamide enhances repair of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic-induced skin cancer is a significant global health burden. In areas with arsenic contamination of water sources, such as China, Pakistan, Myanmar, Cambodia and especially Bangladesh and West Bengal, large populations are at risk of arsenic-induced skin cancer. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet (UV) radiation and affects DNA damage and repair. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) reduces premalignant keratoses in sun-damaged skin, likely by prevention of UV-induced cellular energy depletion and enhancement of DNA repair. We investigated whether nicotinamide modifies DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation and sodium arsenite. HaCaT keratinocytes and ex vivo human skin were exposed to 2μM sodium arsenite and low dose (2J/cm2) solar-simulated UV, with and without nicotinamide supplementation. DNA photolesions in the form of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence. Arsenic exposure significantly increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in irradiated cells. Nicotinamide reduced both types of photolesions in HaCaT keratinocytes and in ex vivo human skin, likely by enhancing DNA repair. These results demonstrate a reduction of two different photolesions over time in two different models in UV and arsenic exposed cells. Nicotinamide is a nontoxic, inexpensive agent with potential for chemoprevention of arsenic induced skin cancer.

  14. Quiescent keratocytes fail to repair MMC induced DNA damage leading to the long-term inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, James V; Nien, Chyong Jy; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Brown, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute and long-term effects of mitomycin C (MMC) on quiescent rabbit corneal keratocytes regarding cell proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation and DNA repair. Quiescent keratocytes cultured in serum-free media were exposed to various concentrations of MMC and then treated with transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). DNA damage was evaluated in both cultured keratocytes and live rabbit eyes following treatment with MMC. The long-term ability of quiescent keratocytes to repair MMC induced damage in vivo was evaluated in rabbits treated with MMC 2 months before 100 μm deep lamellar keratectomy (LK) injury. MMC significantly blocked TGFβ-induced cell proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation in cultured quiescent keratocytes and altered the transcriptional regulation of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). MMC also induced phosphorylation of the nuclear histone marker of DNA damage, γH2AX (a member of the H2A histone family), without induction of cell cycle entry or immediate DNA repair measured by Comet assay. In live rabbits, 0.2 mg/ml MMC significantly induced γH2AX nuclear immunostaining (pMMC treatment 2 months before LK injury showed complete absence of any corneal scarring. MMC induces DNA damage to quiescent corneal keratocytes, which remains unrepaired, resulting in abnormal cell replication and gene transcription that leads to long-term effects on corneal repair. Overall these findings suggest that there may be long-term and perhaps permanent consequences to the application of MMC as an anti-fibrotic therapy.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR GENE POLYMORPHISM hOGG1, XRCC1 and p53 AMONG SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Nishank

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background– Defect in DNA damage repair genes due to oxidative stress predispose the humans to malignancies. There are many cases of association of malignancies with sickle cell disease patients (SCD throughout the world, the molecular cause of which has never been investigated. DNA damage repair genes such as  hOGG1, XRCC1 and p53 play significant role in repair of DNA damage during oxidative stress but the distribution and clinical effect of these genes are not known till date in SCD patients who are associated with oxidative stress related clinical complications.         Objective – The aim of the study was to characterize the distribution and clinical effect of DNA damage gene polymorphisms p53 (codon 72 Arg> Pro, hOGG1 (codon 326 Ser>Cyst and XRCC1 (codons 194 Arg>Trp, codon 280 Arg> His, codon 399 Arg> Gln among SCD patients of  central India.  Methods- A case control study of  250 SCD patients and 250 normal individuals were investigated by PCR-RFLP techniques.      Result- The prevalence of mutant alleles of hOGG1 gene, XRCC1 codon 280 Arg>His  were found to be significantly high among SCD patients as compared to controls. However, SCD patients did not show clinical association with any of these DNA repair gene polymorphisms.   Conclusion- This indicates that hOGG1, p53  and XRCC1 gene polymorphisms  may not have any clinical impact among SCD patients in India.

  16. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  17. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression. © 2014 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. DICER- and MMSET-catalyzed H4K20me2 recruits the nucleotide excision repair factor XPA to DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Shalaka; Richly, Holger

    2017-12-12

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation triggers the recruitment of DNA repair factors to the lesion sites and the deposition of histone marks as part of the DNA damage response. The major DNA repair pathway removing DNA lesions caused by exposure to UV light is nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have previously demonstrated that the endoribonuclease DICER facilitates chromatin decondensation during lesion recognition in the global-genomic branch of NER. Here, we report that DICER mediates the recruitment of the methyltransferase MMSET to the DNA damage site. We show that MMSET is required for efficient NER and that it catalyzes the dimethylation of histone H4 at lysine 20 (H4K20me2). H4K20me2 at DNA damage sites facilitates the recruitment of the NER factor XPA. Our work thus provides evidence for an H4K20me2-dependent mechanism of XPA recruitment during lesion recognition in the global-genomic branch of NER. © 2018 Chitale and Richly.

  19. DNA damage repair genes controlling human papillomavirus (HPV episome levels under conditions of stability and extreme instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terri G Edwards

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR genes and pathways controlling the stability of HPV episomal DNA are reported here. We set out to understand the mechanism by which a DNA-binding, N-methylpyrrole-imidazole hairpin polyamide (PA25 acts to cause the dramatic loss of HPV DNA from cells. Southern blots revealed that PA25 alters HPV episomes within 5 hours of treatment. Gene expression arrays identified numerous DDR genes that were specifically altered in HPV16 episome-containing cells (W12E by PA25, but not in HPV-negative (C33A cells or in cells with integrated HPV16 (SiHa. A siRNA screen of 240 DDR genes was then conducted to identify enhancers and repressors of PA25 activity. Serendipitously, the screen also identified many novel genes, such as TDP1 and TDP2, regulating normal HPV episome stability. MRN and 9-1-1 complexes emerged as important for PA25-mediated episome destruction and were selected for follow-up studies. Mre11, along with other homologous recombination and dsDNA break repair genes, was among the highly significant PA25 repressors. The Mre11 inhibitor Mirin was found to sensitize HPV episomes to PA25 resulting in a ∼5-fold reduction of the PA25 IC50. A novel assay that couples end-labeling of DNA to Q-PCR showed that PA25 causes strand breaks within HPV DNA, and that Mirin greatly enhances this activity. The 9-1-1 complex member Rad9, a representative PA25 enhancer, was transiently phosphorylated in response to PA25 treatment suggesting that it has a role in detecting and signaling episome damage by PA25 to the cell. These results establish that DNA-targeted compounds enter cells and specifically target the HPV episome. This action leads to the activation of numerous DDR pathways and the massive elimination of episomal DNA from cells. Our findings demonstrate that viral episomes can be targeted for elimination from cells by minor groove binding agents, and implicate DDR pathways as important mediators of this process.

  20. DNA damage repair genes controlling human papillomavirus (HPV) episome levels under conditions of stability and extreme instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Terri G; Vidmar, Thomas J; Koeller, Kevin; Bashkin, James K; Fisher, Chris

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) genes and pathways controlling the stability of HPV episomal DNA are reported here. We set out to understand the mechanism by which a DNA-binding, N-methylpyrrole-imidazole hairpin polyamide (PA25) acts to cause the dramatic loss of HPV DNA from cells. Southern blots revealed that PA25 alters HPV episomes within 5 hours of treatment. Gene expression arrays identified numerous DDR genes that were specifically altered in HPV16 episome-containing cells (W12E) by PA25, but not in HPV-negative (C33A) cells or in cells with integrated HPV16 (SiHa). A siRNA screen of 240 DDR genes was then conducted to identify enhancers and repressors of PA25 activity. Serendipitously, the screen also identified many novel genes, such as TDP1 and TDP2, regulating normal HPV episome stability. MRN and 9-1-1 complexes emerged as important for PA25-mediated episome destruction and were selected for follow-up studies. Mre11, along with other homologous recombination and dsDNA break repair genes, was among the highly significant PA25 repressors. The Mre11 inhibitor Mirin was found to sensitize HPV episomes to PA25 resulting in a ∼5-fold reduction of the PA25 IC50. A novel assay that couples end-labeling of DNA to Q-PCR showed that PA25 causes strand breaks within HPV DNA, and that Mirin greatly enhances this activity. The 9-1-1 complex member Rad9, a representative PA25 enhancer, was transiently phosphorylated in response to PA25 treatment suggesting that it has a role in detecting and signaling episome damage by PA25 to the cell. These results establish that DNA-targeted compounds enter cells and specifically target the HPV episome. This action leads to the activation of numerous DDR pathways and the massive elimination of episomal DNA from cells. Our findings demonstrate that viral episomes can be targeted for elimination from cells by minor groove binding agents, and implicate DDR pathways as important mediators of this process.

  1. Identification of candidate polymorphisms on stress oxidative and DNA damage repair genes related with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patricia; Furriol, Jessica; Bermejo, Begoña; Chaves, Felipe Javier; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar

    2012-12-05

    Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH) and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1) with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient's survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH) was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024) in progesterone receptor negative (PGR-) patients and rs3736729 (GCLC) was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.012) in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH) and rs3736729 (GCLC) polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  2. Identification of Candidate Polymorphisms on Stress Oxidative and DNA Damage Repair Genes Related with Clinical Outcome in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1 with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient’s survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024 in progesterone receptor negative (PGR− patients and rs3736729 (GCLC was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p = 0.012 in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER− patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH and rs3736729 (GCLC polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  3. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nal factors such as UV radiation, high energy radiation such as X-. Keywords. DNA repair, DNA damage, base excision repair, nucleotide exci- sion repair, methlyl-directed mis- match repair, Nobel Prize. rays and gamma rays, mutagenic chemicals and viruses. Different types of DNA ... be especially important in plants.

  4. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects.

  5. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  6. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  7. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagala, Pawel; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Kurlapska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs) and to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Thirty five (22.2%) of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7%) of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%), and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%). In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined) were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined) were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group. Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  8. Studies of DNA repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Characterization of a new allele of RAD6. II. Investigation of events in the first cell cycle after DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthwright-Fasse, Jane Ann [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Studies in two independent, but related, areas of DNA repair have been carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; characterization of a new allele in the RAD6 gene which suggests that the gene is multifunctional, and utilization of photoreactivation as a probe of events occurring during the first cell cycle after DNA damage. Strains carrying the new allele, designated rad6-4, are as sensitive to uv and ionizing radiation as those carrying rad6-1 or rad6-3 but, unlike them, are capable of induced mutagenesis and sporulation. Although rad6-4 may well be a missense mutation, the evidence shows that it is unlikely that this phenotype is due to leakiness. Instead, the data suggest that the RAD6 gene is multifunctional. One function is necessary to recover from DNA damage in an error-free manner, and the other is concerned with mutagenic processes and sporulation. Rad6-1 and rad6-3 strains are deficient in both of these functions, while rad6-4 strains are deficient only in the error-free function. The loss of photoreversibility (LOP) of ultraviolet induced mutations to arginine independence in an excision defective strain carrying arg4-17 examines the events occurring in the first cell cycle after DNA damage. LOP is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. LOP begins immediately after UV irradiation, before semiconservative DNA synthesis takes place, and is complete after four hours in growth medium.There is no evidence indicating whether the normal function of the protein is involved in excision repair, or in one of the two repair processes believed to be inducible; induced mutagenesis or recombinational repair.

