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Sample records for sublethal copper exposure

  1. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effects of sublethal copper exposure on two gammarid species: which is the best competitor?

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    Sroda, Sophie; Cossu-Leguille, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Biomarker responses in organisms exposed to copper were examined by comparing two gammarid species, Gammarus roeseli and Dikerogammarus villosus, based on gender. G. roeseli specimens were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 6, 12, 24 and 48-h periods, while D. villosus were exposed to 20 and 30 μg/L of copper for 12, 48 and 72 h. Males and females of each species were exposed separately and biomarker measurements were performed for each species and gender. The selected biomarkers were antioxidant enzymes as total glutathione peroxidase (GPxtot), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGPx), and catalase activities. Malondialdehyde level (MDA) was measured as a biomarker of toxic effect. Energy reserves were evaluated by means of lipid, glycogen and protein levels. For both species and gender, antioxidant enzyme activities were weakly modified by copper exposure and differences were transient. MDA levels were increased in both species and genders in exposed animals compared to controls, when energy reserves were decreased. G. roeseli was more rapidly overwhelmed by copper toxicity while the first response of D. villosus was the mobilization of its energetic content. D. Villosus probably has specific physiological properties that enable it to cope with copper toxicity and thus become the best competitor.

  3. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper to the african catfish ( clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper on Clarias gariepinus were studied using a 96-hour static bioassay. Copper (as copper chloride, CuCl2 . H2O) was used to prepare the stock solution from which five standard concentrations 0.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, and 10.0 mg/L were prepared (coded A – E). 15 juvenile C. gariepinus fish ...

  4. Impacts of Sublethal Mercury Exposure on Birds: A Detailed Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Margaret C; Cristol, Daniel A

    Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant known to accumulate in, and negatively affect, fish-eating and oceanic bird species, and recently demonstrated to impact some terrestrial songbirds to a comparable extent. It can bioaccumulate to concentrations of >1 μg/g in tissues of prey organisms such as fish and insects. At high enough concentrations, exposure to mercury is lethal to birds. However, environmental exposures are usually far below the lethal concentrations established by dosing studies.The objective of this review is to better understand the effects of sublethal exposure to mercury in birds. We restricted our survey of the literature to studies with at least some exposures >5 μg/g. The majority of sublethal effects were subtle and some studies of similar endpoints reached different conclusions. Strong support exists in the literature for the conclusion that mercury exposure reduces reproductive output, compromises immune function, and causes avoidance of high-energy behaviors. For some endpoints, notably certain measures of reproductive success, endocrine and neurological function, and body condition, there is weak or contradictory evidence of adverse effects and further study is required. There was no evidence that environmentally relevant mercury exposure affects longevity, but several of the sublethal effects identified likely do result in fitness reductions that could adversely impact populations. Overall, 72% of field studies and 91% of laboratory studies found evidence of deleterious effects of mercury on some endpoint, and thus we can conclude that mercury is harmful to birds, and the many effects on reproduction indicate that bird population declines may already be resulting from environmental mercury pollution.

  5. The sublethal effects of copper and lead on the haematology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity bioassays were conducted on groovy mullet, Liza dumerili, using copper and lead, in order to assess how these metals affected their blood haematology and acid-base balance. Short-term (96 hours) exposure to lead caused significantly more haematological response [PCO2] than copper, when compared to the ...

  6. Effects Of Exposure To Sublethal Concentrations Of Azadirachta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physiological impairment on the fingerlings of Clarias gariepinus when exposed to sublethal concentrations of Azadirachta Indica was investigated. The fish were exposed to concentrations of 1.25, 2.50, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 ML -1 for the period of 12 weeks. The crude protein content decreased with increased concentration ...

  7. Monitoring colony-level effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure to honey bee colonies may be significant but difficult to detect in the field using standard visual assessment methods. Here we describe methods to measure the quantities of adult bees, brood and food resources by weighing hives and hive parts, by photogra...

  8. Sublethal effects of copper sulphate compared to copper nanoparticles in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at low pH: physiology and metal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bairuty, Genan A; Boyle, David; Henry, Theodore B; Handy, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    A few studies have investigated the interaction between copper toxicity and water pH in fishes, but little is known about the effects of acidic pH on the toxicity of copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs). This study aimed to describe the sub-lethal toxic effects of Cu-NPs compared to CuSO4 at neutral and acidic water pH values in juvenile rainbow trout. Fish were exposed in triplicate (3 tanks/treatment) to control (no added Cu), or 20μgl(-1) of either Cu as CuSO4 or Cu-NPs, at pH 7 and 5 in a semi-static aqueous exposure regime for up to 7 days. Acidification of the water altered the mean primary particle size (at pH 7, 60±2nm and pH 5, 55±1nm) and dialysis experiments to measure dissolution showed an increased release of dissolved Cu from Cu-NPs at pH 5 compared to pH 7. Copper accumulation was observed in the gills of trout exposed to CuSO4 and Cu-NPs at pH 7 and 5, with a greater accumulation from the CuSO4 treatment than Cu-NPs at each pH. The liver also showed Cu accumulation with both Cu treatments at pH 7 only, whereas, the spleen and kidney did not show measurable accumulation of Cu at any of the water pH values. Exposure to acid water caused changes in the ionoregulatory physiology of control fish and also altered the observed effects of Cu exposure; at pH 5, branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was greater than at pH 7 and the inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity caused by exposure to CuSO4 at pH 7 was also not observed. There were some changes in haematology and depletion of plasma Na(+) at pH 7 and 5 due to Cu exposure, but there were few material-type or pH effects. Overall, the data show that the accumulation of Cu is greater from CuSO4 than Cu-NPs; however, understanding of the effects of low pH on bioavailability of CuSO4 may not be directly transferred to Cu-NPs without further consideration of the physico-chemical behaviour of Cu-NPs in acid water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sublethal effects of copper on some biological traits of the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda reared under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, E; Parlapiano, I; Biandolino, F

    2013-10-01

    The common and widespread copper contamination in marine coastal environments make toxicity data necessary to assess the aquatic hazard and risk of this metal. In the present study, the sublethal effects of copper on survival, growth and reproduction of Gammarus aequicauda were investigated. Amphipods were exposed for 77d to 2 nominal copper concentrations (50, 100 μg L(-1)). Survival was the most sensitive measure of effect and was significantly reduced, especially during early life stage (juveniles). Growth of amphipods was also negatively affected by copper and the growth impairment in G. aequicauda increases with increasing metal concentration. The reproductive traits were impaired by each of the copper concentrations, even if there were not any significant differences between control and copper treatments. The size at maturity increased with increasing copper, so the smallest ovigerous females in the control and copper treatments were 0.83 mm and 1.35 mm head length, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the brood size and the body size of the female in all treatments, whilst the fecundity (n°juveniles/female) decreased in the order control, 50 and 100 μg Cu L(-1). Copper demonstrates chronic toxicity to G. aequicauda at realistic environmental concentrations. The results of this study entail that the understanding of chronic toxicity of a substance, especially on population level effects, is crucial to assess the long-term effect of the substance in the ecosystem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parent-to-offspring transfer of sublethal effects of copper exposure: Metabolic rate and life-history traits of Daphnia Transferencia paterno-filial de efectos subletales de la exposición al cobre: Tasa metabólica y rasgos de historia de vida en Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICIO A FERNÁNDEZ-GONZÁLEZ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In ecological communities, pollution driven perturbations exert immediate effects on sensitive individuals, but these effects may be transmitted among interacting organisms and spread over the community through several paths. This makes the assessment and prediction of ecological consequences of pollution difficult. The propagation of perturbation effects among organisms can be horizontal among organisms that coexist in space and time, and vertical among organism that belong to different generations. The latter process is poorly understood, in particular in planktonic organisms facing metal pollution. In this study we evaluate the vertical transfer of effects driven by sublethal copper stress on the heartbeat rate, somatic growth and fertility of Daphnia pulex. In order to evaluate this, we performed a factorial experiment in which parental and filial generations were exposed to both copper-enriched and control media. We found that parental exposure to copper exerted a significant effect on the heartbeat rate, somatic growth and fertility of offspring, revealing a transgenerational effect in D. pulex. This response may be explained by a higher resource investment on repair/detoxification processes in the parental generation, allocating fewer resources to offspring quality. Our results suggest that responsiveness of organisms to stress is dependent on parental history.En las comunidades ecológicas, las perturbaciones producidas por los contaminantes ejercen efectos inmediatos en los individuos sensibles, pero estos efectos podrían ser transmitidos entre los organismos interactuantes y extenderse sobre la comunidad a través de múltiples vías. Esto hace difícil la evaluación y predicción de las consecuencias ecológicas de la contaminación. La propagación de los efectos de una perturbación entre los organismos puede ser horizontal, entre organismos que coexisten espacial y temporalmente, y vertical, entre organismos que pertenecen a

  11. Biochemical Responses of Juvenile European Sturgeon, (Huso Huso to A Sub-Lethal Level of Copper and Cadmium in Freshwater and Brackish Water Environments

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    Saeed Zahedi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Caspian Sea basin, sturgeons spend the larval and juvenile stages in freshwaters of rivers and then, they migrate to brackish waters of the sea where they grow and mature. With regard to the elevation of the metal concentrations in coastal waters and sediments of the Caspian Sea and its adjacent rivers, it is likely that juvenile sturgeon are exposed to sub-lethal levels of metals during seawater entry process. We compared the biochemical responses of juvenile European sturgeon, (Beluga, Huso huso exposed to a sub-lethal level of copper (Cu, 20 μg/L and cadmium (Cd, 300 μg/L in freshwater (FW, 0 ppt and brackish water (BW, 11 ppt for seven days. The results showed that the levels of plasma glucose increased significantly in BW and in all metal exposed groups. Also, plasma cortisol concentrations showed significant increases when juveniles were exposed to BW, Cu(FW/BW and Cd(BW. The activity of liver superoxide dismutase (SOD decreased significantly in BW compared with FW. Moreover, Cu and Cd exposure enhanced the activity of SOD in BW, while SOD did not show any changes in FW. The levels of tissue and plasma proteins as well as plasma triiodothyronine (T3, thyroxine (T4 and liver Catalase (CAT activity remained constant when animals were exposed to Cu/Cd in both FW and BW environments. Our data indicate that exposure of juvenile beluga to BW stimulated the general biochemical responses of stress such as cortisol and glucose, while sub-lethal exposure to Cu and Cd caused oxidative stress in BW environment but not in FW

  12. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients.

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    Elizabeth D Hilborn

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Serum microcystin concentrations were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which measures free serum microcystin LR equivalents (ME. We describe serum ME concentrations and biochemical outcomes among a subset of patients during 8 weeks following exposure. Thirteen patients were included; 6 were males, patients' median age was 45 years (range 16-80, one was seropositive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The median serum ME concentration was 0.33 ng/mL (range: <0.16-0.96. One hundred thirty nine blood samples were collected following exposure. Patients' biochemical outcomes varied, but overall indicated a mixed liver injury. Linear regression evaluated each patient's weekly mean biochemical outcome with their maximum serum ME concentration; a measure of the extrinsic pathway of clotting function, prothrombin time, was negatively and significantly associated with serum ME concentrations. This group of exposed patients' biochemical outcomes display evidence of a mixed liver injury temporally associated with microcystin exposure. Interpretation of biochemical outcomes are complicated by the study population's underlying chronic disease status. It is clear that dialysis patients are a distinct 'at risk' group for cyanotoxin exposures due to direct intravenous exposure to dialysate prepared from surface drinking water supplies. Careful monitoring and treatment of water supplies used to prepare dialysate is required to prevent future cyanotoxin exposure events.

  13. Effects of sublethal exposure to metofluthrin on the fitness of Aedes aegypti in a domestic setting in Cairns, Queensland

    OpenAIRE

    Buhagiar, Tamara S.; Gregor J Devine; Scott A. Ritchie

    2017-01-01

    Background Metofluthrin is highly effective at reducing biting activity in Aedes aegypti. Its efficacy lies in the rapid onset of confusion, knockdown, and subsequent kill of a mosquito. In the field, there are a variety of scenarios that might result in sublethal exposure to metofluthrin, including mosquitoes that are active at the margins of the chemical?s lethal range, brief exposure as mosquitoes fly in and out of treated spaces or decreasing efficacy of the emanators with time. Sublethal...

  14. Sublethal triclosan exposure decreases susceptibility to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G

    2011-09-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan.

  15. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G.; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G.

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan. PMID:21746948

  16. Gene expression changes in honey bees induced by sublethal imidacloprid exposure during the larval stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Wen; Lu, Kuang-Hui; Yang, En-Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Honey bee larvae exposed to sublethal doses of imidacloprid show behavioural abnormalities as adult insects. Previous studies have demonstrated that this phenomenon originates from abnormal neural development in response to imidacloprid exposure. Here, we further investigated the global gene expression changes in the heads of newly emerged adults and observed that 578 genes showed more than 2-fold changes in gene expression after imidacloprid exposure. This information might aid in understanding the effects of pesticides on the health of pollinators. For example, the genes encoding major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), a group of multifunctional proteins with significant roles in the sustainable development of bee colonies, were strongly downregulated. These downregulation patterns were further confirmed through analyses using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on the heads of 6-day-old nurse bees. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that sublethal doses of imidacloprid affect mrjp expression and likely weaken bee colonies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Response of larval fish, Leiostomus xanthurus, to environmental stress following sublethal cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middaugh, D.P.; Davis, W.R.; Yoakum, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The toxicity of cadmium to larval fish, Leiostomus xanthurus, was studied. An incipient LC/sub 50/ concentration of approximately 0.2 to 0.3 mg/l cadmium was first estimated. Subsequent short-term sublethal tests were conducted to determine the relationship of cadmium exposure and accumulated whole body residues of the metal on the response of larvae to thermal stress and low dissolved oxygen. Results of this study indicated a significant decrease (..cap alpha.. = 0.05, t-Test) in the critical thermal maximum (CTM) for larvae exposed to 0.5 and 0.8 mg/l cadmium for 96 hours at 20/sup 0/C. Significant decreases (..cap alpha.. = 0.05, chi/sup 2/) in survival of larvae subjected to a dissolved oxygen (DO) level of 1.6 mg/l after exposure to 0.5 and 0.8 mg/l cadmium were also observed.

  18. Sublethal Effects of Spirodiclofen on Tetranychus urticae Koch_Pre-Ovipositional Females After Different Exposure Times

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    Dejan Marčić

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublethal effect of spirodiclofen on Tetranychus urticae females that survived different exposure times in the pre-ovipositional period was evaluated calculating two parameters - instantaneous rate of increase and net fertility - after six days of reproduction. The females were exposed to four concentrations/doses of the acaricide: 96 mg /L (0.24 μg/cm2, 48 mg/L(0.12 μg/cm2, 24 mg/L (0.06 μg/cm2 and 12 mg./L (0.03 μg/cm2 for 2, 6 and 24h in a leaf disc bioassay. After 24h exposure to 12 mg/L, instantaneous rate of increase was significantlyreduced (0.545; 0.634 in control, while significant reduction in net fertility (20.61; 28.57 in the control was recorded even after 2h exposure to the same concentration. The effect of all tested concentrations of spirodiclofen on both parameters increased with exposure time. The lowest values of instantaneous rate of increase (0.268 and net fertility (2.58 were recorded after 24h exposure to 96 mg/L. After 24h exposure, the concentration increase from 12 to 24 mg/L significantly reduced both parameters, while a further increase from 24 to 96 mg/L significantly reduced instantaneous rate of increase, but not net-fertility. The results regarding T. urticae population management are discussed.

  19. A fish of many scales: extrapolating sublethal pesticide exposures to the productivity of wild salmon populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David H; Spromberg, Julann A; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-12-01

    For more than a decade, numerous pesticides have been detected in river systems of the western United States that support anadromous species of Pacific salmon and steelhead. Over the same interval, several declining wild salmon populations have been listed as either threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Because pesticides occur in surface waters that provide critical habitat for ESA-listed stocks, they are an ongoing concern for salmon conservation and recovery throughout California and the Pacific Northwest. Because pesticide exposures are typically sublethal, a key question is whether toxicological effects at (or below) the scale of the individual animal ultimately reduce the productivity and recovery potential of wild populations. In this study we evaluate how the sublethal impacts of pesticides on physiology and behavior can reduce the somatic growth of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and, by extension, subsequent size-dependent survival when animals migrate to the ocean and overwinter in their first year. Our analyses focused on the organophosphate and carbamate classes of insecticides. These neurotoxic chemicals have been widely detected in aquatic environments. They inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme in the salmon nervous system that regulates neurotransmitter-mediated signaling at synapses. Based on empirical data, we developed a model that explicitly links sublethal reductions in acetylcholinesterase activity to reductions in feeding behavior, food ration, growth, and size at migration. Individual size was then used to estimate size-dependent survival during migration and transition to the sea. Individual survival estimates were then integrated into a life-history population projection matrix and used to calculate population productivity and growth rate. Our results indicate that short-term (i.e., four-day) exposures that are representative of seasonal pesticide use may be sufficient to reduce the

  20. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exposure to sublethal blast overpressure reduces the food intake and exercise performance of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, R A; Elsayed, N; Petras, J M; Widholm, J

    1997-07-25

    Exposure to blast overpressure can typically inflict generalized damage on major organ systems, especially gas-containing organs such as the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of the present study was to use rat's food intake and exercise wheel running as behavioral correlates of the perhaps more subtle damage to these organ systems induced by sublethal blast overpressure. Toward this end, all rats were exposed to a 12-h light/dark cycle and food was available only in the dark period. Prior to exposure, rats in the (E)xercise group were required to execute five rotations of an activity wheel for a food pellet; wheel turns that occurred at times other than when a rat was feeding were recorded separately and labeled exercise running. In the (S)edentary and (A)nesthesia groups, wheel running was not possible and rats were required to execute five leverpresses for a single pellet. A compressed air-driven shock tube was used to expose rats to a supra-atmospheric wave of air pressure. The tube was separated into two sections by a polyester membrane, the thickness of which determined peak and duration of overpressure. All rats were anesthetized with 50 mg/kg of phenobarbital. After reaching a deep plane of anesthesia, they were individually tied in a stockinet across one end of the shock tube. In preliminary tests, the membrane thickness was 1000 (A)ngstroms and rats in Group L(ethality) were exposed to a 129 kPa (peak amplitude) wave of overpressure. Three of six rats survived exposure to this peak pressure; pathology was evident in the lungs and gastrointestinal tract of all non-survivors. Rats in Groups E and S were tested with a 500 A membrane, which resulted in an 83 kPa peak amplitude. All rats survived exposure to this lower peak pressure. On the day of exposure to blast, the relative reduction of intake during the first 3 h of the dark period was significantly greater for Group E than for Groups S and A; the intake of Groups E and S remained reduced

  2. Responses of bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) larvae under lethal and sublethal scenarios of crude oil exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tara A; Childress, William; Portier, Ralph; Chesney, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    Bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) is an ecologically important zooplanktivorous fish inhabiting estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico and eastern North America from Maine to Florida. Because they have a protracted spawning season (spring through fall) and are abundant at all life stages in coastal estuaries, their eggs and larvae likely encountered oil that reached the coast during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We compared responses to oil exposure at different life stages and at lethal and sublethal conditions using acute, 24h exposures. In a series of experiments, bay anchovy larvae were exposed to high energy water accommodated fractions (HEWAF) and chemically-enhanced WAF (CEWAF) at two stages of larval development (5 and 21 days post hatch, dph). HEWAF oil exposures induced significantly greater life stage dependent sensitivity at 5 dph than at 21 dph but chemically dispersed (CEWAF) exposure mortality was more variable and LC50s were not significantly different between 5 and 21dph larvae. Acute exposure to two low-level concentrations of CEWAF did not result in significant mortality over 24h, but resulted in a 25-77% reduction in larval survival and a 12-34% reduction in weight specific growth after six days of post-exposure growth following the initial 24h exposure. These results show that younger (5 dph) bay anchovy larvae are more vulnerable to acute oil exposure than older (21 dph) larvae, and that acute responses do not accurately reflect potential population level mortality and impacts to growth and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival rate of honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers after exposure to sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquiere, T.

    2010-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a commonly used systemic insecticide which can induce several sublethal effects. Previous research has not shown any increased mortality in bees that were fed with sublethal doses. However, there is very little research conducted with the focus on survival rate of honeybees in the

  4. {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics of earthworm exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sarah A.E.; McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.c [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to monitor earthworm responses to sub-lethal (50-1500 mg/kg) phenanthrene exposure in soil. Total phenanthrene was analyzed via soxhlet extraction, bioavailable phenanthrene was estimated by hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and 1-butanol extractions and sorption to soil was assessed by batch equilibration. Bioavailable phenanthrene (HPCD-extracted) comprised approx65-97% of total phenanthrene added to the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed differences in responses between exposed earthworms and controls after 48 h exposure. The metabolites that varied with exposure included amino acids (isoleucine, alanine and glutamine) and maltose. PLS models indicated that earthworm response is positively correlated to both total phenanthrene concentration and bioavailable (HPCD-extracted) phenanthrene in a freshly spiked, unaged soil. These results show that metabolomics is a powerful, direct technique that may be used to monitor contaminant bioavailability and toxicity of sub-lethal concentrations of contaminants in the environment. These initial findings warrant further metabolomic studies with aged contaminated soils. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics is used to directly monitor metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after 48 h of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene in soil.

  5. Sublethal Exposure to Diatomaceous Earth Increases Net Fecundity of Flour Beetles (Tribolium confusum) by Inhibiting Egg Cannibalism

    OpenAIRE

    Shostak, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth) increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day) of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible fo...

  6. Toxicity bioassay and effects of sub-lethal exposure of malathion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarias gariepinus were exposed to different concentrations of malathion to determine the 96 h LC50 value and its sub-lethal effects on haematological parameters and biochemical composition were also investigated. The 96 h LC50 value concluded was 8.22 mg/L. Specimens of C. gariepinus were exposed to sub-lethal ...

  7. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents...

  8. Hormonal and ion regulatory response in three freshwater fish species following waterborne copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, Marleen; Tudorache, Christian; Darras, Veerle M; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated effects of sublethal copper exposure in 3 different freshwater fish: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio). In a first experiment we exposed these fishes to an equally toxic Cu dose, a Cu level 10 times lower than their 96 h LC50 value: 20, 65, and 150 microg/L Cu. In a second series we exposed them to the same Cu concentration (50 microg/L). Na+/K+-ATPase activity in gill tissue was disturbed differently in rainbow trout then in common and gibel carp. Rainbow trout showed a thorough disruption of plasma ion levels at the beginning of both exposures, whereas common carp and gibel carp displayed effects only after 3 days. Rainbow trout and common carp thyroid hormones experienced adverse effects in the beginning of the exposure. The involvement of prolactin in handling metal stress was reflected in changes of mRNA prolactin receptor concentrations in gill tissue, with an up regulation of this mRNA in rainbow trout and a down regulation in gibel carp, which was more pronounced in the latter. Overall, rainbow trout appeared more sensitive in the beginning of the exposure, however, when it overcame this first challenge, it handled copper exposure in a better manner then common and gibel carp as they showed more long term impacts of Cu exposure. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exposure to Sublethal Doses of Fipronil and Thiacloprid Highly Increases Mortality of Honeybees Previously Infected by Nosema ceranae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidau, Cyril; Diogon, Marie; Aufauvre, Julie; Fontbonne, Régis; Viguès, Bernard; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Texier, Catherine; Biron, David G.; Blot, Nicolas; El Alaoui, Hicham; Belzunces, Luc P.; Delbac, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Background The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is undergoing a worldwide decline whose origin is still in debate. Studies performed for twenty years suggest that this decline may involve both infectious diseases and exposure to pesticides. Joint action of pathogens and chemicals are known to threaten several organisms but the combined effects of these stressors were poorly investigated in honeybees. Our study was designed to explore the effect of Nosema ceranae infection on honeybee sensitivity to sublethal doses of the insecticides fipronil and thiacloprid. Methodology/Finding Five days after their emergence, honeybees were divided in 6 experimental groups: (i) uninfected controls, (ii) infected with N. ceranae, (iii) uninfected and exposed to fipronil, (iv) uninfected and exposed to thiacloprid, (v) infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days post-infection (p.i.) to fipronil, and (vi) infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days p.i. to thiacloprid. Honeybee mortality and insecticide consumption were analyzed daily and the intestinal spore content was evaluated 20 days after infection. A significant increase in honeybee mortality was observed when N. ceranae-infected honeybees were exposed to sublethal doses of insecticides. Surprisingly, exposures to fipronil and thiacloprid had opposite effects on microsporidian spore production. Analysis of the honeybee detoxification system 10 days p.i. showed that N. ceranae infection induced an increase in glutathione-S-transferase activity in midgut and fat body but not in 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity. Conclusions/Significance After exposure to sublethal doses of fipronil or thiacloprid a higher mortality was observed in N. ceranae-infected honeybees than in uninfected ones. The synergistic effect of N. ceranae and insecticide on honeybee mortality, however, did not appear strongly linked to a decrease of the insect detoxification system. These data support the hypothesis that the combination of the increasing

  10. Sublethal impact of short term exposure to the organophosphate pesticide azamethiphos in the marine mollusc Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, M N; Hagger, J A; Moore, R T B; Cooper, L; Galloway, T S

    2007-04-01

    Concern has been raised that the increased use of pesticides in intensive aquaculture practices may cause adverse sublethal effects to non-target aquatic species. Azamethiphos is an organophosphate (OP) pesticide used to combat sea lice infestations in farmed salmonids. Here, the sublethal impact on the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, of short term exposure to azamethiphos was determined. The testing regime included biomarkers of exposure (acetylcholinesterase activity), cytotoxicity (neutral red retention), immune function (phagocytic index) and physiological condition (feeding rate). The distribution and sensitivity of M. edulis acetylcholinesterase to inhibition by azamethiphos was first determined, yielding IC(50) values of 0.736 and 1.30 mg l(-1) for gill and haemolymph, respectively. Exposure of mussels to 0.1 mg l(-1) azamethiphos for periods of up to 24h caused a significant reduction in acetylcholinesterase activity in both the haemolymph (Pgill (P<0.002), alteration in cell viability (P<0.02) and decrease in phagocytic index (P<0.03). The feeding rate remained unaffected. The results support the hypothesis that, in addition to its neurotoxic effects, azamethiphos can modulate haemocyte function and immune defence in M. edulis at environmentally relevant concentrations after only a few hours.

  11. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alaee, Mehran [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. > Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. > NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  12. A single exposure to a sublethal pediocin concentration initiates a resistance-associated temporal cell envelope and general stress response in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Bahl, Martin Iain; Licht, Tine Rask

    2015-01-01

    was to determine if exposure to sublethal concentrations of pediocin-containing Lactobacillus plantarum WHE 92 supernatant could prime L. monocytogenes for resistance. By transcriptomic analysis, we found two, 55 and 539 genes differentially expressed after 10, 60 and 180 min of exposure to L. plantarum WHE 92...... resistant than wild types to L. plantarum WHE 92 supernatant. LisRK, SigB and SigL regulation and genes associated with resistance are involved in the temporal adaptive response to pediocin and all three regulatory systems affect pediocin resistance. Thus, a single exposure to a sublethal pediocin...

  13. Sublethal Exposure to Diatomaceous Earth Increases Net Fecundity of Flour Beetles (Tribolium confusum) by Inhibiting Egg Cannibalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth) increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day) of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible for the increased net fecundity: higher egg production and lower egg cannibalism. Adult T. confusum were maintained at low or high density in medium containing sublethal (0–4%) diatomaceous earth. Net fecundity increased up to 2.1× control values during diatomaceous earth exposure, and returned to control levels following removal from diatomaceous earth. Cannibalism assays on adults showed that diatomaceous earth reduced the number of eggs produced to 0.7× control values at low density and to 0.8× controls at high density, and also reduced egg cannibalism rates of adults to as little as 0.4× control values, but at high density only. Diatomaceous earth also reduced cannibalism by larvae on eggs to 0.3× control values. So, while the presence of diatomaceous earth reduced egg production, net fecundity increased as a result of strong suppression of the normal egg cannibalism by adults and larvae that occurs at high beetle density. Undisturbed cultures containing sublethal diatomaceous earth concentrations reached higher population densities than diatomaceous earth-free controls. Cohort studies on survival from egg to adult indicated that this population increase was due largely to decreased egg cannibalism by adult females. This is the first report of inhibition of egg cannibalism by diatomaceous earth on larval or adult insects. The ability of diatomaceous earth to alter cannibalism behavior without causing mortality makes it an ideal investigative tool for cannibalism

  14. Sublethal exposure to diatomaceous earth increases net fecundity of flour beetles (Tribolium confusum by inhibiting egg cannibalism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Shostak

    Full Text Available Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible for the increased net fecundity: higher egg production and lower egg cannibalism. Adult T. confusum were maintained at low or high density in medium containing sublethal (0-4% diatomaceous earth. Net fecundity increased up to 2.1× control values during diatomaceous earth exposure, and returned to control levels following removal from diatomaceous earth. Cannibalism assays on adults showed that diatomaceous earth reduced the number of eggs produced to 0.7× control values at low density and to 0.8× controls at high density, and also reduced egg cannibalism rates of adults to as little as 0.4× control values, but at high density only. Diatomaceous earth also reduced cannibalism by larvae on eggs to 0.3× control values. So, while the presence of diatomaceous earth reduced egg production, net fecundity increased as a result of strong suppression of the normal egg cannibalism by adults and larvae that occurs at high beetle density. Undisturbed cultures containing sublethal diatomaceous earth concentrations reached higher population densities than diatomaceous earth-free controls. Cohort studies on survival from egg to adult indicated that this population increase was due largely to decreased egg cannibalism by adult females. This is the first report of inhibition of egg cannibalism by diatomaceous earth on larval or adult insects. The ability of diatomaceous earth to alter cannibalism behavior without causing mortality makes it an ideal investigative tool for

  15. Sublethal exposure to diatomaceous earth increases net fecundity of flour beetles (Tribolium confusum) by inhibiting egg cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth) increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day) of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible for the increased net fecundity: higher egg production and lower egg cannibalism. Adult T. confusum were maintained at low or high density in medium containing sublethal (0-4%) diatomaceous earth. Net fecundity increased up to 2.1× control values during diatomaceous earth exposure, and returned to control levels following removal from diatomaceous earth. Cannibalism assays on adults showed that diatomaceous earth reduced the number of eggs produced to 0.7× control values at low density and to 0.8× controls at high density, and also reduced egg cannibalism rates of adults to as little as 0.4× control values, but at high density only. Diatomaceous earth also reduced cannibalism by larvae on eggs to 0.3× control values. So, while the presence of diatomaceous earth reduced egg production, net fecundity increased as a result of strong suppression of the normal egg cannibalism by adults and larvae that occurs at high beetle density. Undisturbed cultures containing sublethal diatomaceous earth concentrations reached higher population densities than diatomaceous earth-free controls. Cohort studies on survival from egg to adult indicated that this population increase was due largely to decreased egg cannibalism by adult females. This is the first report of inhibition of egg cannibalism by diatomaceous earth on larval or adult insects. The ability of diatomaceous earth to alter cannibalism behavior without causing mortality makes it an ideal investigative tool for cannibalism studies.

  16. Sublethal exposure to crude oil during embryonic development alters cardiac morphology and reduces aerobic capacity in adult fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicken, Corinne E; Linbo, Tiffany L; Baldwin, David H; Willis, Maryjean L; Myers, Mark S; Holland, Larry; Larsen, Marie; Stekoll, Michael S; Rice, Stanley D; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Incardona, John P

    2011-04-26

    Exposure to high concentrations of crude oil produces a lethal syndrome of heart failure in fish embryos. Mortality is caused by cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous components of petroleum. Here, we show that transient embryonic exposure to very low concentrations of oil causes toxicity that is sublethal, delayed, and not counteracted by the protective effects of cytochrome P450 induction. Nearly a year after embryonic oil exposure, adult zebrafish showed subtle changes in heart shape and a significant reduction in swimming performance, indicative of reduced cardiac output. These delayed physiological impacts on cardiovascular performance at later life stages provide a potential mechanism linking reduced individual survival to population-level ecosystem responses of fish species to chronic, low-level oil pollution.

  17. Differential response of olfactory sensory neuron populations to copper ion exposure in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Milani, Liliana; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Franceschini, Valeria

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral olfactory system of fish is in direct contact with the external aqueous environment, so dissolved contaminants can easily impair sensory functions and cause neurobehavioral injuries. The olfactory epithelium of fish is arranged in lamellae forming a rosette in the olfactory cavity and contains three main types of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs): ciliated (cOSNs) and microvillous olfactory sensory neurons (mOSNs), common to all vertebrates, and a third minor group of olfactory neurons, crypt cells, absent in tetrapods. Since copper is a ubiquitously diffusing olfactory toxicant and a spreading contaminant in urban runoff, we investigated the effect of low copper concentration on the three different OSNs in the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish, a model system widely used in biological research. Image analysis was applied for morphometry and quantification of immunohistochemically detected OSNs. Copper exposure resulted in an evident decrease in olfactory epithelium thickness. Moreover, after exposure, the lamellae of the dorsal and ventral halves of the olfactory rosettes showed a different increase in their sensory areas, suggesting a lateral migration of new cells into non-sensory regions. The results of the present study provide clear evidence of a differential response of the three neural cell populations of zebrafish olfactory mucosa after 96h of exposure to copper ions at the sublethal concentration of 30μgL(-1). Densitometric values of cONS, immunostained with anti-G αolf, decreased of about 60% compared to the control. When the fish were transferred to water without copper addition and examined after 3, 10 and 30days, we observed a partial restoration of anti-G αolf staining intensity to normal condition. The recovery of cOSNs appeared sustained by neuronal proliferation, quantified with anti-PCNA immunostaining, in particular in the early days after exposure. The densitometric analysis applied to mOSNs, immunostained with anti-TRPC2

  18. Effect of sub-lethal exposure to ultraviolet radiation on the escape performance of Atlantic cod larvae (Gadus morhua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Fukunishi

    Full Text Available The amount of ultraviolet (UV radiation reaching the earth's surface has increased due to depletion of the ozone layer. Several studies have reported that UV radiation reduces survival of fish larvae. However, indirect and sub-lethal impacts of UV radiation on fish behavior have been given little consideration. We observed the escape performance of larval cod (24 dph, SL: 7.6±0.2 mm; 29 dph, SL: 8.2±0.3 mm that had been exposed to sub-lethal levels of UV radiation vs. unexposed controls. Two predators were used (in separate experiments: two-spotted goby (Gobiusculus flavescens; a suction predator and lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata; a "passive" ambush predator. Ten cod larvae were observed in the presence of a predator for 20 minutes using a digital video camera. Trials were replicated 4 times for goby and 5 times for jellyfish. Escape rate (total number of escapes/total number of attacks ×100, escape distance and the number of larvae remaining at the end of the experiment were measured. In the experiment with gobies, in the UV-treated larvae, both escape rate and escape distance (36%, 38±7.5 mm respectively were significantly lower than those of control larvae (75%, 69±4.7 mm respectively. There was a significant difference in survival as well (UV: 35%,63%. No apparent escape response was observed, and survival rate was not significantly different, between treatments (UV: 66%,74% in the experiment with jellyfish. We conclude that the effect and impact of exposure to sub-lethal levels of UV radiation on the escape performance of cod larvae depends on the type of predator. Our results also suggest that prediction of UV impacts on fish larvae based only on direct effects are underestimations.

  19. Acute exposure to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid and coumaphos enhances olfactory learning and memory in the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sally M; Baker, Daniel D; Wright, Geraldine A

    2013-06-01

    The decline of honeybees and other pollinating insects is a current cause for concern. A major factor implicated in their decline is exposure to agricultural chemicals, in particular the neonicotinoid insecticides such as imidacloprid. Honeybees are also subjected to additional chemical exposure when beekeepers treat hives with acaricides to combat the mite Varroa destructor. Here, we assess the effects of acute sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, and the organophosphate acaricide coumaphos, on honey bee learning and memory. Imidacloprid had little effect on performance in a six-trial olfactory conditioning assay, while coumaphos caused a modest impairment. We report a surprising lack of additive adverse effects when both compounds were administered simultaneously, which instead produced a modest improvement in learning and memory.

  20. Brief exposure to copper activates lysosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Karina; Coblenz, Jessica; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential mineral, but its toxicity necessitates existence of powerful machinery responsible for the extraction of excess Cu from the cell. Cu exposure was recently shown to induce the translocation of Cu pump ATP7B to the lysosomes followed by lysosomal exocytosis. Here we sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of Cu on lysosomal exocytosis. We found that brief exposure to Cu activates lysosomal exocytosis, which was measured as a release of the lysosomal digestive enzyme β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) into the extracellular medium and by the presence lysosomal protein LAMP1 at the plasma membrane. Such release depends on calcium (Ca) and on the lysosomal SNARE VAMP7. ATP7B knockdown using RNAi suppressed the basal lysosomal exocytosis, but did not affect the ability of Cu to activate it. ATP7B knockdown was associated with sustained oxidative stress. The removal of Ca from the extracellular medium suppressed the Cu-dependent component of the lysosomal exocytosis. We propose that Cu promotes lysosomal exocytosis by facilitating a Ca-dependent step of the lysosomal exocytosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Smith, Luke D; Cooper, Timothy F; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1) TSS (25 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1) TSS (83 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  2. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  3. Effect of Chronic Dietary Copper Exposure on Haematology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    significant reduction in haematocrit, red blood cell, white blood cell and increased lymphocyte (p<0.05) and became anaemic with severe skin discoloration, .... digital camera (Kodak V530 zoom digital).Tissue copper was also determined by .... effects of dietary copper exposure on osmotic balance affected and influenced.

  4. Functional recovery of biofilm bacterial communities after copper exposure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, M.E.Y.; Massieux, B.; Breure, A.M.; Greve, G.D.; Rutgers, M.; Admiraal, W.

    2006-01-01

    Potential of bacterial communities in biofilms to recover after copper exposure was investigated. Biofilms grown outdoor in shallow water on glass dishes were exposed in the laboratory to 0.6, 2.1, 6.8 µmol/l copper amended surface water and a reference and subsequently to un-amended surface water.

  5. Differential response of olfactory sensory neuron populations to copper ion exposure in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzari, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.lazzari@unibo.it; Bettini, Simone; Milani, Liliana; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Franceschini, Valeria

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Copper exposure affects ciliated olfactory receptors more than microvillar cells. • Crypt olfactory sensory neurons are not affected by copper exposure. • Copper exposure induces an increase in the amount of sensory epithelium. - Abstract: The peripheral olfactory system of fish is in direct contact with the external aqueous environment, so dissolved contaminants can easily impair sensory functions and cause neurobehavioral injuries. The olfactory epithelium of fish is arranged in lamellae forming a rosette in the olfactory cavity and contains three main types of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs): ciliated (cOSNs) and microvillous olfactory sensory neurons (mOSNs), common to all vertebrates, and a third minor group of olfactory neurons, crypt cells, absent in tetrapods. Since copper is a ubiquitously diffusing olfactory toxicant and a spreading contaminant in urban runoff, we investigated the effect of low copper concentration on the three different OSNs in the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish, a model system widely used in biological research. Image analysis was applied for morphometry and quantification of immunohistochemically detected OSNs. Copper exposure resulted in an evident decrease in olfactory epithelium thickness. Moreover, after exposure, the lamellae of the dorsal and ventral halves of the olfactory rosettes showed a different increase in their sensory areas, suggesting a lateral migration of new cells into non-sensory regions. The results of the present study provide clear evidence of a differential response of the three neural cell populations of zebrafish olfactory mucosa after 96 h of exposure to copper ions at the sublethal concentration of 30 μg L{sup −1}. Densitometric values of cONS, immunostained with anti-G {sub αolf}, decreased of about 60% compared to the control. When the fish were transferred to water without copper addition and examined after 3, 10 and 30 days, we observed a partial restoration of anti-G {sub

  6. Exploring sub-lethal effects of exposure to a nucleopolyhedrovirus in the speckled wood (Pararge aegeria) butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Helen; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J; Van Dyck, Hans; Turner, Emma; Hails, Rosemary S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the sub-lethal effects of larval exposure to baculovirus on host life history and wing morphological traits using a model system, the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria (L.) and the virus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus. Males and females showed similar responses to the viral infection. Infection significantly reduced larval growth rate, whilst an increase in development time allowed the critical mass for pupation to be attained. There was no direct effect of viral infection on the wing morphological traits examined. There was, however, an indirect effect of resisting infection; larvae that took longer to develop had reduced resource investment in adult flight muscle mass. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Copper exposure effects on yeast mitochondrial proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; D'Alessandro, Annamaria; Jaiswal, Deepa; Marzano, Valeria; Neri, Sara; Ronci, Maurizio; Urbani, Andrea

    2011-10-19

    Mitochondria play an important role on the entire cellular copper homeostatic mechanisms. Alteration of cellular copper levels may thus influence mitochondrial proteome and its investigation represents an important contribution to the general understanding of copper-related cellular effects. In these study we have performed an organelle targeted proteomic investigation focusing our attention on the effect of non-lethal 1mM copper concentration on Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial proteome. Functional copper effects on yeast mitochondrial proteome were evaluated by using both 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomic data have been then analyzed by different unsupervised meta-analysis approaches that highlight the impairment of mitochondrial functions and the activation of oxidative stress response. Interestingly, our data have shown that stress response generated by 1mM copper treatment determines the activation of S. cerevisiae survival pathway. To investigate these findings we have treated yeast cells responsiveness to copper with hydrogen peroxide and observed a protective role of this metal. These results are suggestive of a copper role in the protection from oxidative stress possibly due to the activation of mechanisms involved in cellular survival and growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal transfer and sublethal immune system effects of brevetoxin exposure in nesting loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from western Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Justin R; Bauman, Katherine D; Greenan, Taylor M; Blum, Patricia C; Henry, Michael S; Walsh, Catherine J

    2016-11-01

    Blooms of Karenia brevis (also called red tides) occur almost annually in the Gulf of Mexico. The health effects of the neurotoxins (i.e., brevetoxins) produced by this toxic dinoflagellate on marine turtles are poorly understood. Florida's Gulf Coast represents an important foraging and nesting area for a number of marine turtle species. Most studies investigating brevetoxin exposure in marine turtles thus far focus on dead and/or stranded individuals and rarely examine the effects in apparently "healthy" free-ranging individuals. From May-July 2014, one year after the last red tide bloom, we collected blood from nesting loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) on Casey Key, Florida USA. These organisms show both strong nesting and foraging site fidelity. The plasma was analyzed for brevetoxin concentrations in addition to a number of health and immune-related parameters in an effort to establish sublethal effects of this toxin. Lastly, from July-September 2014, we collected unhatched eggs and liver and yolk sacs from dead-in-nest hatchlings from nests laid by the sampled females and tested these samples for brevetoxin concentrations to determine maternal transfer and effects on reproductive success. Using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), all plasma samples from nesting females tested positive for brevetoxin (reported as ng brevetoxin-3[PbTx-3] equivalents [eq]/mL) exposure (2.1-26.7ng PbTx-3eq/mL). Additionally, 100% of livers (1.4-13.3ng PbTx-3eq/mL) and yolk sacs (1.7-6.6ng PbTx-3eq/mL) from dead-in-nest hatchlings and 70% of eggs (<1.0-24.4ng PbTx-3eq/mL) tested positive for brevetoxin exposure with the ELISA. We found that plasma brevetoxin concentrations determined by an ELISA in nesting females positively correlated with gamma-globulins, indicating a potential for immunomodulation as a result of brevetoxin exposure. While the sample sizes were small, we also found that plasma brevetoxin concentrations determined by an ELISA in

  9. Sublethal red tide toxin exposure in free-ranging manatees (Trichechus manatus) affects the immune system through reduced lymphocyte proliferation responses, inflammation, and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Catherine J., E-mail: cjwalsh@mote.org [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Butawan, Matthew, E-mail: mattbutawan@outlook.com [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Yordy, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.e.balmer@gmail.com [Marine Immunology Program, Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 (United States); Ball, Ray, E-mail: Ray.Ball@lowryparkzoo.com [Lowry Park Zoo, 1101 W Sligh Ave, Tampa, FL 33604 (United States); Flewelling, Leanne, E-mail: Leanne.Flewelling@MyFWC.com [Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 100 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States); Wit, Martine de, E-mail: Martine.deWit@MyFWC.com [Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 100 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (United States); Bonde, Robert K., E-mail: rbonde@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Sirenia Project, 7920 NE 71st Street, Gainesville, FL 32653 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Sublethal brevetoxin exposure affects manatee immune function. • Plasma brevetoxin levels correlate with oxidative stress in rescued manatees. • Brevetoxin exposure affects lymphocyte proliferation in rescued manatees. • Plasma brevetoxin concentrations ranged from 0 to 19 ng PbTx-3 eq/mL. - Abstract: The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected by exposure to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis blooms are common in manatee habitats of Florida’s southwestern coast and produce a group of cyclic polyether toxins collectively referred to as red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Although a large number of manatees exposed to significant levels of red tide toxins die, several manatees are rescued from sublethal exposure and are successfully treated and returned to the wild. Sublethal brevetoxin exposure may potentially impact the manatee immune system. Lymphocyte proliferative responses and a suite of immune function parameters in the plasma were used to evaluate effects of brevetoxin exposure on health of manatees rescued from natural exposure to red tide toxins in their habitat. Blood samples were collected from rescued manatees at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL and from healthy, unexposed manatees in Crystal River, FL. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from whole blood were stimulated with T-cell mitogens, ConA and PHA. A suite of plasma parameters, including plasma protein electrophoresis profiles, lysozyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species, was also used to assess manatee health. Significant decreases (p < 0.05) in lymphocyte proliferation were observed in ConA and PHA stimulated lymphocytes from rescued animals compared to non-exposed animals. Significant correlations were observed between oxidative stress markers (SOD, ROS/RNS) and plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Sublethal exposure to brevetoxins in the

  10. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sub-lethal cadmium exposure increases phytochelatin concentrations in the aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SF, Gonçalves [Department of Biology & CESAM, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); SK, Davies [Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bennett, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Raab, A.; Feldmann, J. [TESLA, Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Kille, P. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Loureiro, S. [Department of Biology & CESAM, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); DJ, Spurgeon [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); JG, Bundy, E-mail: j.bundy@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Phytochelatins are metal-binding metabolites found in almost all plant species and some animal groups, including nematodes and annelids, where they can play an important role in detoxifying metals such as cadmium. Species from several other taxa contain a phytochelatin synthase (PCS) gene orthologue, including molluscs, indicating they may have the potential to synthesize phytochelatins. However, the presence of a gene alone does not demonstrate that it plays a functional role in metal detoxification. In the present study, we show that the aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis produced both penta- and heptapeptide phytochelatins (i.e. phytochelatin-2 and phytochelatin-3), and their levels increased in response to sub-lethal levels of cadmium. - Highlights: • Little is known about the role of phytochelatins in metal detoxification in animals. • We detected phytochelatins (PC{sub 2} and PC{sub 3}) in a mollusc species, Lymnaea stagnalis. • Phytochelatins increased in Lymnaea stagnalis when exposed to cadmium. • Future research on phytochelatin responses in molluscs would be valuable.

  12. Alterations to Juvenile Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Swim Performance after Acute Embryonic Exposure to Sub-lethal Exposures of Hydraulic Fracturing Flowback and Produced Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, Erik J; Blewett, Tamzin A; He, Yuhe; Goss, Greg G

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water (FPW) is a wastewater produced during fracturing activities in an operating well which is hyper saline and chemically heterogeneous in nature, containing both anthropogenic and petrogenic chemicals. Determination of FPW associated toxicity to embryonic fish is limited, while investigation into how embryonic exposures may affect later life stages is not yet studied. Zebrafish embryos (24hrs post fertilization) were acutely exposed to 2.5% and 5% FPW fractions for either 24 or 48hrs and returned to freshwater. After either 24 or 48h exposures, embryos were examined for expression of 3 hypoxia related genes. Erythropoietin (epoa) but not hypoxia inducible factor (hif1aa) nor hemoglobin -ß chain (hbbe1.1) was up-regulated after either 24 or 48h FPW exposure. Surviving embryos were placed in freshwater and grown to a juvenile stage (60days post fertilization). Previously exposed zebrafish were analyzed for both swim performance (Ucrit and Umax) and aerobic capacity. Fish exposed to both sediment containing (FPW-S) or sediment free (FPW-SF) FPW displayed significantly reduced aerobic scope and Ucrit/Umax values compared to control conditions. Our results collectively suggest that organics present in our FPW sample may be responsible for sub-lethal fitness and metabolic responses. We provide evidence supporting the theory that the cardio-respiratory system is impacted by FPW exposure. This is the first known research associating embryonic FPW exposures to sub-lethal performance related responses in later life fish stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sublethal Exposure to Clove and Cinnamon Essential Oils Induces Hormetic-Like Responses and Disturbs Behavioral and Respiratory Responses in Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddi, Khalid; Oliveira, Eugênio E; Faroni, Lêda R A; Guedes, Daniela C; Miranda, Natalie N S

    2015-12-01

    Essential oils have been suggested as suitable alternatives for controlling insect pests. However, the potential adaptive responses elicited in insects for mitigating the actions of these compounds have not received adequate attention. Furthermore, as is widely reported with traditional insecticides, sublethal exposure to essential oils might induce stimulatory responses or contribute to the development of resistance strategies that can compromise the management of insect pests. The current study evaluated the locomotory and respiratory responses as well as the number of larvae per grain produced by the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, after being sublethally exposed to the essential oils of clove, Syzygium aromaticum L., and cinnamon, Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. The essential oils showed similar insecticidal toxicity (exposure route: contact with dried residues; Clove LC95 = 3.96 [2.78-6.75] µl/cm(2); Cinnamon LC95 = 3.47 [2.75-4.73] µl/cm(2)). A stimulatory effect on the median survival time (TL50) was observed when insects were exposed to low concentrations of each oil. Moreover, a higher number of larvae per grain was produced under sublethal exposure to clove essential oil. S. zeamais avoided the treated areas (in free-choice experiments) and altered their mobility when sublethally exposed to both essential oils. The respiratory rates of S. zeamais (i.e., CO2 production) were significantly reduced under low concentrations of the essential oils. We recommend the consideration of the potential sublethal effects elicited by botanical pesticides during the development of integrated pest management programs aiming to control S. zeamais. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Larval Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) Sublethal Exposure to Weathered Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil: Developmental and Transcriptomic Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Elvis Genbo; Khursigara, Alex J; Magnuson, Jason; Hazard, E Starr; Hardiman, Gary; Esbaugh, Andrew J; Roberts, Aaron P; Schlenk, Daniel

    2017-09-05

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) incident resulted in extensive oiling of the pelagic zone and shoreline habitats of many commercially important fish species. Exposure to the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of oil from the spill causes developmental toxicity through cardiac defects in pelagic fish species. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of the oil on near-shore estuarine fish species such as red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Following exposure to a certified weathered slick oil (4.74 μg/L ∑PAH50) from the DWH event, significant sublethal impacts were observed ranging from impaired nervous system development [average 17 and 22% reductions in brain and eye area at 48 h postfertilization (hpf), respectively] to abnormal cardiac morphology (100% incidence at 24, 48, and 72 hpf) in red drum larvae. Consistent with the phenotypic responses, significantly differentially expressed transcripts, enriched gene ontology, and altered functions and canonical pathways predicted adverse outcomes in nervous and cardiovascular systems, with more pronounced changes at later larval stages. Our study demonstrated that the WAF of weathered slick oil of DWH caused morphological abnormalities predicted by a suite of advanced bioinformatic tools in early developing red drum and also provided the basis for a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of crude oil toxicity in fish.

  15. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ashish K. [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Mohanty, Banalata, E-mail: drbana_mohanty@rediffmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2009-09-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  16. Comparative effects of dissolved copper and copper oxide nanoparticle exposure to the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Samreen; Goddard, Russell H; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-03-01

    Increasing use of metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) by various industries has resulted in substantial output of these NP into aquatic systems. At elevated concentrations, NP may interact with and potentially affect aquatic organisms. Environmental implications of increased NP use are largely unknown, particularly in marine systems. This research investigated and compared the effects of copper oxide (CuO) NP and dissolved copper, as copper chloride (CuCl2), on the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida. Sea anemones were collected over 21 days and tissue copper accumulation and activities of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase were quantified. The size and shape of CuO NP were observed using a ecanning electron microscope (SEM) and the presence of copper was confirmed by using Oxford energy dispersive spectroscopy systems (EDS/EDX). E. pallida accumulated copper in their tissues in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with the animals exposed to CuCl2 accumulating higher tissue copper burdens than those exposed to CuO NP. As a consequence of increased copper exposure, as CuO NP or CuCl2, anemones increased activities of all of the antioxidant enzymes measured to some degree, and decreased the activity of carbonic anhydrase. Anemones exposed to CuO NP generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentrations of CuCl2. This study is useful in discerning differences between CuO NP and dissolved copper exposure and the findings have implications for exposure of aquatic organisms to NP in the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative effects of dissolved copper and copper oxide nanoparticle exposure to the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Samreen; Goddard, Russell H.; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K., E-mail: gkbielmyer@valdosta.edu

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Differences between CuO NP and CuCl{sub 2} exposure were characterized. • Copper accumulation in E. pallida was concentration-dependent. • E. pallida exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulated higher copper tissue burdens. • The oxidative stress response was greater in E. pallida exposed to CuO NP. • Both forms of copper inhibited CA activity in E. pallida. - Abstract: Increasing use of metal oxide nanoparticles (NP) by various industries has resulted in substantial output of these NP into aquatic systems. At elevated concentrations, NP may interact with and potentially affect aquatic organisms. Environmental implications of increased NP use are largely unknown, particularly in marine systems. This research investigated and compared the effects of copper oxide (CuO) NP and dissolved copper, as copper chloride (CuCl{sub 2}), on the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida. Sea anemones were collected over 21 days and tissue copper accumulation and activities of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase were quantified. The size and shape of CuO NP were observed using a ecanning electron microscope (SEM) and the presence of copper was confirmed by using Oxford energy dispersive spectroscopy systems (EDS/EDX). E. pallida accumulated copper in their tissues in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with the animals exposed to CuCl{sub 2} accumulating higher tissue copper burdens than those exposed to CuO NP. As a consequence of increased copper exposure, as CuO NP or CuCl{sub 2}, anemones increased activities of all of the antioxidant enzymes measured to some degree, and decreased the activity of carbonic anhydrase. Anemones exposed to CuO NP generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentrations of CuCl{sub 2}. This study is useful in discerning differences between CuO NP and dissolved copper exposure and the findings have implications for exposure of aquatic

  18. Effect of sublethal lead exposure on gastric motility of red-tailed hawks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, E M; Duke, G E; Redig, P T

    1991-07-01

    In order to determine the effects of low level lead exposure on gastric motility in raptors, strain gage transducers were surgically implanted on the serosal surface of the muscular stomach of three red-tailed hawks. The frequency and amplitude of gastric contractions during ingestion and early digestion were monitored for 1 week under control conditions and for 3 weeks while the birds were fed 0.82 or 1.64 mg lead (as lead acetate) per kg body weight each day. Exposure to these doses did not appreciably affect either the frequency or amplitude of gastric contractions in these birds. This low level lead exposure also had no consistent effect on the regular egestion of pellets of undigested material by hawks. Daily exposure to doses up to 6.55 mg lead/kg body weight did not affect the frequency or timing of pellet egestion, and exposure to 1.64 mg lead/kg did not affect the gastric contractions associated with pellet egestion. Although gastrointestinal dysfunction is often associated with clinical cases of acute lead toxicity, chronic exposure to these low levels of lead acetate did not significantly alter gastric motility in red-tailed hawks.

  19. Sublethal effects of copper nanoparticles on the histology of gill, liver and kidney of the Caspian roach, Rutilus rutilus caspicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Aghamirkarimi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study has determined the toxicity effects of copper nanoparticles on the some vital organs such as gill, liver and kidney of Caspian Roach; Rutillus rutillus caspicus. For this purpose, 120 fishes were used as experimental samples and exposed to 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mg/L of Cu nanoparticles for 21 days, and 30 fishes assumed as the experiment control. The mean water temperature of the aquaria was 22±2 ºC, dissolved oxygen 5.2 mg/L, pH at 7±0.004 and the concentration of calcium carbonate was 270 ppm. On 7, 14 and 21 days after exposing the fishes to copper nanoparticles, three fishes were randomly selected from each aquaria, sacrificed and samples from their gill, liver and kidney were taken and fixed in cold 10 % buffered formalin. Then microscopic sections were prepared and examined by light microscope which showed histological alternations in the gill, liver and kidney tissues. Evaluation of these changes could be useful in estimating the harmful effects of copper nanoparticles. Histological alternation in gills included: hyperplasia, fusion and detachment of secondary lamellae, blood congestion in vascular axis of primary filaments, reduced secondary lamellae length and cellular degeneration. Histological changes in liver included blood congestion in the central veins, cytoplasmic vacuolation of the hepatocytes, cellular degeneration and congestion in the blood sinusoids and necrosis of the hepatocytes. Histological changes in kidneys included glomerular shrinkage, severe degeneration in the tubules cells, interstitial tissue and glomerulus, increase in interstitial tissue cells and macrophages aggregation. The degree of damages was more intensive at higher copper nanoparticles concentrations. The result of the study showed that copper nanoparticles could cause severe damages in the vital tissues of Caspian roach; Rutillus rutillus caspicus and have lethal effects for fish.

