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Sample records for sublethal biochemical endocrine

  1. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients.

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    Elizabeth D Hilborn

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Serum microcystin concentrations were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which measures free serum microcystin LR equivalents (ME. We describe serum ME concentrations and biochemical outcomes among a subset of patients during 8 weeks following exposure. Thirteen patients were included; 6 were males, patients' median age was 45 years (range 16-80, one was seropositive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The median serum ME concentration was 0.33 ng/mL (range: <0.16-0.96. One hundred thirty nine blood samples were collected following exposure. Patients' biochemical outcomes varied, but overall indicated a mixed liver injury. Linear regression evaluated each patient's weekly mean biochemical outcome with their maximum serum ME concentration; a measure of the extrinsic pathway of clotting function, prothrombin time, was negatively and significantly associated with serum ME concentrations. This group of exposed patients' biochemical outcomes display evidence of a mixed liver injury temporally associated with microcystin exposure. Interpretation of biochemical outcomes are complicated by the study population's underlying chronic disease status. It is clear that dialysis patients are a distinct 'at risk' group for cyanotoxin exposures due to direct intravenous exposure to dialysate prepared from surface drinking water supplies. Careful monitoring and treatment of water supplies used to prepare dialysate is required to prevent future cyanotoxin exposure events.

  2. Haemato-biochemical and endocrine profiling of north western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was aimed to provide baseline data regarding haemato-biochemical and endocrine profiling of Gaddi sheep found in north western Himalayan region of Himachal Pradesh, India. Each random sample was collected from 45 Gaddi sheep reared in government sheep breeding farm Tal, Hamirpur, India, during ...

  3. Sub-lethal toxicity of chlorpyrifos on Common carp, Cyprinus carpio (Linnaeus, 1758: Biochemical response

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    Mahdi Banaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate pesticide, is widely used to control pests in agriculture farms and orchards of fruit trees. In this study, the fish were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos which were determined based on numerical value of 96 h LC50. Blood was sampled after 10, 20 and 30 days and biochemical parameters including glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and acetylcholinsetrase (AChE activities were measured. Behavioral changes in the fish were also recorded during the experiment. Unbalanced swimming, swimming in the surface water and hyperglycemia, increased blood triglyceride, and increased levels of AST, LDH and CK activities as well as decreased levels of AChE activity were important changes that were observed in the specimens exposed to chlorpyrifos during experimental periods. The most important alterations in the blood biochemical parameters were measured in the specimens exposed to 40 µg/L chlorpyrifos on the 20th and 30th day of the trial. In conclusion, results of the present study indicated that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos as low as 40 µg/L may cause biochemical and behavioral changes in Cyprinus carpio.

  4. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    New and updated test methods to detect and characterise endocrine disrupting chemicals are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment. Although endocrine disruption in invertebrates has not been studied as extensive as in vertebrates, in particular in fish, numerous reports...... regulated by hormones such as growth, molting, sexual maturation and reproduction. The primary endpoints were larval development ratio, egg production and sex ratio. Exposure experiments were conducted with naturally occurring and synthetic vertebrate and invertebrate hormones as well as compounds known...... to act as endocrine disrupters in vertebrates. Larval development ratio was identified to be a remarkably sensitive endpoint. The larval development test with A. tonsa is rapid, cost-effective, easily to perform and results in full concentration-response relationships allowing the determination...

  5. Haematological, blood biochemical and histopathological effects of sublethal cadmium and lead concentrations in common carp

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    M.K.Khalesi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed at examining the effects of common carp (Cyprinus carpio exposure to sublethal concentrations of two non-essential heavy metals: cadmium (Cd: 8.4 mg/L and lead (Pb: 6.2 mg/L for 15 days to evaluate occurring biochemical and haematological effects. The examined parameters included haematocrit (Hct, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocytes (Lym, neutrophils (Neu, total protein (TP, albumin (Alb, immunoglobulin M (IgM, glucose, red and white blood cells counts (RBC & WBC, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC. Exposure to both metals significantly (P<0.05 reduced the amounts of WBC and MCHC. MCV values decreased (P<0.05 after the Pb treatment but MCV estimates with Cd exposure showed no differences. MCH levels increased in both treatments (P<0.05 whereas Hct, Hb, RBC, Lym, and Neu following both metal exposures were almost similar to those in the control. IgM values were elevated in fish contaminated with both Pb and Cd (P<0.05. The exposed fish showed fusion of gill lamellae, vessel dilatation, hyperaemia, and hyperplasia of gill epithelial cells whereas muscle histology remained unchanged. The observed responses can be secondary to low heavy metals concentrations reflecting the trigger of stress reactions in affected fish

  6. Oxidative stress, endocrine disruption, and malformation of Bufo gargarizans embryo exposed to sub-lethal cadmium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Yuhui; Chai, Lihong; Wang, Hongyuan

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical for vertebrate postembryonic development as well as embryonic development. Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) embryos were exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (5, 50, 100, 200 and 500μg Cd L-1) for 7days. Malformations were monitored daily, and growth and development of embryos were measured at day 4 and 7, and type 2 and 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and Dio3), thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) mRNA levels were also measured to assess disruption of TH synthesis. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) mRNA expression were examined to evaluate the ability of scavenging ROS. Our results demonstrated a bimodal inhibitory effect of Cd on the embryo growth and development of Bufo gargarizans. Reduced mean stage, total length and weight were observed at 5, 50, 200 and 500, but not at 100μg Cd L-1. Embryos malformation occurred in all cadmium treatments. Morphological abnormalities of embryos are characterized by axial flexures, abdominal edema, stunted growth and fin flexure. Real-time PCR results show that exposure to cadmium down-regulated TRα and Dio3 mRNA expression and up-regulated Dio2 mRNA level. SOD and GPx mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated after cadmium exposure. We concluded that cadmium could change mRNA expression of TRα, Dio2 and Dio3 leading the inhibition of growth and development of B. gargarizans embryo, which suggests that cadmium might have the endocrine-disrupting effect in embryos. Moreover, the reduced ability of scavenging ROS induced by cadmium might be responsible for the teratogenic effects of cadmium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biochemical Responses of Juvenile European Sturgeon, (Huso Huso to A Sub-Lethal Level of Copper and Cadmium in Freshwater and Brackish Water Environments

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    Saeed Zahedi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Caspian Sea basin, sturgeons spend the larval and juvenile stages in freshwaters of rivers and then, they migrate to brackish waters of the sea where they grow and mature. With regard to the elevation of the metal concentrations in coastal waters and sediments of the Caspian Sea and its adjacent rivers, it is likely that juvenile sturgeon are exposed to sub-lethal levels of metals during seawater entry process. We compared the biochemical responses of juvenile European sturgeon, (Beluga, Huso huso exposed to a sub-lethal level of copper (Cu, 20 μg/L and cadmium (Cd, 300 μg/L in freshwater (FW, 0 ppt and brackish water (BW, 11 ppt for seven days. The results showed that the levels of plasma glucose increased significantly in BW and in all metal exposed groups. Also, plasma cortisol concentrations showed significant increases when juveniles were exposed to BW, Cu(FW/BW and Cd(BW. The activity of liver superoxide dismutase (SOD decreased significantly in BW compared with FW. Moreover, Cu and Cd exposure enhanced the activity of SOD in BW, while SOD did not show any changes in FW. The levels of tissue and plasma proteins as well as plasma triiodothyronine (T3, thyroxine (T4 and liver Catalase (CAT activity remained constant when animals were exposed to Cu/Cd in both FW and BW environments. Our data indicate that exposure of juvenile beluga to BW stimulated the general biochemical responses of stress such as cortisol and glucose, while sub-lethal exposure to Cu and Cd caused oxidative stress in BW environment but not in FW

  8. Biochemical and endocrine aspects of oxytocin production by the mammalian corpus luteum

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    Stormshak Fredrick

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A review of the current state of knowledge of oxytocin production by the preovulatory follicle and corpus luteum is presented. Corpora lutea of a number of mammalian species have been found to synthesize oxytocin. However, the synthesis and secretion of this nanopeptide by the corpus luteum of the ruminant has been most extensively studied because of the potential role of this peptide in facilitating luteal regression. While much information exists relative to various biochemical and endocrine factors that impact on oxytocin gene expression, this aspect about luteal synthesis of this peptide hormone remains enigmatic. Prostaglandin F-2α (PGF-2α has been shown to be a primary endogenous hormone responsible for triggering luteal secretion of oxytocin. Details are provided regarding the PGF-2α-induced intracellular signal transduction pathway that ultimately results in exocytosis of luteal oxytocin. Evidence is also presented for potential autocrine/paracrine actions of oxytocin in regulating progesterone production by luteal and granulosa cells. Concluding remarks highlight aspects about luteal oxytocin production that require further research.

  9. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES AND ENDOCRINE RESPONSES IN PRE-COMPETITION TRAINING IN ELITE SWIMMERS

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    Yue Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe biochemical changes and endocrine responses to low-volume pre-competition swimming training for elite swimmers. Twelve sprint swimmers (6 males and 6 females participated in 3-week pre-competition training. Measures of velocity anaerobic threshold (VAT, creatine kinase (CK, blood urea (BU, haemoglobin (Hb and testosterone/cortisol ratio (TC were obtained before and after the 1st, 2nd and 3rd week of training. The training load decreased from 27.3 to 13.7 km per week within 3 weeks. The VAT tested the load with an increased training protocol of 200 m×4 freestyle swimming and initial loads were 85, 90, 95, and 100 percent of the individual load. There were changes in the values of VAT, CK, BU, Hb and TC ratio during the training, and the changes corresponded to the changes of the training stimuli in time. There were also differences between the male and female swimmers. The most significant finding in this study was that such training stimulated the enginery of the swimmers and helped the swimmers recover enginery and indicated improved velocity in the competition with the following adjusting exercise after pre-competition training.

  10. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). Clinical, biochemical and genetical investigations.

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    Oberg, K; Skogseid, B; Eriksson, B

    1989-01-01

    The syndrome of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease affecting several endocrine organs. The affected organs include the pituitary, the parathyroids and endocrine pancreas, where different types of lesions can be found, such as hyperplasia or frank carcinomas. The most life threatening lesions are the endocrine pancreatic tumors, which cause about 80% of all deaths among the MEN-1 members. In our own series of 108 members from 16 families with multiple endocrine neoplasia, 55 members had the MEN-1 trait. Among these members, pituitary lesions were found in 42%, parathyroid involvement in 89% and endocrine pancreatic tumors in 58%. Hyperparathyroidism was the presenting lesion of the MEN-1 trait. By using a specific meal stimulation test we have been able to unveil pancreatic lesions up to a median of five years previous to radiological detection. Very recently we have been able to detect a specific genetic lesion in MEN-1 members by studying DNA rearrangements with recombinant DNA technique, using the method of polymorphic restriction enzyme recognition in three large kindreds. The MEN-1 locus maps to chromosome 11q and the MEN-1 predisposition would be a constitutional mutation in heterozygous form, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Tumor development involves a second mutational event which involves the chromosome 11, carrying the remaining 'wild' type allele at the MEN-1 locus by means of chromosome loss event. Survival analysis demonstrates that patients with the MEN-1 syndrome had a significantly better survival from diagnosis than patients with sporadic endocrine pancreatic tumors (median 15.1 years and 5.8 years respectively, p = 0.0068). Earlier diagnosis and start of treatment might account for a longer survival in the MEN-1 group, but a possibility of differences in tumor biology between familial and sporadic endocrine pancreatic tumors cannot be ruled out. The surgical treatment of patients with MEN-1

  11. Metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer associations: biochemical and pathophysiological evidences

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    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Palo, Rossella; Lamantia, Elvira; Castaldo, Luigi; Nocerino, Flavia; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Malzone, Gabriella; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pepe, Maria Filomena; Berretta, Massimiliano; D'Aniello, Carmine; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; De Falco, Francesco; Maiolino, Piera; Caraglia, Michele; Montella, Maurizio; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the main pathophysiological basis of the relationship between metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptor exposure and prostate cancer that is the most common cancer among men in industrialized countries. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and hormonal factors having a central role in the initiation and recurrence of many western chronic diseases including hormonal-related cancers and it is considered as the worlds leading health problem in the coming years. Many biological factors correlate metabolic syndrome to prostate cancer and this review is aimed to focus, principally, on growth factors, cytokines, adipokines, central obesity, endocrine abnormalities and exposure to specific endocrine disruptors, a cluster of chemicals, to which we are daily exposed, with a hormone-like structure influencing oncogenes, tumor suppressors and proteins with a key role in metabolism, cell survival and chemo-resistance of prostate cancer cells. Finally, this review will analyze, from a molecular point of view, how specific foods could reduce the relative risk of incidence and recurrence of prostate cancer or inhibit the biological effects of endocrine disruptors on prostate cancer cells. On the basis of these considerations, prostate cancer remains a great health problem in terms of incidence and prevalence and interventional studies based on the treatment of metabolic syndrome in cancer patients, minimizing exposure to endocrine disruptors, could be a key point in the overall management of this disease. PMID:28389628

  12. A study on biochemical changes in the penaeid shrimp, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius) following exposure to sublethal doses of organochlorine pesticide (endosulfan)

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    Suryavanshi, U.; Sreepada, R.A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Nigam, S.; Badesab, S.

    of metabolically active organs (gills, hepatopancreas and muscle) of coastal marine penaeid shrimp species, M. monoceros on exposure to two sublethal doses of endosulfan over 23 days of exposure (DoE). 2. Materials and methods 2.1. Experimental animals... and the average mortality values were calculated using formula as described by Abbot (1925). The median lethal concentration (96-h LC 50 ) and 95% confidence intervals were determined with a computer-based program described by Finney (1971). The acute 96-h LC...

  13. Effects of arsenic supplementation in feed on laying performance, arsenic retention of eggs and organs, biochemical indices and endocrine hormones.

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    Zhang, X Y; Zhou, M Y; Li, L L; Jiang, Y J; Zou, X T

    2017-02-01

    1. The primary objective of this experiment was to estimate the toxic effects of arsenic (As) supplementation in feed on laying performance, As retention by eggs and organs, serum biochemical indices and endocrine hormones in laying hens. 2. A total of 320 "Jinghong Number 1" hens, 56-week-old, were randomly allocated into four treatments of four replicates with 20 layers in each. Graded arsenical was added to the basal diet in the experimental diets at As levels of 0, 17, 34 and 51 mg/kg, respectively. The trial lasted for 9 weeks including 1 week for acclimatisation. 3. Supplementation of dietary As for eight weeks had no effect on laying performance. As retention in albumen, yolk, egg, liver and kidney increased as As levels increased The level of serum phosphorus (P) was minimised at the 17 mg As/kg group. The activity of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) increased linearly. No differences were observed for levels of serum calcium (Ca), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT). Concentrations of estradiol (E2) and progesterone (PG) declined at 34 and 51 mg/kg As levels compared with the control group. As supplementation exerted no influence on levels of serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and the ratio between T3 and T4. 4. In conclusion, dietary As supplementation accelerated retention in tissues and eggs, and affected the laying rate by diminishing hormone levels of E2 and PG at 51 mg/kg.

  14. Sublethal toxicity of commercial formulations of deltamethrin and permethrin on selected biochemical constituents and enzyme activities in liver and muscle tissues of Anabas testudineus.

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    Sapana Devi, Maisnam; Gupta, Abhik

    2014-10-01

    The freshwater fish Anabas testudineus was exposed for 21 days to two commercial formulations of synthetic pyrethroids deltamethrin and permethrin at sublethal concentrations of 0.007 and 0.0007 mg L(-1), and 0.093 and 0.0093 mg L(-1), that represented 10% and 1%, respectively, of the 96 h LC50 of these two pesticides for this fish. The glycogen, protein and lactic acid contents, along with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme activities in liver and muscle tissues of control and pesticide-exposed fish were estimated. When compared with those of control fish, significant depletion of glycogen content was observed in liver, and that of protein in muscle tissue of fish treated with both the pesticides at their higher as well as lower concentrations. Lactic acid reduction was significant only in fish muscle treated with deltamethrin. SDH level was reduced significantly in both liver and muscle tissues except in fish exposed to 0.0093 mg L(-1) permethrin. AST level was reduced significantly in liver and muscle tissues and ALT in muscle tissue of deltamethrin treated fish only. It is concluded that deltamethrin, a type-II pyrethroid, is more toxic to fish than the type-I pyrethroid permethrin and is capable of rendering toxicity at a dose as low as 1% of its LC50 value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Induction of biotransformation in the liver of Eel (Anguilla anguilla L. ) by sublethal exposure to dinitro-o-cresol: An ultrastructural and biochemical study

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    Braunbeck, T.; Voelkl, A. (Department of Zoology I, University of Heidelberg (Germany))

    1991-04-01

    Structural and functional alterations in hepatocytes of the European eel, Anguilla anguilla, following a 4-week-exposure to 5, 50, and 250 micrograms/liter dinitro-o-cresol (DNOC) were investigated by means of electron microscopy and biochemistry and compared to liver pathology in eels exposed to the chemical spill into the Rhine river at Basle in November 1986. Whereas phenological parameters (growth, condition factor) are unaffected, ultrastructural and biochemical alterations are detectable at greater than or equal to 50 and 5 micrograms/liter DNOC, respectively. Structural modifications include: rounding-up of the nuclei; fractionation and reduction of the rough endoplasmic reticulum; proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes; bundles of rod-shaped SER profiles; annulate lamellae; membrane whorls within mitochondria; crystallization of the peroxisomal matrix and glycogen bodies; glycogen depletion and lipid augmentation. Structural changes can be correlated to an increase in hepatic lipid and protein contents as well as stimulation of mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase), peroxisomal (catalase, allantoinase, uricase), lysosomal (arylsulfatase), and microsomal (esterase) enzymes. An increase in NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P450 as well as UDP-glucuronyltransferase and arylsulfotransferase activities in the microsomal fraction document an induction of hepatic biotransformation as a functional correlate to SER proliferation. Maximum inducibility of biotransformation enzymes at 50 micrograms/liter indicates a biphasic, concentration-dependent reaction of eel liver. Comparison of DNOC-induced effects with liver pathology in eel exposed to the chemical spill in 1986 reveals striking similarities so that DNOC may not be excluded as a possible factor in the fish kill in the Rhine river.

  16. Analyzing the some biochemical parameters of diabetes mellitus and obese patients who applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine polyclinic and their prevalence

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    Karageçili, Hasan; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Aydin, Ruken Zeynep

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems throughout the World. Obese individuals body mass index (BMI) is >30 kg/m2. Obesity is characterized by increased waist circumference, total body fat and hyperglycemia. The increased triglyceride and cholesterol level is also shown in obese individuals. The development of obesity is largely due to the consumption of high energy food and sedentary lifestyle. This study was held with the participation of patients applied to Siirt State Hospital endocrine policlinic for treatment. Our aim is to try to determine the biochemical relation and border line of obese and obese+diabetes mellitus patients. Patients and control group lipid profiles were studied in the hospital biochemisty laboratory. Laboratory results of diabetes+obese, obese and control groups were evaluated. Patients and control samples blood serum levels were compared according to their lipid profiles. In 2015, 735 diabetes mellitus type 2 patients applied to Endocrine polyclinic. Some of these patient's serum levels were evaluated. Difference between diabetes+obese and diabetes groups were near critical level for LDL and trigliserid. There were not observed statistically significant difference between groups in terms of HDL and cholesterol. There were found significant difference between groups for blood glucose p<0.003, age p<0.001. According to gender between women and men serum levels, ALT and AST levels; p<0.006 and cholesterol; p<0.04 were detected. According to participants education level blood biochemistry levels were observed statisticaly different p<0.001 with non-literacy group. In conclusion, obese and obese+diabetes patients blood serum values nearly close to each other. Obese subjects were been diabetic obese with age. In women obesity and diabetes mellitus prevalence were seen too much.

  17. High-dose biotin therapy leading to false biochemical endocrine profiles: validation of a simple method to overcome biotin interference.

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    Piketty, Marie-Liesse; Prie, Dominique; Sedel, Frederic; Bernard, Delphine; Hercend, Claude; Chanson, Philippe; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2017-05-01

    High-dose biotin therapy is beneficial in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and is expected to be adopted by a large number of patients. Biotin therapy leads to analytical interference in many immunoassays that utilize streptavidin-biotin capture techniques, yielding skewed results that can mimic various endocrine disorders. We aimed at exploring this interference, to be able to remove biotin and avoid misleading results. We measured free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), parathyroid homrone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, C-peptide, cortisol (Roche Diagnostics assays), biotin and its main metabolites (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) in 23 plasmas from MS patients and healthy volunteers receiving high-dose biotin, and in 39 biotin-unsupplemented patients, before and after a simple procedure (designated N5) designed to remove biotin by means of streptavidin-coated microparticles. We also assayed fT4, TSH and PTH in the 23 high-biotin plasmas using assays not employing streptavidin-biotin binding. The biotin concentration ranged from 31.7 to 1160 µg/L in the 23 high-biotin plasmas samples. After the N5 protocol, the biotin concentration was below the detection limit in all but two samples (8.3 and 27.6 μg/L). Most hormones results were abnormal, but normalized after N5. All results with the alternative methods were normal except two slight PTH elevations. In the 39 biotin-unsupplemented patients, the N5 protocol did not affect the results for any of the hormones, apart from an 8.4% decrease in PTH. We confirm that most streptavidin-biotin hormone immunoassays are affected by high biotin concentrations, leading to a risk of misdiagnosis. Our simple neutralization method efficiently suppresses biotin interference.

  18. Adaptive capability as indicated by endocrine and biochemical responses of Malpura ewes subjected to combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) in a semi-arid tropical environment

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    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Sayeed M. K.

    2010-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on endocrine and biochemical responses in Malpura ewes. Twenty eight adult Malpura ewes (average body weight 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups viz., GI ( n = 7; control), GII ( n = 7; thermal stress), GIII ( n = 7; nutritional stress) and GIV ( n = 7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 1000 hours and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were Hb, PCV, glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, ACP, ALP, cortisol, T4, T3, and insulin. Combined stress significantly ( P homeostasis in sheep.

  19. CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL DATA OF ADULT THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS (TM WITH MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE COMPLICATIONS (MEC VERSUS TM PATIENTS WITH NORMAL ENDOCRINE FUNCTIONS: A RETROSPECTIVE LONG-TERM STUDY (40 YEARS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN ITALY

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    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Introduction: It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC. The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1 to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more in TM patients; 2 to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3 to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation. Patients and Methods: The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years. All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 % developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males had a normal endocrine function (16.5 % and served as controls. Results: In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO; the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2± 1801.4 ng/ml ; the higher percentage of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5% patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 % in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: -0.424; p= 0.031. Conclusions: Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %. It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to

  20. Endocrine System (For Teens)

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    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Teens > Endocrine System Print A A ... called the endocrine system . What Is the Endocrine System? Although we rarely think about the endocrine system, ...

  1. Toxicity bioassay and effects of sub-lethal exposure of malathion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarias gariepinus were exposed to different concentrations of malathion to determine the 96 h LC50 value and its sub-lethal effects on haematological parameters and biochemical composition were also investigated. The 96 h LC50 value concluded was 8.22 mg/L. Specimens of C. gariepinus were exposed to sub-lethal ...

  2. Impacts of Sublethal Mercury Exposure on Birds: A Detailed Review.

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    Whitney, Margaret C; Cristol, Daniel A

    Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant known to accumulate in, and negatively affect, fish-eating and oceanic bird species, and recently demonstrated to impact some terrestrial songbirds to a comparable extent. It can bioaccumulate to concentrations of >1 μg/g in tissues of prey organisms such as fish and insects. At high enough concentrations, exposure to mercury is lethal to birds. However, environmental exposures are usually far below the lethal concentrations established by dosing studies.The objective of this review is to better understand the effects of sublethal exposure to mercury in birds. We restricted our survey of the literature to studies with at least some exposures >5 μg/g. The majority of sublethal effects were subtle and some studies of similar endpoints reached different conclusions. Strong support exists in the literature for the conclusion that mercury exposure reduces reproductive output, compromises immune function, and causes avoidance of high-energy behaviors. For some endpoints, notably certain measures of reproductive success, endocrine and neurological function, and body condition, there is weak or contradictory evidence of adverse effects and further study is required. There was no evidence that environmentally relevant mercury exposure affects longevity, but several of the sublethal effects identified likely do result in fitness reductions that could adversely impact populations. Overall, 72% of field studies and 91% of laboratory studies found evidence of deleterious effects of mercury on some endpoint, and thus we can conclude that mercury is harmful to birds, and the many effects on reproduction indicate that bird population declines may already be resulting from environmental mercury pollution.

  3. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

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    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. Fact Steroid ...

  4. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Seru...

  5. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  6. The endocrine effects of mercury in humans and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shirlee W; Meiller, Jesse C; Mahaffey, Kathryn R

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is well studied and research continues as our knowledge of its health risks increases. One expanding area of research not well emphasized to date is the endocrine effects of Hg. This review summarizes the existing literature on the effects of Hg on the endocrine system and identifies gaps in the knowledge. It focuses on the thyroid, adrenal, and reproductive systems, including the accumulation of Hg in the endocrine system, sex differences that are manifested with Hg exposure, reproductive effects in male and female animals including humans, and Hg effects on the thyroid and adrenal systems. We concluded that there are five main endocrine-related mechanisms of Hg across these systems: (a) accumulation in the endocrine system; (b) specific cytotoxicity in endocrine tissues; (c) changes in hormone concentrations; (d) interactions with sex hormones; and (e) up-regulation or down-regulation of enzymes within the steroidogenesis pathway. Recommendations for key areas of research to better understand how the endocrine effects of Hg affect human and wildlife health were developed, and include increasing the amount of basic biological information available about Hg and wildlife species, exploring the role of Hg in the presence of other stressors and chemicals, understanding sublethal and indirect effects of Hg on adverse outcomes, developing better methods to extrapolate effects across species, and understanding the effects of Hg on multiple organ systems following exposure of an animal. Greater inclusion of endocrine endpoints in epidemiological and field studies on humans and wildlife will also advance the research in this area.

  7. Endocrine Disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo F. Ricci

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Law and science combine in the estimation of risks from endocrine disruptors (EDs and actions for their regulation. For both, dose–response models are the causal link between exposure and probability (or percentage change of adverse response. The evidence that leads to either regulations or judicial decrees is affected by uncertainty and limited knowledge, raising difficult policy issues that we enumerate and discuss. In the United States, some courts have dealt with EDs, but causation based on animal studies has been a stumbling block for plaintiffs seeking compensation, principally because those courts opt for epidemiological evidence. The European Union (EU has several regulatory tools and ongoing research on the risks associated with bisphenol A, under the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH Regulation and other regulations or directives. The integration of a vast (in kind and in scope number of research papers into a statement of causation for either policy or to satisfy legal requirements, in both the United States and the EU, relies on experts. We outline the discursive dilemma and issues that may affect consensus-based results and a Bayesian causal approach that accounts for the evolution of information, yielding both value of information and flexibility associated with public choices.

  8. Endocrine Labomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory endocrinology forms an integral part of 21 st century endocrinology. Perhaps, no other specialty of medicine is as closely associated with laboratory as endocrinology. This review intends to highlight the challenges faced by an endocrinologist before interpreting a hormone assay report. This review by no means is holistic but intends to highlight some of the pitfalls of laboratory endocrinology and arouse further interest in this important but neglected section of endocrinology. Lack of standardization, as well as rigorous implementation is some of the major challenges facing endocrine assays in our country. It is essential to be aware not only of the details of the method of analysis of a hormone, the pre-analytical requisites, but also disease-specific analytical issues to prevent unnecessary concern both for the patient, as well as the treating physician, as well as needless investigations. Problems with interpretation of serum prolactin, thyroglobulin, steroid hormone assays, rennin assay and vitamin-D assay have been highlighted.

  9. Endocrine Treatment of Transsexual Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  10. Endocrine system: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carolyn; Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    2014-05-27

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series and is the first of two articles on the endocrine system, examines the structure and function of the organs of the endocrine system. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health. The role of the endocrine system and the types, actions and control of hormones are explored. The gross structure of the pituitary and thyroid glands are described along with relevant physiology. Several disorders of the thyroid gland are outlined. The second article examines growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands.

  11. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Introduction to the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? The Endocrine System Access more 3D visualizations by downloading the Hormone ... Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  13. Introduction to the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search The Endocrine System Access more 3D visualizations by downloading the Hormone ... About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  14. Archives: Nigerian Endocrine Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives: Nigerian Endocrine Practice. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Endocrine Practice. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 4 of 4 Items. 2013. Vol 7, No 1 ...

  15. Endocrine system and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Doyle D; Reed, Mary Jane

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in endocrine function. An association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia has been well documented. This article highlights the complexities of treating endocrine system disorders in obese patients. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The endocrine quiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject.

  17. Impact of parathion exposure on some biochemical parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pesticides are widely used in order to enhance the food protection by controlling the unwanted insects and disease vectors in agriculture. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of repeated sublethal doses (0.2 mg kg-1 day-1 for two weeks) of the insecticide parathion on some biochemical ...

  18. Impact of parathion exposure on some biochemical parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nagat Aly

    2014-09-16

    Sep 16, 2014 ... tion pattern of ChE, ATPase, CE, GST, ACP, ALP, AST, and ALT in different organs of male rabbits. Besides the effect of repeated sublethal doses of parathion on some biological and biochemical parameters, consequently these parameters can be used as potential biomarkers of damage caused by para-.

  19. Growth performance and biochemical responses of C. Gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extensive use of Dichlorvos in controlling pests raised great concerns about their environmental hazards to aquatic organisms. Effect of sub-lethal concentration of Dichlorvos on growth performance and biochemical response in Clarias gariepinus (0.175 mg/L) was investigated. Juveniles (19±0.5 g) of the fish were ...

  20. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    hormones and their precursors across the foeto-maternal interface. The endocrine system is the earliest system developing in foetal life, and it is functional from early intrauterine existence through old age. Regulation of the foetal endocrine system relies, to some extent, on precursors secreted......The endocrinology of pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes as a consequence of physiological alterations at the foetoplacental boundary between mother and foetus. The vast changes in maternal hormones and their binding proteins complicate assessment of the normal level of most hormones...

  1. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate metabolism variables of Oreochromis mossambicuswere investigated after acute and chronic sublethal manganese exposure. The sublethal concentrations were determined from the LC50 value of manganese. After the exposures, the fish were carefully netted and blood was drawn from the caudal aorta.

  2. Surgical strategies in endocrine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreinemakers, J.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine surgery has become more custom-made throughout the years. Endocrine tumors can be sporadic or develop as part of familial syndromes. Several familial syndromes are known to cause endocrine tumors. The most common are multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes type 1, 2A and 2B. This

  3. Multiple endocrine neoplasia: the Chilean experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René E. Diaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN types 1 and 2 are genetic diseases that are inherited as autosomal traits. The major clinical manifestations of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 include the so-called "3 P's": parathyroid, pituitary, and pancreatic tumors, including gastroenteroneuroendocrine tumors. Genetic testing can be performed on patients and the potential carriers of the menin gene mutation, but the genotype-phenotype correlation in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is less straightforward than multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. Most likely, the main advantage of genetic testing in MEN1 is to exclude from further studies those who are negative for the genetic mutation if they belong to a family with a known history of MEN1. In Chile, we started with rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene genetic testing (MEN2 15 years ago. We carried out a prophylactic total thyroidectomy to prevent medullary thyroid carcinoma in a three-year-old girl who presented with microscopic medullary thyroid carcinoma. More than 90% of the individuals who tested positive using a genetic test achieved a biochemical cure compared with only 27% of patients who receive a clinical diagnosis. Mutations are mainly located in exon 11; the most common is C634W, rather than C634R. Hypertensive crisis was the cause of death in three patients, and extensive distant metastases occurred in nine (including two patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B of 14 patients. Earlier recognition of medullary thyroid carcinoma and the other features of the disease, especially pheochromocytoma, will improve the survival rate of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia.

  4. Endocrine system: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella; Johnstone, Carolyn

    2014-06-03

    This article, the last in the life sciences series, is the second of two articles on the endocrine system. It discusses human growth hormone, the pancreas and adrenal glands. The relationships between hormones and their unique functions are also explored. It is important that nurses understand how the endocrine system works and its role in maintaining health to provide effective care to patients. Several disorders caused by human growth hormone or that affect the pancreas and adrenal glands are examined.

  5. How does obesity affect the endocrine system? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, M; Chetty, Y; Chetty, V T

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a chronic, relapsing medical condition that results from an imbalance of energy expenditure and consumption. It is a leading cause of preventable illness, disability and premature death. The causes of obesity are multifactorial and include behavioural, socioeconomic, genetic, environmental and psychosocial factors. Rarely are endocrine diseases, e.g., hypothyroidism or Cushing's syndrome, the cause of obesity. What is less understood is how obesity affects the endocrine system. In this review, we will discuss the impact of obesity on multiple endocrine systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, changes in vitamin D homeostasis, gender steroids and thyroid hormones. We will also examine the renin angiotensin aldosterone system and insulin pathophysiology associated with obesity. We will provide a general overview of the biochemical changes that can be seen in patients with obesity, review possible aetiologies of these changes and briefly consider current guidelines on their management. This review will not discuss endocrine causes of obesity. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing....... To improve knowledge on possible influences of endocrine disrupters on female reproductive system, the effects of EDCs on genital malformations in females and the development of mammary glands were studied in the present project. AIMS: The aims for the studies on male and female mammary gland development...... effects on prepubertal female rat mammary glands were observed at lower levels than those affecting other endpoints studied. CONCLUSION: The present findings in rats suggest that EDCs may affect mammary gland development in women and men, although risk assessment including comparison with exposure...

  7. Sublethal consequences of urban life for wild vertebrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Austin J; Peiman, Kathryn S; de Bruijn, Robert; Cooke, Steven J; Birnie-Gauvin, Kim

    2016-01-01

    ... — while others have not. Here we present a review of the sublethal consequences of life in the city for wild vertebrates, and demonstrate that urban animals face an almost completely different set of physiological...

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000399.htm Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type II (MEN II) is a disorder passed ...

  9. Your Endocrine System (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Special Needs Glasses and Contact Lenses Your Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Endocrine System Print A A A en español Tu sistema ... a pea, is the "master gland" of the endocrine system. It makes and releases a bunch of hormones ...

  10. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nigerian Endocrine Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal accepts original contributions related to the practice and science of clinical endocrinology, articles updating the clinical endocrinologist on current areas of interest in the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine disorders, articles discussing dilemma facing endocrinologists in the clinical, social, and ethical arena of ...

  12. Endocrine Drugs in Aircrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    intracellular inflammatory action of corticosteroids, the and extracellular communication. The site of action contraceptive action of gonadal steroids...complications occur have results in the disappearance of weakness, malaise allowed more effective methods of prevention and and fatigue. Anorexia and...disease * Osteoporosis "* Pancreatitis * Myopathy Endocrine-Metabolic Neuropsychiatric "* latrogenic Cushing * Psychosis "* Acne, hirsutism, menstrual

  13. Nigerian Endocrine Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders: obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. In: Wilson JD, Foster ... Original Articles should be restricted to clinical or basic studies, particularly translational research, which add new information to the etiology, treatment, and outcomes of endocrine disorders that have not been published previously.

  14. Paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Angelousi, Anna; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2017-06-01

    The majority of neoplasms are responsible for symptoms caused by mass effects to surrounding tissues and/or through the development of metastases. However, occasionally neoplasms, with or without endocrine differentiation, acquire the ability to secrete a variety of bioactive substances or induce immune cross-reactivity with the normal tissues that can lead to the development of characteristic clinical syndromes. These syndromes are named endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes when the specific secretory components (hormones, peptides or cytokines) are unrelated to the anticipated tissue or organ of origin. Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes can complicate the patient's clinical course, response to treatment, impact prognosis and even be confused as metastatic spread. These syndromes can precede, occur concomitantly or present at a later stage of tumour development, and along with the secreted substances constitute the biological 'fingerprint' of the tumour. Their detection can facilitate early diagnosis of the underlying neoplasia, monitor response to treatment and/or detect early recurrences following successful initial management. Although when associated with tumours of low malignant potential they usually do not affect long-term outcome, in cases of highly malignant tumours, endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are usually associated with poorer survival outcomes. Recent medical advances have not only improved our understanding of paraneoplastic syndrome pathogenesis in general but also enhanced their diagnosis and treatment. Yet, given the rarity of endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes, there is a paucity of prospective clinical trials to guide management. The development of well-designed prospective multicentre trials remains a priority in the field in order to fully characterise these syndromes and provide evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic protocols. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. [Repair mechanism of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongmin; Lv, Haipeng; Ai, Zhilu; Wang, Na; Xie, Xinhua; Fan, Huiping; Pan, Zhili; Suo, Biao

    2015-11-04

    To study the repair mechanisms of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aurous cells. We resuscitated frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus at 37 degrees C for different time within 3 h. Meanwhile, we compared the morphological changes of the frozen sublethally damaged cells after 1 h of resuscitation using transmission electron microscopy assay (TEM). The expressions of the transcriptional attenuator MsrR (msrR), iron (Fe3+) ABC transporter ATP-binding protein (fhuC), and cytochrome b (cytB) genes were quantitatively analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) method. The content of cells outside leakage, active oxygen (ROS), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. More than 99% of the frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus repaired after 3 h. The resuscitated cells expressed an equal resistance to high concentration of NaCl. Real-time PCR results showed that the msrR and fhuC genes expressions were down-regulated, whereas the cytB gene expression was up-regulated significantly. The frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus cellar surface ultrastructure significant changed during resuscitation. The cell surface became compact and sturdy from smooth and transparent. The cell leakage rate of ultraviolet absorption material gradually decreased. Meanwhile, the intracellular ROS level declined along with the decrease of SOD activity. Frozen sublethally damaged cells may regain the capability of resistance to high salt stress by repairing cell membrane integrity, reducing the content of ROS through gene regulation, inhibiting the toxicity of active oxygen to the cells. Meanwhile, the regulation of metabolism related genes (cytB) provides the energy for the requirement of cells, therefore, the frozen sublethally damaged cells were repaired finally.

  16. Biochemical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnill, P.

    1979-01-01

    Biochemical engineering as a scientific discipline is becoming accepted in England and is drawing many young men and women to its ranks. This article focuses on how engineering came to embrace the biological sciences. (Author/SA)

  17. Zearalenone endocrine system catch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bursić Vojislava P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the contamination of our environment with thousands of both natural and man-made chemicals which affect the endocrine system of humans and animals. These so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are thought to mimic or block the action of hormones and therefore disrupt sexual development in utero. EDCs are organochlorine pesticides, dioxin compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, alkylpolyethoxylates, plastic additives and phytoestrogens (occurring naturally in foods: isoflavones coumenestans and zearalenone. The structure of zearalenone is similar to the structure of estrogens and it enables binding to the estrogenic receptors. DNA laddering on gel electrophoresis was present 12 h after dosing thus indicating a conclusion that there was apoptosis. Apoptosis is the principal mechanism contributing to germ cell depletion and testicular atrophy following zearalenone exposure.