  9. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  10. The ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism affects DNA repair of benzo[a]pyrene induced damage, tested in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sha; Cui, Su; Lu, Xiaobo; Guan, Yangyang; Li, Dandan; Liu, Qiufang; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; van der Straaten, Tahar

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important defense mechanism of the body to exogenous carcinogens and mutagens, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Genetic polymorphisms in ERCC2/XPD, a critical element in NER, are thought to be associated with individual's cancer susceptibility. Although ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181) is the most studied polymorphism, the impact of this polymorphism on DNA repair capacity to carcinogen remains unclear. In the present study, cDNA clones carrying different genotypes of ERCC2/XPD (Lys751Gln) were introduced into an ERCC2/XPD deficient cell line (UV5) in a well-controlled biological system. After B[a]P treatment, cell growth inhibition rates and DNA damage levels in all cells were detected respectively. As expected, we found that the DNA repair capacity in UV5 cells was restored to levels similar to wildtype parent AA8 cells upon introduction of the cDNA clone of ERCC2/XPD (Lys751). Interestingly, after B[a]P treatment, transfected cells expressing variant ERCC2/XPD (751Gln) showed an enhanced cellular sensitivity and a diminished DNA repair capacity. The wildtype genotype AA (Lys) was found to be associated with a higher DNA repair capacity as compared to its polymorphic genotype CC (Gln). These data indicate that ERCC2/XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism affects DNA repair capacity after exposure to environmental carcinogens such as B[a]P in this well-controlled in vitro system and could act as a biomarker to increase the predictive value to develop cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of high dietary intake of animal fat and an increased fat energy intake on colon and liver genotoxicity and on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidative defence in colon, liver and plasma was investigated in Big Blue rats. The rats were fed ad libitum with semi-synthetic feed...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver....

  12. Activity of CEP-9722, a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in urothelial carcinoma correlates inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Weiguo; Xu, Hua-Guo; Chen, Jianfeng; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Levitt, Jonathan M; Stanley, Jennifer A; Yang, Eddy S; Lerner, Seth P; Sonpavde, Guru

    2014-09-01

    As loss of DNA-repair proteins is common in urothelial carcinoma (UC), a rationale can be made to evaluate the activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors to exploit synthetic lethality. We aimed to preclinically evaluate a PARP inhibitor, CEP-9722, and its active metabolite, CEP-8983, in UC. The activity of CEP-8983 was evaluated using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay against human UC cell lines. Flow cytometry, COMET assay, and western blot were performed to assess apoptosis, DNA damage, and DNA-repair proteins, respectively. RT4 xenografts received placebo or CEP-9722 (100 or 200 mg/kg/day) orally. Xenografts were subjected to immunohistochemistry for apoptosis [cleaved caspase (cc)-3] and angiogenesis (CD31). CEP-8983 (1 μmol/l) reduced the viability of RT4 and T24 cells by 20%, but did not reduce the viability of 5637 and TCC-SUP cells. Apoptosis and necrosis occurred in 9.7 and 9.1% of RT4 and 5637 cells, respectively. RT4 cells showed greater DNA damage compared with 5637 cells. Increased DNA damage occurred with combination versus CEP-8983 or cisplatin alone in RT4 and 5637 cells. T24 and RT4 showed the least RAD51 foci 8 h following radiation, whereas TCC-SUP and 5637 robustly induced RAD51 foci. CEP-9722 showed dose-dependent antitumor activity in RT4 xenografts; 200 mg/kg daily was better than control (P=0.04) and 100 mg/kg was not (P=0.26). Immunohistochemistry of xenografts showed a significant increase in cc-3 and decrease in CD31 with both doses (P<0.05). Biomarker-driven evaluation of PARP inhibitors in UC is justified as the activity of CEP-9722 correlated inversely with homologous recombination repair response to DNA damage.

  13. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  14. A molecular biological study on the identification of the molecular species of DNA polymerases for repairing radiation-damaged DNA and the factors modifying the mutation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Koichi; Inoue, Shuji [National Inst. of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Aiming at prevention and treatment of radiation damages, the authors have been investigating DNA damages by X-ray and its repairing mechanism, however, the molecular species of DNA polymerase which mediate the repairing could not been identified by biochemical methods using various inhibitors because of their low specificity. Therefore, in this study, anti-sense oligonucleotides for DNA polymerase {alpha}, {delta} and {epsilon} were obtained by chemical synthesis and transduced into human fibroblast cell, NB1RGB by three methods; endocytotic method, electroporation method and lipofection method. For the first method, the addition of those peptides into the cell culture at 5 {mu}M inhibited the polymerase activity by up to 30% and it was economically difficult to use at higher concentrations than it. For the electroporation method, different conditions were tested in the respects of initial potential, time constant and buffer, but the uptake of thimidine was scarcely decreased in the surviving cells, suggesting that the surviving rate would be short in the cells electroporated with those anti-sense peptides. For the lipofection method, among several cationic lipids tested, lipofectamine significantly enlarged the decrease of thymidine uptake by anti-sense {delta}, however it was considered that its application to DNA repairing is difficult because lipofectamine is strongly cytotoxic. Therefore, construction of a vector which allows to express anti-sense RNA in those cells is undertaken. (M.N.)

  15. Relative repair of adenovirus damaged by sunlamp, UV and gamma-irradiation in Cockayne syndrome fibroblasts is different from that in xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainbow, A.J. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    The DNA repair capacities of three unrelated Cockayne syndrome (CS) fibroblast strains were compared to that of three unrelated xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) strains for three different DNA damaging agents using a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was treated with either UV light, gamma-rays or sunlamp-irradiation and subsequently assayed for its ability to form viral structural antigens (Vag) in the CS and XP strains using immunofluorescent straining, D{sub 37} values for the survival of Ad 2 Vag synthesis in the CS and XP strains, expressed as a percentage of those obtained in normal strains, were used as a measure of DNA repair capacity. Percent HCR values in the XP strains XP25RO, XP2BE and XP5BE respectively were lowest for UV (6, 14 and 6%), intermediate for sunlamp-irradiation (18, 32 and 10%) and highest for gamma-irradiation (65, 61 and 60%), whereas for the CS strains CS1BE, CS3BE and CS278CTO respectively, percent HCR values were lowest for UV (26, 30 and 34%), intermediate for gamma-irradiation (61, 64 and 69%) and near normal for sunlamp-irradiation (82, 73 and 89%). These results suggest that the 'spectrum of lesions' which is defectively repaired in CS is not the same as that which is defectively repaired in XP. (author).

  16. Role of Bone Marrow-Derived Monocytes/Macrophages in the Repair of Mucosal Damage Caused by Irradiation and/or Anticancer Drugs in Colitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Takaba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal damage is a common side effect of many cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy, which often induce bone marrow (BM suppression. We observed that acetic acid- (AA- induced mucosal damage in the colon of mice was worsened by simultaneous treatment with irradiation or 5-FU. However, irradiation 14 days prior to the AA treatment augmented the recovery from mucosal damage, suggesting that the recovery from BM suppression had an advantageous effect on the mucosal repair. In addition, BM transplantation also augmented the recovery from AA-induced mucosal damage. We further confirmed that transplanted BM-derived cells, particularly F4/80+Gr1+ “inflammatory” monocytes (Subset 1, accumulated in the damaged mucosal area in the early healing phase, and both of Subset 1 and F4/80+Gr1- “resident” monocytes (Subset 2 accumulated in this area in later phases. Our results suggest that monocytes/macrophages contribute to the mucosal recovery and regeneration following mucosal damage by anticancer drug therapy.

  17. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  18. Strand-specific PCR of UV radiation-damaged genomic DNA revealed an essential role of DNA-PKcs in the transcription-coupled repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, there are two sub-pathways of nucleotide excision repair (NER, the global genome (gg NER and the transcription-coupled repair (TCR. TCR can preferentially remove the bulky DNA lesions located at the transcribed strand of a transcriptional active gene more rapidly than those at the untranscribed strand or overall genomic DNA. This strand-specific repair in a suitable restriction fragment is usually determined by alkaline gel electrophoresis followed by Southern blotting transfer and hybridization with an indirect end-labeled single-stranded probe. Here we describe a new method of TCR assay based on strand-specific-PCR (SS-PCR. Using this method, we have investigated the role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs, a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKK family, in the TCR pathway of UV-induced DNA damage. Results Although depletion of DNA-PKcs sensitized HeLa cells to UV radiation, it did not affect the ggNER efficiency of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD damage. We postulated that DNA-PKcs may involve in the TCR process. To test this hypothesis, we have firstly developed a novel method of TCR assay based on the strand-specific PCR technology with a set of smart primers, which allows the strand-specific amplification of a restricted gene fragment of UV radiation-damaged genomic DNA in mammalian cells. Using this new method, we confirmed that siRNA-mediated downregulation of Cockayne syndrome B resulted in a deficiency of TCR of the UV-damaged dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR gene. In addition, DMSO-induced silencing of the c-myc gene led to a decreased TCR efficiency of UV radiation-damaged c-myc gene in HL60 cells. On the basis of the above methodology verification, we found that the depletion of DNA-PKcs mediated by siRNA significantly decreased the TCR capacity of repairing the UV-induced CPDs damage in DHFR gene in HeLa cells

  19. [Effect of acute exposure to microwave from mobile phone on DNA damage and repair of cultured human lens epithelial cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-xia; Yao, Ke; He, Ji-liang; Lu, De-qiang; Wang, Kai-jun; Li, Hong-wu

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the DNA damage of human lens epithelial cells (LECs) caused by acute exposure to low-power 217 Hz modulated 1.8 GHz microwave radiation and DNA repair. Cultured LECs were exposed to 217 Hz modulated 1.8 GHz microwave radiation at SAR (specific absorption rate) of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 W/kg for 2 hours in an sXc-1800 incubator and irradiate system. The DNA single strand breaks were detected with comet assay in sham-irradiated cells and irradiated cells incubated for varying periods: 0, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min after irradiation. Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using an Imagine-pro plus software, and the indexes used in this study were tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM). The difference in DNA-breaks between the exposure and sham exposure groups induced by 1 and 2 W/kg irradiation was not significant at every detect time (P > 0.05). As for the dosage of 3 and 4 W/kg there was difference in both group immediately after irradiation (P 0.05), and existed in 4 W/kg group. No or repairable DNA damage was observed after 2 hour irradiation of 1.8 GHz microwave on LECs when SAR DNA damages caused by 4 W/kg irradiation were irreversible.

  20. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation.