  20. Altered hematological and immunological parameters in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) following short term exposure to sublethal concentration of glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Gil Barcellos, Leonardo José; de Faria Valle, Stella; de Oliveira Silva, Tális; Anziliero, Deniz; Davi dos Santos, Ezequiel; Pivato, Mateus; Zanatta, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Using agrichemicals to control unwanted species has become a necessary and common worldwide practice to improve crop production. Although most currently used agrichemicals are considered relatively safe, continuous usage contributes for soil and water contamination and collateral toxic effects on aquatic species. Few studies correlated the presence of agrichemicals on fish blood cells and natural immune system. Thus, in this study, silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) were exposed to sublethal concentrations (10% of the LC(50-96 h)) of a glyphosate based herbicide and hematological and natural immune system parameters were evaluated. Silver catfish fingerlings exposed to glyphosate for 96 h had a significant reduction on blood erythrocytes, thrombocytes, lymphocytes and total leukocytes in contrast to a significant increase in the number of immature circulating cells. The effect of glyphosate on natural immune system was evaluated after 24h or 10 days exposure by measuring the phagocytic index of coelomic cells, and lysozyme, total peroxidase, bacteria agglutination, bactericidal activity and natural complement hemolytic activity in the serum of fingerlings. A significant reduction on phagocytic index, serum bacteria agglutination and total peroxidase was observed only after 24h exposure to glyphosate. In contrast, fingerlings exposed to glyphosate for 10 days had a significant lower serum bacteria agglutination and lysozyme activity. Glyphosate had no effect on serum bactericidal and complement natural hemolytic activity after 24h or 10 days exposure. Nonetheless, the information obtained in this study indicates that glyphosate contaminated water contributes to alter blood cells parameters and to reduce the activity of natural immune components important to mediate fish resistance to infecting microorganisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metal accumulation and sublethal effects in the sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, after waterborne exposure to metal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, J R; Bielmyer, G K

    2013-09-01

    The marine environment is subjected to contamination by a complex mixture of metals from various anthropogenic sources. Measuring the biological responses of organisms to a complex mixture of metals allows for examination of metal-specific responses in an environmentally realistic exposure scenario. To address this issue, the sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida was exposed to a control and a metal mixture (copper, zinc, nickel, and cadmium) at three exposure levels (10, 50, and 100 μg/L) for 7 days. Anemones were then transferred to metal-free seawater for an additional 7 days after the metal exposure to assess metal depuration and recovery. Metal accumulation, activity of the enzymes catalase, glutathione reductase, and carbonic anhydrase, as well as, cell density of the symbiotic zooxanthellae were measured over 14 days. Metal accumulation in A. pallida occurred in a concentration dependent manner over the 7-day exposure period. Altered enzyme activity and tentacle retraction of the host, as well as decreased zooxanthellae cell density were observed responses over the 7 days, after exposure to a metal concentration as low as 10 μg/L. Metal depuration and physiological recovery were dependent on both the metal and the exposure concentration. Understanding how A. pallida and their symbionts are affected by metal exposures in the laboratory may allow better understanding about the responses of symbiotic cnidarians in metal polluted aquatic environments. © 2013.

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLETHAL EXPOSURE TO MICROCYSTINS AMONG DIALYSIS PATIENTS, BRAZIL, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: During winter 2001-2002, an episode of microcystin exposure occurred among dialysis patients in Rio de Janiero, Brazil. During late November 2001, a cyanobacterial water bloom was detected in the Funil reservoir and the Guandu River, both of which supply drinking wate...

  3. Predictors and immunological correlates of sublethal mercury exposure in vampire bats

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Becker; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Bentz, Alexandra B.; Platt, Steven G.; Czirják, Gábor Á.; Thomas R. Rainwater; Altizer, Sonia; Streicker, Daniel G

    2017-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive heavy metal that often enters the environment from anthropogenic sources such as gold mining and agriculture. Chronic exposure to Hg can impair immune function, reducing the ability of animals to resist or recover from infections. How Hg influences immunity and susceptibility remains unknown for bats, which appear immunologically distinct from other mammals and are reservoir hosts of many pathogens of importance to human and animal health. We here quantify total Hg...

  4. Predictors and immunological correlates of sublethal mercury exposure in vampire bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel J; Chumchal, Matthew M; Bentz, Alexandra B; Platt, Steven G; Czirják, Gábor Á; Rainwater, Thomas R; Altizer, Sonia; Streicker, Daniel G

    2017-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive heavy metal that often enters the environment from anthropogenic sources such as gold mining and agriculture. Chronic exposure to Hg can impair immune function, reducing the ability of animals to resist or recover from infections. How Hg influences immunity and susceptibility remains unknown for bats, which appear immunologically distinct from other mammals and are reservoir hosts of many pathogens of importance to human and animal health. We here quantify total Hg (THg) in hair collected from common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus), which feed on blood and are the main reservoir hosts of rabies virus in Latin America. We examine how diet, sampling site and year, and bat demography influence THg and test the consequences of this variation for eight immune measures. In two populations from Belize, THg concentrations in bats were best explained by an interaction between long-term diet inferred from stable isotopes and year. Bats that foraged more consistently on domestic animals exhibited higher THg. However, relationships between diet and THg were evident only in 2015 but not in 2014, which could reflect recent environmental perturbations associated with agriculture. THg concentrations were low relative to values previously observed in other bat species but still correlated with bat immunity. Bats with higher THg had more neutrophils, weaker bacterial killing ability and impaired innate immunity. These patterns suggest that temporal variation in Hg exposure may impair bat innate immunity and increase susceptibility to pathogens such as bacteria. Unexpected associations between low-level Hg exposure and immune function underscore the need to better understand the environmental sources of Hg exposure in bats and the consequences for bat immunity and susceptibility.

  5. Sublethal red tide toxin exposure in free-ranging manatees (Trichechus manatus) affects the immune system through reduced lymphocyte proliferation responses, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine J; Butawan, Matthew; Yordy, Jennifer; Ball, Ray; Flewelling, Leanne; de Wit, Martine; Bonde, Robert K

    2015-04-01

    The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected by exposure to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis blooms are common in manatee habitats of Florida's southwestern coast and produce a group of cyclic polyether toxins collectively referred to as red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Although a large number of manatees exposed to significant levels of red tide toxins die, several manatees are rescued from sublethal exposure and are successfully treated and returned to the wild. Sublethal brevetoxin exposure may potentially impact the manatee immune system. Lymphocyte proliferative responses and a suite of immune function parameters in the plasma were used to evaluate effects of brevetoxin exposure on health of manatees rescued from natural exposure to red tide toxins in their habitat. Blood samples were collected from rescued manatees at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL and from healthy, unexposed manatees in Crystal River, FL. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from whole blood were stimulated with T-cell mitogens, ConA and PHA. A suite of plasma parameters, including plasma protein electrophoresis profiles, lysozyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species, was also used to assess manatee health. Significant decreases (p<0.05) in lymphocyte proliferation were observed in ConA and PHA stimulated lymphocytes from rescued animals compared to non-exposed animals. Significant correlations were observed between oxidative stress markers (SOD, ROS/RNS) and plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Sublethal exposure to brevetoxins in the wild impacts some immune function components, and thus, overall health, in the Florida manatee. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coelomic fluid: a complimentary biological medium to assess sub-lethal endosulfan exposure using ¹H NMR-based earthworm metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Jimmy; Simpson, Myrna J; Simpson, André J

    2012-07-01

    Endosulfan is an environmentally persistent pesticide and has been shown to be genotoxic, neurotoxic and carcinogenic to surrounding organisms. Earthworms are widely used in environmental metabolomic studies to assess soil ecotoxicity. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic studies have analyzed earthworm tissue extracts after exposure to endosulfan and identified some key metabolic indicators that can be used as biomarkers of stress. However, some metabolites may have been masked due to overlap with other metabolites in the tissue extract. Therefore, in this study, the coelomic fluid (CF) and the tissue extract of the earthworm, Eisenia fetida, were both investigated using ¹H NMR-based metabolomics to analyze their metabolic profile in response to endosulfan exposure at three sub-lethal (below LC₅₀) concentrations. Principal component analysis determined the earthworm CF and earthworm tissue extract to both have significant separation between the exposed and control at the two highest sub-lethal endosulfan exposures (1.0 and 2.0 μg cm⁻²). Alanine, glycine, malate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, betaine, myo-inositol, lactate and spermidine in the earthworm CF and alanine, glutamine, fumarate, glutamate, maltose, melibiose, ATP and lactate in earthworm tissue extract were all detected as having significant fluctuations after endosulfan exposure. An increase in ATP production was detected by the increase activity in the citric acid cycle and by anaerobic metabolism. A significant decrease in the polyamine, spermidine after endosulfan exposure describes an apoptotic mode of protection which correlates to a previous endosulfan exposure study where DNA damage has been reported. This study highlights that earthworm CF is a complementary biological medium to tissue extracts and can be helpful to better understand the toxic mode of action of contaminants at sub-lethal levels in the environment.

  7. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna J. Simpson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS, betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA of contaminants is not clearly defined.

  8. A study on biochemical changes in the penaeid shrimp, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius) following exposure to sublethal doses of organochlorine pesticide (endosulfan)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryavanshi, U.; Sreepada, R.A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Nigam, S.; Badesab, S.

    of metabolically active organs (gills, hepatopancreas and muscle) of coastal marine penaeid shrimp species, M. monoceros on exposure to two sublethal doses of endosulfan over 23 days of exposure (DoE). 2. Materials and methods 2.1. Experimental animals... and the average mortality values were calculated using formula as described by Abbot (1925). The median lethal concentration (96-h LC 50 ) and 95% confidence intervals were determined with a computer-based program described by Finney (1971). The acute 96-h LC...

  9. Effects of clothianidin on aquatic communities: Evaluating the impacts of lethal and sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jesse C; Hua, Jessica; Sepulveda, Maria S; Krupke, Christian H; Hoverman, Jason T

    2017-01-01

    The widespread usage of neonicotinoid insecticides has sparked concern over their effects on non-target organisms. While research has largely focused on terrestrial systems, the low soil binding and high water solubility of neonicotinoids, paired with their extensive use on the landscape, puts aquatic environments at high risk for contamination via runoff events. We assessed the potential threat of these compounds to wetland communities using a combination of field surveys and experimental exposures including concentrations that are representative of what invertebrates experience in the field. In laboratory toxicity experiments, LC50 values ranged from 0.002 ppm to 1.2 ppm for aquatic invertebrates exposed to clothianidin. However, freshwater snails and amphibian larvae showed high tolerance to the chemical with no mortality observed at the highest dissolvable concentration of the insecticide. We also observed behavioral effects of clothianidin. Water bugs, Belostoma flumineum, displayed a dose-dependent reduction in feeding rate following exposure to clothianidin. Similarly, crayfish, Orconectes propinquus, exhibited reduced responsiveness to stimulus with increasing clothianidin concentration. Using a semi-natural mesocosm experiment, we manipulated clothianidin concentration (0.6, 5, and 352 ppb) and the presence of predatory invertebrates to explore community-level effects. We observed high invertebrate predator mortality with increases in clothianidin concentration. With increased predator mortality, prey survival increased by 50% at the highest clothianidin concentration. Thus, clothianidin contamination can result in a top-down trophic cascade in a community dominated by invertebrate predators. In our Indiana field study, we detected clothianidin (max = 176 ppb), imidacloprid (max = 141 ppb), and acetamiprid (max = 7 ppb) in soil samples. In water samples, we detected clothianidin (max = 0.67 ppb), imidacloprid (max = 0.18 ppb), and thiamethoxam (max = 2

  10. Effects of clothianidin on aquatic communities: Evaluating the impacts of lethal and sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse C Miles

    Full Text Available The widespread usage of neonicotinoid insecticides has sparked concern over their effects on non-target organisms. While research has largely focused on terrestrial systems, the low soil binding and high water solubility of neonicotinoids, paired with their extensive use on the landscape, puts aquatic environments at high risk for contamination via runoff events. We assessed the potential threat of these compounds to wetland communities using a combination of field surveys and experimental exposures including concentrations that are representative of what invertebrates experience in the field. In laboratory toxicity experiments, LC50 values ranged from 0.002 ppm to 1.2 ppm for aquatic invertebrates exposed to clothianidin. However, freshwater snails and amphibian larvae showed high tolerance to the chemical with no mortality observed at the highest dissolvable concentration of the insecticide. We also observed behavioral effects of clothianidin. Water bugs, Belostoma flumineum, displayed a dose-dependent reduction in feeding rate following exposure to clothianidin. Similarly, crayfish, Orconectes propinquus, exhibited reduced responsiveness to stimulus with increasing clothianidin concentration. Using a semi-natural mesocosm experiment, we manipulated clothianidin concentration (0.6, 5, and 352 ppb and the presence of predatory invertebrates to explore community-level effects. We observed high invertebrate predator mortality with increases in clothianidin concentration. With increased predator mortality, prey survival increased by 50% at the highest clothianidin concentration. Thus, clothianidin contamination can result in a top-down trophic cascade in a community dominated by invertebrate predators. In our Indiana field study, we detected clothianidin (max = 176 ppb, imidacloprid (max = 141 ppb, and acetamiprid (max = 7 ppb in soil samples. In water samples, we detected clothianidin (max = 0.67 ppb, imidacloprid (max = 0.18 ppb, and

  11. Effects of copper pre-exposure routes on the energy reserves and subsequent copper toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, M

    2006-10-01

    The hypothesis was tested that copper uptake routes affect the tolerance of Daphnia magna to copper and influence the energy reserves. These were determined in D. magna juveniles that had been exposed for 4 days to water borne and/or dietary copper (algae Pseudokichneriella subcapitata loaded with copper) at nominal concentrations of 0, 10, and 100 nM. Tolerance increased with dietary copper pre-exposure reflected in 24 and 48 h LC50 values of 466 and 398 nM at 100 nM pre-exposure versus 301 and 254 nM in controls, respectively. Control animals (no copper added to their exposure medium and diet) had the lowest lipid content and consequently the lowest energy content. The current study stresses the importance of addressing dietary exposure routes in metal toxicity assessments.

  12. Linking mechanistic and behavioral responses to sublethal esfenvalerate exposure in the endangered delta smelt; Hypomesus transpacificus (Fam. Osmeridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen; Pfeiff, Janice; Loguinov, Alexander V; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Wintz, Henri; Vulpe, Christopher D; Werner, Inge

    2009-12-15

    The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is a pelagic fish species listed as endangered under both the USA Federal and Californian State Endangered Species Acts and considered an indicator of ecosystem health in its habitat range, which is limited to the Sacramento-San Joaquin estuary in California, USA. Anthropogenic contaminants are one of multiple stressors affecting this system, and among them, current-use insecticides are of major concern. Interrogative tools are required to successfully monitor effects of contaminants on the delta smelt, and to research potential causes of population decline in this species. We have created a microarray to investigate genome-wide effects of potentially causative stressors, and applied this tool to assess effects of the pyrethroid insecticide esfenvalerate on larval delta smelt. Selected genes were further investigated as molecular biomarkers using quantitative PCR analyses. Exposure to esfenvalerate affected swimming behavior of larval delta smelt at concentrations as low as 0.0625 mug.L-1, and significant differences in expression were measured in genes involved in neuromuscular activity. Alterations in the expression of genes associated with immune responses, along with apoptosis, redox, osmotic stress, detoxification, and growth and development appear to have been invoked by esfenvalerate exposure. Swimming impairment correlated significantly with expression of aspartoacylase (ASPA), an enzyme involved in brain cell function and associated with numerous human diseases. Selected genes were investigated for their use as molecular biomarkers, and strong links were determined between measured downregulation in ASPA and observed behavioral responses in fish exposed to environmentally relevant pyrethroid concentrations. The results of this study show that microarray technology is a useful approach in screening for, and generation of molecular biomarkers in endangered, non-model organisms, identifying specific genes that can be

  13. Linking mechanistic and behavioral responses to sublethal esfenvalerate exposure in the endangered delta smelt; Hypomesus transpacificus (Fam. Osmeridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintz Henri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus is a pelagic fish species listed as endangered under both the USA Federal and Californian State Endangered Species Acts and considered an indicator of ecosystem health in its habitat range, which is limited to the Sacramento-San Joaquin estuary in California, USA. Anthropogenic contaminants are one of multiple stressors affecting this system, and among them, current-use insecticides are of major concern. Interrogative tools are required to successfully monitor effects of contaminants on the delta smelt, and to research potential causes of population decline in this species. We have created a microarray to investigate genome-wide effects of potentially causative stressors, and applied this tool to assess effects of the pyrethroid insecticide esfenvalerate on larval delta smelt. Selected genes were further investigated as molecular biomarkers using quantitative PCR analyses. Results Exposure to esfenvalerate affected swimming behavior of larval delta smelt at concentrations as low as 0.0625 μg.L-1, and significant differences in expression were measured in genes involved in neuromuscular activity. Alterations in the expression of genes associated with immune responses, along with apoptosis, redox, osmotic stress, detoxification, and growth and development appear to have been invoked by esfenvalerate exposure. Swimming impairment correlated significantly with expression of aspartoacylase (ASPA, an enzyme involved in brain cell function and associated with numerous human diseases. Selected genes were investigated for their use as molecular biomarkers, and strong links were determined between measured downregulation in ASPA and observed behavioral responses in fish exposed to environmentally relevant pyrethroid concentrations. Conclusions The results of this study show that microarray technology is a useful approach in screening for, and generation of molecular biomarkers in endangered

  14. Tolerance development in Listeria monocytogenes-Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms after sublethal exposures to pronase-benzalkonium chloride combined treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Cabo, Marta López

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects that sublethal exposures to pronase (PRN) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) combined treatments have on Listeria monocytogenes-Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms grown on stainless steel in terms of tolerance development (TD) to these compounds. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the changes of the biofilm structure. PRN-BAC exposure was carried out using three different approaches and TD was evaluated treating biofilms with a final 100 μg/ml PRN followed by 50 μg/ml BAC combined treatment. Results showed that exposure to PRN-BAC significantly decreased the number of adhered L. monocytogenes (P coli counts remained generally unaltered. It was also demonstrated that the incorporation of recovery periods during sublethal exposures increased the tolerance of both species of the mixed biofilm to the final PRN-BAC treatment. Moreover, control biofilms became more resistant to PRN-BAC if longer incubation periods were used. Regardless of the treatment used, log reduction values were generally lower in L. monocytogenes compared to E. coli. Additionally, microscopy images showed an altered morphology produced by sublethal PRN-BAC in exposed L. monocytogenes-E. coli dual-species biofilms compared to control samples. Results also demonstrated that L. monocytogenes-E. coli dual-species biofilms are able to develop tolerance to PRN-BAC combined treatments depending on way they have been previously exposed. Moreover, they suggest that the generation of bacterial tolerance should be included as a parameter for sanitation procedures design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lethal and sublethal effects of bendiocarb, halofenozide, and imidacloprid on Harpalus pennsylvanicus (Coleoptera: Carabidae) following different modes of exposure in turfgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, B A; Held, D W; Potter, D A

    2001-02-01

    Routes by which nontarget predatory insects can be exposed to turfgrass pesticides include topical, residual, and dietary exposure. We used each of these routes to evaluate potential lethal or sublethal effects of two novel turfgrass insecticides, imidacloprid and halofenozide, and a carbamate, bendiocarb, on survival, behavior, and fecundity of the ground beetle Harpalus pennsylvanicus DeGeer. Field-collected carabids were exposed to direct spray applications in turf plots, fed food contaminated by such applications, or exposed to irrigated or nonirrigated residues on turf cores. Halofenozide caused no apparent acute, adverse effects through topical, residual, or dietary exposure. Moreover, the viability of eggs laid by females fed halofenozide-treated food once, or continuously for 30 d, was not reduced. In contrast, topical or dietary exposure of carabids to bendiocarb inevitably was lethal. Exposure to imidacloprid by those routes caused high incidence of sublethal, neurotoxic effects including paralysis, impaired walking, and excessive grooming. Intoxicated beetles usually recovered within a few days in the laboratory, but in the field, they were shown to be highly vulnerable to predation by ants. One-time intoxication by imidacloprid did not reduce females' fecundity or viability of eggs. There was no apparent behavioral avoidance of insecticide residues, or of insecticide-treated food. Carabids exposed to dry residues on turfgrass cores suffered high mortality from bendiocarb, and some intoxication from imidacloprid, but these effects were greatly reduced by posttreatment irrigation. Implications for predicting hazards of insecticides to beneficial invertebrates in turfgrass are discussed.

  16. Subchronic exposure to sublethal dose of imidacloprid changes electrophysiological properties and expression pattern of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in insect neurosecretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzidane, Yassine; Goven, Delphine; Abd-Ella, Aly Ahmed; Deshayes, Caroline; Lapied, Bruno; Raymond, Valérie

    2017-09-01

    Neonicotinoids are the most important class of insecticides used in agriculture over the last decade. They act as selective agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The emergence of insect resistance to these insecticides is one of the major problems, which limit the use of neonicotinoids. The aim of our study is to better understand physiological changes appearing after subchronic exposure to sublethal doses of insecticide using complementary approaches that include toxicology, electrophysiology, molecular biology and calcium imaging. We used cockroach neurosecretory cells identified as dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive (α-bgt-insensitive) nAChR subtypes, nAChR1 and nAChR2, which differ in their sensitivity to imidacloprid. Although nAChR1 is sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 is insensitive to this insecticide. In this study, we demonstrate that subchronic exposure to sublethal dose of imidacloprid differentially changes physiological and molecular properties of nAChR1 and nAChR2. Our findings reported that this treatment decreased the sensitivity of nAChR1 to imidacloprid, reduced current density flowing through this nAChR subtype but did not affect its subunit composition (α3, α8 and β1). Subchronic exposure to sublethal dose of imidacloprid also affected nAChR2 functions. However, these effects were different from those reported on nAChR1. We observed changes in nAChR2 conformational state, which could be related to modification of the subunit composition (α1, α2 and β1). Finally, the subchronic exposure affecting both nAChR1 and nAChR2 seemed to be linked to the elevation of the steady-state resting intracellular calcium level. In conclusion, under subchronic exposure to sublethal dose of imidacloprid, cockroaches are capable of triggering adaptive mechanisms by reducing the participation of imidacloprid-sensitive nAChR1 and by optimizing functional properties of nAChR2, which is

  17. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics of time-dependent responses of Eisenia fetida to sub-lethal phenanthrene exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankadurai, Brian P.; Wolfe, David M.; Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 Canada (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 Canada (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics was used to examine the response of the earthworm Eisenia fetida after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene over time. Earthworms were exposed to 0.025 mg/cm{sup 2} of phenanthrene (1/64th of the LC{sub 50}) via contact tests over four days. Earthworm tissues were extracted using a mixture of chloroform, methanol and water, resulting in polar and non-polar fractions that were analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR after one, two, three and four days. NMR-based metabolomic analyses revealed heightened E. fetida responses with longer phenanthrene exposure times. Amino acids alanine and glutamate, the sugar maltose, the lipids cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine emerged as potential indicators of phenanthrene exposure. The conversion of succinate to fumarate in the Krebs cycle was also interrupted by phenanthrene. Therefore, this study shows that NMR-based metabolomics is a powerful tool for elucidating time-dependent relationships in addition to the mode of toxicity of phenanthrene in earthworm exposure studies. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the mode of action of phenanthrene is presented. > The earthworm species E. fetida were exposed to sub-lethal phenanthrene concentrations. > Both polar and non-polar metabolites of E. fetida tissue extracts were analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. > Longer phenanthrene exposure times resulted in heightened earthworm responses. > An interruption of the Krebs cycle was also observed due to phenanthrene exposure. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics is used to determine the relationship between phenanthrene exposure and the metabolic response of the earthworm E. fetida over time and also to elucidate the phenanthrene mode of toxicity.

  18. Acute effect of copper exposure on serum biochemical characteristics of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melika Ghelichpour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ambient copper was investigated on serum stress markers, sodium and enzyme levels in Common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. over a 14-d exposure period. Fish were exposed to 0, 25 and 100 μg L-1 copper (as copper sulfate and blood was sampled at 0, 3, 7 and 14 d after exposure. Serum profile was significantly affected by copper concentration, sampling time and their interaction. Increase in serum levels of cortisol, glucose, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decrease in serum sodium levels were observed in both copper-exposed groups, 3 d after copper exposure, which lasted until the end of the experiment. It is concluded that copper exposure causes stress response and sodium loss in common carp. Likewise alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase increase after exposure which might be as results of either tissue damage or stress.

  19. The influence of salinity and copper exposure on copper accumulation and physiological impairment in the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pratikkumar P; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-02-01

    Copper is a common pollutant in many aquatic environments, particularly those surrounding densely populated areas with substantial anthropogenic inputs. These same areas may also experience changes in salinity due to freshwater discharge and tidal influence. Biota that inhabit near-shore coastal environments may be susceptible to both stressors. Although copper is a noted concern in marine environments, effects of copper and varying salinity on symbiotic cnidarians are only scarcely studied. The sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida, was used to investigate effects of copper on physiological impairment (i.e. activities of anti-oxidant enzymes) at two different salinities (20 and 25ppt). E. pallida was exposed to a control and three elevated copper concentrations for up to 21d, and copper accumulation and activity of the enzymes: catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and carbonic anhydrase were measured in the anemones. Photosynthetic parameters in E. pallida's symbiotic dinoflagellate algae were also quantified. Over the course of the exposure, E. pallida accumulated copper in a concentration-dependent manner. Higher tissue copper concentrations were observed in anemones exposed to the lower salinity water (20ppt), and physiological impairment was observed as a consequence of both increased copper exposure and decreased salinity; however, changes in salinity caused a greater response than copper exposure, at the levels tested. In general, antioxidant enzyme activity increased as a consequence of decreased salinity and/or increased copper exposure. These results clearly demonstrated the influence of two local stressors, at environmentally realistic concentrations, on a sensitive cnidarian, and highlight the importance of characterizing combined exposure scenarios. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The Influence of Air Exposures and Thermal Treatments on the Secondary Electron Yield of Copper

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhko, N; Scheuerlein, C

    2000-01-01

    The variation of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of sputter-cleaned OFHC-copper has been studied as a function of air exposure duration at room temperature. After short air exposures of some seconds the maximum SEY (deltaMAX) of clean copper is reduced from 1.3 to less than 1.2, due to the oxidation of the copper surface. Prolonged air exposure increases the SEY steadily until, after about 8 days of atmospheric exposure, deltaMAX is higher than 2.Air exposures at higher temperatures have been found to be effective in reducing the SEY of technical copper surfaces. A 5-minute air exposure of copper at 350°C followed by a 350°C bake-out under vacuum reduces deltaMAX to about 1.05, which is lower than the value of pure copper and that of Cu2O.

  1. Effects of chronic exposure to sublethal concentrations of lead acetate on heme synthesis and immune function in red-tailed hawks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redig, P T; Lawler, E M; Schwartz, S; Dunnette, J L; Stephenson, B; Duke, G E

    1991-07-01

    Red-tailed hawks were exposed to sublethal levels of lead acetate for periods of 3 or 11 weeks. Alterations in the heme biosynthetic pathway were demonstrated after the first week of exposure to 0.82 mg lead per kilogram body weight per day. Activity of erythrocyte porphobilinogen synthase (aminolevulinic acid dehydratase) was depressed significantly and did not return to normal levels until 5 weeks after the termination of lead treatments. A rapid and relatively brief increase in erythrocyte free protoporphyrin and a slower but more prolonged increase in its zinc complex were also demonstrated with exposure to this dose of lead for 3 weeks. Less substantial decreases in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels occurred but only in the longer experiment with exposure to higher lead levels. Short term, low level lead exposure did not effect immune function significantly in the hawks, as measured by antibody titers to foreign red blood cells or by the mitogenic stimulation of T-lymphocytes. Increased lead exposure produced a significant decrease in the mitogenic response but had no effect on antibody titers.

  2. Cellular and aqueous microcystin-LR following laboratory exposures of Microcystis aeruginosa to copper algaecides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwinski, Kyla J; Calomeni, Alyssa J; Geer, Tyler D; Rodgers, John H

    2016-03-01

    Microcystin release from algal cells influences use of copper-algaecides in water resources. Accurate data regarding relationships between copper-algaecide exposures and responses of microcystin-producing algae are needed to make informed management decisions. Responses of Microcystis aeruginosa were measured in terms of cellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR), aqueous MC-LR, and chlorophyll-a following exposure to CuSO4 and copper-ethanolamine. Comparisons were made between treated and untreated samples, and copper formulations. EC50s and slopes for M. aeruginosa responses to copper exposures were calculated. Algal responses followed a sigmoidal exposure-response relationship, and cellular MC-LR and chlorophyll-a were negatively related to copper concentrations. Aqueous MC-LR increased with copper concentrations, although the increase in aqueous MC-LR was not proportional to decreases in cellular MC-LR and chlorophyll-a. Cellular MC-LR and chlorophyll a declined at a greater rate than aqueous MC-LR increased. Total MC-LR was less than untreated controls following copper exposure. Differences were measured between copper formulations in terms of aqueous and total MC-LR concentrations at concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg Cu L-1. Aqueous and total MC-LR were greater (10-20%) following exposure to CuSO4 compared to copper-ethanolamine one day following exposure. The positive relationship between copper concentration and aqueous MC-LR at 0.07-1.0 mg Cu L-1 demonstrates that lower copper concentrations were as effective as higher concentrations in controlling M. aeruginosa while decreasing the total amount of MC-LR, and minimizing the proportion of MC-LR released to the aqueous-phase. Results serve to support more accurate risk evaluations of MC-LR concentrations when M. aeruginosa is exposed to copper-algaecides and when it is untreated. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The Influence of Air Exposures and Thermal Treatments on the Secondary Electron Yield of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Bozhko, N; Hilleret, Noël; Scheuerlein, C

    2000-01-01

    The variation of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of sputter-cleaned OFHC-copper has been studied as a function of air exposure duration at room temperature. After short air exposures of some seconds the maximum SEY (deltaMAX) of clean copper is reduced from 1.3 to less than 1.2, due to the oxidation of the copper surface. Prolonged air exposure increases the SEY steadily until, after about 8 days of atmospheric exposure, deltaMAX is higher than 2.Air exposures at higher temperatures have b...

  4. Exposure to a sublethal concentration of imidacloprid and the side effects on target and nontarget organs of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; Pratavieira, Marcel; Silva Menegasso, Anally Ribeiro da; Palma, Mario Sergio; Malaspina, Osmar

    2018-03-01

    The use of insecticides has become increasingly frequent, and studies indicate that these compounds are involved in the intoxication of bees. Imidacloprid is a widely used neonicotinoid; thus, we have highlighted the importance of assessing its oral toxicity to Africanized bees and used transmission electron microscopy to investigate the sublethal effects in the brain, the target organ, and the midgut, responsible for the digestion/absorption of food. In addition, the distribution of proteins involved in important biological processes in the brain were evaluated on the 1st day of exposure by MALDI-imaging analysis. Bioassays were performed to determine the Median Lethal Concentration (LC 50 ) of imidacloprid to bees, and the value obtained was 1.4651 ng imidacloprid/μL diet. Based on this result, the sublethal concentration to be administered at 1, 4 and 8 days was established as a hundredth (1/100) of the LC 50 . The results obtained from the ultrastructural analysis showed alterations in the midgut cells of bees as nuclear and mitochondrial damage and an increase of vacuoles. The insecticide caused spacing among the Kenyon cells in the mushroom bodies, chromatin condensation and loss of mitochondrial cristae. The MALDI-imaging analysis showed an increase in the expression of such proteins as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, amyloid protein precursor and protein kinase C, which are related to oxygen supply, neuronal degeneration and memory/learning, and a decrease in the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 1, which is fundamental to the synapses. These alterations demonstrated that imidacloprid could compromise the viability of the midgut epithelium, as well as inhibiting important cognitive processes in individuals, and may be reflected in losses of the colony.

  5. Influence of preexposure to sublethal levels of copper on Cu-64 uptake and distribution among tissues of the European eel ( Anguilla anguilla )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosell, M.; Boetius, I.; Hansen, H.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of preexposure to copper was examined in European eels with respect to uptake and distribution of Cu-64 among tissues. Eels were exposed in freshwater to 8 and 64 mu g Cu . L(-1) for 0, 6 and 28 days before Cu-64 incubation. The accumulation of copper in gill, liver and muscle tissue w...

  6. The Influence of an Air Exposure on the Secondary Electron Yield of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël

    1997-01-01

    The influence of different air exposure times on the secondary electron emission of clean copper surfaces as well as on technical copper surfaces has been studied in the context of the phenomenon of multipacting, which can limit the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities for particle acceleration. The copper samples were prepared by heat treatments and in situ sputter-etching and they were investigated with a instrument for SEY measurements, by scanning electron microsco...

  7. Responses of Lyngbya wollei to exposures of copper-based algaecides: the critical burden concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, W M; Rodgers, J H

    2012-04-01

    The formulation of a specific algaecide can greatly influence the bioavailability, uptake, and consequent control of the targeted alga. In this research, three copper-based algaecide formulations were evaluated in terms of copper sorption to a specific problematic alga and amount of copper required to achieve control. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare the masses of copper required to achieve control of Lyngbya wollei using the algaecide formulations Algimycin-PWF, Clearigate, and copper sulfate pentahydrate in laboratory toxicity experiments; (2) to relate the responses of L. wollei to the masses of copper adsorbed and absorbed (i.e., dose) as well as the concentrations of copper in the exposure water; and (3) to discern the relation between the mass of copper required to achieve control of a certain mass of L. wollei among different algaecide formulations. The critical burden of copper (i.e., threshold algaecide concentration that must be absorbed or adsorbed to achieve control) for L. wollei averaged 3.3 and 1.9 mg Cu/g algae for Algimycin-PWF and Clearigate, respectively, in experiments with a series of aqueous copper concentrations, water volumes, and masses of algae. With reasonable exposures in these experiments, control was not achieved with single applications of copper sulfate despite copper sorption >13 mg Cu/g algae in one experiment. Factors governing the critical burden of copper required for control of problematic cyanobacteria include algaecide formulation and concentration, volume of water, and mass of algae. By measuring the critical burden of copper from an algaecide formulation necessary to achieve control of the targeted algae, selection of an effective product and treatment rate can be calculated at a given field site.

  8. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate metabolism variables of Oreochromis mossambicuswere investigated after acute and chronic sublethal manganese exposure. The sublethal concentrations were determined from the LC50 value of manganese. After the exposures, the fish were carefully netted and blood was drawn from the caudal aorta.

  9. Interaction between airborne copper exposure and ATP7B polymorphisms on inattentiveness in scholar children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, S; Vilor-Tejedor, N; Bustamante, M; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M; Rivas, I; Forns, J; Querol, X; Pujol, J; Sunyer, J

    2017-01-01

    Recent research indicates that airborne copper exposure in scholar children negatively affects brain functioning. These effects are likely to be influenced by the efficiency of copper metabolism, which is partly regulated by the ATPase copper transporting beta (ATP7B) gene. We investigated whether indoor and outdoor airborne copper exposure is differentially associated with child inattentiveness depending on genetic variation within the ATP7B gene in 1645 scholar children from the BREATHE project. Outdoor (courtyard) and indoor (classroom) air pollution levels were measured during class hours in each school. Inattentiveness was assessed through a follow-up with four measurements via the Attentional Network Test (4475 observations). Linear mixed models considering repeated measures were conducted to assess genetic and exposure main and interaction effects. Two interactions were detected indicating that ATP7B-rs1061472 (P for interaction 0.016) and ATP7B-rs1801243 (P for interaction 0.003) polymorphisms modified the association between indoor copper exposure and inattentiveness. Stratified analysis by genotypes revealed that both outdoor and indoor copper exposure increased inattentiveness in rs1061472-CC and rs1801243-CC carriers. These findings suggest that the genetic background promotes the association between airborne copper exposure at school with inattentiveness in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of copper exposure on histamine concentrations in the marbled crayfish (Procambarus fallax forma virginalis).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedarini, B.; Klaver, L.; Giesen, D.; Roessink, I.; Widianarko, B.; van Straalen, N.M.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Crustaceans can store excess copper in the hepatopancreas, an organ playing a role in digestive activity as well as in neurosecretory control. Here, we studied the effect of copper exposure on the level of histamine, an indicator of food spoilage in edible crustaceans. Histamine is also a

  11. The effects of acute waterborne exposure to sublethal concentrations of molybdenum on the stress response in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea D Ricketts

    Full Text Available To determine if molybdenum (Mo is a chemical stressor, fingerling and juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed to waterborne sodium molybdate (0, 2, 20, or 1,000 mg l-1 of Mo and components of the physiological (plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit and cellular (heat shock protein [hsp] 72, hsp73, and hsp90 in the liver, gills, heart, and erythrocytes and metallothionein [MT] in the liver and gills stress responses were measured prior to initiation of exposure and at 8, 24, and 96 h. During the acute exposure, plasma cortisol, blood glucose, and hematocrit levels remained unchanged in all treatments. Heat shock protein 72 was not induced as a result of exposure and there were no detectable changes in total hsp70 (72 and 73, hsp90, and MT levels in any of the tissues relative to controls. Both fingerling and juvenile fish responded with similar lack of apparent sensitivity to Mo exposure. These experiments demonstrate that exposure to waterborne Mo of up to 1,000 mg l(-1 did not activate a physiological or cellular stress response in fish. Information from this study suggests that Mo water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life are highly protective of freshwater fish, namely rainbow trout.

  12. Sublethal Toxicity of Crude Oil Exposure in The Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, at Two Life History Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltz, Sarah M; Taylor, Caz M

    2017-02-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred during peak spawning season for many Gulf of Mexico fish and invertebrates. Early life stages of important fishery species were at risk to encounter crude oil. In this study, we investigated the effect of crude oil exposure on two life stages of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). We tested the effects of oil exposure on the survival and growth of larval (pelagic) and juvenile (estuarine) blue crabs as well as the effects of oil on the molt frequency of juveniles. Larval crabs exposed to crude oil showed no discernable growth or mortality differences when compared to non-exposed controls. Juvenile crabs exposed to oil also showed no differences in size but exhibited increased intermolt duration (time between molts). Our study suggests that different life-stages may respond differently when exposed to crude oil and that oil exposure negatively affects growth rate of juvenile blue crabs.

  13. Biomarkers of waterborne copper exposure in the guppy Poecilia vivipara acclimated to salt water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Anderson Abel de Souza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Oceanografia Biológica, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Hoff, Mariana Leivas Müller [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Klein, Roberta Daniele [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas – Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Cardozo, Janaina Goulart [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Giacomin, Marina Mussoi [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas – Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pinho, Grasiela Lopes Leães [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Oceanografia, Av. Itália km 8, 96201-900 Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); and others

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Acute effects of waterborne copper were evaluated in the estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara. •Fishes were acutely exposed to waterborne copper in salt water. •Waterborne copper affects the response of several biochemical and genetic endpoints. •Catalase, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation are responsive to copper exposure. •Copper exposure induces DNA damages in fish erythrocytes. -- Abstract: The responses of a large suite of biochemical and genetic parameters were evaluated in tissues (liver, gills, muscle and erythrocytes) of the estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara exposed to waterborne copper in salt water (salinity 24 ppt). Activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase), metallothionein-like protein concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were evaluated in liver, gills, and muscle. Comet assay score and nuclear abnormalities and micronucleated cell frequency were analyzed in peripheral erythrocytes. The responses of these parameters were evaluated in fish exposed (96 h) to environmentally relevant copper concentrations (5, 9 and 20 μg L{sup −1}). In control and copper-exposed fish, no mortality was observed over the experimental period. Almost all biochemical and genetic parameters proved to be affected by waterborne copper exposure. However, the response of catalase activity in liver, ROS, ACAP and LPO in muscle, gills and liver, and DNA damages in erythrocytes clearly showed to be dependent on copper concentration in salt water. Therefore, the use of these parameters could be of relevance in the scope of biomonitoring programs in salt water environments contaminated with copper.

  14. Environmentally realistic exposure to weathered North Sea oil: Sublethal effects in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holth, Tor Fredrik; Storset, Audun; Ribeiro, Anne Luise; Ólafsdóttir, Ásdís; Halldórsson, Halldór Pálmar; Hylland, Ketil

    2017-01-01

    With increasing oil and gas activities and transport in the Arctic, there is a need to understand how operational or accidental releases of substances affect marine organisms from a pristine environment. The aim of the current study was to describe and compare the responses of two marine fish species, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), following exposure to three levels (low, medium, high) of the water-soluble fraction of a North Sea crude oil for 16 days. The exposure system simulated environmental exposure by allowing clean seawater to percolate through gravel covered in weathered oil before being introduced to aquaria. Both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite bile concentrations and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) levels and activity increased markedly in comparison with controls in both species, but there were no significant differences between the three exposures. Turbot possessed 4-5-fold higher concentrations of two PAH bile metabolites compared to Atlantic cod by day 8. In contrast, hepatic CYP1A activity in cod was consistently 2-6-fold higher than in turbot with increasing differences over the experimental period. Baseline DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes and kidney cells were low in both species, but was elevated for all treatments by day two. There were no marked indications of the treatments affecting immune functions in either species. This investigation demonstrated that there may be significant differences in responses between species receiving identical exposures and that DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes and kidney cells are sensitive to confinement stress. Data also indicate that some species, such as turbot, may adapt to treatments within days and weeks.

  15. Acute and chronic effects from pulse exposure of D. magna to silver and copper oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Rasmussen, Rose

    2016-01-01

    , and afterwards transferred to clean medium and observed for 48 h (post-exposure period) for acute effects and for 21 d for chronic effects. AgNO3 and CuCl2 were used as reference materials for dissolved silver and copper, respectively. For all test materials, a 3 h pulse caused comparable immobility in D. magna...... decreased more with increasing concentrations than for CuCl2 exposures when taking the measured dissolved copper into account. This indicates a nanoparticle-specific effect for CuONPs, possibly related to the CuONPs accumulated in the gut of D. magna during the pulse exposure. Pulse exposure...

  16. Homologous stress adaptation, antibiotic resistance, and biofilm forming ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg ATCC8326 on different food-contact surfaces following exposure to sublethal chlorine concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obe, Tomi; Nannapaneni, Rama; Sharma, Chander Shekhar; Kiess, Aaron

    2018-01-13

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (American Type Culture Collection; ATCC 8326) was examined for the ability to adapt to the homologous stress of chlorine through exposure to increasing chlorine concentrations (25 ppm daily increments) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The tested strain exhibited an acquired tolerance to chlorine in TSB with the tolerant cells growing in concentrations up to 400 ppm. In addition, the chlorine stressed cells displayed rugose morphology on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates at 37°C. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of chlorine for adapted (rugose and smooth) cells was determined to be 550 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively whereas the MIC for the control was 450 ppm. The biofilm forming ability of the adapted and control cells were examined on both plastic and stainless steel surface at room temperature and 37°C. The rugose variant, in contrast to the smooth (adapted and control) showed the ability to form strong biofilms (P ≤ 0.05) on a plastic surface at room temperature and 37°C. Rugose cells compared to smooth and control attached more (P ≤ 0.05) to steel surfaces as well. The possibility of cross-adaptation was examined by exposing the adapted and control cells to different antibiotics according to the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Adapted cells exhibited reduced susceptibility to some of the antibiotics tested as compared to control. The findings of this study suggest that exposure to sublethal chlorine concentration during the sanitization procedure can result in tolerant Salmonella cells. Chlorine may confer cross-protection that aids in the survival of the tolerant population to other environmental stresses. © 2018 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Evaluating the stress response as a bioindicator of sub-lethal effects of crude oil exposure in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Ngai, Heather M; Romero, L Michael

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum can disrupt endocrine function in humans and wildlife, and interacts in particularly complex ways with the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, responsible for the release of the stress hormones corticosterone and cortisol (hereafter CORT). Ingested petroleum can act in an additive fashion with other stressors to cause increased mortality, but it is not clear exactly why--does petroleum disrupt feedback mechanisms, stress hormone production, or both? This laboratory study aimed to quantify the effects of ingested Gulf of Mexico crude oil on the physiological stress response of house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We examined baseline and stress-induced CORT, negative feedback, and adrenal sensitivity in house sparrows given a 1% oil or control diet (n = 12 in each group). We found that four weeks on a 1% oil diet did not alter baseline CORT titers or efficacy of negative feedback, but significantly reduced sparrows' ability to secrete CORT in response to a standardized stressor and adrenocorticotropin hormone injection, suggesting that oil damages the steroid-synthesizing cells of the adrenal. In another group of animals on the same 1% oil (n = 9) or control diets (n = 8), we examined concentrations of eight different blood chemistry parameters, and CORT in feathers grown before and during the feeding experiments as other potential biomarkers of oil exposure. None of the blood chemistry parameters differed between birds on the oil and control diets after two or four weeks of feeding, nor did feather CORT differ between the two groups. Overall, this study suggests that the response of CORT to stressors, but not baseline HPA function, may be a particularly sensitive bioindicator of sub-lethal chronic effects of crude oil exposure.

  18. Evaluating the stress response as a bioindicator of sub-lethal effects of crude oil exposure in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine R Lattin

    Full Text Available Petroleum can disrupt endocrine function in humans and wildlife, and interacts in particularly complex ways with the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, responsible for the release of the stress hormones corticosterone and cortisol (hereafter CORT. Ingested petroleum can act in an additive fashion with other stressors to cause increased mortality, but it is not clear exactly why--does petroleum disrupt feedback mechanisms, stress hormone production, or both? This laboratory study aimed to quantify the effects of ingested Gulf of Mexico crude oil on the physiological stress response of house sparrows (Passer domesticus. We examined baseline and stress-induced CORT, negative feedback, and adrenal sensitivity in house sparrows given a 1% oil or control diet (n = 12 in each group. We found that four weeks on a 1% oil diet did not alter baseline CORT titers or efficacy of negative feedback, but significantly reduced sparrows' ability to secrete CORT in response to a standardized stressor and adrenocorticotropin hormone injection, suggesting that oil damages the steroid-synthesizing cells of the adrenal. In another group of animals on the same 1% oil (n = 9 or control diets (n = 8, we examined concentrations of eight different blood chemistry parameters, and CORT in feathers grown before and during the feeding experiments as other potential biomarkers of oil exposure. None of the blood chemistry parameters differed between birds on the oil and control diets after two or four weeks of feeding, nor did feather CORT differ between the two groups. Overall, this study suggests that the response of CORT to stressors, but not baseline HPA function, may be a particularly sensitive bioindicator of sub-lethal chronic effects of crude oil exposure.

  19. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, J.F.; Holland, L.M.; Johnson, O.S.; LaBauve, P.M.; London, J.E.; Prine, J.R.; Vigil, E.A.

    1977-02-01

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD/sub 50/-/sub 30/ in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day.

  20. Effects of Sublethal Cadmium Exposure on Antipredator Behavioural and Antitoxic Responses in the Invasive Amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornom, Pascal; Gismondi, Eric; Vellinger, Céline; Devin, Simon; Férard, Jean-François; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Amphipods are recognised as an important component of freshwater ecosystems and are frequently used as an ecotoxicological test species. Despite this double interest, there is still a lack of information concerning toxic impacts on ecologically relevant behaviours. The present study investigated the influence of cadmium (Cd), a non-essential heavy metal, on both antipredator behaviours and antitoxic responses in the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus under laboratory conditions. Amphipod behaviour (i.e. refuge use, aggregation with conspecifics, exploration and mobility) was recorded following a 4-min test-exposure to 500 µg Cd/L with or without a 24-h Cd pre-exposure and in the presence or absence of a high perceived risk of predation (i.e. water scented by fish predators and injured conspecifics). Following behavioural tests, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, a biomarker for toxic effect, and energy reserves (i.e. lipid and glycogen contents) were assessed. Cd exposures induced (1) cell damage reflected by high MDA levels, (2) erratic behaviour quantified by decreasing refuge use and exploration, and increasing mobility, and (3) a depletion in energy reserves. No significant differences were observed between 4-min test-exposed and 24-h pre-exposed individuals. Gammarids exposed to Cd had a disturbed perception of the alarm stimuli, reflected by increased time spent outside of refuges and higher mobility compared to gammarids exposed to unpolluted water. Our results suggest that Cd exposure rapidly disrupts the normal behavioural responses of gammarids to alarm substances and alters predator-avoidance strategies, which could have potential impacts on aquatic communities. PMID:22879985

  1. Effects of sublethal cadmium exposure on antipredator behavioural and antitoxic responses in the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sornom

    Full Text Available Amphipods are recognised as an important component of freshwater ecosystems and are frequently used as an ecotoxicological test species. Despite this double interest, there is still a lack of information concerning toxic impacts on ecologically relevant behaviours. The present study investigated the influence of cadmium (Cd, a non-essential heavy metal, on both antipredator behaviours and antitoxic responses in the invasive amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus under laboratory conditions. Amphipod behaviour (i.e. refuge use, aggregation with conspecifics, exploration and mobility was recorded following a 4-min test-exposure to 500 µg Cd/L with or without a 24-h Cd pre-exposure and in the presence or absence of a high perceived risk of predation (i.e. water scented by fish predators and injured conspecifics. Following behavioural tests, malondialdehyde (MDA levels, a biomarker for toxic effect, and energy reserves (i.e. lipid and glycogen contents were assessed. Cd exposures induced (1 cell damage reflected by high MDA levels, (2 erratic behaviour quantified by decreasing refuge use and exploration, and increasing mobility, and (3 a depletion in energy reserves. No significant differences were observed between 4-min test-exposed and 24-h pre-exposed individuals. Gammarids exposed to Cd had a disturbed perception of the alarm stimuli, reflected by increased time spent outside of refuges and higher mobility compared to gammarids exposed to unpolluted water. Our results suggest that Cd exposure rapidly disrupts the normal behavioural responses of gammarids to alarm substances and alters predator-avoidance strategies, which could have potential impacts on aquatic communities.

  2. Sublethal exposure to azamethiphos causes neurotoxicity, altered energy allocation and high mortality during simulated live transport in American lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard, C M; Burridge, L E

    2015-05-01

    In the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, sea lice outbreaks in caged salmon are treated with pesticides including Salmosan(®), applied as bath treatments and then released into the surrounding seawater. The effect of chronic exposure to low concentrations of this pesticide on neighboring lobster populations is a concern. Adult male lobsters were exposed to 61 ngL(-1) of azamethiphos (a.i. in Salmosan(®) formulation) continuously for 10 days. In addition to the direct effects of pesticide exposure, effects on the ability to cope with shipping conditions and the persistence of the effects after a 24h depuration period in clean seawater were assessed. Indicators of stress and hypoxia (serum total proteins, hemocyanin and lactate), oxidative damage (protein carbonyls in gills and serum) and altered energy allocation (hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices, hepatopancreas lipids) were assessed in addition to neurotoxicity (chlolinesterase activity in muscle). Directly after exposure, azamethiphos-treated lobsters had inhibition of muscle cholinesterase, reduced gonadosomatic index and enhanced hepatosomatic index and hepatopancreas lipid content. All these responses persisted after 24-h depuration, increasing the risk of cumulative impacts with further exposure to chemical or non-chemical stressors. In both control and treated lobsters exposed to simulated shipment conditions, concentrations of protein and lactate in serum, and protein carbonyls in gills increased. However, mortality rate was higher in azamethiphos-treated lobsters (33 ± 14%) than in controls (2.6 ± 4%). Shipment and azamethiphos had cumulative impacts on serum proteins. Both direct effects on neurological function and energy allocation and indirect effect on ability to cope with shipping stress could have significant impacts on lobster population and/or fisheries. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Smart, Judy; Spivak, Marla

    2016-08-01

    Many factors can negatively affect honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health including the pervasive use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides. Through direct consumption of contaminated nectar and pollen from treated plants, neonicotinoids can affect foraging, learning, and memory in worker bees. Less well studied are the potential effects of neonicotinoids on queen bees, which may be exposed indirectly through trophallaxis, or food-sharing. To assess effects on queen productivity, small colonies of different sizes (1500, 3000, and 7000 bees) were fed imidacloprid (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 ppb) in syrup for three weeks. We found adverse effects of imidacloprid on queens (egg-laying and locomotor activity), worker bees (foraging and hygienic activities), and colony development (brood production and pollen stores) in all treated colonies. Some effects were less evident as colony size increased, suggesting that larger colony populations may act as a buffer to pesticide exposure. This study is the first to show adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior and improves our understanding of how neonicotinoids may impair short-term colony functioning. These data indicate that risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure.

  4. EFFECT OF CONCENTRATION AND EXPOSURE TIME ON COPPER ACCUMULATION IN EICHHORNIA CRASSIPES (MART. SOLMS. (PONTEDERIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lunardi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Different factors can influence the absorption and storage of substances in plant biomass. In this study, we evaluated the effect of copper concentration in growth medium and plant exposure time on copper accumulation in Eichhornia crassipes (Mart. Solms. (Pontederiaceae roots and leaves under controlled conditions. Plants were subjected to four treatments of copper concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 μg.mL-1, with a control treatment of 0 μg.mL-1, and evaluated at seven-day intervals over 21 days. Copper concentration in biomass was analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomisation. The results showed that copper concentration in the growth medium and time of exposure had a significant effect on the amount of copper accumulated by E. crassipes roots and leaves, with roots more efficient compared to leaves. It is likely that E. crassipes has mechanisms for the translocation of metal from the root system to the leaves. Symptoms of copper toxicity were observed in the vegetative parts of the plants at the end of the experiments. This study demonstrates that E. crassipes presents great potential in the absorption and accumulation of copper under laboratory conditions, indicating its effectiveness for applications in phytoremediation processes.

  5. Copper pellets simulating oral exposure to copper ammunition: Absence of toxicity in American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian; Lahner, Lesanna L.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of copper (Cu) in raptors that may consume Cu bullets, shotgun pellets containing Cu, or Cu fragments as they feed on wildlife carcasses, we studied the effects of metallic Cu exposure in a surrogate, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Sixteen kestrels were orally administered 5 mg Cu/g body mass in the form of Cu pellets (1.18–2.00 mm in diameter) nine times during 38 days and 10 controls were sham gavaged on the same schedule. With one exception, all birds retained the pellets for at least 1 h, but most (69%) regurgitated pellets during a 12-h monitoring period. Hepatic Cu concentrations were greater in kestrels administered Cu than in controls, but there was no difference in Cu concentrations in the blood between treated and control birds. Concentration of the metal-binding protein metallothionein was greater in male birds that received Cu than in controls, whereas concentrations in female birds that received Cu were similar to control female birds. Hepatic Cu and metallothionein concentrations in kestrels were significantly correlated. Histopathologic alterations were noted in the pancreas of four treated kestrels and two controls, but these changes were not associated with hepatic or renal Cu concentrations, and no lesions were seen in other tissues. No clinical signs were observed, and there was no treatment effect on body mass; concentrations of Cu, hemoglobin, or methemoglobin in the blood; or Cu concentrations in kidney, plasma biochemistries, or hematocrit. Based on the parameters we measured, ingested Cu pellets pose little threat to American kestrels (and presumably phylogenetically related species), although the retention time of pellets in the stomach was of relatively short duration. Birds expected to regurgitate Cu fragments with a frequency similar to kestrels are not likely to be adversely affected by Cu ingestion, but the results of our study do not completely rule out the potential for toxicity in

  6. Sublethal exposure to methoxyfenozide-treated surfaces reduces the attractiveness and responsiveness in adult oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Michael D; Barrett, Bruce A

    2007-02-01

    The chemical communication (female attractiveness and male responsiveness) of adult oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), exposed to surfaces treated with the ecdysteroid agonist methoxyfenozide for 48 h were investigated in two laboratory wind tunnel assays. The recapture assay examined the ability of treated males to orient to a single cage of treated females, and the data gathered were mean percentage of males recaptured per treatment. The male sexual behavior assay examined some specific orientation behaviors (associated with sexual excitability) of treated males when they were given a choice of two competing pheromone sources (cages of treated females), and the data gathered were mean time males spent in upwind plume orientations and at source contact (female cage) per treatment. Data from the recapture assay suggests that exposure to methoxyfenozide impacts male responsiveness more than female attractiveness. In contrast, data from the sexual behavior assay strongly revealed that exposure to methoxyfenozide-treated surfaces does negatively impact both the ability of calling females to attract males and of aroused males to display sustained upwind flight behavior and time spent at the female cages.