  18. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    With the growing concern that environmental chemicals might impair human and animal fertility, it is important to investigate the possible influence of these substances on sexual differentiation and genital development of mammals. Many of these substances are suspected to interfere with endocrine...... processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...

  19. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    The endocrinology of pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes as a consequence of physiological alterations at the foetoplacental boundary between mother and foetus. The vast changes in maternal hormones and their binding proteins complicate assessment of the normal level of most hormones...... during gestation. The neuroendocrine events and their timing in the placental, foetal and maternal compartments are critical for initiation and maintenance of pregnancy, for foetal growth and development, and for parturition. As pregnancy advances, the relative number of trophoblasts increase...

  20. Kinetic analysis of the swimming behavior of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, exposed to nickel: Hypoactivity induced by sublethal concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellgaard, E.G.; Ashley, S.E.; Langford, A.E. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The discharge of nickel into aquatic environments from numerous industries poses a threat to fish populations because of its toxcity. Although little is known, however, about the precise mechanism of its toxicity in freshwater fish, it produces some of the symptoms associated with heavy-metal poisoning in general; it accumulates in fish tissues and results in alterations in gill structure, including hypertrophy of respiratory and mucous cells, separation of the epithelial layer from the pillar cell system, cauterization and sloughing, and necrosis of the epithelium. The destruction of the gill lamellae decreases the ventilation rate and if severe, as after acute exposure, may cause blood hypoxia and death. The effects of short-term exposure of fish to sublethal concentrations of nickel and not as well defined. The kinetic method of Ellgaard et al., which uses locomotor activity to assess the general health of fish, is ideally suited to examine whether sublethal concentrations of nickel adversely affect fish. In previous studies, the measured changes in locomotor activity observed when fish are exposed to pollutants correlate with more specific changes, e.g., physiological, biochemical, histological or neurosensory changes, which occur under the same conditions. Thus, the kinetic method also meets the criterial for pollution early warning systems as discussed by Cairns and van der Schale. This method has previously been used to demonstrate that short-term exposure to sublethal concentrations of the heavy metals cadmium, chromium, and zinc and copper are detrimental to the health of bluegills. The present study examines the effects of short-term exposures of sublethal concentrations of nickel on the locomotor activity of the goldfish, Carassius auratus. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Do endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Sisir; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine disruptors or environmental agents, disrupt the endocrine system, leading to various adverse effects in humans and animals. Although the phenomenon has been noted historically in the cases of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), the term “endocrine disruptor” is relatively new. Endocrine disruptors can have a variety of hormonal activities such as estrogenicity or anti-androgenicity. The focus of this review concerns on the induction of hypospadias by exogenous estrogenic endocrine disruptors. This has been a particular clinical concern secondary to reported increased incidence of hypospadias. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed as to whether endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias. Methods A literature search was performed for studies involving both humans and animals. Studies within the past 5 years were reviewed and categorized into basic science, clinical science, epidemiologic, or review studies. Results Forty-three scientific articles were identified. Relevant sentinel articles were also reviewed. Additional pertinent studies were extracted from the reference of the articles that obtained from initial search results. Each article was reviewed and results presented. Overall, there were no studies which definitely stated that endocrine disruptors caused hypospadias. However, there were multiple studies which implicated endocrine disruptors as one component of a multifactorial model for hypospadias. Conclusions Endocrine disruption may be one of the many critical steps in aberrant development that manifests as hypospadias. PMID:26816789

  2. Diagnosis of endocrine disease: Biochemical diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A van; Lenders, J.W.; Timmers, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal phaechromocytomas and extra-adrenal sympathetic paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumours, characterised by production of the catecholamines: noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine. Tumoural secretion of catecholamines determines their clinical presentation which is highly

  3. [Hand and endocrine diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Ryndak, Amélie; Karrouz, Wassila; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Baudoux, Florence

    2013-12-01

    The whole of hormones likely influence state of hands, modifying colouring and trophicity of the skin and having influence on its muscular, tendineous, osseous, articular components. Thus state of the hands contributes to the recognition of the endocrine diseases: hot and moist hands of the Graves' disease, dry, cold and infiltrated hands in myxoedema, pale and fine hands of hypopituitarism, broad and thick hand of acromegaly, brachymetacarpia in the pseudohypoparathyroidism… Diabetes exposes particularly to tendineous and articular retractions, to whitlows and ungual mycosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Women's Health Endocrine Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Ekta; Faubion, Stephanie; Hines, Stephanie; Stuenkel, Cynthia A

    2017-11-07

    The clinical update serves as a brief review of recently published, high-impact, and potentially practice changing journal articles summarized for our readers. Topics include menopause, sexual dysfunction, breast health, contraception, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this clinical update, we selected four recent high-impact publications related to endocrine issues in women. We have chosen to highlight research on subclinical hypothyroidism during pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including cognitive outcomes in offspring; the progression of metabolic syndrome severity during the menopausal transition; and the association of diabetes and metformin use with cancer risk and mortality.

  5. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2: achievements and current challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Machens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Incremental advances in medical technology, such as the development of sensitive hormonal assays for routine clinical care, are the drivers of medical progress. This principle is exemplified by the creation of the concept of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, encompassing medullary thyroid cancer, pheochromocytoma, and primary hyperparathyroidism, which did not emerge before the early 1960s. This review sets out to highlight key achievements, such as joint biochemical and DNA-based screening of individuals at risk of developing multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, before casting a spotlight on current challenges which include: (i ill-defined upper limits of calcitonin assays for infants and young children, rendering it difficult to implement the biochemical part of the integrated DNA-based/biochemical concept; (ii our increasingly mobile society in which different service providers are caring for one individual at various stages in the disease process. With familial relationships disintegrating as a result of geographic dispersion, information about the history of the origin family may become sketchy or just unavailable. This is when DNA-based gene tests come into play, confirming or excluding an individual's genetic predisposition to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 even before there is any biochemical or clinical evidence of the disease. However, the unrivaled molecular genetic progress in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 does not come without a price. Screening may uncover unknown gene sequence variants representing either harmless polymorphisms or pathogenic mutations. In this setting, functional characterization of mutant cells in vitro may generate helpful ancillary evidence with regard to the pathogenicity of gene variants in comparison with established mutations.

  6. Nigerian Endocrine Practice: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Nigerian Endocrine Practice, a peer reviewed publication published twice a year is the official publication of the Nigerian Chapter of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE-Nigeria). The primary mission of the Nigerian Endocrine Practice is to enhance the health care of patients with ...

  7. Sublethal effects of manganese on the haematology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information concerning the sublethal effects of pollutants, such as metals, forms an integral part of ecosystem health assessment programmes and of procedures followed to develop water quality guidelines for environmetal protection. The data from this study were incorporated into a water quality index (RAUWaterz) ...

  8. Sublethal haematological effects of zinc on the freshwater fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... industrial and domestic wastes water discharges and animals where it ... that zinc could cause sub-acute effects that change fish behaviours. ... These include the sublethal effects of concentrations of water extracts of akee apple on C. gariepinus (Onusiriuka and Ufodike, 1998). Toxicity of cas- sava leaf ...

  9. Effects of sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron on the ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, it is concluded that sublethal doses of chlorfluazuron reduced the amounts of ovarian constituents during ovarian development and oogenesis in S. litura. These reductions increased with an increase in dose from LD10 to LD30. The effects of chlorfluazuron on the amounts of ovarian constituents are presumed to ...

  10. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  11. Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Sublethal effects of temperature on freshwater organisms, with special reference to aquatic insects. HF Dallas, V Ross-Gillespie. Abstract. Water temperature is a key variable affecting aquatic organisms. Understanding their response to elevated water temperatures is important for estimating upper thermal limits, ...

  12. Impact of sublethal concentration of triazophos on regulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exposure to sublethal doses of triazophos extract caused significant (p < 0.05) time and dose dependent reduction in the levels of total protein, acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and significant enhancement in the levels of total free amino acids, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminases, adenosine deaminases, ...

  13. Sublethal effects of industrial chemicals on fish fingerlings ( Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tilapia guineensis commonly found in the Niger Delta ecological zone of Nigeria was exposed to sublethal concentrations (1.56, 3.13 mg/l) of neatex (industrial detergent) and norust CR 486 (corrosion inhibitor) using the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) # 203 protocol. At test termination ...

  14. Sublethal effects of carbaryl on embryonic and gonadal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex reversal was delayed in the experimental groups, with a sex ratio of 13 females to 0 males, but the control group recorded 6 females to 8 males. These results suggest that sublethal doses of carbaryl in the environment, similar to those used in the current study, may have an adverse effect on the reproductive success of ...

  15. Effects Of Exposure To Sublethal Concentrations Of Azadirachta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physiological impairment on the fingerlings of Clarias gariepinus when exposed to sublethal concentrations of Azadirachta Indica was investigated. The fish were exposed to concentrations of 1.25, 2.50, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 ML -1 for the period of 12 weeks. The crude protein content decreased with increased concentration ...

  16. Endocrine Actions of Osteocalcin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Patti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteocalcin is the most abundant noncollagenous protein of bone matrix. Once transcribed, this protein undergoes posttranslational modifications within osteoblastic cells before its secretion, including the carboxylation of three glutamic residues in glutamic acid, which is essential for hydroxyapatite binding and deposition in the extracellular matrix of bone. Recent provocative data from experimental observations in mice showed that the circulating undercarboxylated fraction of osteocalcin increases insulin secretion and sensitivity, lowers blood glucose, and decreases visceral fat in both genders, while it enhances testosterone production by the testes in males. Moreover, both total and undercarboxylated osteocalcins increase following physical activity with potential positive effects on glucose tolerance. Despite that these evidences have been only in part confirmed in humans, further prospective investigations are needed to definitively establish the endocrine role of osteocalcin both in the general population and cohorts of patients with diabetes or other metabolic disorders.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    controls within all diagnose categories including antibiotics. The causal relationship between PCOS and autoimmune disease represents an interesting new area of research. PCOS is a lifelong condition and long term morbidity could be worsened by obesity, sedentary way of life, western style diet and smoking......Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine condition in premenopausal women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenism, irregular menses and polycystic ovaries when other etiologies are excluded. Obesity, insulin resistance and low vitamin D levels are present in more...... than 50% patients with PCOS, these factors along with hyperandrogenism could have adverse effects on long term health. Hyperinflammation and impaired epithelial function were reported to a larger extent in women with PCOS and could particularly be associated with hyperandrogenism, obesity and insulin...

  18. SARCOPENIA: AN ENDOCRINE DISORDER?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Alexis; Morley, John E; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Vinik, Aaron

    2017-09-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as low muscle function (walking speed or grip strength) in the presence of low muscle mass. A simple screening test-the SARC-F-is available to identify persons with sarcopenia. The major endocrine causes of sarcopenia are diabetes mellitus and male hypogonadism. Other causes are decreased physical activity, loss of motor neuron units, weight loss, inflammatory cytokines, reduced blood flow to muscles, very low 25(OH) vitamin D levels, and decreased growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1. Treatment for sarcopenia includes resistance and aerobic exercise, leucine-enriched essential amino acids, and vitamin D. In hypogonadal males, testosterone improves muscle mass, strength, and function. Selective androgen receptor molecules and anti-myostatin activin II receptor molecules are under development as possible treatments for sarcopenia. COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease DHEA = dehydroepiandrosterone IGF-1 = insulin-like growth factor 1 GH = growth hormone mTOR = mammalian target of rapamycin SARM = selective androgen receptor molecule.

  19. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  20. Pesticides and Arthropods: Sublethal Effects and Demographic Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Marčić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecticides and acaricides designed to control primary harmful insects and mites may also variously affect some other arthopods present in an (agroecosystem (e.g. secondary pests, predators, parasitoids, saprophytes, bioindicators, pollinators. Apart from insecticides and acaricides, arthropods may also be affected by the activity of other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, etc.. Regardless of whether they are deemed desirable or not, the effects that pesticides have on arthopods need to be quantified as closely as possible through appropriate experimental procedures. Data acquired in tests designed to determined LD50/LC50 values are inadequate for evaluation of pesticide effectiveness in the field as pesticidesalso cause various sublethal effects, generally disregarded in such investigations. The sublethal effects of pesticides refer to any altered behaviour and/or physiology of individuals that have survived exposure to pesticides at doses/concentrations that can be lethal(within range causing mortality in an experimental population that exceeds mortality in an untreated population or sublethal (below that range. Pesticides affect locomotion and mobility, stimulate dispersion of arthropods from treated areas, complicate or prevent their navigation, orientation and ability to locate hosts, and cause changes in their feeding, mating and egg-laying patterns. Sublethal pesticide effects on arthropod physiology reflect on the life span, rate of development, fecundity and/or fertility, sex ratio and immunity of surviving individuals. Different parameters are being used in arthropod bioassays to determine sublethal effects (ED50/EC50, LOEC, NOEC, total effect index. Compared to acute toxicity tests, these parameters improve the quality of evaluation and create a more accurate view of the effects of a pesticide. However, such approach covers mainly fecundity/fertility alone, while all other sublethal effects remain unaccounted for. Besides, it

  1. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  2. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  3. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., -40...

  4. as endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenges of removing EDCs and other pollutants at South African wastewater treatment .... of a particular component within one endocrine axis may also ...... HPG. Hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal. HPT. Hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid.

  5. Sublethal Heavy Metal Stress Stimulates Innate Immunity in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of sublethal heavy metal stress as plant biotic elicitor for triggering innate immunity in tomato plant was investigated. Copper in in vivo condition induced accumulation of defense enzymes like peroxidase (PO, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, and β-1,3 glucanase along with higher accumulation of total phenol, antioxidative enzymes (catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, and total chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the treatment also induced nitric oxide (NO production which was confirmed by realtime visualization of NO burst using a fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA and spectrophotometric analysis. The result suggested that the sublethal dose of heavy metal can induce an array of plant defense responses that lead to the improvement of innate immunity in plants.

  6. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Endocrine involvement in systemic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Didem; Dagdelen, Selcuk; Erbas, Tomris

    2010-01-01

    To present an overview of the published data on endocrine involvement and endocrine dysfunction in patients with systemic amyloidosis. We conducted a review of the medical literature using MEDLINE data sources, including clinical trials, in vitro studies, and case reports on pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreatic, adrenal, and gonadal involvement in systemic amyloidosis. Reports of endocrine involvement in systemic amyloidosis seem to consist primarily of small-samplesize clinical trials or case reports, probably because of the rarity of the disease itself. Systemic amyloidosis mainly involves and causes functional impairment in the thyroid and testes in the endocrine system. Evaluation of adrenal function necessitates special consideration because amyloid infiltration of the adrenal glands resulting in failure may be a life-threatening condition. Amyloid deposition commonly seen in the pituitary gland and the pancreas of patients with Alzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively, is generally classified as local amyloidosis and should not be confused with systemic involvement. Additionally, detection of amyloid deposition in the thyroid and testes may have a diagnostic role in patients with suspected systemic or renal amyloidosis. Published data suggest that systemic amyloidosis frequently involves the endocrine system, and endocrine dysfunction seems to be not as rare as previously thought. A rapidly growing goiter or symptoms and signs of adrenal or gonadal dysfunction should raise suspicion of amyloid infiltration. Involvement of pituitary, parathyroid, and pancreatic sites in systemic amyloidosis still remains to be clarified. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed for complete characterization of the effect of systemic amyloidosis on the endocrine system.

  8. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Angel; Quesada, Ivan; Tudurí, Eva; Nogueiras, Rubén; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma

    2017-09-01

    Energy balance involves the adjustment of food intake, energy expenditure and body fat reserves through homeostatic pathways. These pathways include a multitude of biochemical reactions, as well as hormonal cues. Dysfunction of this homeostatic control system results in common metabolism-related pathologies, which include obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolism-disrupting chemicals (MDCs) are a particular class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that affect energy homeostasis. MDCs affect multiple endocrine mechanisms and thus different cell types that are implicated in metabolic control. MDCs affect gene expression and the biosynthesis of key enzymes, hormones and adipokines that are essential for controlling energy homeostasis. This multifaceted spectrum of actions precludes compensatory responses and favours metabolic disorders. Herein, we review the main mechanisms used by MDCs to alter energy balance. This work should help to identify new MDCs, as well as novel targets of their action.

  9. Clinical polymorphism of endocrine ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Likhvantseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze clinical polymorphism of endocrine ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves’ disease.Methods: Clinical and radiological data of 18 cases with clinical manifestations of lacrimal gland increase were analyzed and compared with data retrieved from 50 patients without increasing of lacrimal gland.Results: the characteristics of clinical manifestations of endocrine ophthalmopathy with lacrimal gland increase were presented. this form differs, as the organ of the target, along with orbital fat and/or eye muscles becomes the glandula lacrimalis. A correlation between fact involving, on the one hand, and the intensity and severity of the autoimmune process in orbit, on the other hand were identified.Conclusion: Involvement of this secretion organ in the autoimmune process makes the clinical course of endocrine ophthalmopa-thy more complicated, and leads to eye dry syndrome creation.

  10. Occult endocrine dysfunction in patients of cerebrovascular accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Hari Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebrovascular disorders are common conditions leading to significant morbidity and mortality in the population. Occult endocrine disorders also contribute to the morbidity and we studied the prevalence of endocrine dysfunction in patients of cerebrovascular accident (CVA. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 30 patients of CVA (aged 18-75, admission within 72 h of symptoms and positive neuroimaging in this prospective, observational study. All subjects were assessed clinically and biochemically for hormonal dysfunction at admission and for mortality at the end of 1 month. The patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (infarct, n = 20 and Group 2 (hemorrhage, n = 10 and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests using GraphPad Prism Software, version 6. Results: The study participants (24M:6F had a mean age of 60.7 ± 11.4 years and body weight of 67.2 ± 11.4 kg. Fourteen out of 30 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including sick euthyroid syndrome (SES and central hypothyroidism (n = 10, secondary hypogonadism (n = 3, subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 1, and growth hormone (GH deficiency in two patients. The endocrine conditions did not differ significantly between both the groups and nine out of 30 patients succumbed to their illness within 1 month. None of the hormonal parameters studied, could predict the 30 day mortality. Conclusion: Endocrine disorders are common in acute stage of CVA and commonest finding is a SES. Hormonal dysfunction did not differ based on the etiology of the CVA. Long-term follow-up is essential to understand the morbidity contributed by the hormonal alterations.

  11. Protective effect of a laser-induced sub-lethal temperature rise on RPE cells from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Hisashi; Pruessner, Joachim; Shiraki, Kunihiko; Brinkmann, Ralf; Miura, Yoko

    2014-07-01

    Recently introduced new technologies that enable temperature-controlled laser irradiation on the RPE allowed us to investigate temperature-resolved RPE cell responses. In this study we aimed primarily to establish an experimental setup that can realize laser irradiation on RPE cell culture with the similar temperature distribution as in the clinical application, with a precise time/temperature history. With this setup, we conducted investigations to elucidate the temperature-dependent RPE cell biochemical responses and the effect of transient hyperthermia on the responses of RPE cells to the secondary-exposed oxidative stress. Porcine RPE cells cultivated in a culture dish (inner diameter = 30 mm) with culture medium were used, on which laser radiation (λ = 1940 nm, spot diameter = 30 mm) over 10 s was applied as a heat source. The irradiation provides a radially decreasing temperature profile which is close to a Gaussian shape with the highest temperature in the center. Power setting for irradiation was determined such that the peak temperature (Tmax) in the center of the laser spot at the cells reaches from 40 °C to 58 °C (40, 43, 46, 50, 58 °C). Cell viability was investigated with ethidium homodimer III staining at the time points of 3 and 24 h following laser irradiation. Twenty four hours after laser irradiation the cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 5 h, followed by the measurement of intracellular glutathione, intracellular 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) protein adducts, and secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The mean temperature threshold for RPE cell death after 3 h was found to be around 52 °C, and for 24 h around 50 °C with the current irradiation setting. A sub-lethal preconditioning on Tmax = 43 °C significantly induced the reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, and decreased H2O2-induced increase of intracellular 4-HNE protein adducts. Although sub-lethal hyperthermia (Tmax

  12. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) by chlorpyrifos at sublethal concentrations: Methodological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Wel, H.; Welling, W.

    1989-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity is a potential biochemical indicator of toxic stress in fish and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of organophosphates. A number of methodological aspects regarding the determination of the in vivo effect of chlorpyrifos on acetylcholinesterase in guppies have been investigated. It was found that with acetylthiocholine as a substrate, the contribution of pseudocholinesterase to the total cholinesterase activity can be neglected. Protection of acetylcholinesterase of guppies exposed to chlorpyrifos from additional, artifactual in vitro enzyme inhibition during homogenization is necessary. Very low concentrations of acetone in the exposure medium, resulting from dilution of the stock solution of chlorpyrifos in acetone, can result in large decreases in the oxygen content of this medium. This may affect the uptake rate of the toxic compound and, thereby, cholinesterase inhibition. Very low, sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos result in high inhibition levels of acetylcholinesterase (80-90%) in guppies within 2 weeks of continuous exposure. Recovery of the enzyme activity occurs after the exposed animals are kept in clean medium for 4 days, but the rate of recovery is considerably lower than the rate of inhibition.

  13. Lipid effects of endocrine medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Dan V; Vora, Avni; Mazzone, Theodore

    2011-02-01

    Various alterations of lipid homeostasis have a significant role in the pathophysiology of the artherosclerotic process. The effects of usual lipid-lowering agents such as statins, fibrates, or niacin are well known, but other endocrine therapeutic agents could also affect the blood levels of various lipoproteins and, in turn, influence atheroma formation. In this review, we attempt to summarize the effect of several hormonal and non-hormonal endocrine agents on lipid metabolism, including insulin, thyroid hormone, sex hormones, glucocorticoids, growth hormone, and several anti-diabetic agents.

  14. Sublethal effect of neem extract on mediterranean fruit fly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Alves Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The sublethal effect of extracts of Azadirachta indica on Ceratitis capitata was evaluated. Two pairs of flies were treated in plastic tubes with cotton placed in plastic cages. An artificial diet (hydrolyzed protein + sugar was provided ad libitum. The extracts affected significantly the longevity of C. capitata. The pre-oviposition period were not significantly affected by the extracts. The A. indica branches extracted with dichloromethane (888 ppm affected significantly the fecundity and fertility, reducing the number of eggs laid to approximately 80 % and the egg hatching by 30 % at the 8th day. Therefore, the neem branches extracted with dichloromethane affected the reproduction of C. capitata.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aspect of your health. What is the endocrine system? Your endocrine system includes glands and organs that make and release ... to feel well. How can TBI affect the endocrine system? Two important parts of the endocrine system—the ...

  16. Endocrine emergencies in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Amie

    2013-07-01

    Success in treatment of endocrine emergencies is contingent on early recognition and treatment. Many endocrine diseases presenting emergently have nonspecific signs and symptoms. In addition, these endocrine crises are often precipitated by concurrent disease, further making early identification difficult. This article concentrates on recognition and emergency management of the most common endocrine crises in dogs and cats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental effect assessment for sexual endocrine-disrupting chemicals: Fish testing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knacker, Thomas; Boettcher, Melanie; Frische, Tobias; Rufli, Hans; Stolzenberg, Hans-Christian; Teigeler, Matthias; Zok, Sabine; Braunbeck, Thomas; Schäfers, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Current standard testing and assessment tools are not designed to identify specific and biologically highly sensitive modes of action of chemicals, such as endocrine disruption. This information, however, can be important to define the relevant endpoints for an assessment and to characterize thresholds of their sublethal, population-relevant effects. Starting a decade ago, compound-specific risk assessment procedures were amended by specifically addressing endocrine-disrupting properties of substances. In 2002, the Conceptual Framework, agreed upon by OECD's Task Force on Endocrine Disrupters Testing and Assessment, did not propose specific testing strategies, and appropriate testing methods had not yet been developed and approved. In the meantime, the OECD Test Guidelines Programme has undertaken important steps to revise established and to develop new test methods, which can be used to identify and quantify effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on mammals, birds, amphibians, fish, and invertebrates. For fish testing of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, the first Test Guidelines have recently been adopted by the OECD and validation of further test systems is under progress. Based on these test systems and the experience gained during their validation procedures, we propose a 3-step fish testing strategy: 1) Weight-of-evidence approach for identifying potential sexual endocrine-disrupting chemicals; even after advanced specification of systematic criteria, this step of establishing initial suspicion will still require expert judgment; 2) in vivo evaluation of sexual endocrine-disrupting activity in fish by applying in vivo fish screening assays; sufficient data are available to diagnose the aromatase-inhibition and estrogen-receptor agonist mechanisms of action by indicative endpoints (biomarkers), whereas the ability of the respective biomarkers in the screening assay to identify the estrogen-receptor antagonists and androgen-receptor agonists and antagonists

  18. The Vitamin D Endocrine System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the physiology and biochemistry of the vitamin D endocrine system, including role of biological calcium and phosphorus, vitamin D metabolism, and related diseases. A 10-item, multiple-choice test which can be used to obtain continuing medical education credit is included. (JN)

  19. Sublethal effect of imidacloprid on Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) feeding, digging, and foraging behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing evidence that exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides at sublethal levels impairs colonies of honeybee and other pollinators. Recently, it was found that sublethal contamination with neonicotinoids also affect growth and behavior of ants. In this study, we exposed red imported fi...

  20. Survival rate of honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers after exposure to sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquiere, T.

    2010-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a commonly used systemic insecticide which can induce several sublethal effects. Previous research has not shown any increased mortality in bees that were fed with sublethal doses. However, there is very little research conducted with the focus on survival rate of honeybees in the

  1. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling of quantal and graded sublethal endpoints: a brief discussion of concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashauer, R.; Agatz, A.; Albert, C.; Ducrot, V.; Galic, N.G.; Hendriks, J.; Jager, T.; Kretschmann, A.; O'Connor, I.; Rubach, M.N.; Nyman, M.; Schmitt, W.; Stadnicka, J.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the advantages and problems of using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TKTD) models for the analysis, understanding, and simulation of sublethal effects. Only a few toxicodynamic approaches for sublethal effects are available. These differ in their effect mechanism and emphasis on linkages

  2. Sublethal effects of cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and iron on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study also evaluated the sublethal effects of cadmium, manganese, lead, zinc and iron in plasma samples utilising plasma electrolyte parameters as a biomarker using an albino mice model, M. musculus. Mice were subjected to sublethal concentrations of the selected heavy metals (1/10th of 96 hrLC50). Blood plasma ...

  3. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  4. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Cerqueira Cesar Machado

    Full Text Available Surgical approaches to pancreatic endocrine tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may differ greatly from those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Presurgical diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is therefore crucial to plan a proper intervention. Of note, hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be surgically treated before pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 resection, apart from insulinoma. Non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 >1 cm have a high risk of malignancy and should be treated by a pancreatic resection associated with lymphadenectomy. The vast majority of patients with gastrinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 present with tumor lesions at the duodenum, so the surgery of choice is subtotal or total pancreatoduodenectomy followed by regional lymphadenectomy. The usual surgical treatment for insulinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is distal pancreatectomy up to the mesenteric vein with or without spleen preservation, associated with enucleation of tumor lesions in the pancreatic head. Surgical procedures for glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, and vipomas/ multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are similar to those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Some of these surgical strategies for pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 still remain controversial as to their proper extension and timing. Furthermore, surgical resection of single hepatic metastasis secondary to pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may be curative and even in multiple liver metastases surgical resection is possible. Hepatic trans-arterial chemo-embolization is usually associated with surgical resection. Liver transplantation may be needed for select cases. Finally, pre-surgical clinical and genetic diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and

  5. Endocrine disruptors and their effects on puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çetinkaya

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors and their possible impact on human health have become a topic of discussion. Endocrine disrupting chemicals are found in plastics, detergents, pesticides and industrial chemicals. Some of these persist in the environment and others do not. Some are lipophilic, sequestered in adipose tissue and secreted in milk, and others may only be present for short periods of time but at critical periods of development. Endocrine disruptors are defined as an extrogenous substance or mixture that alters the function of the endocrine system and consequently causes adverse health effects in an intact organism, or its progeny. Endocrine disruptors affect the reproductive system and they may be responsible for oligospermia, abnormality of sperm characteristics, disorders of testicular steroidogenesis, testicular atrophy, uterus weight increases and precocious puberty. In this review, we aimed to assess on exposure to endocrine disruptors and the effects of endocrine disruptors on puberty.

  6. Effect of exposure to sublethal concentrations of sodium cyanide on the carbohydrate metabolism of the Indian Major Carp Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen N. Dube

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were designed to study in-vivo effects of sodium cyanide on biochemical endpoints in the freshwater fish Labeo rohita. Fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations (0.106 and 0.064mg/L for a period of 15 days. Levels of glycogen, pyruvate, lactate and the enzymatic activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH, phosphorylase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, acid phosphatase (AcP were assessed in different tissues (liver, muscle and gills. Result indicated a steady decrease in glycogen, pyruvate, SDH, ALP and AcP activity with a concomitant increase in the lactate, phosphorylase, LDH and G6PD activity in all selected tissues. The alterations in all the above biochemical parameters were significantly (p<0.05 time and dose dependent. In all the above parameters, liver pointing out the intensity of cyanide intoxication compare to muscle and gills. Study revealed change in the metabolic energy by means of altered metabolic profile of the fish. Further, these observations indicated that even sublethal concentrations of sodium cyanide might not be fully devoid of deleterious influence on metabolism in L. rohita.

  7. Afferent Endocrine Control of Eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Wolfgang; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    The afferent endocrine factors that control eating can be separated into different categories. One obvious categorization is by the time course of their effects, with long-term factors that signal adiposity and short-term factors that operate within the time frame of single meals. The second...... obvious categorization is by the origin of the endocrine signalling molecules. The level of knowledge concerning the physiological mechanisms and relevance of the hormones that are implicated in the control of eating is clearly different. With the accumulating knowledge about the hormones' actions......, various criteria have been developed for when the effect of a hormone can be considered 'physiologic'. This chapter treats the hormones separately and categorizes them by origin. It discusses ALL hormones that are implicated in eating control such as Gastrointestinal (GI) hormone and glucagon-like peptide...

  8. Classical endocrine diseases causing obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jolanta U

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is associated with several endocrine diseases, including common ones such as hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome to rare ones such as Cushing's syndrome, central hypothyroidism and hypothalamic disorders. The mechanisms for the development of obesity vary in according to the endocrine condition. Hypothyroidism is associated with accumulation of hyaluronic acid within various tissues, additional fluid retention due to reduced cardiac output and reduced thermogenesis. The pathophysiology of obesity associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome remains complex as obesity itself may simultaneously be the cause and the effect of the syndrome. Net excess of androgen appears to be pivotal in the development of central obesity. In Cushing's syndrome, an interaction with thyroid and growth hormones plays an important role in addition to an increased adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. This review also describes remaining rare cases: hypothalamic obesity due to central hypothyroidism and combined hormone deficiencies.

  9. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, F; Luisetto, G; Basso, S M M; Basso, U; Brunello, A; Camozzi, V

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer remains one of the first leading causes of death in women, and currently endocrine treatment is of major therapeutic value in patients with estrogen-receptor positive tumors. Selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, aromatase inhibitors, and GnRH agonists are the drugs of choice. Tamoxifen, a partial nonsteroidal estrogen agonist, is a type II competitive inhibitor of estradiol at its receptor, and the prototype of SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors significantly lower serum estradiol concentration in postmenopausal patients, having no detectable effects on adrenocortical steroids formation, while GnRH agonists suppress ovarian function, inducing a menopause-like condition in premenopausal women. Endocrine therapy has generally a relatively low morbidity, leading to a significant reduction of mortality for breast cancer. The aim of chemoprevention is to interfere early with the process of carcinogenesis, reducing the risk of cancer development. As preventive agents, raloxifene and tamoxifene are equivalent, while raloxifene has more potent antiresorptive effects in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Endocrine treatment is usually considered a standard choice for patients with estrogen-receptor positive cancers and non-life-threatening advanced disease, or for older patients unfit for aggressive chemotherapy regimens. Several therapeutic protocols used in patients with breast cancer are associated with bone loss, which may lead to an increased risk of fracture. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice to treat such a drug-induced bone disease. The aim of this review is to outline current understanding on endocrine therapy of breast cancer. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  10. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid diseas...

  11. Sublethal effects of waterborne herbicides in tropical freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stéfani Cibele; Dreyer da Silva, Manuela; Piancini, Laercio Dante Stein; Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Silva de Assis, Helena Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The study evaluated the sublethal effects of the herbicides glyphosate (Roundup) and diuron (Hexaron) and the mixture of them, used extremely in agriculture, through biomarkers in fish. The glutathione S-transferase activity increased (74%) and catalase activity decreased (37%) at the higher exposure concentration of Hexaron in comparison to the control group, suggesting an activation of this metabolism route. Membrane damage was observed at the higher exposure of Roundup and in the mixture group compared to the control group, which can be related to the nuclear alterations observed in these exposed groups. The cholinesterase activity was also inhibited (37%) in mixture group compared to the control group and no gill morphology damage was found. The results suggested a potential synergic effect in some analysed parameters.

  12. SLEEP APNEA IN ENDOCRINE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Misnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, an association between sleep apnea and a  number of endocrine diseases has been established. The secretion of many hormones after falling asleep is considerably changed, compared to the period of wakefulness. In patients with endocrine disorders, abnormal hormonal secretion and its pathological consequences may contribute to sleep apnea. Sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia arising in sleep apnea result in a decrease in insulin sensitivity, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of sleep apnea increases in acromegaly, which may affect the risk of cardio-pulmonary complications. There is an association between sleep apnea and testosterone treatment in men, as well as in postmenopausal women. Sleep apnea in hypothyroidism is most frequently related to the development of hypothyroidism per se and can therefore be reversed with thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Timely detection and treatment of sleep apnea in patients with endocrine disorders can improve their survival prognosis and quality of life.

  13. Endocrine manifestations in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2016-10-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune small intestinal mucosal disorder that often presents with diarrhea, malabsorption and weight loss. Often, one or more associated endocrine disorders may be associated with CD. For this review, methods involved an extensive review of published English-language materials. In children and adolescents, prospective studies have demonstrated a significant relationship to insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes, whereas in adults, autoimmune forms of thyroid disease, particularly hypothyroidism, may commonly co-exist. In some with CD, multiple glandular endocrinopathies may also occur and complicate the initial presentation of the intestinal disease. In others presenting with an apparent isolated endocrine disorder, serological screening for underlying subclinical CD may prove to be positive, particularly if type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid or other autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as Addison's disease are first detected. A number of reports have also recorded hypoparathyroidism or hypopituitarism or ovarian failure in CD and these may be improved with a strict gluten-free diet.

  14. BISEN: Biochemical Simulation Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F; Vinnakota, K. C.; Han, Y; Dash, R. K.; Yang, F; Beard, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for user-specified multi-compartment systems of enzymes and transporters accounting for detailed biochemical thermodynamics, rapid equilibria of multiple biochemical species and dynamic proton and met...

  15. [Disperse endocrine system and APUD concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil'to, I V; Sukhodolo, I V; Gereng, E A; Shamardina, L A

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the problems of disperse endocrine system and APUD-system morphology, summarizes some debatable issues of single endocrine cell biology. The data presented refer to the history of both systems discovery, morphological methods of their study, developmental sources, their structural organization and physiological roles of their cells. The significance of single endocrine cells in the regulation of the organism functions is discussed.

  16. Update on endocrine disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hagen, C

    2001-01-01

    The marked endocrine changes that occur in anorexia nervosa have aroused a great deal of interest, and over the last decade much research has been conducted in this field. The endocrine disturbances are not specific to this disorder, as they also occur in starvation states secondary to other causes...... of the large body of literature concerning endocrine aspects of anorexia nervosa with the main focus on the latest results, which provide leads for potential etiological theories....

  17. Osmoregulation and endocrine glands of teleosts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oguri, M

    1970-01-01

    ...), have indicated that the following endocrine glands: thyroid gland, hypophysis, interrenal body, urophysis, corpuscle of stannius and juxtaglomerular cells, are involved in the osmoregulation in teleosts...

  18. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Roig

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air. For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

  19. Effect of endocrine disruptor pesticides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health.

  20. Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Pesticides: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Wissem; Hassine, Aziza Ibn Hadj; Bouaziz, Aicha; Bartegi, Aghleb; Thomas, Olivier; Roig, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans. A huge number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors, among them several pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill unwanted organisms in crops, public areas, homes and gardens, and parasites in medicine. Human are exposed to pesticides due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil, air). For several years, there have been enquiries about the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of human pathologies. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptor pesticides on human health. PMID:21776230

  1. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour: e0140814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonalons, Carolina Mengoni; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    .... As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period...

  2. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mengoni Goñalons, Carolina; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    .... As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period...

  3. Therapeutics for Equine Endocrine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andy E

    2017-04-01

    Equine endocrine disease is commonly encountered by equine practitioners. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) and equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) predominate. The most logical therapeutic approach in PPID uses dopamine agonists; pergolide mesylate is the most common. Bromocryptine and cabergoline are alternative drugs with similar actions. Drugs from other classes have a poor evidence basis, although cyproheptadine and trilostane might be considered. EMS requires management changes as the primary approach; reasonable justification for use of drugs such as levothyroxine and metformin may apply. Therapeutic options exist in rare cases of diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, hyperthyroidism, and critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Dixon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Around 70% of all breast cancers are estrogen receptor alpha positive and hence their development is highly dependent on estradiol. While the invention of endocrine therapies has revolusioned the treatment of the disease, resistance to therapy eventually occurs in a large number of patients. This paper seeks to illustrate and discuss the complexity and heterogeneity of the mechanisms which underlie resistance and the approaches proposed to combat them. It will also focus on the use and development of methods for predicting which patients are likely to develop resistance.