  1. Molecular assessment of UVC radiation-induced DNA damage repair in the stromatolitic halophilic archaeon, Halococcus hamelinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Neilan, B A; Burns, B P; Walter, M R; Rothschild, L J

    2011-02-07

    The halophilic archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis was isolated from living stromatolites in Shark Bay, Western Australia, that are known to be exposed to extreme conditions of salinity, desiccation, and UV radiation. Modern stromatolites are considered analogues of very early life on Earth and thus inhabitants of modern stromatolites, and Hcc. hamelinensis in particular, are excellent candidates to examine responses to high UV radiation. This organism was exposed to high dosages (up to 500 J/m(2)) of standard germicidal UVC (254 nm) radiation and overall responses such as survival, thymine-thymine cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, and DNA repair have been assessed. Results show that Hcc. hamelinensis is able to survive high UVC radiation dosages and that intact cells give an increased level of DNA protection over purified DNA. The organism was screened for the bacterial-like nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, as well as for the photolyase phr2 gene. All four genes were discovered and changes in the expression levels of those genes during repair in either light or dark were investigated by means of quantitative Real-Time (qRT) PCR. The data obtained and presented in this study show that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes were up-regulated during both repair conditions. The photolyase phr2 was not induced during dark repair, yet showed a 20-fold increase during repair in light conditions. The data presented is the first molecular study of different repair mechanisms in the genus Halococcus following exposure to high UVC radiation levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Live Cell Imaging to Study Real-Time ATM-Mediated Recruitment of DNA Repair Complexes to Sites of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of protein recruitment and the formation of repair complexes at DNA double-strand breaks in real time provide valuable insight into the regulation of the early DNA damage response. Here, we describe the use of live cell microscopy in combination with ionizing radiation as a tool to evaluate the influence of ATM and its site-specific phosphorylation of target proteins on these processes. Recommendations are made for the preparation of the cells and the design of specialized cell chambers for the localized (and/or targeted) irradiation with charged particles at accelerator beamlines as well as the microscopic equipment and protocol to obtain high-resolution, sensitive fluorescence measurements.

  3. Sublethal Dosage of Imidacloprid Reduces the Microglomerular Density of Honey Bee Mushroom Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Chan; Yang, En-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic loss of honey bees is a major concern worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that neonicotinoid insecticides cause behavioural abnormalities and have proven that exposure to sublethal doses of imidacloprid during the larval stage decreases the olfactory learning ability of adults. The present study shows the effect of sublethal doses of imidacloprid on the neural development of the honey bee brain by immunolabelling synaptic units in the calyces of mushroom bodies. We found that the density of the synaptic units in the region of the calyces, which are responsible for olfactory and visual functions, decreased after being exposed to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid. This not only links a decrease in olfactory learning ability to abnormal neural connectivity but also provides evidence that imidacloprid damages the development of the nervous system in regions responsible for both olfaction and vision during the larval stage of the honey bee. PMID:26757950

  4. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  5. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  6. Determination of damage and In vivo DNA repairing through the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique; Determinacion del dano y la reparacion del ADN In vivo mediante la tecnica de electroforesis unicelular en gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The experimental conditions were standardized for the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique setting up (EUG) at the Cellular Radiobiology laboratory. Preliminary experiments were realized with human cells and mouse which were exposed to ionizing radiation or hydroxide peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to induce DNA damage and to verify the technique performance. It was analysed the In vivo repairing kinetics of induced damage by gamma radiation in mouse leukocytes which were exposed to {sup 137} Cs source and taking samples of peripheric blood of the tail of each mouse at different exposure times and processing them for EUG. In function of the cells proportion with damage in each time it was determined the existence of fast repairing mechanism at the first 15 minutes followed by a slight increase in the damage and a late repairing stage between 30 and 90 minutes. It was analysed this behavior and the potentiality of this In vivo system. (Author)

  7. Analysis of the Causes and Recommendations on Elimination of Biological Damage of Structures During the Repair and Reconstruction of the State Biological Museum in Moscow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamskov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of mycological research on buildings of the State Biological Museum located in Moscow. Over time, the building maintenance conditions have worsened, in particular because of construction of high-rise buildings in the immediate vicinity of the museum, as well as construction of a greenhouse above the underground passage tunnel between buildings 1 and 2. Over the years, the temperature gradients, high humidity, wear and damage of wall waterproofing and foundations have caused leaks in the underpass tunnel and the biological corrosion of stone, wood and metal structures in indoor exhibition halls. In this connection, part of the survey was to determine the types and size of biological lesions in structures, determination of the causes of biological damage, and the development of measures to eliminate the mycological problems during repair and reconstruction works in the museum.

  8. Sublethal effects of waterborne herbicides in tropical freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stéfani Cibele; Dreyer da Silva, Manuela; Piancini, Laercio Dante Stein; Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Silva de Assis, Helena Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The study evaluated the sublethal effects of the herbicides glyphosate (Roundup) and diuron (Hexaron) and the mixture of them, used extremely in agriculture, through biomarkers in fish. The glutathione S-transferase activity increased (74%) and catalase activity decreased (37%) at the higher exposure concentration of Hexaron in comparison to the control group, suggesting an activation of this metabolism route. Membrane damage was observed at the higher exposure of Roundup and in the mixture group compared to the control group, which can be related to the nuclear alterations observed in these exposed groups. The cholinesterase activity was also inhibited (37%) in mixture group compared to the control group and no gill morphology damage was found. The results suggested a potential synergic effect in some analysed parameters.

  9. Roles of base excision repair enzymes Nth1p and Apn2p from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in processing alkylation and oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takanori; Igawa, Emi; Tanihigashi, Haruna; Matsubara, Mayumi; Ide, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Shogo

    2005-11-21

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Nthpl, an ortholog of the endonuclease III family, is the sole bifunctional DNA glycosylase encoded in its genome. The enzyme removes oxidative pyrimidine and incises 3' to the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, leaving 3'-alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde. Analysis of nth1 cDNA revealed an intronless structure including 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions. An Nth1p-green fluorescent fusion protein was predominantly localized in the nuclei of yeast cells, indicating a nuclear function. Deletion of nth1 confirmed that Nth1p is responsible for the majority of activity for thymine glycol and AP site incision in the absence of metal ions, while nth1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to methylmethanesulfonate (MMS). Complementation of sensitivity by heterologous expression of various DNA glycosylases showed that the methyl-formamidopyrimidine (me-fapy) and/or AP sites are plausible substrates for Nth1p in repairing MMS damage. Apn2p, the major AP endonuclease in S. pombe, also greatly contributes to the repair of MMS damage. Deletion of nth1 from an apn2 mutant resulted in tolerance to MMS damage, indicating that Nth1p-induced 3'-blocks are responsible for MMS sensitivity in apn2 mutants. Overexpression of Apn2p in nth1 mutants failed to suppress MMS sensitivity. These results indicate that Nth1p, not Apn2p, primarily incises AP sites and that the resultant 3'-blocks are removed by the 3'-phosphodiesterase activity of Apn2p. Nth1p is dispensable for cell survival against low levels of oxidative stress, but wild-type yeast became more sensitive than the nth1 mutant at high levels. Overexpression of Nth1p in heavily damaged cells probably induced cell death via the formation of 3'-blocked single-strand breaks.

  10. Abnormal sensitivity of some Cockayne's syndrome cell strains to UV- and. gamma. -rays. Association with a reduced ability to repair potentially lethal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschavanne, P.J.; Chavaudra, N.; Fertil, B.; Malaise, E.P. (Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France). Lab. de Radiobiologie Cellulaire (Unite Inserm 247))

    1984-02-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease. Using a colony assay in vitro, we studied the sensitivity of 5 CS cell strains and two normal ones to UV- and ..gamma..-irradiation. The 5 CS strains appear to be UV-hypersensitive but the sensitivity varies widely from one strain to another. Hypersensitivity to ..gamma..-rays has been reported for 4 out of the 5 CS cell strains investigated. Repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) after UV- and ..gamma..-irradiation was investigated by using unfed plateau cell cultures. Under these conditions, control cells show a great capacity to repair PLD. The two CS strains, which are hypersensitive to both UV- and ..gamma..-irradiation, exhibit no or only little PLD repair after treatment. The response of CS cell strains after ..gamma..-irradiation suggests a genetic heterogeneity. Three complementation groups are described in CS cells when dealing with UV radiosensitivity. However, variations in ..gamma..-ray sensitivity are reported for cells within the same UV complementation group.

  11. Dietary proanthocyanidins prevent ultraviolet radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancer through enhanced repair of damaged DNA-dependent activation of immune sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Pal, Harish C; Prasad, Ram

    2017-10-01

    Numerous plant products have been used to prevent and manage a wide variety of diseases for centuries. These products are now considered as promising options for the development of more effective and less toxic alternatives to the systems of medicine developed primarily in developed countries in the modern era. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) are of great interest due to their anti-carcinogenic effects that have been demonstrated using various tumor models including ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. In a pre-clinical mouse model supplementation of a control diet (AIN76A) with GSPs at concentrations of 0.2% and 0.5% (w/w) significantly inhibits the growth and multiplicity of UVB radiation-induced skin tumors. In this review, we summarize the evidence that this inhibition of UVB-induced skin tumor development by dietary GSPs is mediated by a multiplicity of coordinated effects including: (i) Promotion of the repair of damaged DNA by nuclear excision repair mechanisms, and (ii) DNA repair-dependent stimulation of the immune system following the functional activation of dendritic cells and effector T cells. Dietary GSPs hold promise for the development of an effective alternative strategy for the prevention of excessive solar UVB radiation exposure-induced skin diseases including the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancement of damage-specific DNA binding of XPA by interaction with the ERCC1 DNA repair protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagai; M. Saijo (Masafumi); I. Kuraoka; T. Matsuda (Toshiro); N. Kodo (Naohiko); Y. Nakatsu (Yoshimichi); T. Mimaki; M. Mino; M. Biggerstaff (Maureen); R.D. Wood (Richard); A.M. Sijbers (Anneke); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe human XPA and ERCC1 proteins, which are involved in early steps of nucleotide excision repair of DNA, specifically interacted in an in vitro binding assay and a yeast two-hybrid assay. A stretch of consecutive glutamic acid residues in XPA was needed for binding to ERCC1. Binding of

  13. The recently identified P2Y-like receptor GPR17 is a sensor of brain damage and a new target for brain repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lecca