  7. Time-averaged copper concentrations from continuous exposures predicts pulsed exposure toxicity to the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum: Importance of uptake and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Brad M; Simpson, Stuart L; Chariton, Anthony A; Stauber, Jenny L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent, fluctuating and pulsed contaminant discharges result in organisms receiving highly variable contaminant exposures. Current water quality guidelines are predominantly derived using data from continuous exposure toxicity tests, and most frequently applied by regulators with the assumption that concentrations from a single sampling event will provide a meaningful approach to assessing potential effects. This study investigated the effect of single and multiple (daily) dissolved copper pulses on the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, including measurements of copper uptake and elimination to investigate the toxic mechanism. Copper pulses of between 0.5 and 24h and continuous exposures with equivalent 72-h time-averaged concentrations (TACs) resulted in similar biomass inhibition of P. tricornutum, with continuous exposures often being marginally more toxic. Rates of cell division generally recovered to control levels within 24h of the copper pulse removal. Upon resuspension in clean seawater, the extracellular copper per cell decreased rapidly, whereas the intracellular copper per cell decreased slowly. Negligible loss of copper from the total algal biomass indicated that P. tricornutum did not have an effective mechanism for eliminating copper from cells, rather the intracellular copper decreased as a result of dilution by cellular division as the algal growth rate recovered. The measurement of copper uptake after 72-h exposure and kinetics of elimination thereafter suggest that continuous exposures are marginally more toxic to P. tricornutum than pulsed copper exposures with equivalent TACs because slow internalization and saturation of algal membrane transport sites results in less copper uptake into pulse-exposed cells than continuously-exposed cells coupled with dilution of internalized copper via cellular division in the post-exposure period. In the case of P. tricornutum, the results indicate that water quality guidelines for copper based on

  8. The Influence of an Air Exposure on the Secondary Electron Yield of Copper

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C

    1997-01-01

    The influence of different air exposure times on the secondary electron emission of clean copper surfaces as well as on technical copper surfaces has been studied in the context of the phenomenon of multipacting, which can limit the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities for particle acceleration. The copper samples were prepared by heat treatments and in situ sputter-etching and they were investigated with a instrument for SEY measurements, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). After short air exposures of some seconds the maximum secondary electron yield dmax of clean copper is reduced from 1.3 to less than 1.2, due to the oxidation of the copper surface. Subsequent air exposure increases the secondary electron yield (SEY) until, after about 8 days exposure dmax is higher than 2. Clean copper samples were also exposed to the single gases present in air to find out the reasons for the dramatic increase of...

  9. Acute and chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Contributions by Wang, Ning; Calfee, Robin D.; Beahan, Erinn; Brumbaugh, William G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Hardesty, Doug K.; Kunz, James L.; Little, Edward E.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Puglis, Holly J.

    2014-01-01

    White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are experiencing poor recruitment in the trans boundary reach of the upper Columbia River in eastern Washington State. Limited toxicity data indicated that early life stages of white sturgeon are sensitive to metals. In acute 4-day (d) exposures with larval white sturgeon, previous studies have reported that the 4-day median lethal concentrations (LC50) based on biotic ligand model (BLM) normalization for copper were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national recommended acute water-quality criterion. In previously published chronic 66-d exposures starting with newly fertilized eggs of white sturgeon, 20-percent lethal effect concentrations (LC20s) for copper, cadmium, or zinc generally were within a factor of two of the chronic values of the most sensitive fish species in the databases of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria (WQC) for the three metals. However, there were some uncertainties in the chronic exposures previously performed with white sturgeon, including (1) low control survival (37 percent), (2) more control fish tested in each replicate compared to other treatments, (3) limited replication of treatments (n=2), (4) lack of reported growth data (such as dry weight), and (5) wide dilution factors for exposure concentrations (6- to 8-fold dilutions). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that additional studies are needed to generate more toxicity data to better define lethal and sublethal toxicity thresholds for metals for white sturgeon. The objective of the study was to further evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to early life stages of white sturgeon in water-only exposures. Toxicity tests also were performed with commonly tested rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under similar test conditions to determine the relative sensitivity between white sturgeon and rainbow trout to these metals. Toxicity data generated from

  10. Neuroenzymatic activity and physiological energetics in Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, during short-term sublethal exposure to harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basti, Leila; Nagai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    The harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama, causes recurrent mortalities of bivalve molluscs in Japan, with demonstrated hemolysis and cytotoxicity in rabbit erythrocytes, HeLa cells, and bivalve tissues. Nonetheless, the effects of exposure to sublethal cell densities on the physiological energetics of bivalves have not been investigated, nor the potential involvement of neurotoxicity. In the present study, two sets of experiments were conducted with adult clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. In the first set, the clearance rate (CR), respiration rate (RR), absorption efficiency (AE), ingestion rate (IR), and absorption rate (AR) were examined in clams exposed to H. circularisquama to quantify the scope for growth (SFG) as an indicative of the bioenergetic status of clams (5, 50, 2.5×10(2), and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1); under 15°C and 20°C). In the second set, the activity of the biomarker of neurotoxic exposure, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was monitored following 3, 6, 24, and 48h of exposure (5, 50, 5×10(2), and 10(3)cellsml(-1), at 20°C) in gills of R. philippinarum, and compared to that in Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis; a species also affected by H. circualrisquama and in which AChE activity was more extensively studied. At 15°C, CR, IR, and AR were decreased for exposures to 50-5×10(2) cells ml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the absorbed energy (A), and a significant decrease in SFG at 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). At 20°C, AE was null for exposures to 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). RR was decreased at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1), CR, IR, and AR were decreased at 5-5×10(2)cellsml(-1), and the AE was null for 2.5×10(2)-5×10(2)cellsml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the respired energy (R), but mainly in (A) especially at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1) decreasing the SFG over the entire range of cell density with negative values for 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). The activity of AChE in both clams and

  11. Effects of nanomolar copper on water plants—Comparison of biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of deficiency and sublethal toxicity under environmentally relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, George, E-mail: george.thomas@uni.kn [Universität Konstanz, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Sektion, Fachbereich Biologie, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Stärk, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: ha-jo.staerk@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wellenreuther, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.wellenreuther@desy.de [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dickinson, Bryan C., E-mail: bryan.dickinson@gmail.com [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Küpper, Hendrik, E-mail: hendrik.kuepper@uni-konstanz.de [Universität Konstanz, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Sektion, Fachbereich Biologie, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Institute of Physical Biology, Branišovská 31, CZ-370 05 České Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •We found different optimal Cu requirement for different physiological mechanisms. •Kinetics and concentration thresholds of damage mechanisms were established. •Cu toxicity caused internal Cu re-distribution and inhibition of Zn uptake. •Cu deficient plants released Cu, indicating lack of high-affinity Cu transporters. •Cu deficiency caused re-distribution of zinc in the plant. -- Abstract: Toxicity and deficiency of essential trace elements like Cu are major global problems. Here, environmentally relevant sub-micromolar concentrations of Cu (supplied as CuSO{sub 4}) and simulations of natural light- and temperature cycles were applied to the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum. Growth was optimal at 10 nM Cu, while PSII activity (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) was maximal around 2 nM Cu. Damage to the PSII reaction centre was the first target of Cu toxicity, followed by disturbed regulation of heat dissipation (NPQ). Only after that, electron transport through PSII (Φ{sub PSII}) was inhibited, and finally chlorophylls decreased. Copper accumulation in the plants was stable until 10 nM Cu in solution, but strongly increased at higher concentrations. The vein was the main storage site for Cu up to physiological concentrations (10 nM). At toxic levels it was also sequestered to the epidermis and mesophyll until export from the vein became inhibited, accompanied by inhibition of Zn uptake. Copper deficiency led to a complete stop of growth at “0” nM Cu after 6 weeks. This was accompanied by high starch accumulation although electron flow through PSII (Φ{sub PSII}) decreased from 2 weeks, followed by decrease in pigments and increase of non photochemical quenching (NPQ). Release of Cu from the plants below 10 nM Cu supply in the nutrient solution indicated lack of high-affinity Cu transporters, and on the tissue level copper deficiency led to a re-distribution of zinc.

  12. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occupational exposure to manganese, copper, lead, iron, mercury and zinc and the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorell, J M; Johnson, C C; Rybicki, B A; Peterson, E L; Kortsha, G X; Brown, G G; Richardson, R J

    1999-01-01

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in metropolitan Detroit to assess occupational exposures to manganese, copper, lead, iron, mercury and zinc as risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). Non-demented men and women 50 years of age who were receiving primary medical care at HFHS were recruited, and concurrently enrolled cases (n = 144) and controls (n = 464) were frequency-matched for sex, race and age (+/- 5 years). A risk factor questionnaire, administered by trained interviewers, inquired about every job held by each subject for 6 months from age 18 onward, including a detailed assessment of actual job tasks, tools and environment. An experienced industrial hygienist, blinded to subjects' case-control status, used these data to rate every job as exposed or not exposed to one or more of the metals of interest. Adjusting for sex, race, age and smoking status, 20 years of occupational exposure to any metal was not associated with PD. However, more than 20 years exposure to manganese (Odds Ratio [OR] = 10.61, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.06, 105.83) or copper (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.06,5.89) was associated with PD. Occupational exposure for > 20 years to combinations of lead-copper (OR = 5.24, 95% CI = 1.59, 17.21), lead-iron (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.07,7.50), and iron-copper (OR = 3.69, 95% CI = 1.40,9.71) was also associated with the disease. No association of occupational exposure to iron, mercury or zinc with PD was found. A lack of statistical power precluded analyses of metal combinations for those with a low prevalence of exposure (i.e., manganese, mercury and zinc). Our findings suggest that chronic occupational exposure to manganese or copper, individually, or to dual combinations of lead, iron and copper, is associated with PD.

  14. Quantitative changes in the digestive gland cells of the snail Helix aspersa after exposure to the fungicide copper oxychloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, R G; Reinecke, A J; Reinecke, S A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between accumulated copper in the digestive gland of Helix aspersa, after exposure to the fungicide copper oxychloride, and quantitative changes in the digestive gland cells of this snail. Snails were exposed to 80 and 240 microg g(-1) copper oxychloride for 6 weeks. Histological sections of digestive glands were analyzed by means of computer-assisted image analysis. Results indicate that copper is strongly accumulated in the digestive gland and that this organ is the main site of copper accumulation in the snail body. Also, as a result of copper accumulation in the digestive gland, measurable changes in epithelium cell height and area of this organ occur. In the case of cell height, these changes are dose-related. It is concluded that changes in digestive gland cells, as a result of copper oxychloride exposure, may possibly serve as biomarkers of exposure to this fungicide.

  15. A long-term copper exposure in a freshwater ecosystem using lotic mesocosms: Invertebrate community responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Sandrine; Roussel, Hélène; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Thybaud, Eric; Mebane, Christopher A.; Brink, Paul Van den; Gauthier, Laury

    2017-01-01

    A lotic mesocosm study was carried out in 20-m-long channels, under continuous, environmentally realistic concentrations of copper (Cu) in low, medium, and high exposures (nominally 0, 5, 25, and 75 μg L−1; average effective concentrations copper exposure, a no-observed-effect concentration at the community level for consumers was set at 5 μg L−1 (4 μg L−1 as average effective concentration), and a lowest-observed-effect concentration at 25 μg L−1(20 μg L−1 as average effective concentration). 

  16. The influence of duckweed species diversity on ecophysiological tolerance to copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Huijuan; Duan, Dongzhu; Li, Hongmei; Lei, Tingwen; Wang, Maolin; Zhao, Hai; Zhao, Yun

    2015-07-01

    In excess, copper is toxic to plants. In the plants, Landoltia punctata and Lemna minor grown in mixed and monoculture, the effects of exposure to varying concentrations of copper (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 and 1mgL(-1) Cu) for seven days were assessed by measuring changes in the chlorophyll, protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. According to results, Cu levels in plants increased with increasing Cu concentration. The level of photosynthetic pigments and crude proteins decreased only upon exposure to high Cu concentrations. However, the starch and malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased. These results suggested a stress alleviation that was possibly the result of antioxidants such as CAT and SOD, the activities of which increased with increasing Cu levels. APX activity increased in L. punctata, but decreased in L. minor, under monoculture or mixed culture conditions. In addition, the duckweed in mixed culture exhibited increased antioxidant enzyme activities which provide increased resistance to copper in moderate copper concentrations. As the copper concentration increased, the duckweed in the mixed culture limited the uptake of copper to avoid toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term adaptation of Daphnia to toxic environment in Lake Orta: the effects of short-term exposure to copper and acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of its 80-year history of heavy pollution and re-colonization, Lake Orta provides a good opportunity for investigating the response of zooplankton organisms to heavy metals and acidification as well as the mechanisms involved. After the recent establishment of Daphnia galeata Sars, and the detection of an extremely low clonal diversity of Lake Orta population, we carried out a study to investigate the lethal tolerance to ionic copper, as well as to acidity, and the impact of newborn Daphnia exposure to sublethal concentrations of copper for their later development and reproduction. We conducted acute toxicity tests to estimate the EC50 for ionic copper and tolerance to low pH, as well as life table experiments. Tolerance to ionic copper was high, three times that reported in literature. An increased mortality soon after exposure to low pH confirmed a high sensitivity to acidity and explained the success of the species in Lake Orta only after pH recovery. An analysis of reproductive and demographic parameters revealed that D. galeata Sars was stressed at concentrations of ionic copper only twice higher than those presently recorded in the lake (i.e., ca 3 μg L-1. An increased cumulative number of eggs produced by each female were in fact counterbalanced by an increasing abortion rate, which resulted in an unaltered or lower intrinsic rate of population increase. Our results are likely due to the strong selective pressure, more than physiological processes (acclimation, in a polluted area in which only specific adapted clones are able to grow, confirming the results previously obtained on Lake Orta's D. obtusa Kurz population. The reproductive response and the relatively low within treatment variability suggest that clone specificity, rather than physiological acclimation, was the driving force. The low variability confirmed results previously obtained from life tables experiments on Lake Orta's D. obtusa clone. Overall, our results

  18. Assessment of metals exposure and sub-lethal effects in voles and small birds captured near the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System Road, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Mora, Miguel A.; May, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Voles (n=6) and small ground-nesting birds (n=12) were live-captured near the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System haul road in Cape Krusenstern National Monument in northwest Alaska in 2006 to assess metals exposure and sub-lethal biological effects. Similar numbers of animals were captured from a reference site in southern Cape Krusenstern National Monument for comparison. Histopathological examination of selected organs, blood analysis, and analysis for aluminum, barium, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations in liver and blood samples were performed. Voles and small birds captured from near the haul road had about 20 times greater blood and liver lead concentrations and about 3 times greater cadmium concentrations when compared to those from the reference site. Barium and zinc tissue concentrations of animals collected from different sites were not remarkably different, and aluminum concentrations were below the reporting limits in most samples. There was no clear evidence of serious sub-lethal biological effects such as lesions in internal organs or DNA damage in blood in any of the animals. Accordingly, blood and liver lead concentrations in animals captured near the haul road generally were less than tissue concentration thresholds associated with serious biological effects reported from other studies; however, subtle effects resulting from lead exposure, such as the suppression of the activity of certain enzymes, cannot be ruled out for those animals nearest the haul road. Notably, liver lead concentrations of voles and small birds at the reference location were considerably less than those previously reported for similar animals at reference sites in other parts of the United States, Canada, and Europe. Results from this reconnaissance-level study indicate that voles and small birds inhabiting this area are not suffering serious biological effects as a result of metals exposure; however, continued monitoring of lead and other metals is

  19. Kinetic analysis of the swimming behavior of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, exposed to nickel: Hypoactivity induced by sublethal concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellgaard, E.G.; Ashley, S.E.; Langford, A.E. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The discharge of nickel into aquatic environments from numerous industries poses a threat to fish populations because of its toxcity. Although little is known, however, about the precise mechanism of its toxicity in freshwater fish, it produces some of the symptoms associated with heavy-metal poisoning in general; it accumulates in fish tissues and results in alterations in gill structure, including hypertrophy of respiratory and mucous cells, separation of the epithelial layer from the pillar cell system, cauterization and sloughing, and necrosis of the epithelium. The destruction of the gill lamellae decreases the ventilation rate and if severe, as after acute exposure, may cause blood hypoxia and death. The effects of short-term exposure of fish to sublethal concentrations of nickel and not as well defined. The kinetic method of Ellgaard et al., which uses locomotor activity to assess the general health of fish, is ideally suited to examine whether sublethal concentrations of nickel adversely affect fish. In previous studies, the measured changes in locomotor activity observed when fish are exposed to pollutants correlate with more specific changes, e.g., physiological, biochemical, histological or neurosensory changes, which occur under the same conditions. Thus, the kinetic method also meets the criterial for pollution early warning systems as discussed by Cairns and van der Schale. This method has previously been used to demonstrate that short-term exposure to sublethal concentrations of the heavy metals cadmium, chromium, and zinc and copper are detrimental to the health of bluegills. The present study examines the effects of short-term exposures of sublethal concentrations of nickel on the locomotor activity of the goldfish, Carassius auratus. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Low-level copper exposures increase visibility and vulnerability of juvenile coho salmon to cutthroat trout predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jenifer K.; Baldwin, David H.; Beauchamp, David A.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Copper contamination in surface waters is common in watersheds with mining activities or agricultural, industrial, commercial, and residential human land uses. This widespread pollutant is neurotoxic to the chemosensory systems of fish and other aquatic species. Among Pacific salmonids (), copper-induced olfactory impairment has previously been shown to disrupt behaviors reliant on a functioning sense of smell. For juvenile coho salmon (O. kisutch), this includes predator avoidance behaviors triggered by a chemical alarm cue (conspecific skin extract). However, the survival consequences of this sublethal neurobehavioral toxicity have not been explored. In the present study juvenile coho were exposed to low levels of dissolved copper (5–20 μg/L for 3 h) and then presented with cues signaling the proximity of a predator. Unexposed coho showed a sharp reduction in swimming activity in response to both conspecific skin extract and the upstream presence of a cutthroat trout predator (O. clarki clarki) previously fed juvenile coho. This alarm response was absent in prey fish that were exposed to copper. Moreover, cutthroat trout were more effective predators on copper-exposed coho during predation trials, as measured by attack latency, survival time, and capture success rate. The shift in predator–prey dynamics was similar when predators and prey were co-exposed to copper. Overall, we show that copper-exposed coho are unresponsive to their chemosensory environment, unprepared to evade nearby predators, and significantly less likely to survive an attack sequence. Our findings contribute to a growing understanding of how common environmental contaminants alter the chemical ecology of aquatic communities.

  1. Effect of exposure to sublethal concentrations of sodium cyanide on the carbohydrate metabolism of the Indian Major Carp Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen N. Dube

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were designed to study in-vivo effects of sodium cyanide on biochemical endpoints in the freshwater fish Labeo rohita. Fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations (0.106 and 0.064mg/L for a period of 15 days. Levels of glycogen, pyruvate, lactate and the enzymatic activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, phosphorylase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, acid phosphatase (AcP were assessed in different tissues (liver, muscle and gills. Result indicated a steady decrease in glycogen, pyruvate, SDH, ALP and AcP activity with a concomitant increase in the lactate, phosphorylase, LDH and G6PD activity in all selected tissues. The alterations in all the above biochemical parameters were significantly (p<0.05 time and dose dependent. In all the above parameters, liver pointing out the intensity of cyanide intoxication compare to muscle and gills. Study revealed change in the metabolic energy by means of altered metabolic profile of the fish. Further, these observations indicated that even sublethal concentrations of sodium cyanide might not be fully devoid of deleterious influence on metabolism in L. rohita.

  2. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  4. Quantitative changes in digestive gland cells and oocytes of Helix aspersa, as biomarkers of copper oxychloride exposure under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, R G; Reinecke, A J; Reinecke, S A

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of accumulated copper, on digestive epithelium height and percentage area, and on oocyte numbers of the snail Helix aspersa, in a vineyard where copper oxychloride is sprayed. The ultimate aim was to determine the usefulness of these cellular responses as biomarkers. Results showed that snails collected 2 months after fungicide application, had a significantly lower mean digestive epithelium height and percentage area, as well as significantly fewer oocytes per 1 mm(2) of ovotestis, compared to snails collected only 1 week after fungicide application and those from a control vineyard. It was concluded that these cellular responses are clear, measurable responses to copper oxychloride exposure and copper accumulation. However, they do not provide an early warning of copper exposure, which impacts on their usefulness as biomarkers.

  5. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thit, Amalie, E-mail: athitj@ruc.dk [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Ramskov, Tina, E-mail: tramskov@hotmail.com [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Croteau, Marie-Noële, E-mail: mcroteau@usgs.gov [Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark); Selck, Henriette [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Universitetsvej 1, Roskilde DK-4000 (Denmark)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • L. variegatus was exposed to sediment spiked with either aqueous Cu or nanoparticulate CuO. • Both aqueous and nanoparticulate Cu were marginally accumulated by L. variegatus. • Elimination of Cu accumulated from both forms was limited. • The subcellular distribution of accumulated Cu varied between Cu forms. • The use of a tracer, greater exposure concentration and duration are recommended. - Abstract: The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched {sup 65}Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus

  6. Integrated transcriptome, proteome and physiology analysis of Epinephelus coioides after exposure to copper nanoparticles or copper sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Long, Xiaohua; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanrui; Liu, Zhaopu; Han, Shiqun; Yan, Shaohua

    2017-03-01

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) are components in numerous commercial products, but little is known about the mechanisms of their toxicity to marine fish. Here, we investigated physiology, transcriptome and proteome in Epinephelus coioides after exposure to Cu as Cu-NPs or copper sulfate (CuSO4). Aggregation, oxidation and dissolution of Cu-NPs occurred after suspension in seawater within 24 h. Cu-NPs had similar types of the histology and hematological effects as CuSO4 on E. coioides, but toxicity of Cu-NPs seems more severe than that of CuSO4. Venn diagram analyses revealed 1428 and 2239 genes with significantly altered regulation in, respectively, CuSO4 and Cu-NPs treatments; of these, 911 genes were common to both treatments. A total of 354 and 140 proteins with significantly altered regulation were identified in, respectively, CuSO4 and Cu-NPs treatments; of these, 75 proteins were common to both treatments. A total of 11,417 transcripts and 3210 proteins were assigned to gene ontology terms, clusters of orthologous groups and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. Correlation analysis of gene and protein expressions revealed that 21 differentially expressed proteins had their regulation changed in the same direction in both Cu-NPs and CuSO4 treatments. Those genes and proteins could be used as targets for subsequent analysis, regardless of the Cu form. Among those proteins, one of the most notable changes was in proteins related to lipid transport and metabolism. This study provides an enhanced understanding of E. coioides responses to Cu-NPs or CuSO4.

  7. Influence of CuSO4and chelated copper algaecide exposures on biodegradation of microcystin-LR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwinski, Kyla J; Rodgers, John H; Kinley, Ciera M; Hendrikse, Maas; Calomeni, Alyssa J; McQueen, Andrew D; Geer, Tyler D; Liang, Jenny; Friesen, Vanessa; Haakensen, Monique

    2017-05-01

    Copper exposures from algaecide applications in aquatic systems are hypothesized to impede bacterial degradation of microcystin (MC), a cyanobacterial produced hepatotoxin. Despite regulatory implications of this hypothesis, limited data exist on influences of copper-exposures on MC-degrading bacteria and consequent MC-degradation. In this study, influences of copper-algaecide concentrations and formulations on bacterial composition and microcystin-LR (MCLR) degradation were investigated. Microcystis aeruginosa was exposed to four concentrations (0-5.0 mg Cu L -1 ) of three copper-algaecide formulations, and rates and extents of MCLR degradation were measured. In untreated controls and following exposures of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg Cu L -1 , MCLR concentrations decreased at a rate of ∼41-53 μg MCLR/L d -1 . Following exposure to 5.0 mg Cu L -1 MCLR degradation rates decreased an order of magnitude to ∼3-7 μg MCLR/L d -1 . Bacterial diversity decreased following copper-exposures greater than 0.1 mg Cu L -1 for all formulations. Relative abundance of certain groups of MC-degrading bacteria identified in treatments increased with increasing copper concentration, suggesting they may be less sensitive to copper exposures than other, MCLR and non MC-degrading heterotrophic bacteria present in the assemblage. Results from this study revealed that copper concentration can influence degradation rates of MCLR, however this influence was not significant within copper concentrations currently registered for use (≤1.0 mg Cu L -1 ) of the tested algaecides. Copper formulation did not significantly alter degradation rates or bacterial composition. These data augment our understanding of the influences of copper algaecide-exposures on MCLR degradation, and can be used to inform more accurate risk evaluations and use of copper-algaecides for management of MCLR-producing cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A long-term copper exposure on freshwater ecosystem using lotic mesocosms: Primary producer community responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Hélène; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Joachim, Sandrine; Le Cohu, René; Gauthier, Laury; Bonzom, Jean-Marc

    2007-02-28

    Copper is commonly used as an algicide and plant herbicide in the aquatic environment. Despite of its frequent application in rivers, ponds and lakes, few studies have been performed at the ecosystem level on primary producers' communities. A long-term lotic mesocosms study was carried on, in 20m long channels, under environmentally realistic concentrations of copper (0, 5, 25 and 75 microgL(-1)) delivered continuously for 18 months. Results showed significant effects at the 25 and 75 microgL(-1) copper treatment levels on the phytoplankton, periphyton and macrophyte community structure. Effects on biomass and abundance were dissimilar depending on the studied community. Phytoplankton showed no abundance variation with treatment, whereas periphyton had higher biomass and macrophytes had lower coverage at 25 and 75 microgL(-1). Taxa richness was significantly affected for all primary producers communities at 25 and 75 microgL(-1). Some taxa seemed to be sensitive to copper, i.e. Cocconeis spp., Epithemia sp., Gomphonema spp., Lemna minor, Nasturtium officinale and filamentous macroalgae. Other taxa appeared to be tolerant or facilitated by indirect effects, i.e. Leptolyngbya sp., Mougeotia sp., Nitzschia palea, Pseudanabaena sp. and Ulothrix sp. and therefore increased in the 25 and 75 microgL(-1) treatments. Important indirect factors influenced the community responses, such as trophic interactions like decrease of grazing pressure, competition for light and nutrients and temperature favouring blue-green algae development. After 18 months of copper exposure, the no observed effect concentration at community level (NOEC(community)) for primary producers was set up at 5 or 4mugL(-1), if we consider the average effective concentration, with a lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC(community)) at 25 or 20 microgL(-1) (AEC).

  9. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  10. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-11-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  11. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-10-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  12. Evaluation of DNA damage in Chinese toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans) after in vivo exposure to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao Hui; Li, Shao Nan; Zhang, Le; Zhu, Guo Nian; Zhuang, Hui Sheng

    2008-05-01

    Chinese toad, Bufo bufo gargarizans, is frequently found in rice fields, muddy ponds, wetlands and other aquatic ecosystems in China. Because of its habitat, it has many chances of being exposed to pesticides, such as acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat, which are extensively used in rice or cereal fields. Amphibians may serve as model organisms for determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants contaminating these areas. In the present study DNA damage was evaluated in the Chinese toad using the comet assay, as a potential tool for the assessment of ecogenotoxicity. The first step was to determine the acute toxicity of the above-mentioned herbicides. In acute tests, tadpoles were exposed to a series of relatively high concentrations of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat for 96 h. The LC(50 )(96 h) of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl and paraquat were measured as 0.76, 1.32, 20.1 and 164 mg l(-1), respectively. Also, negative effects on the behavior of tadpoles were observed with acetochlor, butachlor, and paraquat. Secondly, the comet assay was used for detecting DNA damage in Chinese toad tadpoles exposed to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides. Significant (P Bufo bufo gargarizans for genotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  13. Effects of copper nanoparticle exposure on host defense in a murine pulmonary infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassian Vicki H

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs and environmental bacteria can occur simultaneously. NPs induce inflammatory responses and oxidative stress but may also have immune-suppressive effects, impairing macrophage function and altering epithelial barrier functions. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential pulmonary effects of inhalation and instillation exposure to copper (Cu NPs using a model of lung inflammation and host defense. Methods We used Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p. in a murine lung infection model to determine if pulmonary bacterial clearance is enhanced or impaired by Cu NP exposure. Two different exposure modes were tested: sub-acute inhalation (4 hr/day, 5 d/week for 2 weeks, 3.5 mg/m3 and intratracheal instillation (24 hr post-exposure, 3, 35, and 100 μg/mouse. Pulmonary responses were evaluated by lung histopathology plus measurement of differential cell counts, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Results Cu NP exposure induced inflammatory responses with increased recruitment of total cells and neutrophils to the lungs as well as increased total protein and LDH activity in BAL fluid. Both inhalation and instillation exposure to Cu NPs significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of K.p.-exposed mice measured 24 hr after bacterial infection following Cu NP exposure versus sham-exposed mice also challenged with K.p (1.4 × 105 bacteria/mouse. Conclusions Cu NP exposure impaired host defense against bacterial lung infections and induced a dose-dependent decrease in bacterial clearance in which even our lowest dose demonstrated significantly lower clearance than observed in sham-exposed mice. Thus, exposure to Cu NPs may increase the risk of pulmonary infection.

  14. Toxicokinetics of tilapia following high exposure to waterborne and dietary copper and implications for coping mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jeng-Wei; Ju, Yun-Ru; Huang, Ying-Hsuan; Deng, Yue-Sun; Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Chin-Ching; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-06-01

    One of the major challenges in assessing the potential metal stress to aquatic organisms is explicitly predicting the internal dose in target organs. We aimed to understand the main sources of copper (Cu) accumulation in target organs of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and to investigate how the fish alter the process of Cu uptake, depuration, and accumulation (toxicokinetics (TK)) under prolonged conditions. We measured the temporal Cu profiles in selected organs after single and combined exposure to waterborne and dietary Cu for 14 days. Quantitative relations between different sources and levels of Cu, duration of treatment, and organ-specific Cu concentrations were established using TK modeling approaches. We show that water was the main source of Cu in the gills (>94 %), liver (>89 %), and alimentary canal (>86 %); the major source of Cu in the muscle (>51 %) was food. Cu uptake and depuration in tilapia organs were mediated under prolonged exposure conditions. In general, the uptake rate, depuration rate, and net bioaccumulation ability in all selected organs decreased with increasing waterborne Cu levels and duration of exposure. Muscle played a key role in accounting for the rapid Cu accumulation in the first period after exposure. Conversely, the liver acted as a terminal Cu storage site when exposure was extended. The TK processes of Cu in tilapia were highly changed under higher exposure conditions. The commonly used bioaccumulation model might lead to overestimations of the internal metal concentration with the basic assumption of constant TK processes.

  15. Acute copper toxicity in juvenile fat snook Centropomus parallelus (Teleostei: Centropomidae in sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Three experiments were designed to assess the accumulation and acute toxicity of copper (Cu in juvenile fat snook Centropomusparallelus. The first experiment was performed to determine the 96-h lethal concentration (LC50 of Cu. The second experiment was designed to assess the effects of sublethal concentrations of Cu (0.47 and 0.94 mg/L, while the third one allowed us to test the recovery capacity of fish exposed to the sublethal concentrations Cu and kept in sea water without Cu addition. The LC50value for Cu was found to be 1.88 mg/L Cu. Fish exposed to the sublethal concentrations of Cu showed a significant accumulation of Cu in gills at 96 h respect to the control ones (0.43 µg/g Cu. No significant difference was observed in the accumulation of Cu in gills between fish exposed to 0.47 mg/L (1.09 µg/g Cu and 0.94 mg/L (1.26 µg/g Cu. Exposure (24 and 96 h to the sublethal concentrations of Cu tested induced DNA damage in the erythrocytes. The results show that acute exposure to sublethal concentrations induces Cu accumulation and DNA damage in fish, these effects being recovered after 240 h in sea water without Cu addition.

  16. Exposure of the thorax to a sublethal blast wave causes a hydrodynamic pulse that leads to perivenular inflammation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J Marc; Pampori, Adam; Keledjian, Kaspar; Tosun, Cigdem; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2014-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an explosive blast (blast-TBI) is postulated to result, in part, from transvascular transmission to the brain of a hydrodynamic pulse (a.k.a., volumetric blood surge, ballistic pressure wave, hydrostatic shock, or hydraulic shock) induced in major intrathoracic blood vessels. This mechanism of blast-TBI has not been demonstrated directly. We tested the hypothesis that a blast wave impacting the thorax would induce a hydrodynamic pulse that would cause pathological changes in the brain. We constructed a Thorax-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (TOBIA) and a Jugular-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (JOBIA). TOBIA delivered a collimated blast wave to the right lateral thorax of a rat, precluding direct impact on the cranium. JOBIA delivered a blast wave to the fluid-filled port of an extracorporeal intravenous infusion device whose catheter was inserted retrograde into the jugular vein, precluding lung injury. Long Evans rats were subjected to sublethal injury by TOBIA or JOBIA. Blast injury induced by TOBIA was characterized by apnea and diffuse bilateral hemorrhagic injury to the lungs associated with a transient reduction in pulse oximetry signals. Immunolabeling 24 h after injury by TOBIA showed up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha, ED-1, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein in veins or perivenular tissues and microvessels throughout the brain. The perivenular inflammatory effects induced by TOBIA were prevented by ligating the jugular vein and were reproduced using JOBIA. We conclude that blast injury to the thorax leads to perivenular inflammation, Sur1 up-regulation, and reactive astrocytosis resulting from the induction of a hydrodynamic pulse in the vasculature.

  17. Inhibition in fertilisation of coral gametes following exposure to nickel and copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, Francesca; Stauber, Jenny; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda; Harrison, Peter L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2017-11-01

    The mining and production of nickel in tropical regions have the potential to impact on ecologically valuable tropical marine ecosystems. Currently, few data exist to assess the risks of nickel exposure to tropical ecosystems and to derive ecologically relevant water quality guidelines. In particular, data are lacking for keystone species such as scleractinian corals, which create the complex structural reef habitats that support many other marine species. As part of a larger study developing risk assessment tools for nickel in the tropical Asia-Pacific region, we investigated the toxicity of nickel on fertilisation success in three species of scleractinian corals: Acropora aspera, Acropora digitifera and Platygyra daedalea. In the literature, more data are available on the effects of copper on coral fertilisation, so to allow for comparisons with past studies, the toxicity of copper to A. aspera and P. daedalea was also determined. Overall, copper was more toxic than nickel to the fertilisation success of the species tested. Acropora aspera was the most sensitive species to nickel (NOEC 4610µg Ni/L). Acropora aspera was also the more sensitive species to copper with an EC10 of 5.8µg Cu/L. The EC10 for P. daedalea was 16µg Cu/L, similar to previous studies. This is the first time that the toxicity of nickel on fertilisation success in Acropora species has been reported, and thus provides valuable data that can contribute to the development of reliable water quality guidelines for nickel in tropical marine waters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Sublethal effect of imidacloprid on Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) feeding, digging, and foraging behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing evidence that exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides at sublethal levels impairs colonies of honeybee and other pollinators. Recently, it was found that sublethal contamination with neonicotinoids also affect growth and behavior of ants. In this study, we exposed red imported fi...

  19. Hepatic transcriptional responses to copper in the three-spined stickleback are affected by their pollution exposure history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren Webster, Tamsyn M; Williams, Tim D; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Lange, Anke; Lewis, Ceri; Shears, Janice A; Tyler, Charles R; Santos, Eduarda M

    2017-03-01

    Some fish populations inhabiting contaminated environments show evidence of increased chemical tolerance, however the mechanisms contributing to this tolerance, and whether this is heritable, are poorly understood. We investigated the responses of two populations of wild three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) with different histories of contaminant exposure to an oestrogen and copper, two widespread aquatic pollutants. Male stickleback originating from two sites, the River Aire, with a history of complex pollution discharges, and Siblyback Lake, with a history of metal contamination, were depurated and then exposed to copper (46μg/L) and the synthetic oestrogen ethinyloestradiol (22ng/L). The hepatic transcriptomic response was compared between the two populations and to a reference population with no known history of exposure (Houghton Springs, Dorset). Gene responses included those typical for both copper and oestrogen, with no discernable difference in response to oestrogen between populations. There was, however, some difference in the magnitude of response to copper between populations. Siblyback fish showed an elevated baseline transcription of genes encoding metallothioneins and a lower level of metallothionein induction following copper exposure, compared to those from the River Aire. Similarly, a further experiment with an F1 generation of Siblyback fish bred in the laboratory found evidence for elevated transcription of genes encoding metallothioneins in unexposed fish, together with an altered transcriptional response to 125μg/L copper, compared with F1 fish originating from the clean reference population exposed to the same copper concentration. These data suggest that the stickleback from Siblyback Lake have a differential response to copper, which is inherited by the F1 generation in laboratory conditions, and for which the underlying mechanism may include an elevation of baseline transcription of genes encoding metallothioneins. The

  20. Avoidance of copper and zinc by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss pre-exposed to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecevičius, Gintaras

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on 1-year-old rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in a counter-current flow, steep-gradient chamber to evaluate their ability to detect and avoid copper and zinc at concentrations of 0.1 mg Cu/L and 1 mg Zn/L, respectively, after 10-day pre-exposure to five copper sublethal concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mg Cu/L and after 10-day re-acclimation period in clean water. Avoidance response intensity in affected fish significantly decreased with increase in pre-exposure Cu concentration. The strength of avoidance response to Cu and Zn test solutions in pre-exposed fish after re-acclimation gradually increased in a concentration-dependent order.

  1. Responses of the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida, to ocean acidification conditions and copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Samreen; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is a growing concern due to its deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. Additionally, the combined effects of OA and other local stressors like metal pollution are largely unknown. In this study, we examined physiological effects in the sea anemone, Exaiptasia pallida after exposure to the global stressor carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as the local stressor copper (Cu) over 7 days. Cu accumulated in the tissues of E. pallida in a concentration-dependent manner. At some time points, sea anemones exposed to 1000 ppm CO2 had higher tissue Cu concentrations than those exposed to 400 ppm CO2 at the same Cu exposure concentrations. In general, the activities of all anti-oxidant enzymes measured (catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPx, glutathione reductase, GR) increased with exposure to increasing Cu concentrations. Significant differences in GR, CAT and to some degree GPx activity, were observed due to increasing CO2 exposure in control treatments. Sea anemones exposed to Cu in combination with higher CO2 generally had higher anti-oxidant enzyme activities than those exposed to the same concentration of Cu and lower CO2. Activity of the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), involved in acid-base balance, was significantly decreased with increasing Cu exposure. At the two lowest Cu concentrations, the extent of CA inhibition was lessened with increasing CO2 concentration. These results provide insight into toxic mechanisms of both Cu and CO2 exposure to the sensitive cnidarian E. pallida and have implications for environmental exposure of multiple contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance of copper-based wood preservatives in soil bed exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Thomas Nilsson; Jeffrey J. Morrell

    Copper-based biocides are widely used to protect wood from biological attack in a variety of environments. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is the dominant copper-based preservative for wood protection (J. T. MICKLEWRIGHT, 1989). First developed in India in the 1930s, CCA contains a very effective combination of materials. Copper provides protection against most...

  3. Chronic copper exposure and fatty acid composition of the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus: Results from a field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maazouzi, Chafik [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: maazouzi@univ-metz.fr; Masson, Gerard [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: masson1@univ-metz.fr; Izquierdo, Maria Soledad [Grupo de Investigacion en Acuicultura, ULPGC and ICCM, P.O. Box 56, 35200 Telde, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)], E-mail: mizquierdo@dbio.ulpgc.es; Pihan, Jean-Claude [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)], E-mail: pihan@univ-metz.fr

    2008-11-15

    Field study allows assessment of long-term effects on fatty acid (FA) composition of organisms under chronic exposure to metals. One expected effect of copper is peroxidation of lipids and essentially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). FA analysis was established for the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus subjected to different degrees of copper exposure (4-40 {mu}g Cu L{sup -1}). A previous study in our team showed that this species regulates its body Cu concentration (106-135 mg Cu kg{sup -1} dry weight). Despite the high capacity of bioaccumulation, the absence of a correlation between copper concentration in D. villosus and water prevents its use as bioindicator of copper pollution. Both sexes from the most polluted site showed the lowest total FA content, but the highest PUFA percent, mainly of the long-chained variety (C20-C22). Mechanisms leading to the prevention of lipid peroxidation in this species were discussed (metallothioneins and intracellular granules) and proposed with support from literature data. - Under chronic copper exposure, Dikerogammarus villosus loses in total fatty acids content but increases its essential {omega}3 and {omega}6 PUFA percent.

  4. Immunotoxicological and histopathological effects of exposure to sublethal concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl^sub 2^) in red-bellied pacu (Piaractus brachypomus) ¤/Efectos inmunotoxicológicos e histopatológicos de la exposición a concentraciones subletales de cloruro de mercurio (HgCl^sub 2^) en cachama blanca (Piaractus brachypomus)/Avaliação imunotoxicológica e histopatológica da exposição a concentrações subletais de cloreto de mercúrio (HgCl^sub 2^) em Pirapitinga branca (Piaractus brachypomus)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan S Naranjo-Gómez; Roberto Chacón-Novoa; Fabián Zambrano-Cardona; Fabián Uribe-García; Karol Ramírez; Julieth A Vargas-Morales; Iang S Rondón-Barragán

    2014-01-01

    ... between its content in water sources and mercury bioaccumulation in living organisms. This work assessed the immune and histopathological effects of exposure to sublethal concentrations of mercury chloride (HgCl^sub 2^) in Pacu...

  5. Impact of sublethal concentration of triazophos on regulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exposure to sublethal doses of triazophos extract caused significant (p < 0.05) time and dose dependent reduction in the levels of total protein, acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and significant enhancement in the levels of total free amino acids, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminases, adenosine deaminases, ...

  6. Combined effects of sea water acidification and copper exposure on the symbiont-bearing foraminifer Amphistegina gibbosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joseane Aparecida; de Barros Marangoni, Laura Fernandes; Bianchini, Adalto

    2017-06-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by global and local stressors such as ocean acidification and trace metal contamination. Reliable early warning monitoring tools are needed to assess and monitor coral reef health. Symbiont-bearing foraminifers ( Amphistegina gibbosa) were kept under ambient conditions (no sea water acidification and no copper addition) or exposed to combinations of different levels of sea water pH (8.1, 7.8, 7.5 and 7.2) and environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved copper (measured: 1.0, 1.6, 2.3 and 3.2 µg L-1) in a mesocosm system. After 10- and 25-d exposure, foraminifers were analyzed for holobiont Ca2+-ATPase activity, bleaching, growth and mortality. Enzyme activity was inhibited in foraminifers exposed to pH 7.2 and 3.2 µg L-1 Cu for 25 d. Bleaching frequency was also higher at pH 7.2 combined with copper addition. There was no significant effect of sea water acidification and copper addition on mortality. However, test size was smaller in foraminifers exposed to copper, with a positive interactive effect of sea water acidification. These findings can be explained by the higher availability of free copper ions at lower water pH. This condition would increase Cu competition with Ca2+ for the binding sites on the organism, thus inhibiting Ca2+-ATPase activity and affecting the organism's overall fitness. Findings reported here suggest that key processes in A. gibbosa, such as calcification and photosynthesis, are affected by the combined effect of global (sea water acidification) and local (copper contamination) stressors. Considering the experimental conditions employed (mesocosm system, possible ocean acidification scenarios, low copper concentrations, biomarkers of ecological relevance and chronic exposure), our findings support the use of foraminifera and biomarkers analyzed in the present study as reliable tools to detect and monitor the ecological impacts of multiple stressors in coral reef environments.

  7. Destruction of the Capsid and Genome of GII.4 Human Norovirus Occurs during Exposure to Metal Alloys Containing Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, C S; Moore, M D; Jaykus, L A

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) represents a significant public health burden worldwide and can be environmentally transmitted. Copper surfaces have been shown to inactivate the cultivable surrogate murine norovirus, but no such data exist for HuNoV. The purpose of this study was to characterize the destruction of GII.4 HuNoV and virus-like particles (VLPs) during exposure to copper alloy surfaces. Fecal suspensions positive for a GII.4 HuNoV outbreak strain or GII.4 VLPs were exposed to copper alloys or stainless steel for 0 to 240 min and recovered by elution. HuNoV genome integrity was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) (without RNase treatment), and capsid integrity was assessed by RT-qPCR (with RNase treatment), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, and a histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) binding assay. Exposure of fecal suspensions to pure copper for 60 min reduced the GII.4 HuNoV RNA copy number by ∼3 log10 units when analyzed by RT-qPCR without RNase treatment and by 4 log10 units when a prior RNase treatment was used. The rate of reduction of the HuNoV RNA copy number was approximately proportional to the percentage of copper in each alloy. Exposure of GII.4 HuNoV VLPs to pure-copper surfaces resulted in noticeable aggregation and destruction within 240 min, an 80% reduction in the VP1 major capsid protein band intensity in 15 min, and a near-complete loss of HBGA receptor binding within 8 min. In all experiments, HuNoV remained stable on stainless steel. These results suggest that copper surfaces destroy HuNoV and may be useful in preventing environmental transmission of the virus in at-risk settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Survival and growth of juvenile lost river suckers (Deltistes luxatus) challenged with a bacterial pathogen (Flavobacterium columnaris) during exposure to sublethal ammonia concentrations at pH 9.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 30 September to 1 December 1999, we tested survival and growth of Lost River suckers (Deltistes luxatus) that were exposed for 62 days to sublethal ammonia...

  9. Analysis of cell cycle regulated and regulating proteins following exposure of lung derived cells to sub-lethal doses of a-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, D.; Claudio, P. P.; Cassone, M.; Lucchetti, C.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Introduction Since the last century mankind had to face an increased exposure to man made and natural sources of radiation Radiation represents a therapeutic instrument for radiosensitive cancers as well as a cytotoxic agent for normal human tissues The effects of prolonged exposure to low doses of high energy radiation are still not well-known at the molecular and clinical level Understanding their molecular effects will aid in developing more tailored therapeutic strategies as well as implementing radio-protective measures essential prerequisite for the long-time permanence of men in space Objective of the study The general aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility and the response of lung epithelial cells to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiations We decided to study a panel of epithelial bronchial cell lines because of their fast-growth rate and their prominent exposure to both environmental and medical radiations The specific objective of our study was to qualitatively and semi-quantitatively assess the involvement and behaviour of selected genes in DNA damage DNA-repair mechanisms and apoptosis which follow radiation exposure with the aim to determine the involvement of the most promising targets for the early detection of radiation-mediated lung damage before chronic disease develops Methods Four epithelial cell lines one normal and three neoplastic were selected in order to detect and compare survival cell cycle and protein expression differences related to their different genetic asset

  10. [Effect of copper sulphate on the lung damage induced by chronic intermittent exposure to ozone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún G, Manuel J; Sánchez R, Susan A; Dussaubat D, Nelson; Miller A, María E; González B, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Ozone exposure could increase lung damage induced by airborne particulate matter. Particulate matter lung toxicity has been attributed to its metallic content. To evaluate the acute effect of intratracheal administration of copper sulfate (CuSO4) on rat lungs previously damaged by a chronic intermittent ozone exposure. Two-months-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone four h per day, five days a week, during two months. CuSO4 was intratracheally instilled 20 h after ozone exposure. Controls breathed filtered air or were instilled with 0.9% NaCl or with CuSO4 or were only exposed to ozone. We evaluated lung histopathology. F2 isoprostanes were determined in plasma. Cell count, total proteins, γ glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatases (AP) were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Ozone increased total cell count, macrophages, proteins and AP in BALF (p Ozone plus CuSO4 exposed animals showed a neutrophil inflammatory lung response and an increase in total cell count, proteins, GGT and AP in BALF (p ozone induces a neutrophil pulmonary inflammatory response and cytoplasmic damage in macrophages.

  11. Influence of flow-through and renewal exposures on the toxicity of copper to rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Paul G; Lipton, Joshua; Mebane, Christopher A; Marr, John C A

    2008-02-01

    We examined changes in water chemistry and copper (Cu) toxicity in three paired renewal and flow-through acute bioassays with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Test exposure methodology influenced both exposure water chemistry and measured Cu toxicity. Ammonia and organic carbon concentrations were higher and the fraction of dissolved Cu lower in renewal tests than in paired flow-through tests. Cu toxicity was also lower in renewal tests; 96 h dissolved Cu LC(50) values were 7-60% higher than LC(50)s from matching flow-through tests. LC(50) values in both types of tests were related to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in exposure tanks. Increases in organic carbon concentrations in renewal tests were associated with reduced Cu toxicity, likely as a result of the lower bioavailability of Cu-organic carbon complexes. The biotic ligand model of acute Cu toxicity tended to underpredict toxicity in the presence of DOC. Model fits between predicted and observed toxicity were improved by assuming that only 50% of the measured DOC was reactive, and that this reactive fraction was present as fulvic acid.

  12. Toxicity of copper and zinc to Puntius parrah (Day, 1865).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciji, P P; Bijoy Nandan, S

    2014-02-01

    The toxicities of the trace metals copper and zinc on the fish Puntius parrah were assessed based on standard renewal bioassay methods, and the 96 h LC50 values for copper and zinc were 0.5 mg/L and 9 mg/L, respectively. The zinc and copper concentrations in water and sediment were high in a highly industrialized area compared with those in non-industrialized zones of the Periyar River. The fish exposed to a sublethal concentration of 0.05 mg/L of Cu and 0.9 mg/L of Zn showed a higher accumulation of both of the metals in the liver than in the kidneys, gills, and muscles. The histological changes induced by copper and zinc on the test organism under sublethal concentrations on the 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 28th -days of exposure were also studied. There was a significant decrease (p water bodies and aquatic organisms from trace metal pollution and its toxic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Histopathology biomarker responses in Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer (Bloch exposed to copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maharajan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Copper is a trace element necessary for the normal growth and metabolism of living organisms. If exceeds its limit it becomes pollutant and causes pathological effects. Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer was exposed to sublethal concentrations of copper for 28 days and histopathological alterations were noticed in the gill, liver, muscle and intestine. Epithelial necrosis, hypertrophy, rupture of gill epithelium and haemorrhage at primary lamellae were observed after 7 days of exposure. Lifting of epithelium, oedema and fusion of adjacent secondary lamellae were conspicuous at 28 days of exposure. The experimental liver tissue showed reduction in the size of hepatocytes, vacuolisation, and hypertrophy. The intestine displayed fused microvilli, sloughing of mucus membrane and swollen cells. Muscle bundles with severe oedema and their thickening and separation were more pronounced in sublethal treatment of copper in the muscle. Several histopathological changes observed in various fish organs would serve a useful purpose in evaluating the toxic effects of copper. The present study clearly demonstrated that all the treated body organs exhibited significant damage with response; amongst the body organs the liver is an important target organ for copper toxicity in L. calcarifer and this species could be possibly used as a model organism for toxicity studies.

  14. Sound production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and its alteration by exposure to aldicarb and copper sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ik Joon; Qiu, Xuchun; Moroishi, Junya; Oshima, Yuji

    2017-08-01

    This study is the first to report sound production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Sound production was affected by exposure to the carbamate insecticide (aldicarb) and heavy-metal compound (copper sulfate). Medaka were exposed at four concentrations (aldicarb: 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg L-1; copper sulfate: 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg L-1), and sound characteristics were monitored for 5 h after exposure. We observed constant average interpulse intervals (approx 0.2 s) in all test groups before exposure, and in the control groups throughout the experiment. The average interpulse interval became significantly longer during the recording periods after 50 min of exposure to aldicarb, and reached a length of more than 0.3 s during the recording periods after 120 min exposure. Most medaka fish stopped to produce sound after 50 min of exposure to copper sulfate at 1 and 2 mg L-1, resulting in significantly declined number of sound pulses and pulse groups. Relative shortened interpulse intervals of sound were occasionally observed in medaka fish exposed to 0.5 mg L-1 copper sulfate. These alternations in sound characteristics due to toxicants exposure suggested that they might impair acoustic communication of medaka fish, which may be important for their reproduction and survival. Our results suggested that using acoustic changes of medaka has potential to monitor precipitate water pollutions, such as intentional poisoning or accidental leakage of industrial waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of copper pre-exposure on biochemical responses of the sea anemone Bunodosoma cangicum to changes in oxygen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujamara, Laís Donini; Prazeres, Martina de Freitas; Borges, Vinícius Dias; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-05-01

    The influence of copper on the ability of the intertidal sea anemone Bunodosoma cangicum to cope with reactive oxygen species generation associated with changes in oxygen availability was evaluated. Sea anemones were kept under control condition or pre-exposed (96 h) to dissolved copper (6.1 μg ± 2.7 μg/L) and then subjected to a 6-h period of hypoxia (0.5mg O₂/L) followed by a 6-h period of re-oxygenation (7.5mg O₂/L). Antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, lipid peroxidation (LPO) level, and ATP concentration were evaluated. Control sea anemones showed variations in SOD and LPO while copper pre-exposed sea anemones displayed changes in ACAP, GSH, LPO and ATP. However, no clear pattern of change over time was observed. ACAP was lower in copper pre-exposed sea anemones than in the control ones during hypoxia and recovery. SOD activity was increased during hypoxia and reduced shortly after recovery in control sea anemones. GSH concentration was higher in copper pre-exposed sea anemones than in the control ones in all experimental conditions. The LPO level increased shortly after recovery in both groups of sea anemones, being higher in control sea anemones than in copper pre-exposed ones. ATP concentration showed transient changes in copper pre-exposed sea anemones, being lower in these sea anemones than in control ones during recovery. These findings suggest that B. cangicum possess mechanisms to prevent oxidative stress generated by changes in oxygen availability associated with the tidal cycle, which can be disturbed by pre-exposure to copper. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sublethal and Reproductive Effects of Acute and Chronic Exposure to Flowback and Produced Water from Hydraulic Fracturing on the Water Flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Delompré, Perrine L M; He, Yuhe; Folkerts, Erik J; Flynn, Shannon L; Alessi, Daniel S; Goss, Greg G

    2017-03-07

    Hydraulic fracturing is an industrial process allowing for the extraction of gas or oil. To fracture the rocks, a proprietary mix of chemicals is injected under high pressure, which later returns to the surface as flowback and produced water (FPW). FPW is a complex chemical mixture consisting of trace metals, organic compounds, and often, high levels of salts. FPW toxicity to the model freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna was characterized utilizing acute (48 h median lethal concentrations; LC50) and chronic (21 day) exposures. A decrease in reproduction was observed, with a mean value of 18.5 neonates produced per replicate over a 21 day chronic exposure to 0.04% FPW, which was a significant decrease from the average of 64 neonates produced in the controls. The time to first brood was delayed in the highest FPW (0.04%) treatment. Neonates exhibited an LC50 of 0.19% of full-strength FPW, making them more sensitive than adults, which displayed an LC50 value of 0.75%. Quantitative PCR highlighted significant changes in expression of genes encoding xenobiotic metabolism (cyp4) and moulting (cut). This study is the first to characterize chronic FPW toxicity and will help with the development of environmental monitoring and risk assessment of FPW spills.

  17. Sublethal Heavy Metal Stress Stimulates Innate Immunity in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of sublethal heavy metal stress as plant biotic elicitor for triggering innate immunity in tomato plant was investigated. Copper in in vivo condition induced accumulation of defense enzymes like peroxidase (PO, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, and β-1,3 glucanase along with higher accumulation of total phenol, antioxidative enzymes (catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, and total chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the treatment also induced nitric oxide (NO production which was confirmed by realtime visualization of NO burst using a fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA and spectrophotometric analysis. The result suggested that the sublethal dose of heavy metal can induce an array of plant defense responses that lead to the improvement of innate immunity in plants.

  18. Quantifying fish swimming behavior in response to acute exposure of aqueous copper using computer assisted video and digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, Robin D.; Puglis, Holly J.; Little, Edward E.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors.

  19. Occupational exposure to chromium, copper and arsenic during work with impregnated wood in joinery shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, O; Nilsson, C A; Lindahl, R

    1992-10-01

    CCA-impregnated timber contains copper, chromium and arsenic (CCA), and occupational exposure to wood dust as well as the CCA compounds may occur in work with such timber. Dust from commercially available impregnated wood has been found to contain hexavalent chromium, which is regarded as a carcinogen. Apart from determinations of the total amounts of the CCA compounds, specific determination of hexavalent chromium is therefore essential. Selective methods have been applied for control of the work environment in six joinery shops. The mean exposure to wood dust was found to be below 1 mg m-3. The mean airborne concentration of arsenic around various types of joinery machines was in the range from 0.54 to 3.1 micrograms m-3. No hexavalent chromium was detected in any samples and no increased concentrations of arsenic were found in urine from the workers. The presence of arsenic in the work-room air must be considered for appropriate assessment of the occupational environment in joinery shops.

  20. Hematological and physiological changes induced by short-term exposure to copper in the freshwater fish, Prochilodus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAZON A. F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological and physiological changes in the blood of juveniles of the freshwater fish, Prochilodus scrofa were determined after acute exposure to 20, 25, and 29 mugCu L-1 in water (pH 7.5; hardness 24.5 mg L-1 as CaCO3 for 96 h. Copper exposure to 25 and 29 mugCu L-1 caused significant increase in the hematocrit and red blood cell values. The increase in red blood cells was associated with increase in whole blood hemoglobin only in fish exposed to 29 mugCu L-1. Leukocytes increased following copper exposure and were significantly higher in fish exposed to 29 mugCu L-1. Differential leukocyte percentage displayed significant reduction in lymphocytes and an increase in neutrophils in fish exposed to 25 and 29 mugCu L-1. The percentage of monocytes remained unchanged after copper exposure. The thrombocytes did not change. There was a significant decrease in plasma [Na+] and [Cl-] and a significant drop in blood pH in fish exposed to 25 and 29 mugCu L-1 while [K+] showed significant increase in fish exposed to 29 mugCu L-1. Copper exposure led to ionoregulatory impairment, although chloride cell hypertrophy was induced. The changes in red blood cells suggest a compensatory response to respiratory surface reduction of gills (tissue damage and cell proliferation in order to maintain oxygen transference from water to the tissues, allowing the fish to survive during the so-called shock phase of LC50 exposure, at least while at rest.