  5. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1: institution, management, and data analysis of a nationwide multicenter patient database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Francesca; Cianferotti, Luisella; Boaretto, Francesca; Cetani, Filomena; Cioppi, Federica; Colao, Annamaria; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Ferolla, Piero; Ferone, Diego; Fossi, Caterina; Giudici, Francesco; Gronchi, Giorgio; Loli, Paola; Mantero, Franco; Marcocci, Claudio; Marini, Francesca; Masi, Laura; Opocher, Giuseppe; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Persani, Luca; Scillitani, Alfredo; Sciortino, Giovanna; Spada, Anna; Tomassetti, Paola; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate European epidemiological data on patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 by creating an Italian registry of this syndrome, including clinical and genetic characteristics and therapeutic management. Clinical, familial and genetic data of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, diagnosed, treated, and followed-up for a mean time of 11.3 years, in 14 Italian referral endocrinological centers, were collected, over a 3-year course (2011-2013), to build a national electronic database. The Italian multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 database includes 475 patients (271 women and 204 men), of whom 383 patients (80.6%) were classified as familial cases (from 136 different pedigrees), and 92 (19.4%) patients were sporadic cases. A MEN1 mutation was identified in 92.6% of familial cases and in 48.9% of sporadic cases. Four hundred thirty-six patients were symptomatic, presenting primary hyperparathyroidism, gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and pituitary tumors in 93, 53, and 41% of cases, respectively. Thirty-nine subjects, belonging to affected pedigrees positive for a MEN1 mutation, were asymptomatic at clinical and biochemical screening. Age at diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 probands was similar for both familial and simplex cases (mean age 47.2 ± 15.3 years). In familial cases, diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 in relatives of affected probands was made more than 10 years in advance (mean age at diagnosis 36.5 ± 17.6 years). The analysis of Italian registry of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients revealed that clinical features of Italian multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients are similar to those of other western countries, and confirmed that the genetic test allowed multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 diagnosis 10 years earlier than biochemical or clinical diagnosis.

  6. Primary cilia: a link between hormone signalling and endocrine-related cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Samuel M; Chapple, J Paul

    2016-10-15

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that play a role as signalling hubs. Disruption of primary cilia structure and function is increasingly recognised in a range of cancers, with a growing body of evidence suggesting that ciliary disruption contributes to tumourigenesis. This review considers the role of primary cilia in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Neuroimmune endocrine effects of antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonioli M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Antonioli, Joanna Rybka, LA CarvalhoPsychoimmunology Translational Laboratory, Health Science Research Centre, Roehampton University, London, UKAbstract: Antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date the most often used treatment for depression, but the exact mechanism of action underlying its therapeutic effect is still unclear. Many theories have been put forward to account for depression, as well as antidepressant activity, but none of them is exhaustive. Neuroimmune endocrine impairment is found in depressed patients; high levels of circulating corticosteroids along with hyperactivation of the immune system, high levels of proinflammatory cytokines, low levels of melatonin in plasma and urine, and disentrainment of circadian rhythms have been demonstrated. Moreover, antidepressant treatment seems to correct or at least to interfere with these alterations. In this review, we summarize the complex neuroimmune endocrine and chronobiological alterations found in patients with depression and how these systems interact with each other. We also explain how antidepressant therapy can modify these systems, along with some possible mechanisms of action shown in animal and human models.Keywords: antidepressant agents, biological markers, human, cytokines, neuroinflammation, psychoneuroimmunology, endophenotype

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized by variable penetrance of medullary thyroid carcinoma(MTC), pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). MEN2 consists of two clinical subtypes, MEN2A and MEN2B. Familial medullary thyroid cancer is now viewed as a phenotypic variant of MEN2A with decreased penetrance for PHEO and PHPT rather than a distinct entity. All subtypes are caused by gain-of-function mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. Recognition of the clinical entity in individuals and families at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation is crucial for the management and prevention of associated malignancies. Recent guidelines released by the American Thyroid Association regarding the management of MTC will be summarized in this chapter. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Environmental endocrine disruptors: New diabetogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fénichel, Patrick; Chevalier, Nicolas

    The prevalence of type-2 diabetes has dramatically increased worldwide during the last few decades. While lifestyle factors (sedentariness, noxious food), together with genetic susceptibility, are well-known actors, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may also play a pathophysiological role in the occurrence of metabolic diseases. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence support a role for early and chronic exposure to low doses of chemical pollutants with endocrine and metabolic disrupting effects. Most are present in the food chain and accumulate in the fat mass after absorption. In rodents, bisphenol A stimulates synthesis and secretion of pancreatic β cells and disturbs insulin signaling in liver, muscle and adipose tissue through epigenetic changes leading to insulin resistance and β cell impairment. In humans, epidemiological reports show statistical link between exposure to pesticides, polychlorinated bisphenyls, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins or aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbides or heavy metals and DT2 after acute accidental releases or early in life and/or chronic, low doses exposure. More prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the importance of such environmental risk factors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  11. Nigerian Endocrine Practice: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Endocrine Practice: About this journal. Journal Home > Nigerian Endocrine Practice: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. People. » Contact ...

  12. Positron emission tomography (PET) in endocrine tumours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    endocrine pancreatic tumours is probably limited to those that are less well differentiated and metabolically active. However, a future role for PET imaging in the detection of endocrine tumours, using more specific substrates, appears very promising. Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa Vol.

  13. Genetic testing by cancer site: endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, Robert; Nagy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Numerous hereditary syndromes, caused by mutations in multiple tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, can cause tumors in organs of the endocrine system. The primary syndromes (and genes) addressed here include multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2 (MEN1 and RET genes), Cowden syndrome (PTEN), hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndromes (multiple genes), and von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL). Clinical genetic testing is available for each of these syndromes and is generally directed to individuals with endocrine or other tumors and additional features suggestive of a hereditary syndrome. However, for some endocrine tumors, the proportion because of heredity is so high that genetic testing may be appropriate for all affected individuals. Management for hereditary cases typically involves aggressive screening and/or surgical protocols, starting at young ages to minimize morbidity and mortality. Endocrine tumors can be less commonly seen in a number of other hereditary syndromes (eg, neurofibromatosis), which are not reviewed in this section.

  14. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  15. Endocrine disruption in aquatic systems: up-scaling research to address ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Fredric M; Ormerod, Steve J; Tyler, Charles R

    2018-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter biological function in organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations and are a significant threat to aquatic biodiversity, but there is little understanding of exposure consequences for populations, communities and ecosystems. The pervasive nature of EDCs within aquatic environments and their multiple sub-lethal effects make assessments of their impact especially important but also highly challenging. Herein, we review the data on EDC effects in aquatic systems focusing on studies assessing populations and ecosystems, and including how biotic and abiotic processes may affect, and be affected by, responses to EDCs. Recent research indicates a significant influence of behavioural responses (e.g. enhancing feeding rates), transgenerational effects and trophic cascades in the ecological consequences of EDC exposure. In addition, interactions between EDCs and other chemical, physical and biological factors generate uncertainty in our understanding of the ecological effects of EDCs within aquatic ecosystems. We illustrate how effect thresholds for EDCs generated from individual-based experimental bioassays of the types commonly applied using chemical test guidelines [e.g. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)] may not necessarily reflect the hazards associated with endocrine disruption. We argue that improved risk assessment for EDCs in aquatic ecosystems urgently requires more ecologically oriented research as well as field-based assessments at population-, community- and food-web levels. © 2017 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. ENDOCRINE MANIFESTATIONS OF PRIMARY HYPEROXALURIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Shatha; Eisenberg, Yuval

    2017-11-16

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare metabolic disorder of oxalate overproduction. It is associated with urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis which progress to ESRD and systemic oxalosis. As oxalate deposits in tissues, non-parathyroid hormone (nonPTH) mediated hypercalcemia, oxalate osteopathy, primary hypothyroidism and primary hypogonadism develop. In this review, we will present a case of PH1 and provide an overview of this clinical entity and its endocrine manifestations. We conducted a PubMed search for articles related to PH1. The terms "primary hyperoxaluria," "nonPTH mediated hypercalcemia," "hypothyroidism," and "hypogonadism" were used to identify pertinent literature. Given the rarity of PH1, there is scant literature regarding the incidence and clinical significance of endocrine manifestations of this disorder. There are rare reports of hypercalcemia secondary to osteoclast-stimulating activity of macrophages in bone granulomas, which occur in response to oxalate deposits. We report that hypercalcemia may also be mediated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25 (OH)2D) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Primary hypothyroidism and primary hypogonadism are thought to be due partly to calcium oxalate deposition in thyroid and testicular tissue. The presented case is the first to report PTHrP mediated hypercalcemia and primary hypogonadism in a patient with PH1. PH1 is a metabolic disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Owing to its rarity, it is not widely recognized in the field of endocrinology, despite presenting with several endocrinopathies. Recognition of endocrine disturbances can result in early and successful treatment, limiting morbidity and improving quality of life in these challenging patients. PH = primary hyperoxaluria; ESRD = end stage renal disease; PTH = parathyroid hormone; 1,25 (OH)2D = 1,25 dihydoxyvitamin D; PTHrP = parathyroid hormone related protein; CKD = chronic kidney disease; AGT = alanine: glyoxylate

  17. [Vascular risk in endocrine diseases other than diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antequera, Isabel; Cuende, José I; Nieto López-Guerrero, Jerónimo; Valdivielso, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Endocrinological diseases directly affect the cardiovascular system. The deleterious effects on cardiovascular function can be direct, and linked to the increase or reduction of circulating hormones. Equally, the adverse effects may be indirect; for example following the rise in blood pressure, increase or redistribution of lean mass, or increased plasma lipoproteins. The best health care and the increasing availability of biochemical tests lead to the diagnosis of many endocrine diseases before the onset of clinical signs. This review will focus on presenting evidence of cardiovascular functional or structural impairment in cases of primary hyperparathyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, and hypothyroidism in their sub-clinical forms, as well as the reversibility of complications after appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonelli, Francesco, E-mail: f.tonelli@dfc.unifi.it; Giudici, Francesco [Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Surgical Unit, Medical School, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla n° 3, Florence 50134 (Italy); Giusti, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School and Regional Centre for Hereditary Endocrine Tumors, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla n° 3, Florence 50134 (Italy)

    2012-05-07

    We reviewed the literature about entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) to clarify their demographic features, localization imaging, practice, and appropriate therapeutical strategies, analyzing the current approach to entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. Despite the fact that hyperparathyroidism is usually the first manifestation of MEN1, the penetrance of these tumors is similar. They are characterized by multiplicity of lesions, variable expression of the tumors, and propensity for malignant degeneration. Both the histological type and the size of MEN1 neuroendocrine tumors correlate with malignancy. Monitoring of pancreatic peptides and use of imaging exams allow early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment, resulting in prevention of metastatic disease and improvement of long-term survival. Surgery is often the treatment of choice for MEN1-neuroendocrine tumors. The rationale for surgical approach is to curtail malignant progression of the disease, and to cure the associated biochemical syndrome, should it be present.

  19. Endocrine Disruptors Leading to Obesity and Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios Petrakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The review aims to comprehensively present the impact of exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs in relation to the clinical manifestation of obesity and related diseases, including diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, carcinogenesis and infertility. EDs are strong participants in the obesity epidemic scenery by interfering with cellular morphological and biochemical processes; by inducing inflammatory responses; and by presenting transcriptional and oncogenic activity. Obesity and lipotoxicity enhancement occur through reprogramming and/or remodeling of germline epigenome by exposure to EDs. Specific population groups are vulnerable to ED exposure due to current dietary and environmental conditions. Obesity, morbidity and carcinogenicity induced by ED exposure are an evolving reality. Therefore, a new collective strategic approach is deemed essential, for the reappraisal of current global conditions pertaining to energy management.

  20. Endocrine Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and young adults, and endocrine changes include hypothalamic amenorrhea, a nutritionally acquired growth hormone resistance with low insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), relative hypercortisolemia, decreases in leptin, insulin, amylin and incretins, and increases in ghrelin, PYY and adiponectin. These changes in turn have deleterious effects on bone, and may affect neurocognition, anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology. Low bone density is particularly concerning; clinical fractures occur and changes in both bone microarchitecture and strength estimates have been reported. Recovery causes improvement of many, but not all, hormonal changes, and deficits in bone accrual may persist despite recovery. Physiologic, primarily transdermal, estrogen replacement increases bone density in adolescents, although catch-up is incomplete. In adults, oral estrogen co-administered with rhIGF-1 in one study, and bisphosphonates in another increased bone density, though not to normal. More studies are necessary to determine the optimal therapeutic approach in AN. PMID:24731664

  1. Behcet's Disease and Endocrine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Ozhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease (BD is a chronic disease which is characterized by recurrent oral apthous ulcerations, recurrent genital ulcerations, skin eruptions, ocular involvements and other various systemic manifestations as well as systemic vasculitis. Endocrine involvement in BD regarding various systems can be seen. Hypophysis is one of the best and dense vascularized organs of the body, thus it is likely that it can be affected by BD. Not only anterior hypophysis functions, but posterior hypophysis functions as well can be affected. As BD is a disease of autoimmune process, it may be possible that adrenal insufficiency or alterations in the cortisol levels could be expected. Another concern is whether or not there is insulin resistance in patients with BD. The avaliable data suggests that there is an increased susceptibility to insulin resistance in patients with BD.

  2. Retinoid metabolism in invertebrates: when evolution meets endocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, A; Ruivo, R; Gesto, M; Castro, L Filipe C; Santos, M M

    2014-11-01

    Recent genomic and biochemical evidence in invertebrate species pushes back the origin of the retinoid metabolic and signaling modules to the last common ancestor of all bilaterians. However, the evolution of retinoid pathways are far from fully understood. In the majority of non-chordate invertebrate lineages, the ongoing functional characterization of retinoid-related genes (metabolism and signaling pathways), as well as the characterization of the endogenous retinoid content (precursors and active retinoids), is still incomplete. Despite limited, the available data supports the presence of biologically active retinoid pathways in invertebrates. Yet, the mechanisms controlling the spatial and temporal distribution of retinoids as well as their physiological significance share similarities and differences with vertebrates. For instance, retinol storage in the form of retinyl esters, a key feature for the maintenance of retinoid homeostatic balance in vertebrates, was only recently demonstrated in some mollusk species, suggesting that such ability is older than previously anticipated. In contrast, the enzymatic repertoire involved in this process is probably unlike that of vertebrates. The suggested ancestry of active retinoid pathways implies that many more metazoan species might be potential targets for endocrine disrupting chemicals. Here, we review the current knowledge about the occurrence and functionality of retinoid metabolic and signaling pathways in invertebrate lineages, paying special attention to the evolutionary origin of retinoid storage mechanisms. Additionally, we summarize existing information on the endocrine disruption of invertebrate retinoid modules by environmental chemicals. Research priorities in the field are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. BISEN: Biochemical Simulation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlier, J; Wu, F; Qi, F; Vinnakota, K C; Han, Y; Dash, R K; Yang, F; Beard, D A

    2009-03-15

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for user-specified multi-compartment systems of enzymes and transporters accounting for detailed biochemical thermodynamics, rapid equilibria of multiple biochemical species and dynamic proton and metal ion buffering. The software and a user manual (including several tutorial examples) are available at bbc.mcw.edu/BISEN.

  4. Sublethal toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene in Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeenpaeae, K. [Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)], E-mail: kimmo.maenpaa@joensuu.fi; Leppaenen, M.T.; Kukkonen, J.V.K. [Faculty of Biosciences, University of Joensuu, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the toxicity and biotransformation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in the oligochaete aquatic worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. PAHs are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that pose a hazard to aquatic organisms, and metabolizing capability is poorly known in the case of many invertebrate species. To study the toxicity and biotransformation of pyrene, the worm was exposed for 15 days to various concentrations of water-borne pyrene. The dorsal blood vessel pulse rate was used as a sublethal endpoint. Pyrene biotransformation by L. variegatus was studied and the critical body residues (CBR) were estimated for pyrene toxicity. The toxicokinetics of pyrene uptake was evaluated. A combination of radiolabeled ({sup 14}C) and nonlabeled pyrene was used in the exposures, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and high-pressure liquid chromatography were employed in both water and tissue residue analyses. The results showed that L. variegatus was moderately able to metabolize pyrene to 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), thus demonstrating that the phase-I-like oxidizing enzyme system metabolizes pyrene in L. variegatus. The amount of the 1-HP was 1-2% of the amount of pyrene in the worm tissues. The exposure to pyrene reduced the blood vessel pulse rate significantly (p < 0.05), showing that pyrene had a narcotic effect. The estimated CBRs remained constant during the exposure time, varying from 0.120 to 0.174 mmol pyrene/kg worm wet weight. The bioconcentration factors (BCF) decreased as exposure concentration increased. It was suggested that the increased toxicity of pyrene accounted for the decrease in BCFs by lowering the activity of the organism.

  5. Analyzing endocrine system conservation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing variation in rates of evolution can provide important insights into the factors that constrain trait evolution, as well as those that promote diversification. Metazoan endocrine systems exhibit apparent variation in evolutionary rates of their constituent components at multiple levels, yet relatively few studies have quantified these patterns and analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. This may be in part due to historical and current data limitations for many endocrine components and taxonomic groups. However, recent technological advancements such as high-throughput sequencing provide the opportunity to collect large-scale comparative data sets for even non-model species. Such ventures will produce a fertile data landscape for evolutionary analyses of nucleic acid and amino acid based endocrine components. Here I summarize evolutionary rate analyses that can be applied to categorical and continuous endocrine traits, and also those for nucleic acid and protein-based components. I emphasize analyses that could be used to test whether other variables (e.g., ecology, ontogenetic timing of expression, etc.) are related to patterns of rate variation and endocrine component diversification. The application of phylogenetic-based rate analyses to comparative endocrine data will greatly enhance our understanding of the factors that have shaped endocrine system evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Many Putative Endocrine Disruptors Inhibit Prostaglandin Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David M.; Skalkam, Maria L.; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prostaglandins (PGs) play key roles in development and maintenance of homeostasis of the adult body. Despite these important roles, it remains unclear whether the PG pathway is a target for endocrine disruption. However, several known endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) share a high...... of endocrine disruption. Results: We found that many known EDCs inhibit the PG pathway in a mouse Sertoli cell line and in human primary mast cells. The EDCs also reduced PG synthesis in ex vivo rat testis and it was correlated with a reduced testosterone production. The inhibition of PG synthesis occurs...

  7. Detection of low numbers of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica in chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasson, Vicky; Baert, Leen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2011-02-28

    The capacity to detect low levels of healthy and sub-lethally injured Salmonella enterica cells in chocolate by two alternative rapid detection methods iQ-Check(TM)Salmonella II real-time PCR (Bio-Rad) and VIDAS® Easy SLM (BioMérieux) was assessed and compared with ISO 6579:2005. Chocolate, a low moisture food known to support the survival of Salmonella, was challenged as food matrix. Buffered peptone water (BPW) did not support the recovery of low levels of sub-lethally injured S. enterica independent of the detection method, while BPW supplemented with milk powder enabled detection by the three examined methods. However, inhibition of real-time PCR was observed since for one out of three repetitions of chocolate inoculated with a low number of sub-lethally injured S. enterica cells, no PCR signal was obtained. Therefore, attention should be paid to the enrichment step to avoid false negative results due to the presence of especially sub-lethally injured Salmonella cells in chocolate. An appropriate sample preparation (such as enrichment media and conditions for incubation) remains the key factor for reliable detection including sub-lethally injured cells and should be evaluated, if necessary optimized, for each detection assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Protective Role of Thiourea on Leuciscus cephalus Exposed to Sublethal Doses of Pendigan 330EC (Pendimethalin) Herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunescu, Alina; Zgurschi, Gabriela; Soare, Liliana Cristina; Man, George Mihail; Brinzea, Gheorghita; Fierascu, Radu Claudiu; Fierascu, Irina; Ponepal, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective role of thiourea on the physiological, hematological, biochemical and histopathological parameters of Leuciscus cephalus exposed to sublethal concentration of Pendigan 330 EC herbicide. The animals were divided in four experimental groups (control, animals subjected to 1 ‰ thiourea, animals subjected to 4 × 10(-4) mL/L herbicide and, respectively, animals subjected to 4 × 10(-4) mL/L herbicide and 1 ‰ thiourea). Exposure of European chub to herbicide administered in water for 2 weeks determined installation of pathological changes in the liver and gills tissues. Also, were observed a decrease in the number of white blood cells and oxygen consumption, breathing frequency, and an increase in the number of red blood cells and glycaemia values. Thiourea counteracts the toxic action, describing itself as normal liver parenchyma and normal gills in animals intoxicated with herbicide, without lesion, and a return to normal values of the studied markers.

  9. Endocrine effects on heart function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Gamberini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the factors associated with thalassemic heart disease, endocrine disturbance is also a contributing factor. We present a retrospective, cross sectional study, which aims to establish the prevalence of cardiac complications in thalassaemia major (TM patients with endocrine complications and to evaluate the influence of endocrine disease on cardiac complications. Endocrinological and cardiological parameters were considered on 957 TM patients who are enrolled in the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia (MIOT network in 68 sites in Italy. Patients with pubertal hypogonadism (163 males and 175 females, hypothyroidism (192, diabetes mellitus (87 and hypoparathyroidism (61, were compared according to cardiac complications: global heart T2*, cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, arrythmias, pulmonary hypertension and myocardial fibrosis. Control groups were made up according to the age range of patients with the corresponding endocrinopathy. The prevalence of cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and heart failure was significantly increased in patients with endocrinopathies. Cardiac complications tended to increase according to the number of endocrinologies affecting the patient. 与地中海贫血心脏疾病相关的因素中,内分泌失调也是一个促进因素。 我们进行了回顾和断面研究,旨在患有内分泌并发症的重型地中海贫血患者中建立心脏并发症的患病率,以及评估内分泌疾病对心脏并发症的影响。 曾考虑到意大利地中海贫血心肌铁过载(MIOT)网络的68个站点上注册的957名重型地中海贫血患者的内分泌和心脏病学参数。 根据以下心脏并发症对青春期性腺机能减退的患者(男性163名、女性175名)、甲状腺机能减退患者(192名)、糖尿病患者(87名)和甲状旁腺机能减退患者(61名)进行了比较: 心脏 T2*、心功能障碍、心脏衰竭、心率不齐、肺动脉高

  10. [Endocrine disruptors are a novel direction of endocrinologic scientific investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous anthropogenic chemicals (pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates and others), that are able to bind hormonal receptors of endocrine and other cells in vivo and act like hormones. These substances disrupt endocrine regulation of metabolism, reproduction and adaptive reactions of organisms and promote human and animal endocrine disorders.

  11. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorptive procedures. Weight loss depends on following a strict diet. • Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). RYGB ... index.cfm). www.hormone.org Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery Patient Guide November 2010

  12. Endocrine Disorders Induced by Antiepileptic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disturbances in adolescent women with epilepsy, and the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and hormonal contraception are discussed by a pediatric neurologist and epileptologist at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

  13. The clandestine organs of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia

    2018-02-01

    This review analyzes what could be regarded as the "clandestine organs" of the endocrine system: the gut microbiome, the immune system, and the stress system. The immune system is very closely related to the endocrine system, with many intertwined processes and signals. Many researchers now consider the microbiome as an 'organ' that affects the organism at many different levels. While stress is certainly not an organ, it affects so many processes, including endocrine-related processes, that the stress response system deserved a special section in this review. Understanding the connections, effects, and feedback mechanisms between the different "clandestine organs" and the endocrine system will provide us with a better understanding of how an organism functions, as well as reinforce the idea that there are no independent organs or systems, but a complex, interacting network of molecules, cells, tissues, signaling pathways, and mechanisms that constitute an individual. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. System chemical biology studies of endocrine disruptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Oprea, Tudor I.

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alter hormonal balance and other physiological systems through inappropriate developmental or adult exposure, perturbing the reproductive function of further generations. While disruption of key receptors (e.g., estrogen, androgen, and thyroid) at the ligand...

  15. Report on Criteria for Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather...... new knowledge on endocrine disrupters with the focus on providing information requested for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The Centre is financed by the Ministry of the Environment and the scientific work programme is followed by an international scientific advisory board....... The overall aim of this project is to provide a science based proposal for criteria for endocrine disrupters. The terms of reference for the project specify elements to be included and/or addressed when developing the criteria (Annex 1). Also, several international reports and papers dealing with assessment...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: multiple endocrine neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neoplasia multiple endocrine neoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... stones, thinning of bones, nausea and vomiting, high blood pressure (hypertension), weakness, and fatigue. The most common sign ...

  17. Contribution of the Endocrine Perspective in the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Franssen, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Debate makes science progress. In the field of endocrine disruption, endocrinology has brought up findings that substantiate a specific perspective on the definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the role of the endocrine system and the endpoints of hormone and EDC actions among other...... issues. This paper aims at discussing the relevance of the endocrine perspective with regard to EDC effects on pubertal timing. Puberty involves particular sensitivity to environmental conditions. Reports about the advancing onset of puberty in several countries have led to the hypothesis...

  18. Sublethal effects of some synthetic and botanical insecticides on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeily Saeideh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortality caused by insecticides, some biological traits of insects may also be affected by sublethal insecticide doses. In this study, we used the age-stage, two-sex life table method to evaluate the sublethal effects of the four synthetic insecticides: abamectin, imidacloprid, diazinon, and pymetrozin as well as the botanical insecticide taken from Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae extract, on eggs of the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem.: Aleyrodidae. The lowest and highest survival rates and oviposition periods were observed in whiteflies treated by diazinon and imidacloprid, respectively. We found significant differences in the net reproductive rate (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r, the finite rate of increase (?, and the gross reproductive rate (GRR among different insecticides. Altogether, our results showed that pymetrozin and C. procera induced the most sublethal effects, thus they may be suitable candidates for use in integrated pest management programs of B. tabaci.

  19. Sublethal Dosage of Imidacloprid Reduces the Microglomerular Density of Honey Bee Mushroom Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Chan; Yang, En-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic loss of honey bees is a major concern worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that neonicotinoid insecticides cause behavioural abnormalities and have proven that exposure to sublethal doses of imidacloprid during the larval stage decreases the olfactory learning ability of adults. The present study shows the effect of sublethal doses of imidacloprid on the neural development of the honey bee brain by immunolabelling synaptic units in the calyces of mushroom bodies. We found that the density of the synaptic units in the region of the calyces, which are responsible for olfactory and visual functions, decreased after being exposed to a sublethal dose of imidacloprid. This not only links a decrease in olfactory learning ability to abnormal neural connectivity but also provides evidence that imidacloprid damages the development of the nervous system in regions responsible for both olfaction and vision during the larval stage of the honey bee. PMID:26757950

  20. Sub-lethal antibiotic treatment leads to multidrug resistance via radical-induced mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanski, Michael A.; DePristo, Mark A.; Collins, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance arises through mechanisms such as selection of naturally occurring resistant mutants and horizontal gene transfer. Recently, oxidative stress has been implicated as one of the mechanisms whereby bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria. Here we show that sub-lethal levels of bactericidal antibiotics induce mutagenesis, resulting in heterogeneous increases in the minimum inhibitory concentration for a range of antibiotics, irrespective of the drug target. This increase in mutagenesis correlates with an increase in ROS, and is prevented by the ROS scavenger thiourea and by anaerobic conditions, indicating that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics induce mutagenesis by stimulating the production of ROS. We demonstrate that these effects can lead to mutant strains that are sensitive to the applied antibiotic but resistant to other antibiotics. This work establishes a radical-based molecular mechanism whereby sub-lethal levels of antibiotics can lead to multidrug resistance, which has important implications for the widespread use and misuse of antibiotics. PMID:20159551

  1. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Boutrup, Torsten Snogdal

    2016-01-01

    concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae......Ichthyotoxic algal blooms are normally considered a threat to maricultured fish only when blooms reach lethal cell concentrations. The degree to which sublethal algal concentrations challenge the health of the fish during blooms is practically unknown. In this study, we analysed whether sublethal...... for 12 h prior to the addition of virus, a marginal decrease in the susceptibility to VHSV was observed compared to fish exposed to VHSV without algae. If virus and algae were added simultaneously, inclusion of the algae increased mortality by 50% compared to fish exposed to virus only, depending...

  2. Sublethal dietary effects of Microcystis on Sacramento splittail, Pogonichthys macrolepidotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Shawn; Deng, Dong-Fang; Lehman, Peggy; Teh, Swee

    2012-04-01

    The presence of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis in the upper San Francisco Estuary (SFE) since 1999 is a potential but to date an unquantified threat to the health and survival of aquatic organisms, such as fish and zooplankton. The microcystins (MCs) predominantly in the LR-form (MC-LR) contained in Microcystis is hepatotoxic and a potential threat to the fishery. This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary exposure of the endemic Sacramento splittail, Pogonichthys macrolepidotus in SFE to Microcystis and its toxin, MC-LR. Juvenile splittail (12.59 ± 0.7 g fish(-1)) were exposed to five diets for 28 d with MC-LR obtained from: (1) Microcystis harvested from the SFE and (2) a synthetic purified form of MC-LR. Three of the test diets contained 3.55 (D5), 9.14 (D10) and 17.13 (D20)mg MC-LR kg(-1) from Microcystis. The other two diets contained either purified MC-LR at 3.89 mg MC-LR kg(-1) (D5R) or no MC-LR (D0). The RNA/DNA ratio of fish muscle was significantly lower for all treatments fed test diets containing MC-LR compared to the control diet D0, suggesting Microcystis adversely affected nutritional status. Protein phosphatase 2A expression in the fish from the D5, D10 and D20 treatments were inversely affected by increasing concentrations of MC-LR. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and single cell necrosis were more prevalent and greater in severity in the fish exposed to the diets D10 and D20 compared to fish from the D0 treatment and indicate severe liver toxicity in splittail exposed to MC-LR. The sublethal effects on splittail characterized by this study suggest cyanobacterial blooms have the potential to affect splittail nutritional status and health in SFE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E. (Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1989-08-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis.

  4. Wilson′s disease: An endocrine revelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilson′s disease is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism. The affected patients, who otherwise have a near normal life span, may often suffer from some potentially treatable and under recognized endocrine disorders that may hinder their quality of life. We explored previously published literature on the various endocrine aspects of this disease with their probable underlying mechanisms, highlighting the universal need of research in this area.

  5. Health surveillance and endocrine disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waissmann William

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the extreme relevance of research on the presence of endocrine disruptors (EDs in products of interest to health surveillance (HS. Focusing on EDs, the author highlights the urgency of changes already under way in the direction of HS. The shift should be from product and product-registration approaches to the productive process and its realization in consumption, generation of contaminants, and alterations in the health of workers and the overall population. He briefly describes: regulatory gaps for dealing with EDs; difficulty in evaluating risk and suspension of the production and use of products with its characteristics and the need, as exemplified by such products, to enhance the inter-relationship among all stakeholders and to turn HS into a state-of-the-art technological setting, associated with the academic community and accountable to the public. The author reports on measures already taken in relation to EDs, including the establishment of a reference laboratory for analyzing persistent organic pollutants (POPs, interruption of the use of various POPs in Brazil and an initial review of requirements for registering pesticides under the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA.

  6. Endocrine manifestations of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whooten, Rachel; Schmitt, Jessica; Schwartz, Alison

    2018-02-01

    To summarize the recent developments in endocrine disorders associated with Down syndrome. Current research regarding bone health and Down syndrome continues to show an increased prevalence of low bone mass and highlights the importance of considering short stature when interpreting dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The underlying cause of low bone density is an area of active research and will shape treatment and preventive measures. Risk of thyroid disease is present throughout the life course in individuals with Down syndrome. New approaches and understanding of the pathophysiology and management of subclinical hypothyroidism continue to be explored. Individuals with Down syndrome are also at risk for other autoimmune conditions, with recent research revealing the role of the increased expression of the Autoimmune Regulatory gene on 21st chromosome. Lastly, Down-syndrome-specific growth charts were recently published and provide a better assessment of growth. Recent research confirms and expands on the previously known endocrinopathies in Down syndrome and provides more insight into potential underlying mechanisms.

  7. Vertical transmission of sublethal granulovirus infection in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, J P; Griffiths, C M; Cory, J S; Smith, P; Sait, S M

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of pathogen persistence in relation to fluctuations in host density is crucial to our understanding of disease dynamics. In the case of insect baculoviruses, which are typically transmitted horizontally via a lifestage that can persist outside the host, a key issue that remains to be elucidated is whether the virus can also be transmitted vertically as a sublethal infection. We show that RNA transcripts for the Plodia interpunctella GV granulin gene are present in a high proportion of P. interpunctella insects that survive virus challenge. Granulin is a late-expressed gene that is only transcribed after viral genome replication, its presence thus strongly indicates that viral genome replication has occurred. Almost all insects surviving the virus challenge tested positive for viral RNA in the larval and pupal stage. However, this proportion declined in the emerging adults. Granulin mRNA was also detected in both the ovaries and testes, which may represent a putative mechanism by which reduced fecundity in sublethally affected hosts might be manifested. RNA transcripts were also detected in 60-80% of second-generation larvae that were derived from mating surviving adults, but there was no difference between the sexes, with both males and females capable of transmitting a sublethal infection to their offspring. The data indicate that low-level persistent infection, with at least limited gene expression, can occur in P. interpunctella following survival of a granulovirus challenge. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a persistent, sublethal infection by a baculovirus to be initiated by a sublethal virus dose. We hypothesize that the 'latent' baculovirus infections frequently referred to in the literature may also be low level persistent, sublethal infections resulting from survival from initial baculovirus exposure.

  8. Sublethal Effects of Thiamethoxam on the Demographic Parameters of Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Zhou, Li-Lin; Yang, Fan; Li, Mang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yong; Lei, Chao-Liang; Si, Sheng-Yun

    2017-08-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important sap-sucking pest of many crops, including Chinese cabbage, Brassinca oleracea L. The neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam has been used as an effective insecticide to control M. persicae in cabbage fields. In this study, we assessed the effects of sublethal concentrations of thiamethoxam on demographic parameters of M. persicae. In leaf-dip bioassays, thiamethoxam showed a relatively high toxicity against M. persicae with an LC50 of 6.80 mg liter-1. The duration of the preadult stage was not significantly affected in the sublethal bioassay. Additionally, the longevity and adult preoviposition period were not significantly affected by sublethal thiamethoxam. However, sublethal thiamethoxam significantly increased fecundity (LC10) and prolonged the total preoviposition period (LC40). Consequently, the finite rate of increase (λ) and the intrinsic rate of increase (rm) of aphids exposed to the LC40 were significantly lower than those of control aphids, whereas the net reproductive rate (R0) was higher, and the generation time (T) and the population doubling time (DT) were longer in the treated group. Based on these results, hormesis was induced by sublethal thiamethoxam in M. persicae, with the population growth of M. persicae negatively affected at higher sublethal concentrations of thiamethoxam. Therefore, our study indicated that the possible effects of thiamethoxam on aphids require further study to develop optimized integrated pest management strategies. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The endocrine system in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefai, Hisham; Allababidi, Hisham; Levy, Shiri; Levy, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is complex and not fully understood. However, it emerges as an abnormal metabolic condition associated with a systemic damage to the vascular bed. Cumulative evidence also reveals that the endocrine system is not intact in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is not clear whether the changes observed in the endocrine system represent a primary defect or reflect the effects of the impaired insulin action and abnormal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism on the hormonal milieu. Review of the literature reveals that the function of the entire endocrine system including the functions of hormones from the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid, parathyroid, the vitamin D system, the gonads, and the endocrine function of the adipose tissue, is impaired. Good metabolic control and insulin treatment may reverse some of these abnormalities. It remains unanswered as to what extent these changes in the endocrine system contribute to the vascular pathologies observed in individuals affected by diabetes mellitus and whether part of the abnormalities observed in the endocrine system reflect a basic cellular defect in the diabetic syndrome.

  10. Endocrine Dysregulation in Anorexia Nervosa Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder with serious endocrine consequences, including dysregulation of the gonadal, adrenal, and GH axes, and severe bone loss. This Update reviews recent advances in the understanding of the endocrine dysregulation observed in this state of chronic starvation, as well as the mechanisms underlying the disease itself. Evidence Acquisition: Findings of this update are based on a PubMed search and the author's knowledge of this field. Evidence Synthesis: Recent studies have provided insights into the mechanisms underlying endocrine dysregulation in states of chronic starvation as well as the etiology of anorexia nervosa itself. This includes a more complex understanding of the pathophysiologic bases of hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, GH resistance, appetite regulation, and bone loss. Nevertheless, the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown, and effective therapies for the endocrine complications and for the disease itself are lacking. Conclusions: Despite significant progress in the field, further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia nervosa and its endocrine complications. Such investigations promise to yield important advances in the therapeutic approach to this disease as well as to the understanding of the regulation of endocrine function, skeletal biology, and appetite regulation. PMID:21976742

  11. Endocrine alterations are the main determinants of cardiac remodelling in restrictive anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Guido; Mercurio, Valentina; Ruvolo, Antonio; Senatore, Ignazio; Halinskaya, Irina; Fazio, Valeria; Affuso, Flora; Fazio, Serafino

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Anorexia nervosa is a condition of reduced hemodynamic load, characterized by varying degrees of cardiac remodelling, only in part related to reduced body mass; the mechanism for such variability, as well as its clinical significance, remains unknown. Aim of the study was to assess the possible influence of a great number of clinical, biochemical, and endocrine factors on cardiovascular parameters in restrictive anorexia nervosa. Method. Twenty-five female patients hospitalized for restrictive anorexia nervosa underwent extensive cardiovascular, clinical, and biochemical evaluation. Results. Height-adjusted and cardiac workload-matched left ventricular mass was significantly related to several endocrine parameters, blood pressure, and vasoreactivity. On multivariate analysis, IGF/GH ratio and systolic blood pressure were the only independent predictors of height-adjusted ventricular mass (adj-R(2) = 0.585; P = 0.001); when matching for cardiac workload, left ventricular mass was independently predicted only by GH and FT3 levels. All effects were independent of patient's weight and BMI. Conclusions. Indices of endocrine impairment seem to be the most relevant determinants of left ventricular hypotrophy in anorectic patients, apparently independent of reduced hemodynamic load and BMI. In particular, IGF/GH ratio and FT3 seem to particularly affect left ventricular mass in this population.

  12. Persistent Comorbidities in Cushing’s Syndrome after Endocrine Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Resmini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was assumed that resolution of hypercortisolism in Cushing syndrome (CS was followed by normalization of morbidity; however, in the last decade evidence is accumulating that patients with cured CS still have increased morbidity and mortality after the biochemical control of hypercortisolism. Patients with CS have an increased cardiovascular and metabolic risk and persistent accumulation of central fat, with an unfavorable adipokine profile, not only during the active phase of the disease but also long after biochemical remission. Clinical management should be particularly careful in identifying global cardiovascular risk, as a primary goal during the followup of these patients, aimed at improving global vascular morbidity. Moreover bone mass is reduced not only due to the endogenous hypercortisolism but also due to duration and dose of exogenous glucocorticoid (GC replacement therapy after surgery. Thus, therapy in operated patients with inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis should be reduced to the lowest dose and duration possible. Specific treatments should be considered in patients with decreased bone mass, aimed at reducing the increased fracture incidence. Finally, cognitive and health related quality of life impairments, described in active disease, are still abnormal after endocrine cure. Thus, residual morbidity persists in cured CS, suggesting irreversibility of GC-induced phenomena, typical of chronic hypercortisolism.