    Full Text Available Deciphering the mechanisms regulating the generation of new neurons and new oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, is of paramount importance to address new strategies to replace endogenous damaged cells in the adult brain and foster repair in neurodegenerative diseases. Upon brain injury, the extracellular concentrations of nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs, two families of endogenous signaling molecules, are markedly increased at the site of damage, suggesting that they may act as "danger signals" to alert responses to tissue damage and start repair. Here we show that, in brain telencephalon, GPR17, a recently deorphanized receptor for both uracil nucleotides and cysLTs (e.g., UDP-glucose and LTD(4, is normally present on neurons and on a subset of parenchymal quiescent oligodendrocyte precursor cells. We also show that induction of brain injury using an established focal ischemia model in the rodent induces profound spatiotemporal-dependent changes of GPR17. In the lesioned area, we observed an early and transient up-regulation of GPR17 in neurons expressing the cellular stress marker heat shock protein 70. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in living mice showed that the in vivo pharmacological or biotechnological knock down of GPR17 markedly prevents brain infarct evolution, suggesting GPR17 as a mediator of neuronal death at this early ischemic stage. At later times after ischemia, GPR17 immuno-labeling appeared on microglia/macrophages infiltrating the lesioned area to indicate that GPR17 may also acts as a player in the remodeling of brain circuitries by microglia. At this later stage, parenchymal GPR17+ oligodendrocyte progenitors started proliferating in the peri-injured area, suggesting initiation of remyelination. To confirm a specific role for GPR17 in oligodendrocyte differentiation, the in vitro exposure of cortical pre-oligodendrocytes to the GPR17 endogenous ligands UDP-glucose and LTD(4

  14. USP22 Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma by Regulating γH2AX-Mediated DNA Damage Repair and Ku70/Bax-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is one of the most important reasons for treatment failure in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but the underlying mechanism is extremely complex and unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22 with acquired resistance to cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma. In this study, we found that overexpression of USP22 could lead to cisplatin resistance in A549 cells. USP22 and its downstream proteins γH2AX and Sirt1 levels are upregulated in the cisplatin- resistant A549/CDDP cell line. USP22 enhances DNA damage repair and induce cisplatin resistance by promoting the phosphorylation of histone H2AX via deubiquitinating histone H2A. In addition, USP22 decreases the acetylation of Ku70 by stabilizing Sirt1, thus inhibiting Bax-mediated apoptosis and inducing cisplatin resistance. The cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant A549/CDDP cells was restored by USP22 inhibition in vivo and vitro. In summary, our findings reveal the dual mechanism of USP22 involvement in cisplatin resistance that USP22 can regulate γH2AX-mediated DNA damage repair and Ku70/Bax-mediated apoptosis. USP22 is a potential target in cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma and should be considered in future therapeutic practice.

  15. [High sensitivity to cell death and low repair activity of DNA damages after exposure to oxidative stress in Cockayne syndrome (CS) patient-derived cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Kazuko; Sugita, Katsuo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the protective function of Cockayne syndrome (CS) patient-derived cells against oxidative stress, we examined the sensitivity to cell death and the repair activity of DNA damages after exposure to oxidative stress in CS cells. We used two CS cell lines, CS3BES (CSA defective) and CSIANS (CSB defective), the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells, and the human fibroblastic cell line RSa. Cells were exposed to oxidative stresses, such as X-ray irradiation and hydrogen peroxide treatment, and the sensitivity to cell death was examined using the colony survival assay and MTT assay. DNA lesions were analyzed using the comet assay. CS3BES and CS1ANS cells showed higher sensitivity to cell death induced by X ray and hydrogen peroxide than HeLa and RSa cells. Furthermore, after exposure to the stresses the levels of DNA damage were higher, or repair activity was lower in CS3BES cells when compared with HeLa cells. The present results clearly show that the two CS cell lines are vulnerable to oxidative stress and suggest that both CSA and CSB proteins are involved in the protective response against oxidative injury.

  16. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Brechbiel, Martin W., E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  17. 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'-->5' exonuclease activities of yeast Apn2 protein and requirement of these activities for repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unk, I; Haracska, L; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    2001-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the AP endonucleases encoded by the APN1 and APN2 genes provide alternate pathways for the removal of abasic sites. Oxidative DNA-damaging agents, such as H(2)O(2), produce DNA strand breaks which contain 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate termini. Such 3' termini are inhibitory to synthesis by DNA polymerases. Here, we show that purified yeast Apn2 protein contains 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'-->5' exonuclease activities, and mutation of the active-site residue Glu59 to Ala in Apn2 inactivates both these activities. Consistent with these biochemical observations, genetic studies indicate the involvement of APN2 in the repair of H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage in a pathway alternate to APN1, and the Ala59 mutation inactivates this function of Apn2. From these results, we conclude that the ability of Apn2 to remove 3'-end groups from DNA is paramount for the repair of strand breaks arising from the reaction of DNA with reactive oxygen species.

  18. BioSentinel: Mission Development of a Radiation Biosensor to Gauge DNA Damage and Repair Beyond Low Earth Orbit on a 6U Nanosatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian; Hanel, Robert; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Ricco, Antonion J.; Agasid, Elwood; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Straume, Tore; Parra, Macerena; Boone, Travis; Santa Maria, Sergio; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are designing and developing a "6U" (10 x 22 x 34 cm; 14 kg) nanosatellite as a secondary payload to fly aboard NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission (EM) 1, scheduled for launch in late 2017. For the first time in over forty years, direct experimental data from biological studies beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) will be obtained during BioSentinel's 12- to 18- month mission. BioSentinel will measure the damage and repair of DNA in a biological organism and allow us to compare that to information from onboard physical radiation sensors. In order to understand the relative contributions of the space environment's two dominant biological perturbations, reduced gravity and ionizing radiation, results from deep space will be directly compared to data obtained in LEO (on ISS) and on Earth. These data points will be available for validation of existing biological radiation damage and repair models, and for extrapolation to humans, to assist in mitigating risks during future long-term exploration missions beyond LEO. The BioSentinel Payload occupies 4U of the spacecraft and will utilize the monocellular eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to report DNA double-strand-break (DSB) events that result from ambient space radiation. DSB repair exhibits striking conservation of repair proteins from yeast to humans. Yeast was selected because of 1) its similarity to cells in higher organisms, 2) the well-established history of strains engineered to measure DSB repair, 3) its spaceflight heritage, and 4) the wealth of available ground and flight reference data. The S. cerevisiae flight strain will include engineered genetic defects to prevent growth and division until a radiation-induced DSB activates the yeast's DNA repair mechanisms. The triggered culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a DSB and its successful repair. The yeast will be carried in the dry state within the 1-atm P/L container in 18 separate fluidics cards with each

  19. Damaged anal canal as a cause of fecal incontinence after surgical repair for Hirschsprung disease - a preventable and under-reported complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Andrea; Frischer, Jason; Knod, Jennifer Leslie; Dickie, Belinda; Levitt, Marc A; Holder, Monica; Jackson, Lyndsey; Peña, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Fecal incontinence after the surgical repair of Hirschsprung disease is a potentially preventable complication that carries a negative impact on patient's quality of life. Patients that were previously operated for Hirschsprung disease and presented to our bowel management clinic with the complaint of fecal incontinence were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent a rectal examination under anesthesia looking for anatomic explanations for their incontinence. One hundred three patients were identified. 54 patients had a damaged anal canal. 22 patients also had a patulous anus. The operative reports mentioned the pectinate line in 32 patients, in 12 it was not mentioned, and in 10 patients the operative report was not available. All patients with a damaged anal canal suffered from true fecal incontinence; 45 of them are on daily enemas (41 are clean and 4 are still having "accidents"), 7 are not doing bowel management due to noncompliance and 2 patients have a permanent ileostomy. 49 patients did not have a damaged anal canal, 25 of those responded to changes in diet and medication and are having voluntary bowel movements. Fecal incontinence may occur after an operation for Hirschsprung disease. When the anal canal is damaged, incontinence is always present, severe, and probably permanent. The preservation of the anal canal may avoid this complication. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Human MLH1 protein participates in genomic damage checkpoint signaling in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks, while MSH2 functions in DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs are among the most toxic types of damage to a cell. For this reason, many ICL-inducing agents are effective therapeutic agents. For example, cisplatin and nitrogen mustards are used for treating cancer and psoralen plus UVA (PUVA is useful for treating psoriasis. However, repair mechanisms for ICLs in the human genome are not clearly defined. Previously, we have shown that MSH2, the common subunit of the human MutSalpha and MutSbeta mismatch recognition complexes, plays a role in the error-free repair of psoralen ICLs. We hypothesized that MLH1, the common subunit of human MutL complexes, is also involved in the cellular response to psoralen ICLs. Surprisingly, we instead found that MLH1-deficient human cells are more resistant to psoralen ICLs, in contrast to the sensitivity to these lesions displayed by MSH2-deficient cells. Apoptosis was not as efficiently induced by psoralen ICLs in MLH1-deficient cells as in MLH1-proficient cells as determined by caspase-3/7 activity and binding of annexin V. Strikingly, CHK2 phosphorylation was undetectable in MLH1-deficient cells, and phosphorylation of CHK1 was reduced after PUVA treatment, indicating that MLH1 is involved in signaling psoralen ICL-induced checkpoint activation. Psoralen ICLs can result in mutations near the crosslinked sites; however, MLH1 function was not required for the mutagenic repair of these lesions, and so its signaling function appears to have a role in maintaining genomic stability following exposure to ICL-induced DNA damage. Distinguishing the genetic status of MMR-deficient tumors as MSH2-deficient or MLH1-deficient is thus potentially important in predicting the efficacy of treatment with psoralen and perhaps with other ICL-inducing agents.

  1. Allelism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PSO10, involved in error-prone repair of psoralen-induced DNA damage, with SUMO ligase-encoding MMS21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Nícolas C; Santos, Rafael S; Rosa, Renato M; Machado, Roseane M; Saffi, Jenifer; Brendel, Martin; Henriques, João A P

    2008-06-01

    In order to extend the understanding of the genetical and biochemical basis of photo-activated psoralen-induced DNA repair in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we have identified and cloned 10 pso mutants. Here, we describe the phenotypic characterization and molecular cloning of the pso10-1 mutant which is highly sensitive to photoactivated psoralens, UV(254) (nm) radiation and the alkylating agent methylmethane sulphonate. The pso10-1 mutant allele also confers a block in the mutagenic response to photoactivated psoralens and UV(254) (nm) radiation, and homoallelic diploids do not sporulate. Molecular cloning using a yeast genomic library, sequence analysis and genetic complementation experiments proved pso10-1 to be a mutant allele of gene MMS21 that encodes a SUMO ligase involved in the sumoylation of several DNA repair proteins. The ORF of pso10-1 contains a single nucleotide C-->T transition at position 758, which leads to a change in amino acid sequence from serine to phenylalanine [S253F]. Pso10-1p defines a leaky mutant phenotype of the essential MMS21 gene, and as member of the Smc5-Smc6 complex, still has some essential functions that allow survival of the mutant. DNA repair via translesion synthesis is severely impaired as the pso10-1 mutant allele confers severely blocked induced forward and reverse mutagenesis and shows epistatic interaction with a rev3Delta mutant allele. By identifying the allelism of PSO10 and MMS21 we demonstrate the need of a fully functional Smc5-Smc6 complex for a WT-like adequate repair of photoactivated psoralen-induced DNA damage in yeast.