  1. Effects of Short-Term Exposure to Sublethal Concentrations of Silver Nanoparticles on Histopathology and Electron Microscope Ultrastructure of Zebrafish (Danio Rerio Gills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Mansouri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing use of nanomaterials and nanoproducts has increased the possibility of contamination of the environment, which may have adverse effects on different organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of silver nanoparticles on histopathology and gill ultrastructure of zebrafish (Danio rerio under laboratory conditions. Methods: Zebrafish were exposed to four concentrations of silver nanoparticles (0.0015, 0.00375, 0.0075, and 0.015 mg/l for a period of 4 days. Gill ultrastructure and histopathological changes were studied using scanning electron microscope and haematoxylin - eosin staining. Results: Exposure to silver nanoparticles significantly (P < 0.001 increased the diameter of gill filaments and secondary lamellae, while silver nanoparticles significantly reduced the length of the secondary gills in zebrafish. Moreover, other changes such as vacuolization, dilated and clubbed tips, hyperplasia, edema, fusion, swelling of mucocytes, hypertrophy, and necrosis were observed. The effects of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish gills were dose dependent. Conclusion: Based on the adverse effects of AgNPs on zebrafish gills, silver nanoparticle solutions can be hazardous pollutants for the environment.

  2. Pesticidal copper (I) oxide: environmental fate and aquatic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaune, Lina; Singhasemanon, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Besides being a naturally occurring element and an essential micronutrient, copper is used as a pesticide, but at generally higher concentrations. Copper, unlike organic pesticides, does not degrade, but rather enters a complex biogeochemical cycle. In the water column, copper can exist bound to both organic and inorganic species and as free or hydrated copper ions. Water column chemistry affects copper speciation and bioavailability. In all water types (saltwater, brackish water, and freshwater), organic ligands in the water column can sequester the majority of dissolved copper, and therefore, organic ligands play the largest role in copper bioavailability. In freshwater, however, the geochemistry of a particular location, including water column characteristics such as water hardness and pH, is a significant factor that can increase copper bioavailability and toxicity. In most cases, organic ligand concentrations greatly exceed copper ion concentrations in the water column and therefore provide a large buffering capacity. Hence, copper bioavailability can be grossly overestimated if it is based on total dissolved copper (TDCu) concentrations alone. Other factors that influence copper concentrations include location in the water column, season, temperature, depth, and level of dissolved oxygen. For example, concentrations of bioavailable copper may be significantly higher in the bottom waters and sediment pore waters, where organic ligands degrade much faster and dissolved copper is constantly resuspended and recycled into the aquatic system. Aquatic species differ greatly in their sensitivity to copper. Some animals, like mollusks, can tolerate high concentrations of the metal, while others are adversely affected by very low concentrations of copper. Emerging evidence shows that very low, sublethal copper levels can adversely affect the sense of smell and behavior of fish. The developmental stage of the fish at the time of copper exposure is critical to the

  3. Induction of biotransformation in the liver of Eel (Anguilla anguilla L. ) by sublethal exposure to dinitro-o-cresol: An ultrastructural and biochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunbeck, T.; Voelkl, A. (Department of Zoology I, University of Heidelberg (Germany))

    1991-04-01

    Structural and functional alterations in hepatocytes of the European eel, Anguilla anguilla, following a 4-week-exposure to 5, 50, and 250 micrograms/liter dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC) were investigated by means of electron microscopy and biochemistry and compared to liver pathology in eels exposed to the chemical spill into the Rhine river at Basle in November 1986. Whereas phenological parameters (growth, condition factor) are unaffected, ultrastructural and biochemical alterations are detectable at greater than or equal to 50 and 5 micrograms/liter DNOC, respectively. Structural modifications include: rounding-up of the nuclei; fractionation and reduction of the rough endoplasmic reticulum; proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes; bundles of rod-shaped SER profiles; annulate lamellae; membrane whorls within mitochondria; crystallization of the peroxisomal matrix and glycogen bodies; glycogen depletion and lipid augmentation. Structural changes can be correlated to an increase in hepatic lipid and protein contents as well as stimulation of mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase), peroxisomal (catalase, allantoinase, uricase), lysosomal (arylsulfatase), and microsomal (esterase) enzymes. An increase in NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P450 as well as UDP-glucuronyltransferase and arylsulfotransferase activities in the microsomal fraction document an induction of hepatic biotransformation as a functional correlate to SER proliferation. Maximum inducibility of biotransformation enzymes at 50 micrograms/liter indicates a biphasic, concentration-dependent reaction of eel liver. Comparison of DNOC-induced effects with liver pathology in eel exposed to the chemical spill in 1986 reveals striking similarities so that DNOC may not be excluded as a possible factor in the fish kill in the Rhine river.

  4. Sinclair and Dyes Inlets Toxicity Study: An Assessment of Copper Bioavailability and Toxicity in Surface Waters Adjacent to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    and Corneillie, 2006). In the recent update of copper criteria recommended for fresh water (U.S. EPA, 2003), EPA used the biotic ligand model (BLM... waters because of fecal coliform (FC) contamination in the marine waters and metals and organic contaminants in bottom sediments and fish tissues...conducted at Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) reported that juvenile salmonids were sensitive to Cu exposure in fresh water (sublethal olfactory

  5. The effects of copper on blood and biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethloff, G.M.; Schlenk, D.; Khan, S.; Bailey, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    Metals are released into aquatic systems from many sources, often at sublethal concentrations. The effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on fish are not entirely understood. The objective of this study was to determine the hematological and biochemical effects of a range of copper concentrations (6.4, 16.0, 26.9 ??g Cu/L) on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a prolonged period of time. Trout were exposed to copper, and, at intervals of 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, selected parameters were evaluated. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, and plasma cortisol levels were elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L at day 3 and then returned to levels comparable to control fish. Plasma protein and lactate levels were not significantly altered in trout from any copper treatment. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression were consistently elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L. Both of these parameters stabilized by day 3, with only hepatic copper concentration showing a further increase at day 21. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression appear to be robust indicators of copper exposure. Most blood-based parameters evaluated appear to be associated with a transitory, nonspecific stress response. The return of elevated hematological and biochemical parameters to control levels after 3 days and thestabilization of hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression and copper concentration over a similar time period suggested acclimation to dissolved copper at 26.9 ??g/L. Further analysis of the data on blood-based parameters indicated that certain parameters (hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, plasma cortisol) may be useful in field monitoring.

  6. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part I: Relative importance of water and sediment as exposure routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramskov, Tina; Thit, Amalie; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2015-07-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, and likely released into the aquatic environment. Both aqueous (i.e., dissolved Cu) and particulate Cu can be taken up by organisms. However, how exposure routes influence the bioavailability and subsequent toxicity of Cu remains largely unknown. Here, we assess the importance of exposure routes (water and sediment) and Cu forms (aqueous and nanoparticulate) on Cu bioavailability and toxicity to the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, a head-down deposit-feeder. We characterize the bioaccumulation dynamics of Cu in L. variegatus across a range of exposure concentrations, covering both realistic and worst-case levels of Cu contamination in the environment. Both aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq; administered as Cu(NO3)2) and nanoparticulate Cu (CuO NPs), whether dispersed in artificial moderately hard freshwater or mixed into sediment, were weakly accumulated by L. variegatus. Once incorporated into tissues, Cu elimination was negligible, i.e., elimination rate constants were in general not different from zero for either exposure route or either Cu form. Toxicity was only observed after waterborne exposure to Cu-Aq at very high concentration (305μgL(-1)), where all worms died. There was no relationship between exposure route, Cu form or Cu exposure concentration on either worm survival or growth. Slow feeding rates and low Cu assimilation efficiency (approximately 30%) characterized the uptake of Cu from the sediment for both Cu forms. In nature, L. variegatus is potentially exposed to Cu via both water and sediment. However, sediment progressively becomes the predominant exposure route for Cu in L. variegatus as Cu partitioning to sediment increases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete: Part I: relative importance of water and sediment as exposure routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramskov, Tina; Thit, Amalie; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, and likely released into the aquatic environment. Both aqueous (i.e., dissolved Cu) and particulate Cu can be taken up by organisms. However, how exposure routes influence the bioavailability and subsequent toxicity of Cu remains largely unknown. Here, we assess the importance of exposure routes (water and sediment) and Cu forms (aqueous and nanoparticulate) on Cu bioavailability and toxicity to the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, a head-down deposit-feeder. We characterize the bioaccumulation dynamics of Cu in L. variegatus across a range of exposure concentrations, covering both realistic and worst-case levels of Cu contamination in the environment. Both aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq; administered as Cu(NO3)2) and nanoparticulate Cu (CuO NPs), whether dispersed in artificial moderately hard freshwater or mixed into sediment, were weakly accumulated by L. variegatus. Once incorporated into tissues, Cu elimination was negligible, i.e., elimination rate constants were in general not different from zero for either exposure route or either Cu form. Toxicity was only observed after waterborne exposure to Cu-Aq at very high concentration (305 µgL-1), where all worms died. There was no relationship between exposure route, Cu form or Cu exposure concentration on either worm survival or growth. Slow feeding rates and low Cu assimilation efficiency (approximately 30%) characterized the uptake of Cu from the sediment for both Cu forms. In nature, L. variegatus is potentially exposed to Cu via both water and sediment. However, sediment progressively becomes the predominant exposure route for Cu in L. variegatus as Cu partitioning to sediment increases.

  8. Comparative toxicity and biodistribution assessments in rats following subchronic oral exposure to copper nanoparticles and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Chul; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Je-Hein; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2016-10-28

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) have great potential in electronics and biomedical fields because of their efficient thermodynamic and anti-microbial properties. However, their potential toxic effects and kinetic data following repeated exposure are still unclear. We evaluated the physicochemical properties of Cu NPs (25 nm) and copper microparticles (Cu MPs, 14-25 μm). Comparative in vivo toxicity of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was evaluated by conducting a 28-day repeated oral dose study at equivalent dose levels of 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day (vehicle, 1 % hydroxypropyl methylcellulose). We determined Cu levels in the blood, tissues, urine, and feces by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The solubility of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was 84.5 and 17.2 %, respectively, in an acidic milieu; however, they scarcely dissolved in vehicle or intestinal milieus. The specific surface area of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was determined to be 14.7 and 0.16 m(2)/g, respectively. Cu NPs exhibited a dose-dependent increase of Cu content in the blood and tested organs, with particularly high levels of Cu in the liver, kidney, and spleen. Only for liver and kidney increased Cu levels were found in Cu MPs-treated rats. Cu NPs caused a dose-related increase in Cu levels in urine, whereas Cu MPs did not affect the urine Cu levels. Extremely high levels of Cu were detected in the feces of Cu MPs-treated rats, whereas much lower levels were detected in the feces of Cu NPs-treated rats. A comparative in vivo toxicity study showed that Cu NPs caused damages to red blood cells, thymus, spleen, liver, and kidney at ≥200 mg/kg/days, but Cu MPs did not cause any adverse effects even at the highest dose. Overall, the in vivo repeated dose toxicity study of Cu NPs and Cu MPs demonstrated that large surface area and high solubility in physiological milieus could directly influence the toxicological responses and biodistribution of Cu particles when administered orally. Under these experimental

  9. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete – Part I: Relative importance of water and sediment as exposure routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramskov, Tina, E-mail: tramskov@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, PO Box 260, Universitetsvej 1, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Thit, Amalie, E-mail: athitj@ruc.dk [Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, PO Box 260, Universitetsvej 1, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Croteau, Marie-Noële, E-mail: mcroteau@usgs.gov [US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Selck, Henriette, E-mail: selck@ruc.dk [Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, PO Box 260, Universitetsvej 1, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); US Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Both aqueous and nanoparticulate Cu forms are available for uptake by L. variegatus. • Cu accumulation is driven by both water and sediment uptake. • Cu form weakly influences Cu biodynamics in L. variegatus. • Food ingestion rate is a sensitive endpoint for dietborne Cu exposure. • Stable isotope tracers allow detecting accumulation after environmentally relevant exposures. - Abstract: Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, and likely released into the aquatic environment. Both aqueous (i.e., dissolved Cu) and particulate Cu can be taken up by organisms. However, how exposure routes influence the bioavailability and subsequent toxicity of Cu remains largely unknown. Here, we assess the importance of exposure routes (water and sediment) and Cu forms (aqueous and nanoparticulate) on Cu bioavailability and toxicity to the freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, a head-down deposit-feeder. We characterize the bioaccumulation dynamics of Cu in L. variegatus across a range of exposure concentrations, covering both realistic and worst-case levels of Cu contamination in the environment. Both aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq; administered as Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) and nanoparticulate Cu (CuO NPs), whether dispersed in artificial moderately hard freshwater or mixed into sediment, were weakly accumulated by L. variegatus. Once incorporated into tissues, Cu elimination was negligible, i.e., elimination rate constants were in general not different from zero for either exposure route or either Cu form. Toxicity was only observed after waterborne exposure to Cu-Aq at very high concentration (305 μg L{sup −1}), where all worms died. There was no relationship between exposure route, Cu form or Cu exposure concentration on either worm survival or growth. Slow feeding rates and low Cu assimilation efficiency (approximately 30%) characterized the uptake of Cu from the sediment for both Cu forms. In nature, L. variegatus is potentially exposed to Cu

  10. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha

    2013-11-01

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiCf composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  11. Copper-Based Aquatic Algaecide Adsorption and Accumulation Kinetics: Influence of Exposure Concentration and Duration for Controlling the Cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, West M; Lynch, Clayton L; Willis, Ben E; Cope, W Gregory

    2017-09-01

    Filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria are increasingly impairing uses of freshwater resources. To effectively manage, a better understanding of control measures is needed. Copper (Cu)-based algaecide formulations are often applied to reactively control nuisance cyanobacterial blooms. This laboratory research assessed typical field exposure scenarios for the ability of Cu to partition to, and accumulate in Lyngbya wollei. Exposure factors (Cu concentration × duration) of 4, 8, 16, 24, 32 h were tested across three aqueous Cu concentrations (1, 2, 4 ppm). Results indicated that internally accumulated copper correlated with control of L. wollei, independent of adsorbed copper. L. wollei control was determined by filament viability and chlorophyll a concentrations. Similar exposure factors elicited similar internalized copper levels and consequent responses of L. wollei. Ultimately, a "concentration-exposure-time" (CET) model was created to assist water resource managers in selecting an appropriate treatment regime for a specific in-water infestation. By assessing the exposure concentration and duration required to achieve the internal threshold of copper (i.e., critical burden) that elicits control, water management objectives can be achieved while simultaneously decreasing the environmental loading of copper and potential for non-target species risks.

  12. Evaluation and simulation of silver and copper nanoparticle migration from polyethylene nanocomposites to food and an associated exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, M; Kerry, J; Morris, M; Cruz-Romero, M; Cummins, E

    2014-02-12

    Silver nanoparticles (nanosilver) and copper nanoparticles (nanocopper) exhibit antimicrobial activity and have been incorporated into polymers to create antimicrobial packaging materials. Their use in conjunction with food has caused concerns regarding the potential risk of particle migration, resulting in human exposure to nanoparticles. A migration experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of time and temperature on the migration of nanosilver and nanocopper particles from polyethylene (PE) nanocomposites to boneless chicken breasts. Migration of silver ranged from 0.003 to 0.005 mg/dm², while migration of copper ranged from 0.024 to 0.049 mg/dm², for a set of four different scenarios representing typical storage conditions. Effects of time and temperature were not significant (p > 0.1). A migration and exposure model was developed on the basis of mathematical relationships defining migratability and subsequent migratables using the Williams-Landel-Ferry equation for time-temperature superposition. The results of the model accurately predicted the nanosilver levels detected in the laboratory migration tests (R values ranging from 0.43 to 0.99); however, the model was less accurate in predicting nanocopper levels (R values ranging from 0.65 to 0.99), probably because of the highly variable background levels of copper observed in the real food matrix. The 95th percentile of the simulated human exposure to nanosilver based on laboratory experimental results of four scenarios ranged from 5.89 × 10⁻⁵ to 8.9 × 10⁻⁵ mg kg(bw)⁻¹ day⁻¹. For the measured migration of copper under the same storage conditions, the exposure ranged from 2.26 × 10⁻⁵ to 1.17 × 10⁻⁴ mg kg(bw)⁻¹ day⁻¹. This study highlights the potential migration of nanoparticles from PE composite packaging to a food material and the potential for simulation models to accurately capture this migration potential; however, variable background levels of copper in the

  13. Lethal copper concentration levels for Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822 @ a preliminary study

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    Marinda Van der Merwe

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Lethal copper concentrations were determined for both adult and juvenile Clarias gariepinus at representative mean summer and winter temperatures. Fish were exposed to copper for 96 hours in an experimental system and mortalities monitored. Toxicity curves of percentage mortality versus actual copper concentration were drawn, and the LC50 calculated for winter and summer temperatures. The lethal copper concentrations, expressed as LC50, found in laboratory exposures, ranged for adults from 1,29 mg/1 during summer to 1,38 mg/1 in winter. These values are considerably higher than the levels of copper in the water of the Olifants River in the Kruger National Park during summer (0,055 @ 0,016 mg/1 and winter (0,085 @ 0,032 mg/1. The derived LC50 values predict the level of copper which should be prevented at all cost. The fish in the Olifants River are already exposed to sublethal concentrations (40 of LC50 of copper. The results can be used as an indication of what the safe concentrations of copper should be.

  14. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine benthic invertebrates and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changkeun; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Jongseong; Park, Young-Gyu; Kang, Seong-Gil; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-08-01

    Concern about leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep-sea storage in geological reservoirs is increasing because of its possible adverse effects on marine organisms locally or at nearby coastal areas both in sediment and water column. In the present study, we examined how elevated CO2 affects various intertidal epibenthic (benthic copepod), intertidal endobenthic (Manila clam and Venus clam), sub-tidal benthic (brittle starfish), and free-living (marine medaka) organisms in areas expected to be impacted by leakage. Acute lethal and sub-lethal effects were detected in the adult stage of all test organisms exposed to varying concentrations of CO2, due to the associated decline in pH (8.3 to 5.2) during 96-h exposure. However, intertidal organisms (such as benthic copepods and clams) showed remarkable resistance to elevated CO2, with the Venus clam being the most tolerant (LpH50 = 5.45). Sub-tidal species (such as brittle starfish [LpH50 = 6.16] and marine medaka [LpH50 = 5.91]) were more sensitive to elevated CO2 compared to intertidal species, possibly because they have fewer defensive capabilities. Of note, the exposure duration might regulate the degree of acute sub-lethal effects, as evidenced by the Venus clam, which showed a time-dependent effect to elevated CO2. Finally, copper was chosen as a model toxic element to find out the synergistic or antagonistic effects between ocean acidification and metal pollution. Combination of CO2 and Cu exposure enhances the adverse effects to organisms, generally supporting a synergistic effect scenario. Overall, the significant variation in the degree to which CO2 adversely affected organisms (viz., working range and strength) was clearly observed, supporting the general concept of species-dependent effects of elevated CO2.

  15. Copper-Induced Spermatozoa Head Malformation Is Related to Oxidative Damage to Testes in CD-1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo-Wei; Zhi-GangTan; Qiao, Na; Kang, Zhen-Long; Chen, Zhi-Ling; Hu, Lian-Mei; Yang, Zeng-Ming; Li, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The molecular mechanism for copper toxicity on spermatozoa quality in mice is not well understood. In a 4-week experiment, we challenged 24, 6-week-old male CD-1 mice with twice-a-week intraperitoneal copper chloride injections and evaluated spermatozoa quality, copper levels in the testes, serum testosterone, the expression of key antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5), and the regulated androgen receptor (AR) in the mice testes. We compared these outcomes for four groups of six mice given doses of 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg weight copper chloride twice a week for 4 weeks. The mice demonstrated a copper increase spermatozoa head malformation in a dose-response manner. However, we observed no changes in spermatozoa viability and acrosome integrity in the ratio of mouse body weight to testes weight or in the histomorphology of the testes as the average copper level increased. Results of our RT-PCR assays, immunohistochemical tests, ELISA, and histochemistry analyses indicated that testis GPx5 expression was increased, AR expression in the testes was decreased, serum testosterone was decreased, and the activity of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was decreased as the copper dose increased. In conclusion, these data show that sublethal exposure to copper induces spermatozoa head malformation and influences both mRNA and protein levels of GPx5 and AR which is related to copper resides in the testes.

  16. Mortality, bioaccumulation and physiological responses in juvenile freshwater mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) chronically exposed to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marianna B; Loro, Vania L; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M; Gillis, Patricia L

    2013-01-15

    Several studies have indicated that the early life stages of freshwater mussels are among the most sensitive aquatic organisms to inorganic chemicals, including copper. However, little is known about the toxic mode of action and sub-lethal effects of copper exposure in this group of imperiled animals. In this study, the physiological effects of long-term copper exposure (survival, growth, copper bioaccumulation, whole-body ion content, oxygen consumption, filtration rate, ATPase activities, and biomarkers of oxidative stress) were evaluated in juvenile (6 month old) mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). The mussels' recovery capacity and their ability to withstand further acute copper challenge were also evaluated in secondary experiments following the 28 day exposure by assessing survival, copper bioaccumulation and whole-body ion content. Mussels chronically exposed to 2 and 12 μg Cu/L showed significantly higher mortality than those held under control conditions (mortality 20.9, 69.9 and 12.5%, respectively), indicating that juvenile L. siliquoidea is underprotected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) biotic ligand model (BLM)-derived chronic water quality criteria (WQC) (2.18 μg Cu/L) and the hardness-derived USEPA WQC (12.16 μg Cu/L). Soft tissue copper burden increased equally for both copper exposures, suggesting that chronic toxicity is not associated with copper bioaccumulation. Several physiological disturbances were also observed during chronic copper exposure. Most relevant was a decrease in whole-body sodium content paralleled by an inhibition of Na(+) K(+)-ATPase activity, indicating a metal-induced ionoregulatory disturbance. Filtration and oxygen consumption rates were also affected. Redox parameters (reactive oxygen production, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, and glutathione (GSH) concentration) did not show clear responses, but membrane damage as lipid peroxidation (LPO) was

  17. Pesticides and Arthropods: Sublethal Effects and Demographic Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Marčić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecticides and acaricides designed to control primary harmful insects and mites may also variously affect some other arthopods present in an (agroecosystem (e.g. secondary pests, predators, parasitoids, saprophytes, bioindicators, pollinators. Apart from insecticides and acaricides, arthropods may also be affected by the activity of other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, etc.. Regardless of whether they are deemed desirable or not, the effects that pesticides have on arthopods need to be quantified as closely as possible through appropriate experimental procedures. Data acquired in tests designed to determined LD50/LC50 values are inadequate for evaluation of pesticide effectiveness in the field as pesticidesalso cause various sublethal effects, generally disregarded in such investigations. The sublethal effects of pesticides refer to any altered behaviour and/or physiology of individuals that have survived exposure to pesticides at doses/concentrations that can be lethal(within range causing mortality in an experimental population that exceeds mortality in an untreated population or sublethal (below that range. Pesticides affect locomotion and mobility, stimulate dispersion of arthropods from treated areas, complicate or prevent their navigation, orientation and ability to locate hosts, and cause changes in their feeding, mating and egg-laying patterns. Sublethal pesticide effects on arthropod physiology reflect on the life span, rate of development, fecundity and/or fertility, sex ratio and immunity of surviving individuals. Different parameters are being used in arthropod bioassays to determine sublethal effects (ED50/EC50, LOEC, NOEC, total effect index. Compared to acute toxicity tests, these parameters improve the quality of evaluation and create a more accurate view of the effects of a pesticide. However, such approach covers mainly fecundity/fertility alone, while all other sublethal effects remain unaccounted for. Besides, it

  18. Effect of dietary Spirulina on reduction of copper toxicity and improvement of growth, blood parameters and phosphatases activities in carp, Cirrhinus mrigala (Hamilton, 1822).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R; Sampath, K; Nagarajan, R; Vellaisamy, P; Manikandan, M Maripandi

    2009-09-01

    The effect of Spirulina supplementation on reduction of copper toxicity based on food utilization, phosphatases activities and selected haematological parameters was studied in a freshwater cultivable fish C. mrigala. Metal concentration in medium, body tissues and fecal matter was also analysed. Sublethal exposure of C. mrigala fed Spirulina-free diet significantly reduced the consumption and growth rates, phosphatases activities and haematological parameters. However, the above parameters enhanced in the copper exposed fish fed with Spirulina supplemented diets. A significant positive correlation was obtained for the relationship between supplementation of dietary Spirulina and copper defecation through feces. Among the doses of Spirulina supplementation, 6% addition has been considered optimum for C. mrigala since this dose produces maximum elimination of copper from the body and feces and better improvement on growth, phosphatases activities and haematological parameters.

  19. Proteomic and physiological responses of Kineococcus radiotolerans to copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Bagwell

    Full Text Available Copper is a highly reactive, toxic metal; consequently, transport of this metal within the cell is tightly regulated. Intriguingly, the actinobacterium Kineococcus radiotolerans has been shown to not only accumulate soluble copper to high levels within the cytoplasm, but the phenotype also correlated with enhanced cell growth during chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. This study offers a first glimpse into the physiological and proteomic responses of K. radiotolerans to copper at increasing concentration and distinct growth phases. Aerobic growth rates and biomass yields were similar over a range of Cu(II concentrations (0-1.5 mM in complex medium. Copper uptake coincided with active cell growth and intracellular accumulation was positively correlated with Cu(II concentration in the growth medium (R(2=0.7. Approximately 40% of protein coding ORFs on the K. radiotolerans genome were differentially expressed in response to the copper treatments imposed. Copper accumulation coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in oxidative stress and defense, DNA stabilization and repair, and protein turnover. Interestingly, the specific activity of superoxide dismutase was repressed by low to moderate concentrations of copper during exponential growth, and activity was unresponsive to perturbation with paraquot. The biochemical response pathways invoked by sub-lethal copper concentrations are exceptionally complex; though integral cellular functions are preserved, in part, through the coordination of defense enzymes, chaperones, antioxidants and protective osmolytes that likely help maintain cellular redox. This study extends our understanding of the ecology and physiology of this unique actinobacterium that could potentially inspire new biotechnologies in metal recovery and sequestration, and environmental restoration.

  20. Transcriptional response of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam. following exposure to heat stress and copper.

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    Alessandro Negri

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major factor that may affect biological organization, especially in marine ecosystems and in coastal areas that are particularly subject to anthropogenic pollution. We evaluated the effects of simultaneous changes in temperature and copper concentrations on lysosomal membrane stability (N-acetyl-hexosaminidase activity and malondialdehyde accumulation (MDA in the gill of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam.. Temperature and copper exerted additive effects on lysosomal membrane stability, exacerbating the toxic effects of metal cations present in non-physiological concentrations. Mussel lysosomal membrane stability is known to be positively related to scope for growth, indicating possible effects of increasing temperature on mussel populations in metal-polluted areas. To clarify the molecular response to environmental stressors, we used a cDNA microarray with 1,673 sequences to measure the relative transcript abundances in the gills of mussels exposed to copper (40 µg/L and a temperature gradient (16°C, 20°C, and 24°C. In animals exposed only to heat stress, hierarchical clustering of the microarray data revealed three main clusters, which were largely dominated by down-regulation of translation-related differentially expressed genes, drastic up-regulation of protein folding related genes, and genes involved in chitin metabolism. The response of mussels exposed to copper at 24°C was characterized by an opposite pattern of the genes involved in translation, most of which were up-regulated, as well as the down-regulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins and "microtubule-based movement" proteins. Our data provide novel information on the transcriptomic modulations in mussels facing temperature increases and high copper concentrations; these data highlight the risk of marine life exposed to toxic chemicals in the presence of temperature increases due to climate change.

  1. Induction of expression of a 14-3-3 gene in response to copper exposure in the marine alga, Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jennifer R; Morris, Ceri A; Nicolaus, Beate; Harwood, John L; Kille, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The macro-alga Fucus vesiculosus has a broad global and estuarine distribution and exhibits exceptional resistance to toxic metals, the molecular basis of which is poorly understood. To address this issue a cDNA library was constructed from an environmental isolate of F. vesiculosus growing in an area with chronic copper pollution. Characterisation of this library led to the identification of a cDNA encoding a protein known to be synthesised in response to toxicity, a full length 14-3-3 exhibiting a 71% identity to human/mouse epsilon isoform, 70-71% identity to yeast BMH1/2 and 95 and 71% identity to the Ectocarpus siliculosus 14-3-3 isoforms 1 and 2 respectively. Preliminary characterisation of the expression profile of the 14-3-3 indicated concentration- and time-dependent inductions on acute exposure of F. vesiculosus of copper (3-30 μg/l). Higher concentrations of copper (≥150 μg/l) did not elicit significant induction of the 14-3-3 gene compared with the control even though levels of both intracellular copper and the expression of a cytosolic metal chaperone, metallothionein, continued to rise. Analysis of gene expression within environmental isolates demonstrated up-regulation of the 14-3-3 gene associated with the known copper pollution gradient. Here we report for the first time, identification of a gene encoding a putative 14-3-3 protein in a multicellular alga and provide preliminary evidence to link the induction of this 14-3-3 gene to copper exposure in this alga. Interestingly, the threshold exposure profile may be associated with a decrease in the organism's ability to control copper influx so that it perceives copper as a toxic response.

  2. Radiation-induced bystander effects in the Atlantic salmon (salmo salar L.) following mixed exposure to copper and aluminum combined with low-dose gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin B. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway); Smith, Richard W. [McMaster University, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Department, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Heier, Lene Soerlie; Teien, Hans-Christian; Land, Ole Christian; Oughton, Deborah; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Aas (Norway)

    2014-03-15

    Very little is known about the combined effects of low doses of heavy metals and radiation. However, such ''multiple stressor'' exposure is the reality in the environment. In the work reported in this paper, fish were exposed to cobalt 60 gamma irradiation with or without copper or aluminum in the water. Doses of radiation ranged from 4 to 75 mGy delivered over 48 or 6 h. Copper doses ranged from 10 to 80 μg/L for the same time period. The aluminum dose was 250 μg/L. Gills and skin were removed from the fish after exposure and explanted in tissue culture flasks for investigation of bystander effects of the exposures using a stress signal reporter assay, which has been demonstrated to be a sensitive indicator of homeostatic perturbations in cells. The results show complex synergistic interactions of radiation and copper. Gills on the whole produce more toxic bystander signals than skin, but the additivity scores show highly variable results which depend on dose and time of exposure. The impacts of low doses of copper and low doses of radiation are greater than additive, medium levels of copper alone have a similar level of effect of bystander signal toxicity to the low dose. The addition of radiation stress, however, produces clear protective effects in the reporters treated with skin-derived medium. Gill-derived medium from the same fish did not show protective effects. Radiation exposure in the presence of 80 μg/L led to highly variable results, which due to animal variation were not significantly different from the effect of copper alone. The results are stressor type, stressor concentration and time dependent. Clearly co-exposure to radiation and heavy metals does not always lead to simple additive effects. (orig.)

  3. Effects of salinity on olfactory toxicity and behavioral responses of juvenile salmonids from copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Frank; Mudrock, Emma; Labenia, Jana; Baldwin, David

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved copper is one of the more pervasive and toxic constituents of stormwater runoff and is commonly found in stream, estuary, and coastal marine habitats of juvenile salmon. While stormwater runoff does not usually carry copper concentrations high enough to result in acute lethality, they are of concern because sublethal concentrations of copper exposure have been shown to both impair olfactory function and alter behavior in various species in freshwater. To compare these results to other environments that salmon are likely to encounter, experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of salinity on the impairment of olfactory function and avoidance of copper. Copper concentrations well within the range of those found in urban watersheds, have been shown to diminish or eliminate the olfactory response to the amino acid, l-serine in freshwater using electro-olfactogram (EOG) techniques. The olfactory responses of both freshwater-phase and seawater-phase coho and seawater-phase Chinook salmon, were tested in freshwater or seawater, depending on phase, and freshwater-phase coho at an intermediate salinity of 10‰. Both 10‰ salinity and full strength seawater protected against the effects of 50μg copper/L. In addition to impairing olfactory response, copper has also been shown to alter salmon behavior by causing an avoidance response. To determine whether copper will cause avoidance behavior at different salinities, experiments were conducted using a multi-chambered experimental tank. The circular tank was divided into six segments by water currents so that copper could be contained within one segment yet fish could move freely between them. The presence of individual fish in each of the segments was counted before and after introduction of dissolved copper (experiments were also conducted with a submerged structural element. The presence of sub-lethal levels of dissolved copper altered the behavior of juvenile Chinook salmon by inducing an avoidance

  4. Hepatocyte nuclear structure and subcellular distribution of copper in zebrafish Brachydanio rerio and roach Rutilus rutilus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) exposed to copper sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris-Palacios, Severine [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: severine.paris@univ-reims.fr; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), UFR Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, Institut International de Recherche sur les Ions Metalliques, B.P. 1039-51687 Reims cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: sylvie.biagianti@univ-reims.fr

    2006-05-10

    Copper is a trace element essential to life, but also a heavy metal with toxic effect clearly demonstrated. Cu induced perturbations in fish liver are well documented but the variability of the reported results is large. In this study two cyprinids, zebrafish and roach, were exposed to copper. Reported histocytological changes are either adaptative or degenerative depending on fish species, concentration of metal, and duration of exposure. Hepatic subcellular distribution of copper was determined by X-ray microanalysis in control and Cu-exposed roach and zebrafish. Sublethal copper sulphate contamination induced the development of a particular nucleolar alteration forming a network or honeycomb like structure in liver. This perturbation is observable in almost all the hepatocytes of zebrafish and roach exposed to copper for a minimum of 4 days of exposure. It seemed to concern more precisely the pars fibrosa. X-ray microanalysis showed that the appearance of network nucleolus was in relation to a Cu accumulation. Cu deposit was well located in the network as pars granulosa and nucloplasm showed very lower metal concentrations. The origin and consequence of network structure in nucleolus was discussed.

  5. Effect of Cadmium and Copper Exposure on Growth, Secondary Metabolites and Antioxidant Activity in the Medicinal Plant Sambung Nyawa (Gynura procumbens (Lour. Merr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A randomized complete block (RCBD study was designed to investigate the effects of cadmium (Cd and copper (Cu on the growth, bioaccumulation of the two heavy metals, metabolite content and antibacterial activities in Gyanura procumbens (Lour. Merr. Nine treatments including (1 control (no Cd and Cu; (2 Cd 2 = cadmium 2 mg/L; (3 Cd 4 = cadmium 4 mg/L; (4 Cu 70 = copper 70 mg/L; (5 Cu 140 = copper 140 mg/L; (6 Cd 2 + Cu 70 = cadmium 2 mg/L + copper 70 mg/L; (7 Cd 2 + Cu 140 = cadmium 2 mg/L + copper 70 mg/L; (8 Cd 4 + Cu 70 = cadmium 4 mg/L+ copper 70 mg/L and (9 Cd 4 + Cu 140 = cadmium 4 mg/L + copper 140 mg/L were evaluated in this experiment. It was found that the growth parameters (plant dry weight, total leaf area and basal diameter were reduced with the exposure to increased concentrations of Cd and Cu and further decreased under interaction between Cd and Cu. Production of total phenolics, flavonoids and saponin was observed to be reduced under combined Cd and Cu treatment. The reduction in the production of plant secondary metabolites might be due to lower phenyl alanine lyase (PAL activity under these conditions. Due to that, the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP and antibacterial activities was also found to be reduced by the combined treatments. The current experiments show that the medicinal properties of G. procumbens are reduced by cadmium and copper contamination. The accumulation of heavy metal also was found to be higher than the safety level recommended by the WHO in the single and combined treatments of Cd and Cu. These results indicate that exposure of G. procumbens to Cd and Cu contaminated soil may potentially harm consumers due to bioaccumulation of metals and reduced efficacy of the herbal product.

  6. Chronic effects of copper in oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis under different exposure regimes as shown by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2017-09-01

    Traditional metal toxicity tests on organisms have mainly focused on continuous exposure at a fixed concentration. However, organisms are more likely exposed to pollutants intermittently in estuarine environments that are significantly impacted by anthropogenic activity. The present study examined whether different copper (Cu) exposure regimes at an equivalent dose can induce different metabolomics effects on the oysters. An estuarine oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis was exposed to Cu continuously or intermittently at an equal dose (time × concentration) for 6 wk. Continuous exposure regimes included 2 doses of 3.3 μg/L for 24 h and 20 μg/L for 24 h, with corresponding equal doses of 2 intermittent exposure regimes of 20 μg/L for 4 h and 120 μg/L for 4 h, respectively. Time-course measurements suggested that Cu bioaccumulation was comparable at equal low doses between the continuous regime (3.3 μg/L for 24 h) and the intermittent regime (20 μg/L for 4 h), but there was considerable difference for the high dose under different regimes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics suggested that continuous and intermittent Cu exposures led to similar metabolite variation pattern in gills at an equal high dose, including decreased amino acids (e.g., aspartate, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, threonine, and valine), lower energy-related compounds (e.g., adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate, acetate, citrate, and glycogen), and altered osmolytes (e.g., homarine and taurine). These biomarkers indicated disturbance of osmotic regulation and energy metabolism induced by Cu exposure regardless of regime. In addition, the 4-h intermittent Cu exposure resulted in slightly fewer adverse effects compared with the corresponding equal-dose continuous exposure. Oysters appeared to recover during the intervals of Cu exposure. The results indicated that metabolomic effects induced by Cu were more dose dependent

  7. Testicular toxicity and sperm quality following copper exposure in Wistar albino rats: ameliorative potentials of L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushboo, Maurya; Murthy, Meesala Krishna; Devi, Maibam Sunita; Sanjeev, Sanasam; Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil; Roy, Vikas Kumar; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami

    2018-01-01

    Copper is a persistent toxic and bio-accumulative heavy metal of global concern. Continuous exposure of copper compounds of different origin is the most common form of copper poisoning and in turn adversely altering testis morphology and function and affecting sperm quality. L-carnitine has a vital role in the spermatogenesis, physiology of sperm, sperm production and quality. This study was designed to examine whether the detrimental effects of long-term copper consumption on sperm quality and testis function of Wistar albino rat could be prevented by L-carnitine therapy. The parameters included were sperm quality (concentration, viability, motility, and morphology), histopathology, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), serum urea, serum creatinine, serum testosterone and testis antioxidant enzyme levels (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase), and biomarkers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and expression of heat shock protein 70 in testis). Three-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 30) were divided into six groups as group 1 (G1, 0.9% saline control), group 2 (G2, CuSO4 200 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water), groups 3 and 4 (G3 and G4, L-carnitine 50 and 100 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water, respectively), and groups 5 and 6 (G5 and G6, CuSO 4 200 mg/kg plus L-carnitine, 50 and 100 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water, respectively). Doses of copper (200 mg/kg) and L-carnitine (50 and 100 mg/kg) alone and in combinations along with untreated control were administered orally for 30 days. The following morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations were observed due to chronic exposure of copper (200 mg/kg) to rats in comparison with the untreated control: (1) generation of oxidative stress through rise in testis lipid peroxidation (12.21 vs 3.5 nmol MDA equivalents/mg protein) and upregulation of heat shock protein (overexpression of HSP70 in testis), (2) liver and kidney

  8. Transcriptional profiling reveals gene expression changes associated with inflammation and cell proliferation following short-term inhalation exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Pedro M; Gosens, Ilse; Williams, Andrew; Farcal, Lucian Romeo; Pantano, Daniele; Brown, David M; Stone, Vicki; Cassee, Flemming R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143038990; Halappanavar, Sabina; Fadeel, Bengt

    Our recent studies revealed a dose-dependent proinflammatory response to copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) in rats following short-term inhalation exposure for five consecutive days. Here transcriptomics approaches were applied using the same model to assess global gene expression in lung tissues

  9. Impact of copper oxide nanoparticles exposure on Arabidopsis thaliana growth, root system development, root lignificaion, and molecular level changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2014-11-01

    The effect of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) on physiological and molecular level responses were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. The seedlings were exposed to different concentrations of CuONPs (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) for 21 days in half strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The plant biomass significantly reduced under different concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) of CuONPs stress. Exposure to 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs has resulted in significant reduction of total chlorophyll content. The anthocyanin content significantly increased upon exposure to 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed upon exposure to 5, 10, and 20 mg/L of CuONPs and amino acid proline content was significantly high in plants exposed to 10 and 20 mg/L of CuONPs. Significant reduction in root elongation was observed upon exposure to 0.5-100 mg/L of CuONPs for 21 days. Exposure to CuONPs has resulted in retardation of primary root growth, enhanced lateral root formation, and also resulted in loss of root gravitropism. Staining with phloroglucionol detected the deposition of lignin in CuONPs-treated roots. Histochemical staining of leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants with nitroblue tetrazolium and 3'3'-diaminobenzidine showed a concentration-dependant increase in superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation in leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants. Cytotoxicity was observed in root tips of CuONPs-exposed plants as evidenced by increased propidium iodide staining. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant induction of genes related to oxidative stress responses, sulfur assimilation, glutathione, and proline biosynthesis under CuONPs stress.

  10. Toxicity of short-term copper exposure to early life stages of red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jinhu; Ye, Zhenjiang; Dou, Shuozeng

    2010-09-01

    Acute (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg Cu/L) and chronic (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10, 0.12 mg Cu/L) toxicity tests of Cu with embryonic and larval red sea bream, Pagrus major, were carried out to investigate their biological responses to Cu exposure in static water at 18 +/- 1 degrees C (dissolved organic carbon, 1.8 +/- 0.65 mg C/L; hardness, 6,183 +/- 360 mg CaCO3/L; salinity, 33 +/- 1 per thousand). The 24- and 48-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) values of Cu for embryos were 0.23 and 0.15 mg/L, whereas the 48-, 72-, and 96-h LC50 values for larvae were 0.52, 0.19, and 0.13 mg/L, respectively, suggesting that embryos were more sensitive to Cu toxicity than larvae. Copper exposures at > or =0.06 mg concentrations caused low hatching success, a delay in the time to hatching of embryos, and reductions in the growth and yolk absorption of the larvae, whereas high mortality and morphological malformations occurred in the embryos and larvae at > or =0.08 mg/L concentrations. Copper concentration did not significantly affect the heart rate of the embryos, but it significantly decreased the heart rate of the newly hatched larvae when the Cu concentration was > or =0.08 mg/L, suggesting that Cu at high concentrations could induce heartbeat disturbances in red sea bream more easily at the larval stage than at the embryonic stage. Hatching success, time to hatching, growth rate, morphological abnormality, yolk absorption, and heart rate were Cu concentration-dependent and could be effective endpoints for evaluating Cu toxicity to the early life stages of red sea bream in nature. Copyright 2010 SETAC.

  11. Effects of copper exposure on hatching success and early larval survival in marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soteropoulos, Diana L; Lance, Stacey L; Flynn, R Wesley; Scott, David E

    2014-07-01

    The creation of wetlands, such as urban and industrial ponds, has increased in recent decades, and these wetlands often become enriched in pollutants over time. One metal contaminant trapped in created wetlands is copper (Cu(2+)). Copper concentrations in sediments and overlying water may affect amphibian species that breed in created wetlands. The authors analyzed the Cu concentration in dried sediments from a contaminated wetland and the levels of aqueous Cu released after flooding the sediments with different volumes of water, mimicking low, medium, and high pond-filling events. Eggs and larvae of Ambystoma opacum Gravenhorst, a salamander that lays eggs on the sediments in dry pond beds that hatch on pond-filling, were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations that bracketed potential aqueous Cu levels in created wetlands. Embryo survival varied among clutches, but increased Cu levels did not affect embryo survival. At Cu concentrations of 500 µg/L or greater, however, embryos hatched earlier, and the aquatic larvae died shortly after hatching. Because Cu concentrations in sediments increase over time in created wetlands, even relatively tolerant species such as A. opacum may be affected by Cu levels in the posthatching environment. © 2014 SETAC.

  12. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  13. Sub-lethal effects of neonicitinoids on the alfalfa leafcutter bee, Megachile rotundata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonicotinoids are commonly used pesticides in U.S. agriculture. For many beneficial insect species, lethal effects of neonicotinoids are well-documented; however, much less is known about sublethal exposure. The alfalfa leaf cutter bee Megachile rotundata is a managed pollinator that constructs com...

  14. Migration protocol to estimate metal exposure from mouthing copper and tin alloy objects

    OpenAIRE

    Urrestarazu, Paola; Villavicencio, Germán; Opazo, Margaret; Arbildua, José; Boreiko, Craig; Delbeke, Katrien; Rodriguez, Patricio H

    2014-01-01

    Background Low blood lead levels previously thought to pose no health risks may have an adverse impact on the cognitive development of children. This concern has given rise to new regulatory restrictions upon lead metal containing products intended for child use. However few reliable experimental testing methods to estimate exposure levels from these materials are available. Methods The present work describes a migration test using a mimetic saliva fluid to estimate the chronic exposure of ch...

  15. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  16. Sublethal Dosage of Imidacloprid Reduces the Microglomerular Density of Honey Bee Mushroom Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Chan; Yang, En-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic loss of honey bees is a major concern worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that neonicotinoid insecticides cause behavioural abnormalities and have proven that exposure to sublethal doses of imidacloprid during the larval stage decreases the olfactory learning ability of adults. The present study shows the effect of sublethal doses of imidacloprid on the neural development of the honey bee brain by immunolabelling synaptic units in the calyces of mushroom bodies. We found that the density of the synaptic units in the region of the calyces, which are responsible for olfactory and visual functions, decreased after being exposed to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid. This not only links a decrease in olfactory learning ability to abnormal neural connectivity but also provides evidence that imidacloprid damages the development of the nervous system in regions responsible for both olfaction and vision during the larval stage of the honey bee. PMID:26757950

  17. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Boutrup, Torsten Snogdal

    2016-01-01

    concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae......Ichthyotoxic algal blooms are normally considered a threat to maricultured fish only when blooms reach lethal cell concentrations. The degree to which sublethal algal concentrations challenge the health of the fish during blooms is practically unknown. In this study, we analysed whether sublethal...... for 12 h prior to the addition of virus, a marginal decrease in the susceptibility to VHSV was observed compared to fish exposed to VHSV without algae. If virus and algae were added simultaneously, inclusion of the algae increased mortality by 50% compared to fish exposed to virus only, depending...

  18. ROS dependent copper toxicity in Hydra-biochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Mohammed; Murugadas, Anbazhagan; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Rajendran, Ramasamy Babu; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2016-01-01

    Copper, an essential microelement, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at concentrations higher than that could be tolerated. Copper-induced oxidative stress has been documented in vitro, yet the in vivo effects of metal-induced oxidative stress have not been extensively studied in the lower invertebrates. The objective of the present study has been to find the effect of ROS-mediated toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of copper at organismal and cellular levels in Hydra magnipapillata. Exposure to copper at sublethal concentrations (0.06 and 0.1mg/L) for 24 or 48h resulted in generation of significant levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We infer that the free radicals here originate predominantly at the lysosomes but partly at the mitochondria also as visualized by H2-DHCFDA staining. Quantitative real-time PCR of RNA extracted from copper-exposed polyps revealed dose-dependent up-regulation of all antioxidant response genes (CAT, SOD, GPx, GST, GR, G6PD). Concurrent increase of Hsp70 and FoxO genes suggests the ability of polyps to respond to stress, which at 48h was not the same as at 24h. Interestingly, the transcript levels of all genes were down-regulated at 48h as compared to 24h incubation period. Comet assay indicated copper as a powerful genotoxicant, and the DNA damage was dose- as well as duration-dependent. Western blotting of proteins (Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3) confirmed ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death in copper-exposed animals. These changes correlated well with changes in morphology, regeneration and aspects of reproduction. Taken together, the results indicate increased production of intracellular ROS in Hydra on copper exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of chronic cadmium exposure on the tissue distribution of copper and zinc and oxidative stress parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Onur; Yazihan, Nuray; Kocak, Mehtap Kacar; Sayal, Ahmet; Akcil, Ethem

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the antioxidant response and its relationship with essential bioelements like copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). The experimental group was chronically exposed to Cd daily for 8 weeks via consumption of water containing 15 ppm cadmium chloride. Cu, Zn, and Cd concentrations and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in liver, kidney, and heart tissues. Exposure to Cd led to a significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase in all considered samples while a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase except for the kidney. We found a significant increase in malondialdehyde concentration in the tissues except for heart. Also oral administration of Cd caused a significant reduction of Zn and Cu in the tissues. Our results allow us to hypothesize that higher Cd concentration in the tissues causes oxidative stress by increasing malondialdehyde as a means of altering antioxidant defense system and deterioration of bioelements in rat liver, kidney, and heart. In addition, further studies are needed to explain the effect of long-term, low-dose exposure to Cd on distribution of bioelements and its relationship with oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Antioxidant biochemical responses to long-term copper exposure in Bathymodiolus azoricus from Menez-Gwen hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Company, Rui; Serafim, Angela; Cosson, Richard P; Fiala-Médioni, Aline; Camus, Lionel; Colaço, Ana; Serrão-Santos, Ricardo; Bebianno, Maria João

    2008-01-25

    Copper (Cu) is essential to various physiological processes in marine organisms. However, at high concentrations this redox-active transition metal may enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequently initiate oxidative damage. High concentrations of Cu may increase oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. Bathymodiolus azoricus is a Mytilid bivalve very common in hydrothermal environments near the Azores Triple Junction continuously exposed to high metal concentrations, including Cu, emanating from the vent fluids. The knowledge of antioxidant defence system and other stress related biomarkers in these organisms is still scarce. The aim of this work was to study the effect of Cu (25 microg l(-1); 24 days exposure; 6 days depuration) on the antioxidant stress biomarkers in the gills and mantle of B. azoricus. The expression of stress related biomarkers was tissue-dependent and results suggest that other factors than metal exposure may influence stress biomarkers, since little variation in antioxidant enzymes activities, MT concentrations, LPO and total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC) occurred in both control and Cu-exposed mussels. Moreover, there is a general tendency for these parameters to increase with time, in both control and Cu-exposed mussels, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is not metal dependent, and may be related with poor physiological conditions of the animals after long periods in adverse conditions compared to those in hydrothermal environments.

  1. Sublethal effect of nanosilver on the structure of gill of Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharifian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Widespread use of nanosilver can be led the contamination of aquatic environment and impact on living organisms such as fishes. We investigated histopathological changes in the gills tissue of Caspian roach fingerlings after two weeks exposure to sublethal concentrations of nanosilver. Following one and two weeks exposure, necrosis, shortening of secondary lamellae, edema, destruction of epithelial lamella, shortening of secondary lamellae, epithelial lifting and curling of secondary lamellae were observed in gill tissues. This observation showed that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of nanosilver is caused damages in the gill tissues of Caspian roach. The results demonstrated direct correlation of gill tissue damage and toxin exposure i.e. increasing nanosilver concentration is caused more tissue damage. Hence, histopathological changes of gill can considered as a proper indicator for nanosilver contamination of aquatic environments.

  2. Effects of copper and lead exposure on the ecophysiology of the brown seaweed Sargassum cymosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giulia Burle; de Felix, Marthiellen R L; Simioni, Carmen; Ramlov, Fernanda; Oliveira, Eva Regina; Pereira, Débora T; Maraschin, Marcelo; Chow, Fungyi; Horta, Paulo Antunes; Lalau, Cristina Moreira; da Costa, Cristina H; Matias, William Gerson; Bouzon, Zenilda L; Schmidt, Éder C

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the heavy metals copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) on Sargassum cymosum were evaluated by determining uptake capacity, growth rates, photosynthetic efficiency, contents of photosynthetic pigments and phenolic compounds, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging capacity, and morphological and cellular changes. S. cymosum was cultivated with Cu and Pb separately and combined at concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μM for 7 days in laboratory-controlled conditions. Seaweeds under Cu treatment showed the highest biosorption capacity, and growth rates were significantly reduced compared to the control. The photosynthesis/irradiance curves showed alterations in kinetic patterns in the metal-treated samples. Specifically, Cu treatment alone inhibited electron transport rate (ETR) response, while Pb alone induced it. However, samples treated with both Cu and Pb (Cu + Pb) showed inhibition in ETR. The total amount of pigments increased relative to control. Light microscopy showed an increase in phenolic compounds, with physodes migrating towards cortical cells. Scanning electronic microscopy revealed alterations in the typical rough surface of thallus, when compared with control, especially for Pb treatments. Based on these results, it could be concluded that Cu and Pb are stress factors for S. cymosum, promoting alterations in seaweed metabolism and stimulating protective mechanisms against oxidative stress. However, the high bioaccumulation capacity of both heavy metals indicates a possible application for S. cymosum as a biosorbent agent for contaminated wastewater when metals are in low concentrations.

  3. Sublethal effects of waterborne herbicides in tropical freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stéfani Cibele; Dreyer da Silva, Manuela; Piancini, Laercio Dante Stein; Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Silva de Assis, Helena Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The study evaluated the sublethal effects of the herbicides glyphosate (Roundup) and diuron (Hexaron) and the mixture of them, used extremely in agriculture, through biomarkers in fish. The glutathione S-transferase activity increased (74%) and catalase activity decreased (37%) at the higher exposure concentration of Hexaron in comparison to the control group, suggesting an activation of this metabolism route. Membrane damage was observed at the higher exposure of Roundup and in the mixture group compared to the control group, which can be related to the nuclear alterations observed in these exposed groups. The cholinesterase activity was also inhibited (37%) in mixture group compared to the control group and no gill morphology damage was found. The results suggested a potential synergic effect in some analysed parameters.

  4. Chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Kunz, James L.; Hardesty, Douglas K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was evaluated in water-only exposures started with newly hatched larvae or approximately 1-mo-old juveniles. The 20% effect concentration (EC20) for cadmium from the sturgeon tests was higher than the EC20 from the trout tests, whereas the EC20 for copper, lead, or zinc for the sturgeon were lower than those EC20s for the trout. When the EC20s from the present study were included in compiled toxicity databases for all freshwater species, species mean chronic value for white sturgeon was in a relatively low percentile of the species sensitivity distribution for copper (9th percentile) and in the middle percentile for cadmium (55th percentile), zinc (40th percentile), or lead (50th percentile). However, the species mean chronic value for rainbow trout was in a high percentile for copper, lead, and zinc (∼68th–82nd percentile), but in a low percentile for cadmium (23rd percentile). The trout EC20s for each of the 4 metals and the sturgeon EC20s for cadmium or lead were above US Environmental Protection Agency chronic ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) or Washington State chronic water quality standards (WQS), whereas the sturgeon EC20s for copper or zinc were approximately equal to or below the chronic AWQC and WQS. In addition, acute 50% effect concentrations (EC50s) for copper obtained in the first 4 d of the chronic sturgeon test were below the final acute value used to derive acute AWQC and below acute WQS for copper.