  13. Paraneoplastic endocrine-metabolic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grandi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The paraneoplastic syndromes (PS are characterized by the presence of biochemical alterations, signs and symptoms expressive of cancer distance action into the patient’s organism. Sometimes these syndromes can precede the evidence of malignancy even of some years or can correspond to cancer relapse. PS, even being characterized by general symptoms (fever, anorexia, cachexia, may occur with neurological, rheumathological, osteoarticular, vascular, haematological, nephrological and endocrinological/metabolic symptoms; the latter ones are discussed in this article. AIM OF THE STUDY Here we will focus on the most common PS: paraneoplastic hypercalcemia, inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH and paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Our work can be useful in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of paraneoplastic syndromes.

  14. Monitoring and risk assessment for endocrine disruptors in the aquatic environment: a biomarker approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerregaard, P.; Korsgaard, B.; Christiansen, L.B.; Pedersen, K.L.; Christensen, L.J.; Pedersen, S.N.; Horn, P. [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Biologisk Inst.

    1998-12-31

    Evidence that a number of chemicals affect wildlife populations or individuals via interaction with endocrine systems has been increasing in recent years. Not all of the mechanisms of action are fully understood, but endocrine disrupting chemicals may work at various biochemical levels, e.g. affecting the synthesis of hormones, interfering with hormone transporting proteins in the blood, affecting the metabolisation of hormones or by direct effects on cellular hormone receptors. In dogwhelks Nucella lapillus tributyltin inhibits the aromatase that converts testosterone to oestrogen thereby masculinising the females (Oehlmann et al. 1996). Metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls interfere with thyroxin transporting proteins in the blood of seals. Chemicals that induce MFO-activity may indirectly lead to altered hormone levels by increasing the metabolisation of hormones. Alkylphenols react directly with the oestrogen receptor which in turn may lead to feminisation of male organisms exposed. (orig.)

  15. Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on interactions in a tritrophic system of non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Philipp; Bucher, Roman; Schäfer, Ralf B; Entling, Martin H

    2015-08-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most used insecticides worldwide, but is highly toxic to non-target arthropods. Effects of sublethal imidacloprid intoxication can potentially propagate in food webs, yet little is known about the impact on non-target populations and communities. We investigated short-term sublethal toxicity of imidacloprid in a tritrophic model system of wild strawberry Fragaria vesca, wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris and nursery web spider Pisaura mirabilis. Strawberries were treated two times with 0mg (control), 1mg (low rate) and 10mg (high rate) of Confidor® WG 70 and crickets were allowed to feed on them. In four lab experiments, we quantified the impact of imidacloprid on leaf damage, growth, behaviour and survival of crickets. The high imidacloprid rate reduced feeding, mass gain, thorax growth and mobility in crickets compared to the control, while mortality was similarly low in all treatments. The low rate reduced mass gain only. Cricket survival of spider predation was higher in the low rate treatment than in the control. Overall, herbivory and predation were reduced at sublethal imidacloprid rates in a non-target organism, three-level food chain, which demonstrates possible propagation of sublethal effects through trophic interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of chronic sublethal effects of imidacloprid on honey bee colony health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present results of a three-year study to determine the fate of imidacloprid residues in hive matrices and to assess chronic sublethal effects on whole honey bee colonies fed supplemental pollen diet containing imidacloprid at 5, 20 and 100 µg/kg over multiple brood cycles. Various endpoints ...

  17. Effect of sublethal preculturing on the survival of probiotics and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settachaimongkon, S.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Winata, V.; Wang, X.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Smid, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of preculturing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12 under sublethal stress conditions on their survival and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt. Prior to co-cultivation with yoghurt starters in milk,

  18. Sub-lethal effects of neonicitinoids on the alfalfa leafcutter bee, Megachile rotundata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonicotinoids are commonly used pesticides in U.S. agriculture. For many beneficial insect species, lethal effects of neonicotinoids are well-documented; however, much less is known about sublethal exposure. The alfalfa leaf cutter bee Megachile rotundata is a managed pollinator that constructs com...

  19. Monitoring colony-level effects of sublethal pesticide exposure on honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of sublethal pesticide exposure to honey bee colonies may be significant but difficult to detect in the field using standard visual assessment methods. Here we describe methods to measure the quantities of adult bees, brood and food resources by weighing hives and hive parts, by photogra...

  20. Physiological stress and ethanol accumulation in tree stems and woody tissues at sublethal temperatures from fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick G. Kelsey; Douglas J. Westlind

    2017-01-01

    The lethal temperature limit is 60 degrees Celsius (°C) for plant tissues, including trees, with lower temperatures causing heat stress. As fire injury increases on tree stems, there is an accompanying rise in tissue ethanol concentrations, physiologically linked to impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation energy production. We theorize that sublethal tissue...

  1. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents...

  2. Lethal and sublethal effects of an insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, on obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-04-01

    The obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is one of the most destructive pests of tree fruit in Washington. The development of insecticide resistance in C. rosaceana has led us to explore new management tactics. The use of very low doses of insecticides that have strong sublethal effects represents an environmentally friendly option to improve existing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on growth and development of C. rosaceana. A leaf-disk bioassay was used to test seven concentrations of pyriproxyfen ranging from 0 to 30 ppm on fifth-instar C. rosaceana. Male and female larvae were assessed separately for mortality as well as other parameters of growth and development. The LC, values for males and females were 2.4 and 4.8 ppm, respectively. The response to pyriproxyfen was concentration-dependent: only 5-6% of the larvae treated with the highest concentration emerged as morphologically normal adults compared with 86% emergence in the controls. The pupation and adult emergence was significantly delayed at concentrations higher than 1 ppm. The weights of C. rosaceana pupae and adults were significantly increased, whereas fecundity and fertility were significantly reduced at a sublethal concentration of 0.3 ppm. We conclude that both lethal and sublethal effects might exhibit significant impacts on the population dynamics of C. rosaceana in tree fruit orchards treated with low concentrations of pyriproxyfen.

  3. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of a vegetable oil mill effluent on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of a vegetable oil mill effluent on growth of Clarius gariepinus. JA Adakole, E Alabi. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Fisheries Vol. 4 (2) 2007: pp. 182-189. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  4. Effects of IL-10 on systemic inflammatory responses during sublethal primate endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Jansen, P. M.; Montegut, W. J.; Braxton, C. C.; Calvano, S. E.; Stackpole, S. A.; Smith, S. R.; Swanson, S. W.; Hack, C. E.; Lowry, S. F.; Moldawer, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    IL-10 protects mice from LPS-induced lethality. To determine the effects of IL-10 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses, six Papio anubis baboons were i.v. injected with a sublethal dose of LPS (Salmonella typhimurium; 500 microg/kg) directly preceded by either human rIL-10 (n = 3, 500 microg/kg) or

  5. Sublethal Photothermal Stimulation with a Micropulse Laser Induces Heat Shock Protein Expression in ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Inagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Aim of the Study. Subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation is an effective treatment for macular edema. The molecular mechanisms underlying treatment success are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sublethal laser energy doses on a single layer of densely cultured ARPE-19 cells as a model of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Materials and Methods. A single layer of densely cultured human ARPE-19 cells was perpendicularly irradiated with a micropulse diode laser. Nonirradiated cells served as controls. Sublethal laser energy was applied to form a photocoagulation-like area in the cultured cell layers. Hsp70 expression was evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results. Photocoagulation-like areas were successfully created in cultured ARPE-19 cell layers using sublethal laser energy with our laser irradiation system. Hsp70 mRNA expression in cell layers was induced within 30 min of laser irradiation, peaking at 3 h after irradiation. This increase was dependent on the number of laser pulses. Hsp70 upregulation was not observed in untreated cell layers. Immunostaining indicated that Hsp70 expression occurred concentrically around laser irradiation sites and persisted for 24 h following irradiation. Conclusion. Sublethal photothermal stimulation with a micropulse laser may facilitate Hsp70 expression in the RPE without inducing cellular damage.

  6. Effects of sublethal concentrations of formalin on weight gain in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Catfish, Clarias gariepinus, was exposed to various sublethal concentrations (25.0, 12.50, 6.25, 3.125, 1.56 and 0.0 mgl-1) of formalin to investigate their effects on the weight gain of the fish. Decrease in weight gain, directly proportional to the toxicant concentration, was observed in fish exposed to ...

  7. Evidence for endocrine disruption in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetken, Matthias; Bachmann, Jean; Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The issue of endocrine disruption (ED) in invertebrates has generated remarkably little interest in the past compared to research with aquatic vertebrates in this area. However, with more than 95% of all known species in the animal kingdom, invertebrates constitute a very important part of the global biodiversity with key species for the structure and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Despite the fact that ED in invertebrates has been investigated on a smaller scale than in vertebrates, invertebrates provide some of the best documented examples for deleterious effects in wildlife populations following an exposure to endocrine-active substances. The article provides an overview of the diversity in endocrine systems of invertebrates. The principal susceptibility of invertebrates to endocrine-active compounds is demonstrated with the case studies of tributyltin effects in mollusks and of insect growth regulators, the latter as purposely synthesized endocrine disrupters. The additional evidence for ED in invertebrates from laboratory and field studies is summarized as an update and amendment of the EDIETA report from 1998. Finally, conclusions about the scale and implications of the observed effects are drawn and research needs are defined.

  8. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  9. Purinergic signaling pathways in endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5'-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5'-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5'-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Endocrine sequelae in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casano Sancho, Paula

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to the advances in cancer treatment, the five-year survival rate after childhood cancer has increased up to 80%. Therefore 1/500 young adults will be a survivor. Endocrine sequelae are most common, affecting 40-60% of survivors. The most frequent sequelae include growth failure and gonadal and thyroid diseases. Sequelae occur more frequently in survivors from central nervous system tumors, leukemia, and lymphoma. Their development will depend on the type of cancer, its location, age at diagnosis, and treatment administered. Treatments associated to more endocrine sequels are cranial radiotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation. Because of the high prevalence of endocrine sequelae, international guidelines recommend endocrinologists to prospectively evaluate the survivors. As some of these endocrine changes will not develop until adult life, transition programs should be implemented, and active investigation should be made to decrease the endocrine consequences of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. RFID tracking of sublethal effects of two neonicotinoid insecticides on the foraging behavior of Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof W Schneider

    Full Text Available The development of insecticides requires valid risk assessment procedures to avoid causing harm to beneficial insects and especially to pollinators such as the honeybee Apis mellifera. In addition to testing according to current guidelines designed to detect bee mortality, tests are needed to determine possible sublethal effects interfering with the animal's vitality and behavioral performance. Several methods have been used to detect sublethal effects of different insecticides under laboratory conditions using olfactory conditioning. Furthermore, studies have been conducted on the influence insecticides have on foraging activity and homing ability which require time-consuming visual observation. We tested an experimental design using the radiofrequency identification (RFID method to monitor the influence of sublethal doses of insecticides on individual honeybee foragers on an automated basis. With electronic readers positioned at the hive entrance and at an artificial food source, we obtained quantifiable data on honeybee foraging behavior. This enabled us to efficiently retrieve detailed information on flight parameters. We compared several groups of bees, fed simultaneously with different dosages of a tested substance. With this experimental approach we monitored the acute effects of sublethal doses of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid (0.15-6 ng/bee and clothianidin (0.05-2 ng/bee under field-like circumstances. At field-relevant doses for nectar and pollen no adverse effects were observed for either substance. Both substances led to a significant reduction of foraging activity and to longer foraging flights at doses of ≥0.5 ng/bee (clothianidin and ≥1.5 ng/bee (imidacloprid during the first three hours after treatment. This study demonstrates that the RFID-method is an effective way to record short-term alterations in foraging activity after insecticides have been administered once, orally, to individual bees. We contribute further

  12. Neuro-endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bech Sanderhoff, Lene; Waller, Stine P.

    The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG......) to assess the effect of chemicals in molluscs. To date no endocrine specific mollusc biomarkers have though been validated and included in draft test guidelines due to lack of knowledge of the endocrine system. Here we investigate effects of pharmaceuticals targeting serotonin and dopamine in a cost...... efficient and fast in vivo system using embryos of the freshwater pulmonate gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis (the great pond snail). It is known that serotonin and dopamine are involved in many reproductive processes in molluscs Incl. egg maturation and spawning and that pedal ciliary activity causing L...

  13. Effects of alcohol on the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2013-09-01

    Chronic consumption of a large amount of alcohol disrupts the communication between nervous, endocrine, and immune system and causes hormonal disturbances that lead to profound and serious consequences at physiologic and behavioral levels. These alcohol-induced hormonal dysregulations affect the entire body and can result in various disorders such as stress abnormalities, reproductive deficits, body growth defect, thyroid problems, immune dysfunction, cancers, bone disease, and psychological and behavioral disorders. This review summarizes the findings from human and animal studies that provide consistent evidence on the various effects of alcohol abuse on the endocrine system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption......) report is not particularly erudite and that their critique is not intended to be convincing to the scientific community, but to confuse the scientific data. Consequently, it promotes misinterpretation of the UNEP/WHO (2013) report by non-specialists, bureaucrats, politicians and other decision makers...

  15. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a r...

  16. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  17. BIOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF POLYMERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is the object of the article to review the specific hydrolytic, redox, and electron transfer reactions involving enzymes and their mechanisms...The stability of the synthetic high polymers in the biochemical environments is much higher than that of proteins in general, but the increasing use of

  18. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  19. Schedule for Rating Disabilities; the Endocrine System. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    This document amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Schedule for Rating Disabilities (VASRD) by revising the portion of the Schedule that addresses endocrine conditions and disorders of the endocrine system. The effect of this action is to ensure that the VASRD uses current medical terminology and to provide detailed and updated criteria for evaluation of endocrine disorders.

  20. Endocrine Disruptors (Chapter 14) in Mammalian Toxicology Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that alter endocrine system function(s) and consequently cause adverse health effects in intact organisms or its progeny. The endocrine system is important for a wide range of biological processes, from normal cell si...

  1. Spreeta-based biosensor for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; Meulenberg, E.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta¿-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  2. Endocrine Aspects of Environmental "Obesogen" Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Francesca; Barrea, Luigi; Di Somma, Carolina; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Orio, Francesco; Savastano, Silvia

    2016-07-28

    Growing evidence suggests the causal link between the endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and the global obesity epidemics, in the context in the so-called "obesogenic environment". Dietary intake of contaminated foods and water, especially in association with unhealthy eating pattern, and inhalation of airborne pollutants represent the major sources of human exposure to EDCs. This is of particular concern in view of the potential impact of obesity on chronic non-transmissible diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hormone-sensitive cancers. The key concept is the identification of adipose tissue not only as a preferential site of storage of EDCs, but also as an endocrine organ and, as such, susceptible to endocrine disruption. The timing of exposure to EDCs is critical to the outcome of that exposure, with early lifetime exposures (e.g., fetal or early postnatal) particularly detrimental because of their permanent effects on obesity later in life. Despite that the mechanisms operating in EDCs effects might vary enormously, this minireview is aimed to provide a general overview on the possible association between the pandemics of obesity and EDCs, briefly describing the endocrine mechanisms linking EDCs exposure and latent onset of obesity.

  3. Mechanistic evaluation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla

    BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent for the ......BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent......, and f) effect on PPAR α and γ using a transactivation assay. For the in vitro metabolism studies, ten selected EDCs: five azole fungicides, three parabens, and two phthalates, were tested in vitro in the T-screen assay to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDCs to bind to and activate...... when looking at the metabolism of the azole fungicides. The PCBinduced rat microsomes gave a statistically significant difference between the amount of parent compound before and after treatment with the microsomes for four out of the five azole fungicides tested. When using the human liver S9...

  4. Endocrine and Metabolic Aspects of OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Goswami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by repeated spells of apnea.Collapsibility of hypopharynx due to multiple factors involving pharyngeal dilatormuscles and deposition of fat or fluid in the surrounding soft tissues are importantcontributing factors in its pathogenesis. OSA commonly affects obese individuals.Males are more commonly affected than the females probably due to the disturbingeffect of testosterone on sleep.The impact of OSA on human health include disturbances in endocrine and metabolicsystem affecting hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, adrenocorticotrophic-cortisolaxis, growth hormone, antidiuretic hormones and insulin resistance. There is atendency for predisposition of the metabolic syndrome or its components includingglycemic dysregulation, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and physical parameters relatedto adiposity. On the other hand, several endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism,growth hormone excess, polycystic ovarian disease and testosterone replacement areassociated with increased prevalence of OSA.There is limited information on the effect of treatment of OSA by continuous positiveairway pressure (CPAP on the endocrine and metabolic disturbances. There is a needto conduct randomized controlled trials using CPAP therapy in patients with OSA andto study its cause and effect relationship with endocrine and metabolic disturbances.

  5. Primary endocrine-secreting pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C

    1980-04-01

    Insulinoma, glucagonoma, gastrinoma (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), vipoma, somatostatinoma and a tumor that secretes human pancreatic polypeptide are the primary endocrine-secreting tumors of the pancreas. hormones are produced by specific tumor cell types and cause a variety of dramatic clinical pictures. Diagnosis often requires hormone assays. Computerized tomography may be helpful. Definitive surgical treatment is possible, but metastases may be present.

  6. Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many chemicals have recently been demonstrated to be Endocrine-disrupting compounds and may potential interfere with normal reproductive processes. In this study, we quantified the effect of Bonnylight crude oil contaminated diet on Wister albino rats. Forty-five rats (twenty male and twenty five females) were expose to ...

  7. Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting activity of Bonny light crude oil contaminated - diet on Wistar albino rats. Olawale OTITOJU. 1* and Ikechukwu N. E. ONWURAH. 2. 1Department of Biochemistry, Kogi State University, P M B 1008 Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria. 2Dept of Biochemistry, Pollution ...

  8. CONTAMINANT-ASSOCIATED ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN REPTILES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data presented suggest that contaminants can alter the endocrine and reproductive system of reptiles by mimicking hormones and by various mechanisms other than direct hormonal mimicry. However, these data indicate, as do many other studies using various vertebrates, that a fo...

  9. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  10. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A; Chin, Marshall H; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify...

  11. Early endocrine disruptors exposure acts on 3T3-L1 differentiation and endocrine activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane Boudalia

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: This study confirms that EDs singularly or in mixtures, introduced during early stages of life, could affect the differentiation and the endocrine activity of adipocytes, and can act as potential factors for obesity.

  12. [Early endocrine complications in childhood cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez González, Cristina; Andrades Toledo, Mónica; Cárdeno Morales, Álvaro; Gutiérrez Carrasco, Ignacio; Ramírez Villar, Gema Lucía; Pérez Hurtado, José María; García García, Emilio

    2016-10-21

    The treatment of childhood cancers has increased survival rates, but also the risk of sequelae, such as endocrine complications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the endocrine disorders in survivors of childhood malignant tumors within the first years after treatment and analyze the variables related to their appearance. A retrospective medical record review of patients referred to pediatric endocrinology after treatment of malignancy. Outcome measures were frequency and types of endocrine dysfunction and new-onset obesity. Clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed every 6 months. Statistics tests were: chi square and multiple logistic regression. Fifty five patients (26 women) were included with an age at diagnosis of tumour (mean±standard deviation) 6.0±4.4 years and followed up for 6.8±3.6 years. Thirty endocrine disorders were diagnosed in 26 patients (47.3%), 17 women (P=.01). Eleven adolescents had primary hypogonadism (26.2% to 0.6±0.5 years of follow-up) in relation to local irradiation (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.99, P=.005). Eleven patients had a pituitary disorder (20.0%) 5.2±2.4 years after diagnosis in relation to brain irradiation (OR 1.54, P=.039). Six children (10.9%) had primary hypothyroidism from 3.2±1.0 years of follow-up. Two children developed obesity. Endocrine disorders are frequently seen within the first years after diagnosis of a childhood cancer, so hormonal evaluation should start early and be repeated periodically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Locomotion Inhibition of Cimex lectularius L. Following Topical, Sublethal Dose Application of the Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor Lufenuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Campbell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, few studies have evaluated chitin synthesis inhibitors against bed bugs, although they would provide an alternative mode of action to circumvent insecticide resistance. Acute and sublethal effects of lufenuron were evaluated against two strains of the common bed bug. Combined acute and sublethal effects were used to calculate effective doses. The dose that was effective against 50% of Harlan strain bed bugs was 0.0081% (w/v, and was much higher against Bradenton strain bed bugs (1.11% w/v. Sublethal doses were chosen to determine the effect that leg abnormalities had on pulling force. Both Harlan and Bradenton strain bed bugs had significantly lower locomotion ability (p < 0.0001 following topical application of lufenuron. The observed sublethal effects that limit locomotion could prevent bed bugs from moving within a domicile and taking a blood meal, subsequently reducing a bed bug population over time.

  14. [The immuno-endocrine system. A new endocrine theory: the problem of the packed transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2011-05-15

    Since the eighties of the last century hormone content was justified in immune cells (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells), which produce, store and secrete these hormones. Although the amount of these materials in immune cells is relatively small, the mass of the producers (immune cells) is so large, that the phenomenon must be considered from endocrinological point of view, underlying the important differences between the "classical" and immuno-endocrine systems. Cells of the classic (built-in) endocrine system are mono-producers, while immune cells can synthesize many types of hormones (polyproducers). In addition, these cells can transport the whole hormone-producing machinery to the site of need, producing a local effect. This can be observed, for example, in the case of endorphin producing immune cells during inflammation and during early pregnancy around the chorionic villi. Hormone producing immune cells also have receptors for many hormones, so that they are poly-receivers. Via hormone producing and receiving capacity there is a bidirectional connection between the neuro-endocrine and immuno-endocrine systems. In addition, there is a network inside the immuno-endocrine system. The packed transport theory attempts to explain the mechanism and importance of the immuno-endocrine system.

  15. Endocrine treatment of transsexual persons: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, Wylie C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A; Gooren, Louis J; Meyer, Walter J; Spack, Norman P; Tangpricha, Vin; Montori, Victor M

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for endocrine treatment of transsexual persons. This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence, which was low or very low. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society, European Society of Endocrinology, European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology, Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, and World Professional Association for Transgender Health commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Transsexual persons seeking to develop the physical characteristics of the desired gender require a safe, effective hormone regimen that will 1) suppress endogenous hormone secretion determined by the person's genetic/biologic sex and 2) maintain sex hormone levels within the normal range for the person's desired gender. A mental health professional (MHP) must recommend endocrine treatment and participate in ongoing care throughout the endocrine transition and decision for surgical sex reassignment. The endocrinologist must confirm the diagnostic criteria the MHP used to make these recommendations. Because a diagnosis of transsexualism in a prepubertal child cannot be made with certainty, we do not recommend endocrine treatment of prepubertal children. We recommend treating transsexual adolescents (Tanner stage 2) by suppressing puberty with GnRH analogues until age 16 years old, after which cross-sex hormones may be given. We suggest suppressing endogenous sex hormones, maintaining physiologic levels of gender-appropriate sex hormones and monitoring for known risks in adult transsexual persons.

  16. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  17. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Barber, Larry B; Brown, Greg K; Taylor, Howard E; Kiesling, Richard L; Ferrey, Mark L; Jahns, Nathan D; Bartell, Steve E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17β-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effects of sublethal exposure to metofluthrin on the fitness of Aedes aegypti in a domestic setting in Cairns, Queensland

    OpenAIRE

    Buhagiar, Tamara S.; Gregor J Devine; Scott A. Ritchie

    2017-01-01

    Background Metofluthrin is highly effective at reducing biting activity in Aedes aegypti. Its efficacy lies in the rapid onset of confusion, knockdown, and subsequent kill of a mosquito. In the field, there are a variety of scenarios that might result in sublethal exposure to metofluthrin, including mosquitoes that are active at the margins of the chemical?s lethal range, brief exposure as mosquitoes fly in and out of treated spaces or decreasing efficacy of the emanators with time. Sublethal...

  19. Sublethal doses of imidacloprid disrupt sexual communication and host finding in a parasitoid wasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Lars; Pokorny, Tamara; Hofferberth, John; Ruther, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides, but their use is subject of debate because of their detrimental effects on pollinators. Little is known about the effect of neonicotinoids on other beneficial insects such as parasitoid wasps, which serve as natural enemies and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. Here we show that sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impair sexual communication and host finding in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Depending on the dose, treated females were less responsive to the male sex pheromone or unable to use it as a cue at all. Courtship behaviour of treated couples was also impeded resulting in a reduction of mating rates by up to 80%. Moreover, treated females were no longer able to locate hosts by using olfactory cues. Olfaction is crucial for the reproductive success of parasitoid wasps. Hence, sublethal doses of neonicotinoids might compromise the function of parasitoid wasps as natural enemies with potentially dire consequences for ecosystem services.

  20. Both genome and cytosol dynamics change in E. coli challenged with sublethal rifampicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarski, Michal; Raciti, Bianca; Kotar, Jurij; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Fraser, Gillian M.; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    While the action of many antimicrobial drugs is well understood at the molecular level, a systems-level physiological response to antibiotics remains largely unexplored. This work considers fluctuation dynamics of both the chromosome and cytosol in Escherichia coli, and their response to sublethal treatments of a clinically important antibiotic, rifampicin. We precisely quantify the changes in dynamics of chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates (a rheovirus nonstructural protein known as μNS-GFP), measuring short time-scale displacements across several hours of drug exposure. To achieve this we develop an empirical method correcting for photo-bleaching and loci size effects. This procedure allows us to characterize the dynamic response to rifampicin in different growth conditions, including a customised microfluidic device. We find that sub-lethal doses of rifampicin cause a small but consistent increase in motility of both the chromosomal loci and cytosolic aggregates. Chromosomal and cytosolic responses are consistent with each other and between different growth conditions.

  1. Sublethal effects of spinetoram on the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zhang, Youjun; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli

    2016-09-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a serious pest of many agricultural crops and ornamental plants. The sublethal effects of a new chemical, spinetoram, on T. urticae were investigated by treating adult females and eggs with LC10 and LC20 in the laboratory. The data were assessed based on age-stage, two-sex life table analysis. The results showed that T. urticae developmental time from egg to adult was reduced and that fecundity was increased by treatment with LC10 and LC20 of spinetoram. The LC10 and LC20 of spinetoram also increased the intrinsic and finite rate of increase and the net reproductive rate and reduced the mean generation time, egg duration, and larval duration whether eggs or adult females were treated. These laboratory results suggest that sublethal or lethal doses of spinetoram may cause outbreaks of T. urticae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sublethal effect of nanosilver on the structure of gill of Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharifian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Widespread use of nanosilver can be led the contamination of aquatic environment and impact on living organisms such as fishes. We investigated histopathological changes in the gills tissue of Caspian roach fingerlings after two weeks exposure to sublethal concentrations of nanosilver. Following one and two weeks exposure, necrosis, shortening of secondary lamellae, edema, destruction of epithelial lamella, shortening of secondary lamellae, epithelial lifting and curling of secondary lamellae were observed in gill tissues. This observation showed that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of nanosilver is caused damages in the gill tissues of Caspian roach. The results demonstrated direct correlation of gill tissue damage and toxin exposure i.e. increasing nanosilver concentration is caused more tissue damage. Hence, histopathological changes of gill can considered as a proper indicator for nanosilver contamination of aquatic environments.

  3. Sublethal triclosan exposure decreases susceptibility to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G

    2011-09-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan.

  4. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G.; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G.

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan. PMID:21746948

  5. Assessment of sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on oriental fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Daniel M; Walgenbach, James F; Kennedy, George G

    2005-06-01

    Sublethal effects of the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide were examined in oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), in laboratory and field studies. In laboratory studies, oriental fruit moth larvae reared on diet amended with 0.1 ppm methoxyfenozide developed at the same rate as larvae reared on untreated diet, and paired moths reared as larvae from the same treated or untreated diets exhibited similar fecundity and fertility. Population growth differences over multiple generations were used to examine sublethal effects of methoxyfenozide on population dynamics in the field. Multiple single-tree cages were placed over apple (Malus spp.) trees treated with two applications of methoxyfenozide (70 g [AI] /ha) and nontreated trees. Cages were infested at a single time point with virgin male and female oriental fruit moth adults, and population growth was evaluated by egg counts, shoot infestation, fruit damage, and larval counts over a 12-wk period. Significantly fewer eggs, larvae, and damaged fruit were found on methoxyfenozide-treated compared with nontreated trees in 2001. Observed population differences may have been a result of direct mortality to eggs and larvae of the first generation rather than sublethal effects. In 2002, no differences were observed between treatments, but a heavy rain event shortly after the early infestation impacted the experiment. A late moth release treatment was tested in 2002 to examine the effects of residual methoxyfenozide 55 d after initial application. Significantly fewer eggs were found in the methoxyfenozide treatment compared with the control, but no differences existed among treatments in shoot infestation, percentage of damaged fruit, or larval populations. It was concluded direct mortality of eggs and larvae exposed to methoxyfenozide rather than sublethal effects were most important in reduction of subsequent generations.

  6. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper to the african catfish ( clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper on Clarias gariepinus were studied using a 96-hour static bioassay. Copper (as copper chloride, CuCl2 . H2O) was used to prepare the stock solution from which five standard concentrations 0.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, and 10.0 mg/L were prepared (coded A – E). 15 juvenile C. gariepinus fish ...

  7. Polyglandular autoimmune endocrine insufficiency complicated by severe osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassotti, G; Di Sarra, D; Pietrobono, D; Schiaffini, R; Battocletti, T; D'Amico, T; Gargiulo, P

    2006-12-01

    In literature different cases of polyglandular autoimmune type II syndrome (PGA II) are reported, where Addison's disease is associated with gonadal insufficiency. The lack in the production of sexual steroids causes a severe postmenopausal osteoporosis. The case we report is related to a 38-year-old woman we met in 1988 and who was suffering from deep asthenia, cramps, cutaneous hyperpigmentation, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss and hypotension. The biochemical data were indicative for autoimmune adrenal failure. Between 1988 and 1997 the patient developed a progressive insufficiency of other endocrine glands, leading to the classic feature of PGA II. In 1998, this clinical status was complicated by a severe osteoporosis. We thought that the sudden decrease in the bony mineral density was due to the lack of the protective role played by adrenal gland androgens in postmenopausal osteoporosis. They would directly act on the bony tissue, independently from oestrogens peripheral conversion, thus producing a stimulant effect on the bone formation. A new therapeutical approach, in case of osteoporosis, is today represented by DHEA replacement therapy in women showing low hormone levels.

  8. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Morbidity in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine condition in premenopausal women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenism, irregular menses and polycystic ovaries when other etiologies are excluded. Obesity, insulin resistance and low vitamin D levels are present in more than 50% patients with PCOS, these factors along with hyperandrogenism could have adverse effects on long-term health. Hyperinflammation and impaired epithelial function were reported to a larger extent in women with PCOS and could particularly be associated with hyperandrogenism, obesity and insulin resistance. Available data from register-based and data linkage studies support that metabolic-vascular and thyroid diseases, asthma, migraine, depression and cancer are diagnosed more frequently in PCOS, whereas fracture risk is decreased. Drug prescriptions are significantly more common in PCOS than controls within all diagnose categories including antibiotics. The causal relationship between PCOS and autoimmune disease represents an interesting new area of research. PCOS is a lifelong condition and long-term morbidity could be worsened by obesity, sedentary way of life, Western-style diet and smoking, whereas lifestyle intervention including weight loss may partly or fully resolve the symptoms of PCOS and could improve the long-term prognosis. In this review, the possible implications of increased morbidity for the clinical and biochemical evaluation of patients with PCOS at diagnosis and follow-up is further discussed along with possible modifying effects of medical treatment. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Michele; Bongianni, Matilde; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Prion disease or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are characterized by the presence of the abnormal form of the prion protein (PrPSc). The pathological and transmissible properties of PrPSc are enciphered in its secondary and tertiary structures. Since it's well established that different strains of prions are linked to different conformations of PrPSc, biochemical characterization of prions seems a preliminary but reliable approach to detect, analyze, and compare prion strains. Experimental biochemical procedures might be helpful in distinguishing PrPSc physicochemical properties and include resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion, insolubility in nonionic detergents, PK-resistance under denaturing conditions and sedimentation properties in sucrose gradients. This biochemical approach has been extensively applied in human prion disorders and subsequently expanded for PrPSc characterization in animals. In particular, in sporadic Creutzfedlt-Jakob disease (sCJD) PrPSc is characterized by two main glycotypes conventionally named Type 1 and Type 2, based on the apparent gel migration at 21 and 19kDa of the PrPSc PK-resistant fragment. An additional PrPSc type was identified in sCJD characterized by an unglycosylated dominant glycoform pattern and in 2010 a variably protease-sensitive prionopathy (VPSPr) was reported showing a PrPSc with an electrophoretic ladder like pattern. Additionally, the presence of PrPSc truncated fragments completes the electrophoretic characterization of different prion strains. By two-dimensional (2D) electrophoretic analysis additional PrPSc pattern was identified, since this procedure provides information about the isoelectric point and the different peptides length related to PK cleavage, as well as to glycosylation extent or GPI anchor presence. We here provide and extensive review on PrPSc biochemical analysis in human and animal prion disorders. Further, we show that PrPSc glycotypes observed in CJD share similarities with

  10. Sublethal dose of phoxim and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus interact to elevate silkworm mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, ZhiYa; Li, FanChi; Hu, JingSheng; Ding, Chao; Wang, Chaoqian; Tian, JiangHai; Xue, Bin; Xu, KaiZun; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically important insect. It is relatively less resistant to certain chemicals and environment exposures such as pesticides and pathogens. After pesticide exposures, the silkworms are more susceptible to microbial infections. The mechanism underlying the susceptibility might be related to immune response and oxidative stress. A sublethal dose of phoxim combined with Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) elevated the silkworm mortality at 96 h. We found a higher content of H2 O2 and increased levels of genes related to oxidative stress and immune response after treatment with a sublethal dose of phoxim for 24 h or 48 h. However, such response decreased with longer pesticide treatment. Mortality increased by 44% when B. mori was exposed to combined treatment with BmNPV and phoxim rather than BmNPV alone. The level of examined immune-related and oxidative-stress-related genes significantly decreased in the combined treatment group compared with the BmNPV group. Our results indicated that, with long-term exposure to pesticides such as OPs, even at sublethal dose, the oxidative stress response and immune responses in silkworm were inhibited, which may lead to further immune impairment and accumulation of oxidative stress, resulting in susceptibility to the virus and harm to the silkworm. Our study provided insights for understanding the susceptibility to pathogen after pesticide exposures, which may promote the development of better pesticide controls to avoid significant economic losses. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Acute toxicity and sublethal effects of fipronil on detoxification enzymes in juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haihua; Gao, Cuie; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Ma, Enbo

    2014-10-01

    The acute toxicity of fipronil and its sublethal effects on detoxification enzymes (carboxylesterases (CarEs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD)) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated. The results indicated that the 24-h LC50 of fipronil for zebrafish was 220.4 μg/L (95% CI: 173.7-272.4 μg/L). Sublethal concentrations of fipronil did not cause significant changes in CarEs activities. In the liver and muscle tissues, GST activities at the tested concentrations did not significantly differ from those in the control. In the brain and gill tissues, GST activities at a concentration of 4 μg/L were significantly lower than those at a concentration of 2 μg/L. The results suggest that CarEs and GSTs were not suitable biomarkers for fipronil effects in D. rerio. A significant induction in the ECOD activities in the brain, gill, liver, and muscle tissues was observed compared with the control. Moreover, the dose-dependent responses of the ECOD activity were observed after treatment with sublethal concentrations of fipronil in the range of 2-20 μg/L. The results suggested that ECOD could be a suitable biomarker of fipronil effects in D. rerio. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Fumigant Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Artemisia khorassanica and Artemisia sieberi on Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, B; Abedi, Z; Abdolmaleki, A; Jafary-Jahed, M; Borzoui, E; Mozaffar Mansouri, Seyed

    2017-09-01

    Fumigant toxicity and sublethal effects of essential oils from Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Artemisia sieberi Bess were investigated against adults of Sitotroga cerealella Olivier. To assess the sublethal effects, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters of the surviving S. cerealella were studied. Higher fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 7.38 µl/liter air) than A. sieberi (LC50: 9.26 µl/liter air) was observed against S. cerealella. Also, the insecticidal effects of A. khorassanica (LT50: 9.01 h) were faster than A. sieberi (LT50: 14.37 h). A significant extension was observed in the developmental time (egg to adult) of S. cerealella treated with the essential oils. In addition, fecundity of S. cerealella reduced by 25.29 and 35.78% following exposure to sublethal concentrations of A. sieberi and A. khorassanica, respectively. Both tested essential oils caused a significant reduction in the gross and net reproductive rates, intrinsic rate of increase (rm), and finite rate of increase of S. cerealella. The rm values following exposure to A. sieberi, A. khorassanica, and control were 0.098, 0.094, and 0.107 d-1, respectively. The results of this study suggest that tested essential oils have a good potential to apply in integrated pest management of S. cerealella. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  13. Fumigant Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Artemisia khorassanica and Artemisia sieberi on Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Z; Abdolmaleki, A; Jafary-Jahed, M; Borzoui, E; Mozaffar Mansouri, Seyed

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fumigant toxicity and sublethal effects of essential oils from Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Artemisia sieberi Bess were investigated against adults of Sitotroga cerealella Olivier. To assess the sublethal effects, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters of the surviving S. cerealella were studied. Higher fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 7.38 µl/liter air) than A. sieberi (LC50: 9.26 µl/liter air) was observed against S. cerealella. Also, the insecticidal effects of A. khorassanica (LT50: 9.01 h) were faster than A. sieberi (LT50: 14.37 h). A significant extension was observed in the developmental time (egg to adult) of S. cerealella treated with the essential oils. In addition, fecundity of S. cerealella reduced by 25.29 and 35.78% following exposure to sublethal concentrations of A. sieberi and A. khorassanica, respectively. Both tested essential oils caused a significant reduction in the gross and net reproductive rates, intrinsic rate of increase (rm), and finite rate of increase of S. cerealella. The rm values following exposure to A. sieberi, A. khorassanica, and control were 0.098, 0.094, and 0.107 d−1, respectively. The results of this study suggest that tested essential oils have a good potential to apply in integrated pest management of S. cerealella. PMID:29117375

  14. Effect of non-homogenous thermal stress during sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadura, N.; Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Pathogens could be inactivated via a light source coupled with a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). This project studied the effect of non-homogenous substrate on cell colony. The non-homogeneity could be controlled by iron oxide nano-particles doping in porous glassy substrates such that each cell would experience tens of hot spots when illuminated with additional light source. The substrate non-homogeneity was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source. Microscopy images of cell motion were used to study the motility. Laboratory cell colonies on non-homogenous substrates exhibit reduced motility similar to those observed with sub-lethal PCAT treatment. Such motility reduction on non-homogenous substrate is interpreted as the presence of thermal stress. The studied pathogens included E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Non-pathogenic microbes Bacillus subtilis was also studied for comparison. The results show that sub-lethal PACT could be effective with additional non-homogenous thermal stress. The use of non-uniform illumination on a homogeneous substrate to create thermal stress in sub-micron length scale is discussed via light correlation in propagation through random medium. Extension to sub-lethal PACT application complemented with thermal stress would be an appropriate application.