  2. Alkylation base damage is converted into repairable double-strand breaks and complex intermediates in G2 cells lacking AP endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjian Ma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are potent sources of genome instability. While there is considerable genetic and molecular information about the disposition of direct DSBs and breaks that arise during replication, relatively little is known about DSBs derived during processing of single-strand lesions, especially for the case of single-strand breaks (SSBs with 3'-blocked termini generated in vivo. Using our recently developed assay for detecting end-processing at random DSBs in budding yeast, we show that single-strand lesions produced by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS can generate DSBs in G2-arrested cells, i.e., S-phase independent. These derived DSBs were observed in apn1/2 endonuclease mutants and resulted from aborted base excision repair leading to 3' blocked single-strand breaks following the creation of abasic (AP sites. DSB formation was reduced by additional mutations that affect processing of AP sites including ntg1, ntg2, and, unexpectedly, ogg1, or by a lack of AP sites due to deletion of the MAG1 glycosylase gene. Similar to direct DSBs, the derived DSBs were subject to MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2-determined resection and relied upon the recombinational repair genes RAD51, RAD52, as well as on the MCD1 cohesin gene, for repair. In addition, we identified a novel DNA intermediate, detected as slow-moving chromosomal DNA (SMD in pulsed field electrophoresis gels shortly after MMS exposure in apn1/2 cells. The SMD requires nicked AP sites, but is independent of resection/recombination processes, suggesting that it is a novel structure generated during processing of 3'-blocked SSBs. Collectively, this study provides new insights into the potential consequences of alkylation base damage in vivo, including creation of novel structures as well as generation and repair of DSBs in nonreplicating cells.

  3. Sublethal effect of nanosilver on the structure of gill of Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharifian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Widespread use of nanosilver can be led the contamination of aquatic environment and impact on living organisms such as fishes. We investigated histopathological changes in the gills tissue of Caspian roach fingerlings after two weeks exposure to sublethal concentrations of nanosilver. Following one and two weeks exposure, necrosis, shortening of secondary lamellae, edema, destruction of epithelial lamella, shortening of secondary lamellae, epithelial lifting and curling of secondary lamellae were observed in gill tissues. This observation showed that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of nanosilver is caused damages in the gill tissues of Caspian roach. The results demonstrated direct correlation of gill tissue damage and toxin exposure i.e. increasing nanosilver concentration is caused more tissue damage. Hence, histopathological changes of gill can considered as a proper indicator for nanosilver contamination of aquatic environments.

  4. Self-Repairing Fatigue Damage in Metallic Structures for Aerospace Vehicles Using Shape Memory Alloy Self-healing (SMASH) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Brinson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This DAA is for the Phase II webinar presentation of the ARMD-funded SMASH technology. A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal matrix composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of low-melting phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a pre-determined temperature. Shape memory alloy wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to optimize and computer model the SMASH technology for aeronautical applications.

  5. Refinement of Foam Backfill Technology for Expedient Airfield Damage Repair- Phase I: Laboratory Evaluation of Foam Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    was Deputy Director of ERDC- GSL, and the Director was Bartley P. Durst. Dr. Jack E. Davis was Deputy Director of ERDC-EL; Dr. Beth Fleming was...Geotechnical and Structural Laboratory GTP Geotechnical Test Procedure HMI Hydraulic Mudpumps Inc. hr hour IED Improvised explosive device min minute...stabilization. HMI RR601 is designed for slab- jacking and infrastructure repair, such as highways, slabs, and heavy- traffic areas. In addition

  6. REC-2006—A Fractionated Extract of Podophyllum hexandrum Protects Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage by Reducing the Initial Damage and Enhancing Its Repair In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Podophyllum hexandrum, a perennial herb commonly known as the Himalayan May Apple, is well known in Indian and Chinese traditional systems of medicine. P. hexandrum has been widely used for the treatment of venereal warts, skin infections, bacterial and viral infections, and different cancers of the brain, lung and bladder. This study aimed at elucidating the effect of REC-2006, a bioactive fractionated extract from the rhizome of P. hexandrum, on the kinetics of induction and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in murine thymocytes in vivo. We evaluated its effect on non-specific radiation-induced DNA damage by the alkaline halo assay in terms of relative nuclear spreading factor (RNSF and gene-specific radiation-induced DNA damage via semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whole body exposure of animals with gamma rays (10 Gy caused a significant amount of DNA damage in thymocytes (RNSF values 17.7 ± 0.47, 12.96 ± 1.64 and 3.3 ± 0.014 and a reduction in the amplification of β-globin gene to 0, 28 and 43% at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. Administrating REC-2006 at a radioprotective concentration (15 mg kg−1 body weight 1 h before irradiation resulted in time-dependent reduction of DNA damage evident as a decrease in RNSF values 6.156 ± 0.576, 1.647 ± 0.534 and 0.496 ± 0.012, and an increase in β-globin gene amplification 36, 95 and 99%, at 0, 15 and 60 min, respectively. REC-2006 scavenged radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner stabilized DPPH free radicals and also inhibited superoxide anions. Various polyphenols and flavonoides present in REC-2006 might contribute to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals, thereby preventing DNA damage and stimulating its repair.

  7. Protective effects of mate tea (Ilex paraguariensis) on H2O2-induced DNA damage and DNA repair in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miranda, Daniel D. C; Arçari, Demétrius P; Pedrazzoli, José; Carvalho, Patrícia de O; Cerutti, Suzete M; Bastos, Deborah H. M; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2008-01-01

    .... Since oxidative DNA damage is involved in various pathological states such as cancer, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of mate tea as well as the ability to influence...

  8. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.R. Vivek, E-mail: prvkumar06@gmail.com [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Seshadri, M. [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jaikrishan, G. [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Das, Birajalaxmi [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in radio adaptive response studied. • PBMCs of subjects from NLNRA and HLNRA were challenged with gamma radiation. • DNA damage and repair in PBMCs was compared using the alkaline comet assay. • Significant reduction in DNA damage in subjects of high dose group from HLNRA noted. • Probable induction of an in vivo radio adaptive response in subjects from HLNRA. - Abstract: This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year{sup −1}), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N = 43, range 1.07 mSv year{sup −1} to 5.55 mSv year{sup −1}) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year{sup −1} to17.41 mSv year{sup −1}), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from

  9. Structural, molecular and cellular functions of MSH2 and MSH6 during DNA mismatch repair, damage signaling and other noncanonical activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelbrock, Michael A., E-mail: Edelbrock@findlay.edu [The University of Findlay, 1000 North Main Street, Findlay, OH 45840 (United States); Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan, E-mail: Saravanan.Kaliyaperumal@hms.harvard.edu [Division of Comparative Medicine and Pathology, New England Primate Research Center, One Pine Hill Drive, Southborough, MA 01772 (United States); Williams, Kandace J., E-mail: Kandace.williams@utoledo.edu [University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, 3000 Transverse Dr., Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The field of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) has rapidly expanded after the discovery of the MutHLS repair system in bacteria. By the mid 1990s yeast and human homologues to bacterial MutL and MutS had been identified and their contribution to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch syndrome) was under intense investigation. The human MutS homologue 6 protein (hMSH6), was first reported in 1995 as a G:T binding partner (GTBP) of hMSH2, forming the hMutSα mismatch-binding complex. Signal transduction from each DNA-bound hMutSα complex is accomplished by the hMutLα heterodimer (hMLH1 and hPMS2). Molecular mechanisms and cellular regulation of individual MMR proteins are now areas of intensive research. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms associated with mismatch binding, as well as emerging evidence that MutSα, and in particular, MSH6, is a key protein in MMR-dependent DNA damage response and communication with other DNA repair pathways within the cell. MSH6 is unstable in the absence of MSH2, however it is the DNA lesion-binding partner of this heterodimer. MSH6, but not MSH2, has a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif that recognizes and binds several different DNA structural distortions, initiating different cellular responses. hMSH6 also contains the nuclear localization sequences required to shuttle hMutSα into the nucleus. For example, upon binding to O{sup 6}meG:T, MSH6 triggers a DNA damage response that involves altered phosphorylation within the N-terminal disordered domain of this unique protein. While many investigations have focused on MMR as a post-replication DNA repair mechanism, MMR proteins are expressed and active in all phases of the cell cycle. There is much more to be discovered about regulatory cellular roles that require the presence of MutSα and, in particular, MSH6.

  10. Graphene oxide nanosheets induce DNA damage and activate the base excision repair (BER) signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Junaid, Muhammad; Ma, Yan-Bo; Jia, Pan-Pan; Wang, Hua-Bin; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has widespread concerns in the fields of biological sciences and medical applications. Currently, studies have reported that excessive GO exposure can cause cellular DNA damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, DNA damage mediated response of the base excision repair (BER) pathway due to GO exposure is not elucidated yet. Therefore, we exposed HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos to different concentrations of GO for 24 h, and transcriptional profiles of BER pathway genes, DNA damage, and cell viability were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the deformation of HEK293T cells before and after GO exposure was also investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify the physical changes occurred in the cells' structure. CCK-8 and Comet assay revealed the significant decrease in cell viability and increase in DNA damage in HEK293T cells at higher GO doses (25 and 50 μg/mL). Among the investigated genetic markers in HEK293T cells, BER pathway genes (APEX1, OGG1, CREB1, UNG) were significantly up-regulated upon exposure to higher GO dose (50 μg/mL), however, low exposure concentration (5, 25 μg/mL) failed to induce significant genetic induction except for CREB1 at 25 μg/mL. Additionally, the viscosity of HEK293T cells decreased upon GO exposure. In zebrafish, the results of up-regulated gene expressions (apex1, ogg1, polb, creb1) were consistent with those in the HEK293T cells. Taken all together, the exposure to elevated GO concentration could cause DNA damage to HEK293T cells and zebrafish embryos; BER pathway could be proposed as the possible inner response mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  12. Assessment of oxidative DNA damage and repair at single cellular level via real-time monitoring of 8-OHdG biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-12-15

    8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is the most important and best-documented biomarker of oxidative stress, which is involved in the instigation of various diseases. 8-OHdG levels correlate to oxidative DNA damage which is known to be the root cause of a variety of age-related chronic diseases. The purpose of our research was to develop a detection strategy capable of measuring 8-OHdG in real-time at the surface of a single cell. Activated carbon fiber microelectrodes were used as the sensing platform. The microelectrodes were used to measure 8-OHdG release from single lung epithelial cells under the influence of nicotine. In order to evaluate the direct role of nicotine in tobacco induced genotoxicity, we studied the influence of parameters such as nicotine concentration and exposure times on 8-OHdG secretion. 2-8 mM nicotine solutions induced dose-dependent DNA damage in single cells, which was observed via amperometric measurements of secreted 8-OHdG biomarker. Real-time 8-OHdG measurements from single cells exposed to 4 mM nicotine solution revealed cessation of 8-OHdG secretion after 110 min. We have successfully outlined a methodology to detect 8-OHdG at the surface of single cells. A similar protocol can be used to evaluate oxidative DNA damage and repair mechanisms in other disease models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural repairs to fire-damaged Guastavino tile vaults at Grand Central Terminal’s Oyster Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Silman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The fireproof character of Guastavino vaults, one of the major characteristics of their structure, has been demonstrated on several occasions over the past hundred and twenty years. The firm of Robert Silman Associates has verified the versatility and solidity of these vaults in several restoration works. This article deals with the fire that broke out on 29th June 1997 in the Oyster Bar at Grand Central Station, which did not impair the structural integrity of the Guastavino vaults so that only cosmetic repairs to the lowest layer of tiles were required.