  5. Toxicity of copper nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinlong; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Chen, Guangchao; Vijver, Martina G

    2016-09-01

    Although the risks of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) to aquatic organisms have already been studied for >10years, our understanding of the link between the fate of particles in exposure medium and their toxicity is still in its infancy. Moreover, most of the earlier studies did not distinguish the contribution of particles and soluble ions to the toxic effects caused by suspensions of metallic NPs. In this study, the toxicity of CuNPs to Daphnia magna upon modification of the exposure conditions, achieved by aging the suspensions of CuNPs and by altering water chemistry parameters like the pH and levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was investigated. The LC50 values for CuNPs exposure decreased by about 30% after 7days of aging. The LC50 values increased >12-fold upon addition of DOC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 10mg/L to the exposure medium. Changing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 resulted in a 3-fold higher LC50 value. Furthermore, it was found that during 7days of aging of the exposure medium (without addition of DOC and at pH7.8), the toxicity could be mostly ascribed to the particles present in the suspension (around 70%). However, adding DOC or decreasing the pH of the exposure medium reduced the contribution of the particles to the observed toxicity. We thus found that the effective concentration regarding the toxicity was mainly driven by the contribution of the soluble ions in the presence of DOC or at pH6.5. Our results suggest that the toxicity results of CuNPs obtained from laboratory tests may overestimate the risk of the particles in polluted waters due to the common absence of DOC in laboratory test solutions. Moreover, the role of the ions shedding from CuNPs is very important in explaining the toxicity in natural waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Haemolymph from Mytilus galloprovincialis: Response to copper and temperature challenges studied by (1)H-NMR metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Giuseppe; Sforzini, Susanna; Cassino, Claudio; Robotti, Elisa; Oliveri, Caterina; Marengo, Emilio; Musso, Davide; Osella, Domenico; Viarengo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies on molluscs have been carried out to clarify the physiological roles of haemolymph serum proteins and haemocytes. However, little is known about the presence and functional role of the serum metabolites. In this study, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to assess whether changes of the metabolic profile of Mytilus galloprovincialis haemolymph may reflect alterations of the physiological status of the organisms due to environmental stressors, namely copper and temperature. Mussel haemolymph was taken from the posterior adductor muscle after a 4-day exposure to ambient (16 °C) or high temperature (24 °C) and in the absence or presence (5 μg/L, 20 μg/L, or 40 μg/L) of sublethal copper (Cu(2+)). The total glutathione (GSH) concentration in the haemolymph of both control and treated mussels was minimal, indicating the absence of significant contaminations by muscle intracellular metabolites due to the sampling procedure. In the (1)H-NMR spectrum of haemolymph, 27 metabolites were identified unambiguously. The separate and combined effects of exposure to copper and temperature on the haemolymph metabolic profile were assessed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Ranking-PCA multivariate analysis. Changes of the metabolomic profile due to copper exposure at 16 °C became detectable at a dose of 20 μg/L copper. Alanine, lysine, serine, glutamine, glycogen, glucose and protein aliphatics played a major role in the classification of the metabolic changes according to the level of copper exposition. High temperature (24 °C) and high copper levels caused a coherent increase of a common set of metabolites (mostly glucose, serine, and lysine), indicating that the metabolic impairment due to high temperature is enforced by the presence of copper. Overall, the results demonstrate that, as for human blood plasma, the analysis of haemolymph metabolites represents a promising tool for the diagnosis of pollutant-induced stress syndrome in marine

  7. Monitoring the developmental impact of copper and silver nanoparticle exposure in Drosophila and their microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Geller, Brennen; Moniz, Kristy; Das, Pranab; Chippindale, Adam K; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-07-15

    There is concern that waste waters containing manufactured metal nanoparticles (NPs) originating from consumer goods, will find their way into streams and larger water bodies. Aquatic invertebrates could be vulnerable to such pollution, and here we have used fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model invertebrate, to test for the effect of NPs on fitness. Both copper NP and microparticle (MP)-containing medium slowed development, reduced adult longevity and decreased sperm competition. In contrast, ingestion of silver resulted in a significant reduction in developmental success only if the metal particles were nanosized. Ag NP-treatments resulted in reduced developmental success as assessed by larval and pupal survival as well as larval climbing ability, but there was no impact of silver on adult longevity and little effect on reproductive success. However, Cu NPs generally appeared to be no more toxic to this invertebrate model than the bulk counterpart. The impact of silver ingestion in larvae was further investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of the midgut flora. There was a striking reduction in the diversity of the gut microbiota of Ag NP-treated larvae with a rise in the predominance of Lactobacillus brevis and a decrease in Acetobacter compared to control or Ag MP-treatment groups. Importantly, these experiments show that perturbation of the microbial assemblage within a metazoan model may contribute to Ag NP-mediated toxicity. These observations have implications for impact assessments of nanoparticles as emerging contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Survival and virulence of copper- and chlorine-stressed Yersinia enterocolitica in Experimentally infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; McFeters, G.A.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of gastric pH on the viability and virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:8 after exposure to sublethal concentrations of copper and chlorine was determined in mice. Viability and injury were assessed with a nonselective TLY agar and two selective media, TLYD agar and CIN agar. Both copper and chlorine caused injury which was manifested by the inability of the cells to grow on selective media. CIN agar was more restrictive to the growth of injured cells than TLYD agar. Injury of the exposed cells was further enhanced in the gastric environment of mice. Besides injury, the low gastric pH caused extensive loss of viability in copper-exposed cells. Lethality in the chlorine-exposed cells was less extensive, and a portion of the inoculum reached the small intestine 5 min postinoculation. No adverse effect on the injured cells was apparent in the small intestine, and a substantial revival of the injury occurred in 3 to 4 h after intraluminal inoculation. The virulence of chlorine-stressed Y. enterocolitica in orally inoculated mice was similar to that of the control culture, but copper-stressed cells showed reduced virulence. Virulence was partly restored by oral administration of sodium bicarbonate before the inoculation of copper-exposed cells. Neutralization of gastric acidity had no effect on the virulence of the control of chlorine-stressed cells.

  9. Migration protocol to estimate metal exposure from mouthing copper and tin alloy objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrestarazu, Paola; Villavicencio, Germán; Opazo, Margaret; Arbildua, José; Boreiko, Craig; Delbeke, Katrien; Rodriguez, Patricio H

    2014-08-11

    Low blood lead levels previously thought to pose no health risks may have an adverse impact on the cognitive development of children. This concern has given rise to new regulatory restrictions upon lead metal containing products intended for child use. However few reliable experimental testing methods to estimate exposure levels from these materials are available. The present work describes a migration test using a mimetic saliva fluid to estimate the chronic exposure of children to metals such as lead while mouthing metallic objects. The surrogate saliva medium was composed of: 150 mM NaCl, 0.16% porcine Mucin and 5 mM buffer MOPS, adjusted to pH 7.2. Alloys samples, in the form of polished metallic disc of known surface area, were subjected to an eight hours test. Two whitemetal alloys Sn/Pb/Sb/Cu and three brass alloys Cu/Zn/Pb were tested using the saliva migration protocol. In the case of the whitemetal alloys, first order release kinetics resulting in the release of 0.03 and 0.51 μg lead/cm2 after 8 hours of tests were observed, for lead contents of 0.05-0.07% and 5.5%, respectively. Brasses exhibited linear incremental release rates of 0.043, 0.175 and 0.243 μg lead/cm2h for lead contents of 0.1-0.2%, 1.7-2.2% and 3.1-3.5%, respectively. The linear regression analysis of lead release rates relative to Pb content in brasses yielded a slope of 0.08 μg lead/cm2h%Pb (r2 = 0.92). Lead release rates were used to estimate the mean daily mouthing exposure of a child to lead, according to age-specific estimates of mouthing time behavior. Calculated daily intakes were used as oral inputs for the IEUBK toxicokinetic model, predicting only marginal changes in blood lead levels (0.2 μg lead/dL or less) for children aged 0.5 to 1 years old exposed to either class of alloy. The results of this study as a whole support the use of migration data of metal ions, rather than total metal content, to estimate health risk from exposure to metals and metal alloys substances

  10. Certain antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) as early warning biomarkers of soil copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bai-Ye; Kan, Shi-Hong; Zhang, Yan-Zong; Deng, Shi-Huai; Wu, Jun; Yuan, Hao; Qi, Hui; Yang, Gang; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Hong; Wang, Ying-Jun; Peng, Hong; Li, Yuan-Wei

    2010-11-15

    Copper (Cu) is a major heavy metal contaminant with various anthropogenic and natural sources. Recently, using biomarkers to monitor the effects of pollutants has attracted increased interest. Pot culture experiments using radish (Raphanus sativus L.) was performed to investigate Cu phytotoxic effects on antioxidant enzymes and other early warning biomarkers of soil Cu exposure. Under low dose Cu stress (lower than the EC10, Cu concentration reducing root length by 10%), activity and isozyme expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidases (POD) increased significantly; no significant variations in chlorophyll, carotenoid, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in leaves and toxic symptoms were observed. Under a slightly higher Cu stress (close to the EC10), activity and isozyme expression of SOD and MDA content were enhanced significantly; those of CAT and POD decreased due to an inverted U-shape dose response. Chlorophyll content remained unchanged. Thus, antioxidant enzymes and MDA content are more sensitive to Cu stress, showing significant variations ahead of chlorophyll and toxic symptoms under Cu stress (lower than about 200 mg kg(-1) soil). Thus, the joint monitoring of antioxidant enzymes and MDA content of R. sativus can be used as biomarkers of soil Cu contamination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vertical transmission of sublethal granulovirus infection in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, J P; Griffiths, C M; Cory, J S; Smith, P; Sait, S M

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of pathogen persistence in relation to fluctuations in host density is crucial to our understanding of disease dynamics. In the case of insect baculoviruses, which are typically transmitted horizontally via a lifestage that can persist outside the host, a key issue that remains to be elucidated is whether the virus can also be transmitted vertically as a sublethal infection. We show that RNA transcripts for the Plodia interpunctella GV granulin gene are present in a high proportion of P. interpunctella insects that survive virus challenge. Granulin is a late-expressed gene that is only transcribed after viral genome replication, its presence thus strongly indicates that viral genome replication has occurred. Almost all insects surviving the virus challenge tested positive for viral RNA in the larval and pupal stage. However, this proportion declined in the emerging adults. Granulin mRNA was also detected in both the ovaries and testes, which may represent a putative mechanism by which reduced fecundity in sublethally affected hosts might be manifested. RNA transcripts were also detected in 60-80% of second-generation larvae that were derived from mating surviving adults, but there was no difference between the sexes, with both males and females capable of transmitting a sublethal infection to their offspring. The data indicate that low-level persistent infection, with at least limited gene expression, can occur in P. interpunctella following survival of a granulovirus challenge. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a persistent, sublethal infection by a baculovirus to be initiated by a sublethal virus dose. We hypothesize that the 'latent' baculovirus infections frequently referred to in the literature may also be low level persistent, sublethal infections resulting from survival from initial baculovirus exposure.

  12. Effects of copper exposure on the energy metabolism in juveniles of the marine clam Mesodesma mactroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomin, Marina; Jorge, Marianna Basso; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    In freshwater osmoregulating mollusks, Cu can cause toxicity by inducing ionoregulatory disturbances. In mussels, it inhibits the activity of key enzymes involved in Na(+) uptake and consequently induces ionic and osmotic disturbances. In snails, Cu induces disruption of the Ca(2+) homeostasis leading to effects in shell deposition and snail growth. However, the mechanisms involved in Cu toxicity in osmoconforming sweater mollusks remain unclear. Recent findings from our laboratory have suggested that Cu toxicity in marine invertebrates can be associated with both ionic and respiratory disturbances. In the present study, metabolic changes induced by waterborne Cu exposure were evaluated in the osmoconforming clam Mesodesma mactroides, a bivalve species widely distributed along the South American sandy beaches. Juvenile clams were kept under control conditions (no Cu addition in the water) or acutely (96h) exposed to Cu (96-h LC10=150μgL(-1)) in artificial seawater (30ppt). ATP, protein, lipid, glycogen and glucose contents were analyzed in gills, digestive gland, pedal muscle and hemolymph. Dinucleotide (NAD(+) and NADH) content was also analyzed in gills, digestive gland and pedal muscle while pyruvate and lactate content was determined in pedal muscle and hemolymph. In all tissues analyzed, Cu exposure did not affect ATP content and NAD(+)/NADH ratio, except in the hemolymph, where a decrease in ATP content was observed. These findings indicate that clam cells, except those from hemolymph, were able to maintain a constant level of free energy. A significant increase in total protein content was observed in the digestive gland, which could be a compensatory mechanism to counteract the higher level of protein oxidation previously observed in M. mactroides exposed to Cu under the same experimental conditions. Finally, reduced glucose content in the pedal muscle paralleled by increased lactate content in the pedal muscle and hemolymph was observed in Cu

  13. Induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) and F1057 in sublethal concentrations of H2O2 and NaOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Soni, Kamlesh A; Sharma, Chander S; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-12-05

    Food processing and food handling environments may contain residual levels of sanitizers or cleaners which may trigger oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine the induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) (serotype 1/2a) and F1057 (serotype 4b) at different concentrations and times of sublethal oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or sublethal alkali stress induced by NaOH at 37°C. Both L. monocytogenes Bug600 and F1057 strains showed significantly higher survival in lethal oxidative stress (1000ppm H2O2) after pre-exposure to 50ppm H2O2 for 30min compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to H2O2). When the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress by NaOH, the oxidative stress adaptation was induced within 5min in L. monocytogenes. The survival of both L. monocytogenes strains was increased by 2 to 4.5 logs in lethal oxidative stress when the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress at pH9 from 5 to 120min by NaOH compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to sublethal alkali pH). Two other alkali reagents tested (KOH and NH4OH) also induced oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. For both L. monocytogenes strains, the oxidative stress adaptation induced by sublethal H2O2 was reversible in 30min and that induced by sublethal alkali stress was reversible within 60min at 37°C in the absence of such sublethal stress. These findings show that sublethal oxidative or alkali stress conditions can induce oxidative stress adaptation that may increase the risk of survival of L. monocytogenes cells in lethal oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological effects and oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana following exposure to uranium and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Saenen, E.; Vandenhove, H.; Vanhoudt, N.; Wannijn, J.; Nauts, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Vangronsveld, J.; Cuypers, A. [Hasselt University (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Since organisms are almost always exposed to multiple stressors, it is important to investigate the toxicity effects in plants in a multiple stressor context to provide a more realistic estimate of environmental risks. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of U and Cu individually and in combination. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were exposed during 3 days to 25 μM U, 2.5 μM Cu or 12.5 μM U + 1.25 μM Cu at pH 7.5. The concentrations of U and Cu administered to the plants were the derived EC30 values for plant growth reduction based on the single-dose response curves. When plants were exposed to U or Cu, this resulted in an increased metal concentration in both roots and shoots as compared to the control plants. The increased Cu content of the plant, led to a significant decrease in leaf and root growth, while U exposure did not affect plant growth. By exposing plants to both metals, it seems that Cu interferes with the translocation of U from the roots to the leaves. In addition, U interferes with the Cu uptake, since less Cu was found in the roots than expected. This can probably be explained by the fact that U causes a shift in the Cu speciation in our medium. As such, the percentage of the bioavailable fractions of Cu decreased, while the percentage Cu-EDTA (i.e. non-available fraction) increased. No effects on plant growth were observed by exposing plants to U+Cu. Exposing plants to heavy metals can lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). After U or Cu exposure, the transcript levels of different ROS-producing enzymes (NADPH oxidases and lipoxygenases (LOX)) were up-regulated in the roots. Furthermore, exposing plants to U+Cu resulted in a 20-fold increase in the expression of LOX1 as compared to the single stressor conditions. This possibly indicates an enhanced ROS production. In addition, the increased expression of LOX1 can also indicate an increased production of oxylipins, important molecules in inter-organ signalling. In the

  15. Effect of copper on the characterization of proteins in the Spiny lobster, Panulirus homarus homarus (Linnaeus,1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharajan Athisuyambulingam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is most toxic metal in marine organisms. Characterization of protein occurring in the metabolically active tissues of muscle (MU, hepatopancreas (HP and gills (GL of the spiny lobster, Panulirus homarus homarus on exposure to two sub-lethal doses (9.55 and 19.1 µg/l of copper were studied for 28 days of exposure (DoE. The electrophoretic pattern of muscle, hepatopancreas and gill proteins revealed 12, 8 and 8 slow moving bands (control. The number of bands decreased to 8 and 7, 6 and 5, 6 and 4 after 7 days of exposure to 9.55 µg/l and 19.1 µg/l concentrations of copper, respectively. After 28 days, the protein bands decreased to 7 and 6, 5 and 4, 4 and 4 at 9.55 µg/l and 19.1 µg/l concentrations of copper, respectively. Present study to indicate that to avoid the Cupro-Nickel coil in lobster holding centers in chiller plants used for cooling of water was found to be responsible for the mortality of lobsters during live transportation.

  16. Sublethal dose of phoxim and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus interact to elevate silkworm mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, ZhiYa; Li, FanChi; Hu, JingSheng; Ding, Chao; Wang, Chaoqian; Tian, JiangHai; Xue, Bin; Xu, KaiZun; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically important insect. It is relatively less resistant to certain chemicals and environment exposures such as pesticides and pathogens. After pesticide exposures, the silkworms are more susceptible to microbial infections. The mechanism underlying the susceptibility might be related to immune response and oxidative stress. A sublethal dose of phoxim combined with Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) elevated the silkworm mortality at 96 h. We found a higher content of H2 O2 and increased levels of genes related to oxidative stress and immune response after treatment with a sublethal dose of phoxim for 24 h or 48 h. However, such response decreased with longer pesticide treatment. Mortality increased by 44% when B. mori was exposed to combined treatment with BmNPV and phoxim rather than BmNPV alone. The level of examined immune-related and oxidative-stress-related genes significantly decreased in the combined treatment group compared with the BmNPV group. Our results indicated that, with long-term exposure to pesticides such as OPs, even at sublethal dose, the oxidative stress response and immune responses in silkworm were inhibited, which may lead to further immune impairment and accumulation of oxidative stress, resulting in susceptibility to the virus and harm to the silkworm. Our study provided insights for understanding the susceptibility to pathogen after pesticide exposures, which may promote the development of better pesticide controls to avoid significant economic losses. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Multigenerational effects of copper nanomaterials (CuONMs) are different of those of CuCl2: exposure in the soil invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Rita C; Santos, Fátima C F; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2017-08-16

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are recommended to be tested in longer term exposures. Multigenerational (MG) studies are scarce and particularly important because effects can be transferred to the next generation. The current risk assessment framework does not include MG effects and this is a caveat for persistent materials. Here, the effects of copper NMs (CuONMs) and copper salt (CuCl 2 ) were assessed in a MG exposure (4 generations in spiked soil + 2 generations in clean soil, F1 to F7 generations in total), with the standard soil model Enchytraeus crypticus, using relevant reproduction test effect concentrations (EC 10 , EC 50 ), monitoring survival and reproduction. This represented ca. 1 year continuous exposure tests. MG effects varied with effect concentration and test materials: CuONMs caused increased toxicity for EC 10 exposed organisms (EC 50 did not change), and transfer to clean media reset effects, whereas CuCl 2 reduced toxicity for EC 10 and EC 50 , but the transfer to clean media "revived" the initial effects, i.e. close to EC 50 levels in F7. Clearly CuONMs and CuCl 2 cause different mechanisms of toxicity or response in the long term, not predictable based on short term or one generation studies. The present contributes for the improvement of risk assessment, adding important information for the long term exposure and effects.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy study of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells exposed to sublethal heat stress and carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological changes that occurred in Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after exposure to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 min and in combination with lethal concentration of carv...

  19. Uptake and elimination of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) at sublethal and lethal aqueous concentrations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, van J.M.C.; Koelmans, A.A.; Deneer, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) have been studied in an accumulation and elimination experiment. At a sublethal exposure, uptake and elimination rate constants of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were determined, employing a first-order one-compartment model. The

  20. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  1. Relationship between Sublethal Injury and Inactivation of Yeast Cells by the Combination of Sorbic Acid and Pulsed Electric Fields▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M.; García, D.; Condón, S.; Mañas, P.; Pagán, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sublethal injury after the pulsed-electric-field (PEF) treatment of two yeasts, Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the relation of sublethal injury to the inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid. PEF caused sublethal injury in both yeasts: more than 90% of surviving D. bruxellensis cells and 99% of surviving S. cerevisiae cells were sublethally injured after 50 pulses at 12 kV/cm in buffer at pHs of both 7.0 and 4.0. The proportion of sublethally injured cells reached a maximum after 50 pulses at 12.0 kV/cm (S. cerevisiae) or 16.5 kV/cm (D. bruxellensis), and it kept constant or progressively decreased at greater electric field strengths and with longer PEF treatments. Sublethally PEF-injured cells showed sensitivity to the presence of sorbic acid at a concentration of 2,000 ppm. A synergistic inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid was observed. Survivors of the PEF treatment were progressively inactivated in the presence of 2,000 ppm of sorbic acid at pH 3.8, with the combined treatments achieving more than log10 5 cycles of dead cells under the conditions investigated. This study has demonstrated the occurrence of sublethal injury after exposure to PEF, so yeast inactivation by PEF is not an all-or-nothing event. The combination of PEF and sorbic acid has proven to be an effective method to achieve a higher level of yeast inactivation. This work contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF, and it may be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology. PMID:17468278

  2. Relationship between sublethal injury and inactivation of yeast cells by the combination of sorbic acid and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Condón, S; Mañas, P; Pagán, R

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sublethal injury after the pulsed-electric-field (PEF) treatment of two yeasts, Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the relation of sublethal injury to the inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid. PEF caused sublethal injury in both yeasts: more than 90% of surviving D. bruxellensis cells and 99% of surviving S. cerevisiae cells were sublethally injured after 50 pulses at 12 kV/cm in buffer at pHs of both 7.0 and 4.0. The proportion of sublethally injured cells reached a maximum after 50 pulses at 12.0 kV/cm (S. cerevisiae) or 16.5 kV/cm (D. bruxellensis), and it kept constant or progressively decreased at greater electric field strengths and with longer PEF treatments. Sublethally PEF-injured cells showed sensitivity to the presence of sorbic acid at a concentration of 2,000 ppm. A synergistic inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid was observed. Survivors of the PEF treatment were progressively inactivated in the presence of 2,000 ppm of sorbic acid at pH 3.8, with the combined treatments achieving more than log10 5 cycles of dead cells under the conditions investigated. This study has demonstrated the occurrence of sublethal injury after exposure to PEF, so yeast inactivation by PEF is not an all-or-nothing event. The combination of PEF and sorbic acid has proven to be an effective method to achieve a higher level of yeast inactivation. This work contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF, and it may be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology.

  3. Developmental and subcellular effects of chronic exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of ammonia, PAH and PCP mixtures in brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario L.) early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbach, Till; Ferling, Hermann; Gernhöfer, Maike; Köhler, Heinz-R; Negele, Rolf-Dieter; Pfefferle, Eva; Triebskorn, Rita

    2003-10-08

    Brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario L.) early life stages were studied for physiological effects caused by chronic exposure to sub-acute levels of unionised ammonia, a mixture of PCP and PAHs, and a combination of ammonia and the mixture of organics during the entire embryonic development. Nominal concentrations of tested compounds were based on field data. Accumulation data for PAHs and PCP in trout tissue reflected respective water concentrations of PCP and PAHs. Physiological responses were studied by early life stage tests (ELST) and by the analysis of the 70 kDa stress protein (hsp70). Endpoint responses in the ELST were: accelerated development, pre-hatching, and increased heart rates. For these endpoints, response levels were highest in the ammonia treatment, followed by the exposure to the PCP/PAH mixture. Weight was reduced in embryos treated with the PCP/PAH mixture, but not in the group treated with this mixture combined with ammonia. Induction of hsp70 by the test agents was found to be stage-specific with increased response levels at advanced developmental stages. In both the ELST and hsp70 analysis, response levels were lower in the combined ammonia/PCP/PAH treatment than in groups treated with either ammonia or the PCP/PAH mixture alone.

  4. The effect of copper and zinc at neutral and acidic pH on the general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of sublethal copper and zinc concentrations at a neutral and an acidic pH, on selected haematological parameters as well as on the total osmolality and electrolyte concentrations of Oreochromis mossambicus. In general, at neutral pH copper and zinc caused blood ...

  5. Interactions of manganese with iron, zinc, and copper in neonatal C57BL/6J and parkin mice following developmental oral manganese exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Foster

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High dose manganese (Mn exposure can result in changes in tissue concentrations of other essential metals due to Mn-induced alterations in metal absorption and competition for metal transporters and regulatory proteins. We evaluated responses in mice with a Parkin gene defect (parkin mice and a wildtype strain (C57BL/6J following neonatal Mn exposure. Neonatal parkin and C57BL/6J littermates were randomly assigned to 0, 11, or 25 mg Mn/kg-day dose groups with oral exposures occurring from postnatal day (PND 1 through PND 28. We report liver, femur, olfactory bulb, striatum, and frontal cortex iron, copper, and zinc concentrations and changes in hepatic gene expression of different metal transporters in PND 29 parkin and C57BL/6J mice. A companion manuscript (Foster et al., 2017 [1] describes the primary study findings. This data provides insights into strain differences in the way Mn interacts with other trace metals in mice. Keywords: Copper, Zinc, Iron, Manganese Toxicity, Mouse

  6. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  7. Fumigant Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Artemisia khorassanica and Artemisia sieberi on Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, B; Abedi, Z; Abdolmaleki, A; Jafary-Jahed, M; Borzoui, E; Mozaffar Mansouri, Seyed

    2017-09-01

    Fumigant toxicity and sublethal effects of essential oils from Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Artemisia sieberi Bess were investigated against adults of Sitotroga cerealella Olivier. To assess the sublethal effects, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters of the surviving S. cerealella were studied. Higher fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 7.38 µl/liter air) than A. sieberi (LC50: 9.26 µl/liter air) was observed against S. cerealella. Also, the insecticidal effects of A. khorassanica (LT50: 9.01 h) were faster than A. sieberi (LT50: 14.37 h). A significant extension was observed in the developmental time (egg to adult) of S. cerealella treated with the essential oils. In addition, fecundity of S. cerealella reduced by 25.29 and 35.78% following exposure to sublethal concentrations of A. sieberi and A. khorassanica, respectively. Both tested essential oils caused a significant reduction in the gross and net reproductive rates, intrinsic rate of increase (rm), and finite rate of increase of S. cerealella. The rm values following exposure to A. sieberi, A. khorassanica, and control were 0.098, 0.094, and 0.107 d-1, respectively. The results of this study suggest that tested essential oils have a good potential to apply in integrated pest management of S. cerealella. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  8. Fumigant Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Artemisia khorassanica and Artemisia sieberi on Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Z; Abdolmaleki, A; Jafary-Jahed, M; Borzoui, E; Mozaffar Mansouri, Seyed

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fumigant toxicity and sublethal effects of essential oils from Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Artemisia sieberi Bess were investigated against adults of Sitotroga cerealella Olivier. To assess the sublethal effects, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters of the surviving S. cerealella were studied. Higher fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 7.38 µl/liter air) than A. sieberi (LC50: 9.26 µl/liter air) was observed against S. cerealella. Also, the insecticidal effects of A. khorassanica (LT50: 9.01 h) were faster than A. sieberi (LT50: 14.37 h). A significant extension was observed in the developmental time (egg to adult) of S. cerealella treated with the essential oils. In addition, fecundity of S. cerealella reduced by 25.29 and 35.78% following exposure to sublethal concentrations of A. sieberi and A. khorassanica, respectively. Both tested essential oils caused a significant reduction in the gross and net reproductive rates, intrinsic rate of increase (rm), and finite rate of increase of S. cerealella. The rm values following exposure to A. sieberi, A. khorassanica, and control were 0.098, 0.094, and 0.107 d−1, respectively. The results of this study suggest that tested essential oils have a good potential to apply in integrated pest management of S. cerealella. PMID:29117375

  9. Acute and chronic sensitivity to copper of a promising ecotoxicological model species, the annual killifish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Charlotte; Grégoir, Arnout F; Janssens, Lizanne; Pinceel, Tom; De Boeck, Gudrun; Brendonck, Luc

    2017-10-01

    Nothobranchius furzeri is a promising model for ecotoxicological research due to the species' short life cycle and the production of drought-resistant eggs. Although the species is an emerging vertebrate fish model for several fundamental as well as applied research domains, its potential for ecotoxicological research has not yet been tested. The aim of this study was to characterise the acute and chronic sensitivity of this species to copper as compared to other model organisms. Effects of both acute and chronic copper exposure were tested on survival, life history and physiological traits. We report a 24h-LC50 of 53.93µg Cu/L, which is situated within the sensitivity range of other model species such as Brook Trout, Fathead Minnow and Rainbow Trout. Moreover, in the full life cycle exposure, we show that an exposure concentration of 10.27µg/L did not cause acute adverse effects (96h), but did cause mortality after prolonged exposure (3-4 weeks). Also chronic, sublethal effects were observed, such as a reduction in growth rate, delayed maturation and postponed reproduction. Based on our results, we define the NOEC at 6.68µg Cu/L, making N. furzeri more sensitive to copper as compared to Brook Trout and Fathead Minnow. We found stimulatory effects on peak fecundity at subinhibitory levels of copper concentrations (hormesis). Finally, we found indications for detoxifying and copper-excreting mechanisms, demonstrating the ability of the fish to cope with this essential metal, even when exposed to stressful amounts. The successful application of current ecotoxicological protocols on N. furzeri and its sensitivity range comparable to that of other model organisms forms the basis to exploit this species in further ecotoxicological practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Both genome and cytosol dynamics change in E. coli challenged with sublethal rifampicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarski, Michal; Raciti, Bianca; Kotar, Jurij; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Fraser, Gillian M.; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    While the action of many antimicrobial drugs is well understood at the molecular level, a systems-level physiological response to antibiotics remains largely unexplored. This work considers fluctuation dynamics of both the chromosome and cytosol in Escherichia coli, and their response to sublethal treatments of a clinically important antibiotic, rifampicin. We precisely quantify the changes in dynamics of chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates (a rheovirus nonstructural protein known as μNS-GFP), measuring short time-scale displacements across several hours of drug exposure. To achieve this we develop an empirical method correcting for photo-bleaching and loci size effects. This procedure allows us to characterize the dynamic response to rifampicin in different growth conditions, including a customised microfluidic device. We find that sub-lethal doses of rifampicin cause a small but consistent increase in motility of both the chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates. Chromosomal and cytosolic responses are consistent with each other and between different growth conditions.

  11. Organ burden and pulmonary toxicity of nano-sized copper (II) oxide particles after short-term inhalation exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Ilse; Cassee, Flemming R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143038990; Zanella, Michela; Manodori, Laura; Brunelli, Andrea; Costa, Anna Luisa; Bokkers, Bas G H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847062; de Jong, Wim H; Brown, David; Hristozov, Danail; Stone, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about the potential for undesirable human health and environmental effects. Releases into the air may occur and, therefore, the inhalation route is of specific interest. Here we tested copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) after

  12. Sublethal toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeenpaeae, K. [Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)], E-mail: kimmo.maenpaa@joensuu.fi; Leppaenen, M.T.; Kukkonen, J.V.K. [Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the toxicity and biotransformation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in the oligochaete aquatic worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. PAHs are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that pose a hazard to aquatic organisms, and metabolizing capability is poorly known in the case of many invertebrate species. To study the toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene, the worm was exposed for 15 days to various concentrations of water-borne pyrene. The dorsal blood vessel pulse rate was used as a sublethal endpoint. Pyrene biotransformation by L. variegatus was studied and the critical body residues (CBR) were estimated for pyrene toxicity. The toxicokinetics of pyrene uptake was evaluated. A combination of radiolabeled ({sup 14}C) and nonlabeled pyrene was used in the exposures, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and high-pressure liquid chromatography were employed in both water and tissue residue analyses. The results showed that L. variegatus was moderately able to metabolize pyrene to 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), thus demonstrating that the phase-I-like oxidizing enzyme system metabolizes pyrene in L. variegatus. The amount of the 1-HP was 1-2% of the amount of pyrene in the worm tissues. The exposure to pyrene reduced the blood vessel pulse rate significantly (p < 0.05), showing that pyrene had a narcotic effect. The estimated CBRs remained constant during the exposure time, varying from 0.120 to 0.174 mmol pyrene/kg worm wet weight. The bioconcentration factors (BCF) decreased as exposure concentration increased. It was suggested that the increased toxicity of pyrene accounted for the decrease in BCFs by lowering the activity of the organism.

  13. Toxic effects of selenium and copper on the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Aquatic toxicologists have become increasingly concerned with the effects of sublethal concentrations of toxicants on aquatic organisms. Sublethal effects of toxicants on freshwater invertebrates were reviewed. Selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) are both essential trace elements and toxicants. Se has been reported to alter the toxicity of heavy metals. Planarians, Dugesia dorotocephala, were used as test animals. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) acute toxicity of Se on planarians and the effect of the number of planarians per test chamber, (2) interaction of the acute toxicity of Se and Cu on planarians, and (3) sublethal effects of Se and Cu on planarians.

  14. Evaluating sub-lethal effects of orchard-applied pyrethroids using video-tracking software to quantify honey bee behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Erin M; Augustin, Julie; Ellis, Marion D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-09-01

    Managed honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies are contracted to pollinate fruit and nut orchards improving crop quality and yield. Colonies placed in orchards are potentially exposed to pyrethroid insecticides used for broad-spectrum pest control. Pyrethroids have been reported to pose minimal risk to bees due to their low application rates in the field and putative repellent properties. This repellency is believed to alter foraging behavior with the benefit of preventing bees from encountering a lethal dose in the field. However, sub-lethal exposure to pyrethroids may adversely impact bee behavior potentially resulting in social dysfunction or disruption of foraging. This study quantified behaviors associated with sub-lethal exposure to orchard-applied pyrethroids including, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and permethrin, using video tracking software, Ethovision XT (Noldus Information Technologies). Bee locomotion, social interaction, and time spent near a food source were measured over a 24-h period. Bees treated with a pyrethroid traveled 30-71% less than control bees. Social interaction time decreased by 43% for bees treated with a high sub-lethal dose of esfenvalerate. Bees exposed to a high sub-lethal dose of permethrin spent 67% less time in social interaction and spent more than 5 times as long in the food zone compared to control bees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of increasing temperature alone and combined with copper exposure on biochemical and physiological parameters in the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Mussismilia harttii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Juliana da Silva; Marangoni, Laura Fernandes de Barros; Marques, Joseane Aparecida; Bianchini, Adalto

    2017-09-01

    Effects of increasing temperature alone and in combination with exposure to dissolved copper (Cu) were evaluated in the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Mussismilia harttii using a marine mesocosm system. Endpoints analyzed included parameters involved in metabolism [maximum photosynthetic capacity of zooxanthellae (Fv/Fm), chlorophyll a and ATP concentrations], calcification [carbonic anhydrase (CA) and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activity], and oxidative status [antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and lipid peroxidation (LPO)]. Coral polyps were collected, acclimated and exposed to three increasing temperature conditions [25.0±0.1°C (control; average temperature of local seawater), 26.6±0.1°C and 27.3±0.1°C] using a marine mesocosm system. They were tested alone and in combination with four environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu in seawater [2.9±0.7 (control; average concentration in local seawater), 3.8±0.8, 5.4±0.9 and 8.6±0.3μg/L] for 4, 8 and 12days. Fv/Fm reduced over the experimental period with increasing temperature. Combination of increasing temperature with Cu exposure enhanced this effect. CA and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities increased up to 8days of exposure, but recovered back after 12days of experiment. Short-term exposure to increasing temperature or long-term exposure to the combination of stressors reduced LPO, suggesting the occurrence of a remodeling process in the lipid composition of biological membranes. ACAP, ATP and chlorophyll a were not significantly affected by the stressors. These findings indicate that increasing temperature combined with exposure to dissolved Cu increase susceptibility to bleaching and reduce growth in the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral M. harttii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sublethal effects on wood frogs chronically exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of two neonicotinoid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacey A; Richardson, Sarah D; Dalton, Rebecca L; Maisonneuve, France; Trudeau, Vance L; Pauli, Bruce D; Lee-Jenkins, Stacey S Y

    2017-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are prophylactically used globally on a variety of crops, and there is concern for the potential impacts of neonicotinoids on aquatic ecosystems. The intensive use of pesticides on crops has been identified as a contributor to population declines of amphibians, but currently little is known regarding the sublethal effects of chronic neonicotinoid exposure on amphibians. The objective of the present study was to characterize the sublethal effect(s) of exposure to 3 environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg/L, 10 μg/L, and 100 μg/L) of 2 neonicotinoids on larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) using outdoor mesocosms. We exposed tadpoles to solutions of 2 commercial formulations containing imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, and assessed survival, growth, and development. Exposure to imidacloprid at 10 μg/L and 100 μg/L increased survival and delayed completion of metamorphosis compared with controls. Exposure to thiamethoxam did not influence amphibian responses. There was no significant effect of any treatment on body mass or size of the metamorphs. The results suggest that current usage of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam does not pose a threat to wood frogs. However, further assessment of both direct and indirect effects on subtle sublethal endpoints, and the influence of multiple interacting stressors at various life stages, is needed to fully understand the effects of neonicotinoids on amphibians. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1101-1109. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  17. Modeling Population and Ecosystem Response to Sublethal Toxicant Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-30

    Award No. N000149910024 http://lifesci.ucsb.edu/EEMB/faculty/nisbet LONG TERM GOALS The ecological effects of environmental stress occur within complex...those of real populations. We have also investigated how toxicants may affect the stability of the system. If the toxicant effect is primarily an...will be submitted in the near future. IMPACT/APPLICATIONS Our DEB modeling work aims to unify theory describing the effects of environmental stress on

  18. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Seru...

  19. Molecular characterization and mRNA expression during metal exposure and thermal stress of copper/zinc- and manganese-superoxide dismutases in disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keun-Yong; Lee, Sang Yoon; Cho, Young Sun; Bang, In Chul; Kim, Ki Hong; Kim, Dong Soo; Nam, Yoon Kwon

    2007-11-01

    Complementary DNAs encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD; SOD1) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD; SOD2) were isolated from disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus. The open reading frame sequences of Cu/Zn- and Mn-SODs encoded 154 and 226 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments using the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both abalone SODs showed considerable sequence similarities with their orthologues from diverse aerobic organisms, in which the amino acid residues forming metal ligands were highly conserved. All phylogenetic trees for both SOD genes inferred from maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses presented the monophyletic status of Teleostei and Aves/Tetrapoda clades, and recovered relatively close genetic affiliation of H. discus discus with some molluscan species. Expression of both SODs at mRNA levels were highly modulated in various tissues (gill, muscle and hepatopancreas from juveniles, and haemocytes from adults) by experimental exposures to heavy metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) and also by thermal treatments (elevation of temperature). The mRNA levels of both SODs were increased in general during the metal or thermal treatments; however, the transcriptional responses of SOD genes were quite variable depending upon isoforms and tissues based on semi-quantitative and/or real-time RT-PCR assays.

  20. Tolerance to copper and to salinity in Daphnia longispina: implications within a climate change scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Leitão

    Full Text Available Considering IPPC climate change scenarios, it is pertinent to predict situations where coastal ecosystems already impacted with chemical contamination became exposed to an additional stressor under a future scenario of seawater intrusion. Accordingly, the present study aimed at evaluating if a negative association between tolerance to a metal and to saltwater exists among genotypes of a freshwater organism. For this, five clonal lineages of the cladoceran Daphnia longispina O.F. Müller, exhibiting a differential tolerance to lethal levels of copper, were selected. Each clonal lineage was exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of sodium chloride (assumed as a protective surrogate to evaluate the toxicity of increased salinity to freshwater organisms. Mortality, time to release the first brood and total number of neonates per female were monitored and the somatic growth rate and intrinsic rate of natural increase were computed for each clonal lineage. Data here obtained were compared with their lethal responses to copper and significant negative correlations were found. These results suggest that genetically eroded populations of D. longispina, due to copper or salinity, may be particularly susceptible to a later exposure to the other contaminant supporting the multiple stressors differential tolerance.

  1. Tolerance to copper and to salinity in Daphnia longispina: implications within a climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, João; Ribeiro, Rui; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Lopes, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Considering IPPC climate change scenarios, it is pertinent to predict situations where coastal ecosystems already impacted with chemical contamination became exposed to an additional stressor under a future scenario of seawater intrusion. Accordingly, the present study aimed at evaluating if a negative association between tolerance to a metal and to saltwater exists among genotypes of a freshwater organism. For this, five clonal lineages of the cladoceran Daphnia longispina O.F. Müller, exhibiting a differential tolerance to lethal levels of copper, were selected. Each clonal lineage was exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of sodium chloride (assumed as a protective surrogate to evaluate the toxicity of increased salinity to freshwater organisms). Mortality, time to release the first brood and total number of neonates per female were monitored and the somatic growth rate and intrinsic rate of natural increase were computed for each clonal lineage. Data here obtained were compared with their lethal responses to copper and significant negative correlations were found. These results suggest that genetically eroded populations of D. longispina, due to copper or salinity, may be particularly susceptible to a later exposure to the other contaminant supporting the multiple stressors differential tolerance.

  2. Effects of copper on the physiological responses of the commercial crab Lithodes santolla (Decapoda: Anomura larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Amin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of copper toxicity on zoea I of Lithodes santolla (Decapoda: Anomura were analysed. The 96-h LC50 was estimated, resulting in 298.5 µg L-1. Groups of larvae were exposed to sublethal concentrations (40, 80 and 160 µg L-1 for 96 h. Oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, O:N atomic ratio, lipid peroxidation (LPO and body water content were measured. Oxygen consumption of treated groups (mean 46.92 ± 8.03 µg-atom O2 h-1 mg-1 did not differ significantly with control. Ammonia excretion decreased by 60% at higher Cu concentration (1.61 ± 0.65 µg-atom N-NH3 h-1 mg-1, leading to a 117% increase in the O:N ratio. LPO values during the exposure time were higher in all treatments than in the controls. The water content was significantly higher in treatments than in controls. The highest concentration assayed, which represents about 50% of 96-h LC50, had evident effects on the parameters analysed. The values of copper in water reported for the coastal zone of Ushuaia bay exceed the value established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA for ambient water quality criteria. Therefore, the results obtained in the present study are a contribution to the study of potential effects of copper as a common stressor in the first larval stage of this commercial species of the Beagle Channel.

  3. Histopathological effect of sub-lethal concentration of aluminum phosphide (phostoxin on Clarias gariepinus juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode B. Olurin

    Full Text Available Abtsract: The study evaluated the effect of sub-lethal concentration of phostoxin on Clarias gariepinus juveniles. C. gariepinus juveniles belonging to the same cohort (40.1±1.2g; 18.1±1.1cm from a commercial fish farm were randomly placed ten in each of 15 plastic tanks containing 15 liters of water. They were exposed for 96 hrs to three sub-lethal concentrations (treatments of phostoxin (0.125, 0.250, 0.5mg L-1 and a phostoxin free control. At the end of 96 hrs exposure, they were dissected and the tissues need for histopathology removed and fixed in Bouin's fluid. The gill filament exhibited fusion at the secondary lamella that was progressive with concentration. At the highest concentration of exposure, the secondary lamellae showed marked pyknotic and necrotic changes characterized by epithelia detachment. The hepatic tissue showed mild inflammatory changes at lower concentrations while at the highest concentration of exposure there was marked inflammation with observed hydropic degeneration. In the kidney, an inflammatory change was only observed in the interstices at the highest dose of exposure with the convoluted tubules showing partial shrinkage. Phostoxin showed to have significantly caused alterations in cyto-architecture of the gills and to a considerable extent liver and kidney of C. gariepinus.

  4. Sublethal consequences of urban life for wild vertebrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Austin J; Peiman, Kathryn S; de Bruijn, Robert; Cooke, Steven J; Birnie-Gauvin, Kim

    2016-01-01

    ... — while others have not. Here we present a review of the sublethal consequences of life in the city for wild vertebrates, and demonstrate that urban animals face an almost completely different set of physiological...

  5. Contact irritant responses of Aedes aegypti Using sublethal concentration and focal application of pyrethroid chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortance Manda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated contact irritant and spatial repellent behaviors in Aedes aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentrations of chemicals. These sublethal actions are currently being evaluated in the development of a push-pull strategy for Ae. aegypti control. This study reports on mosquito escape responses after exposure to candidate chemicals for a contact irritant focused push-pull strategy using varying concentrations and focal application. METHODS: Contact irritancy (escape behavior, knockdown and 24 hour mortality rates were quantified in populations of female Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions and validated in the field (Thailand and Peru using experimental huts. Evaluations were conducted using varying concentrations and treatment surface area coverage (SAC of three pyrethroid insecticides: alphacypermethrin, lambacyhalothrin and deltamethrin. RESULTS: Under laboratory conditions, exposure of Ae. aegypti to alphacypermethrin using the standard field application rate (FAR resulted in escape responses at 25% and 50% SAC that were comparable with escape responses at 100% SAC. Significant escape responses were also observed at <100% SAC using ½FAR of all test compounds. In most trials, KD and 24 hour mortality rates were higher in mosquitoes that did not escape than in those that escaped. In Thailand, field validation studies indicated an early time of exit (by four hours and 40% increase in escape using ½FAR of alphacypermethrin at 75% SAC compared to a matched chemical-free control. In Peru, however, the maximum increase in Ae. aegypti escape from alphacypermethrin-treated huts was 11%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results presented here suggest a potential role for sublethal and focal application of contact irritant chemicals in an Ae. aegypti push-pull strategy to reduce human-vector contact inside treated homes. However, the impact of an increase in escape response on dengue virus transmission is

  6. A comparison of the sublethal and lethal toxicity of four pesticides in Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbein, Simone; Connon, Richard E; Lawler, Sharon P; Geist, Juergen

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory toxicity testing is the primary tool used for surface water environmental risk assessment; however, there are critical information gaps regarding the sublethal effects of pesticides. In 10-day exposures, we assessed the lethal and sublethal (motility and growth) toxicities of four commonly used pesticides, bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and chlorpyrifos, on two freshwater invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca. Pyrethroids were more toxic than the organophosphate chlorpyrifos in both species. Bifenthrin was most toxic to H. azteca survival and growth. Cyfluthrin was most toxic to C. dilutus. However, cyfluthrin had the greatest effect on motility on both H. azteca and C. dilutus. The evaluated concentrations of chlorpyrifos did not affect C. dilutus motility or growth, but significantly impacted H. azteca growth. Motility served as the most sensitive endpoint in assessing sublethal effects at low concentrations for both species, while growth was a good indicator of toxicity for all four pesticides for H. azteca. The integration of sublethal endpoints in ambient water monitoring and pesticide regulation efforts could improve identification of low-level pesticide concentrations that may eventually cause negative effects on food webs and community structure in aquatic environments.

  7. Effects of Sublethal Concentrations of Insecticides on the Functional Response of Two Mirid Generalist Predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki F Martinou

    Full Text Available The use of agrochemicals particularly pesticides, can hamper the effectiveness of natural enemies, causing disruption in the ecosystem service of biological control. In the current study, the effects of the insecticides thiacloprid and chlorantraniliprole on the functional response curves were assessed for two mirid predator nymphs, Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur and Nesidiocoris tenuis Reuter. In the absence of insecticides, both predators exhibited a type II functional response when feeding on eggs of the moth Ephestia kuehniella. N. tenuis seems to be a more efficient predator than M. pygmaeus, as model estimated handling time was significantly lower for the former than for the latter. Residual exposure of M. pygmaeus to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide was associated with a change in the asymptote but not the type of the functional response curve. Thiacloprid seems to be the least compatible with M. pygmaeus, as it led to both a significant reduction of the attack rate and an increase in handling time. In contrast, chlorantraniliprole exposure significantly increased the handling time, but not the attack rate of the predator. Residual exposure of N. tenuis to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide did not have a significant effect on the type nor the parameters of the functional response model. The results show that pesticide residues that do not have lethal effects on beneficial arthropods can reduce prey consumption depending on predator species and on likely risks associated with toxicity.

  8. The role of sublethal effects in evaluating earthworm responses to soil contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilborn, D.; Bollman, M.; Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Frequently, standard test methods rely upon relatively straightforward, easily interpreted endpoints to evaluate biological effects, like growth inhibition, gross morbidity or death. In soil contamination evaluations, for example, earthworm toxicity tests are routinely completed in order to consider adverse biological effects associated with exposures to soil samples in the laboratory or field. Here, the toxicity endpoint measured in the standard test using Eisenia foetida is death; however, if chronic effects are more appropriate to the questions being asked within a risk assessment context, then alternative test endpoints must be developed and standardized. Prior evaluations have relied upon sublethal endpoints, most frequently behavioral and morphological observations, for evaluating chronic effects associated with contaminant exposures. The authors applied these behavioral and morphological endpoints in analyzing potential chronic effects in earthworms exposed to heavy metal-contaminated soils in both the laboratory and field. In using a relatively standard set of these sublethal endpoints the authors found that these endpoints could be used to evaluate chronic effects associated with soil exposures, but that selection of the specific end-points had to be adequately standardized and that observer bias had to be adequately characterized in order for these measures of chronic effects to be unequivocally applied within an ecological risk assessment.

  9. Copper oxide nanoparticles can induce toxicity to the freshwater shredder Allogamus ligonifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Arunava; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2012-11-01

    Increased commercialisation of nanometal-based products augments the possibility of their deposition into aquatic ecosystems; this, in turn, may pose risks to aquatic biota and associated ecological functions. Freshwater invertebrate shredders mostly use microbially-colonized plant litter as food resource and play an important role in aquatic detritus food webs. We assessed lethal effects of nanoCuO on the shredder Allogamus ligonifer (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae) by determining the concentration that induced 50% of death (LC(50)), and sublethal effects of nanoCuO on the feeding behaviour and growth of the shredder by exposing the animals to: (i) stream water supplemented with nanoCuO and microbially-colonized leaves, and (ii) stream water (without nanoCuO) and microbially-colonized leaves pre-exposed to nanoCuO. Results from acute lethal tests showed that the 96 h LC(50) of nanoCuO was very high (569 mg L(-1)). In the absence of nanoparticles, leaf consumption rate was 0.27 mg leaf DM mg(-1) animal DM d(-1) and the shredder growth rate was 56 μg animal DM mg(-1) animal DM d(-1). A significant inhibition in leaf consumption rate (up to 47%) and invertebrate growth rate (up to 46%) was observed when shredders were exposed to the higher tested sublethal concentration of nanoCuO (75 mg L(-1)) through either contaminated stream water or pre-contaminated food. The exposure to increased nanoCuO concentration via water or pre-contaminated food led to higher accumulation of copper in the larval body. Leached water-soluble ionic copper from the nanoCuO adsorbed or accumulated in the shredder (up to 10.2% of total Cu) seemed to influence the feeding behaviour and growth of the shredder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Time-dependent changes in copper indium gallium (di)selenide and cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules due to outdoor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Sato, Ritsuko; Ishii, Tetsuyuki; Chiba, Yasuo; Masuda, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    The performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules deteriorates with time due to outdoor exposure. We investigated the time-dependent changes in PV modules and evaluated the amount of power generated during their lifetime. Once a year, the exposed modules were removed and measured under standard test conditions using a solar simulator. Their outputs were measured indoors and normalized to nominal values. In addition, the relationship between the indoor measurement and the energy yield for thin-film PV modules will be reported. In CIGS PV modules, the normalized maximum power (P MAX) and performance ratio (PR) differ with the type of module. The P MAX and PR of CdTe PV modules significantly decrease after outdoor exposure for three years. These results help to determine the characteristics of the time-dependent changes in the P MAX of PV modules due to outdoor exposure.

  11. [Repair mechanism of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongmin; Lv, Haipeng; Ai, Zhilu; Wang, Na; Xie, Xinhua; Fan, Huiping; Pan, Zhili; Suo, Biao

    2015-11-04

    To study the repair mechanisms of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aurous cells. We resuscitated frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus at 37 degrees C for different time within 3 h. Meanwhile, we compared the morphological changes of the frozen sublethally damaged cells after 1 h of resuscitation using transmission electron microscopy assay (TEM). The expressions of the transcriptional attenuator MsrR (msrR), iron (Fe3+) ABC transporter ATP-binding protein (fhuC), and cytochrome b (cytB) genes were quantitatively analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) method. The content of cells outside leakage, active oxygen (ROS), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. More than 99% of the frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus repaired after 3 h. The resuscitated cells expressed an equal resistance to high concentration of NaCl. Real-time PCR results showed that the msrR and fhuC genes expressions were down-regulated, whereas the cytB gene expression was up-regulated significantly. The frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus cellar surface ultrastructure significant changed during resuscitation. The cell surface became compact and sturdy from smooth and transparent. The cell leakage rate of ultraviolet absorption material gradually decreased. Meanwhile, the intracellular ROS level declined along with the decrease of SOD activity. Frozen sublethally damaged cells may regain the capability of resistance to high salt stress by repairing cell membrane integrity, reducing the content of ROS through gene regulation, inhibiting the toxicity of active oxygen to the cells. Meanwhile, the regulation of metabolism related genes (cytB) provides the energy for the requirement of cells, therefore, the frozen sublethally damaged cells were repaired finally.

  12. Feeding Inhibition: the Ups and Downs of Sublethal Effects on Grazers and Detritivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A.; Culp, J.; Liber, K.; Baird, D.

    2005-05-01

    Sublethal impacts are likely the primary mechanism of exposure for the aquatic community in the case of soluble agricultural pesticides. This study examines the effects of pulsed exposures of the common insecticide, imidacloprid, on the feeding and growth of the mayfly Epeorus longimanus, and the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Examining the effects of pulsed exposures of imidacloprid is particularly relevant due to the soluble (0.51g/L) nature of this compound. Recovery experiments were conducted by exposing mayflies and oligochaetes to an environmentally realistic range (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 ppb) of concentrations for a short period. Effects on feeding were measured by quantifying the foodstuffs consumed by mayflies and egested by oligochaetes. In tandem with the feeding experiments, a series of artificial stream experiments were undertaken that demonstrate the changes in growth and abundance of adult mayflies in response to this common insecticide stressor.

  13. Copper transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  14. Changes in urinary catecholamines in response to noise exposure in workers at Sarcheshmeh Copper Complex, Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Reza; Khanjani, Narges; Barkhordari, Abolfazl; Rahimi Moghadam, Somayeh; Mozaffari, Abbas; Gozashti, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-11-01

    Noise is one of the most harmful agents in the workplace. In addition to the adverse effects of noise on the auditory system, as a stressor it may cause increased blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, anxiety, and impaired secretion of hormones. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in urinary catecholamines in workers exposed to industrial noise. This is an experimental study of the workers at the smelter section of Sarcheshmeh Copper Industries done on two separate days. During the first day, urine samples from 20 workers who did not use any hearing protection device, were collected during an 8-h work shift and on the second day the same was done but they were asked to use earplugs. Also 20 people were selected as a control group from people who were not exposed to noise at work. Urinary catecholamine levels were measured with ELISA kits. The mean urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in the workers (without earplugs) was respectively 8.69 and 35.56 μg/8h on the first day and on the second day (with earplugs) dropped to 6.45 and 30.95 μg/8h. Noise reduction by earplugs led to almost significant reductions in urinary epinephrine (p = 0.05) and significant reductions in norepinephrine (p = 0.02). The results showed that with noise reduction the urinary excretion of stress hormones, especially norepinephrine significantly decreases and workers are probably less prone to stress-related disorders.

  15. The effect of low-molecular-weight organic acids on copper toxicity in E. fetida in an acute exposure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Yu, Jiaoda; Li, Ying; Liu, Aiqin

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids (OAs) on the toxicity of copper (Cu) to the earthworm Eisenia fetida (E. fetida) were investigated in a simulated soil solution. We exposed E. fetida to soil solution containing Cu and a variety of OAs (acetic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid, and EDTA). We found that the addition of OAs reduced the toxicity of Cu to E. fetida, where the reduction was strongest in EDTA and weakest in acetic acid. These compounds decreased the mortality rate of E. fetida that were exposed to Cu and reduced levels of antioxidant enzymes and malondialdehyde to unexposed control levels. E. fetida were exposed to Cu with OAs had reduced Cu(2+), which were likely caused by Cu forming complexes with the OAs, reducing the availability of Cu. The presence of OAs also reduced Cu-induced damage on earthworm cellular ultrastructures and changed the subcellular distribution of Cu. These results demonstrated that OAs could reduce the toxicity, as well as the bioavailability, of heavy metals in soil solutions where both OAs and heavy metals often coexist.

  16. Survival and growth of freshwater pulmonate and nonpulmonate snails in 28-day exposures to copper, ammonia, and pentachlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    We performed toxicity tests with two species of pulmonate snails (Lymnaea stagnalis and Physa gyrina) and four taxa of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae (Pyrgulopsis robusta,Taylorconcha serpenticola, Fluminicola sp., and Fontigens aldrichi). Snails were maintained in static-renewal or recirculating culture systems with adults removed periodically to isolate cohorts of offspring for toxicity testing. This method successfully produced offspring for both species of pulmonate snails and for two hydrobiid species, P. robusta and Fluminicola sp. Toxicity tests were performed for 28 days with copper, ammonia, and pentachlorophenol in hard reconstituted water with endpoints of survival and growth. Tests were started with 1-week-old L. stagnalis, 2-week-old P. gyrina, 5- to 13-week-old P. robusta and Fluminicola sp., and older juveniles and adults of several hydrobiid species. For all three chemicals, chronic toxicity values for pulmonate snails were consistently greater than those for hydrobiid snails, and hydrobiids were among the most sensitive taxa in species sensitivity distributions for all three chemicals. These results suggest that the toxicant sensitivity of nonpulmonate snails in the family Hydrobiidae would not be adequately represented by results of toxicity testing with pulmonate snails.

  17. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni Goñalons, Carolina; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI), a neonicotinoid used for its high selective toxicity to insects, is one of the most commonly used pesticides. However, its effect on beneficial insects such as the honeybee Apis mellifera L is still controversial. As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period. Also, because this insecticide acts as a cholinergic-nicotinic agonist and these pathways take part in insect learning and memory processes; we used IMI to assess their role and the changes they suffer along early adulthood. We focused on appetitive behaviours based on the proboscis extension response. Laboratory reared adults of 2 to 10 days of age were exposed to sublethal IMI doses (0.25 or 0.50ng) administered orally or topically prior to behavioural assessment. Modification of gustatory responsiveness and impairment of learning and memory were found as a result of IMI exposure. These outcomes differed depending on age of evaluation, type of exposure and IMI dose, being the youngest bees more sensitive and the highest oral dose more toxic. Altogether, these results imply that IMI administered at levels found in agroecosystems can reduce sensitivity to reward and impair associative learning in young honeybees. Therefore, once a nectar inflow with IMI traces is distributed within the hive, it could impair in-door duties with negative consequences on colony performance. PMID:26488410

  18. Assessment of the lethal and sublethal effects of 20 environmental chemicals in zebrafish embryos and larvae by using OECD TG 212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Yoshifumi; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hiroko; Shintaku, Youko; Iguchi, Taisen; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2017-10-01

    Fish embryo toxicity tests are used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of environmental chemicals in aquatic organisms. Previously, we used a short-term toxicity test published by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (test no. 212: Fish, Short-term Toxicity Test on Embryo and Sac-Fry Stages [OECD TG 212]) to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of aniline and several chlorinated anilines in zebrafish embryos and larvae. To expand upon this previous study, we used OECD TG 212 in zebrafish embryos and larvae to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of 20 additional environmental chemicals that included active pharmaceutical ingredients, pesticides, metals, aromatic compounds or chlorinated anilines. Zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were exposed to the test chemicals until 8 days post-fertilization. A delayed lethal effect was induced by 16 of the 20 test chemicals, and a positive correlation was found between heart rate turbulence and mortality. We also found that exposure to the test chemicals at concentrations lower than the lethal concentration induced the sublethal effects of edema, body curvature and absence of swim-bladder inflation. In conclusion, the environmental chemicals assessed in the present study induced both lethal and sublethal effects in zebrafish embryos and larvae, as assessed by using OECD TG 212. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Mortality, Temporary Sterilization, and Maternal Effects of Sublethal Heat in Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukke, Bjørn Arne; Aak, Anders; Edgar, Kristin Skarsfjord

    2015-01-01

    Adult bed bugs were exposed to the sublethal temperatures 34.0°C, 35.5°C, 37.0°C, 38.5°C, or 40.0°C for 3, 6, or 9 days. The two uppermost temperatures induced 100% mortality within 9 and 2 days, respectively, whereas 34.0°C had no observable effect. The intermediate temperatures interacted with time to induce a limited level of mortality but had distinct effects on fecundity, reflected by decreases in the number of eggs produced and hatching success. Adult fecundity remained low for up to 40 days after heat exposure, and the time until fertility was restored correlated with the temperature-sum experienced during heat exposure. Three or 6 days of parental exposure to 38.5°C significantly lowered their offspring’s feeding and moulting ability, which consequently led to a failure to continue beyond the third instar. Eggs that were deposited at 22.0°C before being exposed to 37.0°C for 3 or 6 days died, whereas eggs that were exposed to lower temperatures were not significantly affected. Eggs that were deposited during heat treatment exhibited high levels of mortality also at 34.0°C and 35.5°C. The observed negative effects of temperatures between 34.0°C and 40.0°C may be utilized in pest management, and sublethal temperature exposure ought to be further investigated as an additional tool to decimate or potentially eradicate bed bug populations. The effect of parental heat exposure on progeny demonstrates the importance of including maternal considerations when studying bed bug environmental stress reactions. PMID:25996999

  20. Coping with copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines; Jacquiod, Samuel; Brejnrod, Asker

    2016-01-01

    Copper has been intensively used in industry and agriculture since mid-18(th) century and is currently accumulating in soils. We investigated the diversity of potential active bacteria by 16S rRNA gene transcript amplicon sequencing in a temperate grassland soil subjected to century-long exposure...