  15. Sublethal effects of some botanical and chemical insecticides on the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae

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    Fatemeh Jafarbeigi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortalities caused by acute concentrations of insecticides, some biological traits of target pests may be also affected by sublethal doses. The cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae is an important pest of a wide variety of agricultural crops across the world. The control of B. tabaci largely relies on wide application of chemical insecticides. In this study, we analyzed the life table parameters to evaluate the sublethal effect of three plant-derived insecticides (Fumaria parviflora (Fumariaceae, Teucrium polium (Lamiaceae, and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae and two chemical insecticides (pymetrozin and neemarin on B. tabaci. The whiteflies were allowed to oviposit on plants infected with each of the five insecticides using leaf-dip method. The data were analyzed using the age-stage two-sex life table. We found significant differences in the gross reproductive rate (GRR, the net reproductive rat (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r and the finite rate of increase (λ of treated whiteflies compared to control. Our results showed that some biological traits of B. tabaci are affected by sub-lethal doses of the plant-derived extracts and that these effects are comparable to those of chemical insecticides. Given the detrimental effects of chemical insecticides on human, environment and non-target organisms, plant-derived insecticides may provide valuable environmentally friendly tools for pest management programs.

  16. Genetic regulation of allolysis in response to sub-lethal antibiotic stress in Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    MANISHA DASH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dash M, Dash HR, Das S. 2014. Genetic regulation of allolysis in response to sub-lethal antibiotic stress in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 111-117. Allolysis is the phenomenon of cell lysis induced by other cells of the same species. Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen exhibits competence induced allolysis that increases the genetic recombination and enhances the virulence. During allolysis, a group of non-competent bacterial cells are lysed by another group of competent cells in the same culture. This process is regulated by com operon as well as bacteriocin. In this study, allolysis was induced in Streptococcus pneumoniae MTCC655 by sub-lethal dose of antibiotic (chloramphenicol and the mechanism of allolysis has been deduced by amplification of lytA, lytC and cbpD genes in the bacterium. The strain was found to be resistant to a number of antibiotics including amoxicillin, cefpodoxime, erythromycin and vancomycin. The early onset of allolysis induction from 7-9 h under normal conditions to 2-3 h by sub-lethal dose of chloramphenicol was observed.

  17. Assessing for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 in Patients Evaluated for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome-Clues to a Safer Diagnostic Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Donegan, Diane; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Al-Hilli, Zahraa; Young, William F

    2017-05-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare cause of tumoral hypergastrinemia; 1 of 5 patients with this syndrome also has multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The diagnosis of this disease is complicated by the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors that can elevate serum gastrin levels, the cornerstone for biochemical diagnosis. Abrupt discontinuation of proton pump inhibitors could lead to adverse outcomes. Clinician awareness of the relationship between Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 could lead to a safer diagnostic pathway. We conducted a retrospective review of a cohort of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. There were 287 patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (73 with gastrinoma) evaluated between 1997 and 2014. Two patients experienced adverse events after proton pump inhibitor therapy was discontinued to re-measure serum gastrin level during the evaluation of severe peptic ulcer disease. In both cases, the diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was made after proton pump therapy was discontinued. Abrupt discontinuation of proton pump therapy can lead to adverse outcomes in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Clinical assessment for features of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (eg, serum calcium levels, personal and family history of hypercalcemia, pituitary or pancreatic tumors) could identify patients with higher risk for a tumoral source of hypergastrinemia where imaging studies can help support the diagnosis without the potential side effects of abrupt discontinuation of proton pump inhibitor therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-02-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the "unfolded protein response" (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article.

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER Stress and Endocrine Disorders

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    Daisuke Ariyasu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR, which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI, Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2 are discussed in this article.

  1. Paraoxonase 1 Activity in Endocrine Diseases

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    Özlem Tarçın

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Paraoxonase is an esterase bound to high-density lipoproteins which by metabolizing lipid peroxides, prevents their accumulation on low-density lipoproteins. It also hydrolyzes various organophosphorus compounds. Considering the role of PON1 in hydrolyzing phospholipid and cholesteryl-ester hydroperoxides and thus protecting lipoproteins against oxidative modification, it can be concluded that PON1 may be an indicator of the risk of atherosclerosis/coronary artery disease development. Recent studies have also shown that PON activity was related to several disorders, including endocrine disorders as well. In this paper, we review the relation of PON1 activity with endocrine diseases like diabetes, thyroid dysfunction, osteoporosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, obesity and dyslipidemia. Turk Jem 2011; 15: 33-8

  2. Predicting chemical impacts on vertebrate endocrine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, John W; Breen, Miyuki; Denver, Robert J; Distefano, Joseph J; Edwards, Jeremy S; Hoke, Robert A; Volz, David C; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    Animals have evolved diverse protective mechanisms for responding to toxic chemicals of both natural and anthropogenic origin. From a governmental regulatory perspective, these protective responses complicate efforts to establish acceptable levels of chemical exposure. To explore this issue, we considered vertebrate endocrine systems as potential targets for environmental contaminants. Using the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as case examples, we identified features of these systems that allow them to accommodate and recover from chemical insults. In doing so, a distinction was made between effects on adults and those on developing organisms. This distinction was required because endocrine system disruption in early life stages may alter development of organs and organ systems, resulting in permanent changes in phenotypic expression later in life. Risk assessments of chemicals that impact highly regulated systems must consider the dynamics of these systems in relation to complex environmental exposures. A largely unanswered question is whether successful accommodation to a toxic insult exerts a fitness cost on individual animals, resulting in adverse consequences for populations. Mechanistically based mathematical models of endocrine systems provide a means for better understanding accommodation and recovery. In the short term, these models can be used to design experiments and interpret study findings. Over the long term, a set of validated models could be used to extrapolate limited in vitro and in vivo testing data to a broader range of untested chemicals, species, and exposure scenarios. With appropriate modification, Tier 2 assays developed in support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program could be used to assess the potential for accommodation and recovery and inform the development of mechanistically based models. © 2010

  3. Essential Medicines for Children: An Endocrine Perspective

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    Sanjay Kalra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of endocrine disease has created significant challenges for healthcare policy-makers and payers across the world. Policy-makers have to ensure availability of drugs used for various endocrinopathies. One way in which this is facilitated is through the World Health Organization (WHO List of Essential Medicines (LEM. The LEM aims to cover the basic pharmaceutical needs of the majority of people seeking healthcare (1.

  4. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

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    Rohit Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18-70 years, any duration in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40 and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20 and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4, sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3, growth hormone (GH deficiency (n = 2, primary hypogonadism (n = 2 and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006. Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study.

  5. Frequency of other endocrine disorders in hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Bjekić-Macut, Jelica; Trbojević, Božo

    2012-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a condition of reduced production, distribution, or absence of action of thyroid hormones. Clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism is not easily established due to the nonspecific clinical manifestations. Determination of serum TSH is the first-line test for the diagnosis of hypothyroidism. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of other endocrine disorders in patients with subclinical (TSH levels between 5 and 10 mIU/l), or clinical (TSH above 10 mIU/l) hypothyrodi...

  6. Endocrine tumors associated with the vagusnerve

    OpenAIRE

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Kebebew, Electron; Sebag, Fréderic; Wolf, Katherine; Henry, Jean-François; Pacak, Karel; Taïeb, David

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) is the main nerve of the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system. Vagal paragangliomas (VPGLs) are a prime example of an endocrine tumor associated with the vagus nerve. This rare, neural-crest tumor constitutes the second most common site of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs), most often in relation to mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene. The treatment paradigm for VPGL has progressively shifted from ...

  7. The endocrine function of adipose tissue

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    Wagner de Jesus Pinto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is considered the adipose tissue as a dynamic structure involved in many physiological and metabolic processes, produces and releases a variety of active peptides known by the generic name of adipokines that act performing endocrine, paracrine and autocrine. Furthermore, numbers expressed receptors that respond allows the afferent signals from endocrine organs, and also central nervous system. In 1987, the adipose tissue has been identified as the major site of metabolism of steroid hormones, thereafter, in 1994, it was recognized as an endocrine organ and the leptin being an early secretory products identified. In addition other biologically active substances were being isolated, such as adiponectin, resistin, TNF-a, interleukin-6 and others. The adipokines derived from adipose tissue modulate many metabolic parameters such as control of food intake, energy balance and peripheral insulin sensitivity, for example. Thus, the altered secretion of adipokines by adipose tissue may have metabolic effects may present complex relations with the pathophysiological process of obesity, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, atherosclerosis and Diabetes mellitus. The understanding of the molecular processes occurring in the adipocytes may provide new tools for the treatment of pathophysiological conditions such as, for example, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Relationship between Sublethal Injury and Inactivation of Yeast Cells by the Combination of Sorbic Acid and Pulsed Electric Fields▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M.; García, D.; Condón, S.; Mañas, P.; Pagán, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sublethal injury after the pulsed-electric-field (PEF) treatment of two yeasts, Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the relation of sublethal injury to the inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid. PEF caused sublethal injury in both yeasts: more than 90% of surviving D. bruxellensis cells and 99% of surviving S. cerevisiae cells were sublethally injured after 50 pulses at 12 kV/cm in buffer at pHs of both 7.0 and 4.0. The proportion of sublethally injured cells reached a maximum after 50 pulses at 12.0 kV/cm (S. cerevisiae) or 16.5 kV/cm (D. bruxellensis), and it kept constant or progressively decreased at greater electric field strengths and with longer PEF treatments. Sublethally PEF-injured cells showed sensitivity to the presence of sorbic acid at a concentration of 2,000 ppm. A synergistic inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid was observed. Survivors of the PEF treatment were progressively inactivated in the presence of 2,000 ppm of sorbic acid at pH 3.8, with the combined treatments achieving more than log10 5 cycles of dead cells under the conditions investigated. This study has demonstrated the occurrence of sublethal injury after exposure to PEF, so yeast inactivation by PEF is not an all-or-nothing event. The combination of PEF and sorbic acid has proven to be an effective method to achieve a higher level of yeast inactivation. This work contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF, and it may be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology. PMID:17468278

  9. Relationship between sublethal injury and inactivation of yeast cells by the combination of sorbic acid and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Condón, S; Mañas, P; Pagán, R

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of sublethal injury after the pulsed-electric-field (PEF) treatment of two yeasts, Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the relation of sublethal injury to the inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid. PEF caused sublethal injury in both yeasts: more than 90% of surviving D. bruxellensis cells and 99% of surviving S. cerevisiae cells were sublethally injured after 50 pulses at 12 kV/cm in buffer at pHs of both 7.0 and 4.0. The proportion of sublethally injured cells reached a maximum after 50 pulses at 12.0 kV/cm (S. cerevisiae) or 16.5 kV/cm (D. bruxellensis), and it kept constant or progressively decreased at greater electric field strengths and with longer PEF treatments. Sublethally PEF-injured cells showed sensitivity to the presence of sorbic acid at a concentration of 2,000 ppm. A synergistic inactivating effect of the combination of PEF and sorbic acid was observed. Survivors of the PEF treatment were progressively inactivated in the presence of 2,000 ppm of sorbic acid at pH 3.8, with the combined treatments achieving more than log10 5 cycles of dead cells under the conditions investigated. This study has demonstrated the occurrence of sublethal injury after exposure to PEF, so yeast inactivation by PEF is not an all-or-nothing event. The combination of PEF and sorbic acid has proven to be an effective method to achieve a higher level of yeast inactivation. This work contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF, and it may be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology.

  10. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional and body composition abnormalities are common in advanced intensively-treated (transplanted) multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, D M; Boland, E; Ezaydi, Y; Ross, R J M; Ahmedzai, S H; Snowden, J A

    2014-07-01

    Modern treatment strategies have increased life expectancy in multiple myeloma, but little is known about the endocrine, metabolic and nutritional status of long-term survivors. We performed endocrine, metabolic, bone, body composition and nutritional evaluations in 32 patients with intensively-treated, advanced but stable, myeloma a median duration of 6 years from diagnosis and three lines of intensive treatment, including at least one haematopoietic SCT procedure. All patients were off active treatment. There was a high prevalence of endocrine dysfunction: hypothyroidism (9%), hypogonadism (65% males) and elevated prolactin (19%). Adrenocortical function was preserved despite large cumulative corticosteroid pretreatment. Biochemical markers were consistent with postmenopausal status in all females and infertility in males. Nutritionally, 59% were vitamin D insufficient/deficient, reduced serum folate in 25% and vitamin B12 in 6%. Total body DEXA scanning confirmed 'sarcopenic-obesity' in 65%, but reduced bone density was seen in a minority. We conclude that potentially correctable endocrine, metabolic and nutritional abnormalities are prevalent in heavily-treated patients with stable multiple myeloma. Preservation of bone supports the efficacy of bisphosphonate treatment from diagnosis, but sarcopenic-obesity may contribute to frailty. Ultimately, multi-system screening and appropriate interventions may optimise quality of long-term survival and further studies are warranted.

  11. Persistent Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deierlein, Andrea L; Rock, Sarah; Park, Sally

    2017-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prominent chronic liver disease in Western countries, affecting approximately 25% of the population worldwide. Sex-specific differences in the development of NAFLD are apparent. While obesity and insulin resistance are major contributors to the increasing prevalence of NAFLD, a growing body of literature suggests that exposure to persistent endocrine-disrupting chemicals (pEDCs) may also play a role. This review summarizes recent (2011 and later) scientific literature investigating exposures to pEDCs, specifically persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and NAFLD, with a focus on sex-specific associations. The overwhelming majority of studies were conducted in single-sex animal models and provide biological evidence that exposures to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin polychlorinated biphenyls, and other POPs or POP mixtures are negatively associated with liver health. There were four cross-sectional epidemiological studies in humans that reported associations for several POPs, including polychlorinated biphenyls and perfluorinated chemicals, with elevated liver enzymes. Only one of these studies, using a sample of gastric bypass surgery patients, examined sex-specific associations of POPs and liver enzymes, finding adverse associations among women only. The noticeable lack of studies investigating how differences (i.e., biochemical, physiological, and behavioral) between men and women may influence associations of pEDCs and NAFLD represents a large research gap in environmental health. Sexual dimorphism in metabolic processes throughout the body, including the liver, is established but often overlooked in the designs and analyses of studies. Other factors identified in this review that may also act to modulate associations of environmental chemicals and NAFLD are reproductive status and dietary nutrient intakes, which also remain understudied in the literature. Despite knowledge of sexual dimorphism in the

  12. Biochemical Hypermedia: Galactose Metabolism.

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    J.K. Sugai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animations of biochemical processes and virtual laboratory environments lead to true molecular simulations. The use of interactive software’s in education can improve cognitive capacity, better learning and, mainly, it makes information acquisition easier. Material and Methods: This work presents the development of a biochemical hypermedia to understanding of the galactose metabolism. It was developed with the help of concept maps, ISIS Draw, ADOBE Photoshop and FLASH MX Program. Results and Discussion: A step by step animation process shows the enzymatic reactions of galactose conversion to glucose-1-phosphate (to glycogen synthesis, glucose-6-phosphate (glycolysis intermediary, UDP-galactose (substrate to mucopolysaccharides synthesis and collagen’s glycosylation. There are navigation guide that allow scrolling the mouse over the names of the components of enzymatic reactions of via the metabolism of galactose. Thus, explanatory text box, chemical structures and animation of the actions of enzymes appear to navigator. Upon completion of the module, the user’s response to the proposed exercise can be checked immediately through text box with interactive content of the answer. Conclusion: This hypermedia was presented for undergraduate students (UFSC who revealed that it was extremely effective in promoting the understanding of the theme.

  13. Evaluating the stress response as a bioindicator of sub-lethal effects of crude oil exposure in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Ngai, Heather M; Romero, L Michael

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum can disrupt endocrine function in humans and wildlife, and interacts in particularly complex ways with the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, responsible for the release of the stress hormones corticosterone and cortisol (hereafter CORT). Ingested petroleum can act in an additive fashion with other stressors to cause increased mortality, but it is not clear exactly why--does petroleum disrupt feedback mechanisms, stress hormone production, or both? This laboratory study aimed to quantify the effects of ingested Gulf of Mexico crude oil on the physiological stress response of house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We examined baseline and stress-induced CORT, negative feedback, and adrenal sensitivity in house sparrows given a 1% oil or control diet (n = 12 in each group). We found that four weeks on a 1% oil diet did not alter baseline CORT titers or efficacy of negative feedback, but significantly reduced sparrows' ability to secrete CORT in response to a standardized stressor and adrenocorticotropin hormone injection, suggesting that oil damages the steroid-synthesizing cells of the adrenal. In another group of animals on the same 1% oil (n = 9) or control diets (n = 8), we examined concentrations of eight different blood chemistry parameters, and CORT in feathers grown before and during the feeding experiments as other potential biomarkers of oil exposure. None of the blood chemistry parameters differed between birds on the oil and control diets after two or four weeks of feeding, nor did feather CORT differ between the two groups. Overall, this study suggests that the response of CORT to stressors, but not baseline HPA function, may be a particularly sensitive bioindicator of sub-lethal chronic effects of crude oil exposure.

  14. Evaluating the stress response as a bioindicator of sub-lethal effects of crude oil exposure in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine R Lattin

    Full Text Available Petroleum can disrupt endocrine function in humans and wildlife, and interacts in particularly complex ways with the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, responsible for the release of the stress hormones corticosterone and cortisol (hereafter CORT. Ingested petroleum can act in an additive fashion with other stressors to cause increased mortality, but it is not clear exactly why--does petroleum disrupt feedback mechanisms, stress hormone production, or both? This laboratory study aimed to quantify the effects of ingested Gulf of Mexico crude oil on the physiological stress response of house sparrows (Passer domesticus. We examined baseline and stress-induced CORT, negative feedback, and adrenal sensitivity in house sparrows given a 1% oil or control diet (n = 12 in each group. We found that four weeks on a 1% oil diet did not alter baseline CORT titers or efficacy of negative feedback, but significantly reduced sparrows' ability to secrete CORT in response to a standardized stressor and adrenocorticotropin hormone injection, suggesting that oil damages the steroid-synthesizing cells of the adrenal. In another group of animals on the same 1% oil (n = 9 or control diets (n = 8, we examined concentrations of eight different blood chemistry parameters, and CORT in feathers grown before and during the feeding experiments as other potential biomarkers of oil exposure. None of the blood chemistry parameters differed between birds on the oil and control diets after two or four weeks of feeding, nor did feather CORT differ between the two groups. Overall, this study suggests that the response of CORT to stressors, but not baseline HPA function, may be a particularly sensitive bioindicator of sub-lethal chronic effects of crude oil exposure.

  15. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Contents The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors. PMID:26382024

  16. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  17. Contact irritant responses of Aedes aegypti Using sublethal concentration and focal application of pyrethroid chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortance Manda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated contact irritant and spatial repellent behaviors in Aedes aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentrations of chemicals. These sublethal actions are currently being evaluated in the development of a push-pull strategy for Ae. aegypti control. This study reports on mosquito escape responses after exposure to candidate chemicals for a contact irritant focused push-pull strategy using varying concentrations and focal application. METHODS: Contact irritancy (escape behavior, knockdown and 24 hour mortality rates were quantified in populations of female Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions and validated in the field (Thailand and Peru using experimental huts. Evaluations were conducted using varying concentrations and treatment surface area coverage (SAC of three pyrethroid insecticides: alphacypermethrin, lambacyhalothrin and deltamethrin. RESULTS: Under laboratory conditions, exposure of Ae. aegypti to alphacypermethrin using the standard field application rate (FAR resulted in escape responses at 25% and 50% SAC that were comparable with escape responses at 100% SAC. Significant escape responses were also observed at <100% SAC using ½FAR of all test compounds. In most trials, KD and 24 hour mortality rates were higher in mosquitoes that did not escape than in those that escaped. In Thailand, field validation studies indicated an early time of exit (by four hours and 40% increase in escape using ½FAR of alphacypermethrin at 75% SAC compared to a matched chemical-free control. In Peru, however, the maximum increase in Ae. aegypti escape from alphacypermethrin-treated huts was 11%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results presented here suggest a potential role for sublethal and focal application of contact irritant chemicals in an Ae. aegypti push-pull strategy to reduce human-vector contact inside treated homes. However, the impact of an increase in escape response on dengue virus transmission is

  18. Identification of sublethal toxicants in a BC coastal pulp and paper mill effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickhoff, C.V.; Pickard, J.; Kinnee, K. [BC Research Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dwernychuk, W. [Hatfield Consultants Ltd., West Vancouver, BC (Canada); Birkholz, D. [EnviroTest Lab., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kilback, D. [Pacifica Papers, Powell River, BC (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    BC Research Inc. conducted a toxicity identification evaluation to identify the different compounds comprised in the mill Outfall number 1 effluent. The Environmental Effects Monitoring program had determined that these compounds were responsible for sublethal effects to organisms. Echinoderm species like the sand dollar, Dendraster excentricus Eshscholtz, the purple sea urchin, Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus Stimpson, and the marine algae, Champia parvula had suffered toxicity caused by the mill effluent. The last several Environmental Effects Monitoring testing periods had shown the sublethal toxicity of the Outfall number 1 effluent to echinoderms was very consistent. Based on the high cost and shipping associated with the Champia bioassays, toxicity tests conducted during the peak spawning season of the sea urchin and the non significant difference between the sensitivity of the sand dollar and the purple sea urchin, the purple sea urchin was selected to evaluate the toxicity of the manipulated samples for the tests. The tests conducted were: a baseline toxicity test performed immediately upon receipt of the effluent sample, the pH adjustment filtration test to determine if the toxic compound can be removed using filtration, the pH adjustment aeration test to determine if volatile compounds in the sample are toxic, the pH adjustment solid phase extraction test to determine the level of toxicity from organic compounds and metal chelates that can be removed by solid phase extraction. The results indicated that it seems high molecular weight molecules were responsible for the sublethal toxicity observed. Two different sources could be responsible: lignin derived macromolecules, and polymer compounds used as flocculants and sizing agents. Further testing of the pulp mill effluent to identify the source of the toxic high molecular weight compounds was recommended. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Manure source and age affect survival of zoonotic pathogens during aerobic composting at sublethal temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Smith, Chris; Jiang, Xiuping; Flitcroft, Ian D; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Heat is the primary mechanism by which aerobic composting inactivates zoonotic bacterial pathogens residing within animal manures, but at sublethal temperatures, the time necessary to hold the compost materials to ensure pathogen inactivation is uncertain. To determine the influence of the type of nitrogen amendment on inactivation of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in compost mixtures stored at sublethal temperatures, specific variables investigated in these studies included the animal source of the manure, the initial carbon/nitrogen (C:N) ratio of the compost mixture, and the age of the manure. Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were both inactivated more rapidly in chicken and swine compost mixtures stored at 20°C when formulated to an initial C:N ratio of 20:1 compared with 40:1, whereas a C:N ratio did not have an effect on inactivation of these pathogens in cow compost mixtures. Pathogen inactivation was related to the elevated pH of the samples that likely arises from ammonia produced by the indigenous microflora in the compost mixtures. Indigenous microbial activity was reduced when compost mixtures were stored at 30°C and drier conditions (compost mixtures prepared with aged chicken litter compared with fresh chicken litter, whereas E. coli O157:H7 survived to similar extents in compost mixtures prepared with either fresh or aged cow manure. The different responses observed when different sources of manure were used in compost mixtures reveal that guidelines with times required for pathogen inactivation in compost mixtures stored at sublethal temperatures should be dependent on the source of nitrogen, i.e., type of animal manure, present.

  20. Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Cantharidin on Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasoob, Hassan; Ali Khan, Hafiz Azhar; Zhang, Yalin

    2017-09-27

    The house fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), is a major pest of medical and veterinary importance all over the world. Management efforts for house flies are usually compromised owing to their resistance to many groups of conventional insecticides. Cantharidin, a natural toxin produced by meloid beetles, is a biopesticide with a reported toxicity to some insect pests including house flies. However, the effects of cantharidin on biological and fitness parameters of house flies have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we investigated the toxicity and sublethal effects of cantharidin on biological parameters of house flies for two consecutive generations. The results revealed that the values of LC50, LC25, LC10, and LC2 against house flies were to be 2.45, 1.23, 0.66, and 0.30 mg/liter, respectively. Sublethal effects of these concentrations on the development and reproduction parameters of house flies revealed that cantharidin reduced population growth by affecting pupation rate, adult emergence, and by lengthening developmental time. The female ratio, fecundity, egg hatching, and survival of adult flies were significantly reduced at LC2, LC10, LC25, and LC50 of cantharidin when compared with the control group. Furthermore, the increase in concentration of cantharidin had a significant effect on reducing the mean values of mean relative growth rate, net reproductive rate (Ro), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm), and biotic potential (bp). In conclusion, the results of this study revealed the toxicity of cantharidin against house flies and the adverse effects of sublethal concentrations on biological parameters which may have positive implications for effective management of house flies. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Sublethal effects on wood frogs chronically exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of two neonicotinoid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacey A; Richardson, Sarah D; Dalton, Rebecca L; Maisonneuve, France; Trudeau, Vance L; Pauli, Bruce D; Lee-Jenkins, Stacey S Y

    2017-04-01

    Neonicotinoids are prophylactically used globally on a variety of crops, and there is concern for the potential impacts of neonicotinoids on aquatic ecosystems. The intensive use of pesticides on crops has been identified as a contributor to population declines of amphibians, but currently little is known regarding the sublethal effects of chronic neonicotinoid exposure on amphibians. The objective of the present study was to characterize the sublethal effect(s) of exposure to 3 environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg/L, 10 μg/L, and 100 μg/L) of 2 neonicotinoids on larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) using outdoor mesocosms. We exposed tadpoles to solutions of 2 commercial formulations containing imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, and assessed survival, growth, and development. Exposure to imidacloprid at 10 μg/L and 100 μg/L increased survival and delayed completion of metamorphosis compared with controls. Exposure to thiamethoxam did not influence amphibian responses. There was no significant effect of any treatment on body mass or size of the metamorphs. The results suggest that current usage of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam does not pose a threat to wood frogs. However, further assessment of both direct and indirect effects on subtle sublethal endpoints, and the influence of multiple interacting stressors at various life stages, is needed to fully understand the effects of neonicotinoids on amphibians. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1101-1109. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  2. Busulfan administration produces sublethal effects on somatic tissues and inhibits gametogenesis in Senegalese sole juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarini, T; Olague, E; Sarasquete, C; Cabrita, E

    2014-05-01

    Busulfan, a cytotoxic alkylating agent used for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia has effects in mammalian germ cells. In fish species, the use of this compound is of special interest in intra and interspecies germ cell transplants. To determine the effects of busulfan in fish a previous range finding experiment was designed. Survival and growth rate of 150-days after hatching (150DAH) Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) juveniles was determined. In a second experiment, the effects of a sublethal busulfan dose in fish germ cell depletion and in somatic tissues were analysed. Sublethal effects of several busulfan treatments (B10-10 days after injection, B20-20 days after injection, B20÷-20 days after injection with double injection) were determined in somatic and gonadal tissues. Alterations were registered through histopathological techniques, TUNEL (cell apoptosis) and quantified at molecular level (Q-PCR analyses) using the vasa mRNAs (Ssvasa1-2 and Ssvasa3-4 mRNAs) as molecular markers for germinal cells in Senegalese sole juveniles. Several sublethal effects were observed with 40 mg kg⁻¹ busulfan, a non-lethal dose, such as: pyknosis in liver, increase of melanomacrophage centres and blood stagnation in spleen and interruption of gonadal development. Females were more affected by busulfan treatments than males in terms of germ cell disruption, since a significant decrease in the expression of both Ssvasa1-2 and Ssvasa3-4 markers was found in the gonad of treated females rather than males. At 10 days post-treatment (B10), females already presented a decrease in germ cell proliferation, as confirmed by Q-PCR. Ssvasa expression proved to be a reliable tool for the direct evaluation of the effects of busulfan on Senegalese sole gonadal development, proving that busulfan can be a suitable treatment for causing transient sterility in recipient gonads for germ cell transplantation.

  3. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    STOCHASTIC MODELING OF BIOCHEMICAL REACTIONS Abhyudai Singh and João Pedro Hespanha* Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of...procedure for con- structing approximate stochastic models for chemical reactions used for modeling biochemical processes such as gene regulatory networks... biochemical reactions , the modeling tools developed in this paper can be applied to a very general class of stochastic systems, in particular

  4. Acute and sublethal toxicity of seepage waters from garbage dumps to permanent cell lines and primary cultures of hepatocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): a novel approach to environmental risk assessment for chemicals and chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, T; Hauck, C; Holzschuh, J; Braunbeck, T

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the suitability of cytopathological criteria in isolated fish hepatocytes as endpoints in (eco)toxicological research, liver cells isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by collagenase perfusion were exposed in vitro for up to 5 days to sublethal dilutions of two seepage water samples collected from garbage dumps. Hepatocytes were analysed with respect to acute (lactate dehydrogenase leakage) and sublethal toxicity (electron microscopy, stereology). In addition, acute toxicity (24 h) was tested in the piscine fibrocytic cell line R1 by means of crystal violet staining and neutral red retention. Acute toxicity in R1 cells and isolated hepatocytes could only be documented for sample I at dilutions of 1:2 and 1:4. This difference in toxicity could be corroborated by cytological alterations in isolated hepatocytes, which could be documented for dilutions of 1:100 and 1:8 in samples I and II, respectively. Ultrastructural changes were time- and dose-dependent and included reduction of hepatocellular volume, disturbance of intracellular compartmentation, modified heterochromatin distribution, transformation of rough endoplasmic reticulum into concentric membrane whorls, proliferation of lysosomes and cytoplasmic vacuoles, as well as reduction of hepatocellular glycogen. Although several hepatocellular reactions were found after exposure to either sample, the syndrome of ultrastructural alterations allowed clear differentiation between the two samples. Results illustrate that cytological effects far below macroscopically detectable damage can be discovered not only in intact fish, but also in fish cell culture systems. On the basis of the data presented, a multi-tiered test procedure for aquatic toxicity assessment exclusively based on tests with fish cell culture systems is proposed: (1) rapid screening for acute toxicity with permanent cell lines; (2) short-term tests with more complex, yet more sensitive systems such as primary

  5. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs.

  6. Rare and unusual endocrine cancer syndromes with mutated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-12-01

    The study of a number of rare familial syndromes associated with endocrine tumor development has led to the identification of genes involved in the development of these tumors. Major advances have expanded our understanding of the pathophysiology of these rare endocrine tumors, resulting in the elucidation of causative genes in rare familial diseases and a better understanding of the signaling pathways implicated in endocrine cancers. Recognition of the familial syndrome associated with a particular patient's endocrine tumor has important implications in terms of prognosis, screening of family members, and screening for associated conditions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The eunuchs of India: An endocrine eye opener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are established guidelines for the endocrine and overall treatment of transsexual persons. These guidelines provide information about the optimal endocrine management of male-to-female and female-to-male transsexual persons. India has a large community of eunuchs, also known as hijras, who are men with gender identity disorders. While this community has been studied from a social and medical point of new, no endocrine work has been done in them. This exploratory article tries to discuss the endocrine status, health, and management of the eunuchs.

  8. Endocrine function in 97 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Arlien-Søborg, P; Duno, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine function and its association to number of CTG repeats in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Concentration of various hormones and metabolites in venous blood was used to assess the endocrine function in 97 patients with DM1....... We found that patients with DM1 have an increased risk of abnormal endocrine function, particularly calcium metabolism disorders. However, the endocrine dysfunction appears not to be of clinical significance in all of the cases. Finally, we found correlations between CTG(n) expansion size and plasma...

  9. Response to and recovery from acute sublethal gamma radiation in the Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1979-05-01

    Acute irradiation of the Amazon molly with a sublethal dose of 1,000 rad caused some damage to the intestinal tract and to the haematopoietic system. Histologically, the intestine appeared to have regenerated by the end of a week; damage to the haematopoietic tissue appeared more slowly, but repair was almost complete some two months later. Nevertheless, recovery to the intestine cannot have been entirely completed in seven days, since the fish did not feed well for the following two weeks. After this, there were no obvious deleterious effects upon the survival and viability of the fish, although irradiated fish weighed less at the termination of the experiment.

  10. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with St. Cloud State University, Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, and the University of Minnesota, has conducted field monitoring studies and laboratory research to determine the presence of endocrine active chemicals and the incidence of endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes during 1994–2008. Endocrine active chemicals are chemicals that interfere with the natural regulation of endocrine systems, and may mimic or block the function of natural hormones in fish or other organisms. This interference commonly is referred to as endocrine disruption. Indicators of endocrine disruption in fish include vitellogenin (female egg yolk protein normally expressed in female fish) in male fish, oocytes present in male fish testes, reduced reproductive success, and changes in reproductive behavior.

  11. Well differentiated endocrine carcinomas of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. For the difference from poorly differentiated, well differentiated endocrine carcinomas of the pancreas are the tumours in whom with aggressive surgery and chemotherapy fair results can be achieved. Objective. The aim of the study was to point out the importance of such treatment. Methods. Over a 6-year period eight patients (seven female and one male of average age 51 years (ranging from 23 to 71 years were operated on for well differentiated endocrine carcinoma: six of the head and two of the tail of the pancreas. There were two functional and six nonfunctional tumours. Pain in the upper part of the abdomen in seven, mild loss in weight in two, strong heartburn in two, obstructive jaundice in three, diarrhoea in one, sudden massive bleeding from gastric varicosities due to prehepatic portal hypertension caused by pancreatic head tumour in one, and bruise in one patient were registered preoperatively. US and CT in all, angiography in one, octreoscan in two and PET scan in one patient were performed. Whipple’s procedure was performed in six and distal pancreatectomy in two patients, as well as systemic lymphadenectomy in all and excision of liver secondary tumours in two patients. In the patient with massive gastric bleeding a total gastrectomy was performed first, followed by Whipple’s procedure a month later. Results. R0 resection was achieved in all patients. Lymph nodes metastases were found in six patients. Six patients were given chemotherapy. One patient died 3 years after surgery, seven are still alive, on average 2.5 years. A local recurrence after distal pancreatectomy that occurred 5 years after surgery was successfully reresected and the patient is on peptide-receptor radiotherapy. In other six patients there were no local recurence or distant metastases. Conclusion. With aggressive surgery and chemotherapy fair results can be achieved in well differentiated endocrine carcinomas of the pancreas.

  12. Health disparities in endocrine disorders: biological, clinical, and nonclinical factors--an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A; Chin, Marshall H; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E; Anton, Blair

    2012-09-01

    The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC STATEMENT: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. consensus process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the Advocacy and Public

  13. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  14. Prediction of biochemical recurrence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: analysis of 784 Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Nagao, Go; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Yoshio; Horiguchi, Yutaka; Namiki, Kazunori; Nakashima, Jun; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    To examine biochemical recurrence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in Japanese patients, and to develop a risk stratification model for biochemical recurrence. The study cohort consisted of 784 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant or adjuvant endocrine therapy. The relationships of biochemical recurrence with perioperative findings were evaluated. The prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence-free survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard model analyses. During the follow-up period, 80 patients showed biochemical recurrence. The biochemical recurrence-free survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 92.2%, 85.2% and 80.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the prostate-specific antigen level, prostate-specific antigen density, biopsy Gleason score, percent positive core, pathological T stage, pathological Gleason score, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion and positive surgical margin were significantly associated with biochemical recurrence. In multivariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen density ≥0.4 (P = 0.0011), pathological T stage ≥3a (P = 0.002), pathological Gleason score ≥8 (P = 0.007) and positive surgical margin (P biochemical recurrence. The patients were stratified into three risk groups according to these factors. The 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was 89.4% in the low-risk group, 65.6% in the intermediate-risk group and 30.3% in the high-risk group. The prostate-specific antigen density, pathological T stage, pathological Gleason score and positive surgical margin were independent prognostic factors for biochemical recurrence. The risk stratification model developed using these four factors could help clinicians identify patients with a poor prognosis who might be good candidates for clinical trials of alternative management strategies. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. Avian endocrine responses to environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B A; Eroschenko, V P; Fox, G A; Fry, D M; Gorsline, J

    1984-12-01

    Many environmental contaminants are hazardous to populations of wild birds. Chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides and industrial pollutants are thought to be responsible for population declines of several species of predatory birds through eggshell thinning. Studies have demonstrated that these contaminants have estrogenic potency and may affect the functioning of the gonadal and thyroidal endocrine subsystems. Petroleum crude oil exerts toxicity externally, by oiling of plumage, and internally, by way of ingestion of oil while feeding or preening. Extensive ultrastructural damage to the inner zone of the adrenal, diminished adrenal responsiveness to adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and reduced corticosterone secretion rate suggest that low levels of plasma corticosterone reflect a direct effect of petroleum on the adrenal gland. Suppressive effects of oil on the ovary and decreases in circulating prolactin have been associated with impaired reproductive function. Large-scale field studies of free-living seabirds have confirmed some of the inhibitory effects of oil on reproduction that have been observed in laboratory studies. Organophosphorus insecticides, representing the most widely used class of pesticides in North America, have been shown to impair reproductive function, possibly by altering secretion of luteinizing hormone and progesterone. Relevant areas of future research on the effects of contaminants on avian endocrine function are discussed.

  16. Somatostatin receptors as markers for endocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, J.C.

    1987-06-19

    Endocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are relatively rare neoplasias that secrete large amounts of peptide hormones such as insulin, glucagon, gastrin, or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These substances are usually responsible for the distinct clinical features observed in patients with such tumors. Although most are relatively slow growing tumors, they may lead in early stages to dramatic symptoms such as hypoglycemia, gastric ulcerations, or watery diarrhea. Unfortunately they are often difficult to localize precisely at that stage. Somatostatin, a tetradecapeptide that inhibits peptide hormone release in various sites such as the pituitary, the pancreas, and the gastrointestinal tract, has been shown recently to have beneficial effects when given chronically in the form of a stable non-degradable octapeptide analogue (SMS 201-995) in such gastrointestinal endocrine tumors. This essay demonstrates with autoradiographic techniques the very high density of somatostatin receptors in one case of human gastrinoma. A hematoxylineosin-stained histologic section reveals a well-defined, 2-mm-long tumor surrounded by normal tissue. After incubation of the section with an iodinated somatostatin analogue (/sup 125/I-(Leu, D-Trp, Tyr)-somatostatin-28), the distribution of somatostatin receptors was visualized on tritium-sensitive films after a one-week exposure of the section in x-ray cassettes.