  14. Roscovitine modulates DNA repair and senescence: implications for combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, Elvira; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Brady, Hugh J M

    2005-11-15

    Treatment of tumor cells by chemotherapy activates a series of responses ranging from apoptosis to premature senescence and repair. Survival responses are characterized by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. Because inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases represents a distinctive feature of DNA damage-induced prosurvival responses, we investigated the possibility that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine modulates drug-induced responses in human adenocarcinoma cells, favoring cell survival. Sublethal concentrations of doxorubicin were used to induce premature senescence in human adenocarcinoma cells. The effect of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine on the doxorubicin-dependent cell cycle checkpoint activation and DNA repair pathways was evaluated. Roscovitine reinforces doxorubicin-dependent G(1) checkpoint in A549 and HEC1B cells leading to decreased frequency of double-strand breaks and to the preferential induction of senescence and enhanced clonogenic survival. However, in other tumor cell lines, such as HCT116 and H1299, combined treatment with doxorubicin and roscovitine increases the frequency of double-strand breaks and dramatically sensitizes to doxorubicin. This unexpected effect of roscovitine depends on a novel ability to inhibit DNA double-strand break repair processes and requires inactivation of the pRb pathway. Roscovitine, by hindering DNA repair processes, has the potential to inhibit recovery of mildly damaged tumor cells after doxorubicin treatment and to increase the susceptibility of tumor cells to chemotherapy. However, in some tumor cells, the cell cycle inhibitory function of roscovitine prevails over the DNA repair inhibitory activity, favoring premature senescence and clonogenic growth. These data indicate a novel mechanism underlying combined chemotherapy, which may have wide application in treatment of carcinomas.

  15. Recognition of Damaged DNA for Nucleotide Excision Repair: A Correlated Motion Mechanism with a Mismatched cis-syn Thymine Dimer Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair requires lesion recognition by XPC, whose detailed binding mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we have delineated the dynamic molecular pathway and energetics of lesion-specific and productive binding by the Rad4/yeast XPC lesion recognition factor, as it forms the open complex [Min, J. H., and Pavletich, N. P. (2007) Nature 449, 570-575; Chen, X., et al. (2015) Nat. Commun. 6, 5849] that is required for excision. We investigated extensively a cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in mismatched duplex DNA, using high-level computational approaches. Our results delineate a preferred correlated motion mechanism, which provides for the first time an atomistic description of the sequence of events as Rad4 productively binds to the damaged DNA.

  16. Global transcriptome profile reveals abundance of DNA damage response and repair genes in individuals from high level natural radiation areas of Kerala coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Jain

    Full Text Available The high level natural radiation areas (HLNRA of Kerala coast in south west India is unique for its wide variation in the background radiation dose (15.0 mGy/year] to find out differentially expressed genes and their biological significance in response to chronic low dose radiation exposure. Our results revealed a dose dependent increase in the number of differentially expressed genes with respect to different background dose levels. Gene ontology analysis revealed majority of these differentially expressed genes are involved in DNA damage response (DDR signaling, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, histone/chromatin modification and immune response. In the present study, 64 background dose responsive genes have been identified as possible chronic low dose radiation signatures. Validation of 30 differentially expressed genes was carried out using fluorescent based universal probe library. Abundance of DDR and DNA repair genes along with pathways such as MAPK, p53 and JNK in higher background dose groups (> 5.0mGy/year indicated a possible threshold dose for DDR signaling and are plausible reason of observing in vivo radio-adaptive response and non-carcinogenesis in HLNRA population. To our knowledge, this is the first study on molecular effect of chronic low dose radiation exposure on human population from high background radiation areas at transcriptome level using high throughput approach. These findings have tremendous implications in understanding low dose radiation biology especially, the effect of low dose radiation exposure in humans.

  17. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Wysokińska, Halina; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Toma, Monika; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx). LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid). The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx) regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds.

  18. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Sitarek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx. LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin, and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid. The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds.

  19. Treatment with metallothionein prevents demyelination and axonal damage and increases oligodendrocyte precursors and tissue repair during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE and MS are characterized by significant inflammation, demyelination, neuroglial damage, and cell death. Metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I + II) are antiinflammatory an...

  20. DNA damage and repair assessed by comet assay in workers exposed to lead in a battery recycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahara Valverde

    2015-05-01

    In addition to these findings, DNA damage determined by comet assay was sensible to reflect lead exposure levels related to specific activities inside this factory. Human biomonitoring studies through comet assay could be robust when additional biomarkers are determined at time.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1, OGG1, APE1 and XRCC3 DNA repair genes, ionizing radiation exposure and chromosomal DNA damage in interventional cardiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Foffa, Ilenia [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Sant' Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa (Italy); Manfredi, Samantha; Botto, Nicoletta [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Cioppa, Angelo [Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy); Picano, Eugenio [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Pisa (Italy); Clinica Cardiologica ' Montevergine' , Mercogliano (Italy)

    2009-06-18

    Interventional cardiologists working in high-volume cardiac catheterization laboratory are exposed to significant occupational radiation risks. Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes are thought to modify the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on DNA damage, the main initiating event in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between XRCC1 (Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), APE1 (Asp148Glu) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) SNPs and chromosomal DNA damage. We enrolled 77 subjects: 40 interventional cardiologists (27 male, 41.3 {+-} 9.4 years and 13 female, 37.8 {+-} 8.4 years) and 37 clinical cardiologists (26 male, 39.4 {+-} 9.5 years and 11 female, 35.0 {+-} 9.8 years) without radiation exposure as the control group. Micronucleus (MN) assay was performed as biomarker of chromosomal DNA damage and an early predictor of cancer. MN frequency was significantly higher in interventional cardiologists than in clinical physicians (19.7 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 13.5 {+-} 6.3 per mille , p = 0.0003). Within the exposed group, individuals carrying a XRCC3 Met241 allele had higher frequency than homozygous XRCC3 Thr241 (21.2 {+-} 7.8 per mille vs. 16.6 {+-} 7.1 per mille , p = 0.03). Individuals with two or more risk alleles showed a higher MN frequency when compared to subjects with one or no risk allele (18.4 {+-} 6.6 per mille vs. 14.4 {+-} 6.1 per mille , p = 0.02). An interactive effect was found between smoking, exposure >10 years and the presence of the two or more risk alleles on the MN frequency (F = 6.3, p = 0.02). XRCC3 241Met alleles, particularly in combination with multiple risk alleles of DNA repair genes, contribute to chromosomal DNA damage levels in interventional cardiologists.

  2. Base excision repair of chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage predominantly causes contractions of expanded GAA repeats associated with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhao Lai

    Full Text Available Expansion of GAA·TTC repeats within the first intron of the frataxin gene is the cause of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. However, no effective treatment for the disease has been developed as yet. In this study, we explored a possibility of shortening expanded GAA repeats associated with FRDA through chemotherapeutically-induced DNA base lesions and subsequent base excision repair (BER. We provide the first evidence that alkylated DNA damage induced by temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic DNA damaging agent can induce massive GAA repeat contractions/deletions, but only limited expansions in FRDA patient lymphoblasts. We showed that temozolomide-induced GAA repeat instability was mediated by BER. Further characterization of BER of an abasic site in the context of (GAA20 repeats indicates that the lesion mainly resulted in a large deletion of 8 repeats along with small expansions. This was because temozolomide-induced single-stranded breaks initially led to DNA slippage and the formation of a small GAA repeat loop in the upstream region of the damaged strand and a small TTC loop on the template strand. This allowed limited pol β DNA synthesis and the formation of a short 5'-GAA repeat flap that was cleaved by FEN1, thereby leading to small repeat expansions. At a later stage of BER, the small template loop expanded into a large template loop that resulted in the formation of a long 5'-GAA repeat flap. Pol β then performed limited DNA synthesis to bypass the loop, and FEN1 removed the long repeat flap ultimately causing a large repeat deletion. Our study indicates that chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage can induce large contractions/deletions of expanded GAA repeats through BER in FRDA patient cells. This further suggests the potential of developing chemotherapeutic alkylating agents to shorten expanded GAA repeats for treatment of FRDA.

  3. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heravi, Mitra [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kumala, Slawomir [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J. [Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal (Canada); Radzioch, Danuta [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Muanza, Thierry M., E-mail: tmuanza@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  4. Base excision repair of chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage predominantly causes contractions of expanded GAA repeats associated with Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yanhao; Beaver, Jill M; Lorente, Karla; Melo, Jonathan; Ramjagsingh, Shyama; Agoulnik, Irina U; Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of GAA·TTC repeats within the first intron of the frataxin gene is the cause of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder. However, no effective treatment for the disease has been developed as yet. In this study, we explored a possibility of shortening expanded GAA repeats associated with FRDA through chemotherapeutically-induced DNA base lesions and subsequent base excision repair (BER). We provide the first evidence that alkylated DNA damage induced by temozolomide, a chemotherapeutic DNA damaging agent can induce massive GAA repeat contractions/deletions, but only limited expansions in FRDA patient lymphoblasts. We showed that temozolomide-induced GAA repeat instability was mediated by BER. Further characterization of BER of an abasic site in the context of (GAA)20 repeats indicates that the lesion mainly resulted in a large deletion of 8 repeats along with small expansions. This was because temozolomide-induced single-stranded breaks initially led to DNA slippage and the formation of a small GAA repeat loop in the upstream region of the damaged strand and a small TTC loop on the template strand. This allowed limited pol β DNA synthesis and the formation of a short 5'-GAA repeat flap that was cleaved by FEN1, thereby leading to small repeat expansions. At a later stage of BER, the small template loop expanded into a large template loop that resulted in the formation of a long 5'-GAA repeat flap. Pol β then performed limited DNA synthesis to bypass the loop, and FEN1 removed the long repeat flap ultimately causing a large repeat deletion. Our study indicates that chemotherapeutically-induced alkylated DNA damage can induce large contractions/deletions of expanded GAA repeats through BER in FRDA patient cells. This further suggests the potential of developing chemotherapeutic alkylating agents to shorten expanded GAA repeats for treatment of FRDA.