  1. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster.

  2. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. NA{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase, histopathological, and genetic responses of Corbicula fluminea to sediment-associated copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Time-dependent responses to sediment-associated copper were studies at hierarchical levels of biological organization along an extreme concentration gradient (40 to 40,000 mg/kg total Cu). Laboratory and in situ estimates of molecular to tissue-level responses (Na/K-ATPase activity, DNA content, histopathology) were monitored in Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam), and compared with laboratory and field based survival of Corbicula and Elimia teres (an indigenous Gastropoda). Mollusc survival was, in turn, compared with effects on macrobenthic community composition along the stream/[Cu] gradient. Relationships between selected sediment characteristics and the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment associated copper were also investigated. Sediment-associated copper depressed Na/K-ATPase activity and led to histopathological damage of renal and gill epithelia (vacuolization, degeneration), indicating that impaired ion regulation was an important mechanism of toxicity. Concurrent reductions in DNA content were believed to be secondary effects due to cell death, not an indication of genotoxicity. Sublethal responses were significantly correlated with survival in both species; however, while survival in situ was indicative of differences in community structure, laboratory-based survival was not. Copper levels in tissues were indicative of exposure, but were not significantly correlated with adverse effects. Copper levels in sediments, interstitial water, and overlying water varied independently of sediment characteristics except pH. Cu/AVS ratios were predictive of Corbicula and Elimia survival, but were not significantly related to differences in community structure. Instead, macrobenthic community structure was influenced by other sediment factors (grain size, Eh, pH).

  4. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer A; Hood, W Michael; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Delaplane, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate) and Check Mite+ (coumaphos) and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  5. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Berry

    Full Text Available In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate and Check Mite+ (coumaphos and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  6. Effect of mercury vapour exposure on urinary excretion of calcium, zinc and copper: relationship to alterations in functional and structural integrity of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Ibrahim A M; Gadallah, Mohsen; Shafik, Ahmed; Shouman, Ahmed E

    2002-09-01

    The kidney has a remarkable capacity to concentrate mercury (Hg) and as such is a primary target organ when exposure to Hg occurs, and it is also an organ for Hg excretion. The present work aims to investigate the effect of occupational Hg vapour exposure on the urinary excretion of calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), and the possible association of this excretion to work duration as well as renal alterations. 83 non-smoker participants (36 referents, age: 35.6 +/- 9.5 years; 27 Hg vapour-exposed workers with or = 11 years work duration, age: 39.50 +/- 8.50 years) were included in the present study. Urinary levels of microalbumin (U-Malb) and retinol-binding protein (U-RBP) as well as cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity (U-GST) were measured to assess the glomerular and proximal tubular reabsorption functions as well as structural integrity of proximal tubules; respectively. In addition, blood Hg (B-Hg), serum levels of Hg (S-Hg) and Ca (S-Ca), and urinary levels of Hg (U-Hg), Ca (U-Ca), Zn (U-Zn), Cu (U-Cu) and creatinine (U-cr) were estimated. In comparison to referents, all investigated parameters showed significant increase (except S-Ca and U-Zn/U-Cu ratio that significantly decreased among the workers as one group, S-Ca and U-Zn/U-Cu ratio that significantly and nonsignificantly decreased; respectively among workers with or = 11 years work duration). In addition, B-Hg was nonsignificantly increased and S-Ca was significantly decreased; also, both U-Hg and U-Zn/U-Cu were nonsignificantly decreased among workers with > or = 11 years work duration in comparison to those with < or = 10 years work duration. Also, each of U-Hg, U-Ca, U-Zn and U-Cu was related to one another, while each of U-Ca, U-Zn and U-Cu was related to each of U-Malb, U-RBP and U-GST (except U-Zn was not related to U-GST). Hg vapour exposure leads to renal alterations which may parallel the change in proteinuria and enzymuria as well as the increased loss in urine of each of Ca, Zn

  7. Enhancement of pigment concentrations in Dunaliella tertiolecta as a result of copper toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustigman, B.K.

    1986-11-01

    The addition of copper to coastal waters through the disposal of complex effluents has been increasing. Copper is a well known algicide. It binds to the cell membrane, effects permeability mechanisms and attaches to SH groups on vital enzymes. The ability of algae to withstand copper toxicity varies greatly. The green flagellate, Dunaliella tertiolecta has previously been shown to be highly resistant to copper. Its ability to withstand high concentrations of copper promotes growth of Dunaliella in coastal waters contaminated with increased copper concentrations. Dunaliella tertiolecta possesses chlorophylls a and b, small amounts of alpha- and greater amounts of beta-carotene as well as neoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper on the growth and production of chlorophyll and carotenoids in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

  8. Sublethal effects of manganese on the haematology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information concerning the sublethal effects of pollutants, such as metals, forms an integral part of ecosystem health assessment programmes and of procedures followed to develop water quality guidelines for environmetal protection. The data from this study were incorporated into a water quality index (RAUWaterz) ...

  9. Sublethal haematological effects of zinc on the freshwater fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... industrial and domestic wastes water discharges and animals where it ... that zinc could cause sub-acute effects that change fish behaviours. ... These include the sublethal effects of concentrations of water extracts of akee apple on C. gariepinus (Onusiriuka and Ufodike, 1998). Toxicity of cas- sava leaf ...

  10. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it is concluded that sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron reduced the amounts of ovarian constituents during ovarian development and oogenesis in S. litura. These reductions increased with an increase in dose from LD10 to LD30. The effects of chlorfluazuron on the amounts of ovarian constituents are presumed to ...

  11. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  12. Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms, with special reference to aquatic insects. HF Dallas, V Ross-Gillespie. Abstract. Water temperature is a key variable affecting aquatic organisms. Understanding their response to elevated water temperatures is important for estimating upper thermal limits, ...

  13. Sublethal effects of industrial chemicals on fish fingerlings ( Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tilapia guineensis commonly found in the Niger Delta ecological zone of Nigeria was exposed to sublethal concentrations (1.56, 3.13 mg/l) of neatex (industrial detergent) and norust CR 486 (corrosion inhibitor) using the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) # 203 protocol. At test termination ...

  14. Sublethal effects of carbaryl on embryonic and gonadal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex reversal was delayed in the experimental groups, with a sex ratio of 13 females to 0 males, but the control group recorded 6 females to 8 males. These results suggest that sublethal doses of carbaryl in the environment, similar to those used in the current study, may have an adverse effect on the reproductive success of ...

  15. Copper-2 Ingestion, Plus Increased Meat Eating Leading to Increased Copper Absorption, Are Major Factors Behind the Current Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J

    2015-12-02

    It has become clear that copper toxicity is playing a major role in Alzheimer's disease; but why is the brain copper toxicity with cognition loss in Alzheimer's disease so much different clinically than brain copper toxicity in Wilson's disease, which results in a movement disorder? Furthermore, why is the inorganic copper of supplement pills and in drinking water so much more damaging to cognition than the organic copper in food? A recent paper, which shows that almost all food copper is copper-1, that is the copper-2 of foods reverts to the reduced copper-1 form at death or harvest, gives new insight into these questions. The body has an intestinal transport system for copper-1, Ctr1, which channels copper-1 through the liver and into safe channels. Ctr1 cannot absorb copper-2, and some copper-2 bypasses the liver, ends up in the blood quickly, and is toxic to cognition. Humans evolved to handle copper-1 safely, but not copper-2. Alzheimer's is at least in part, a copper-2 toxicity disease, while Wilson's is a general copper overload disease. In this review, we will show that the epidemiology of the Alzheimer's epidemic occurring in developed, but not undeveloped countries, fits with the epidemiology of exposure to copper-2 ingestion leached from copper plumbing and from copper supplement pill ingestion. Increased meat eating in developed countries is also a factor, because it increases copper absorption, and thus over all copper exposure.

  16. Sublethal and hormesis effects of imidacloprid on the soybean aphid Aphis glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanyan; Xiao, Da; Li, Jinyu; Chen, Zhou; Biondi, Antonio; Desneux, Nicolas; Gao, Xiwu; Song, Dunlun

    2015-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is a major pest in soybean crop. Current management of this pest relies mainly on insecticides applications, and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid has been proposed as an effective insecticide to control A. glycines in soybean field. Imidacloprid at lethal concentrations not only exerts acute toxicity to A. glycines, but also cause various biological changes when aphids are chronically exposed to lower concentrations. In this study, we assessed the effects of a low-lethal (0.20 mg L(-1)) and two sublethal (0.05 and 0.10 mg L(-1)) imidacloprid concentrations on various A. glycines life history traits. Aphid exposure to 0.20 mg L(-1) imidacloprid caused slower juvenile development, shorter reproductive period, and reduced adult longevity, fecundity and total lifespan. Stimulatory effects, i.e. hormesis, on reproduction and immature development duration were observed in aphids exposed to the lower sublethal imidacloprid concentrations. Consequently, the net reproduction rate (R 0) was significantly higher than in the control aphids. These findings stress the importance of the actual imidacloprid concentration in its toxicological properties on A. glycines. Therefore, our results would be useful for assessing the overall effects of imidacloprid on A. glycines and for optimizing integrated pest management programs targeting this pest.

  17. Development and application of a sublethal toxicity test to PAH using marine harpacticoid copepods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeger, J.W.; Lotufo, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This research project was designed to improve the understanding of the acute and sublethal effects of PAHs to benthic invertebrates. Sublethal bioassay protocols for benthic harpacticoid copepods were developed, and two species of harpacticoids were exposed to a range of concentrations of sediment-amended PAHs; the single compounds fluoranthene and phenanthrene as well as a complex mixture (diesel fuel). The harpacticoid copepods Schizopera knabeni and Nitocra lacustris were tested using several bioassay approaches. Reproductive assays, feeding assays and avoidance tests were conducted in addition to lethal tests for S. knabeni. Species-specific differences in sensitivity were detected. Early life history stages were much more sensitive than adults in one species but not in the other. Concentrations of PAH as low as 26 micrograms PAH decreased copepod offspring production, egg hatching success, and embryonic and early-stage development, demonstrating the high sensitivity of life history-related endpoints. In addition, grazing on microalgae was significantly impaired at concentrations as low as 20 micrograms/g PAH after short exposures (<30 h). Finally it was demonstrated that harpacticoids can actively avoid contamination.

  18. Sub-lethal toxicity of chlorpyrifos on Common carp, Cyprinus carpio (Linnaeus, 1758: Biochemical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Banaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate pesticide, is widely used to control pests in agriculture farms and orchards of fruit trees. In this study, the fish were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos which were determined based on numerical value of 96 h LC50. Blood was sampled after 10, 20 and 30 days and biochemical parameters including glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and acetylcholinsetrase (AChE activities were measured. Behavioral changes in the fish were also recorded during the experiment. Unbalanced swimming, swimming in the surface water and hyperglycemia, increased blood triglyceride, and increased levels of AST, LDH and CK activities as well as decreased levels of AChE activity were important changes that were observed in the specimens exposed to chlorpyrifos during experimental periods. The most important alterations in the blood biochemical parameters were measured in the specimens exposed to 40 µg/L chlorpyrifos on the 20th and 30th day of the trial. In conclusion, results of the present study indicated that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos as low as 40 µg/L may cause biochemical and behavioral changes in Cyprinus carpio.

  19. Sublethal amounts of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil and carvacrol cause injury and changes in membrane fatty acid of Salmonella Typhimurium cultivated in a meat broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Isabelle da Silva; de Melo, Adma Nadja Ferreira; Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; Madruga, Marta Suely; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether sublethal concentrations of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) and its major compound carvacrol (CAR) cause injury to the cell membrane and outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 grown in a meat broth and to assess the effect of these substances on membrane fatty acid (FA) composition. Exposure of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 to sublethal concentrations of OVEO or CAR caused damage to the cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane. OVEO- and CAR-treated cells showed lower amounts of saturated FA than nontreated cells. Changes in membrane FA composition were mainly related to an increase of C16:1ω7c, C16:1ω7t, and C18:2ω6c, and to a decrease of C16:0, C17:0 cyclo, and C19:0 cyclo. These results indicate that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OVEO or CAR caused sublethal injury Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and suggest that an adaptive response to these stresses is related to increased synthesis of unsaturated FA and cis-trans isomerization.

  20. Sublethal effects of chlorantraniliprole on development, reproduction and vitellogenin gene (CsVg) expression in the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Lu, Mingxing; Han, Guangjie; Du, Yuzhou; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-12-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is one of the most damaging rice pests in the world. The sublethal effects of chlorantraniliprole on development,reproduction and mRNA expression levels of vitellogenin gene (CsVg) in C. suppressalis were investigated. Exposure of third-instar larvae to sublethal concentrations of chlorantraniliprole (LC10 and LC30 ) significantly extended larval duration, lowered the mean weight of male pupae and shortened male adult longevity. Pupal duration was significantly prolonged and the mean weight of female pupae was significantly lowered in the LC30 treatment group. While there were no significant sublethal effects on either the adult emergence rate or the egg hatch, the pupation rates in the LC10 treatment group (41.30%) and in the LC30 treatment group (23.98%) were significantly lower than the pupation rate of the control (71.86%), and LC10 and LC30 chlorantraniliprole significantly reduced fecundity, by 32.18 and 52.94% respectively. Furthermore, the expression levels of CsVg mRNA after exposure to LC10 and LC30 chlorantraniliprole significantly decreased, by 42.52 and 47.84% respectively, in 12-h-old female adults. Sublethal concentrations of chlorantraniliprole adversely affect the development and reproduction of C. suppressalis. The downregulation of CsVg by chlorantraniliprole might have negative impacts on the fecundity of C. suppressalis. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Different pathways for copper sulphate and copper nitrate antioxidation and organic acid excretion in Typha latifolia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubenova L.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The major topic of the present experiment was the investigation of the antioxidative enzymes and the root exudate excretion after plant exposure to copper. The copper was added for each treatment as copper sulphate and copper nitrate in the concentrations of 10 μM, 50 μM and 100 μM, respectively. The plant species chosen for the study was Typha latifolia. The experiment gives insight into the plant responses to different copper supplies during the same conditions of exposure. Remarkable results were obtained during the time course about the excretion of organic acids from Typha latifolia roots during one week of copper exposure. Oxalic acid, malic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid were detected. Interestingly, not all organic acids are excreted from the roots in the first hours after copper addition.

  2. Sublethal dietary effects of Microcystis on Sacramento splittail, Pogonichthys macrolepidotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Shawn; Deng, Dong-Fang; Lehman, Peggy; Teh, Swee

    2012-04-01

    The presence of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis in the upper San Francisco Estuary (SFE) since 1999 is a potential but to date an unquantified threat to the health and survival of aquatic organisms, such as fish and zooplankton. The microcystins (MCs) predominantly in the LR-form (MC-LR) contained in Microcystis is hepatotoxic and a potential threat to the fishery. This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary exposure of the endemic Sacramento splittail, Pogonichthys macrolepidotus in SFE to Microcystis and its toxin, MC-LR. Juvenile splittail (12.59 ± 0.7 g fish(-1)) were exposed to five diets for 28 d with MC-LR obtained from: (1) Microcystis harvested from the SFE and (2) a synthetic purified form of MC-LR. Three of the test diets contained 3.55 (D5), 9.14 (D10) and 17.13 (D20)mg MC-LR kg(-1) from Microcystis. The other two diets contained either purified MC-LR at 3.89 mg MC-LR kg(-1) (D5R) or no MC-LR (D0). The RNA/DNA ratio of fish muscle was significantly lower for all treatments fed test diets containing MC-LR compared to the control diet D0, suggesting Microcystis adversely affected nutritional status. Protein phosphatase 2A expression in the fish from the D5, D10 and D20 treatments were inversely affected by increasing concentrations of MC-LR. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and single cell necrosis were more prevalent and greater in severity in the fish exposed to the diets D10 and D20 compared to fish from the D0 treatment and indicate severe liver toxicity in splittail exposed to MC-LR. The sublethal effects on splittail characterized by this study suggest cyanobacterial blooms have the potential to affect splittail nutritional status and health in SFE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Chris G.; Brunson, Eric L.; Dwyer, F. James; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Kemble, Nile E.

    1998-01-01

    Short-term sediment toxicity tests that only measure effects on survival can be used to identify high levels of contamination but may not be able to identify marginally contaminated sediments. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for determining the potential sublethal effects of contaminants associated with sediment on the amphipod Hyalella azteca (e.g., reproduction). Exposures to sediment were started with 7- to 8-d-old amphipods. On day 28, amphipods were isolated from the sediment and placed in water-only chambers where reproduction was measured on day 35 and 42. Typically, amphipods were first in amplexus at about day 21 to 28 with release of the first brood between day 28 to 42. Endpoints measured included survival (day 28, 35, and 42), growth (as length and weight on day 28 and 42), and reproduction (number of young/female produced from day 28 to 42). This method was used to evaluate a formulated sediment and field-collected sediments with low to moderate concentrations of contaminants. Survival of amphipods in these sediments was typically >85% after the 28-d sediment exposures and the 14-d holding period in water to measure reproduction. Reproduction was more variable than growth; hence, more replicates might be needed to establish statistical differences among treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated that growth of H. azteca in sediment tests often provides unique information that can be used to discriminate toxic effects of exposure to contaminants. Either length or weight can be measured in sediment tests with H. azteca. However, additional statistical options are available if length is measured on individual amphipods, such as nested analysis of variance that can account for variance in length within replicates. Ongoing water-only studies testing select contaminants will provide additional data on the relative sensitivity and variability of sublethal endpoints in toxicity tests with H. azteca.

  4. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Acclimation to Sublethal Temperature on Subsequent Susceptibility of Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jianhua; Zhang, Huina

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is a popular alternative to synthetic pesticides in disinfesting food-processing facilities and empty grain storages. Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky is one of the most cosmopolitan and destructive insects found in empty grain storage facilities and processing facilities. The effect of acclimation in S. zeamais adults to sublethal high temperature on their subsequent susceptibility to high temperatures was investigated. S. zeamais adults were acclimated to 36°C for 0 (as a control), 1, 3, and 5 h, and then were exposed at 43, 47, 51, and 55°C for different time intervals respectively. Acclimation to sublethal high temperature significantly reduced subsequent susceptibility of S. zeamais adults to lethal high temperatures of 43, 47, 51, and 55°C, although the mortality of S. zeamais adults significantly increased with increasing exposure time at lethal high temperatures. The mortality of S. zeamais adults with 1, 3, and 5 h of acclimation to 36°C was significantly lower than that of S. zeamais adults without acclimation when exposed to the same lethal high temperatures. The present results suggest that the whole facility should be heated to target lethal high temperature as soon as possible, avoiding decreasing the control effectiveness of heat treatment due to the acclimation in stored product insects to sublethal temperature.

  6. Low salinity enhances NI-mediated oxidative stress and sub-lethal toxicity to the green shore crab (Carcinus maenas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-12-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a metal of environmental concern, known to cause toxicity to freshwater organisms by impairing ionoregulation and/or respiratory gas exchange, and by inducing oxidative stress. However, little is known regarding how nickel toxicity is influenced by salinity. In the current study we investigated the salinity-dependence and mechanisms of sub-lethal Ni toxicity in a euryhaline crab (Carcinus maenas). Crabs were acclimated to three experimental salinities--20, 60 and 100% seawater (SW)--and exposed to 3mg/L Ni for 24h or 96 h. Tissues were dissected for analysis of Ni accumulation, gills were taken for oxidative stress analysis (catalase activity and protein carbonyl content), haemolymph ions were analysed for ionoregulatory disturbance, and oxygen consumption was determined in exercised crabs after 96 h of Ni exposure. Total Ni accumulation was strongly dependant on salinity, with crabs from 20% SW displaying the highest tissue Ni burdens after both 24 and 96-h exposures. After 96 h of exposure, the highest accumulation of Ni occurred in the posterior (ionoregulatory) gills at the lowest salinity, 20% SW. Posterior gill 8 exhibited elevated protein carbonyl levels and decreased catalase activity after Ni exposure, but only in 20% SW. Similarly, decreased levels of haemolymph Mg and K and an increased level of Ca were recorded but only in crabs exposed to Ni for 96 h in 20% SW. Oxygen consumption after exercise was also inhibited in crabs exposed to Ni in 20% SW. These data show for the first time the simultaneous presence of all three modes of sub-lethal Ni toxicity in exposed animals, and indicate a strong salinity dependence of sub-lethal Ni toxicity to the euryhaline crab, C. maenas, a pattern that corresponded to tissue Ni accumulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do biopesticides affect the demographic traits of a parasitoid wasp and its biocontrol services through sublethal effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Biondi

    Full Text Available Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®, emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life

  8. Do Biopesticides Affect the Demographic Traits of a Parasitoid Wasp and Its Biocontrol Services through Sublethal Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Antonio; Zappalà, Lucia; Stark, John D.; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®), emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment) and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life-history variables

  9. Thermal inactivation and sublethal injury kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth versus agar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Devlieghere, Frank; Geeraerd, Annemie; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2017-02-21

    The objective of the present study was to compare the thermal inactivation and sublethal injury kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth (suspended cells) and on solid surface (agar-seeded cells). A 3-strain cocktail of S. enterica or L. monocytogenes inoculated in broth or on agar was subjected to heating in a water bath at various set temperatures (55.0, 57.5 and 60.0°C for S. enterica and 60.0, 62.5 and 65°C for L. monocytogenes). The occurrence of sublethally injured cells was determined by comparing enumerations on nonselective (TSAYE) and selective (XLD or ALOA) media. Results showed that the inactivation curves obtained from selective media were log-linear, and significant shoulders (pagar surface exhibited higher heat resistance than those in broth. For S. enterica, cell injury increased with the exposure time, no difference was observed when treated at temperatures from 55.0 to 60.0°C, while for L. monocytogenes, cell injury increased significantly with heating time and treatment temperature (from 60.0 to 65°C). Moreover, the degree of sublethal injury affected by thermal treatment in broth or on agar surface depended upon the target microorganism. Higher proportions of injured S. enterica cells were observed for treatment in broth than on agar surface, while the opposite was found for L. monocytogenes. The provided information may be used to assess the efficacy of thermal treatment processes on surfaces for inactivation of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes, and it provides insight into the sublethally injured survival state of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes treated in liquid or on solid food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sub-lethal doses of photodynamic therapy affect biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, M; Chiniforush, N; Shahabi, S; Ghorbanzadeh, R; Bahador, A

    2016-09-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of a primary endodontic infection, it is extremely likely that microorganisms would be exposed to sub-lethal doses of PDT (sPDT). Although sPDT cannot kill microorganisms, it can considerably influence microbial virulence. This study was conducted to characterize the effect of sPDT using toluidine blue O (TBO), methylene blue (MB), and indocyanine green (ICG) on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis. The antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential of ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT against E. faecalis was analyzed at sub-lethal doses (1/2-1/64 minimum inhibitory concentration) using the XTT reduction assay, crystal violet assay, and scanning electron microscopy. Higher doses of sPDT adversely affected biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-PDT at a maximum sub-lethal dose markedly reduced the formation of biofilm up to 42.8%, 22.6%, and 19.5%, respectively. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT showed a marked reduction in bacterial metabolic activity by 98%, 94%, and 82%, respectively. ICG-PDT showed a stronger inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in E. faecalis than MB- and TBO-PDT at sub-lethal levels. Interestingly, a gradual increase in metabolic activity and biofilm formation upon exposure to a lower dose of test sPDT were observed. sPDT showed dual effect on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis. High doses revealed antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses had conflicting results. Hence, when PDT is prescribed in clinical settings, the dose of PDT used in vivo should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  12. Evaluating sublethal indicators of stress in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) caged in an urban stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, M.C.; Belin, J.I. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

    1998-12-31

    Freshwater bivalves have been used extensively to monitor chemical accumulation in field exposures, although little information is available on the use of biomarker measurements in field exposures with bivalves. DNA strand breakage, growth rate, condition index and percentage tissue water were measured in freshwater Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed in-situ in a stream that receives urban and industrial stormwater runoff and in a non-impacted reference stream. After 4 weeks exposure, DNA strand lengths in foot tissue from Trail Creek-exposed clams were significantly shorter than DNA from reference clams. These results suggest a reduction in DNA integrity in Trail Creek-exposed clams, possibly indicating exposure to genotoxic chemicals. No significant differences were observed in the growth rates of clams. However, a significant inverse relationship was detected between condition index and % tissue water for all clams. Furthermore, site-specific differences in percentage tissue water and condition indices were observed after 2 and 10 weeks exposure. For this study DNA strand breakage, condition indices, and tissue hydration appear to be more sensitive indicators of sublethal toxicity than growth.

  13. Influence of copper oxide nanoparticle form and shape on toxicity and bioaccumulation in the deposit feeder, Capitella teleta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lina; Banta, Gary T; Selck, Henriette; Forbes, Valery E

    2015-10-01

    Few in vivo studies have been conducted to assess how nanoparticle (NP) characteristics such as particle form and shape affect their toxicity and bioaccumulation. In the present study, the deposit feeder, Capitella teleta, was used to investigate the influence of copper form (CuO NPs, micron-sized CuO particles, and aqueous Cu) and CuO NP shape (spheres, rods and platelets) on toxicity and bioaccumulation through sediment exposures of approximately 250 μg Cu/g dw sed. There were no effects of nanoparticle form or shape on mortality or growth rate during the exposure period. However, mortality increased to approximately 26.3% on average in all Cu treatments after the depuration period indicating a delayed effect of Cu exposure, despite more than 90% depuration of Cu during this period. A significant effect of nanoparticle shape was detected on body burden, the gross uptake rate constant and the depuration rate constant, suggesting preferential accumulation of rods by the worms. We recommend that additional sublethal endpoints and longer exposure durations should be examined to fully understand the environmental risks of CuO nanoparticles compared to other forms of Cu entering marine sediment systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The growth and development of Schistosoma mansoni in mice exposed to sublethal doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, R.; Wilson, R.A. (Univ. of York, Heslington (England))

    1989-12-01

    The maturation of Schistosoma mansoni was studied in mice exposed to various sublethal doses of radiation. Although the treatment of mice with 500 rads of radiation prior to infection did not alter parasite maturation, doses in excess of 500 rads led to a reduction in worm burden. This could not be attributed to a delay in the arrival of parasites in the hepatic portal system. Worms developing in mice treated with 800 rads commenced egg-laying about 1 wk later than worms in intact mice, and the rate of egg deposition appeared to be lower in irradiated hosts. The data demonstrate that exposure of C57BL/6 mice to doses of radiation in excess of 500 rads impairs their ability to carry infections of S. mansoni. The findings do not support the hypothesis that primary worm burdens in the mouse are controlled by a host immune response.

  15. 'Systems toxicology' approach identifies coordinated metabolic responses to copper in a terrestrial non-model invertebrate, the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stürzenbaum Stephen R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New methods are needed for research into non-model organisms, to monitor the effects of toxic disruption at both the molecular and functional organism level. We exposed earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister to sub-lethal levels of copper (10–480 mg/kg soil for 70 days as a real-world situation, and monitored both molecular (cDNA transcript microarrays and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling: metabolomics and ecological/functional endpoints (reproduction rate and weight change, which have direct relevance to population-level impacts. Results Both of the molecular endpoints, metabolomics and transcriptomics, were highly sensitive, with clear copper-induced differences even at levels below those that caused a reduction in reproductive parameters. The microarray and metabolomic data provided evidence that the copper exposure led to a disruption of energy metabolism: transcripts of enzymes from oxidative phosphorylation were significantly over-represented, and increases in transcripts of carbohydrate metabolising enzymes (maltase-glucoamylase, mannosidase had corresponding decreases in small-molecule metabolites (glucose, mannose. Treating both enzymes and metabolites as functional cohorts led to clear inferences about changes in energetic metabolism (carbohydrate use and oxidative phosphorylation, which would not have been possible by taking a 'biomarker' approach to data analysis. Conclusion Multiple post-genomic techniques can be combined to provide mechanistic information about the toxic effects of chemical contaminants, even for non-model organisms with few additional mechanistic toxicological data. With 70-day no-observed-effect and lowest-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC and LOEC of 10 and 40 mg kg-1 for metabolomic and microarray profiles, copper is shown to interfere with energy metabolism in an important soil organism at an ecologically and functionally relevant level.

  16. Haematological, blood biochemical and histopathological effects of sublethal cadmium and lead concentrations in common carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K.Khalesi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed at examining the effects of common carp (Cyprinus carpio exposure to sublethal concentrations of two non-essential heavy metals: cadmium (Cd: 8.4 mg/L and lead (Pb: 6.2 mg/L for 15 days to evaluate occurring biochemical and haematological effects. The examined parameters included haematocrit (Hct, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocytes (Lym, neutrophils (Neu, total protein (TP, albumin (Alb, immunoglobulin M (IgM, glucose, red and white blood cells counts (RBC & WBC, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC. Exposure to both metals significantly (P<0.05 reduced the amounts of WBC and MCHC. MCV values decreased (P<0.05 after the Pb treatment but MCV estimates with Cd exposure showed no differences. MCH levels increased in both treatments (P<0.05 whereas Hct, Hb, RBC, Lym, and Neu following both metal exposures were almost similar to those in the control. IgM values were elevated in fish contaminated with both Pb and Cd (P<0.05. The exposed fish showed fusion of gill lamellae, vessel dilatation, hyperaemia, and hyperplasia of gill epithelial cells whereas muscle histology remained unchanged. The observed responses can be secondary to low heavy metals concentrations reflecting the trigger of stress reactions in affected fish

  17. Quantifying sublethal effects of glyphosate and Roundup® to Daphnia magna using a fluorescence based enzyme activity assay and video tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roslev, Peter; R. Hansen, Lone; Ørsted, Michael

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is the active ingredient in a range of popular broad-spectrum, non-selective herbicide formulations. The toxicity of this herbicide to non-target aquatic organisms such as Daphnia magna is often evaluated using conventional toxicity assays that focus...... on endpoints such as immobility and mortality. In this study, we investigated sublethal effects of glyphosate and Roundup® to D. magna using video tracking for quantifying behavioral changes, and a novel fluorescence based assay for measuring in vivo hydrolytic enzyme activity (FLEA assay). Roundup® exposure...... resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity in D. magna. The inhibition of alkaline phosphatase by Roundup® was temperature-dependent with lowest inhibition at 14 °C and greater inhibition at 20 and 26 °C. Exposure of D. magna to sublethal concentrations of glyphosate...

  18. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests G6PD Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Gastrin Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose ... hepatic). Copper is found in many foods including nuts, chocolate, mushrooms, shellfish, whole grains, dried fruits, and ...

  19. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... or trying to get more copper in my diet? In most cases, a regular diet satisfies the ...

  20. Development of a New Technique to Assess Susceptibility to Predation Resulting from Sublethal Stresses (Indirect Mortality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, G.F.

    2003-08-25

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. We evaluated a new technique for assessing indirect mortality, based on a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). We compare this technique to the standard predator preference test. The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. We subjected striped shiners and fathead minnows to varying intensities of either turbulence (10-, 20- or 30-min) or 2-min exposures to a fish anesthetic (100 or 200 mg/L of tricaine methanesulfonate), and evaluated their subsequent behavior. Individual fish were given a startle stimulus and filmed with a high-speed video camera. Each fish was startled and filmed twice before being stressed, and then at 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min post-exposure. The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of maximum C-shape, time to completion of C-shape, and completeness of C-shape. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether stressed fish exhibited a startle response. For striped shiners, the number of fish not responding to the stimulus was significantly different

  1. Stage specific effects of soluble copper and copper oxide nanoparticles during sea urchin embryo development and their relation to intracellular copper uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Rahimoff, René; Cherr, Gary N

    2017-08-01

    The effects of exposure to either soluble copper (copper sulfate) or copper oxide nanoparticles (nano-CuO) during specific early developmental stages of sea urchin embryos were analyzed. Soluble copper caused significant malformations in embryos (skeletal malformations, delayed development or gut malformations) when present at any given stage, while cleavage stage was the most sensitive to nano-CuO exposure causing skeletal malformations and decreased total antioxidant capacity. The stage specificity was linked to higher endocytic activity during the first hours of development that leads to higher accumulation of copper in specific cells critical for development. Results indicate that nano-CuO results in higher accumulation of copper inside of embryos and this intracellular copper is more persistent as compared to soluble copper. The possible implications later in development are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Accumulation of Copper and Zinc and their Effects on Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accumulation and the effects of copper and zinc on the macroalga Padina gymnospora were assessed in the laboratory after artificial exposure to copper and zinc (separately or in combination). Exposure concentrations of copper used were 0, 25, 50, 100, 500 and 1,000 μg l-1. Concentrations of zinc exposure were 0, 50, ...

  3. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of copper in Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri under different pH values: Impacts of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjun; Yang, Shaogui; Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Li, Yong; Liu, Jiaoqin; Wang, Zunyao; Sun, Cheng

    2016-03-15

    Aquatic oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (L. hoffmeisteri) has been commonly used as a lethal and/or sub-lethal toxicological model organism in ecological risk assessments in contaminated water environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the potential toxic effects of copper (Cu(II)) with or without perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) under different pH values (6.0, 7.0 and 8.0) on LC50, bioaccumulation, and oxidative stress biomarkers in L. hoffmeisteri after 3 and 7 days. The LC50 values of Cu(II) decreased with the increasing pH and the addition of PFOS. After each exposure, increasing bioaccumulation of Cu(II) in L. hoffmeisteri was observed in the combined exposure treatments, whereas the bioaccumulation of PFOS decreased. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase, the level of glutathione, and the content of malondialdehyde were significantly altered after these exposures, possibly indicating that the bioaccumulation of Cu(II) and PFOS caused adverse effects on antioxidant defenses of L. hoffmeisteri. The integrated biomarker response index, indicates that the combined effect was proposed as synergism, which is coincided with the results of toxic unit. Moreover, this work showed that aquatic environment may become more livable when water conditions changed from acidic to near-neutral or alkaline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Toxic effects of copper sulfate and copper nanoparticles on minerals, enzymes, thyroid hormones and protein fractions of plasma and histopathology in common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Hedayati, Aliakbar; Taheri Mirghaed, Ali; Ghelichpour, Melika

    2016-10-01

    Differences in toxicological effects of dissolved copper and copper nanoparticles were studied in common carp, Cyprinus carpio. The fish were exposed to 0.25mgL(-1) copper as copper sulfate (0.25Cu), 0.25mgL(-1) copper as copper oxide nanoparticles (0.25NCu) and 25mgL(-1) copper as copper oxide nanoparticles (25NCu) over 14days. Plasma biochemical, enzymatic and hormonal characteristics, and liver and kidney histopathology were examined at the end of the experiment. The results showed that both forms of copper had no significant effects on plasma calcium levels, however, significantly increased plasma phosphorous levels, compared to control group (no added copper). Plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) activity increased in 0.25Cu and 25NCu treatments compared to the control and 0.25NCu treatments. Nanoparticle copper exposure significantly decreased plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to the control and 0.25Cu treatments. Only copper sulfate exposure caused plasma aspartate transaminase (AST) elevation. Both copper forms increased plasma T4 and free T4 (FT4); however, copper sulfate effect was higher than nanoparticle copper. Copper sulfate exposure increased plasma albumin fraction, whereas, 25mgL(-1) copper nanoparticle exposure increased plasma α2-globulin fraction compared to the control. Both copper forms damaged the fish liver and kidney, however, copper sulfate caused more severe damages compared to nanoparticle copper. Overall, except for plasma ALP and α2-globulin fraction, dissolved copper seems to be more toxic than nanoparticle copper in common carp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Sublethal effects of insecticide seed treatments on two nearctic lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Michaud, J P; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade

    2015-07-01

    Predatory insects often feed on plants or use plant products to supplement their diet, creating a potential route of exposure to systemic insecticides used as seed treatments. This study examined whether chlorantraniliprole or thiamethoxam might negatively impact Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens when the beetles consumed the extrafloral nectar of sunflowers grown from treated seed. We reared both species on eggs of Ephestia kuehniella and then switched adult H. convergens to a diet of greenbugs, Schizaphis graminum, in order to induce oviposition in this species. Excised sunflower stems, either treated or control and refreshed every 48 h, were provided throughout larval development, or for the first week of adult life. Exposure of C. maculata larvae to chlorantraniliprole and thiamethoxam applied as seed treatments delayed adult emergence by prolonging the pupal period. When adults were exposed, thiamethoxam reduced the preoviposition period compared to chlorantraniliprole, whereas the latter treatment cause females to produce fewer clutches during the observation period. Larvae of C. maculata did not appear to obtain sufficient hydration from the sunflower stems and their subsequent fecundity and fertility were compromised in comparison to the adult exposure experiment where larvae received supplemental water during development. Exposure of H. convergens larvae to thiamethoxam skewed the sex ratio in favor of females; both materials reduced the egg viability of resulting adults and increased the period required for eclosion. Exposure of H. convergens adults to chlorantraniliprole reduced egg eclosion times compared to thiamethoxam and exposure to both insecticides reduced pupation times in progeny. The results indicate that both insecticides have negative, sublethal impacts on the biology of these predators when they feed on extrafloral nectar of sunflower plants grown from treated seed.

  6. Sublethal effect of neem extract on mediterranean fruit fly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Alves Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The sublethal effect of extracts of Azadirachta indica on Ceratitis capitata was evaluated. Two pairs of flies were treated in plastic tubes with cotton placed in plastic cages. An artificial diet (hydrolyzed protein + sugar was provided ad libitum. The extracts affected significantly the longevity of C. capitata. The pre-oviposition period were not significantly affected by the extracts. The A. indica branches extracted with dichloromethane (888 ppm affected significantly the fecundity and fertility, reducing the number of eggs laid to approximately 80 % and the egg hatching by 30 % at the 8th day. Therefore, the neem branches extracted with dichloromethane affected the reproduction of C. capitata.

  7. Sub-lethal effects of essential oil of Lippia sidoides on drywood termite Cryptotermes brevis (Blattodea: Termitoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Abraão Almeida; de Oliveira, Bruna Maria Santos; Melo, Carlisson Ramos; Lima, Ana Paula Santana; Santana, Emile Dayara Rabelo; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho; Araújo, Ana Paula Albano; Cristaldo, Paulo Fellipe; Bacci, Leandro

    2017-11-01

    The drywood termite Cryptotermes brevis (Walker, 1853) (Kalotermitidae) is one of the most important wood structural pest in the world. Substances from the secondary metabolism of plants (e.g., essential oils) have been considered an environmentally safer form of control for urban pests, such as termites. In the present study, we analyzed the lethal and sub-lethal effects of essential oil of Lippia sidoides and its major components on C. brevis pseudergates in two routes of exposure (contact and fumigation). The essential oil of L. sidoides and thymol were more toxic to C. brevis pseudergates when applied by contact (LD50 = 9.33 and 8.20µgmg(-1), respectively) and by fumigation (LC50 = 9.10 and 23.6µLL(-1), respectively). In general, treatments changed the individual and collective behaviors of C. brevis pseudergates, as well as the displacement and walking speed. The essential oil of L. sidoides and its major components showed a high potential to control C. brevis pseudergates, due to the bioactivity in the two routes of exposure and the sub-lethal effects on the behavior and walking, important activities for the cohesion of C. brevis colonies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal tolerance of juvenile freshwater mussels (Unionidae) under the added stress of copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Tamara J; Cope, W Gregory; Arellano, Consuelo

    2010-03-01

    Freshwater mussels fulfill an essential role in aquatic communities, but are also one of the most sensitive and rapidly declining faunal groups in North America. Rising water temperatures, caused by global climate change or industrial discharges, can further challenge impaired unionid communities, but thermal stress is almost certainly not the only stressor affecting freshwater mussels. Metals, such as copper (Cu), are a common source of toxicant exposure in aquatic environments. The toxic effects of Cu on the early life stages of freshwater mussels have been well studied, and freshwater mussels are more sensitive to Cu than most aquatic organisms. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of a sublethal copper concentration on the upper thermal tolerance of three species, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Potamilus alatus, and Ligumia recta, of juvenile freshwater mussels in 48- and 96-h tests. Thermal tolerance was determined over a range of experimental temperatures (20-42 degrees C) at three acclimation temperatures (17, 22, and 27 degrees C). Median lethal temperatures (LT50s) were calculated in the absence and presence of Cu, and at 48 h ranged from 34.6 to 44.4 degrees C (mean 37.7 degrees C) without Cu, and from 33.8 to 38.9 degrees C (mean 35.8 degrees C) with Cu. The LT50s at 96 h ranged from 32.5 to 35.6 degrees C (mean 34.5 degrees C) without Cu and from 33.0 to 35.4 degrees C (mean 34.2 degrees C) with Cu. Potamilus alatus had a significantly lower 48 h LT50 with Cu than without Cu at the 22 degrees C acclimation temperature; there were no other significant differences in LT50s attributed to Cu. Survival trends showed limited evidence of interactive effects between copper and temperature for all three species, suggesting the combined stress of elevated temperatures and copper exposure to freshwater mussels should be further explored.

  9. A limited legacy effect of copper in marine biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, David J; Doblin, Martina A; Murphy, Richard J; Hochuli, Dieter F; Coleman, Ross A

    2016-08-15

    The effects of confounding by temporal factors remains understudied in pollution ecology. For example, there is little understanding of how disturbance history affects the development of assemblages. To begin addressing this gap in knowledge, marine biofilms were subjected to temporally-variable regimes of copper exposure and depuration. It was expected that the physical and biological structure of the biofilms would vary in response to copper regime. Biofilms were examined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, chlorophyll-a fluorescence and field spectrometry and it was found that (1) concentrations of copper were higher in those biofilms exposed to copper, (2) concentrations of copper remain high in biofilms after the source of copper is removed, and (3) exposure to and depuration from copper might have comparable effects on the photosynthetic microbial assemblages in biofilms. The persistence of copper in biofilms after depuration reinforces the need for consideration of temporal factors in ecology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaradasa, B Sajeewa; Everhart, Sydney E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment, and

  11. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sajeewa Amaradasa

    Full Text Available Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor, iprodione (unclear mode of action, thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors. Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each. Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001. Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the

  12. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaradasa, B. Sajeewa

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50–100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment

  13. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular

  14. Development and application of long-term sublethal whole sediment tests with Arenicola marina and Corophium volutator using Ivermectin as the test compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Yvonne T. [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Burnham Laboratory, Remembrance Avenue, Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, CM0 8HA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: yvonne.allen@cefas.co.uk; Thain, John E. [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Burnham Laboratory, Remembrance Avenue, Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, CM0 8HA (United Kingdom); Haworth, Sarah [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Burnham Laboratory, Remembrance Avenue, Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, CM0 8HA (United Kingdom); Barry, Jon [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Burnham Laboratory, Remembrance Avenue, Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, CM0 8HA (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Short-term whole sediment tests using the amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina are now routinely used in Europe to assess the acute toxicity of marine sediments. However, there is still a need to develop longer-term assays which measure effects on sublethal endpoints that are more relevant to predicting impacts at the population level. The effect of increasing exposure times and measuring additional endpoints such as growth, on the sensitivity of these assays was investigated. The test compound used was the chemotherapeutant Ivermectin (IVM), used in aquaculture to treat sea lice infestations. IVM was found to be acutely toxic to both test organisms. Extending the lugworm test to 100 days increased sensitivity of survival by a factor of three; a significant reduction in casting rate was observed at concentrations an order of magnitude lower. This assay shows potential for detecting the sublethal effects of low concentrations of sediment contaminants. Increasing the exposure time did not seem to affect the sensitivity of the amphipod, but further method development is required. - Long-term sublethal sediment tests are more sensitive than standard acute tests when assessing the toxic effects of Ivermectin.

  15. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  16. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling of quantal and graded sublethal endpoints: a brief discussion of concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashauer, R.; Agatz, A.; Albert, C.; Ducrot, V.; Galic, N.G.; Hendriks, J.; Jager, T.; Kretschmann, A.; O'Connor, I.; Rubach, M.N.; Nyman, M.; Schmitt, W.; Stadnicka, J.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the advantages and problems of using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TKTD) models for the analysis, understanding, and simulation of sublethal effects. Only a few toxicodynamic approaches for sublethal effects are available. These differ in their effect mechanism and emphasis on linkages

  17. Sublethal effects of cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and iron on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study also evaluated the sublethal effects of cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and iron in plasma samples utilising plasma electrolyte parameters as a biomarker using an albino mice model, M. musculus. Mice were subjected to sublethal concentrations of the selected heavy metals (1/10th of 96 hrLC50). Blood plasma ...

  18. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  19. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Essential Oils From Artemisia khorassanica and Vitex pseudo-negundo Against Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzoui, Ehsan; Naseri, Bahram; Abedi, Zahra; Karimi-Pormehr, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-10-01

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner, 1813) is a polyphagous and key pest of different stored products worldwide. The lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils of Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Vitex pseudo-negundo (Hausskn) were studied on P. interpunctella The chemical constituents of the essential oils were also assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Assays showed that the fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 9.60 µl/liter air) was higher than V. pseudo-negundo (LC50: 23.05 µl/liter air). Moreover, the speed of mortality caused by A. khorassanica oil (LT50: 2.07 h) was higher than V. pseudo-negundo (LT50: 3.11 h). To assess the sublethal effects of the essential oils, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters and energy contents of the surviving P. interpunctella were studied. Exposure to sublethal concentration of A. khorassanica negatively affected the life table of P. interpunctella, and also the protein, lipid, and glycogen contents of the larvae that came from treated adults. Vitex pseudo-negundo also affected lipid, protein, and glycogen contents of P. interpunctella The intrinsic rate of increase (rm), finite rate of increase ([Formula: see text]), and doubling time (DT) were not significantly different between control and V. pseudo-negundo treatment. According with these results, both tested essential oils, especially one extracted from A. khorassanica, have potential applications for the integrated management of P. interpunctella. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the industrial chemical epichlorohydrin on Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae) embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutler Wolkowicz, Ianina R; Aronzon, Carolina M; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2013-12-15

    Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the major chemical used in epoxide compounds, epichlorohydrin (ECH) was evaluated on the early life cycle of the common South American toad, Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae). The stages evaluated were (according to Del Conte and Sirlin): early blastula (S.3-S.4), gastrula (S.10-S.12), rotation (S.15), tail bud (S.17), muscular response (S.18), gill circulation (S.20), open mouth (S.21), opercular folds (S.23) and complete operculum (S.25). The LC50 and EC50 values for lethal and sublethal effects were calculated. The early blastula was the most sensitive stage to ECH both for continuously and pulse-exposures (LC50-24h=50.9 mg L(-1)), while S.20 was the most resistant (LC50-24h=104.9 mg L(-1)). Among sublethal effects, early blastula was also the most sensitive stage (LOEC-48 h=20 mg L(-1)) and it has a Teratogenic Index of 2.5, which indicates the teratogenic potential of the substance. The main abnormalities were persistent yolk plugs, cell dissociation, tumors, hydropsy, oral malformations, axial/tail flexures, delayed development and reduced body size. ECH also caused neurotoxicity including scarce response to stimuli, reduction in the food intake, general weakness, spasms and shortening, erratic or circular swimming. Industrial contamination is considered an important factor on the decline of amphibian populations. Considering the available information about ECH's toxicity and its potential hazard to the environment, this work shows the first results of its developmental toxicity on a native amphibian species, Rhinella arenarum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of Four Insecticides on the Aphidophagous Coccinellid Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depalo, Laura; Lanzoni, Alberto; Masetti, Antonio; Pasqualini, Edison; Burgio, Giovanni

    2017-12-05

    Conventional insecticide assays, which measure the effects of insecticide exposure on short-term mortality, overlook important traits, including persistence of toxicity or sub-lethal effects. Therefore, such approaches are especially inadequate for prediction of the overall impact of insecticides on beneficial arthropods. In this study, the side effects of four modern insecticides (chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate, spinosad, and spirotetramat) on Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions by exposition on treated potted plants. In addition to investigation of acute toxicity and persistence of harmful activity in both larvae and adults of A. bipunctata, demographic parameters were evaluated, to provide a comprehensive picture of the nontarget effects of these products. Field doses of the four insecticides caused detrimental effects to A. bipunctata; but in different ways. Overall, spinosad showed the best toxicological profile among the products tested. Emamectin benzoate could be considered a low-risk insecticide, but had high persistence. Chlorantraniliprole exhibited lethal effects on early instar larvae and adults, along with a long-lasting activity, instead spirotetramat showed a low impact on larval and adult mortality and can be considered a short-lived insecticide. However, demographic analysis demonstrated that chlorantraniliprole and spirotetramat caused sub-lethal effects. Our findings highlight that sole assessment of mortality can lead to underestimation of the full impact of pesticides on nontarget insects. Demographic analysis was demonstrated to be a sensitive method for detection of the sub-lethal effects of insecticides on A. bipunctata, and this approach should be considered for evaluation of insecticide selectivity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Arsenic-induced sub-lethal stress reprograms human bronchial epithelial cells to CD61¯ cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qingshan; Chen, Bailing; Thakur, Chitra; Lu, Yongju; Chen, Fei

    2014-03-15

    In the present report, we demonstrate that sub-lethal stress induced by consecutive exposure to 0.25 µM arsenic (As3+) for six months can trigger reprogramming of the human bronchial epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) to form cancer stem cells (CSCs) without forced introduction of the stemness transcription factors. These CSCs formed from As3+-induced sub-lethal stress featured with an increased expression of the endogenous stemness genes, including Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, Myc, and others that are associated with the pluripotency and self-renewal of the CSCs. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that 90% of the CSC cells are CD61¯, whereas 100% of the parental cells are CD61+. These CD61¯ CSCs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic to the lung in xenotransplantation tests in NOD/SCID Il2rγ-/- mice. Additional tests also revealed that the CD61¯ CSCs showed a significant decrease in the expression of the genes important for DNA repair and oxidative phosphorylation. To determine the clinical relevance of the above findings, we stratified human lung cancers based on the level of CD61 protein and found that CD61low cancer correlates with poorer survival of the patients. Such a correlation was also observed in human breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Taken together, our findings suggest that in addition to the traditional approaches of enforced introduction of the exogenous stemness circuit transcription factors, sub-lethal stress induced by consecutive low dose As3+ is also able to convert non-stem cells to the CSCs.

  3. The effects of chronic mercury exposure on the survival, reproduction, and population dynamics of Mysidopsis bahia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gentile, J.H; Gentile, S

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that M. bahia can be used as a model for evaluating the effects of chronic pollutant exposure on survival patterns, sub-lethal reprodutive responses and populatioon growth rates...

  4. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of copper in treated lumber may result in a potential for human exposure. Due to a lack of information concerning the release of copper from treated wood particles following oral ingestion, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust i...

  5. Sublethal effects of atrazine on embryo-larval development of Rhinella arenarum (Anura: Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartz, Gabriela V; Herkovits, Jorge; Pérez-Coll, Cristina S

    2012-05-01

    Atrazine (ATR), one of the most widely used herbicides in the world, affects not only target organisms but also the biota in general. Here, the teratogenic and neurotoxic effects of ATR on Rhinella arenarum (South American toad) embryos, and larvae were evaluated by means of standardized bioassays during acute and chronic exposures. The herbicide had a significant incidence of malformations, with a Teratogenic Index (TI) of 3.28. The main effects were delayed development, reduced body size, microcephaly, axial flexures, wavy tail and edema. In addition, delayed development, reduced development of forelimbs, and edema were recorded at metamorphosis stages. Scanning electron microscopy allowed observing different degrees of cellular dissociation and persistent cilliar cells in specific regions like the adhesive structure and tail fin. Results obtained by ATR 24 h pulse exposures at six developmental stages pointed out blastula as the most susceptible developmental stage both for immediate and delayed adverse effects. A noteworthy recovery capacity from acute toxic effects was recorded from the neural plate stage onwards. Regarding neurotoxic effects, abnormal, and erratic swimming and spasmodic contractions were recorded. Both the teratogenic and neurotoxic effects reported in this study demonstrate the importance of evaluating sublethal effects in non-target organisms as they could imply reduced fitness of individuals and eventually a population decline. The Hazard Quotients (HQ) for ATR ranged from 0.14 to 10.80, and the fact that some of these values are above USEPA's level of concern indicate that ATR is likely a risk to R. arenarum.

  6. Haematological changes in Bufo maculatus treated with sublethal concentrations of Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ikechukwu Ezemonye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult Bufo maculatus was exposed to sublethal cadmium concentrations of 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 2.00 mg/L. The toxicant from which the cadmium concentrations were prepared was cadmium chloride (CdCl2.H2O. There were three replicate tanks per treatment and three individuals per tank including control groups. The hematologic alterations based on the examination of blood indices during the 28 days of exposure showed that total erythrocyte count (TEC, hematocrit (Hct and hemoglobin (Hb concentration decreased (P<0.05 relative to controls. The decline was concentration- dependent as concentration of cadmium increased. The decline in hemoglobin and hematocrit in the experimental organism could be due to a decrease in the synthesis or release of erythrocytes into the circulation or an increase in the rate of erythrocyte destruction inflicted by cadmium toxicity. There was significant (P<0.05 elevation in total leuko- leukocyte count (TLC with increase in the concen- cyte concentration of cadmium. The increase in total leukocyte count observed in this study could be attributed to a stimulation of the immune system in response to tissue damage caused by cadmium toxicity. The study has shown that the exposure of the Bufo maculatus toad to cadmium can inflict alterations in the hematologic indices, which could induce unfavorable physiological changes in the amphibian, which may lead to death. There is, therefore, the need to protect amphibians in order to sustain the biodiversity in the Nigerian Niger Delta ecological zone.

  7. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) by chlorpyrifos at sublethal concentrations: Methodological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Wel, H.; Welling, W.

    1989-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity is a potential biochemical indicator of toxic stress in fish and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of organophosphates. A number of methodological aspects regarding the determination of the in vivo effect of chlorpyrifos on acetylcholinesterase in guppies have been investigated. It was found that with acetylthiocholine as a substrate, the contribution of pseudocholinesterase to the total cholinesterase activity can be neglected. Protection of acetylcholinesterase of guppies exposed to chlorpyrifos from additional, artifactual in vitro enzyme inhibition during homogenization is necessary. Very low concentrations of acetone in the exposure medium, resulting from dilution of the stock solution of chlorpyrifos in acetone, can result in large decreases in the oxygen content of this medium. This may affect the uptake rate of the toxic compound and, thereby, cholinesterase inhibition. Very low, sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos result in high inhibition levels of acetylcholinesterase (80-90%) in guppies within 2 weeks of continuous exposure. Recovery of the enzyme activity occurs after the exposed animals are kept in clean medium for 4 days, but the rate of recovery is considerably lower than the rate of inhibition.

  8. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects.

  9. Sublethal responses of the common mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to sodium hypochlorite and Mexel432 used as antifoulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Galindo, Cristina; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Nebot, Enrique; Casanueva, José F; Rubio, Daniel; Mancera, Juan M; Solé, Montserrat

    2010-07-01

    The sublethal effects of two antifoulants currently used in power plant cooling systems were assessed in the common mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and an alkyl amine surfactant (Mexel432) assayed, were within the range of those currently discharged by power plants into receiving waters. Enzymatic activities and oxidative stress responses were measured in digestive gland and gill of mussels after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of exposure, as well as histopathology in gill tissue. Both antifoulants caused a pathological response in gills and the activities of the enzymes glutathione S-transferase, catalase, acetylcholinesterase and the lipid peroxidation levels were also affected. Exposure to NaClO caused a greater toxicological response than Mexel432. In both treatments, gills appeared to be the most affected tissue, although Mexel432 also significantly affected digestive gland parameters. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sublethal Ciprofloxacin Treatment Leads to Rapid Development of High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance during Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    lineages after 240 generations. The genetic basis of resistance was mutations in gyrA (C248T and G259T) and gyrB (C1397A). Cross-resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics was observed in the bacterial populations that evolved during exposure to sublethal concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Our study shows...... that mutants with high-level ciprofloxacin resistance are selected in P. aeruginosa bacterial populations exposed to sub-MICs of ciprofloxacin. This can have implications for the long-term persistence of resistant bacteria and spread of antibiotic resistance by exposure of commensal bacterial flora to low...