  17. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Moon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed.

  18. Endocrine disruption: fact or urban legend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Borgert, Christopher J; Dietrich, Daniel; Rozman, Karl K

    2013-12-16

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are substances that cause adverse health effects via endocrine-mediated mechanisms in an intact organism or its progeny or (sub) populations. Purported EDCs in personal care products include 4-MBC (UV filter) or parabens that showed oestrogenic activity in screening tests, although regulatory toxicity studies showed no adverse effects on reproductive endpoints. Hormonal potency is the key issue of the safety of EDCs. Oestrogen-based drugs, e.g. the contraceptive pill or the synthetic oestrogen DES, possess potencies up to 7 orders of magnitude higher than those of PCP ingredients; yet, in utero exposure to these drugs did not adversely affect fertility or sexual organ development of offspring unless exposed to extreme doses. Additive effects of EDs are unlikely due to the multitude of mechanisms how substances may produce a hormone-like activity; even after uptake of different substances with a similar mode of action, the possibility of additive effects is reduced by different absorption, metabolism and kinetics. This is supported by a number of studies on mixtures of chemical EDCs. Overall, despite of 20 years of research a human health risk from exposure to low concentrations of exogenous chemical substances with weak hormone-like activities remains an unproven and unlikely hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  20. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Endocrine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Peppa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the existing literature data concerning the involvement of skeletal muscle (SM in whole body glucose homeostasis and the contribution of SM insulin resistance (IR to the metabolic derangements observed in several endocrine disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, adrenal disorders and thyroid function abnormalities. IR in PCOS is associated with a unique postbinding defect in insulin receptor signaling in general and in SM in particular, due to a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Adrenal hormone excess is also associated with disrupted insulin action in peripheral tissues, such as SM. Furthermore, both hyper- and hypothyroidism are thought to be insulin resistant states, due to insulin receptor and postreceptor defects. Further studies are definitely needed in order to unravel the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. In summary, the principal mechanisms involved in muscle IR in the endocrine diseases reviewed herein include abnormal phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins, altered muscle fiber composition, reduced transcapillary insulin delivery, decreased glycogen synthesis, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

  1. DETECTION OF THERMAL SUBLETHAL INJURY IN ESCHERICHIA COLI VIA THE SELECTIVE MEDIUM PLATING TECHNIQUE: MECHANISMS AND IMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Espina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In food preservation, the selective medium plating technique (SMPT is commonly used in order to detect and quantify the amount of sublethally injured cells in their bacterial cytoplasmic membranes after inimical treatments. From an applicative point of view, this information is of use in the synergistic combination of different preservation technologies, so that cells that are sublethally injured after one or more processes can end up being entirely inactivated by other hurdle(s. However, little work has been done to explain the reasons for the inability of sublethally injured cells to outgrow in selective agar media (containing the osmolyte NaCl as a selective agent, whereas they are able to grow in non-selective agar media. This research could contribute to explain this technique’s limits. In the present paper, the performance of SMPT on Escherichia coli cells after heat treatments is explored by applying different selective agents in the recovery media, using several mutants lacking factors involved in osmoregulation, and also by examining the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. In view of the results, the possibility of a specific toxic effect of Na+ as the main mechanism under SMPT is discarded, and the same level of sublethal injury is detected using KCl instead of NaCl. The synthesis of the osmoprotectant trehalose determined the maximum osmotolerance of intact cells to the selective agents, but was not crucial in the quantification of sublethal injury. Moreover, the extent of sublethal injury detected via SMPT was directly correlated with the physical loss of integrity of the cell membrane as measured with the propidium iodide-exclusion technique when that dye was added before thermal treatments. The present work confirms the adequacy of SMPT as a tool for detecting the occurrence and quantity of sublethally injured cells and thus, for efficiently designing combined preservation treatments. Additionally, we propose the combination

  2. Sublethal and hormesis effects of imidacloprid on the soybean aphid Aphis glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanyan; Xiao, Da; Li, Jinyu; Chen, Zhou; Biondi, Antonio; Desneux, Nicolas; Gao, Xiwu; Song, Dunlun

    2015-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is a major pest in soybean crop. Current management of this pest relies mainly on insecticides applications, and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid has been proposed as an effective insecticide to control A. glycines in soybean field. Imidacloprid at lethal concentrations not only exerts acute toxicity to A. glycines, but also cause various biological changes when aphids are chronically exposed to lower concentrations. In this study, we assessed the effects of a low-lethal (0.20 mg L(-1)) and two sublethal (0.05 and 0.10 mg L(-1)) imidacloprid concentrations on various A. glycines life history traits. Aphid exposure to 0.20 mg L(-1) imidacloprid caused slower juvenile development, shorter reproductive period, and reduced adult longevity, fecundity and total lifespan. Stimulatory effects, i.e. hormesis, on reproduction and immature development duration were observed in aphids exposed to the lower sublethal imidacloprid concentrations. Consequently, the net reproduction rate (R 0) was significantly higher than in the control aphids. These findings stress the importance of the actual imidacloprid concentration in its toxicological properties on A. glycines. Therefore, our results would be useful for assessing the overall effects of imidacloprid on A. glycines and for optimizing integrated pest management programs targeting this pest.

  3. Gene expression changes in honey bees induced by sublethal imidacloprid exposure during the larval stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Wen; Lu, Kuang-Hui; Yang, En-Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Honey bee larvae exposed to sublethal doses of imidacloprid show behavioural abnormalities as adult insects. Previous studies have demonstrated that this phenomenon originates from abnormal neural development in response to imidacloprid exposure. Here, we further investigated the global gene expression changes in the heads of newly emerged adults and observed that 578 genes showed more than 2-fold changes in gene expression after imidacloprid exposure. This information might aid in understanding the effects of pesticides on the health of pollinators. For example, the genes encoding major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), a group of multifunctional proteins with significant roles in the sustainable development of bee colonies, were strongly downregulated. These downregulation patterns were further confirmed through analyses using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on the heads of 6-day-old nurse bees. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that sublethal doses of imidacloprid affect mrjp expression and likely weaken bee colonies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  5. Macroalgal extracts induce bacterial assemblage shifts and sublethal tissue stress in Caribbean corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kathleen M; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Ross, Cliff; Liles, Mark R; Paul, Valerie J

    2012-01-01

    Benthic macroalgae can be abundant on present-day coral reefs, especially where rates of herbivory are low and/or dissolved nutrients are high. This study investigated the impact of macroalgal extracts on both coral-associated bacterial assemblages and sublethal stress response of corals. Crude extracts and live algal thalli from common Caribbean macroalgae were applied onto the surface of Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides corals on reefs in both Florida and Belize. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to examine changes in the surface mucus layer (SML) bacteria in both coral species. Some of the extracts and live algae induced detectable shifts in coral-associated bacterial assemblages. However, one aqueous extract caused the bacterial assemblages to shift to an entirely new state (Lobophora variegata), whereas other organic extracts had little to no impact (e.g. Dictyota sp.). Macroalgal extracts more frequently induced sublethal stress responses in M. faveolata than in P. astreoides corals, suggesting that cellular integrity can be negatively impacted in selected corals when comparing co-occurring species. As modern reefs experience phase-shifts to a higher abundance of macroalgae with potent chemical defenses, these macroalgae are likely impacting the composition of microbial assemblages associated with corals and affecting overall reef health in unpredicted and unprecedented ways.

  6. Histopathological effect of sub-lethal concentration of aluminum phosphide (phostoxin on Clarias gariepinus juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode B. Olurin

    Full Text Available Abtsract: The study evaluated the effect of sub-lethal concentration of phostoxin on Clarias gariepinus juveniles. C. gariepinus juveniles belonging to the same cohort (40.1±1.2g; 18.1±1.1cm from a commercial fish farm were randomly placed ten in each of 15 plastic tanks containing 15 liters of water. They were exposed for 96 hrs to three sub-lethal concentrations (treatments of phostoxin (0.125, 0.250, 0.5mg L-1 and a phostoxin free control. At the end of 96 hrs exposure, they were dissected and the tissues need for histopathology removed and fixed in Bouin's fluid. The gill filament exhibited fusion at the secondary lamella that was progressive with concentration. At the highest concentration of exposure, the secondary lamellae showed marked pyknotic and necrotic changes characterized by epithelia detachment. The hepatic tissue showed mild inflammatory changes at lower concentrations while at the highest concentration of exposure there was marked inflammation with observed hydropic degeneration. In the kidney, an inflammatory change was only observed in the interstices at the highest dose of exposure with the convoluted tubules showing partial shrinkage. Phostoxin showed to have significantly caused alterations in cyto-architecture of the gills and to a considerable extent liver and kidney of C. gariepinus.

  7. Effects of Sublethal Concentrations of Insecticides on the Functional Response of Two Mirid Generalist Predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki F Martinou

    Full Text Available The use of agrochemicals particularly pesticides, can hamper the effectiveness of natural enemies, causing disruption in the ecosystem service of biological control. In the current study, the effects of the insecticides thiacloprid and chlorantraniliprole on the functional response curves were assessed for two mirid predator nymphs, Macrolophus pygmaeus Rambur and Nesidiocoris tenuis Reuter. In the absence of insecticides, both predators exhibited a type II functional response when feeding on eggs of the moth Ephestia kuehniella. N. tenuis seems to be a more efficient predator than M. pygmaeus, as model estimated handling time was significantly lower for the former than for the latter. Residual exposure of M. pygmaeus to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide was associated with a change in the asymptote but not the type of the functional response curve. Thiacloprid seems to be the least compatible with M. pygmaeus, as it led to both a significant reduction of the attack rate and an increase in handling time. In contrast, chlorantraniliprole exposure significantly increased the handling time, but not the attack rate of the predator. Residual exposure of N. tenuis to sublethal concentrations of either insecticide did not have a significant effect on the type nor the parameters of the functional response model. The results show that pesticide residues that do not have lethal effects on beneficial arthropods can reduce prey consumption depending on predator species and on likely risks associated with toxicity.

  8. Gene expression in Listeria monocytogenes exposed to sublethal concentration of benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburro, Manuela; Ripabelli, Giancarlo; Vitullo, Monia; Dallman, Timothy James; Pontello, Mirella; Amar, Corinne Francoise Laurence; Sammarco, Michela Lucia

    2015-06-01

    In this study, tolerance at sublethal concentration of benzalkonium chloride and transcription levels of mdrL, ladR, lde, sigB and bcrABC genes in Listeria monocytogenes strains were evaluated. Viable cells reduction occurred in 45% of strains and clinical isolates showed lower sensitivity than isolates from foods. An increased transcription of an efflux system encoding gene was found in 60% of strains, and simultaneous mdrL overexpression and ladR underexpression occurred in 30% of isolates. A significant association between reduced benzalkonium chloride activity and both mdrL and sigB overexpression was observed; sigB expression also correlated with both mdrL and ladR genes. The bcrABC gene was only found in six strains, all isolated from foods and sensitive to benzalkonium chloride, and in four strains an underexpression was observed. Disinfection at sublethal concentration was less effective in clinical isolates, and mdrL and sigB expression was significantly affected by disinfection. Further insights are needed to understand the adaptation to benzalkonium chloride and to evaluate whether changes in gene expression could affect the L. monocytogenes virulence traits and persistence in the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using photopigment biomarkers to quantify sub-lethal effects of petroleum pollution on natural phytoplankton assemblages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swistak, J.; Pinckney, J.; Piehler, M.; Paerl, H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC (United States). Inst. of Marine Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Although much work has been undertaken to determine the toxicity of petroleum pollutants to phytoplankton, most studies have used pure cultures to monitor growth of selected phytoplankton species. Fewer have considered the net effect on entire microalgal communities. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize diagnostic microalgal pigments, the authors were able to simultaneously assess sub-lethal pollutant effects on entire communities as well as on individual phytoplankton functional groups. Incubations of natural water samples with diesel fuel, an important contributor to coastal petroleum pollution, revealed significant changes in photopigments and relative abundance of taxonomic groups at sub-lethal concentrations. Differential rates of change of indicator pigment concentrations suggest a range of sensitivity among phytoplankton groups. In preliminary experiments, cyanobacteria exhibited the greatest overall tolerance to the diesel fuel concentrations tested, while cryptomonads displayed the most sensitivity. The authors are currently evaluating the responses of seasonal phytoplankton populations from 3 sites exposed to varied levels of petroleum pollution. HPLC will be used to characterize phytoplankton populations and to determine if the most abundant groups are also the most tolerant of diesel fuel. Preliminary experiments indicate that diesel fuel pollution may modify the structure and function of phytoplankton communities and subsequently alter the trophodynamics of impacted systems.

  10. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Smith, Luke D; Cooper, Timothy F; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1) TSS (25 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1) TSS (83 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  11. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  12. Lethal and sublethal effects of cyantraniliprole on Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruimin; Jang, Eric B; He, Shiyu; Chen, Jiahua

    2015-02-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is one of the most globally important insect pests. Studies were conducted with the novel anthranilic diamide insecticide cyantraniliprole to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on B. dorsalis. An ingestion toxicity bioassay showed that cyantraniliprole was active against B. dorsalis, and the 72 h feeding LC50 was 3.22 µg g(-1) in adult diet for a susceptible strain. Sublethal doses of cyantraniliprole (1.30 µg g(-1) adult diet) induced a hormesis effect on B. dorsalis. The mating competitiveness of B. dorsalis treated with cyantraniliprole at 3.27 µg g(-1) adult diet was significantly lower when compared with the controls. The lower dose (1.30 µg g(-1) adult diet) of cyantraniliprole improved the total mating times of both mating pairs in treated groups and also the mating competitiveness of the treated males when compared with the higher dose and controls. Cyantraniliprole-treated females of the mated pairs with the lower dose laid more eggs. On the fifth day, female receptivity in the treated group was significantly reduced when compared with the controls. These results indicate that cyantraniliprole is effective against B. dorsalis. The inhibition and stimulation effect of cyantraniliprole on the adult's mating performance at different concentrations was proved. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Sublethal Dose of Diazinon Induces Pulmonary Toxicity in Rat: Histopathological Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Najafi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diazinon (DZ is a widely used contact organophosphorous pesticide with broad spectrum insecticide activity. The extensive use of DZ has caused great concern due to the hazardous side effects on human beings as well as wild and domestic animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sublethal dose of DZ on rat lung. Material and methods: Seven groups of male Wistar rats were used comprising control and test groups. The control group received corn oil (0.3 ml/day for 60 days by oral gavages. The test groups received DZ at a dose of 60 mg/kg body weight orally for 2, 10, 24, 30, 54 and 60 days, respectively. Results: The histopathological analysis of the lungs in DZ-treated groups revealed congestion on day 2, pulmonary edema and emphysema on day 10, congestion and atelectasia on day 24, infiltration of mononuclear cells on day 30 and pulmonary hemorrhage along with bronchial glands hyperplasia on days 54 and 60. DZ administration also caused a significant decrease in serum cholinesterase activity in a time-dependent manner. Conclusion: These findings indicate that sublethal dose of DZ can induce severe lesions in the lung of rat. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(1.000: 26-31

  14. Development and application of a sublethal toxicity test to PAH using marine harpacticoid copepods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeger, J.W.; Lotufo, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This research project was designed to improve the understanding of the acute and sublethal effects of PAHs to benthic invertebrates. Sublethal bioassay protocols for benthic harpacticoid copepods were developed, and two species of harpacticoids were exposed to a range of concentrations of sediment-amended PAHs; the single compounds fluoranthene and phenanthrene as well as a complex mixture (diesel fuel). The harpacticoid copepods Schizopera knabeni and Nitocra lacustris were tested using several bioassay approaches. Reproductive assays, feeding assays and avoidance tests were conducted in addition to lethal tests for S. knabeni. Species-specific differences in sensitivity were detected. Early life history stages were much more sensitive than adults in one species but not in the other. Concentrations of PAH as low as 26 micrograms PAH decreased copepod offspring production, egg hatching success, and embryonic and early-stage development, demonstrating the high sensitivity of life history-related endpoints. In addition, grazing on microalgae was significantly impaired at concentrations as low as 20 micrograms/g PAH after short exposures (<30 h). Finally it was demonstrated that harpacticoids can actively avoid contamination.

  15. Effects of Sublethal Doses of Imidacloprid on Young Adult Honeybee Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni Goñalons, Carolina; Farina, Walter Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI), a neonicotinoid used for its high selective toxicity to insects, is one of the most commonly used pesticides. However, its effect on beneficial insects such as the honeybee Apis mellifera L is still controversial. As young adult workers perform in-hive duties that are crucial for colony maintenance and survival, we aimed to assess the effect of sublethal IMI doses on honeybee behaviour during this period. Also, because this insecticide acts as a cholinergic-nicotinic agonist and these pathways take part in insect learning and memory processes; we used IMI to assess their role and the changes they suffer along early adulthood. We focused on appetitive behaviours based on the proboscis extension response. Laboratory reared adults of 2 to 10 days of age were exposed to sublethal IMI doses (0.25 or 0.50ng) administered orally or topically prior to behavioural assessment. Modification of gustatory responsiveness and impairment of learning and memory were found as a result of IMI exposure. These outcomes differed depending on age of evaluation, type of exposure and IMI dose, being the youngest bees more sensitive and the highest oral dose more toxic. Altogether, these results imply that IMI administered at levels found in agroecosystems can reduce sensitivity to reward and impair associative learning in young honeybees. Therefore, once a nectar inflow with IMI traces is distributed within the hive, it could impair in-door duties with negative consequences on colony performance. PMID:26488410

  16. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Human Endometrial Mesenchymal Stem Cells That Survived Sublethal Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Vinogradov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature is a critical environmental and personal factor. Although heat shock is a well-studied biological phenomenon, hyperthermia response of stem cells is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that sublethal heat shock induced premature senescence in human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells (eMSC. This study aimed to investigate the fate of eMSC-survived sublethal heat shock (SHS with special emphasis on their genetic stability and possible malignant transformation using methods of classic and molecular karyotyping, next-generation sequencing, and transcriptome functional analysis. G-banding revealed random chromosome breakages and aneuploidy in the SHS-treated eMSC. Molecular karyotyping found no genomic imbalance in these cells. Gene module and protein interaction network analysis of mRNA sequencing data showed that compared to untreated cells, SHS-survived progeny revealed some difference in gene expression. However, no hallmarks of cancer were found. Our data identified downregulation of oncogenic signaling, upregulation of tumor-suppressing and prosenescence signaling, induction of mismatch, and excision DNA repair. The common feature of heated eMSC is the silence of MYC, AKT1/PKB oncogenes, and hTERT telomerase. Overall, our data indicate that despite genetic instability, SHS-survived eMSC do not undergo transformation. After long-term cultivation, these cells like their unheated counterparts enter replicative senescence and die.

  17. The role of sublethal effects in evaluating earthworm responses to soil contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilborn, D.; Bollman, M.; Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Frequently, standard test methods rely upon relatively straightforward, easily interpreted endpoints to evaluate biological effects, like growth inhibition, gross morbidity or death. In soil contamination evaluations, for example, earthworm toxicity tests are routinely completed in order to consider adverse biological effects associated with exposures to soil samples in the laboratory or field. Here, the toxicity endpoint measured in the standard test using Eisenia foetida is death; however, if chronic effects are more appropriate to the questions being asked within a risk assessment context, then alternative test endpoints must be developed and standardized. Prior evaluations have relied upon sublethal endpoints, most frequently behavioral and morphological observations, for evaluating chronic effects associated with contaminant exposures. The authors applied these behavioral and morphological endpoints in analyzing potential chronic effects in earthworms exposed to heavy metal-contaminated soils in both the laboratory and field. In using a relatively standard set of these sublethal endpoints the authors found that these endpoints could be used to evaluate chronic effects associated with soil exposures, but that selection of the specific end-points had to be adequately standardized and that observer bias had to be adequately characterized in order for these measures of chronic effects to be unequivocally applied within an ecological risk assessment.

  18. Avoidance behaviour and anxiety in rats irradiated with a sublethal dose of gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomášová, Lenka; Smajda, B; Bona, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, whether a sublethal dose of gamma-rays will influence the avoidance behaviour and anxiety in rats and whether the response to radiation depends on time of day of its application. Adult male Wistar rats were tested in elevated plus-maze, in hot plate test and in the light/dark box in 4 regular intervals during a day. After two weeks the animals were irradiated with a whole-body dose 6 Gy of gamma-rays. One day after irradiation the animals were repeatedly tested in the same way, as before irradiation. In the plus-maze test an increased level of anxiety was established. The irradiation significantly decreased the locomotor activity of rats, but the extent of exploratory and comfortable behaviour were not altered. After irradiation, an elevated aversion to the thermal stimulus was observed in the hot plate test. The effects of radiation were more pronounced in the light period of the day, than in the dark one. No significant differences in aversion to light were detected after irradiation. The obtained results indicate, that sublethal doses of ionizing radiation can markedly influence the reactivity of animals to adverse stimuli, their motoric activity and emotional status, as well.

  19. Lethal and sublethal effects of four essential oils on the egg parasitoids Trissolcus basalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdin González, Jorge Omar; Laumann, Raúl Alberto; da Silveira, Samantha; Moraes, Maria Carolina Blassioli; Borges, Miguel; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia

    2013-07-01

    The essential oils from leaves of Schinus molle var. areira, Aloysia citriodora, Origanum vulgare and Thymus vulgaris have showed potential as phytoinsecticides against the green stink bug, Nezara viridula. In this work were evaluated their toxicological and behavioral effects on the parasitoid Trissolcus basalis, a biological control agent of this pest insect. Essential oils were obtained via hydrodestillation from fresh leaves. Insecticide activity in T. basalis females was evaluated in direct contact and fumigation bioassays. Behavioral effects were evaluated in olfactometer bioassays. To evaluate the residual toxicity, females of the parasitoids were exposed to oil residues; in these insects, the sublethal effects were evaluated (potential parasitism and survivorship of immature stages). The essential oils from O. vulgare and T. vulgaris proved to be highly selective when used as fumigant and did not change parasitoid behavior. After one week, the residues of these oils were harmless and did not show sublethal effects against T. basalis. According with these results, essential oils have potential applications for the integrated management of N. viridula. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Paediatric endocrine disorders as seen at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In most developing countries, data on the prevalence and distribution of paediatric endocrine disorders is lacking. Objective: To describe the pattern of endocrine disorders seen in the Department of Child Health, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria between 2004 to 2013.

  1. Nuclear Receptors and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreijerink, K.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470238

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an inherited syndrome that is characterized by the occurrence of tumours of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumours, pitui-tary gland adenomas, as well as adrenal adenomas and neuro-endocrine tumours, often at a young age. MEN1 tumours can

  2. paediatric endocrine disorders at the university college hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.O. Jarrett1, B.O. Ogunbosi1 and O.O. Ayoola2. 1. Department of Paediatrics, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. 2. Endocrine Science Research Group, University of Manchester, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital,. Manchester, UK. Correspondence: Dr. Omolola Ayoola. Endocrine Science Research Group,.

  3. Case Report: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A | Klisiewicz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A. ... Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN-2A) is an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome consisting of medullary thyroid carcinoma, phaeochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism. A germline ...

  4. The heart of the matter: Cardiac manifestations of endocrine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya John Binu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disorders manifest as a disturbance in the milieu of multiple organ systems. The cardiovascular system may be directly affected or alter its function to maintain the state of homeostasis. In this article, we aim to review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical features and management of cardiac manifestations of various endocrine disorders.

  5. Molecular diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A. RJ Pegoraro, DJ Hacking, RH Buck, L Rom, PA Lanning, GMB Berger. Abstract. Objective. To identify by means of genetic analyses individuals who are at risk of developing medullary thyroid cancer that is a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia. Subjects.

  6. In vitro screening for endocrine disruptive activity in selected South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various waterborne anthropogenic contaminants disrupt the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, targeting reproductive pathways, among others. Very little is known, however, regarding the occurrence of endocrine disruptive activity in South African freshwater ecosystems, and coastal ecosystems have not been ...

  7. paediatric endocrine disorders at the university college hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infectious diseases, childhood endocrine disorders constitute a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. ... on infectious diseases and malnutrition giving the impression that endocrine disorders are uncommon. Reports on .... of Vitamin D and the role of ultra violent light in prevention.12 The increased risk in dark skinned.

  8. The coagulation system in endocrine disorders: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Ageno, W.; Büller, H. R.

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine disorders can influence the haemostatic balance. Abnormal coagulation test results have been observed in patients with abnormal hormone levels. Also unprovoked bleeding or thrombotic events have been associated with endocrine disease. The aim of the present review is to summarise the

  9. INTRODUCTION Endocrine disorders do occur among children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    endocrine disorders in children in developing countries are few compared to ... children. We use this case to illustrate the challenges of diagnosis, management and of follow up of this treatable endocrine condition in a developing country and the ... electrocardiography, full blood count, urine culture and urinalysis were all ...

  10. Diazinon mediated biochemical changes in the African toad (Bufo regularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isioma Tongo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sublethal toxicity of diazinon to the adult African toad, Bufo regularis was assessed using an integration of biomarkers. Changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE, corticosterone and total protein levels were assessed in the serum, brain, liver, lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT and the results supported by bioaccumulation data. The biomarkers were chosen as indicators of key physiological functions: AChE for neurotoxicity, corticosterone and total protein levels as indicators of oxidative stress. Toads were exposed to 0.01, 0.02, 0.03 and 0.04 g/L for 28 days. Brain AChE activity reduced by 96% in the highest concentration (0.04 g/L compared to the control brain. Similarly, AChE activities in serum, liver, lungs and GIT tissues (88%, 88%, 87, 87% umg-1 protein respectively were also inhibited in the toads. Corticosterone and total protein levels in the tissues decreased compared to the control. The accumulation results obtained showed accumulation in the tissues (liver>serum>brain> lung>GIT, with a direct relationship between tissue concentration and changes in the biochemical indices. The alterations in all the indices were significantly concentration dependent. The biomarkers described in this study could be useful complementary indices in the risk assessment of diazinon pesticide.

  11. Endocrine disruptors induce perturbations in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamani, Uthra; Gross, Andrew R.; Ocampo, Camille; Andres, Allen M.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Sareen, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Persistent exposure to man-made endocrine disrupting chemicals during fetal endocrine development may lead to disruption of metabolic homeostasis contributing to childhood obesity. Limited cellular platforms exist to test endocrine disrupting chemical-induced developmental abnormalities in human endocrine tissues. Here we use an human-induced pluripotent stem cell-based platform to demonstrate adverse impacts of obesogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals in the developing endocrine system. We ...

  12. Endocrine disruption of phenanthrene in the protogynous dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus (Serranidae: Perciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Mariana Frias; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L; Da Cuña, Rodrigo H; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2017-06-23

    The dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus is a protogynous hermaphrodite fish, that maintains high levels of plasma steroids as juveniles, as substrates for sex inversion. These fish are exposed to marine pollution from oil spills during cargo handling. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene (Phe), are the main crude oil components and are toxic to fish, acting as endocrine disruptors (ED). This is the first study that investigated impacts of Phe as an ED in E. marginatus juveniles. An in vivo sublethal exposure (96h) to Phe was carried out at two concentrations (0.1mg/L and 1mg/L); exposure to the vehicle (ethanol; ETOH) was also performed. Plasma levels of 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) were measured by ELISA. Gonads, liver and spleen were processed for histological analysis. In an in vitro bioassay, gonad fragments were incubated with Phe (8.91mg/L) or ETOH. Steroid levels in the culture media were measured by ELISA. The in vivo exposure to Phe triggered an increase of the area of the hepatocytes, increased number of melanomacrophagic centers and hemosiderosis in the spleen; ETOH induced similar effects on spleen. E2 and T levels did not change in plasma or in vitro media. In plasma, ETOH decreased 11-KT levels. Phenanthrene sharply reduced 11-KT levels in vitro. Although in vivo bioassay results were not unequivocal owing to ethanol effects, Phe might disrupt steroidogenesis in juvenile grouper, possibly causing dysfunctions during sex change and gonadal maturity, considering the importance of 11-KT in developing ovaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  14. Endocrine disrupting chemicals: harmful substances and how to test them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olea-Serrano Nicolás

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the opinions of different groups from: scientists, international regulatory bodies, non-governmental organizations and industry; with an interest in the problem of identifying chemical substances with endocrine disrupting activity. There is also discussion of the consequences that exposure to endocrine disruptors may have for human health, considering concrete issues related to: the estimation of risk; the tests that must be used to detect endocrine disruption; the difficulties to establish an association between dose, time of exposure, individual susceptibility, and effect; and the attempts to create a census of endocrine disruptors. Finally, it is proposed that not all hormonal mimics should be included under the single generic denomination of endocrine disruptors.

  15. Palbociclib Combined with Fulvestrant in Premenopausal Women with Advanced Breast Cancer and Prior Progression on Endocrine Therapy: PALOMA-3 Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Turner, Nicholas C; Ro, Jungsil; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Iwata, Hiroji; Im, Seock-Ah; Masuda, Norikazu; Loi, Sherene; André, Fabrice; Harbeck, Nadia; Verma, Sunil; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Puyana Theall, Kathy; Hoffman, Justin; Zhang, Ke; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Dowsett, Mitchell

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor, combined with fulvestrant and goserelin was assessed in premenopausal women with advanced breast cancer (ABC) who had progressed on prior endocrine therapy (ET). One hundred eight premenopausal endocrine-refractory women ≥18 years with hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) ABC were among 521 women randomized 2:1 (347:174) to fulvestrant (500 mg) ± goserelin with either palbociclib (125 mg/day orally, 3 weeks on, 1 week off) or placebo. This analysis assessed whether the overall tolerable safety profile and significant progression-free survival (PFS) improvement extended to premenopausal women. Potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and ovarian suppression with goserelin were assessed via plasma pharmacokinetics and biochemical analyses, respectively. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01942135) RESULTS: Median PFS for premenopausal women in the palbociclib (n = 72) versus placebo arm (n = 36) was 9.5 versus 5.6 months, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.87), and consistent with the significant PFS improvement in the same arms for postmenopausal women. Any-grade and grade ≤3 neutropenia, leukopenia, and infections were among the most frequent adverse events reported in the palbociclib arm with concurrent goserelin administration. Hormone concentrations were similar between treatment arms and confirmed sustained ovarian suppression. Clinically relevant DDIs were not observed. Palbociclib combined with fulvestrant and goserelin was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for premenopausal women with prior endocrine-resistant HR+/HER2- ABC. Inclusion of both premenopausal and postmenopausal women in pivotal combination ET trials facilitates access to novel drugs for young women and should be considered as a new standard for clinical trial design. PALOMA-3, the first registrational study

  16. Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Triclosan on the Placenta in Pregnant Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixing Feng

    Full Text Available Triclosan (TCS is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is frequently used in pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Reports have shown that TCS is a potential endocrine disruptor; however, the potential effects of TCS on placental endocrine function are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects of TCS on the placenta in pregnant rats. Pregnant rats from gestational day (GD 6 to GD 20 were treated with 0, 30, 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg/d TCS followed by analysis of various biochemical parameters. Of the seven tissues examined, the greatest bioaccumulation of TCS was observed in the placenta. Reduction of gravid uterine weight and the occurrence of abortion were observed in the 600 mg/kg/d TCS-exposed group. Moreover, hormone detection demonstrated that the serum levels of progesterone (P, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and prolactin (PRL were decreased in groups exposed to higher doses of TCS. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in mRNA levels for placental steroid metabolism enzymes, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1, estrogen sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1, steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and steroid 5α-reductase 2 (SRD5A2. Furthermore, the transcriptional expression levels of progesterone receptor (PR, estrogen receptor (ERα and androgen receptor (AR were up-regulated. Taken together, these data demonstrated that the placenta was a target tissue of TCS and that TCS induced inhibition of circulating steroid hormone production might be related to the altered expression of hormone metabolism enzyme genes in the placenta. This hormone disruption might subsequently affect fetal development and growth.

  17. Hidden diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 unraveled during workup of virilization caused by adrenocortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN1 is an autosomal dominant syndrome with classic triad of parathyroid hyperplasia, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and pituitary adenomas. Other recognized manifestations include carcinoid, cutaneous or adrenocortical tumors. It is commonly presented with clinical features related to parathyroid, pancreas or pituitary lesions. Here, we have presented a case that had virilization and biochemical Cushing′s syndrome due to adrenocortical carcinoma as presenting feature of MEN1. Cushing′s syndrome in MEN1 is an extremely rare and usually late manifestation and most cases are due to corticotropin-producing pituitary adenomas. Although Cushing′s syndrome generally develops years after the more typical manifestations of MEN1 appear, it may be the primary manifestation of MEN1 syndrome particularly when related to adrenal adenoma or carcinoma.

  18. The epidemiologic evidence linking prenatal and postnatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals with male reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Rimborg, Susie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 20 years ago, it was hypothesized that exposure to prenatal and early postnatal environmental xenobiotics with the potential to disrupt endogenous hormone signaling might be on the causal path to cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low sperm count and testicular cancer. Several...... was to systematically synthesize published data on the risk of cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low sperm counts and testicular cancer following in utero or infant exposure to chemicals that have been included on the European Commission's list of Category 1 endocrine disrupting chemicals defined as having documented...... and exposures documented by biochemical analyses of biospecimens including maternal blood or urine, placenta or fat tissue as well as amnion fluid, cord blood or breast milk; this was followed by meta-analysis of quantitative data. OUTCOMES: The literature search resulted in 1314 references among which we...

  19. Ketogenic diet in endocrine disorders: Current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, L; Khandelwal, D; Kalra, S; Gupta, P; Dutta, D; Aggarwal, S

    2017-01-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet that leads to nutritional ketosis, long known for antiepileptic effects and has been used therapeutically to treat refractory epilepsy. This review attempts to summarize the evidence and clinical application of KD in diabetes, obesity, and other endocrine disorders. KD is usually animal protein based. An empiric vegetarian Indian variant of KD has been provided keeping in mind the Indian food habits. KD has beneficial effects on cardiac ischemic preconditioning, improves oxygenation in patients with respiratory failure, improves glycemic control in diabetics, is associated with significant weight loss, and has a beneficial impact on polycystic ovarian syndrome. Multivitamin supplementations are recommended with KD. Recently, ketones are being proposed as super-metabolic fuel; and KD is currently regarded as apt dietary therapy for "diabesity."

  20. Ketogenic diet in endocrine disorders: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketogenic diet (KD is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet that leads to nutritional ketosis, long known for antiepileptic effects and has been used therapeutically to treat refractory epilepsy. This review attempts to summarize the evidence and clinical application of KD in diabetes, obesity, and other endocrine disorders. KD is usually animal protein based. An empiric vegetarian Indian variant of KD has been provided keeping in mind the Indian food habits. KD has beneficial effects on cardiac ischemic preconditioning, improves oxygenation in patients with respiratory failure, improves glycemic control in diabetics, is associated with significant weight loss, and has a beneficial impact on polycystic ovarian syndrome. Multivitamin supplementations are recommended with KD. Recently, ketones are being proposed as super-metabolic fuel; and KD is currently regarded as apt dietary therapy for “diabesity.”

  1. Ketogenic diet in endocrine disorders: Current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, L; Khandelwal, D; Kalra, S; Gupta, P; Dutta, D; Aggarwal, S

    2017-01-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet that leads to nutritional ketosis, long known for antiepileptic effects and has been used therapeutically to treat refractory epilepsy. This review attempts to summarize the evidence and clinical application of KD in diabetes, obesity, and other endocrine disorders. KD is usually animal protein based. An empiric vegetarian Indian variant of KD has been provided keeping in mind the Indian food habits. KD has beneficial effects on cardiac ischemic preconditioning, improves oxygenation in patients with respiratory failure, improves glycemic control in diabetics, is associated with significant weight loss, and has a beneficial impact on polycystic ovarian syndrome. Multivitamin supplementations are recommended with KD. Recently, ketones are being proposed as super-metabolic fuel; and KD is currently regarded as apt dietary therapy for “diabesity.” PMID:29022562

  2. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and growth of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, Jérémie; Kadawathagedara, Manik; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine

    2017-06-01

    According to the "environmental obesogen hypothesis", early-life (including in utero) exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may disturb the mechanisms involved in adipogenesis or energy storage, and thus may increase the susceptibility to overweight and obesity. Animal models have shown that exposure to several of these chemicals could induce adipogenesis and mechanisms have been described. Epidemiological studies are crucial to know whether this effect could also be observed in humans. We aimed at summarizing the literature in epidemiology on the relationship between EDCs exposure and child's growth. Overall, epidemiological studies suggest that pre- and/or early postnatal exposure to some EDCs may increase the risk of overweight or obesity during childhood. In that review, we present some limitations of these studies, mainly in exposure assessment, that currently prevent to conclude about causality. Recent advances in epidemiology should bring further knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Criteria for endocrine disrupters: report from the Danish centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla

    The aim of this session is to give a presentation of the report (both ENV and HH) on criteria carried out by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. CEHOS is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls...... and gives examples of available ED data and relevant placement in groups. The overall purpose of the report is to provide scientific background for Danish input to the ongoing EU work within this field....

  4. Surgical management of pancreatico-duodenal tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Åkerström

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatico-duodenal tumors are the second most common endocrinopathy in multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1, and have a pronounced effect on life expectancy as the principal cause of disease-related death. Previous discussions about surgical management have focused mainly on syndromes of hormone excess and, in particular, the management of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1-related Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Since hormonal syndromes tend to occur late and indicate the presence of metastases, screening with biochemical markers and endoscopic ultrasound is recommended for early detection of pancreatico-duodenal tumors, and with early surgery before metastases have developed. Surgery is recommended in patients with or without hormonal syndromes in the absence of disseminated liver metastases. The suggested operation includes distal 80% subtotal pancreatic resection together with enucleation of tumors in the head of the pancreas, and in cases with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, excision of duodenal gastrinomas together with clearance of regional lymph node metastases. This strategy, with early and aggressive surgery before metastases have developed, is believed to reduce the risks for tumor recurrence and malignant progression.