  5. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  6. Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on interactions in a tritrophic system of non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Philipp; Bucher, Roman; Schäfer, Ralf B; Entling, Martin H

    2015-08-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most used insecticides worldwide, but is highly toxic to non-target arthropods. Effects of sublethal imidacloprid intoxication can potentially propagate in food webs, yet little is known about the impact on non-target populations and communities. We investigated short-term sublethal toxicity of imidacloprid in a tritrophic model system of wild strawberry Fragaria vesca, wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris and nursery web spider Pisaura mirabilis. Strawberries were treated two times with 0mg (control), 1mg (low rate) and 10mg (high rate) of Confidor® WG 70 and crickets were allowed to feed on them. In four lab experiments, we quantified the impact of imidacloprid on leaf damage, growth, behaviour and survival of crickets. The high imidacloprid rate reduced feeding, mass gain, thorax growth and mobility in crickets compared to the control, while mortality was similarly low in all treatments. The low rate reduced mass gain only. Cricket survival of spider predation was higher in the low rate treatment than in the control. Overall, herbivory and predation were reduced at sublethal imidacloprid rates in a non-target organism, three-level food chain, which demonstrates possible propagation of sublethal effects through trophic interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sublethal Photothermal Stimulation with a Micropulse Laser Induces Heat Shock Protein Expression in ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Inagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Aim of the Study. Subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation is an effective treatment for macular edema. The molecular mechanisms underlying treatment success are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sublethal laser energy doses on a single layer of densely cultured ARPE-19 cells as a model of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Materials and Methods. A single layer of densely cultured human ARPE-19 cells was perpendicularly irradiated with a micropulse diode laser. Nonirradiated cells served as controls. Sublethal laser energy was applied to form a photocoagulation-like area in the cultured cell layers. Hsp70 expression was evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results. Photocoagulation-like areas were successfully created in cultured ARPE-19 cell layers using sublethal laser energy with our laser irradiation system. Hsp70 mRNA expression in cell layers was induced within 30 min of laser irradiation, peaking at 3 h after irradiation. This increase was dependent on the number of laser pulses. Hsp70 upregulation was not observed in untreated cell layers. Immunostaining indicated that Hsp70 expression occurred concentrically around laser irradiation sites and persisted for 24 h following irradiation. Conclusion. Sublethal photothermal stimulation with a micropulse laser may facilitate Hsp70 expression in the RPE without inducing cellular damage.

  8. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of patern...

  9. Genomic Approaches to DNA repair and Mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrick, John J.; Roberts, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processin...

  10. Proteasome nuclear import mediated by Arc3 can influence efficient DNA damage repair and mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Rodrigo; Sha, Zhe; Vadakkan, Tegy J.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomes must remove regulatory molecules and abnormal proteins throughout the cell, but how proteasomes can do so efficiently remains unclear. We have isolated a subunit of the Arp2/3 complex, Arc3, which binds proteasomes. When overexpressed, Arc3 rescues phenotypes associated with proteasome....... Proteasome nuclear import is reduced when Arc3 is inactivated, leading to hypersensitivity to DNA damage and inefficient cyclin-B degradation, two events occurring in the nucleus. These data suggest that proteasomes display Arc3-dependent mobility in the cell, and mobile proteasomes can efficiently access...

  11. Astragalin from Cassia alata Induces DNA Adducts in Vitro and Repairable DNA Damage in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brendel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse phase-solid phase extraction from Cassia alata leaves (CaRP was used to obtain a refined extract. Higher than wild-type sensitivity to CaRP was exhibited by 16 haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in DNA repair and membrane transport. CaRP had a strong DPPH free radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 2.27 µg mL−1 and showed no pro-oxidant activity in yeast. CaRP compounds were separated by HPLC and the three major components were shown to bind to DNA in vitro. The major HPLC peak was identified as kampferol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (astragalin, which showed high affinity to DNA as seen by HPLC-UV measurement after using centrifugal ultrafiltration of astragalin-DNA mixtures. Astragalin-DNA interaction was further studied by spectroscopic methods and its interaction with DNA was evaluated using solid-state FTIR. These and computational (in silico docking studies revealed that astragalin-DNA binding occurs through interaction with G-C base pairs, possibly by intercalation stabilized by H-bond formation.

  12. Astragalin from Cassia alata induces DNA adducts in vitro and repairable DNA damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Samuel; Silva, Givaldo; Santos, Regineide Xavier; Gosmann, Grace; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Reverse phase-solid phase extraction from Cassia alata leaves (CaRP) was used to obtain a refined extract. Higher than wild-type sensitivity to CaRP was exhibited by 16 haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in DNA repair and membrane transport. CaRP had a strong DPPH free radical scavenging activity with an IC(50) value of 2.27 μg mL(-1) and showed no pro-oxidant activity in yeast. CaRP compounds were separated by HPLC and the three major components were shown to bind to DNA in vitro. The major HPLC peak was identified as kampferol-3-O-β-d-glucoside (astragalin), which showed high affinity to DNA as seen by HPLC-UV measurement after using centrifugal ultrafiltration of astragalin-DNA mixtures. Astragalin-DNA interaction was further studied by spectroscopic methods and its interaction with DNA was evaluated using solid-state FTIR. These and computational (in silico) docking studies revealed that astragalin-DNA binding occurs through interaction with G-C base pairs, possibly by intercalation stabilized by H-bond formation.

  13. Assessment of sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on oriental fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Daniel M; Walgenbach, James F; Kennedy, George G

    2005-06-01

    Sublethal effects of the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide were examined in oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), in laboratory and field studies. In laboratory studies, oriental fruit moth larvae reared on diet amended with 0.1 ppm methoxyfenozide developed at the same rate as larvae reared on untreated diet, and paired moths reared as larvae from the same treated or untreated diets exhibited similar fecundity and fertility. Population growth differences over multiple generations were used to examine sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on population dynamics in the field. Multiple single-tree cages were placed over apple (Malus spp.) trees treated with two applications of methoxyfenozide (70 g [AI] /ha) and nontreated trees. Cages were infested at a single time point with virgin male and female oriental fruit moth adults, and population growth was evaluated by egg counts, shoot infestation, fruit damage, and larval counts over a 12-wk period. Significantly fewer eggs, larvae, and damaged fruit were found on methoxyfenozide-treated compared with nontreated trees in 2001. Observed population differences may have been a result of direct mortality to eggs and larvae of the first generation rather than sublethal effects. In 2002, no differences were observed between treatments, but a heavy rain event shortly after the early infestation impacted the experiment. A late moth release treatment was tested in 2002 to examine the effects of residual methoxyfenozide 55 d after initial application. Significantly fewer eggs were found in the methoxyfenozide treatment compared with the control, but no differences existed among treatments in shoot infestation, percentage of damaged fruit, or larval populations. It was concluded direct mortality of eggs and larvae exposed to methoxyfenozide rather than sublethal effects were most important in reduction of subsequent generations.

  14. Probing for DNA damage with β-hairpins: Similarities in incision efficiencies of bulky DNA adducts by prokaryotic and human nucleotide excision repair systems in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Reeves, Dara; Kropachev, Konstantin; Cai, Yuqin; Ding, Shuang; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Bolton, Judith L.; Broyde, Suse; Van Houten, Bennett; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important prokaryotic and eukaryotic defense mechanism that removes a large variety of structurally distinct lesions in cellular DNA. While the proteins involved are completely different, the mode of action of these two repair systems is similar, involving a cut-and-patch mechanism in which an oligonucleotide sequence containing the lesion is excised. The prokaryotic and eukaryotic NER damage-recognition factors have common structural features of β-hairpin intrusion between the two DNA strands at the site of the lesion. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that this common β-hairpin intrusion motif is mirrored in parallel NER incision efficiencies in the two systems. We have utilized human HeLa cell extracts and the prokaryotic UvrABC proteins to determine their relative NER incision efficiencies. We report here comparisons of relative NER efficiencies with a set of stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene and equine estrogens in different sequence contexts, utilizing 21 samples. We found a general qualitative trend towards similar relative NER incision efficiencies for ~ 65% of these substrates; the other cases deviate mostly by ~ 30% or less from a perfect correlation, although several more distant outliers are also evident. This resemblance is consistent with the hypothesis that lesion recognition through β-hairpin insertion, a common feature of the two systems, is facilitated by local thermodynamic destabilization induced by the lesions in both cases. In the case of the UvrABC system, varying the nature of the UvrC endonuclease, while maintaining the same UvrA/B proteins, can markedly affect the relative incision efficiencies. These observations suggest that, in addition to recognition involving the initial modified duplexes, downstream events involving UvrC can also play a role in distinguishing and processing different lesions in prokaryotic NER. PMID:21741328

  15. Modification of the alkaline Comet assay to allow simultaneous evaluation of mitomycin C-induced DNA cross-link damage and repair of specific DNA sequences in RT4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Declan J; Gallus, Massimo; McKeown, Stephanie R; Downes, C Stephen; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J

    2003-08-12

    The alkaline Comet assay is a simple, sensitive method for measuring the extent of DNA strand breaks in individual cells. Several modifications to the original assay have been developed to increase its applications. One such modification allows the measurement of DNA cross-links by assessing the relative reduction in DNA migration induced by a strand-breaking agent. Another modification includes the application of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) to investigate the localisation of specific gene domains within a cell. Although several studies have used these approaches separately, no report to date has combined these two versions of the Comet assay. The current study describes the modification of the Comet assay, to allow both measurement of mitomycin C (MMC)-induced cross-links and the subsequent application of FISH to study repair in the TP53 gene region. RT4 human bladder cancer cells were treated with 0, 5, 50 and 200 microg/ml MMC to study dose response, whilst for cross-link repair studies, they were treated with 50 microg/ml MMC and allowed to repair for up to 24 h. A clear dose response to MMC was displayed, demonstrable by a marked reduction in DNA migration, whilst repair studies showed that MMC-induced cross-links take at least 24 h to repair fully in RT4 cells. For Comet-FISH experiments, the number and location of TP53 hybridisation spots was also recorded for each cell. In dose response experiments, the number of spots per cell, and per Comet tail, decreased as MMC dose increased. In repair experiments, the number of spots, particularly in the Comet tail, increased as repair time increased. Furthermore, our results suggest that repair of the TP53 gene region is most rapid within the first 4 h following MMC treatment. We conclude that the novel experimental protocol presented here has considerable potential in evaluating DNA damage and sequence-related repair responses to cross-linking agents.