  11. Copper exposure induces toxicity to the antioxidant system via the destruction of Nrf2/ARE signaling and caspase-3-regulated DNA damage in fish muscle: Amelioration by myo-inositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Jiang, Jun [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Wu, Pei [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Feng, Lin, E-mail: fenglin@sicau.edu.cn [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Zhou, Xiao-Qiu, E-mail: zhouxq@sicau.edu.cn [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Cu stress decreased fish muscle CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and PKCδ mRNA levels. • Cu stress caused fish muscle lower nuclear Nrf2 levels and poor ARE binding ability. • Cu stress induced caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in fish muscle. • Pre-treatment with MI prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages. - Abstract: The muscle is the main portion of fish that is consumed by humans. Copper (Cu) can induce oxidative damage in fish muscle. However, the effects of Cu exposure on the muscle antioxidant system and molecular patterns and preventive measures against these effects remain unclear. In this study, ROS production, enzymatic and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling-related molecules, antioxidant response element (ARE) binding ability, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activities were analyzed in fish muscle following Cu exposure or myo-inositol (MI) pre-administration. The results indicated that contamination due to copper exposure caused an approximately three-fold increase in ROS production, induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and resulted in depletion of the glutathione (GSH) content of fish muscle. Moreover, Cu exposure caused decreases in the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZnSOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) that were accompanied by decreases in CuZnSOD, GPx1a, GPx1b and signaling factor protein kinase C delta mRNA levels. The decreases in the antioxidant enzyme gene mRNA levels were confirmed to be partly due to the reduced nuclear Nrf2 protein levels, poor ARE binding ability and increased caspase-3 signaling-modulated DNA fragmentation in the fish muscle. Interestingly, MI pre-treatment prevented fish muscle from Cu-induced oxidative damages mainly through increasing the GSH content, and increasing the CuZnSOD and GPx activities and corresponding mRNA levels and ARE binding ability. Taken together, our results show for the first

  12. Copper Resistance of the Emerging Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caitlin L; Neu, Heather M; Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Michel, Sarah L J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Merrell, D Scott

    2016-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that is capable of causing many types of severe infection, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Since A. baumannii can rapidly acquire antibiotic resistance genes, many infections are on the verge of being untreatable, and novel therapies are desperately needed. To investigate the potential utility of copper-based antibacterial strategies against Acinetobacter infections, we characterized copper resistance in a panel of recent clinical A. baumannii isolates. Exposure to increasing concentrations of copper in liquid culture and on solid surfaces resulted in dose-dependent and strain-dependent effects; levels of copper resistance varied broadly across isolates, possibly resulting from identified genotypic variation among strains. Examination of the growth-phase-dependent effect of copper on A. baumannii revealed that resistance to copper increased dramatically in stationary phase. Moreover, A. baumannii biofilms were more resistant to copper than planktonic cells but were still susceptible to copper toxicity. Exposure of bacteria to subinhibitory concentrations of copper allowed them to better adapt to and grow in high concentrations of copper; this copper tolerance response is likely achieved via increased expression of copper resistance mechanisms. Indeed, genomic analysis revealed numerous putative copper resistance proteins that share amino acid homology to known proteins in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transcriptional analysis revealed significant upregulation of these putative copper resistance genes following brief copper exposure. Future characterization of copper resistance mechanisms may aid in the search for novel antibiotics against Acinetobacter and other highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Acinetobacter baumannii causes many types of severe nosocomial infections; unfortunately, some isolates have acquired resistance to almost every available antibiotic, and treatment options

  13. Copper metallothioneins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jenifer; Jung, Hunmin; Meloni, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a class of low molecular weight and cysteine-rich metal binding proteins present in all the branches of the tree of life. MTs efficiently bind with high affinity several essential and toxic divalent and monovalent transition metals by forming characteristic polynuclear metal-thiolate clusters within their structure. MTs fulfil multiple biological functions related to their metal binding properties, with essential roles in both Zn(II) and Cu(I) homeostasis as well as metal detoxification. Depending on the organism considered, the primary sequence, and the specific physiological and metabolic status, Cu(I)-bound MT isoforms have been isolated, and their chemistry and biology characterized. Besides the recognized role in the biochemistry of divalent metals, it is becoming evident that unique biological functions in selectively controlling copper levels, its reactivity as well as copper-mediated biochemical processes have evolved in some members of the MT superfamily. Selected examples are reviewed to highlight the peculiar chemical properties and biological functions of copper MTs. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):236-245, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Copper-2 Ingestion, Plus Increased Meat Eating Leading to Increased Copper Absorption, Are Major Factors Behind the Current Epidemic of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J.

    2015-01-01

    It has become clear that copper toxicity is playing a major role in Alzheimer’s disease; but why is the brain copper toxicity with cognition loss in Alzheimer’s disease so much different clinically than brain copper toxicity in Wilson’s disease, which results in a movement disorder? Furthermore, why is the inorganic copper of supplement pills and in drinking water so much more damaging to cognition than the organic copper in food? A recent paper, which shows that almost all food copper is copper-1, that is the copper-2 of foods reverts to the reduced copper-1 form at death or harvest, gives new insight into these questions. The body has an intestinal transport system for copper-1, Ctr1, which channels copper-1 through the liver and into safe channels. Ctr1 cannot absorb copper-2, and some copper-2 bypasses the liver, ends up in the blood quickly, and is toxic to cognition. Humans evolved to handle copper-1 safely, but not copper-2. Alzheimer’s is at least in part, a copper-2 toxicity disease, while Wilson’s is a general copper overload disease. In this review, we will show that the epidemiology of the Alzheimer’s epidemic occurring in developed, but not undeveloped countries, fits with the epidemiology of exposure to copper-2 ingestion leached from copper plumbing and from copper supplement pill ingestion. Increased meat eating in developed countries is also a factor, because it increases copper absorption, and thus over all copper exposure. PMID:26633489

  15. Extended hypoxia in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, increases survival but causes sub-lethal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, H; Rinehart, J P; Yocum, G D; Greenlee, K J; Helm, B R; Kemp, W P; Schulz, C H; Bowsher, J H

    2014-05-01

    Many insects are tolerant of hypoxic conditions, but survival may come at a cost to long-term health. The alfalfa leaf-cutting bee, Megachile rotundata, develops in brood cells inside natural cavities, and may be exposed to hypoxic conditions for extended periods of time. Whether M. rotundata is tolerant of hypoxia, and whether exposure results in sub-lethal effects, has never been investigated. Overwintering M. rotundata prepupae were exposed to 10%, 13%, 17%, 21% and 24% O2 for 11 months. Once adults emerged, five indicators of quality - emergence weight, body size, feeding activity, flight performance, and adult longevity, - were measured to determine whether adult bees that survived past exposure to hypoxia were competent pollinators. M. rotundata prepupae are tolerant of hypoxic condition and have higher survival rates in hypoxia, than in normoxia. Under hypoxia, adult emergence rates did not decrease over the 11 months of the experiment. In contrast, bees reared in normoxia had decreased emergence rates by 8 months, and were dead by 11 months. M. rotundata prepupae exposed to extended hypoxic conditions had similar emergence weight, head width, and cross-thorax distance compared to bees reared in standard 21% oxygen. Despite no significant morphological differences, hypoxia-exposed bees had lower feeding rates and shorter adult lifespans. Hypoxia may play a role in post-diapause physiology of M. rotundata, with prepupae showing better survival under hypoxic conditions. Extended exposure to hypoxia, while not fatal, causes sub-lethal effects in feeding rates and longevity in the adults, indicating that hypoxia tolerance comes at a cost. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Sublethal concentrations of silver nanoparticles affect the mechanical stability of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Alexandra Y; Meier, Jutta; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Manz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are most likely confronted with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as a pollutant stressor in aquatic systems. In this study, biofilms of Aquabacterium citratiphilum were exposed for 20 h to 30 and 70 nm citrate stabilized Ag NPs in low-dose concentrations ranging from 600 to 2400 μg l(-1), and the Ag NP-mediated effects on descriptive, structural, and functional biofilm characteristics, including viability, protein content, architecture, and mechanical stability, were investigated. Viability, based on the bacterial cell membrane integrity of A. citratiphilum, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy, remained unaffected after Ag NP exposure. Moreover, in contrast to information in the current literature, protein contents of cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and biofilm architecture, including dry mass, thickness, and density, were not significantly impacted by exposure to Ag NPs. However, the biofilms themselves served as effective sinks for Ag NPs, exhibiting enrichment factors from 5 to 8. Biofilms showed a greater capacity to accumulate 30 nm sized Ag NPs than 70 nm Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs significantly threatened the mechanical stability of biofilms, as determined by a newly developed assay. For 30 nm Ag NPs, the mechanical stability of biofilms decreased as the Ag NP concentrations applied to them increased. In contrast, 70 nm Ag NPs produced a similar decrease in mechanical stability for each applied concentration. Overall, this finding demonstrates that exposure to Ag NPs triggers remarkable changes in biofilm adhesion and/or cohesiveness. Because of biofilm-mediated ecological services, this response raises environmental concerns regarding Ag NP release into freshwater systems, even in sublethal concentrations.

  17. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obringer, John

    2004-01-01

    .... We assessed the sublethal insult to human retinal pigment epithelial cells using a cadaver organ donor explant system for genes differentially expressed 12 and 24 hours post- exposure using gene...

  18. Sublethal Effects of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Thiamethoxam on the Transcriptome of the Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Teng-Fei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Liu, Fang; Qi, Lei; Yu, Lin-Sheng

    2017-12-05

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are now the most widely used insecticides in the world. Previous studies have indicated that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids impair learning, memory capacity, foraging, and immunocompetence in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Linnaeus) (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Despite these, few studies have been carried out on the molecular effects of neonicotinoids. In this study, we focus on the second-generation neonicotinoid thiamethoxam, which is currently widely used in agriculture to protect crops. Using high-throughput RNA-Seq, we investigated the transcriptome profile of honey bees after subchronic exposure to 10 ppb thiamethoxam over 10 d. In total, 609 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, of which 225 were upregulated and 384 were downregulated. Several genes, including vitellogenin, CSP3, defensin-1, Mrjp1, and Cyp6as5 were selected and further validated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The functions of some DEGs were identified, and Gene Ontology-enrichment analysis showed that the enriched DEGs were mainly linked to metabolism, biosynthesis, and translation. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis showed that thiamethoxam affected biological processes including ribosomes, the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, tyrosine metabolism pathway, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and drug metabolism. Overall, our results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the complex interactions between neonicotinoid insecticides and honey bees. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Sublethal Effects in Pest Management: A Surrogate Species Perspective on Fruit Fly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Banks

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tephritid fruit flies are economically important orchard pests globally. While much effort has focused on controlling individual species with a combination of pesticides and biological control, less attention has been paid to managing assemblages of species. Although several tephritid species may co-occur in orchards/cultivated areas, especially in mixed-cropping schemes, their responses to pesticides may be highly variable. Furthermore, predictive efforts about toxicant effects are generally based on acute toxicity, with little or no regard to long-term population effects. Using a simple matrix model parameterized with life history data, we quantified the responses of several tephritid species to the sublethal effects of a toxicant acting on fecundity. Using a critical threshold to determine levels of fecundity reduction below which species are driven to local extinction, we determined that threshold levels vary widely for the three tephritid species. In particular, Bactrocera dorsalis was the most robust of the three species, followed by Ceratitis capitata, and then B. cucurbitae, suggesting individual species responses should be taken into account when planning for area-wide pest control. The rank-order of susceptibility contrasts with results from several field/lab studies testing the same species, suggesting that considering a combination of life history traits and individual species susceptibility is necessary for understanding population responses of species assemblages to toxicant exposure.

  20. Sub-lethal effects of herbicides penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone and glyphosate on Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiali; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Ramírez-Duarte, Wilson F; Bolotaolo, Melissa B; Lam, Chelsea H; Pandey, Pramod K; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Stillway, Marie E; Zweig, Leanna; Caudill, Jeffrey; Lin, Li; Teh, Swee J

    2018-02-01

    Concerns regarding non-target toxicity of new herbicides used to control invasive aquatic weeds in the San Francisco Estuary led us to compare sub-lethal toxicity of four herbicides (penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone, and glyphosate) on an endangered fish species Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus). We measured 17β-estradiol (E2) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations in liver, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in brain of female and male fish after 6 h of exposure to each of the four herbicides. Our results indicate that fluridone and glyphosate disrupted the E2 concentration and decreased glutathione concentration in liver, whereas penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone inhibited brain AChE activity. E2 concentrations were significantly increased in female and male fish exposed to 0.21 μM of fluridone and in male fish exposed to 0.46, 4.2, and 5300 μM of glyphosate. GSH concentrations decreased in males exposed to fluridone at 2.8 μM and higher, and glyphosate at 4.2 μM. AChE activity was significantly inhibited in both sexes exposed to penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone, and more pronounced inhibition was observed in females. The present study demonstrates the potential detrimental effects of these commonly used herbicides on Delta Smelt. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Response of DNA, proteins, lipids and antioxidant enzymes as measure of toxicity to mercury exposures in green mussel Perna viridis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verlecar, X.N.; Jena, K.B.; Chainy, G.B.N.

    Studies on exposures of gills of green-lipped mussel Perna viridis to sublethal levels of mercury (Hg) indicates that oxidative stress marker like lipids peroxidation and protein carbonyl content increase. With the exception of superoxide dismutase...

  2. Astrocyte functions in the copper homeostasis of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Copper is an essential element that is required for a variety of important cellular functions. Since not only copper deficiency but also excess of copper can seriously affect cellular functions, the cellular copper metabolism is tightly regulated. In brain, astrocytes appear to play a pivotal role in the copper metabolism. With their strategically important localization between capillary endothelial cells and neuronal structures they are ideally positioned to transport copper from the blood-brain barrier to parenchymal brain cells. Accordingly, astrocytes have the capacity to efficiently take up, store and to export copper. Cultured astrocytes appear to be remarkably resistant against copper-induced toxicity. However, copper exposure can lead to profound alterations in the metabolism of these cells. This article will summarize the current knowledge on the copper metabolism of astrocytes, will describe copper-induced alterations in the glucose and glutathione metabolism of astrocytes and will address the potential role of astrocytes in the copper metabolism of the brain in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Montes; Susana Rivera-Mancia; Araceli Diaz-Ruiz; Luis Tristan-Lopez; Camilo Rios

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson’s disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson’s disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased pr...

  4. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour: e0140814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonalons, Carolina Mengoni; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    .... As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period...

  5. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mengoni Goñalons, Carolina; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    .... As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period...

  6. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal...... antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics...... caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by Imo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant...

  7. Bioaccumulation and Depuration of Copper in the Kidney and Liver of a Freshwater Fish, Capoeta fusca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Mansouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to investigate the patterns of bioaccumulation and depuration of copper in the selected kidney and liver of Capoeta fusca. Methods: The fish were collected between September and November 2010 from a qanat in Birjand. They were exposed to two types treatments with copper (0.25 and 0.75 mg/L for a period of 41 days. The fish under study were exposed to the above-mentioned sub-lethal concentrations separately for 14 and 21 days (accumulation period. At the end of this period, the remaining fish were kept in tap water (elimination period for 31 and 41 days. Results: The findings showed that the accumulation of copper in lower and higher sub-lethal concentrations was higher in kidney as the mean accumulation of copper on day 21 was 1.9±0.1 μg/g and 2.93±0.47 μg/g respectively, in 0.25 μg/g and 0.75 μg/g concentrations. On the other hand, the results also showed that the depuration level of copper in the given concentrations was higher in liver than kidney. The bioaccumulation and depuration of copper significantly increased in the kidney and liver of C. fusca (P<0.01. Conclusion: Based on the present work, it is concluded that C. fusca has a potential for the rapid accumulation and depuration of copper in freshwater. Also, the results indicate that the fish C. fusca, as representative fish species in the East of Iran, can be a useful bioindicator organism of water contamination with copper.

  8. Copper exposure induces oxidative injury, disturbs the antioxidant system and changes the Nrf2/ARE (CuZnSOD) signaling in the fish brain: Protective effects of myo-inositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Hu, Kai [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Jiang, Jun [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Li, Shu-Hong [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Feng, Lin, E-mail: fenglin@sicau.edu.cn [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Zhou, Xiao-Qiu, E-mail: xqzhouqq@tom.com [Animal Nutrition Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Fish Nutrition and Safety Production University Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China); Key Laboratory for Animal Disease-Resistance Nutrition of China Ministry of Education, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, Sichuan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Cu exposure increased ROS production, lipid and protein oxidation of fish brain. • Cu exposure caused depletion of some antioxidants in the brain of fish. • Cu exposure up-regulated mRNA levels of brain CuZnSOD, GPx1a and GR genes in fish. • Cu exposure induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and binding to ARE in fish brain. • Myo-inositol can inhibit Cu-induced toxic effects in the brain of fish. - Abstract: The brain is the center of the nervous system in all vertebrates, and homeostasis of the brain is crucial for fish survival. Copper (Cu) is essential for normal cellular processes in most eukaryotic organisms but is toxic in excess. Although Cu is indicated as a potent neurotoxicant, information regarding its threat to fish brain and underlying mechanisms is still scarce. In accordance, the objective of this study was to assess the effects and the potential mechanism of Cu toxicity by evaluating brain oxidative status, the enzymatic and mRNA levels of antioxidant genes, as well as the Nrf2/ARE signaling in the brain of fish after Cu exposure. The protective effects of myo-inositol (MI) against subsequent Cu exposure were also investigated. The results indicate that induction of oxidative stress by Cu is shown by increases in brain ROS production, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, which are accompanied by depletions of antioxidants, including total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZnSOD, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and glutathione (GSH) content. Cu exposure increased the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Further molecular results showed that Cu exposure up-regulated CuZnSOD, GPx1a and GR mRNA levels, suggesting an adaptive mechanism against stress. Moreover, Cu exposure increased fish brain Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and increased its ability of binding to ARE (CuZnSOD), which supported the increased CuZnSOD mRNA levels. In addition, Cu exposure caused increases of

  9. Sub-lethal effects of pesticide residues in brood comb on worker honey bee (Apis mellifera development and longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Y Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous surveys reveal high levels of pesticide residue contamination in honey bee comb. We conducted studies to examine possible direct and indirect effects of pesticide exposure from contaminated brood comb on developing worker bees and adult worker lifespan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Worker bees were reared in brood comb containing high levels of known pesticide residues (treatment or in relatively uncontaminated brood comb (control. Delayed development was observed in bees reared in treatment combs containing high levels of pesticides particularly in the early stages (day 4 and 8 of worker bee development. Adult longevity was reduced by 4 days in bees exposed to pesticide residues in contaminated brood comb during development. Pesticide residue migration from comb containing high pesticide residues caused contamination of control comb after multiple brood cycles and provided insight on how quickly residues move through wax. Higher brood mortality and delayed adult emergence occurred after multiple brood cycles in contaminated control combs. In contrast, survivability increased in bees reared in treatment comb after multiple brood cycles when pesticide residues had been reduced in treatment combs due to residue migration into uncontaminated control combs, supporting comb replacement efforts. Chemical analysis after the experiment confirmed the migration of pesticide residues from treatment combs into previously uncontaminated control comb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to demonstrate sub-lethal effects on worker honey bees from pesticide residue exposure from contaminated brood comb. Sub-lethal effects, including delayed larval development and adult emergence or shortened adult longevity, can have indirect effects on the colony such as premature shifts in hive roles and foraging activity. In addition, longer development time for bees may provide a reproductive advantage for parasitic Varroa destructor

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 exposed to a sublethal concentration of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kendi Nishino; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; da Silva Caumo, Karin; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-04-24

    Listeria monocytogenes infections have been frequently reported in many food poisoning outbreaks around the world. In this work, the protein repertoires of L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644 cells treated or not with a 10(-3)mg/mL nisin sublethal concentration, established by antimicrobial susceptibility tests, were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Overall, 179 proteins were identified, 9 of them more abundant in nisin-treated samples, and 4 more abundant in non-treated control samples. In nisin treated cells, proteins associated to oxidative stress response showed higher abundance. Also, the higher abundance of an enzyme related to the production of cell membrane lipids upon nisin exposure is suggestive of both a failure in conventional cell division mechanism and the activation of an alternative L-form mediated division mechanism. Finally, flagellar and motility proteins' overexpression upon nisin exposure is indicative of increased bacterial motility in response to the bacteriocin. Taken together, these results provide new insights on nisin effects on L. monocytogenes cells and on how this bacterium may overcome a bacteriocin-containing environment. The antimicrobial mechanism of nisin on target bacterial cells has been extensively studied since discovery of this bacteriocin. The nisin pore-forming mechanism is mediated by its binding to the pyrophosphate portion of membrane lipid II [1], but some evidences point out to alternative mechanisms. Results from assays with mutacin 1140 hybrids [2] showed that the portion of nisin that is not involved with lipid II binding could damage the bacterial cell, independently of pore formation [3,4]. Moreover, there are insufficient data to explain how nisin affects the bacterial survival. In this scenario, proteomics is an interesting approach, as a comparison between treated and untreated cells may provide insights of both antimicrobial mechanisms of action and bacterial response mechanisms [5]. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes.......In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  12. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  13. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  14. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  15. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys.

  16. Sublethal effects of subzero temperatures on the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana: fitness costs in response to partial freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Amy C; Venette, Robert C; Hutchison, William D

    2017-11-28

    Population responses to environmental extremes often dictate the bounds to species' distributions. However, population dynamics at, or near, those range limits may also be affected by sublethal effects. We exposed late instars and pupae of an invasive leafroller, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to cold temperatures and measured the effects of exposure on subsequent survivorship, development, and reproduction. Cold temperature was applied as acute exposure to -10 °C (a low, but not immediately lethal temperature for this species) or the onset of freezing (the peak of the supercooling point exotherm). Survival was defined as the ability to successfully eclose as an adult. We measured immature development times, pupal mass, and adult longevity as proxies of fitness in survivors. Additionally, surviving insects were mated with individuals that had not been exposed to cold to measure fertility. There was no difference between the proportion of larvae or pupae that survived acute exposure to -10 °C and those exposed to the control temperature. Approximately 17% of larvae and 8% of pupae survived brief periods with internal ice formation and continued development to become reproductively viable adults. Importantly, surviving the onset of freezing came with significant fitness costs but not to exposure to -10 °C; most insects that survived partial freezing had lower fertility and shorter adult lifespans than either the -10 °C or control group. These results are discussed within the context of forecasting invasive insect distributions. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of the fungicide chlorothalonil on three life stages of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Peter B; Meyer, Shelli L; Chung, Katy W

    2003-09-01

    Chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) is the second most widely used fungicide in the United States. Due to the widespread use of chlorothalonil, it is important to investigate the effects chlorothalonil may have on estuarine species such as the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. This study examined the toxicity of chlorothalonil to three life-history stages (embryo, larvae, adult) of the grass shrimp. Also, molting frequency, growth response and metamorphosis from a larval life cycle pulsed exposure assay were examined as sub-lethal indicators of chlorothalonil exposure. Results showed embryos were the least sensitive with a 96-h Median Lethal Concentration (LC50) of 396.0 microg/L (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 331.3-472.4 microg/L). The adult 96-h LC50 was 152.9 microg/L (95% CI 120.3-194.5 microg/L). Larvae were the most sensitive to chlorothalonil exposure with a 96-h LC50 of 49.5 microg/L (95% CI 44.4-55.27 microg/L). In the life cycle pulsed exposure assay, all surviving larvae in the treatments required significantly more molts to reach postlarvae than the control. Other measured parameters showed differences between treatments and control but there was no statistical significance. This research demonstrated that chlorothalonil is highly toxic to grass shrimp and that larval grass shrimp would be the most appropriate life stage to use for chlorothalonil risk assessments since that stage is the most sensitive.

  18. The contribution of ecdysis to the fate of copper, zinc and cadmium in grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio holthius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keteles, K.A.; Fleeger, J.W. [Louisiana State Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Depuration through ecdysis by grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was examined by exposure to a sublethal mixture of copper, zinc and cadmium for 72 h, followed by placement in uncontaminated water to molt. Percent eliminated with the exuviae varied for each metal; of the total intermolt body burden, 11% Cu, 18% Zn and 26% Cd was associated with the exuviae. Cu concentrations of intermolt exoskeletons were significantly higher than of the exuviae of post-ecdysis shrimp suggesting that Cu contained in the exoskeleton was reabsorbed before molting. Exuvial Cd concentration was not significantly different than the concentration of the intermolt exoskeleton, suggesting that most Cd in the exoskeleton was depurated with the exuviae. Although Zn whole-body burdens were lower after a molt, Zn losses were most likely due to excretion because exuvial concentrations were significantly lower than in the intermolt exoskeleton. Cu, Cd and Zn concentrations in exuvaie shed in metal-enriched water were significantly higher due to adsorption than exuvaie produced in uncontaminated water. (Author)

  19. Effect of Copper on Fatty-Acid Composition and Peroxidation of Lipids in the Roots of Copper Tolerant and Sensitive Silene-Cucubalus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, C.H.R.; TenBookum, W.M.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H.; De Kok, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of high copper exposure in vivo on the lipid and fatty acid composition and lipid peroxidation was studied in the roots of plants from one copper sensitive and two copper tolerant genotypes of Silene cucubalus. At 0.5 muM Cu (control treatment) the compositions of lipids and fatty acids

  20. Assessment of chronic sublethal effects of imidacloprid on honey bee colony health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen P Dively

    Full Text Available Here we present results of a three-year study to determine the fate of imidacloprid residues in hive matrices and to assess chronic sublethal effects on whole honey bee colonies fed supplemental pollen diet containing imidacloprid at 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg over multiple brood cycles. Various endpoints of colony performance and foraging behavior were measured during and after exposure, including winter survival. Imidacloprid residues became diluted or non-detectable within colonies due to the processing of beebread and honey and the rapid metabolism of the chemical. Imidacloprid exposure doses up to 100 μg/kg had no significant effects on foraging activity or other colony performance indicators during and shortly after exposure. Diseases and pest species did not affect colony health but infestations of Varroa mites were significantly higher in exposed colonies. Honey stores indicated that exposed colonies may have avoided the contaminated food. Imidacloprid dose effects was delayed later in the summer, when colonies exposed to 20 and 100 μg/kg experienced higher rates of queen failure and broodless periods, which led to weaker colonies going into the winter. Pooled over two years, winter survival of colonies averaged 85.7, 72.4, 61.2 and 59.2% in the control, 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg treatment groups, respectively. Analysis of colony survival data showed a significant dose effect, and all contrast tests comparing survival between control and treatment groups were significant, except for colonies exposed to 5 μg/kg. Given the weight of evidence, chronic exposure to imidacloprid at the higher range of field doses (20 to 100 μg/kg in pollen of certain treated crops could cause negative impacts on honey bee colony health and reduced overwintering success, but the most likely encountered high range of field doses relevant for seed-treated crops (5 μg/kg had negligible effects on colony health and are unlikely a sole cause of colony declines.

  1. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  2. Copper Imbalances in Ruminants and Humans: Unexpected Common Ground1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Neville F.

    2012-01-01

    Ruminants are more vulnerable to copper deficiency than humans because rumen sulfide generation lowers copper availability from forage, increasing the risk of conditions such as swayback in lambs. Molybdenum-rich pastures promote thiomolybdate (TM) synthesis and formation of unabsorbable Cu-TM complexes, turning risk to clinical reality (hypocuprosis). Selection pressures created ruminant species with tolerance of deficiency but vulnerability to copper toxicity in alien environments, such as specific pathogen–free units. By contrast, cases of copper imbalance in humans seemed confined to rare genetic aberrations of copper metabolism. Recent descriptions of human swayback and the exploratory use of TM for the treatment of Wilson’s disease, tumor growth, inflammatory diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease have created unexpected common ground. The incidence of pre–hemolytic copper poisoning in specific pathogen–free lambs was reduced by an infection with Mycobacterium avium that left them more responsive to treatment with TM but vulnerable to long-term copper depletion. Copper requirements in ruminants and humans may need an extra allowance for the “copper cost” of immunity to infection. Residual cuproenzyme inhibition in TM-treated lambs and anomalies in plasma copper composition that appeared to depend on liver copper status raise this question “can chelating capacity be harnessed without inducing copper-deficiency in ruminants or humans?” A model of equilibria between exogenous (TM) and endogenous chelators (e.g., albumin, metallothionein) is used to predict risk of exposure and hypocuprosis; although risk of natural exposure in humans is remote, vulnerability to TM-induced copper deficiency may be high. Biomarkers of TM impact are needed, and copper chaperones for inhibited cuproenzymes are prime candidates. PMID:22983845

  3. The effect of pH and calcium on copper availability to the springtail Folsomia candida in soil solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardestani, M.M.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pH and calcium on copper bioavailability to the springtail Folsomia candida was determined by assessing uptake kinetics upon copper exposure for 15 days in simplified soil solutions. A slight bioaccumulation of copper was observed in all treatments and controls. The effect of exposure

  4. Sporicidal efficacy of thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Romina; Mostaghimi, Javad; Pershin, Valerian; Ringuette, Maurice

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 200 000 Canadians acquire healthcare-associated bacterial infections each year and several-fold more acquire food-borne bacterial illnesses. Bacterial spores are particularly problematic because they can survive on surfaces for several months. Owing to its sporicidal activity, copper alloy sheet metal is sometimes used in hospital settings, but its widespread use is limited by cost and incompatibility with complex furniture and instrument designs and topographies. A potential alternative is the use of thermal spray technology to coat surfaces with copper alloys. We compared the sporicidal activity of thermally sprayed copper alloy on stainless steel with that of copper alloy sheet metal against Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores remained intact for at least 1 week on uncoated stainless steel, whereas spore fragmentation was initiated within 2 h of exposure to either copper surface. Less than 15% of spores were viable 2 h after exposure to either copper surface, as compared with stainless steel. By day 7, only degraded spores and petal-like nanoflowers were present on the copper surfaces. Nanoflowers, which are laminar arrangements of thin crystal sheets composed of carbon - copper phosphate, appeared to be derived from the degraded spores. Altogether, these results indicate that a thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating on stainless steel provides sporicidal activity similar to that afforded by copper alloy sheet metal.

  5. Sublethal mechanisms of Pb and Zn toxicity to the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellis, Margaret S; Lauer, Mariana M; Nadella, Sunita; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand sublethal mechanisms of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) toxicity, developing sea urchins were exposed continuously from 3h post-fertilization (eggs) to 96 h (pluteus larvae) to 55 (±2.4) μgPb/L or 117 (±11)μgZn/L, representing ~ 70% of the EC50 for normal 72 h development. Growth, unidirectional Ca uptake rates, whole body ion concentrations (Na, K, Ca, Mg), Ca(2+) ATPase activity, and metal bioaccumulation were monitored every 12h over this period. Pb exhibited marked bioaccumulation whereas Zn was well-regulated, and both metals had little effect on growth, measured as larval dry weight, or on Na, K, or Mg concentrations. Unidirectional Ca uptake rates (measured by (45)Ca incorporation) were severely inhibited by both metals, resulting in lower levels of whole body Ca accumulation. The greatest disruption occurred at gastrulation. Ca(2+) ATPase activity was also significantly inhibited by Zn but not by Pb. Interestingly, embryos exposed to Pb showed some capacity for recovery, as Ca(2+)ATPase activities increased, Ca uptake rates returned to normal intermittently, and whole body Ca levels were restored to control values by 72-96 h of development. This did not occur with Zn exposure. Both Pb and Zn rendered their toxic effects through disruption of Ca homeostasis, though likely through different proximate mechanisms. We recommend studying the toxicity of these contaminants periodically throughout development as an effective way to detect sublethal effects, which may not be displayed at the traditional toxicity test endpoint of 72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of acute sublethal effects of clothianidin on motor function of honeybee workers using video-tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkassab, Abdulrahim T; Kirchner, Wolfgang H

    2018-01-01

    Sublethal impacts of pesticides on the locomotor activity might occur to different degrees and could escape visual observation. Therefore, our objective is the utilization of video-tracking to quantify how the acute oral exposure to different doses (0.1-2ng/bee) of the neonicotinoid "clothianidin" influences the locomotor activity of honeybees in a time course experiment. The total distance moved, resting time as well as the duration and frequency of bouts of laying upside down are measured. Our results show that bees exposed to acute sublethal doses of clothianidin exhibit a significant increase in the total distance moved after 30 and 60min of the treatment at the highest dose (2ng/bee). Nevertheless, a reduction of the total distance is observed at this dose 90min post-treatment compared to the distance of the same group after 30min, where the treated bees show an arched abdomen and start to lose their postural control. The treated bees with 1ng clothianidin show a significant increase in total distance moved over the experimental period. Moreover, a reduction in the resting time and increase of the duration and frequency of bouts of laying upside down at these doses are found. Furthermore, significant effects on the tested parameters are observed at the dose (0.5ng/bee) first at 60min post-treatment compared to untreated bees. The lowest dose (0.1ng/bee) has non-significant effects on the motor activity of honeybees compared to untreated bees over the experimental period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lethal and Sublethal Toxicity Comparison of BFRs to Three Marine Planktonic Copepods: Effects on Survival, Metabolism and Ingestion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Gong

    Full Text Available The estuarine planktonic copepods have a wide geographical distribution and commendable tolerance to various kinds of contaminants. The primary aim of the present study was to contrast the impacts of model POPs (TBBPA and HBCD on three common estuarine planktonic copepods (Oithona similis, Acartia pacifica and Pseudodiaptomus inopinus and establish a protocol for the assessment of acute toxicity of marine organic pollutants. We first quantified the 96h-LC50 (0.566, 0.04 and 0.257 mg/L of TBBPA to the three subjects above respectively and 0.314 mg/L of HBCD to P. inopinus; all reported concentrations are nominal values. In the sub-lethal toxicity tests, it was turned out that the effects of copepods exposed to TBBPA could product different influences on the energy ingestion and metabolism. Different type of pollutions, meanwhile, could also bring varying degree effect on the target copepods. In general, the indicators (the rate of oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, food ingestion and filtration in higher concentration groups showed marked significant difference compared with controls as well a dose-effect relationship. The study also extended the research on the joint toxicity of TBBPA and HBCD based on the survival rate of P.inopinus. Whether 1:1 concentration or 1:1 toxic level, the research showed synergy effect relative to single exposure conditions. The result indicated that current single ecological testing used for environmental protection activities may underestimate the risk for copepods. It was also demonstrated that short-term sub-lethal experiment could be a standard to evaluate the sensitivity of copepods to POPs.

  8. Stress response of the black coral Leiopathes glaberrima when exposed to sub-lethal amounts of crude oil and dispersant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannise V. Ruiz-Ramos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil well failure released billions of gallons of crude oil into the deep Gulf of Mexico, and, combined with chemical dispersants, this oil caused significant coral mortality. However, the mechanisms by which oil and dispersed oil impact deep marine fauna are not well understood. Here, we investigate the effects of oil and dispersed oil on a black coral common in the deep Gulf of Mexico, 'Leiopathes glaberrima. 'This coral occurs in several color morphs that show ecological and genetic differences. We hypothesized that dispersed oil would be more detrimental to coral health than oil alone and that this difference would be detectable in the gene expression response of the colonies even at sub-lethal concentrations. In two experiments, four and six colonies of red and white color morphs were exposed to oil, dispersant, and dispersed oil for a minimum of 96 hours. Visual assessment indicated that indeed dispersant and dispersed oil treatments were more damaging than oil alone, for target concentrations of 25 mg L–1. Decline in health was observed for all treatments, independently of color morphotype, but the decline was faster in the white colonies exposed to dispersant. The responses to the treatments were also investigated by monitoring gene expression after 24 hours of sub-lethal chemical exposure. Coral gene expression differed by chemical stressor. Interestingly, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biomarker gene, cytochrome P450, was only up-regulated in dispersed oil but not oil alone, suggesting that the dispersant increased the availability of such hydrocarbons in the tissue. The gene expression response was apparent at 24 hours when visual impacts were not (yet detectable. The use of chemical dispersants in oil-spill remediation may cause health declines in deep-water corals and deserves further study.

  9. Behavioral responses of the estuarine calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis to sub-lethal concentrations of waterborne pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalec, François-Gaël [Université Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, LOG, Station Marine de Wimereux, F-62930 Wimereux (France); CNRS, UMR 8187, F-62930 Wimereux (France); National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Marine Biology, Keelung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Holzner, Markus [Institute of Environmental Engineering, ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Menu, Dominique [Université Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, LOG, Station Marine de Wimereux, F-62930 Wimereux (France); CNRS, UMR 8187, F-62930 Wimereux (France); Hwang, Jiang-Shiou [National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Marine Biology, Keelung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Souissi, Sami, E-mail: sami.souissi@univ-lille1.fr [Université Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, LOG, Station Marine de Wimereux, F-62930 Wimereux (France); CNRS, UMR 8187, F-62930 Wimereux (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •We studied the effects of sub-lethal exposure to pollutants on Eurytemora affinis swimming behavior. •Nonylphenol, cadmium and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons caused hyperactivity. •Effects were observable within 30 min of exposure and persisted during a depuration period. •The response resembles an escape reaction allowing copepods to evade stressful conditions. -- Abstract: Estuarine waters contain a variety of chemicals which affect to various extents the behavior of aquatic organisms. Little is known, however, on the behavioral response of copepods. The present study shows the results of laboratory experiments investigating the immediate effects of sub-lethal concentrations of three commonly found contaminants on the three-dimensional swimming behavior of the estuarine calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis. Nonylphenol at 2 μg L{sup −1}, cadmium at 45 ng L{sup −1} and a mixture of low to medium molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 40 ng L{sup −1} all affected the swimming behavior of E. affinis adults, increasing both swimming speed and activity. In most cases, effects were observable within 30 min of exposure and persisted or faded during a period of depuration in uncontaminated water of similar duration. In ovigerous females exposed to Cd and PAHs, effects appeared to be more pronounced during the depuration period, suggesting that carrying ovisacs may impair recovery. We quantified differences in the distribution of swimming speed values by considering the relative frequencies of periods of break, slow and fast swimming and we observed a trend toward faster movements in the presence of pollutants. The degree of trajectory complexity, estimated through their fractal dimension, was unaffected by pollutants. Since both narcotic and non-narcotic pollutants induced hyperactivity, our results suggest that changes in behavior after a short-term exposure may be independent of the general mode of action of the chemicals. The

  10. Detection of low numbers of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica in chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasson, Vicky; Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2011-02-28

    The capacity to detect low levels of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica cells in chocolate by two alternative rapid detection methods iQ-Check(TM)Salmonella II real-time PCR (Bio-Rad) and VIDAS® Easy SLM (BioMérieux) was assessed and compared with ISO 6579:2005. Chocolate, a low moisture food known to support the survival of Salmonella, was challenged as food matrix. Buffered peptone water (BPW) did not support the recovery of low levels of sub-lethally injured S. enterica independent of the detection method, while BPW supplemented with milk powder enabled detection by the three examined methods. However, inhibition of real-time PCR was observed since for one out of three repetitions of chocolate inoculated with a low number of sub-lethally injured S. enterica cells, no PCR signal was obtained. Therefore, attention should be paid to the enrichment step to avoid false negative results due to the presence of especially sub-lethally injured Salmonella cells in chocolate. An appropriate sample preparation (such as enrichment media and conditions for incubation) remains the key factor for reliable detection including sub-lethally injured cells and should be evaluated, if necessary optimized, for each detection assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Copper kinetics and internal distribution in the marbled crayfish (Procambarus sp.).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedarini, B.; Klaver, L.; Roessink, I.; Widianarko, B.; van Straalen, N.M.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Metal pollution e.g. copper, in water bodies occurs worldwide. Although copper is an essential trace metal, at certain levels it is still considered as pollutant. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure concentration on copper bioaccumulation in marbled crayfish (Procambarus

  12. Copper kinetics and internal distribution in the marbled crayfish (Procambarus sp.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedarini, B.; Klaver, L.; Roessink, I.; Widianarko, B.; Straalen, van N.M.; Gestel, van C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Metal pollution e.g. copper, in water bodies occurs worldwide. Although copper is an essential trace metal, at certain levels it is still considered as pollutant. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure concentration on copper bioaccumulation in marbled crayfish (Procambarus

  13. Development and application of long-term sublethal whole sediment tests with Arenicola marina and Corophium volutator using Ivermectin as the test compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Yvonne T; Thain, John E; Haworth, Sarah; Barry, Jon

    2007-03-01

    Short-term whole sediment tests using the amphipod Corophium volutator and the polychaete Arenicola marina are now routinely used in Europe to assess the acute toxicity of marine sediments. However, there is still a need to develop longer-term assays which measure effects on sublethal endpoints that are more relevant to predicting impacts at the population level. The effect of increasing exposure times and measuring additional endpoints such as growth, on the sensitivity of these assays was investigated. The test compound used was the chemotherapeutant Ivermectin (IVM), used in aquaculture to treat sea lice infestations. IVM was found to be acutely toxic to both test organisms. Extending the lugworm test to 100 days increased sensitivity of survival by a factor of three; a significant reduction in casting rate was observed at concentrations an order of magnitude lower. This assay shows potential for detecting the sublethal effects of low concentrations of sediment contaminants. Increasing the exposure time did not seem to affect the sensitivity of the amphipod, but further method development is required.

  14. Lethal/sublethal responses of Daphnia magna to acute norfloxacin contamination and changes in phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions induced by this antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Yan, Shi-Wei; Li, Ruo-Zhu; Hu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Xue-Xiu

    2017-01-01

    Although the well-known antibiotic norfloxacin (NOR) is recognized as an important environmental pollutant, little is known about its impacts on ecological processes, particularly on species interactions. In this paper, we quantified Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) responses in mortality rate at lethal NOR concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg L-1), and in heartbeat rate, swimming behavior and feeding rate (on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa) at sublethal NOR concentrations (0, 25, 50 and 100 mg L-1) to determine the effects of this antibiotic in plankton systems. In 96-h-long lethal experiment, mortality rates of D. magna increased significantly with increasing NOR concentration and exposure time. In sublethal experiments, heartbeat rate decreased, while time ratio of vertical to horizontal swimming (TVH) and the duration of quiescence increased in D. magna individuals exposed to increasing NOR concentrations after 4 and 12 h of exposure. These collectively led to decreases in both average swimming ability and feeding rate, consistent with the positive relationship between average swimming ability and feeding rate. Overall, results indicate that, by affecting zooplankton heartbeat rate and behavior, NOR decreased feeding efficiency of D. magna even at low doses, therefore, it might seriously compromise ecosystem health and function.

  15. Copper stress proteomics highlights local adaptation of two strains of the model brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Andrés; Ubertini, Martin; Romac, Sarah; Gaillard, Fanny; Delage, Ludovic; Mann, Aaron; Cock, J Mark; Tonon, Thierry; Correa, Juan A; Potin, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Ectocarpus siliculosus is a cosmopolitan brown alga with capacity to thrive in copper enriched environments. Analysis of copper toxicity was conducted in two strains of E. siliculosus isolated from (i) an uncontaminated coast in southern Peru (Es32) and (ii) a copper polluted rocky beach in northern Chile (Es524). Es32 was more sensitive than Es524, with toxicity detected at 50 microg/L Cu, whereas Es524 displayed negative effects only when exposed to 250 microg/L Cu. Differential soluble proteome profiling for each strain exposed to sub-lethal copper levels allowed to identify the induction of proteins related to processes such as energy production, glutathione metabolism as well as accumulation of HSPs. In addition, the inter-strain comparison of stress-related proteomes led to identify features related to copper tolerance in Es524, such as striking expression of a PSII Mn-stabilizing protein and a Fucoxanthine chlorophyll a-c binding protein. Es524 also expressed specific stress-related enzymes such as RNA helicases from the DEAD box families and a vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase. These observations were supported by RT-qPCR for some of the identified genes and an enzyme activity assay for vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase. Therefore, the occurrence of two different phenotypes within two distinct E. siliculosus strains studied at the physiological and proteomic levels strongly suggest that persistent copper stress may represent a selective force leading to the development of strains genetically adapted to copper contaminated sites.

  16. Differential cytotoxicity of copper ferrite nanoparticles in different human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-10-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to be applied in biomedical fields such as cell labeling and hyperthermia. However, there is a lack of information concerning the toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. We explored the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were crystalline and almost spherically shaped with an average diameter of 35 nm. Copper ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, evident by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide and neutral red uptake assays. However, we observed a quite different susceptibility in the two kinds of cells regarding toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. Particularly, A549 cells showed higher susceptibility against copper ferrite NP exposure than those of HepG2 cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential due to copper ferrite NP exposure was observed. The mRNA level as well as activity of caspase-3 enzyme was higher in cells exposed to copper ferrite NPs. Cellular redox status was disturbed as indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (oxidant) generation and depletion of the glutathione (antioxidant) level. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by copper ferrite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetylcysteine treatment, which suggests that reactive oxygen species generation might be one of the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by copper ferrite NPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the mechanisms of differential toxicity of copper ferrite NPs in different types of cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  18. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaskos, J., E-mail: flaskos@vet.auth.gr [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Nikolaidis, E. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Harris, W. [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom); Sachana, M. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Hargreaves, A.J., E-mail: alan.hargreaves@ntu.ac.uk [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-lethal levels of chlorpyrifos oxon inhibit neurite outgrowth in N2a cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylcholinesterase exhibits sustained inhibition throughout exposure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The levels of neurofilament heavy chain and GAP-43

  19. Excess copper induced proteomic changes in the marine brown algae Sargassum fusiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hui-Xi; Pang, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Lin, Li-Dong; Li, Nan; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for algal growth and development; however, it is also generally considered to be one of the most toxic metals when present at higher levels. Seaweeds are often exposed to low concentrations of metals, including Cu, for long time periods. In cases of ocean outfall, they may even be abruptly exposed to high levels of metals. The physiological processes that are active under Cu stress are largely unknown. In this study, the brown macroalga Sargassum fusiforme was cultured in fresh seawater at final Cu concentrations of 0, 4, 8, 24 and 47 μM. The Cu(2+) concentration and chlorophyll autofluorescence were measured to establish the toxic effects of Cu on this economically important seaweed. The accumulation of Cu by S. fusiforme was also dependent upon the external Cu concentration. Algal growth displayed a general decline with increasing media Cu concentrations, indicating that S. fusiforme was able to tolerate Cu stress at low concentrations, while it was negatively impacted at high concentrations. The term "acute stress" was employed to indicate exposure to high Cu concentrations for 1 day in this study. On the other hand, "chronic stress" was defined as exposure to lower sub-lethal Cu concentrations for 7 days. Proteins were extracted from control and Cu-treated S. fusiforme samples and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct patterns of protein expression in the acute and chronic stress conditions were observed. Proteins related to energy metabolism and photosynthesis were reduced significantly, whereas those related to carbohydrate metabolism, protein destination, RNA degradation and signaling regulation were induced in S. fusiforme in response to acute copper stress. Energy metabolism-related proteins were significantly induced by chronic Cu stress. Proteins from other functional groups, such as those related to membranes and transport, were present in minor quantities. These results suggest that S

  20. Effects of sub-chronic Cd exposure on levels of copper, selenium, zinc, iron and other essential metals in rat renal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Prozialeck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cd (Cd is a nephrotoxic environmental pollutant that causes generalized proximal tubule dysfunction. Even though the specific mechanisms by which Cd damages the kidney have yet to be fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that some of these nephrotoxic effects may result from the ability of Cd to alter the levels and function of metals such as Cu, Se, Zn and Fe within the kidney. In order to further explore this issue, we examined the effects of subchronic Cd exposure on tissue levels of a panel of metals (Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn in the rat renal cortex. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with CdCl2 (0.6 mg Cd/kg body weight in isotonic saline by subcutaneous injection, 5 days per week for 6, 9 or 12 weeks. At each time point, 24 h urine samples were collected and assayed for levels of protein, creatinine, β2 microglobulin and cystatin C. Samples of renal cortex were removed and assayed for levels of the metals of interest by inductively-coupled mass spectrometry at Michigan State University. Results showed that at 9 and 12 weeks, Cd caused significant increases in urine volume and urinary protein with no change in creatinine excretion. Increases in the excretion of the urinary biomarkers β2 microglobulin and cystatin C were evident after 6 weeks of Cd exposure. Results of the metal analyses showed that Cd caused significant increases in tissue levels of Cu and Se at all of the time points examined. Tissue levels of Zn were transiently elevated at 6 weeks but declined to control levels at 9 and 12 weeks. Cd caused a significant decrease in levels of Fe at 9 and 12 weeks. Cd had no effects on any of the other metals. Tissue levels of Cd were 530 ± 52, 863 ± 23, 837 ± 23 ppm dry weight at 6, 9 and 12 weeks, respectively. These results indicate that the early stages of Cd nephrotoxicity are associated with alterations in renal tissue levels of Cu, Se, Zn and Fe. The fact that the changes in levels of the

  1. Sublethal effects of some synthetic and botanical insecticides on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeily Saeideh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortality caused by insecticides, some biological traits of insects may also be affected by sublethal insecticide doses. In this study, we used the age-stage, two-sex life table method to evaluate the sublethal effects of the four synthetic insecticides: abamectin, imidacloprid, diazinon, and pymetrozin as well as the botanical insecticide taken from Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae extract, on eggs of the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem.: Aleyrodidae. The lowest and highest survival rates and oviposition periods were observed in whiteflies treated by diazinon and imidacloprid, respectively. We found significant differences in the net reproductive rate (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r, the finite rate of increase (?, and the gross reproductive rate (GRR among different insecticides. Altogether, our results showed that pymetrozin and C. procera induced the most sublethal effects, thus they may be suitable candidates for use in integrated pest management programs of B. tabaci.

  2. Sub-lethal antibiotic treatment leads to multidrug resistance via radical-induced mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanski, Michael A.; DePristo, Mark A.; Collins, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance arises through mechanisms such as selection of naturally occurring resistant mutants and horizontal gene transfer. Recently, oxidative stress has been implicated as one of the mechanisms whereby bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria. Here we show that sub-lethal levels of bactericidal antibiotics induce mutagenesis, resulting in heterogeneous increases in the minimum inhibitory concentration for a range of antibiotics, irrespective of the drug target. This increase in mutagenesis correlates with an increase in ROS, and is prevented by the ROS scavenger thiourea and by anaerobic conditions, indicating that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics induce mutagenesis by stimulating the production of ROS. We demonstrate that these effects can lead to mutant strains that are sensitive to the applied antibiotic but resistant to other antibiotics. This work establishes a radical-based molecular mechanism whereby sub-lethal levels of antibiotics can lead to multidrug resistance, which has important implications for the widespread use and misuse of antibiotics. PMID:20159551

  3. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  4. Growth and metal removal potential of a Phormidium bigranulatum-dominated mat following long-term exposure to elevated levels of copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Gaur, J P

    2014-09-01

    The present study explores the tolerance and metal removal response of a well-developed 2-week-old Phormidium mat after long-term exposure to Cu(2+)-enriched medium. Cu(2+) enrichment inhibited increase in mat biomass in a concentration-dependent manner. Mat area and the number of entrapped air bubbles decreased as Cu(2+) concentration increased in the medium. Decrease in number of air bubbles obviously reflects the adverse effect of Cu(2+) on photosynthetic performance of the mat. Metal enrichment did not substantially alter the amount of pigments, such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoids, and phycocyanin, in the mat. Enhancement of Cu(2+) concentration in the medium led to changes in species composition of the test mat; however, Phormidium bigranulatum always remained the dominant organism. Relative share of green algae and some cyanobacterial taxa, namely, Lyngbya sp. and Oscillatoria tenuis, in the mat were increased by Cu(2+) enrichment. The mat successfully removed 80 to 94 % Cu(2+) from the growth medium containing 10 to 100 μM Cu(2+). Extracellular polysaccharides, whose share increased in the mat community after metal addition, seem to have contributed substantially to metal binding by the mat biomass.

  5. Impacts of ambient salinity and copper on brown algae: 1. Interactive effects on photosynthesis, growth, and copper accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Solène; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-07-01

    The effect of copper enrichment and salinity on growth, photosynthesis and copper accumulation of two temperate brown seaweeds, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, was investigated in laboratory experiments. A significant negative impact of reduced salinity on photosynthetic activity and growth was observed for both species. After 15 days at a salinity of 5, photosynthesis of A. nodosum was entirely inhibited and growth ceased at a salinity of 15. Increased copper concentration negatively affected photosynthetic activity of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus resulting in chlorosis and reduced seaweed growth; 5 mg L⁻¹ copper caused an inhibition of the photosynthesis and the degradation of seaweed tips. Under reduced salinity, copper toxicity was enhanced and caused an earlier impact on the physiology of seaweed tips. After exposure to copper and different salinities for 15 days, copper contents of seaweeds were closely related to copper concentration in the water; seaweed copper contents reached their maximum after 1 day of exposure; contents only increased again when additional, free copper was added to the water. At high water copper concentrations or low salinity, or a combination of both, copper content of A. nodosum decreased. By contrast, copper content of F. vesiculosus increased, suggesting that different binding sites or uptake mechanisms exist in the two species. The results suggest that when using brown seaweeds in biomonitoring in situ, any change in the environment will directly and significantly affect algal physiology and thus their metal binding capacity; the assessment of the physiological status of the algae in combination with the analysis of thallus metal content will enhance the reliability of the biomonitoring process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sublethal Effects of Thiamethoxam on the Demographic Parameters of Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Zhou, Li-Lin; Yang, Fan; Li, Mang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yong; Lei, Chao-Liang; Si, Sheng-Yun

    2017-08-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important sap-sucking pest of many crops, including Chinese cabbage, Brassinca oleracea L. The neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam has been used as an effective insecticide to control M. persicae in cabbage fields. In this study, we assessed the effects of sublethal concentrations of thiamethoxam on demographic parameters of M. persicae. In leaf-dip bioassays, thiamethoxam showed a relatively high toxicity against M. persicae with an LC50 of 6.80 mg liter-1. The duration of the preadult stage was not significantly affected in the sublethal bioassay. Additionally, the longevity and adult preoviposition period were not significantly affected by sublethal thiamethoxam. However, sublethal thiamethoxam significantly increased fecundity (LC10) and prolonged the total preoviposition period (LC40). Consequently, the finite rate of increase (λ) and the intrinsic rate of increase (rm) of aphids exposed to the LC40 were significantly lower than those of control aphids, whereas the net reproductive rate (R0) was higher, and the generation time (T) and the population doubling time (DT) were longer in the treated group. Based on these results, hormesis was induced by sublethal thiamethoxam in M. persicae, with the population growth of M. persicae negatively affected at higher sublethal concentrations of thiamethoxam. Therefore, our study indicated that the possible effects of thiamethoxam on aphids require further study to develop optimized integrated pest management strategies. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Unbiased high-throughput characterization of mussel transcriptomic responses to sublethal concentrations of the biotoxin okadaic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernandez-Tajes, Juan; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Prego-Faraldo, M. Veronica; Florez-Barros, Fernanda; Sexto-Iglesias, Alexia; Mendez, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Background. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) responsible for Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) represent a major threat for human consumers of shellfish. The biotoxin Okadaic Acid (OA), a well-known phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoter, is the primary cause of acute DSP intoxications. Although several studies have described the molecular effects of high OA concentrations on sentinel organisms (e.g., bivalve molluscs), the effect of prolonged exposures to low (sublethal) OA concentrations is still unknown. In order to fill this gap, this work combines Next-Generation sequencing and custom-made microarray technologies to develop an unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic response of mussels during early stages of a DSP bloom. Methods. Mussel specimens were exposed to a HAB episode simulating an early stage DSP bloom (200 cells/L of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima for 24 h). The unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic responses triggered by OA was carried out using two complementary methods of cDNA library preparation: normalized and Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Libraries were sequenced and read datasets were mapped to Gene Ontology and KEGG databases. A custom-made oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on these data, completing the expression analysis of digestive gland and gill tissues. Results. Our findings show that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OA is enough to induce gene expression modifications in the mussel Mytilus. Transcriptomic analyses revealed an increase in proteasomal activity, molecular transport, cell cycle regulation, energy production and immune activity in mussels. Oppositely, a number of transcripts hypothesized to be responsive to OA (notably the Serine/Threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A) failed to show substantial modifications. Both digestive gland and gill tissues responded similarly to OA, although expression modifications were more dramatic in the former, supporting the choice of

  8. Unbiased high-throughput characterization of mussel transcriptomic responses to sublethal concentrations of the biotoxin okadaic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Suarez-Ulloa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs responsible for Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP represent a major threat for human consumers of shellfish. The biotoxin Okadaic Acid (OA, a well-known phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoter, is the primary cause of acute DSP intoxications. Although several studies have described the molecular effects of high OA concentrations on sentinel organisms (e.g., bivalve molluscs, the effect of prolonged exposures to low (sublethal OA concentrations is still unknown. In order to fill this gap, this work combines Next-Generation sequencing and custom-made microarray technologies to develop an unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic response of mussels during early stages of a DSP bloom.Methods. Mussel specimens were exposed to a HAB episode simulating an early stage DSP bloom (200 cells/L of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima for 24 h. The unbiased characterization of the transcriptomic responses triggered by OA was carried out using two complementary methods of cDNA library preparation: normalized and Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH. Libraries were sequenced and read datasets were mapped to Gene Ontology and KEGG databases. A custom-made oligonucleotide microarray was developed based on these data, completing the expression analysis of digestive gland and gill tissues.Results. Our findings show that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OA is enough to induce gene expression modifications in the mussel Mytilus. Transcriptomic analyses revealed an increase in proteasomal activity, molecular transport, cell cycle regulation, energy production and immune activity in mussels. Oppositely, a number of transcripts hypothesized to be responsive to OA (notably the Serine/Threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A failed to show substantial modifications. Both digestive gland and gill tissues responded similarly to OA, although expression modifications were more dramatic in the former, supporting the

  9. Copper-tantalum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  10. Impact of sublethal levels of environmental pollutants found in sewage sludge on a novel Caenorhabditis elegans model biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie McLaggan

    Full Text Available A transgenic strain of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in which bioluminescence reports on relative, whole-organism ATP levels was used to test an environmentally-relevant mixture of pollutants extracted from processed sewage sludge. Changes in bioluminescence, following exposure to sewage sludge extract, were used to assess relative ATP levels and overall metabolic health. Reproductive function and longevity were also monitored. A short (up to 8 h sublethal exposure of L4 larval stage worms to sewage sludge extract had a concentration-dependent, detrimental effect on energy status, with bioluminescence decreasing to 50-60% of the solvent control (1% DMSO. Following longer exposure (22-24 h, the energy status of the nematodes showed recovery as assessed by bioluminescence. Continuous exposure to sewage sludge extract from the L4 stage resulted in a shorter median lifespan relative to that of solvent or medium control animals, but only in the presence of 400-600 µM 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR, which was incorporated to inhibit reproduction. This indicated that FUdR increased lifespan, and that the effect was counteracted by SSE. Exposure to sewage sludge extract from the L1 stage led to slower growth and a delayed onset of egg laying. When L1 exposed nematodes reached the reproductive stage, no effect on egg laying rate or egg number in the uterus was observed. DMSO itself (1% had a significant inhibitory effect on growth and development of C. elegans exposed from the L1 stage and on reproduction when exposed from the L4 stage. Results demonstrate subtle adverse effects on C. elegans of a complex mixture of environmental pollutants that are present, individually, in very low concentrations and indicate that our biosensor of energy status is a novel, sensitive, rapid, quantitative, whole-organism test system which is suitable for high throughput risk assessment of complex pollutant mixtures.