  5. A fish of many scales: extrapolating sublethal pesticide exposures to the productivity of wild salmon populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David H; Spromberg, Julann A; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-12-01

    For more than a decade, numerous pesticides have been detected in river systems of the western United States that support anadromous species of Pacific salmon and steelhead. Over the same interval, several declining wild salmon populations have been listed as either threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). Because pesticides occur in surface waters that provide critical habitat for ESA-listed stocks, they are an ongoing concern for salmon conservation and recovery throughout California and the Pacific Northwest. Because pesticide exposures are typically sublethal, a key question is whether toxicological effects at (or below) the scale of the individual animal ultimately reduce the productivity and recovery potential of wild populations. In this study we evaluate how the sublethal impacts of pesticides on physiology and behavior can reduce the somatic growth of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and, by extension, subsequent size-dependent survival when animals migrate to the ocean and overwinter in their first year. Our analyses focused on the organophosphate and carbamate classes of insecticides. These neurotoxic chemicals have been widely detected in aquatic environments. They inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme in the salmon nervous system that regulates neurotransmitter-mediated signaling at synapses. Based on empirical data, we developed a model that explicitly links sublethal reductions in acetylcholinesterase activity to reductions in feeding behavior, food ration, growth, and size at migration. Individual size was then used to estimate size-dependent survival during migration and transition to the sea. Individual survival estimates were then integrated into a life-history population projection matrix and used to calculate population productivity and growth rate. Our results indicate that short-term (i.e., four-day) exposures that are representative of seasonal pesticide use may be sufficient to reduce the

  6. Endocrine and follicular studies in Meishan pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M G; Biggs, C; Faillace, L S

    1993-01-01

    The enhanced early embryonic survival in Chinese Meishan compared with Large-White gilts may be due, in part, to differences in ovarian and endocrine function, particularly during the periovulatory period. The overall patterns of oestradiol, LH and FSH secretion were not different between Meishan and Large-White hybrid controls during this period, although circulating inhibin concentrations were higher in Meishan gilts. Thus, there appeared to be a decreased sensitivity to inhibin feedback on FSH secretion in Meishan gilts. Behavioural oestrus was exhibited earlier relative to the LH surge in Meishan gilts than in Large-White hybrid gilts, but the time interval from the oestradiol peak until the LH surge was similar in both breeds. This finding suggests that Meishan gilts are more sensitive in terms of initiating a behavioural response, but not in terms of positive feedback. Although preovulatory follicular characteristics were as variable in Meishan as in Large-White hybrid gilts, follicles from Meishan gilts were smaller, but contained a higher concentration of oestradiol in the follicular fluid. This was probably due to increased aromatase activity in both granulosa and theca cells of Meishan follicles. The enhanced maturation of the intrafollicular environment in Meishan gilts was reflected in the oocyte population which was at a more advanced stage of development in the period preceding ovulation. In addition to decreasing the time between onset of oestrus and ovulation, advancing the LH surge to coincide with onset of oestrus (via hCG administration) decreased embryo survival at day 30 of gestation. It is concluded that both endocrine and follicular mechanisms have a role in ensuring the prolificacy in the Meishan breed.

  7. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene T. Won

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory growth (CG is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch-up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. Compensatory growth is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin and leptin.

  8. A comparison of the sublethal and lethal toxicity of four pesticides in Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbein, Simone; Connon, Richard E; Lawler, Sharon P; Geist, Juergen

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory toxicity testing is the primary tool used for surface water environmental risk assessment; however, there are critical information gaps regarding the sublethal effects of pesticides. In 10-day exposures, we assessed the lethal and sublethal (motility and growth) toxicities of four commonly used pesticides, bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and chlorpyrifos, on two freshwater invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca. Pyrethroids were more toxic than the organophosphate chlorpyrifos in both species. Bifenthrin was most toxic to H. azteca survival and growth. Cyfluthrin was most toxic to C. dilutus. However, cyfluthrin had the greatest effect on motility on both H. azteca and C. dilutus. The evaluated concentrations of chlorpyrifos did not affect C. dilutus motility or growth, but significantly impacted H. azteca growth. Motility served as the most sensitive endpoint in assessing sublethal effects at low concentrations for both species, while growth was a good indicator of toxicity for all four pesticides for H. azteca. The integration of sublethal endpoints in ambient water monitoring and pesticide regulation efforts could improve identification of low-level pesticide concentrations that may eventually cause negative effects on food webs and community structure in aquatic environments.

  9. Evaluating sub-lethal effects of orchard-applied pyrethroids using video-tracking software to quantify honey bee behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Erin M; Augustin, Julie; Ellis, Marion D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-09-01

    Managed honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies are contracted to pollinate fruit and nut orchards improving crop quality and yield. Colonies placed in orchards are potentially exposed to pyrethroid insecticides used for broad-spectrum pest control. Pyrethroids have been reported to pose minimal risk to bees due to their low application rates in the field and putative repellent properties. This repellency is believed to alter foraging behavior with the benefit of preventing bees from encountering a lethal dose in the field. However, sub-lethal exposure to pyrethroids may adversely impact bee behavior potentially resulting in social dysfunction or disruption of foraging. This study quantified behaviors associated with sub-lethal exposure to orchard-applied pyrethroids including, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and permethrin, using video tracking software, Ethovision XT (Noldus Information Technologies). Bee locomotion, social interaction, and time spent near a food source were measured over a 24-h period. Bees treated with a pyrethroid traveled 30-71% less than control bees. Social interaction time decreased by 43% for bees treated with a high sub-lethal dose of esfenvalerate. Bees exposed to a high sub-lethal dose of permethrin spent 67% less time in social interaction and spent more than 5 times as long in the food zone compared to control bees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy study of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells exposed to sublethal heat stress and carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological changes that occurred in Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after exposure to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 min and in combination with lethal concentration of carv...

  12. Toxicity and sub-lethal effect of endemic plants from family Anacardiaceae on oviposition behavior of Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fatma Zuharah

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: These results clearly indicate that the acetone extract of G. renghas could be served as potential larvicide, whereas M. fasciculiflora has better sub-lethal effect for oviposition deterrence and against Ae. albopictus as an oviciding agent.

  13. Uptake and elimination of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) at sublethal and lethal aqueous concentrations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, van J.M.C.; Koelmans, A.A.; Deneer, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) have been studied in an accumulation and elimination experiment. At a sublethal exposure, uptake and elimination rate constants of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were determined, employing a first-order one-compartment model. The

  14. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  16. Sublethal effects of Imidacloprid on honey bee colony growth and activity at three sites in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field experiments in southern Arizona, central Arkansas and southern Mississippi were conducted to evaluate the effects of sublethal concentrations (0, 5, 20 and 100 ppb) of imidacloprid in sugar syrup on honey bee colony growth and activity. Response variables included discrete data from hive inspe...

  17. Ouroboros - Playing A Biochemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ouroboros: Playing A Biochemical RODRIGUES,D.T.1,2;GAYER, M.C.1,2; ESCOTO, D.F.1; DENARDIN, E.L.G.2, ROEHRS, R.1,2 1Interdisciplinary Research Group on Teaching Practice, Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil 2Laboratory of Physicochemical Studies and Natural Products, Post Graduate Program in Biochemistry, Unipampa, RS, Brazil Introduction: Currently, teachers seek different alternatives to enhance the teaching-learning process. Innovative teaching methodologies are increasingly common tools in educational routine. The use of games, electronic or conventional, is an effective tool to assist in learning and also to raise the social interaction between students. Objective: In this sense our work aims to evaluate the card game and "Ouroboros" board as a teaching and learning tool in biochemistry for a graduating class in Natural Sciences. Materials and methods: The class gathered 22 students of BSc in Natural Sciences. Each letter contained a question across the board that was drawn to a group to answer within the allotted time. The questions related concepts of metabolism, organic and inorganic chemical reactions, bioenergetics, etc.. Before the game application, students underwent a pre-test with four issues involving the content that was being developed. Soon after, the game was applied. Then again questions were asked. Data analysis was performed from the ratio of the number of correct pre-test and post-test answers. Results and discussion: In the pre-test 18.1% of the students knew all issues, 18.1% got 3 correct answers, 40.9% answered only 2 questions correctly and 22.7% did not hit any. In post-test 45.4% answered all the questions right, 31.8% got 3 questions and 22.7% got 2 correct answers. The results show a significant improvement of the students about the field of content taught through the game. Conclusion: Generally, traditional approaches of chemistry and biochemistry are abstract and complex. Thus, through games

  18. Endocrine adaptations in the foal over the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowden, A L; Forhead, A J; Ousey, J C

    2012-02-01

    In adapting to life ex utero, the foal encounters a number of physiological challenges. It has to assume the nutritional, respiratory and excretory functions of the placenta and activate full regulatory control over its own internal environment for the first time. To achieve this, there must be structural and functional changes to a wide range of tissues including several endocrine glands. In most species, including the horse, these maturational changes begin in late gestation and continue into the first few days of neonatal life. Consequently, during this perinatal period, there are major changes in the sensitivity and/or set point of key endocrine axes, which alter the circulating hormone concentrations in the foal. In turn, these endocrine changes are responsible for many of the other physiological adaptations essential for neonatal survival. The perinatal alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are particularly important in these processes, although the sympatho-adrenal medullary axis and endocrine pancreas also have key roles in ensuring homeostasis during the multiple novel stimuli experienced at birth. Abnormalities in the perinatal endocrine profile caused by adverse conditions before or after birth may, therefore, lead to maladaptation or aid survival of the newborn foal depending on the specific circumstances. This review examines the perinatal changes in endocrinology in normal and compromised foals and the role of these endocrine changes in the physiological adaptations to extrauterine life with particular emphasis on the HPA axis, adreno-medullary catecholamines and the endocrine pancreas.

  19. The effects of copper on blood and biochemical parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethloff, G.M.; Schlenk, D.; Khan, S.; Bailey, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    Metals are released into aquatic systems from many sources, often at sublethal concentrations. The effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on fish are not entirely understood. The objective of this study was to determine the hematological and biochemical effects of a range of copper concentrations (6.4, 16.0, 26.9 ??g Cu/L) on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) over a prolonged period of time. Trout were exposed to copper, and, at intervals of 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, selected parameters were evaluated. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, and plasma cortisol levels were elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L at day 3 and then returned to levels comparable to control fish. Plasma protein and lactate levels were not significantly altered in trout from any copper treatment. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression were consistently elevated in trout exposed to 26.9 ??g Cu/L. Both of these parameters stabilized by day 3, with only hepatic copper concentration showing a further increase at day 21. Hepatic copper concentration and hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression appear to be robust indicators of copper exposure. Most blood-based parameters evaluated appear to be associated with a transitory, nonspecific stress response. The return of elevated hematological and biochemical parameters to control levels after 3 days and thestabilization of hepatic metallothionein mRNA expression and copper concentration over a similar time period suggested acclimation to dissolved copper at 26.9 ??g/L. Further analysis of the data on blood-based parameters indicated that certain parameters (hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma glucose, plasma cortisol) may be useful in field monitoring.

  20. Reinitialization of evolutionary clocks during sublethal environmental stress in some invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex, Jean

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the influence of high environmental stress on evolutionary trends in some selected Mesozoic ammonite lineages and some protists. During extinction periods, many ammonoids are affected by drastic simplifications of their shell geometry, ornamentation and suture line. We observe that relatively tightly coiled ammonites can give rise to highly evolute forms or uncoiled heteromorphs with simple ornamentation and almost ceratitic suture line—a phenomenon called "proteromorphosis". Such simplifications often correspond to a reappearance of ancestral geometries (primitive ornamentation, evolute coiling or uncoiling) which suggest that the evolutionary clock of these organisms can be reinitialized by extreme, sublethal, environmental stress such as giant volcanism (including its consequences on diverse pollutions and on climatic changes) and major regressive events.

  1. The growth and development of Schistosoma mansoni in mice exposed to sublethal doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, R.; Wilson, R.A. (Univ. of York, Heslington (England))

    1989-12-01

    The maturation of Schistosoma mansoni was studied in mice exposed to various sublethal doses of radiation. Although the treatment of mice with 500 rads of radiation prior to infection did not alter parasite maturation, doses in excess of 500 rads led to a reduction in worm burden. This could not be attributed to a delay in the arrival of parasites in the hepatic portal system. Worms developing in mice treated with 800 rads commenced egg-laying about 1 wk later than worms in intact mice, and the rate of egg deposition appeared to be lower in irradiated hosts. The data demonstrate that exposure of C57BL/6 mice to doses of radiation in excess of 500 rads impairs their ability to carry infections of S. mansoni. The findings do not support the hypothesis that primary worm burdens in the mouse are controlled by a host immune response.

  2. Feeding Inhibition: the Ups and Downs of Sublethal Effects on Grazers and Detritivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A.; Culp, J.; Liber, K.; Baird, D.

    2005-05-01

    Sublethal impacts are likely the primary mechanism of exposure for the aquatic community in the case of soluble agricultural pesticides. This study examines the effects of pulsed exposures of the common insecticide, imidacloprid, on the feeding and growth of the mayfly Epeorus longimanus, and the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus. Examining the effects of pulsed exposures of imidacloprid is particularly relevant due to the soluble (0.51g/L) nature of this compound. Recovery experiments were conducted by exposing mayflies and oligochaetes to an environmentally realistic range (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 ppb) of concentrations for a short period. Effects on feeding were measured by quantifying the foodstuffs consumed by mayflies and egested by oligochaetes. In tandem with the feeding experiments, a series of artificial stream experiments were undertaken that demonstrate the changes in growth and abundance of adult mayflies in response to this common insecticide stressor.

  3. Effects of Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Sub-Lethal Concentrations on Fish Feeding Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaquinto, Percilia Cardoso; de Sá, Marina Borges; Sugihara, Vanessa Seiko; Gonçalves, Bruno Bastos; Delício, Helton Carlos; Barki, Assaf

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used in agricultural systems. Although the target organism are particularly plant organisms, there are numerous studies showing adverse effects in aquatic animals, such as inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase, effects on kidney, liver, and gill and stressors effects. This study analyzed the effects of commercial formulation of glyphosate on feeding behavior in Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Fish were exposed to three glyphosate concentrations (0.2, 0.6, and 1.8 ppm) for 15 days. At concentrations of 0.2 and 0.6 ppm, food intake decreased on day 13 and then returned to normal on day 15. At the highest glyphosate-based herbicide concentration, 1.8 ppm, food consumption decreased dramatically and did not recover on day 15. This study showed that glyphosate-based herbicide at sub-lethal concentrations can affect feed intake in pacu and consequently inhibits its growth.

  4. Influence of biorhythms on sensitivity of Nerita to pollutants at Sublethal levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battershill, C.N.; Bergquist, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    Intrinsic rhythmic activity of Nerita (Melanerita) atramentosa melanotragus was assessed under constant laboratory conditions. Activity proved to be a sensitive indicator of toxicity, and was affected by low levels of a relatively new oil dispersing agent, Shell SD LTX. How the state of activity influenced animal sensitivity to Shell SD LTX and to an oil, Maui Condensate, was investigated using short-term recovery experiments. Nerita were most sensitive during their active phase, and results during this period differed significantly from tests carried out during the inactive phase of the animal. Dispersant/oil mixture proved to be highly toxic. These findings have ecological implications and permit comment relating to the design of sublethal toxicity tests. These subjects are discussed. 37 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Response of larval fish, Leiostomus xanthurus, to environmental stress following sublethal cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middaugh, D.P.; Davis, W.R.; Yoakum, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The toxicity of cadmium to larval fish, Leiostomus xanthurus, was studied. An incipient LC/sub 50/ concentration of approximately 0.2 to 0.3 mg/l cadmium was first estimated. Subsequent short-term sublethal tests were conducted to determine the relationship of cadmium exposure and accumulated whole body residues of the metal on the response of larvae to thermal stress and low dissolved oxygen. Results of this study indicated a significant decrease (..cap alpha.. = 0.05, t-Test) in the critical thermal maximum (CTM) for larvae exposed to 0.5 and 0.8 mg/l cadmium for 96 hours at 20/sup 0/C. Significant decreases (..cap alpha.. = 0.05, chi/sup 2/) in survival of larvae subjected to a dissolved oxygen (DO) level of 1.6 mg/l after exposure to 0.5 and 0.8 mg/l cadmium were also observed.

  6. Effects of sublethal entrainment stresses on the vulnerability of juvenile bluegill sunfish to predation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, G.F.; Solomon, J.A.; Loar, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a review of literature concerning the effects of sublethal stresses on predator-prey interactions in aquatic systems. In addition, the results of a preliminary laboratory study of the susceptibility of entrainment-stressed juvenile bluegill to striped bass predation are presented. Juvenile bluegill were exposed to thermal and physical entrainment stresses in the ORNL Power Plant Simulator and subsequently to predation by juvenile striped bass in a susceptibility to predation experimental design. None of the entrainment stresses tested (thermal shock, physical effects of pump and condenser passage, and combination of thermal and physical shock) was found to significantly increase predation rates as compared to controls, and no significant interactions between thermal and physical stresses were detected. The validity of laboratory predator-prey studies and the application of indirect mortality information for setting protective standards and predicting environmental impacts are discussed.

  7. Sublethal gamma irradiation affects reproductive impairment and elevates antioxidant enzyme and DNA repair activities in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • No mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). • A reduced fecundity of Brachionus koreanus at over 150 Gy with a decrease in lifespan. • Dose-dependent ROS increase with GST enzyme activity at sub-lethal doses. • Significant impact on life table parameters, particularly fecundity. • Significant up-regulation of DNA repair-associated genes at sublethal doses. - Abstract: To examine the effects of gamma radiation on marine organisms, we irradiated several doses of gamma ray to the microzooplankton Brachionus koreanus, and measured in vivo and in vitro endpoints including the survival rate, lifespan, fecundity, population growth, gamma ray-induced oxidative stress, and modulated patterns of enzyme activities and gene expressions after DNA damage. After gamma radiation, no individuals showed any mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). However, a reduced fecundity (e.g. cumulated number of offspring) of B. koreanus at over 150 Gy was observed along with a slight decrease in lifespan. At 150 Gy and 200 Gy, the reduced fecundity of the rotifers led to a significant decrease in population growth, although in the second generation the population growth pattern was not affected even at 200 Gy when compared to the control group. At sub-lethal doses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels dose-dependently increased with GST enzyme activity. In addition, up-regulations of the antioxidant and chaperoning genes in response to gamma radiation were able to recover cellular damages, and life table parameters were significantly influenced, particularly with regard to fecundity. DNA repair-associated genes showed significantly up-regulated expression patterns in response to sublethal doses (150 and 200 Gy), as shown in the expression of the gamma-irradiated B. koreanus p53 gene, suggesting that these sublethal doses were not significantly fatal to B. koreanus but induced DNA damages leading to a decrease of the population size.

  8. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer A; Hood, W Michael; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Delaplane, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate) and Check Mite+ (coumaphos) and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  9. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptation and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qian; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-16

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced in pH 5.0 tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSB-YE) at 37 °C. Subsequently, the stability of acid stress adaptation, which was defined as the capacity to maintain its acquired acid adaptation after induction in the absence of sublethal acid stress, was determined at 37 °C, 22 °C or 4 °C in broth and in different food substrates. Then, the acid stress adaptation induced cross protection against lauric arginate (LAE) and its stability was investigated in TSB-YE, milk and carrot juice. Our findings show that the acid stress adaptation was stable at 4 °C up to 24h but was reversed at 37 °C or 22 °C within 2h. In the cross protection assay with LAE, the acid stress adapted cells had approximately 2 log CFU/ml greater survival than non-adapted cells in broth at 22 °C or in milk and carrot juice at 4 °C. The acid adaptation induced cross protection against LAE in L. monocytogenes was reversible within 1h at 4 °C in the absence of sublethal acid stress. Our findings suggest that the stability of acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes under cold conditions should be taken into account when the risk analysis is performed during food processing. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Mortality, Temporary Sterilization, and Maternal Effects of Sublethal Heat in Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukke, Bjørn Arne; Aak, Anders; Edgar, Kristin Skarsfjord

    2015-01-01

    Adult bed bugs were exposed to the sublethal temperatures 34.0°C, 35.5°C, 37.0°C, 38.5°C, or 40.0°C for 3, 6, or 9 days. The two uppermost temperatures induced 100% mortality within 9 and 2 days, respectively, whereas 34.0°C had no observable effect. The intermediate temperatures interacted with time to induce a limited level of mortality but had distinct effects on fecundity, reflected by decreases in the number of eggs produced and hatching success. Adult fecundity remained low for up to 40 days after heat exposure, and the time until fertility was restored correlated with the temperature-sum experienced during heat exposure. Three or 6 days of parental exposure to 38.5°C significantly lowered their offspring’s feeding and moulting ability, which consequently led to a failure to continue beyond the third instar. Eggs that were deposited at 22.0°C before being exposed to 37.0°C for 3 or 6 days died, whereas eggs that were exposed to lower temperatures were not significantly affected. Eggs that were deposited during heat treatment exhibited high levels of mortality also at 34.0°C and 35.5°C. The observed negative effects of temperatures between 34.0°C and 40.0°C may be utilized in pest management, and sublethal temperature exposure ought to be further investigated as an additional tool to decimate or potentially eradicate bed bug populations. The effect of parental heat exposure on progeny demonstrates the importance of including maternal considerations when studying bed bug environmental stress reactions. PMID:25996999

  11. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Chris G.; Brunson, Eric L.; Dwyer, F. James; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Kemble, Nile E.

    1998-01-01

    Short-term sediment toxicity tests that only measure effects on survival can be used to identify high levels of contamination but may not be able to identify marginally contaminated sediments. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for determining the potential sublethal effects of contaminants associated with sediment on the amphipod Hyalella azteca (e.g., reproduction). Exposures to sediment were started with 7- to 8-d-old amphipods. On day 28, amphipods were isolated from the sediment and placed in water-only chambers where reproduction was measured on day 35 and 42. Typically, amphipods were first in amplexus at about day 21 to 28 with release of the first brood between day 28 to 42. Endpoints measured included survival (day 28, 35, and 42), growth (as length and weight on day 28 and 42), and reproduction (number of young/female produced from day 28 to 42). This method was used to evaluate a formulated sediment and field-collected sediments with low to moderate concentrations of contaminants. Survival of amphipods in these sediments was typically >85% after the 28-d sediment exposures and the 14-d holding period in water to measure reproduction. Reproduction was more variable than growth; hence, more replicates might be needed to establish statistical differences among treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated that growth of H. azteca in sediment tests often provides unique information that can be used to discriminate toxic effects of exposure to contaminants. Either length or weight can be measured in sediment tests with H. azteca. However, additional statistical options are available if length is measured on individual amphipods, such as nested analysis of variance that can account for variance in length within replicates. Ongoing water-only studies testing select contaminants will provide additional data on the relative sensitivity and variability of sublethal endpoints in toxicity tests with H. azteca.

  12. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Berry

    Full Text Available In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate and Check Mite+ (coumaphos and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  13. Using a sequential regimen to eliminate bacteria at sublethal antibiotic dosages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayari Fuentes-Hernandez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We need to find ways of enhancing the potency of existing antibiotics, and, with this in mind, we begin with an unusual question: how low can antibiotic dosages be and yet bacterial clearance still be observed? Seeking to optimise the simultaneous use of two antibiotics, we use the minimal dose at which clearance is observed in an in vitro experimental model of antibiotic treatment as a criterion to distinguish the best and worst treatments of a bacterium, Escherichia coli. Our aim is to compare a combination treatment consisting of two synergistic antibiotics to so-called sequential treatments in which the choice of antibiotic to administer can change with each round of treatment. Using mathematical predictions validated by the E. coli treatment model, we show that clearance of the bacterium can be achieved using sequential treatments at antibiotic dosages so low that the equivalent two-drug combination treatments are ineffective. Seeking to treat the bacterium in testing circumstances, we purposefully study an E. coli strain that has a multidrug pump encoded in its chromosome that effluxes both antibiotics. Genomic amplifications that increase the number of pumps expressed per cell can cause the failure of high-dose combination treatments, yet, as we show, sequentially treated populations can still collapse. However, dual resistance due to the pump means that the antibiotics must be carefully deployed and not all sublethal sequential treatments succeed. A screen of 136 96-h-long sequential treatments determined five of these that could clear the bacterium at sublethal dosages in all replicate populations, even though none had done so by 24 h. These successes can be attributed to a collateral sensitivity whereby cross-resistance due to the duplicated pump proves insufficient to stop a reduction in E. coli growth rate following drug exchanges, a reduction that proves large enough for appropriately chosen drug switches to clear the bacterium.

  14. Intra- and intergenerational persistence of an insect nucleopolyhedrovirus: adverse effects of sublethal disease on host development, reproduction, and susceptibility to superinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabodevilla, Oihana; Villar, Eduardo; Virto, Cristina; Murillo, Rosa; Williams, Trevor; Caballero, Primitivo

    2011-05-01

    Sublethal infections by Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) are common in field populations of the beet armyworm (S. exigua, Hübner) in the Almerian horticultural region of Spain. Inoculation of second, third, and fourth instars with occlusion bodies (OBs) of an isolate (VT-SeAl1) associated with vertically transmitted infections resulted in 15 to 100% of sublethal infection in adult survivors, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of viral DNA polymerase transcripts, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeted at the DNA polymerase gene. The prevalence of adult sublethal infection was positively related to the inoculum OB concentration consumed during the larval stage. Sublethal infections persisted in OB-treated insects for at least five generations. Viral transcripts were more frequently detected in adult insects than in third instars. qPCR analysis indicated a consistently higher prevalence of sublethal infection than RT-PCR. Sublethal infection was associated with significant reductions in pupal weight, adult emergence, fecundity, and fertility (egg hatch) and significant increases in larval development time and duration of the preoviposition period. Insects taken from a persistently infected experimental population were significantly more susceptible to the OB inoculum than control insects that originated from the same virus-free colony as the persistently infected insects. We conclude that OB treatment results in rapid establishment of sublethal infections that persist between generations and which incur costs in the development and reproductive capacity of the host insect.

  15. Endocrine disrupting chemicals – probability of adverse environmental effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some information about current state of knowledge of the risk due to exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs. Endocrine disruptors are defined as chemicals substances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and wildlife. Exposure to EDCs in animals models correlate positively with an increased incidence of malformations of genital tract, on neoplasmas, obesity, alternations on male and female reproduction and changes in neuroendocrinology and behavior. Results from animal models, human clinical observations and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant risk to public health.

  16. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  17. Headway in resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yali; Sun, Qiang

    2010-09-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is the major problem for ERα(+) breast cancer patients. Research in endocrine resistance, mainly based on breast cancer cell lines and transplantation animal models, has indicated that phosphorylation of estrogen receptors, high expression of SRC and high activation of ErbB/MAPK pathway are the 3 main mechanisms for occurrence of endocrine resistance. Restoration of ER expression and exploration of inhibitors to various biological targets are the 2 promising ways to solve this problem. Further research is needed to deeply explore relevant mechanisms and resolvents so as to guide clinical practice.

  18. Induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) and F1057 in sublethal concentrations of H2O2 and NaOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abrew Abeysundara, Piumi; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Soni, Kamlesh A; Sharma, Chander S; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-12-05

    Food processing and food handling environments may contain residual levels of sanitizers or cleaners which may trigger oxidative stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to determine the induction and stability of oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes EGD (Bug600) (serotype 1/2a) and F1057 (serotype 4b) at different concentrations and times of sublethal oxidative stress induced by H2O2 or sublethal alkali stress induced by NaOH at 37°C. Both L. monocytogenes Bug600 and F1057 strains showed significantly higher survival in lethal oxidative stress (1000ppm H2O2) after pre-exposure to 50ppm H2O2 for 30min compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to H2O2). When the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress by NaOH, the oxidative stress adaptation was induced within 5min in L. monocytogenes. The survival of both L. monocytogenes strains was increased by 2 to 4.5 logs in lethal oxidative stress when the cells were pre-exposed to sublethal alkali stress at pH9 from 5 to 120min by NaOH compared to control cells (no pre-exposure to sublethal alkali pH). Two other alkali reagents tested (KOH and NH4OH) also induced oxidative stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. For both L. monocytogenes strains, the oxidative stress adaptation induced by sublethal H2O2 was reversible in 30min and that induced by sublethal alkali stress was reversible within 60min at 37°C in the absence of such sublethal stress. These findings show that sublethal oxidative or alkali stress conditions can induce oxidative stress adaptation that may increase the risk of survival of L. monocytogenes cells in lethal oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 78 FR 57859 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Endocrine Disruption Potential of Drugs: Nonclinical Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... determine the potential for a drug to disrupt the endocrine system. This draft guidance also discusses... compounds that have the potential to interfere with some aspect of the endocrine system of an organism or its progeny. Any component of the endocrine system can be a target of endocrine disruptors, although...

  20. Vitamin D endocrine system after short-term space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoten, William B. (Principal Investigator); Sergeev, Igor N. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca(2+) metabolism, yet the cellular/molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. There is some evidence for microgravity-induced alterations in the vitamin D endocrine system, which is known to be primarily involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) metabolism. Vitamin D-dependent Ca(2+) binding proteins, or calbindins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. We used immunocytochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D(sub 28k) and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in kidneys and intestines of rats flown for 9 days aboard the Spacelab 3 mission. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats in space vs. 'grounded' animals (synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls and tail suspension controls) were compared. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant decrease in calbindin-D(sub 28k) content in kidneys and calbindin-D(sub 9k) in the intestine of flight and suspended animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in kidneys and intestine, and insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease in the distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 28k) and absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D(sub 9k) immunoreactivity in the space and suspension kidneys and intestine, as compared with matched ground controls. No consistent differences in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space, suspension and ground controls was observed. There were significant correlations between results by quantitative ICC and ELISA. Western blot analysis showed no consistent changes in the low levels of intestinal and renal vitamin D receptors. These findings suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins after a short

  1. VAV3 mediates resistance to breast cancer endocrine therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aguilar (Helena); A. Urruticoechea (Ander); P. Halonen (Pasi); K. Kiyotani (Kazuma); T. Mushiroda (Taisei); X. Barril (Xavier); J. Serra-Musach (Jordi); A.B.M.M.K. Islam (Abul); L. Caizzi (Livia); L. Di Croce (Luciano); E. Nevedomskaya (Ekaterina); W. Zwart (Wilbert); J. Bostner (Josefine); E. Karlsson (Elin); G. Pérez Tenorio (Gizeh); T. Fornander (Tommy); D.C. Sgroi (Dennis); R. Garcia-Mata (Rafael); M.P.H.M. Jansen (Maurice); N. García (Nadia); N. Bonifaci (Núria); F. Climent (Fina); E. Soler (Eric); A. Rodríguez-Vida (Alejo); M. Gil (Miguel); J. Brunet (Joan); G. Martrat (Griselda); L. Gómez-Baldó (Laia); A.I. Extremera (Ana); J. Figueras; J. Balart (Josep); R. Clarke (Robert); K.L. Burnstein (Kerry); K.E. Carlson (Kathryn); J.A. Katzenellenbogen (John); M. Vizoso (Miguel); M. Esteller (Manel); A. Villanueva (Alberto); A.B. Rodríguez-Peña (Ana); X.R. Bustelo (Xosé); Y. Nakamura (Yusuke); H. Zembutsu (Hitoshi); O. Stål (Olle); R.L. Beijersbergen (Roderick); M.A. Pujana (Miguel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Endocrine therapies targeting cell proliferation and survival mediated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) are among the most effective systemic treatments for ERα-positive breast cancer. However, most tumors initially responsive to these therapies acquire resistance through

  2. Endocrine therapy use among elderly hormone receptor-pos...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Clinical guidelines recommend that women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer receive endocrine therapy (selective estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase...

  3. Differential levels of Neurod establish zebrafish endocrine pancreas cell fates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalgin, Gökhan; Prince, Victoria E

    2015-01-01

    .... Differentiation of appropriate numbers of each hormone-expressing endocrine cell type is essential for the normal development of the pancreas and ultimately for effective maintenance of blood glucose levels...

  4. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day eac...... as endocrine disruptors in vivo, although the profile of action in vivo varies. As ketoconazole is known to implicate numerous endocrine-disrupting effects in humans, the concern for the effects of the other tested azole fungicides in humans is growing.......The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each...

  5. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and public health protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Brown, T R; Doan, L L

    2012-01-01

    exposures to have potent and irreversible effects. Finally, with regard to the current program designed to detect putative EDC, namely, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program, we offer recommendations for strengthening this program through the incorporation of basic endocrine principles to promote......An endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) is an exogenous chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that can interfere with any aspect of hormone action. The potential for deleterious effects of EDC must be considered relative to the regulation of hormone synthesis, secretion, and actions and the variability...... in regulation of these events across the life cycle. The developmental age at which EDC exposures occur is a critical consideration in understanding their effects. Because endocrine systems exhibit tissue-, cell-, and receptor-specific actions during the life cycle, EDC can produce complex, mosaic effects...

  6. Endocannabinoids and the Endocrine System in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Cecilia J

    2015-01-01

    Some of the earliest reports of the effects of cannabis consumption on humans were related to endocrine system changes. In this review, the effects of cannabinoids and the role of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the regulation of the following endocrine systems are discussed: the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, prolactin and oxytocin, thyroid hormone and growth hormone, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Preclinical and human study results are presented.

  7. Cabergoline and the risk of valvular lesions in endocrine disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Livadariu, E.; Markov, M.; Daly, Adrian; Burlacu, M. C.; BETEA, Daniela; Pierard, Luc; Beckers, Albert

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: The cardiac valvular risk associated with lower exposure to cabergoline in common endocrine conditions such as hyperprolactinemia is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a cross-sectional, case-control echocardiographic study to assess the valvular status in 102 subjects receiving cabergoline for endocrine disorders and 51 matched control subjects. Cabergoline treatment ranged from 12 to 228 months, with a cumulative dose of 18-1718 mg. Valvular regurgitation was equally prevalent...

  8. Sarcopenic Obesity and Endocrinal Adaptation with Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In normal aging, changes in the body composition occur that result in a shift toward decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass. The loss of muscle mass that occurs with aging is termed sarcopenia and is an important cause of frailty, disability, and loss of independence in older adults. Age-related changes in the body composition as well as the increased prevalence of obesity determine a combination of excess weight and reduced muscle mass or strength, recently defined as sarcopenic obesity. Weight gain increases total/abdominal fat, which, in turn, elicits inflammation and fatty infiltration in muscle. Sarcopenic obesity appears to be linked with the upregulation of TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, leptin, and myostatin and the downregulation of adiponectin and IL-15. Multiple combined exercise and mild caloric restriction markedly attenuate the symptoms of sarcopenic obesity. Intriguingly, the inhibition of myostatin induced by gene manipulation or neutralizing antibody ameliorates sarcopenic obesity via increased skeletal muscle mass and improved glucose homeostasis. In this review, we describe the possible influence of endocrinal changes with age on sarcopenic obesity.

  9. Metabolic and endocrine effects of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copinschi, Georges

    2005-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has multiple effects on endocrine and metabolic function. In particular, sleep restriction is accompanied by increased cortisol levels in the afternoon and early evening and a shorter quiescent period compared with extended sleep periods. Those alterations could facilitate central and peripheral disturbances that are associated with glucocorticoid excess, such as memory deficits, and are similar to those observed in aging. Thus, chronic sleep loss could contribute to acceleration of the aging process. Sleep restriction is also associated with an impairment of carbohydrate tolerance, similar to that observed in individuals with clinically significant impaired glucose tolerance. Thus, chronic sleep deprivation may increase the risk for diabetes. Finally, sleep plays an important role in energy balance. Partial sleep deprivation was found to be associated with a decrease in plasma levels of leptin and a concomitant increase in plasma levels of ghrelin; subjective ratings of hunger and appetite also increased (the appetite for protein-rich foods was not significantly affected). Moreover, a remarkable correlation was found between the increase in hunger and the increase in the ghrelin:leptin ratio. Thus, the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite and food intake appears to be influenced by sleep duration, and sleep restriction may favor the development of obesity.

  10. QSAR Methods to Screen Endocrine Disruptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Porta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on in silico methods addressing toxicological studies about EDCs with a special focus on the application of QSAR models for screening purpose. Since Estrogen-like (ER activity has been extensively studied, the majority of the available models are based on ER-related endpoints. Some of these models are here reviewed and described. As example for their application, we screen an assembled dataset of candidate substitutes for some known EDCs belonging to the chemical classes of phthalates, bisphenols and parabens, selected considering their toxicological relevance and broad application, with the general aim of preliminary assessing their ED potential. The goal of the substitution processes is to advance inherently safer chemicals and products, consistent with the principles of green chemistry. Results suggest that the integration of a family of different models accounting for different endpoints can be a convenient way to describe ED as properly as possible and allow also both to increase the confidence of the predictions and to maximize the probability that most active compounds are correctly found.

  11. The endocrine and paracrine control of menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Patrick; Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Marbaix, Etienne

    2012-07-25

    During the reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes cycles of substantial remodeling including, at menstruation, a massive but delimited tissue breakdown immediately followed by scarless repair. The present review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on the endocrine and paracrine control of menstruation in the light of recent observations that undermine obsolete dogmas. Menstruation can be globally considered as a response to falling progesterone concentration. However, tissue breakdown is heterogeneous and tightly controlled in space and time by a complex network of regulators and effectors, including cytokines, chemokines, proteases and various components of an inflammatory response. Moreover, menstruation must be regarded as part of a complex and integrated mechanism of tissue remodeling including features that precede and follow tissue lysis, i.e. decidualization and immediate post-menstrual regeneration. The understanding of the regulation of menstruation is of major basic and clinical interest. Indeed, these mechanisms largely overlap with those controlling other histopathological occurrences of tissue remodeling, such as development and cancer, and inappropriate control of menstrual features is a major potential cause of two frequent endometrial pathologies (i.e. abnormal uterine bleeding and endometriosis). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. All Madelung deformities are not endocrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Madelung deformity is a rare inherited disorder associated with endocrine disorders like Turner′s syndrome, pseudohypoparathyroidism, but can be seen with short stature homeobox deficiency conditions such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD and Langers mesomelic dysplasia. It has also been reported following trauma to the distal radius epiphysis neoplasia mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS and achondroplasia. Madelung deformity is an abnormality of distal radial epiphysis where in progressive ulnar and volar tilt of the articular surface occurring in association with distal subluxation of ulna. A 13-year-old girl was referred to us for evaluation of bilateral deformity of wrist and short stature. There was ulnar deviation and dorsal tilt of bilateral hands without history of pain to the joint trauma and family history of similar illness. On X-ray, wrist showed malformed distal radial epiphysis with dorsal and ulnar shift and with increased length of phalanges suggestive of Madelung deformity. X-ray spine was normal. Ultrasound abdomen showed normal uterus and ovary and her follicle stimulating hormone. Luteinizing hormone was normal and so was urine MPS screening. Based on the above points the diagnosis of LWD was made.