  16. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in children exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero and during early childhood: Application of salivary and urinary biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinhumpatch, Pantip; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Chaisatra, Krittinee; Promvijit, Jeerawan [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Mahidol, Chulabhorn [Laboratory of Chemical Carcinogenesis, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Ruchirawat, Mathuros, E-mail: mathuros@cri.or.th [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Phayathai, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-12-15

    The present study aimed to assess arsenic exposure and its effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair in young children exposed in utero and continued to live in arsenic-contaminated areas. To address the need for biological specimens that can be acquired with minimal discomfort to children, we used non-invasive urinary and salivary-based assays for assessing arsenic exposure and early biological effects that have potentially serious health implications. Levels of arsenic in nails showed the greatest magnitude of difference between exposed and control groups, followed by arsenic concentrations in saliva and urine. Arsenic levels in saliva showed significant positive correlations with other biomarkers of arsenic exposure, including arsenic accumulation in nails (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) and arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.05). Exposed children had a significant reduction in arsenic methylation capacity indicated by decreased primary methylation index and secondary methylation index in both urine and saliva samples. Levels of salivary 8-OHdG in exposed children were significantly higher (∼ 4-fold, P < 0.01), whereas levels of urinary 8-OHdG excretion and salivary hOGG1 expression were significantly lower in exposed children (∼ 3-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting a defect in hOGG1 that resulted in ineffective cleavage of 8-OHdG. Multiple regression analysis results showed that levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in saliva and urine had a significant positive association with salivary 8-OHdG and a significant negative association with salivary hOGG1 expression. - Highlights: • The effects of arsenic exposure in utero and through early childhood were studied. • Arsenic-exposed children had a reduction in arsenic methylation capacity. • Exposed children had more DNA damage, observed as elevated salivary 8-OHdG. • Lower salivary hOGG1 in exposed children indicated impairment of 8-OHdG repair. • Salivary and urinary 8-OHdG levels were discordant.

  17. Components of myelin damage and repair in the progression of white matter pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M; McDaniel, Dennis P; Armstrong, Regina C

    2015-03-01

    White matter tracts are highly vulnerable to damage from impact-acceleration forces of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mild TBI is characterized by a low density of traumatic axonal injury, whereas associated myelin pathology is relatively unexplored. We examined the progression of white matter pathology in mice after mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury localized in the corpus callosum. Adult mice received a closed-skull impact and were analyzed from 3 days to 6 weeks post-TBI/sham surgery. At all times post-TBI, electron microscopy revealed degenerating axons distributed among intact fibers in the corpus callosum. Intact axons exhibited significant demyelination at 3 days followed by evidence of remyelination at 1 week. Accordingly, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase labeling demonstrated the generation of new oligodendrocytes, identified by myelin proteolipid protein messenger RNA expression, at 3 days post-TBI. Overall oligodendrocyte populations, identified by immunohistochemical staining for CC1 and/or glutathione S-transferase pi, were similar between TBI and sham mice by 2 weeks. Excessively long myelin figures, similar to redundant myelin sheaths, were a significant feature at all post-TBI time points. At 6 weeks post-TBI, microglial activation and astrogliosis were localized to areas of axon and myelin pathology. These studies show that demyelination, remyelination, and excessive myelin are components of white matter degeneration and recovery in mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Streptococcus sanguis DNase necessary for repair of DNA damage induced by UV light and methyl methanesulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindler, L.E.; Macrina, F.L.

    1987-07-01

    We developed a method for cloning cellular nucleases from streptococci. Recombinant lambda gt11 bacteriophage containing streptococcal nuclease determinants were identified by the production of pink plaques on toluidine blue O DNase plates. We used this technique to clone a 3.2-kilobase-pair EcoRI fragment with DNase activity from the chromosome of Streptococcus sanguis. The locus was designated don (DNase one) and could be subcloned and stably maintained on plasmid vectors in Escherichia coli. Minicell analyses of various subclones of the don locus allowed us to determine the coding region and size of the Don nuclease in E. coli. The don gene product had an apparent molecular mass of 34 kilodaltons and degraded native DNA most efficiently, with lesser activity against denatured DNA and no detectable activity against RNA. S. sanguis don deletion mutants were constructed by transformation of competent cells with in vitro-prepared plasmid constructs. S. sanguis don deletion mutants retained normal transformation frequencies for exogenously added donor DNA. However, when compared with Don+ wild-type cells, these mutants were hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by UV light and methyl methanesulfonate. An S. sanguis don-specific DNA probe detected homology to chromosomal DNA isolated from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans Bratthall serogroups d and g. Our results suggested that the don locus was the S. sanguis allele of the previously described S. pneumoniae major exonuclease and was involved in repair of DNA damage. Furthermore, hybridization studies suggested that the don locus was conserved among species of oral streptococci.

  19. Introducing a true internal standard for the Comet assay to minimize intra- and inter-experiment variability in measures of DNA damage and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, Murizal; Stoute, Julia; Almeida, Gabriela M.; Rapp, Alexander; Bowman, Karen J.; Jones, George D. D.

    2009-01-01

    The Comet assay (CA) is a sensitive/simple measure of genotoxicity. However, many features of CA contribute variability. To minimize these, we have introduced internal standard materials consisting of ‘reference’ cells which have their DNA substituted with BrdU. Using a fluorescent anti-BrdU antibody, plus an additional barrier filter, comets derived from these cells could be readily distinguished from the ‘test’-cell comets, present in the same gel. In experiments to evaluate the reference cell comets as external and internal standards, the reference and test cells were present in separate gels on the same slide or mixed together in the same gel, respectively, before their co-exposure to X-irradiation. Using the reference cell comets as internal standards led to substantial reductions in the coefficient of variation (CoV) for intra- and inter-experimental measures of comet formation and DNA damage repair; only minor reductions in CoV were noted when the reference and test cell comets were in separate gels. These studies indicate that differences between individual gels appreciably contribute to CA variation. Further studies using the reference cells as internal standards allowed greater significance to be obtained between groups of replicate samples. Ultimately, we anticipate that development will deliver robust quality assurance materials for CA. PMID:19828597

  20. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Michelle; Bouzid, Hana; Soares, Daniele G; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M; Henriques, João A P; Larsen, Annette K; Escargueil, Alexandre E

    2016-05-03

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors.

  1. The DNA repair genes RAD54 and UNG1 are cell cycle regulated in budding yeast but MCB promoter elements have no essential role in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, L H; Johnson, A L

    1995-06-25

    The DNA repair genes RAD54 and UNG1 have MCB elements in their promoters and are shown to be cell cycle regulated. Their transcripts are coordinately expressed with RNR1, ribonucleotide reductase, a MCB-regulated gene known to be expressed in late G1. However, no evidence was obtained for a direct role of MCB elements in DNA repair. Of the proteins that bind and activate MCB elements, only mutations in SWI6 have a defect in DNA repair, showing significant sensitivity to methyl methane sulphonate. Furthermore, analysis of the CDC9 promoter indicates that MCB elements are not required for the induction of the gene by ultraviolet light irradiation. These promoter elements may not respond directly to DNA damage but may have a role in enhancing the induction response.

  2. DNA repair mechanisms and gametogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Baarends (Willy); R. van der Laan (Roald); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn mammals, there is a complex and intriguing relationship between DNA repair and gametogenesis. DNA repair mechanisms are involved not only in the repair of different types of DNA damage in developing germline cells, but also take part in the meiotic

  3. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate metabolism variables of Oreochromis mossambicuswere investigated after acute and chronic sublethal manganese exposure. The sublethal concentrations were determined from the LC50 value of manganese. After the exposures, the fish were carefully netted and blood was drawn from the caudal aorta.

  4. Inhibition of UV-induced G1 arrest by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields in repair-proficient and -deficient yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Y; Ikehata, M; Miyakoshi, J; Koana, T

    2003-11-01

    To assess the possibility that extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields obstruct the damage repair process, the gene conversion frequency and cell cycle kinetics in a DNA repair-proficient and nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient strain of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA repair- or NER-deficient cells were irradiated with sublethal doses of ultraviolet light (UV) radiation followed by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields up to 30 mT for 48 h. After exposure, colony-forming ability was scored as revertants in which gene conversion had restored the functional allele of the ARG4 gene conversion hotspot. Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. Gene conversion rate was increased by the combined exposure in DNA repair-proficient cells, whereas it remained unchanged between UV alone and the combined exposure in NER-deficient cells. The UV-induced G1 arrest was inhibited by exposure to 30 mT ELF magnetic fields in both repair-proficient and -deficient cells. The results suggest that exposure to high-density (30 mT) ELF magnetic fields decreases the efficiency of NER by suppressing G1 arrest, which in turn led to enhancement of the UV-induced gene conversion.

  5. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhen-Zhou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. Methods HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of 75 Gy each, over 8 months, yielding the sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR. Radioresistant characteristics were detected by clone formation assay, ultrastructural observations, cell doubling time, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis assay. Gene expression patterns of the radioresistant sub-lines were studied through microarray analysis and verified by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results The radioresistant sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR were more radioresisitant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays than parental HeLa cells by detecting their radioresistant characteristics, respectively. Compared to HeLa cells, the expression of 24 genes was significantly altered by at least 2-fold in HeLaNR cells. Of these, 19 genes were up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. In HeLaXR cells, 41 genes were significantly altered by at least 2-fold; 38 genes were up-regulated and 3 down-regulated. Conclusions Chronic exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induces adaptive responses that enhance tolerance of ionizing radiation and allow investigations of cellular radioresistance mechanisms. The insights gained into the molecular mechanisms activated by these "radioresistance" genes will lead to new therapeutic targets for cervical cancer.

  6. Involvement of two endonuclease III homologs in the base excision repair pathway for the processing of DNA alkylation damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Michelle; Chow, Barbara L; Morey, Natalie J; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Wei

    2004-01-05

    DNA base excision repair (BER) is initiated by DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove damaged bases. The phosphate backbone adjacent to the resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is then cleaved by an AP endonuclease or glycosylase-associated AP lyase to invoke subsequent BER steps. We have used a genetic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine whether or not AP sites are blocks to DNA replication and the biological consequences if AP sites persist in the genome. We previously reported that yeast cells deficient in the two AP endonucleases (apn1 apn2 double mutant) are extremely sensitive to killing by a model DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and that this sensitivity can be reduced by deleting the MAG1 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase gene. Here we report that in the absence of the AP endonucleases, deletion of two Escherichia coli endonuclease III homologs, NTG1 and NTG2, partially suppresses MMS-induced killing, which indicates that the AP lyase products are deleterious unless they are further processed by an AP endonuclease. The severe MMS sensitivity seen in AP endonuclease deficient strains can also be rescued by treatment of cells with the AP lyase inhibitor methoxyamine, which suggests that the product of AP lyase action on an AP site is indeed an extremely toxic lesion. In addition to the AP endonuclease interactions, deletion of NTG1 and NTG2 enhances the mag1 mutant sensitivity to MMS, whereas overexpression of MAG1 in either the ntg1 or ntg2 mutant severely affects cell growth. These results help to delineate alkylation base lesion flow within the BER pathway.

  7. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cythoarquitecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eD’Alessio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test, and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope. Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group, sub-lethal dose of 0.5 ηg and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n=6. Blood–Brain Barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance.

  8. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga Toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alipio; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Brener, Gabriela J.; Goldstein, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic–uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however, the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood–brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test), and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope). Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group), sub-lethal dose of 0.5 and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n = 6). Blood–brain barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1 ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance. PMID:26904009

  9. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  10. Effects of cadmium(II) on (+/-)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide-induced DNA damage response in human fibroblasts and DNA repair: a possible mechanism of cadmium's cogenotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Jagat J; Gupta, Suresh K; Kumar, Subodh; Sikka, Harish C

    2004-03-01

    Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant and a cigarette smok