  11. Copper Bioaccumulation and Depuration in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Following Co-exposure to TiO2 and CuO Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Borhan; Maleki, Afshin; Johari, Seyed Ali; Shahmoradi, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Shahsavari, Siros; Davari, Behroz

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs), such as TiO2 and CuO, are widely applied in an increasing number of products and applications, and therefore their release to the aquatic ecosystems is unavoidable. However, little is known about joint toxicity of different NPs on tissues of aquatic organisms, such as fish. This study was conducted to assess the uptake and depuration of Cu following exposure to CuO NPs in the presence of TiO2 NPs in the liver, intestine, muscle, and gill of common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Carps with a mean total length of 23 ± 1.5 cm and mean weight of 13 ± 1.3 g were divided into 6 groups of 15 each (1 control group) and exposed to TiO2 NPs, CuO NPs, and a mixture of TiO2 and CuO NPs for periods of 20 days for uptake and 10 days for depuration. The determination of total Cu concentration was carried out by an ICP-OES. The order of Cu uptake in different tissues of the carps was liver > gill > muscle > intestine in both levels of CuO NPs alone; results showed that the total Cu concentrations in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles were increased and were in the sequence of liver > gill > intestine > muscle. In depuration period, Cu concentrations were decreased in all treatments in the sequence of gill > intestine > muscle > liver. Uptake of Cu in different tissues of common carp increased with increasing concentration and time and was tissues- and time-dependent. In conclusion, this study suggested that the uptake of Cu in the tissues of common carp increased in the joint presence of TiO2 NPs.

  12. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils, carvacrol, thymol, citral and trans-2-hexenal on membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profile of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the modifications of cell membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profiles of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, during growth in the presence of different sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils as well as carvacrol, thymol, trans-2-hexenal and citral. The results evidenced that the tested molecules induced noticeable modifications of membrane fatty acid profiles and volatile compounds produced during the growth. Although specific differences in relation to the species considered were identified, the tested compounds induced a marked increase of some membrane associated fatty acids, particularly unsaturated fatty acids, trans-isomers, and specific released free fatty acids. These findings can contribute to the comprehension of the stress response mechanisms used by different pathogenic microorganisms often involved in food-borne diseases in relation to the exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of natural antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sublethal effects of chlorantraniliprole on juvenile hormone levels and mRNA expression of JHAMT and FPPS genes in the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Beibei; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Nan; Miao, Lijun; Cai, Jingxuan; Lu, Mingxing; Du, Yuzhou; Wang, Jianjun

    2017-10-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates the development and reproduction of insects. The sublethal effects of chlorantraniliprole on JH levels and mRNA expression of JH acid methyltransferase gene (CsJHAMT) and farnesyl diphosphate synthase genes (CsFPPS1 and CsFPPS2) in Chilo suppressalis (Walker) were investigated. Exposure of sublethal concentrations of chlorantraniliprole (LC10 and LC30 ) to the third instar larvae of C. suppressalis significantly increased the JH levels in all developmental stages investigated including larvae 72 h after treatment, the first, third and fifth day of female pupae, as well as newly emerged, 12-h-old and 24-h-old female adults. A general trend of increased mRNA expression levels of CsJHAMT, CsFPPS1and CsFPPS2 was also observed in LC10 and LC30 treatment groups. Notably, the mRNA expression level of CsJHAMT significantly increased by 7.46-fold in the larvae 72 h after LC30 treatment. A significant increase of the mRNA expression levels of CsFPPS2 was also observed in the fifth day female pupae of LC10 and LC30 treatment groups (2.60-fold and 2.62-fold, respectively) as well as in 12-h-old female adults of the LC30 treatment group (3.45-fold). Sublethal concentrations of chlorantraniliprole might upregulate the expression of JH biosynthesis genes and in turn result in an increase of JH level in C. suppressalis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    properties. The thin outer layer controls the corrosion properties of copper, corrosion rate being limited by ionic transport through the layer and the charge transfer step of the film dissolution. Chlorides cause a breakdown of the oxide film in the stability region of divalent copper, but they seem to have no effect on the properties of the film in the stability region of monovalent copper; oxidising conditions with simultaneous exposure to chlorides are thus expected to subject copper to localised corrosion. Sulphides at the concentration of 10 ppm dissolved H{sub 2}S were found not to promote the formation of a three-dimensional film of Cu{sub 2}S (or other copper sulphides), thus the mechanisms of localised corrosion which operate under reducing conditions and are based on the formation of copper sulphides seem not to be valid. In the presence of 10 ppm H{sub 2}S the corrosion rate of copper is controlled by the charge transfer step of the dissolution of the outer layer 57 refs, 35 figs, 7 tabs

  15. Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Impact Several Toxicological Endpoints and Cause Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashock, Michael J; Zanon, Tyler; Kappell, Anthony D; Petrella, Lisa N; Andersen, Erik C; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly incorporated into technology and consumer products. In 2014, over 300 tons of copper oxide nanoparticles were manufactured in the United States. The increased production of nanoparticles raises concerns regarding the potential introduction into the environment or human exposure. Copper oxide nanoparticles commonly release copper ions into solutions, which contribute to their toxicity. We quantified the inhibitory effects of both copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on C. elegans toxicological endpoints to elucidate their biological effects. Several toxicological endpoints were analyzed in C. elegans, including nematode reproduction, feeding behavior, and average body length. We examined three wild C. elegans isolates together with the Bristol N2 laboratory strain to explore the influence of different genotypic backgrounds on the physiological response to copper challenge. All strains exhibited greater sensitivity to copper oxide nanoparticles compared to copper sulfate, as indicated by reduction of average body length and feeding behavior. Reproduction was significantly reduced only at the highest copper dose, though still more pronounced with copper oxide nanoparticles compared to copper sulfate treatment. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper sulfate on neurons, cells with known vulnerability to heavy metal toxicity. Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons was observed in up to 10% of the population after copper oxide nanoparticle exposure. Additionally, mutants in the divalent-metal transporters, smf-1 or smf-2, showed increased tolerance to copper exposure, implicating both transporters in copper-induced neurodegeneration. These results highlight the complex nature of CuO nanoparticle toxicity, in which a nanoparticle-specific effect was observed in some traits (average body length, feeding behavior) and a copper ion specific effect was observed for other traits

  16. Sensitivity of two green microalgae to copper stress: Growth, oxidative and antioxidants analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Seham M; Selim, Samy; Klöck, Gerd; AbdElgawad, Hamada

    2017-10-01

    Depending on species, heavy metals, including copper (Cu), differentially affect algal growth and metabolism. Here, we aim to evaluate the differential responses of two green microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus acuminatus, exposed to sub-lethal doses of Cu (25 and 50µM, respectively) for 7 days. The changes in growth, oxidative damage markers, and antioxidants were analysed. We found that S. acuminatus could acclimatise during long-term exposure to Cu stress. S. acuminatus accumulated lower Cu content and showed a slight decrease in H 2 O 2 levels when compared to C. sorokiniana. Cu stress induced membrane damage in the two microalgae species, however, this increase was slightly lower in S. acuminatus. To mitigate Cu stress impact, C. sorkiniana markedly increased proline, polyphenols, flavonoids, tocopherols, glutathione levels, as well as the activities of GST, APX, GR and SOD enzymes, which could explain less-stress sensitivity. On the other hand, S. acuminatus exhibited significant increases in proline, polyphenol, and tocopherol contents. Activity levels of POX, APX, GR and SOD enzymes, were also increased. These results suggest that the two microalgae differentially induced the antioxidant defence system to neutralise the oxidative damage induced by Cu stress. This study also provided new data for Cu tolerance and Cu removal abilities of two microalgal species, which commonly exist in surface water bodies, where low Cu uptake and efficient antioxidant defence system protected S. acuminatus against oxidative stress induced by Cu stress. This makes it feasible for treatment of Cu contaminated waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-02

    Aug 2, 2016 ... membrane and intracellular vesicles (Zheng et al. ... The extracellular N- terminus has both N- and O-linked glycosylation sites at residues Asn 15 and Thr 27 respectively. There are two histidine and two methionine residues that act as copper ... followed by Cu exposure nor an increase in extracellular Cu.

  18. Exposure of bighorn sheep to domestic goats colonized with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae induces sub-lethal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Thomas E; Cassirer, E Frances; Potter, Kathleen A; Foreyt, William J

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) that has been associated with contact with domestic Caprinae. The disease is polymicrobial but is initiated by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is commonly carried by both domestic sheep (O. aries) and goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). However, while previous bighorn sheep comingling studies with domestic sheep have resulted in nearly 100% pneumonia mortality, only sporadic occurrence of fatal pneumonia was reported from previous comingling studies with domestic goats. Here, we evaluated the ability of domestic goats of defined M. ovipneumoniae carriage status to induce pneumonia in comingled bighorn sheep. In experiment 1, three bighorn sheep naïve to M. ovipneumoniae developed non-fatal respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) following comingling with three naturally M. ovipneumoniae-colonized domestic goats. Gross and histological lesions of pneumonia, limited to small areas on the ventral and lateral edges of the anterior and middle lung lobes, were observed at necropsies conducted at the end of the experiment. A control group of three bighorn sheep from the same source housed in isolation during experiment 1 remained free of observed respiratory disease. In experiment 2, three bighorn sheep remained free of observed respiratory disease while comingled with three M. ovipneumoniae-free domestic goats. In experiment 3, introduction of a domestic goat-origin strain of M. ovipneumoniae to the same comingled goats and bighorn sheep used in experiment 2 resulted in clinical signs of respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) in both host species. At the end of experiment 3, gross and histological evidence of pneumonia similar to that observed in experiment 1 bighorn sheep was observed in both affected bighorn sheep and domestic goats. M. ovipneumoniae strains carried by domestic goats were transmitted to comingled bighorn sheep, triggering development of pneumonia. However, the severity of the disease was markedly milder than that seen in similar experiments with domestic sheep strains of the bacterium.

  19. Repeated Exposure to Sublethal Doses of the Organophosphorus Compound VX Activates BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    urinary and fecal incontinence , and bronchial constriction (reviewed in Russell and Overstreet, 1987). Acute toxic levels of CWNA, particularly at...of toxicity (Sterri et al., 1980). Unfortunately, Disclaimers: The views expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not reflect the

  20. Mitochondrial Ferredoxin Determines Vulnerability of Cells to Copper Excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Cindy; Holland, Sara L; Avery, Simon V

    2017-10-19

    The essential micronutrient copper is tightly regulated in organisms, as environmental exposure or homeostasis defects can cause toxicity and neurodegenerative disease. The principal target(s) of copper toxicity have not been pinpointed, but one key effect is impaired supply of iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters to the essential protein Rli1 (ABCE1). Here, to find upstream FeS biosynthesis/delivery protein(s) responsible for this, we compared copper sensitivity of yeast-overexpressing candidate targets. Overexpression of the mitochondrial ferredoxin Yah1 produced copper hyper-resistance. 55Fe turnover assays revealed that FeS integrity of Yah1 was particularly vulnerable to copper among the test proteins. Furthermore, destabilization of the FeS domain of Yah1 produced copper hypersensitivity, and YAH1 overexpression rescued Rli1 dysfunction. This copper-resistance function was conserved in the human ferredoxin, Fdx2. The data indicate that the essential mitochondrial ferredoxin is an important copper target, determining a tipping point where plentiful copper supply becomes excessive. This knowledge could help in tackling copper-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Copper Status of Exposed Microorganisms Influences Susceptibility to Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Vincent C.; Spitzmiller, Melissa R.; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Kropat, Janette; Damoiseaux, Robert D.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Mahendra, Shaily

    2017-01-01

    Although interactions of metallic nanoparticles (NP) with various microorganisms have been previously explored, few studies have examined how metal sensitivity impacts NP toxicity. Herein, we investigated the effects of copper nanoparticles’ (Cu-NPs) exposure to the model alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in the presence and absence of the essential micronutrient copper. The toxic ranges for Cu-NPs and the ionic control, CuCl2, were determined using a high-throughput ATP-based fluorescence assay. Cu-NPs caused similar mortality in copper-replete and copper-deplete cells (IC50: 14–16 mg/L), but were less toxic than the ionic control, CuCl2 (IC50: 7 mg/L). Using this concentration range, we assessed Cu-NP impacts to cell morphology, copper accumulation, chlorophyll content, and expression of stress genes under both copper supply states. Osmotic swelling, membrane damage, and chloroplast and organelle disintegration were observed by transmission electron microscopy at both conditions. Despite these similarities, copper-deplete cells showed greater accumulation of loosely bound and tightly bound copper after exposure to Cu-NPs. Furthermore, copper-replete cells experienced greater loss of chlorophyll content, 19 % for Cu-NPs, compared to only an 11% net decrease in copper-deplete cells. The tightly bound copper was bioavailable as assessed by reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR analysis of CYC6, a biomarker for Cu-deficiency. The increased resistance of copper-deplete cells to Cu-NPs suggests that these cells potentially metabolize excess Cu-NPs or better manage sudden influxes of ions. Our findings recommend that toxicity assessments must account for the nutritional status of impacted organisms and use toxicity models based on estimations of the bioavailable fractions. PMID:26387648

  2. Copper status of exposed microorganisms influences susceptibility to metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Vincent C; Spitzmiller, Melissa R; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Kropat, Janette; Damoiseaux, Robert D; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Mahendra, Shaily

    2016-05-01

    Although interactions of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with various microorganisms have been previously explored, few studies have examined how metal sensitivity impacts NP toxicity. The present study investigated the effects of copper NPs (Cu-NP) exposure on the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the presence and absence of the essential micronutrient copper. The toxic ranges for Cu-NPs and the ionic control, CuCl2 , were determined using a high-throughput adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-based fluorescence assay. The Cu-NPs caused similar mortality in copper-replete and copper-deplete cells (median inhibitory concentration [IC50]: 14-16 mg/L) but were less toxic than the ionic control, CuCl2 (IC50: 7 mg/L). Using this concentration range, the Cu-NP impacts on cell morphology, copper accumulation, chlorophyll content, and expression of stress genes under both copper supply states were assessed. Osmotic swelling, membrane damage, and chloroplast and organelle disintegration were observed by transmission electron microscopy at both conditions. Despite these similarities, copper-deplete cells showed greater accumulation of loosely bound and tightly bound copper after exposure to Cu-NPs. Furthermore, copper-replete cells experienced greater loss of chlorophyll content, 19% for Cu-NPs, compared with only an 11% net decrease in copper-deplete cells. The tightly bound copper was bioavailable as assessed by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of CYC6, a biomarker for Cu deficiency. The increased resistance of copper-deplete cells to Cu-NPs suggests that these cells potentially metabolize excess Cu-NPs or better manage sudden influxes of ions. The results suggest that toxicity assessments must account for the nutritional status of impacted organisms and use toxicity models based on estimations of the bioavailable fractions. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. Effects of elevated temperature on the toxicity of copper and oxytetracycline in the marine model, Euplotes crassus: a climate change perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomiero, A; Viarengo, A

    2014-11-01

    Trace metals and broad-spectrum antibiotic drugs are common environmental contaminants, the importance of which is increasing due to global climate change-related effects. In the present study, the biological model organism E. crassus was first acclimated to five temperatures, from 25 °C to 33 °C, followed by exposure to nominal concentrations of copper, the antibiotic model compound oxytetracycline and mixtures of both, at increasing thermal conditions. Variations of temperature-related toxicity were assessed by two high-level endpoint tests, survival and replication rates, and two sublethal parameters: endocytosis rate and lysosomal membrane stability. The selected toxicants presented opposite behaviours as the protozoa's survival rates increased following an increasing thermal gradient in the oxytetracycline-related treatments, and a decline of tolerance in metal-related treatments was observed. Results of tests combining binary mixtures of tested toxicants showed a complex pattern of responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Copper Induced Lysosomal Membrane Destabilisation in Haemolymph Cells of Mediterranean Green Crab (Carcinus aestuarii, Nardo, 1847 from the Narta Lagoon (Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valbona Aliko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTDestabilisation of blood cell lysosomes in Mediterranean green crabCarcinus aestuarii was investigated using Neutral Red Retention Assay (NRRA. Crabs collected in Narta Lagoon, Vlora (Albania during May 2014 were exposed in the laboratory to sub-lethal, environmentally realistic concentrations of copper. Neutral Red Retention Time (NRRT and glucose concentration in haemolymph of animals were measured. The mean NRRT showed a significant reduction for the animals of the treatment group compared to the control one (from 118.6 ± 28.4 to 36.4 ± 10.48 min, p<0.05, indicating damage of lysosomal membrane. Haemolymph glucose concentration was significantly higher in the treatment group (from 37.8 ± 2.7 to 137.8.4 ± 16.2 mg/dL, p<0.05 than in control group, demonstrating the presence of stress on the animals. These results showed thatC. aestuarii could be used as a successful and reliable bioindicator for evaluating the exposure to contaminants in laboratory conditions. NRRA provides a successful tool for rapid assessment of heavy metal pollution effects on marine biota.

  5. Assessment of the Bioaccessibility of Micronized Copper Wood on Simulated Stomach Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of copper-treated lumber has increased the potential for human exposure. Moreover, there is a lack of information on the fate and behavior of copper-treated wood particles following oral ingestion. In this study, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust in simulated stomach fluid and DI water was determined. Three copper-treated wood products, liquid alkali copper quaternary and two micronized copper quarternary from different manufacturers, were incubated in the extraction media then fractionated by centrifugation and filtration through 0.45 ?m and 10 kDa filters. The copper concentrations from isolated fractions were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Total amounts of copper from each wood product were also determined using microwave-assisted acid digestion of dried wood samples and quantification using ICP-OES. The percent in vitro bioaccessible copper was between 83 and 90 % for all treated wood types. However, the percent of copper released in DI water was between 14 and 25 % for all wood products. This data suggests that copper is highly bioaccessible at low pH and may pose a potential human exposure risk upon ingestion. This dataset is associated with the following publication:Santiago-Rodrigues, L., J.L. Griggs, K. Bradham , C. Nelson , T. Luxton , W. Platten , and K. Rogers. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach flu

  6. Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on interactions in a tritrophic system of non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Philipp; Bucher, Roman; Schäfer, Ralf B; Entling, Martin H

    2015-08-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most used insecticides worldwide, but is highly toxic to non-target arthropods. Effects of sublethal imidacloprid intoxication can potentially propagate in food webs, yet little is known about the impact on non-target populations and communities. We investigated short-term sublethal toxicity of imidacloprid in a tritrophic model system of wild strawberry Fragaria vesca, wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris and nursery web spider Pisaura mirabilis. Strawberries were treated two times with 0mg (control), 1mg (low rate) and 10mg (high rate) of Confidor® WG 70 and crickets were allowed to feed on them. In four lab experiments, we quantified the impact of imidacloprid on leaf damage, growth, behaviour and survival of crickets. The high imidacloprid rate reduced feeding, mass gain, thorax growth and mobility in crickets compared to the control, while mortality was similarly low in all treatments. The low rate reduced mass gain only. Cricket survival of spider predation was higher in the low rate treatment than in the control. Overall, herbivory and predation were reduced at sublethal imidacloprid rates in a non-target organism, three-level food chain, which demonstrates possible propagation of sublethal effects through trophic interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of chronic sublethal effects of imidacloprid on honey bee colony health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present results of a three-year study to determine the fate of imidacloprid residues in hive matrices and to assess chronic sublethal effects on whole honey bee colonies fed supplemental pollen diet containing imidacloprid at 5, 20 and 100 µg/kg over multiple brood cycles. Various endpoints ...

  8. Effect of sublethal preculturing on the survival of probiotics and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settachaimongkon, S.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Winata, V.; Wang, X.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Smid, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of preculturing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12 under sublethal stress conditions on their survival and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt. Prior to co-cultivation with yoghurt starters in milk,

  9. Physiological stress and ethanol accumulation in tree stems and woody tissues at sublethal temperatures from fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Douglas J. Westlind

    2017-01-01

    The lethal temperature limit is 60 degrees Celsius (°C) for plant tissues, including trees, with lower temperatures causing heat stress. As fire injury increases on tree stems, there is an accompanying rise in tissue ethanol concentrations, physiologically linked to impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation energy production. We theorize that sublethal tissue...

  10. Lethal and sublethal effects of an insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, on obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-04-01

    The obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is one of the most destructive pests of tree fruit in Washington. The development of insecticide resistance in C. rosaceana has led us to explore new management tactics. The use of very low doses of insecticides that have strong sublethal effects represents an environmentally friendly option to improve existing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on growth and development of C. rosaceana. A leaf-disk bioassay was used to test seven concentrations of pyriproxyfen ranging from 0 to 30 ppm on fifth-instar C. rosaceana. Male and female larvae were assessed separately for mortality as well as other parameters of growth and development. The LC, values for males and females were 2.4 and 4.8 ppm, respectively. The response to pyriproxyfen was concentration-dependent: only 5-6% of the larvae treated with the highest concentration emerged as morphologically normal adults compared with 86% emergence in the controls. The pupation and adult emergence was significantly delayed at concentrations higher than 1 ppm. The weights of C. rosaceana pupae and adults were significantly increased, whereas fecundity and fertility were significantly reduced at a sublethal concentration of 0.3 ppm. We conclude that both lethal and sublethal effects might exhibit significant impacts on the population dynamics of C. rosaceana in tree fruit orchards treated with low concentrations of pyriproxyfen.

  11. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of a vegetable oil mill effluent on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of a vegetable oil mill effluent on growth of Clarius gariepinus. JA Adakole, E Alabi. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Fisheries Vol. 4 (2) 2007: pp. 182-189. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  12. Effects of IL-10 on systemic inflammatory responses during sublethal primate endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Jansen, P. M.; Montegut, W. J.; Braxton, C. C.; Calvano, S. E.; Stackpole, S. A.; Smith, S. R.; Swanson, S. W.; Hack, C. E.; Lowry, S. F.; Moldawer, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    IL-10 protects mice from LPS-induced lethality. To determine the effects of IL-10 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses, six Papio anubis baboons were i.v. injected with a sublethal dose of LPS (Salmonella typhimurium; 500 microg/kg) directly preceded by either human rIL-10 (n = 3, 500 microg/kg) or

  13. Sublethal Photothermal Stimulation with a Micropulse Laser Induces Heat Shock Protein Expression in ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Inagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Aim of the Study. Subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation is an effective treatment for macular edema. The molecular mechanisms underlying treatment success are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sublethal laser energy doses on a single layer of densely cultured ARPE-19 cells as a model of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Materials and Methods. A single layer of densely cultured human ARPE-19 cells was perpendicularly irradiated with a micropulse diode laser. Nonirradiated cells served as controls. Sublethal laser energy was applied to form a photocoagulation-like area in the cultured cell layers. Hsp70 expression was evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results. Photocoagulation-like areas were successfully created in cultured ARPE-19 cell layers using sublethal laser energy with our laser irradiation system. Hsp70 mRNA expression in cell layers was induced within 30 min of laser irradiation, peaking at 3 h after irradiation. This increase was dependent on the number of laser pulses. Hsp70 upregulation was not observed in untreated cell layers. Immunostaining indicated that Hsp70 expression occurred concentrically around laser irradiation sites and persisted for 24 h following irradiation. Conclusion. Sublethal photothermal stimulation with a micropulse laser may facilitate Hsp70 expression in the RPE without inducing cellular damage.

  14. Effects of sublethal concentrations of formalin on weight gain in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Catfish, Clarias gariepinus, was exposed to various sublethal concentrations (25.0, 12.50, 6.25, 3.125, 1.56 and 0.0 mgl-1) of formalin to investigate their effects on the weight gain of the fish. Decrease in weight gain, directly proportional to the toxicant concentration, was observed in fish exposed to ...

  15. RFID tracking of sublethal effects of two neonicotinoid insecticides on the foraging behavior of Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof W Schneider

    Full Text Available The development of insecticides requires valid risk assessment procedures to avoid causing harm to beneficial insects and especially to pollinators such as the honeybee Apis mellifera. In addition to testing according to current guidelines designed to detect bee mortality, tests are needed to determine possible sublethal effects interfering with the animal's vitality and behavioral performance. Several methods have been used to detect sublethal effects of different insecticides under laboratory conditions using olfactory conditioning. Furthermore, studies have been conducted on the influence insecticides have on foraging activity and homing ability which require time-consuming visual observation. We tested an experimental design using the radiofrequency identification (RFID method to monitor the influence of sublethal doses of insecticides on individual honeybee foragers on an automated basis. With electronic readers positioned at the hive entrance and at an artificial food source, we obtained quantifiable data on honeybee foraging behavior. This enabled us to efficiently retrieve detailed information on flight parameters. We compared several groups of bees, fed simultaneously with different dosages of a tested substance. With this experimental approach we monitored the acute effects of sublethal doses of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid (0.15-6 ng/bee and clothianidin (0.05-2 ng/bee under field-like circumstances. At field-relevant doses for nectar and pollen no adverse effects were observed for either substance. Both substances led to a significant reduction of foraging activity and to longer foraging flights at doses of ≥0.5 ng/bee (clothianidin and ≥1.5 ng/bee (imidacloprid during the first three hours after treatment. This study demonstrates that the RFID-method is an effective way to record short-term alterations in foraging activity after insecticides have been administered once, orally, to individual bees. We contribute further

  16. Paralytic shellfish toxins inhibit copper uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Kathleen D; Wetzel, Randall K; Minkin, Steven C; Dodani, Sheel C; Wilhelm, Steven W; Sayler, Gary S

    2013-06-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins are secondary metabolites produced by several species of dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria. Known targets of these toxins, which typically occur at detrimental concentrations during harmful algal blooms, include voltage-gated ion channels in humans and other mammals. However, the effects of the toxins on the co-occurring phytoplankton community remain unknown. The present study examined the molecular mechanisms of the model photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to saxitoxin exposure as a means of gaining insight into the phytoplankton community response to a bloom. Previous work with yeast indicated that saxitoxin inhibited copper uptake, so experiments were designed to examine whether saxitoxin exhibited a similar mode of action in algae. Expression profiling following exposure to saxitoxin or a copper chelator produced similar profiles in copper homeostasis genes, notably induction of the cytochrome c6 (CYC6) and copper transporter (COPT1, CTR1) genes. Cytochrome c6 is used as an alternative to plastocyanin under conditions of copper deficiency, and immunofluorescence data showed this protein to be present in a significantly greater proportion of saxitoxin-exposed cells compared to controls. Live-cell imaging with a copper-sensor probe for intracellular labile Cu(I) confirmed that saxitoxin blocked copper uptake. Extrapolations of these data to phytoplankton metabolic processes along with the copper transporter as a molecular target of saxitoxin based on existing structural models are discussed. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  17. Sub-lethal effects of the neurotoxic pyrethroid insecticide Fastac 50EC on the general motor and locomotor activities of the non-targeted beneficial carabid beetle Platynus assimilis (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooming, Ene; Merivee, Enno; Must, Anne; Sibul, Ivar; Williams, Ingrid

    2014-06-01

    Sub-lethal effects of pesticides on behavioural endpoints are poorly studied in carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae) though changes in behaviour caused by chemical stress may affect populations of these non-targeted beneficial insects. General motor activity and locomotion are inherent in many behavioural patterns, and changes in these activities that result from xenobiotic influence mirror an integrated response of the insect to pesticides. Influence of pyrethroid insecticides over a wide range of sub-lethal doses on the motor activities of carabids still remains unclear. Video tracking of Platynus assimilis showed that brief exposure to alpha-cypermethrin at sub-lethal concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 100 mg L(-1) caused initial short-term (24 h) locomotor hypo-activity. In addition, significant short- and long-term concentration and time-dependent changes occurred in general motor activity patterns and rates. Conspicuous changes in motor activity of Platynus assimilis beetles treated at alpha-cypermethrin concentrations up to 75,000-fold lower than maximum field recommended concentration (MFRC) suggest that many, basic fitness-related behaviours might be severely injured as well. These changes may negatively affect carabid populations in agro-ecosystems. Long-term hypo-activity could directly contribute to decreased trap captures of carabids frequently observed after insecticide application in the field. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Sublethal effects of petroleum fractions on the behavior of the lobster, Homarus americanus, and the mud snail, Nassarius obsoletus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atema, J.

    1976-01-01

    Studies by our laboratory on sublethal effects of petroleum fractions on behavior of H. americanus and N. obsoletus are summarized in an attempt to clarify contradictory results and to gain an understanding of the underlying principles. There appear a surprising number of similarities in the way specific petroleum fractions affect the behavior of a crustacean arthropod and a gastropod mollusc. Acute toxicity, caused perhaps by the branched-cyclic fraction, was evident in short term exposures to whole No. 2 fuel oil at 50 ppM and kerosene in ..mu..l/100 l quantities. Feeding attraction, caused perhaps by the branched-cyclic fraction in lower concentrations, was seen after exposure to 1 ppM No. 2 fuel oil, and to kerosene and its branched-cyclic and polar-aromatic fractions in ..mu..l/100 l quantities. Repulsion and feeding inhibition, caused perhaps by the polar-aromatic fraction which contains most of the soluble materials, was observed in response to many concentrations of No. 2 fuel oil and kerosene, and their soluble fractions down to 1 ppB levels. No effect was apparent in exposures to the lower concentrations of solubles of .1 and .01 ppM No. 2 fuel oil and to solubles of La Rosa crude at 10 ppB. The hypothesis is advanced that specific hydrocarbon fractions in specific amounts are responsible for distinct behavioral changes; these fractions are present in varying quantities in different oils; and the changes in behavior are general enough to affect a large number of marine invertebrates in a similar manner.

  19. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  20. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  1. Single-cell analysis of S. cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat-stress applied during an alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibayrenc, Pierre; Preziosi-Belloy, Laurence; Ghommidh, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Interest in bioethanol production has experienced a resurgence in the last few years. Poor temperature control in industrial fermentation tanks exposes the yeast cells used for this production to intermittent heat stress which impairs fermentation efficiency. Therefore, there is a need for yeast strains with improved tolerance, able to recover from such temperature variations. Accordingly, this paper reports the development of methods for the characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat stress. Single-cell measurements were carried out in order to detect cell-to-cell variability. Alcoholic batch fermentations were performed on a defined medium in a 2 l instrumented bioreactor. A rapid temperature shift from 33 to 43 °C was applied when ethanol concentration reached 50 g l⁻¹. Samples were collected at different times after the temperature shift. Single cell growth capability, lag-time and initial growth rate were determined by monitoring the growth of a statistically significant number of cells after agar medium plating. The rapid temperature shift resulted in an immediate arrest of growth and triggered a progressive loss of cultivability from 100 to 0.0001% within 8 h. Heat-injured cells were able to recover their growth capability on agar medium after a lag phase. Lag-time was longer and more widely distributed as the time of heat exposure increased. Thus, lag-time distribution gives an insight into strain sensitivity to heat-stress, and could be helpful for the selection of yeast strains of technological interest.

  2. The Protective Role of Thiourea on Leuciscus cephalus Exposed to Sublethal Doses of Pendigan 330EC (Pendimethalin) Herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunescu, Alina; Zgurschi, Gabriela; Soare, Liliana Cristina; Man, George Mihail; Brinzea, Gheorghita; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Fierascu, Irina; Ponepal, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective role of thiourea on the physiological, hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of Leuciscus cephalus exposed to sublethal concentration of Pendigan 330 EC herbicide. The animals were divided in four experimental groups (control, animals subjected to 1 ‰ thiourea, animals subjected to 4 × 10(-4) mL/L herbicide and, respectively, animals subjected to 4 × 10(-4) mL/L herbicide and 1 ‰ thiourea). Exposure of European chub to herbicide administered in water for 2 weeks determined installation of pathological changes in the liver and gills tissues. Also, were observed a decrease in the number of white blood cells and oxygen consumption, breathing frequency, and an increase in the number of red blood cells and glycaemia values. Thiourea counteracts the toxic action, describing itself as normal liver parenchyma and normal gills in animals intoxicated with herbicide, without lesion, and a return to normal values of the studied markers.

  3. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  4. Penicillin-binding protein encoded by pbp4 is involved in mediating copper stress in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cameron; Costolo, Ben; Brown, Phillip; Kathariou, Sophia

    2017-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes raises major food safety and public health concerns due to its potential for severe foodborne disease and persistent colonization of food processing facilities. Copper is often employed to control pathogens in agriculture and is increasingly used in healthcare facilities, but mechanisms mediating tolerance of L. monocytogenes to copper remain poorly understood. A mariner-based mutant library of L. monocytogenes 2011L-2858, implicated in the 2011 listeriosis outbreak via whole cantaloupe, was screened for growth at sublethal levels of copper yielding mutant G2B4 with decreased copper tolerance. The transposon was localized in pbp4 (lmo2229 homolog), encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP). In addition to reduced copper tolerance, G2B4 exhibited increased susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics, reduced biofilm formation and reduced virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. Mutant phenotypes were fully restored upon genetic complementation of G2B4 with intact pbp4. Findings provide the first evidence for the role of a PBP in copper tolerance of L. monocytogenes and suggest that pbp4 may be a suitable target to enable the use of lower levels of copper or enhance the effectiveness of levels currently in use. Given the wide distribution of PBPs and their highly conserved nature, this could have profound impacts in regard to ecology and control of L. monocytogenes and other microorganisms. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Sublethal effects of chronic lead ingestion in mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, M.T.; Dieter, M.P.; Locke, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Mallard drakes (Anas platyrhynchos) fed 1, 5, or 25 ppm lead nitrate were bled and sacrificed at 3-wk intervals. No mortality occurred, and the pathologic lesions usually associated with lead poisoning were not found. Changes in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration did not occur. After 3-wk ducks fed 25 ppm lead exhibited a 40% inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity that persisted through 12 wk exposure. After 12 wk treatment similar enzyme inhibition was present in the ducks fed 5 ppm lead. At 3 wk there was a small accumulation of lead (less than 1 ppm) in the liver and kidneys of ducks fed 25ppm lead; no further increases occurred throughout the exposure. No significant accumulation of lead occurred the the tibiae or wing bones. Groups of ducks fed 5 and 25 ppm diets for 12 wk were placed on clean feed and examined through a 12 wk posttreatment period. After 3 wk on clean diet delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity and lead concentrations in the blood had returned to pretreatment levels. Even though lead concentrations in the blood, soft organs and bone were low, a highly significant negative correlation between blood lead and blood enzyme activity was obtained. This enzyme bioassay should provide a sensitive and precise estimate for monitoring lead in the blood for waterflow.

  6. Cell density dependence of Microcystis aeruginosa responses to copper algaecide concentrations: Implications for microcystin-LR release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Ciera M; Iwinski, Kyla J; Hendrikse, Maas; Geer, Tyler D; Rodgers, John H

    2017-11-01

    Along with mechanistic models, predictions of exposure-response relationships for copper are often derived from laboratory toxicity experiments with standardized experimental exposures and conditions. For predictions of copper toxicity to algae, cell density is a critical factor often overlooked. For pulse exposures of copper-based algaecides in aquatic systems, cell density can significantly influence copper sorbed by the algal population, and consequent responses. A cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, was exposed to a copper-based algaecide over a range of cell densities to model the density-dependence of exposures, and effects on microcystin-LR (MC-LR) release. Copper exposure concentrations were arrayed to result in a gradient of MC-LR release, and masses of copper sorbed to algal populations were measured following exposures. While copper exposure concentrations eliciting comparable MC-LR release ranged an order of magnitude (24-h EC50s 0.03-0.3mg Cu/L) among cell densities of 10 6 through 10 7 cells/mL, copper doses (mg Cu/mg algae) were similar (24-h EC50s 0.005-0.006mg Cu/mg algae). Comparisons of MC-LR release as a function of copper exposure concentrations and doses provided a metric of the density dependence of algal responses in the context of copper-based algaecide applications. Combined with estimates of other site-specific factors (e.g. water characteristics) and fate processes (e.g. dilution and dispersion, sorption to organic matter and sediments), measuring exposure-response relationships for specific cell densities can refine predictions for in situ exposures and algal responses. These measurements can in turn decrease the likelihood of amending unnecessary copper concentrations to aquatic systems, and minimize risks for non-target aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Copper (II) Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: N – histidyl – 2, 4 – pentanedione Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of histidine and 2, 4 - pentandione. The reaction of methanolic solution of N – histidyl – 2, 4 – pentanedione Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride gave diaquo bis( N – histidyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) ...

  8. Copper Pyrimidine based MOFs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure S17. Self assembly of the tecton [CuI(pdz)Cl] can occur through two paths that causes the occurrence of supramolecular isomers. .... The pdz ligands bridge a pair of copper atoms in a chain through coordinate bonds. In addition ...... The weight loss thereafter corresponds to degradation of copper halide framework.

  9. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  10. Locomotion Inhibition of Cimex lectularius L. Following Topical, Sublethal Dose Application of the Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor Lufenuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Campbell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, few studies have evaluated chitin synthesis inhibitors against bed bugs, although they would provide an alternative mode of action to circumvent insecticide resistance. Acute and sublethal effects of lufenuron were evaluated against two strains of the common bed bug. Combined acute and sublethal effects were used to calculate effective doses. The dose that was effective against 50% of Harlan strain bed bugs was 0.0081% (w/v, and was much higher against Bradenton strain bed bugs (1.11% w/v. Sublethal doses were chosen to determine the effect that leg abnormalities had on pulling force. Both Harlan and Bradenton strain bed bugs had significantly lower locomotion ability (p < 0.0001 following topical application of lufenuron. The observed sublethal effects that limit locomotion could prevent bed bugs from moving within a domicile and taking a blood meal, subsequently reducing a bed bug population over time.

  11. Sublethal doses of imidacloprid disrupt sexual communication and host finding in a parasitoid wasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Lars; Pokorny, Tamara; Hofferberth, John; Ruther, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides, but their use is subject of debate because of their detrimental effects on pollinators. Little is known about the effect of neonicotinoids on other beneficial insects such as parasitoid wasps, which serve as natural enemies and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. Here we show that sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impair sexual communication and host finding in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Depending on the dose, treated females were less responsive to the male sex pheromone or unable to use it as a cue at all. Courtship behaviour of treated couples was also impeded resulting in a reduction of mating rates by up to 80%. Moreover, treated females were no longer able to locate hosts by using olfactory cues. Olfaction is crucial for the reproductive success of parasitoid wasps. Hence, sublethal doses of neonicotinoids might compromise the function of parasitoid wasps as natural enemies with potentially dire consequences for ecosystem services.

  12. Sublethal effects of spinetoram on the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli

    2016-09-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a serious pest of many agricultural crops and ornamental plants. The sublethal effects of a new chemical, spinetoram, on T. urticae were investigated by treating adult females and eggs with LC10 and LC20 in the laboratory. The data were assessed based on age-stage, two-sex life table analysis. The results showed that T. urticae developmental time from egg to adult was reduced and that fecundity was increased by treatment with LC10 and LC20 of spinetoram. The LC10 and LC20 of spinetoram also increased the intrinsic and finite rate of increase and the net reproductive rate and reduced the mean generation time, egg duration, and larval duration whether eggs or adult females were treated. These laboratory results suggest that sublethal or lethal doses of spinetoram may cause outbreaks of T. urticae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Avaliação da toxicidade do cobre para o piauçu (Leporinus macrocephalus, Garavello & Britski, 1988 por meio de parâmetros leucocitários e enzimáticos = Evaluation of the toxicity of copper for piauçu (Leporinus macrocephalus through leukocyte and enzymatic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Martinazzi Quirgo Nunes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Como forma de monitoramento de áreas degradadas, testes de toxicidade têm sido amplamente utilizados. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a toxicidade do cobre para o piauçu a partir da determinação da CL50 96h e da análise de alterações nos padrões enzimáticos e leucocitários, em exposição subletal (25 e 50% da concentração letal por 96h. A CL50 96h do cobre para o piauçu foi 0,09 ± 0,03 mg L-1. Após a exposição às concentrações subletal, os valores das concentrações enzimáticas de Alanina Aminotrasferase e Aspartato Aminotransferase não apresentaram diferença significativa entre os indivíduos do grupo-controle e dos expostos ao metal. A glicose plasmática apresentou aumento significativo nos peixes expostos a 25 e 50% da CL50, quando comparados ao controle. O eosinófilo, o linfócito e o neutrófilo não apresentaram diferença significativa do grupo-controle. Os trombócitos aumentaram significativamente nos peixes expostos a 50% da CL50; os monócitos, nos peixes expostos a 25 e 50% da CL50. Os resultados indicam que o piauçu é uma espécie sensível aos efeitos letais do cobre e que a exposição a concentrações subletais causa um distúrbio imunológico, porém não induz dano hepático, de acordo com as enzimas mensuradas.Toxicity tests have been widely used as a form of monitoring degraded areas. This work has as objective to evaluate the toxicity of copper for Piauçu from the determination of LC50 for 96 hours and analysis of alterations in the enzymatic and leukocyte patterns, in sublethal exposure (25 and 50% of the lethal concentration for 96 hours. The LC50 of copper for Piauçu, during 96 hours, is 0.09±0.03 mg L-1 Cu2+. After exposure to the sublethal concentrations, enzymatic concentrations of Alanine Aminotrasferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase did not show any significant difference between the individuals of the control and metal groups. Plasma glucose showed a significant increase

  14. Life histories, salinity zones, and sublethal contributions of contaminants to pelagic fish declines illustrated with a case study of San Francisco Estuary, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Marjorie L.; Fleishman, Erica; Brown, Larry R.; Lehman, Peggy W.; Werner, Inge; Scholz, Nathaniel; Michelmore, Carys; Loworn, James R.; Johnson, Michael L.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human effects on estuaries are often associated with major decreases in abundance of aquatic species. However, remediation priorities are difficult to identify when declines result from multiple stressors with interacting sublethal effects. The San Francisco Estuary offers a useful case study of the potential role of contaminants in declines of organisms because the waters of its delta chronically violate legal water quality standards; however, direct effects of contaminants on fish species are rarely observed. Lack of direct lethality in the field has prevented consensus that contaminants may be one of the major drivers of coincident but unexplained declines of fishes with differing life histories and habitats (anadromous, brackish, and freshwater). Our review of available evidence indicates that examining the effects of contaminants and other stressors on specific life stages in different seasons and salinity zones of the estuary is critical to identifying how several interacting stressors could contribute to a general syndrome of declines. Moreover, warming water temperatures of the magnitude projected by climate models increase metabolic rates of ectotherms, and can hasten elimination of some contaminants. However, for other pollutants, concurrent increases in respiratory rate or food intake result in higher doses per unit time without changes in the contaminant concentrations in the water. Food limitation and energetic costs of osmoregulating under altered salinities further limit the amount of energy available to fish; this energy must be redirected from growth and reproduction toward pollutant avoidance, enzymatic detoxification, or elimination. Because all of these processes require energy, bioenergetics methods are promising for evaluating effects of sublethal contaminants in the presence of other stressors, and for informing remediation. Predictive models that evaluate the direct and indirect effects of contaminants will be possible when data become

  15. Assessment of sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on oriental fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Daniel M; Walgenbach, James F; Kennedy, George G

    2005-06-01

    Sublethal effects of the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide were examined in oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), in laboratory and field studies. In laboratory studies, oriental fruit moth larvae reared on diet amended with 0.1 ppm methoxyfenozide developed at the same rate as larvae reared on untreated diet, and paired moths reared as larvae from the same treated or untreated diets exhibited similar fecundity and fertility. Population growth differences over multiple generations were used to examine sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on population dynamics in the field. Multiple single-tree cages were placed over apple (Malus spp.) trees treated with two applications of methoxyfenozide (70 g [AI] /ha) and nontreated trees. Cages were infested at a single time point with virgin male and female oriental fruit moth adults, and population growth was evaluated by egg counts, shoot infestation, fruit damage, and larval counts over a 12-wk period. Significantly fewer eggs, larvae, and damaged fruit were found on methoxyfenozide-treated compared with nontreated trees in 2001. Observed population differences may have been a result of direct mortality to eggs and larvae of the first generation rather than sublethal effects. In 2002, no differences were observed between treatments, but a heavy rain event shortly after the early infestation impacted the experiment. A late moth release treatment was tested in 2002 to examine the effects of residual methoxyfenozide 55 d after initial application. Significantly fewer eggs were found in the methoxyfenozide treatment compared with the control, but no differences existed among treatments in shoot infestation, percentage of damaged fruit, or larval populations. It was concluded direct mortality of eggs and larvae exposed to methoxyfenozide rather than sublethal effects were most important in reduction of subsequent generations.

  16. Acute toxicity and sublethal effects of fipronil on detoxification enzymes in juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haihua; Gao, Cuie; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Ma, Enbo

    2014-10-01

    The acute toxicity of fipronil and its sublethal effects on detoxification enzymes (carboxylesterases (CarEs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD)) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated. The results indicated that the 24-h LC50 of fipronil for zebrafish was 220.4 μg/L (95% CI: 173.7-272.4 μg/L). Sublethal concentrations of fipronil did not cause significant changes in CarEs activities. In the liver and muscle tissues, GST activities at the tested concentrations did not significantly differ from those in the control. In the brain and gill tissues, GST activities at a concentration of 4 μg/L were significantly lower than those at a concentration of 2 μg/L. The results suggest that CarEs and GSTs were not suitable biomarkers for fipronil effects in D. rerio. A significant induction in the ECOD activities in the brain, gill, liver, and muscle tissues was observed compared with the control. Moreover, the dose-dependent responses of the ECOD activity were observed after treatment with sublethal concentrations of fipronil in the range of 2-20 μg/L. The results suggested that ECOD could be a suitable biomarker of fipronil effects in D. rerio. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effect of non-homogenous thermal stress during sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadura, N.; Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Pathogens could be inactivated via a light source coupled with a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). This project studied the effect of non-homogenous substrate on cell colony. The non-homogeneity could be controlled by iron oxide nano-particles doping in porous glassy substrates such that each cell would experience tens of hot spots when illuminated with additional light source. The substrate non-homogeneity was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source. Microscopy images of cell motion were used to study the motility. Laboratory cell colonies on non-homogenous substrates exhibit reduced motility similar to those observed with sub-lethal PCAT treatment. Such motility reduction on non-homogenous substrate is interpreted as the presence of thermal stress. The studied pathogens included E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Non-pathogenic microbes Bacillus subtilis was also studied for comparison. The results show that sub-lethal PACT could be effective with additional non-homogenous thermal stress. The use of non-uniform illumination on a homogeneous substrate to create thermal stress in sub-micron length scale is discussed via light correlation in propagation through random medium. Extension to sub-lethal PACT application complemented with thermal stress would be an appropriate application.

  18. Sublethal effects of some botanical and chemical insecticides on the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarbeigi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortalities caused by acute concentrations of insecticides, some biological traits of target pests may be also affected by sublethal doses. The cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae is an important pest of a wide variety of agricultural crops across the world. The control of B. tabaci largely relies on wide application of chemical insecticides. In this study, we analyzed the life table parameters to evaluate the sublethal effect of three plant-derived insecticides (Fumaria parviflora (Fumariaceae, Teucrium polium (Lamiaceae, and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae and two chemical insecticides (pymetrozin and neemarin on B. tabaci. The whiteflies were allowed to oviposit on plants infected with each of the five insecticides using leaf-dip method. The data were analyzed using the age-stage two-sex life table. We found significant differences in the gross reproductive rate (GRR, the net reproductive rat (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r and the finite rate of increase (λ of treated whiteflies compared to control. Our results showed that some biological traits of B. tabaci are affected by sub-lethal doses of the plant-derived extracts and that these effects are comparable to those of chemical insecticides. Given the detrimental effects of chemical insecticides on human, environment and non-target organisms, plant-derived insecticides may provide valuable environmentally friendly tools for pest management programs.

  19. Genetic regulation of allolysis in response to sub-lethal antibiotic stress in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANISHA DASH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dash M, Dash HR, Das S. 2014. Genetic regulation of allolysis in response to sub-lethal antibiotic stress in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 111-117. Allolysis is the phenomenon of cell lysis induced by other cells of the same species. Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen exhibits competence induced allolysis that increases the genetic recombination and enhances the virulence. During allolysis, a group of non-competent bacterial cells are lysed by another group of competent cells in the same culture. This process is regulated by com operon as well as bacteriocin. In this study, allolysis was induced in Streptococcus pneumoniae MTCC655 by sub-lethal dose of antibiotic (chloramphenicol and the mechanism of allolysis has been deduced by amplification of lytA, lytC and cbpD genes in the bacterium. The strain was found to be resistant to a number of antibiotics including amoxicillin, cefpodoxime, erythromycin and vancomycin. The early onset of allolysis induction from 7-9 h under normal conditions to 2-3 h by sub-lethal dose of chloramphenicol was observed.

  20. Analysis of gene expression changes, caused by exposure to nitrite, in metabolic and antioxidant enzymes in the red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qichen; Zhang, Wenyi; Tan, Hongyue; Pan, Dongmei; Yang, Yuanhao; Ren, Qian; Yang, Jiaxin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of acute exposure to nitrite on expression of antioxidant and metabolic enzyme genes in gill tissue of advanced juvenile Cherax quadricarinatus. A 48h nitrite exposure was conducted, using four test concentrations (NO2-N=0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2mg L(-1)) plus a control group. The relative mRNA expression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mMnSOD), cytosolic MnSOD (cMnSOD), extracellular copper/zinc SOD (exCu/ZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), arginine kinase (AK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in gill tissue was measured. Significantly increased mRNA expression was observed for all the antioxidant enzymes after 12 and 24h. After 48h, they all decreased at high nitrite concentrations. The gene expression levels of AK, GDH, mMDH and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit showed similar trends as the antioxidant enzymes. Significant depression of gene expression levels of PEPCK occurred throughout the experimental time at high nitrite concentrations. The results indicated that nitrite could induce oxidative and metabolic stress in C. quadricarinatus, in a time dependent manner, which suggests they could be helpful in predicting sublethal nitrite toxicity and useful in environmental monitoring studies. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The effects of copper and nickel on the embryonic life stages of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellis, Margaret S; Lauer, Mariana M; Nadella, Sunita; Bianchini, Adalto; Wood, Chris M

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research was to generate data on the mechanisms of toxicity of copper [Cu (4-12 µg/L)] and nickel [Ni (33-40 µg/L)] during continuous sublethal exposure in seawater (32 ppt, 15 °C) in a sensitive test organism (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) at its most sensitive life stage (developing embryo). Whole-body ions [calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), potassium (K), and magnesium (Mg)], metal burdens, Ca uptake, and Ca ATPase activity were measured every 12 h during the first 72-84 h of development. Ionoregulatory disruption was clearly an important mechanism of toxicity for both metals and occurred with minimal metal bioaccumulation. Most noteworthy was a significant disruption of Ca homeostasis, which was evident from an inhibition of unidirectional Ca uptake rates, whole-body Ca accumulation, and Ca ATPase activity intermittently during 72-84 h of development. At various times, Cu- and Ni-exposed embryos also displayed lower levels of K and increased levels of Na suggesting inhibition of Na/K ATPase activity. Greater levels of Mg during initial stages of development in Cu-exposed embryos were also observed and were considered a possible compensatory mechanism for disruptions to Ca homeostasis because both of these ions are important constituents of the developing spicule. Notably, most of these effects occurred during the initial stages of development but were reversed by 72-84 h. We therefore propose that it is of value to study the toxic impacts of contaminants periodically during development before the traditional end point of 48-72 h.

  2. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level.

  3. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  4. Addressing the recovery of feeding rates in post-exposure feeding bioassays: Cyathura carinata as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais-Costa, Antonia Juliana [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Acevedo, Pelayo [SaBio IREC, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (UCLM-CSIC-JCCM), Ciudad Real 13005 (Spain); Marques, João Carlos [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Martinez-Haro, Mónica, E-mail: monica.martinezharo@gmail.com [IMAR—Institute of Marine Research, MARE—Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-02-15

    Post-exposure bioassays are used in environmental assessment as a cost-effective tool, but the effects of organism's recovery after exposure to pollutant has not yet been addressed in detail. The recoveries of post-exposure feeding rates after being exposed to two sublethal concentrations of cadmium during two different exposure periods (48 h and 96 h) were evaluated under laboratory conditions using the estuarine isopod Cyathura carinata. Results showed that feeding depression was a stable endpoint up to 24 h after cadmium exposure, which is useful for ecotoxicological bioassays. - Highlights: • We studied recovery of post-exposure feeding rates 48–96 h after cadmium exposure. • The assay is based on the isopod Cyathura carinata. • Post-exposure feeding inhibition is a stable sublethal endpoint.

  5. Evaluation of biocidal efficacy of copper alloy coatings in comparison with solid metal surfaces: generation of organic copper phosphate nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, H; Portman, T; Pershin, V; Ringuette, M

    2013-03-01

    To analyse the biocidal efficacy of thermal sprayed copper surfaces. Copper alloy sheet metals containing >60% copper have been shown to exhibit potent biocidal activity. Surface biocidal activity was assessed by epifluorescence microscopy. After 2-h exposure at 20 °C in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), contact killing of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis by brass sheet metal and phosphor bronze was 3-4-times higher than that by stainless steel. SEM observations revealed that the surface membranes of both bacterial strains were slightly more irregular when exposed to brass sheet metal than stainless steel. However, when exposed to phosphor bronze coating, E. coli were 3-4 times larger with irregular membrane morphology. In addition, the majority of the cells were associated with spherical carbon-copper-phosphate crystalline nanostructures characteristic of nanoflowers. The membranes of many of the S. epidermidis exhibited blebbing, and a small subset was also associated with nanoflowers. Our data indicate that increasing the surface roughness of copper alloys had a pronounced impact on the membrane integrity of Gram-positive and, to a lesser degree, Gram-negative bacteria. In the presence of PBS, carbon-copper-phosphate-containing nanoflowers were formed, likely nucleated by components derived from killed bacteria. The intimate association of the bacteria with the nanoflowers and phosphor bronze coating likely contributed to their nonreversible adhesion. Thermal spraying of copper alloys provides a strategy for the rapid coating of three-dimensional organic and inorganic surfaces with biocidal copper alloys. Our study demonstrates that the macroscale surface roughness generated by the thermal spray process enhances the biocidal activity of copper alloys compared with the nanoscale surface roughness of copper sheet metals. Moreover, the coating surface topography provides conditions for the rapid formation of organic copper

  6. Sliding Friction of Copper

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Tung

    1963-01-01

    .... With less clean surfaces, the coefficient of friction obtained was about 0.4. Since the degree of cleanliness cannot be controlled quantitatively, the friction - load curve of sliding copper pairs in air exhibits a bifurcation characteristic...

  7. Copper Phenoxyl Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Butsch, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    The work described in the following was inspired by radical copper enzymes such as Galactose Oxidase (GO). GO catalyses the two-electron oxidation of terminal alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes using air oxygen. Transfer of two electrons is possible, since GO contains two magnetically coupled one-electron redox centres: a tyrosylate ligand from the apo-protein, which exists either in the tyrosylate or the tyrosyl radical form and is bound to a copper ion possessing two stable oxidation s...

  8. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  9. Effects of copper on inver