  13. Skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Kenji; Machida, Takuji; Hirafuji, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle plays a key role in postural retention as well as locomotion for maintaining the physical activities of human life. Skeletal muscle has a second role as an elaborate energy production and consumption system that influences the whole body's energy metabolism. Skeletal muscle is a specific organ that engenders a physical force, and exercise training has been known to bring about multiple benefits for human health maintenance and/or improvement. The mechanisms underlying the improvement of the human physical condition have been revealed: skeletal muscle synthesizes and secretes multiple factors, and these muscle-derived factors, so-called as myokines, exert beneficial effects on peripheral and remote organs. In this short review, we focus on the third aspect of skeletal muscle function - namely, the release of multiple types of myokines, which constitute a broad network for regulating the function of remote organs as well as skeletal muscle itself. We conclusively show that skeletal muscle is one of the endocrine organs and that understanding the mechanisms of production and secretion of myokines may lead to a new pharmacological approach for treatment of clinical disorders.

  14. EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Endocrine Society's first Scientific Statement in 2009 provided a wake-up call to the scientific community about how environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect health and disease. Five years later, a substantially larger body of literature has solidified our understanding of plausible mechanisms underlying EDC actions and how exposures in animals and humans—especially during development—may lay the foundations for disease later in life. At this point in history, we have much stronger knowledge about how EDCs alter gene-environment interactions via physiological, cellular, molecular, and epigenetic changes, thereby producing effects in exposed individuals as well as their descendants. Causal links between exposure and manifestation of disease are substantiated by experimental animal models and are consistent with correlative epidemiological data in humans. There are several caveats because differences in how experimental animal work is conducted can lead to difficulties in drawing broad conclusions, and we must continue to be cautious about inferring causality in humans. In this second Scientific Statement, we reviewed the literature on a subset of topics for which the translational evidence is strongest: 1) obesity and diabetes; 2) female reproduction; 3) male reproduction; 4) hormone-sensitive cancers in females; 5) prostate; 6) thyroid; and 7) neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. Our inclusion criteria for studies were those conducted predominantly in the past 5 years deemed to be of high quality based on appropriate negative and positive control groups or populations, adequate sample size and experimental design, and mammalian animal studies with exposure levels in a range that was relevant to humans. We also focused on studies using the developmental origins of health and disease model. No report was excluded based on a positive or negative effect of the EDC exposure. The bulk of the results across the board strengthen the

  15. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Associated Disorders and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam De Coster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and/or prevalence of health problems associated with endocrine-disruption have increased. Many chemicals have endocrine-disrupting properties, including bisphenol A, some organochlorines, polybrominated flame retardants, perfluorinated substances, alkylphenols, phthalates, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, solvents, and some household products including some cleaning products, air fresheners, hair dyes, cosmetics, and sunscreens. Even some metals were shown to have endocrine-disrupting properties. Many observations suggesting that endocrine disruptors do contribute to cancer, diabetes, obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility are listed in this paper. An overview is presented of mechanisms contributing to endocrine disruption. Endocrine disruptors can act through classical nuclear receptors, but also through estrogen-related receptors, membrane-bound estrogen-receptors, and interaction with targets in the cytosol resulting in activation of the Src/Ras/Erk pathway or modulation of nitric oxide. In addition, changes in metabolism of endogenous hormones, cross-talk between genomic and nongenomic pathways, cross talk with estrogen receptors after binding on other receptors, interference with feedback regulation and neuroendocrine cells, changes in DNA methylation or histone modifications, and genomic instability by interference with the spindle figure can play a role. Also it was found that effects of receptor activation can differ in function of the ligand.

  16. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Reifschneider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life.

  17. Development of a New Technique to Assess Susceptibility to Predation Resulting from Sublethal Stresses (Indirect Mortality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, G.F.

    2003-08-25

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. We evaluated a new technique for assessing indirect mortality, based on a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). We compare this technique to the standard predator preference test. The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. We subjected striped shiners and fathead minnows to varying intensities of either turbulence (10-, 20- or 30-min) or 2-min exposures to a fish anesthetic (100 or 200 mg/L of tricaine methanesulfonate), and evaluated their subsequent behavior. Individual fish were given a startle stimulus and filmed with a high-speed video camera. Each fish was startled and filmed twice before being stressed, and then at 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min post-exposure. The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of maximum C-shape, time to completion of C-shape, and completeness of C-shape. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether stressed fish exhibited a startle response. For striped shiners, the number of fish not responding to the stimulus was significantly different

  18. BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1996-01-01

    The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

  19. Sublethal pesticide doses negatively affect survival and the cellular responses in American foulbrood-infected honeybee larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Javier Hernández; Krainer, Sophie; Engert, Antonia; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Riessberger-Gallé, Ulrike; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-02-01

    Disclosing interactions between pesticides and bee infections is of most interest to understand challenges that pollinators are facing and to which extent bee health is compromised. Here, we address the individual and combined effect that three different pesticides (dimethoate, clothianidin and fluvalinate) and an American foulbrood (AFB) infection have on mortality and the cellular immune response of honeybee larvae. We demonstrate for the first time a synergistic interaction when larvae are exposed to sublethal doses of dimethoate or clothianidin in combination with Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of AFB. A significantly higher mortality than the expected sum of the effects of each individual stressor was observed in co-exposed larvae, which was in parallel with a drastic reduction of the total and differential hemocyte counts. Our results underline that characterizing the cellular response of larvae to individual and combined stressors allows unmasking previously undetected sublethal effects of pesticides in colony health.

  20. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  1. Physicochemical Evidence on Sublethal Neonicotinoid Imidacloprid Interacting with an Odorant-Binding Protein from the Tea Geometrid Moth, Ectropis obliqua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongliang; Zhao, Lei; Fu, Xiaobin; Song, Xinmi; Wu, Fan; Tang, Mingzhu; Cui, Hongchun; Yu, Jizhong

    2017-04-26

    Nowadays the excessive usage of neonicotinoid insecticides always results in residues in Chinese tea fields. It is not clear whether the insecticide residue at the sublethal level influences the physiological processes of tea pests. Here, we provide evidence of interaction between the neonicotinoid imidacloprid and a general odorant-binding protein, EoblGOBP2, from the tea geometrid moth, Ectropis obliqua. The interacting process was demonstrated through multiple fluorescence spectra, UV absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular docking, etc. The binding mode was determined to be static (from 300 to 310 K) and dynamic quenching (from 290 to 300 K). The binding distance was calculated to be 6.9 nm on the basis of FRET theory. According to the thermodynamic analysis, the process was mainly driven by enthalpy (ΔH neonicotinoid insecticide at sublethal level may still affect the olfactory cognition of the tea geometrid moth to volatile compounds from tea leaves.

  2. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaradasa, B Sajeewa; Everhart, Sydney E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment, and

  3. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sajeewa Amaradasa

    Full Text Available Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor, iprodione (unclear mode of action, thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors. Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50-100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each. Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001. Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the

  4. Effects of Sublethal Fungicides on Mutation Rates and Genomic Variation in Fungal Plant Pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaradasa, B. Sajeewa

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen exposure to sublethal doses of fungicides may result in mutations that may represent an important and largely overlooked mechanism of introducing new genetic variation into strictly clonal populations, including acquisition of fungicide resistance. We tested this hypothesis using the clonal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Nine susceptible isolates were exposed independently to five commercial fungicides with different modes of action: boscalid (respiration inhibitor), iprodione (unclear mode of action), thiophanate methyl (inhibition of microtubulin synthesis) and azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin (quinone outside inhibitors). Mycelium of each isolate was inoculated onto a fungicide gradient and sub-cultured from the 50–100% inhibition zone for 12 generations and experiment repeated. Mutational changes were assessed for all isolates at six neutral microsatellite (SSR) loci and for a subset of isolates using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). SSR analysis showed 12 of 85 fungicide-exposed isolates had a total of 127 stepwise mutations with 42 insertions and 85 deletions. Most stepwise deletions were in iprodione- and azoxystrobin-exposed isolates (n = 40/85 each). Estimated mutation rates were 1.7 to 60-fold higher for mutated loci compared to that expected under neutral conditions. AFLP genotyping of 33 isolates (16 non-exposed control and 17 fungicide exposed) generated 602 polymorphic alleles. Cluster analysis with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) identified fungicide-exposed isolates as a distinct group from non-exposed control isolates (PhiPT = 0.15, P = 0.001). Dendrograms based on neighbor-joining also supported allelic variation associated with fungicide-exposure. Fungicide sensitivity of isolates measured throughout both experiments did not show consistent trends. For example, eight isolates exposed to boscalid had higher EC50 values at the end of the experiment

  5. Exposure to sublethal blast overpressure reduces the food intake and exercise performance of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, R A; Elsayed, N; Petras, J M; Widholm, J

    1997-07-25

    Exposure to blast overpressure can typically inflict generalized damage on major organ systems, especially gas-containing organs such as the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of the present study was to use rat's food intake and exercise wheel running as behavioral correlates of the perhaps more subtle damage to these organ systems induced by sublethal blast overpressure. Toward this end, all rats were exposed to a 12-h light/dark cycle and food was available only in the dark period. Prior to exposure, rats in the (E)xercise group were required to execute five rotations of an activity wheel for a food pellet; wheel turns that occurred at times other than when a rat was feeding were recorded separately and labeled exercise running. In the (S)edentary and (A)nesthesia groups, wheel running was not possible and rats were required to execute five leverpresses for a single pellet. A compressed air-driven shock tube was used to expose rats to a supra-atmospheric wave of air pressure. The tube was separated into two sections by a polyester membrane, the thickness of which determined peak and duration of overpressure. All rats were anesthetized with 50 mg/kg of phenobarbital. After reaching a deep plane of anesthesia, they were individually tied in a stockinet across one end of the shock tube. In preliminary tests, the membrane thickness was 1000 (A)ngstroms and rats in Group L(ethality) were exposed to a 129 kPa (peak amplitude) wave of overpressure. Three of six rats survived exposure to this peak pressure; pathology was evident in the lungs and gastrointestinal tract of all non-survivors. Rats in Groups E and S were tested with a 500 A membrane, which resulted in an 83 kPa peak amplitude. All rats survived exposure to this lower peak pressure. On the day of exposure to blast, the relative reduction of intake during the first 3 h of the dark period was significantly greater for Group E than for Groups S and A; the intake of Groups E and S remained reduced

  6. Effects of nanomolar copper on water plants—Comparison of biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of deficiency and sublethal toxicity under environmentally relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, George, E-mail: george.thomas@uni.kn [Universität Konstanz, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Sektion, Fachbereich Biologie, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Stärk, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: ha-jo.staerk@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wellenreuther, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.wellenreuther@desy.de [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dickinson, Bryan C., E-mail: bryan.dickinson@gmail.com [Harvard University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Küpper, Hendrik, E-mail: hendrik.kuepper@uni-konstanz.de [Universität Konstanz, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Sektion, Fachbereich Biologie, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); University of South Bohemia, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Institute of Physical Biology, Branišovská 31, CZ-370 05 České Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •We found different optimal Cu requirement for different physiological mechanisms. •Kinetics and concentration thresholds of damage mechanisms were established. •Cu toxicity caused internal Cu re-distribution and inhibition of Zn uptake. •Cu deficient plants released Cu, indicating lack of high-affinity Cu transporters. •Cu deficiency caused re-distribution of zinc in the plant. -- Abstract: Toxicity and deficiency of essential trace elements like Cu are major global problems. Here, environmentally relevant sub-micromolar concentrations of Cu (supplied as CuSO{sub 4}) and simulations of natural light- and temperature cycles were applied to the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum. Growth was optimal at 10 nM Cu, while PSII activity (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) was maximal around 2 nM Cu. Damage to the PSII reaction centre was the first target of Cu toxicity, followed by disturbed regulation of heat dissipation (NPQ). Only after that, electron transport through PSII (Φ{sub PSII}) was inhibited, and finally chlorophylls decreased. Copper accumulation in the plants was stable until 10 nM Cu in solution, but strongly increased at higher concentrations. The vein was the main storage site for Cu up to physiological concentrations (10 nM). At toxic levels it was also sequestered to the epidermis and mesophyll until export from the vein became inhibited, accompanied by inhibition of Zn uptake. Copper deficiency led to a complete stop of growth at “0” nM Cu after 6 weeks. This was accompanied by high starch accumulation although electron flow through PSII (Φ{sub PSII}) decreased from 2 weeks, followed by decrease in pigments and increase of non photochemical quenching (NPQ). Release of Cu from the plants below 10 nM Cu supply in the nutrient solution indicated lack of high-affinity Cu transporters, and on the tissue level copper deficiency led to a re-distribution of zinc.

  7. Do biopesticides affect the demographic traits of a parasitoid wasp and its biocontrol services through sublethal effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Biondi

    Full Text Available Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®, emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae, on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life

  8. Do Biopesticides Affect the Demographic Traits of a Parasitoid Wasp and Its Biocontrol Services through Sublethal Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Antonio; Zappalà, Lucia; Stark, John D.; Desneux, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide risk assessments are usually based on short-term acute toxicity tests, while longer-term population dynamic related traits, critical to the success of biological control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, are often overlooked. This is increasingly important with respect to new biopesticides that frequently cause no short-term acute effects, but that can induce multiple physiological and behavioral sublethal effects, leading to a decrease in population growth and ecosystem services. In this study we assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of six biopesticides [abamectin, azadirachtin, Bacillus thuringiensis, borax plus citrus oil (Prev-Am®), emamectin benzoate, and spinosad], used in tomato crops to control the invasive pest Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), on adults and pupae of the parasitoid Bracon nigricans (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Data on female survival and production of female offspring were used to calculate population growth indexes as a measure of population recovery after pesticide exposure. Spinosad caused 100% and 80% mortality in exposed adults (even 10 d after the treatment) and pupae, respectively. Although most of the biopesticides had low levels of acute toxicity, multiple sublethal effects were observed. The biocontrol activity of both females that survived 1-h and 10-d old residues, and females that emerged from topically treated pupae was significantly affected by the application of the neurotoxic insecticides emamectin benzoate and abamectin. Furthermore, very low B. nigricans demographic growth indices were estimated for these two insecticides, indicating potential local extinction of the wasp populations. Among the tested products, Bt proved to be the safest for B. nigricans adults and pupae. Our findings emphasize that acute toxicity assessment alone cannot fully predict the actual impact of pesticides on non-target parasitoids. Thus, sublethal effects related to the species specific life-history variables

  9. Sublethal doses of the pesticide imidacloprid alter honey bee (Apis mellifera) response threshold and navigation, potentially affecting colony health

    OpenAIRE

    Eiri, Daren

    2011-01-01

    Much attention on honey bee declines has focused on the sublethal effects the pesticide, imidacloprid, has on honey bee behavior. How it affects individual foragers and their preference for nectar or their ability to navigate to communicated food sources is unknown. We use the proboscis extension reflex (PER) assay to test an individual's response threshold. Bees treated with the pesticide have higher response thresholds and respond less often to high concentrations of sucrose than control be...

  10. Thermal inactivation and sublethal injury kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth versus agar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Devlieghere, Frank; Geeraerd, Annemie; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2017-02-21

    The objective of the present study was to compare the thermal inactivation and sublethal injury kinetics of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in broth (suspended cells) and on solid surface (agar-seeded cells). A 3-strain cocktail of S. enterica or L. monocytogenes inoculated in broth or on agar was subjected to heating in a water bath at various set temperatures (55.0, 57.5 and 60.0°C for S. enterica and 60.0, 62.5 and 65°C for L. monocytogenes). The occurrence of sublethally injured cells was determined by comparing enumerations on nonselective (TSAYE) and selective (XLD or ALOA) media. Results showed that the inactivation curves obtained from selective media were log-linear, and significant shoulders (pagar surface exhibited higher heat resistance than those in broth. For S. enterica, cell injury increased with the exposure time, no difference was observed when treated at temperatures from 55.0 to 60.0°C, while for L. monocytogenes, cell injury increased significantly with heating time and treatment temperature (from 60.0 to 65°C). Moreover, the degree of sublethal injury affected by thermal treatment in broth or on agar surface depended upon the target microorganism. Higher proportions of injured S. enterica cells were observed for treatment in broth than on agar surface, while the opposite was found for L. monocytogenes. The provided information may be used to assess the efficacy of thermal treatment processes on surfaces for inactivation of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes, and it provides insight into the sublethally injured survival state of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes treated in liquid or on solid food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sub-lethal doses of photodynamic therapy affect biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, M; Chiniforush, N; Shahabi, S; Ghorbanzadeh, R; Bahador, A

    2016-09-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of a primary endodontic infection, it is extremely likely that microorganisms would be exposed to sub-lethal doses of PDT (sPDT). Although sPDT cannot kill microorganisms, it can considerably influence microbial virulence. This study was conducted to characterize the effect of sPDT using toluidine blue O (TBO), methylene blue (MB), and indocyanine green (ICG) on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis. The antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential of ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT against E. faecalis was analyzed at sub-lethal doses (1/2-1/64 minimum inhibitory concentration) using the XTT reduction assay, crystal violet assay, and scanning electron microscopy. Higher doses of sPDT adversely affected biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-PDT at a maximum sub-lethal dose markedly reduced the formation of biofilm up to 42.8%, 22.6%, and 19.5%, respectively. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT showed a marked reduction in bacterial metabolic activity by 98%, 94%, and 82%, respectively. ICG-PDT showed a stronger inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in E. faecalis than MB- and TBO-PDT at sub-lethal levels. Interestingly, a gradual increase in metabolic activity and biofilm formation upon exposure to a lower dose of test sPDT were observed. sPDT showed dual effect on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis. High doses revealed antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses had conflicting results. Hence, when PDT is prescribed in clinical settings, the dose of PDT used in vivo should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sublethal Exposure to Diatomaceous Earth Increases Net Fecundity of Flour Beetles (Tribolium confusum) by Inhibiting Egg Cannibalism

    OpenAIRE

    Shostak, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth) increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day) of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible fo...

  13. Minireview: Gut Microbiota: The Neglected Endocrine Organ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gerard; Stilling, Roman M.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Stanton, Catherine; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The concept that the gut microbiota serves as a virtual endocrine organ arises from a number of important observations. Evidence for a direct role arises from its metabolic capacity to produce and regulate multiple compounds that reach the circulation and act to influence the function of distal organs and systems. For example, metabolism of carbohydrates results in the production of short-chain fatty acids, such as butyrate and propionate, which provide an important source of nutrients as well as regulatory control of the host digestive system. This influence over host metabolism is also seen in the ability of the prebiotic inulin to influence production of relevant hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, ghrelin, and leptin. Moreover, the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus PL60, which produces conjugated linoleic acid, has been shown to reduce body-weight gain and white adipose tissue without effects on food intake. Manipulating the microbial composition of the gastrointestinal tract modulates plasma concentrations of tryptophan, an essential amino acid and precursor to serotonin, a key neurotransmitter within both the enteric and central nervous systems. Indirectly and through as yet unknown mechanisms, the gut microbiota exerts control over the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This is clear from studies on animals raised in a germ-free environment, who show exaggerated responses to psychological stress, which normalizes after monocolonization by certain bacterial species including Bifidobacterium infantis. It is tempting to speculate that therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota may be useful in treating stress-related disorders and metabolic diseases. PMID:24892638

  14. Endocrine activity of mycotoxins and mycotoxin mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaegdt, Heidi; Daminet, Britt; Evrard, Annick; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Muller, Marc; Pussemier, Luc; Callebaut, Alfons; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2016-10-01

    Reporter gene assays incorporating nuclear receptors (estrogen, androgen, thyroid β and PPARγ2) have been implemented to assess the endocrine activity of 13 mycotoxins and their mixtures. As expected, zearalenone and its metabolites α-zearalenol and β- zearalenol turned out to have the strongest estrogenic potency (EC50 8,7 10-10 ± 0,8; 3,1 10-11 ± 0,5 and 1,3 10-8 ± 0,3 M respectively). The metabolite of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol also had estrogenic activity (EC50 3,8 10-7 ± 1,1 M). Furthermore, most of the mycotoxins (and their mixtures) showed anti-androgenic effects (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol and α-zearalenol with potencies within one order of magnitude of that of the reference compound flutamide). In particular, deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol acted as antagonists for the PPARy2 receptor. When testing mixtures of mycotoxins on the same cell systems, we showed that most of the mixtures reacted as predicted by the concentration addition (CA) theory. Generally, the CA was within the 95% confidence interval of the observed ones, only minor deviations were detected. Although these reporter gene tests cannot be directly extrapolated in vivo, they can be the basis for further research. Especially the additive effects of ZEN and its metabolites are of importance and could have repercussions in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency of other endocrine disorders in hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjekić-Macut Jelica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothyroidism is a condition of reduced production, distribution, or absence of action of thyroid hormones. Clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism is not easily established due to the nonspecific clinical manifestations. Determination of serum TSH is the first-line test for the diagnosis of hypothyroidism. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of other endocrine disorders in patients with subclinical (TSH levels between 5 and 10 mIU/l, or clinical (TSH above 10 mIU/l hypothyrodism. We analyzed 50 patients (35 with clinical hypothyroidism and 15 with subclinical form. In all patients anthropometric data (age, sex, weight, height, body mass index, blood pressure and heart rate, and clinical signs of hypothyroidism (skin changes, menstrual disorders were determined. Blood was drawn in fasting state for measurement of FT4, sTSH, glucose, lipids, ionized calcium, PTH, cortisol, ACTH, prolactin, gonadotropins, estradiol in women of reproductive age, and testosterone in men. Skin lesions were rarely present. Oligomenorrhea was more frequent in subclinical hypothyroidism, and menopause in clinical hypothyroidism. Blood pressure was normal in all subjects. Patients with clinical hypothyroidism compared to those with subclinical form had higher TSH values (19.5 ± 5.7 vs. 5.9 ± 0.3 mIU/l, and higher doses of L-thyroxine (81.2 ± 4.6 vs. 21.4 ± 3.5 μg/day. Disturbance of glycemic control was present in 18% of patients. Total cholesterol and LDL were insignificantly higher in patients with hypothyroidism than in subclinical form of the disease. FT4, calcium, PTH, cortisol, ACTH, gonadotropins, estradiol and testosterone did not differ between groups. The proatherogenic relation of estradiol with triglycerides was established in women with clinical form of hypothyroidism.

  16. Sexual Orientation Modulates Endocrine Stress Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Mendrek, Adrianna; Pfaus, James G.; Smith, Nathan Grant; Johnson, Philip Jai; Lefebvre-Louis, Jean-Philippe; Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Sindi, Shireen; Lupien, Sonia J.; Pruessner, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biological sex differences and sociocultural gender diversity influence endocrine stress reactivity. Although numerous studies have shown that men typically activate stronger stress responses than women when exposed to laboratory-based psychosocial stressors, it is unclear whether sexual orientation further modulates stress reactivity. Given that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals frequently report heightened distress secondary to stigma-related stressors, we investigated whether cortisol stress reactivity differs between LGB individuals and heterosexual individuals in response to a well-validated psychosocial stressor. METHODS The study population comprised 87 healthy adults (mean age, 25 years) who were grouped according to their biological sex and their gendered sexual orientation: lesbian/bisexual women (n = 20), heterosexual women (n = 21), gay/bisexual men (n = 26), and heterosexual men (n = 20). Investigators collected 10 salivary cortisol samples throughout a 2-hour afternoon visit involving exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test modified to maximize between-sex differences. RESULTS Relative to heterosexual women, lesbian/bisexual women showed higher cortisol stress reactivity 40 min after exposure to the stressor. In contrast, gay/bisexual men displayed lower overall cortisol concentrations throughout testing compared with heterosexual men. Main findings were significant while adjusting for sex hormones (estradiol-to-progesterone ratio in women and testosterone in men), age, self-esteem, and disclosure status (whether LGB participants had completed their “coming out”). CONCLUSIONS Our results provide novel evidence for gender-based modulation of cortisol stress reactivity based on sexual orientation that goes beyond well-established between-sex differences. This study raises several important avenues for future research related to the physiologic functioning of LGB populations and gender diversity more broadly. PMID:25444167

  17. Biochemical Abnormalities in Batten's Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jytte Lene; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov

    1978-01-01

    -butyl hydroperoxide as donors also makes it possible biochemically to divide Batten's syndrome into two types: (1) one type with decreased values when H2O2 and cumene hydroperoxide are used, and (2) one type with increased values when t-butyl hydroperoxide is used. Furthermore an increased content of palmitic, oleic...

  18. Autotaxin : biochemical and functional studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, Anna Jacoba Sara

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on autotaxin (ATX), the main enzyme responsible for the production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The ATX-LPA receptor axis has a wide implication in health and disease. The studies described in this thesis aim at characterizing the biochemical and functional properties of ATX,

  19. BIOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF SCHISTOSOME BEHAVIOUR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF SCHISTOSOME BEHAVIOUR. P.J.FRIPP. Bilharzia. Research Unit, South African Institute for Medical Research, Johannesburg. ABSTRACT. The haematophagous blood trematodes that comprise the genus SchistolJlOmIl live in a stable environment with an adequate food supply and an ...

  20. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cythoarquitecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eD’Alessio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test, and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope. Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group, sub-lethal dose of 0.5 ηg and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n=6. Blood–Brain Barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance.

  1. Protective effect of milk constituents and sublethal injuries limiting process effectiveness during PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, H; Schulz, A; Karapetkov, N; Knorr, D

    2009-08-31

    The inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus by pulsed electric field treatment (PEF) was studied in different fractions of raw milk and Ringer solution in order to evaluate the protective effect of nutrient rich media in comparison to aqueous buffer solutions. Apart from monitoring of culturability, analysis of the physiological fitness of Lb. rhamnosus was conducted aiming to identify sublethally damaged cells. Therefore, flow cytometry and a selective medium plating technique were used and compared to each other. The goal of the study was to apply three different parameters describing the physiological fitness of the model organism Lb. rhamnosus after PEF treatment such as culturability, membrane permeability and metabolic activity depending on treatment media and parameters. A concentration dependent protective effect of the milk protein fraction could be shown and allocated to micellar casein as the major milk protein. Increasing the concentration of whey proteins up to 2% showed a similar impact on limiting the PEF inactivation of Lb. rhamnosus. The evaluation of physiological fitness of cells was based on a determination of structural and functional characteristics by rapid cellular staining using carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide. This approach showed good accordance to the conventional selective medium plating technique for the enumeration of sublethally-injured bacteria but flow cytometry provided additional information for the characterisation of this fraction. The extent of occurrence of dead, sublethal and vital fractions of cells was found dependent on the PEF treatment parameters such as electrical field strength and energy input as well as the different milk fractions used as treatment media.

  2. Acute Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Terpenoids and Essential Oils on the Predator Chrysoperla externa (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, R V; Grützmacher, A D; Coats, J R

    2017-07-31

    The search for new safer insecticides has increased in recent agriculture. Botanical compounds such as terpenoids and plant essential oils with insecticidal activity could represent important tools in pest management, and their risk assessment against non-target organisms is necessary since they may serve as a precursor for the synthesis of new insecticide active ingredients. For this study, the acute toxicity and sublethal effects of seven terpenoids and three essential oils with recognized insecticidal activity were evaluated on the predator Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) in laboratory bioassays. Results indicate that these compounds feature relative selectivity to the predator C. externa; however, sublethal effects on reproduction were recorded for some compounds. The phenolic monoterpenoids carvacrol and thymol were more acutely toxic than other terpenoids screened, with LD 50 <20,000 μg/g; however, they were less toxic than natural pyrethrins (toxicity standard) in these bioassays. Sublethal effects on fecundity and fertility were observed for R-(+)-limonene, while oregano oil only affected fecundity. The compounds evaluated here have potential to be used as insecticides and can serve as backbone for future synthesis of selective active ingredients; however, a complete risk assessment to C. externa and other non-target organisms is necessary for their incorporation in future crop protection paradigms.

  3. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Some Chemical and Biological Insecticides on Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) Eggs and Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozad-Bonab, Z; Hejazi, M J; Iranipour, Sh; Arzanlou, M

    2017-06-01

    Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) is one of the serious pests of tomatoes. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of some chemical and biological insecticides on T. absoluta. The insecticides tested were diazinon, dichlorvos, chlorantraniliprole, deltamethrin, acetamiprid, imidacloprid, spinosad, abamectin, indoxacarb, Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin. Sublethal effects for the most effective insecticides tested, namely, abamectin, spinosad, chlorantraniliprole, and indoxacarb were assessed, and life table parameters were calculated. Chlorantraniliprole had the highest lethal effect on T. absoluta followed by spinosad, abamectin, and indoxacarb. On the other hand, imidacloprid was not considerably effective on T. absoluta eggs. Metarhizium anisopliae was 11 and 518 times more effective on the eggs and newly hatched larvae than B. bassiana and B. thuringiensis, respectively. Chlorantraniliprole, spinosad, abamectin, and indoxacarb affected life table parameters of T. absoluta significantly (α = 0.05). Spinosad had the highest sublethal effect on T. absoluta followed by abamectin, chlorantraniliprole, and indoxacarb. The results revealed that chlorantraniliprole, spinosad, abamectin, and indoxacarb had considerable lethal and sublethal effects on T. absoluta, and if they perform similarly in commercial greenhouses and fields, they would be suitable candidates to be considered in IPM programs for this pest. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster.

  5. Does selective logging stress tropical forest invertebrates? Using fat stores to examine sublethal responses in dung beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Filipe; Barlow, Jos; Araújo, Bárbara; Louzada, Julio

    2016-12-01

    The increased global demand for tropical timber has driven vast expanses of tropical forests to be selectively logged worldwide. While logging impacts on wildlife are predicted to change species distribution and abundance, the underlying physiological responses are poorly understood. Although there is a growing consensus that selective logging impacts on natural populations start with individual stress-induced sublethal responses, this literature is dominated by investigations conducted with vertebrates from temperate zones. Moreover, the sublethal effects of human-induced forest disturbance on tropical invertebrates have never been examined. To help address this knowledge gap, we examined the body fat content and relative abundance of three dung beetle species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) with minimum abundance of 40 individuals within each examined treatment level. These were sampled across 34 plots in a before-after control-impact design (BACI) in a timber concession area of the Brazilian Amazon. For the first time, we present evidence of logging-induced physiological stress responses in tropical invertebrates. Selective logging increased the individual levels of fat storage and reduced the relative abundance of two dung beetle species. Given this qualitative similarity, we support the measurement of body fat content as reliable biomarker to assess stress-induced sublethal effects on dung beetles. Understanding how environmental modification impacts the wildlife has never been more important. Our novel approach provides new insights into the mechanisms through which forest disturbances impose population-level impacts on tropical invertebrates.

  6. {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics of earthworm exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sarah A.E.; McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.c [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to monitor earthworm responses to sub-lethal (50-1500 mg/kg) phenanthrene exposure in soil. Total phenanthrene was analyzed via soxhlet extraction, bioavailable phenanthrene was estimated by hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and 1-butanol extractions and sorption to soil was assessed by batch equilibration. Bioavailable phenanthrene (HPCD-extracted) comprised approx65-97% of total phenanthrene added to the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed differences in responses between exposed earthworms and controls after 48 h exposure. The metabolites that varied with exposure included amino acids (isoleucine, alanine and glutamine) and maltose. PLS models indicated that earthworm response is positively correlated to both total phenanthrene concentration and bioavailable (HPCD-extracted) phenanthrene in a freshly spiked, unaged soil. These results show that metabolomics is a powerful, direct technique that may be used to monitor contaminant bioavailability and toxicity of sub-lethal concentrations of contaminants in the environment. These initial findings warrant further metabolomic studies with aged contaminated soils. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics is used to directly monitor metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after 48 h of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene in soil.

  7. Sub-Lethal Dose of Shiga Toxin 2 from Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Affects Balance and Cerebellar Cytoarchitecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alipio; Cangelosi, Adriana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Brener, Gabriela J.; Goldstein, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli may damage the central nervous system before or concomitantly to manifested hemolytic–uremic syndrome symptoms. The cerebellum is frequently damaged during this syndrome, however, the deleterious effects of Shiga toxin 2 has never been integrally reported by ultrastructural, physiological and behavioral means. The aim of this study was to determine the cerebellar compromise after intravenous administration of a sub-lethal dose of Shiga toxin 2 by measuring the cerebellar blood–brain barrier permeability, behavioral task of cerebellar functionality (inclined plane test), and ultrastructural analysis (transmission electron microscope). Intravenous administration of vehicle (control group), sub-lethal dose of 0.5 and 1 ηg of Stx2 per mouse were tested for behavioral and ultrastructural studies. A set of three independent experiments were performed for each study (n = 6). Blood–brain barrier resulted damaged and consequently its permeability was significantly increased. Lower scores obtained in the inclined plane task denoted poor cerebellar functionality in comparison to their controls. The most significant lower score was obtained after 5 days of 1 ηg of toxin administration. Transmission electron microscope micrographs from the Stx2-treated groups showed neurons with a progressive neurodegenerative condition in a dose dependent manner. As sub-lethal intravenous Shiga toxin 2 altered the blood brain barrier permeability in the cerebellum the toxin penetrated the cerebellar parenchyma and produced cell damaged with significant functional implications in the test balance. PMID:26904009

  8. The Effect of Acclimation to Sublethal Temperature on Subsequent Susceptibility of Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jianhua; Zhang, Huina

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is a popular alternative to synthetic pesticides in disinfesting food-processing facilities and empty grain storages. Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky is one of the most cosmopolitan and destructive insects found in empty grain storage facilities and processing facilities. The effect of acclimation in S. zeamais adults to sublethal high temperature on their subsequent susceptibility to high temperatures was investigated. S. zeamais adults were acclimated to 36°C for 0 (as a control), 1, 3, and 5 h, and then were exposed at 43, 47, 51, and 55°C for different time intervals respectively. Acclimation to sublethal high temperature significantly reduced subsequent susceptibility of S. zeamais adults to lethal high temperatures of 43, 47, 51, and 55°C, although the mortality of S. zeamais adults significantly increased with increasing exposure time at lethal high temperatures. The mortality of S. zeamais adults with 1, 3, and 5 h of acclimation to 36°C was significantly lower than that of S. zeamais adults without acclimation when exposed to the same lethal high temperatures. The present results suggest that the whole facility should be heated to target lethal high temperature as soon as possible, avoiding decreasing the control effectiveness of heat treatment due to the acclimation in stored product insects to sublethal temperature.

  9. Sucralose Induces Biochemical Responses in Daphnia magna

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the expose...

  10. Sublethal effects of atrazine on embryo-larval development of Rhinella arenarum (Anura: Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartz, Gabriela V; Herkovits, Jorge; Pérez-Coll, Cristina S

    2012-05-01

    Atrazine (ATR), one of the most widely used herbicides in the world, affects not only target organisms but also the biota in general. Here, the teratogenic and neurotoxic effects of ATR on Rhinella arenarum (South American toad) embryos, and larvae were evaluated by means of standardized bioassays during acute and chronic exposures. The herbicide had a significant incidence of malformations, with a Teratogenic Index (TI) of 3.28. The main effects were delayed development, reduced body size, microcephaly, axial flexures, wavy tail and edema. In addition, delayed development, reduced development of forelimbs, and edema were recorded at metamorphosis stages. Scanning electron microscopy allowed observing different degrees of cellular dissociation and persistent cilliar cells in specific regions like the adhesive structure and tail fin. Results obtained by ATR 24 h pulse exposures at six developmental stages pointed out blastula as the most susceptible developmental stage both for immediate and delayed adverse effects. A noteworthy recovery capacity from acute toxic effects was recorded from the neural plate stage onwards. Regarding neurotoxic effects, abnormal, and erratic swimming and spasmodic contractions were recorded. Both the teratogenic and neurotoxic effects reported in this study demonstrate the importance of evaluating sublethal effects in non-target organisms as they could imply reduced fitness of individuals and eventually a population decline. The Hazard Quotients (HQ) for ATR ranged from 0.14 to 10.80, and the fact that some of these values are above USEPA's level of concern indicate that ATR is likely a risk to R. arenarum.

  11. The sub-lethal effects of repeated freezing in the woolly bear caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katie E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-04-01

    Repeated freeze-thaw cycles are common and are increasing in frequency with climate change in many temperate locations, yet understanding of their impact on freeze-tolerant insects is extremely limited. We investigated the effects of repeated freezing and thawing on the freeze-tolerant final instar caterpillars of the moth Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) by subjecting individuals to either a single sustained 35 h freeze or five 7 h freezes. Sub-lethal effects were quantified with changes in three broad groups of measures: (1) cold hardiness, (2) metabolic rate and energy reserves and (3) survival after challenge with fungal spores. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased mortality to almost 30% and increased tissue damage in Malpighian tubules and hemocytes. Repeated freezing increased caterpillar glycerol concentration by 0.82 mol l(-1). There were no changes in metabolic rate or energy reserves with repeated freezing. For the first time, we report increased survival after immune challenge in caterpillars after freezing and suggest that this may be linked to wounding during freezing. We suggest that little repair of freezing damage is possible in P. isabella caterpillars and repeated freeze-thaw cycles may present significant challenges to survival in this species.

  12. Sublethal Effects of Spirodiclofen on Tetranychus urticae Koch_Pre-Ovipositional Females After Different Exposure Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Marčić

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublethal effect of spirodiclofen on Tetranychus urticae females that survived different exposure times in the pre-ovipositional period was evaluated calculating two parameters - instantaneous rate of increase and net fertility - after six days of reproduction. The females were exposed to four concentrations/doses of the acaricide: 96 mg /L (0.24 μg/cm2, 48 mg/L(0.12 μg/cm2, 24 mg/L (0.06 μg/cm2 and 12 mg./L (0.03 μg/cm2 for 2, 6 and 24h in a leaf disc bioassay. After 24h exposure to 12 mg/L, instantaneous rate of increase was significantlyreduced (0.545; 0.634 in control, while significant reduction in net fertility (20.61; 28.57 in the control was recorded even after 2h exposure to the same concentration. The effect of all tested concentrations of spirodiclofen on both parameters increased with exposure time. The lowest values of instantaneous rate of increase (0.268 and net fertility (2.58 were recorded after 24h exposure to 96 mg/L. After 24h exposure, the concentration increase from 12 to 24 mg/L significantly reduced both parameters, while a further increase from 24 to 96 mg/L significantly reduced instantaneous rate of increase, but not net-fertility. The results regarding T. urticae population management are discussed.

  13. Haematological changes in Bufo maculatus treated with sublethal concentrations of Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ikechukwu Ezemonye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult Bufo maculatus was exposed to sublethal cadmium concentrations of 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 2.00 mg/L. The toxicant from which the cadmium concentrations were prepared was cadmium chloride (CdCl2.H2O. There were three replicate tanks per treatment and three individuals per tank including control groups. The hematologic alterations based on the examination of blood indices during the 28 days of exposure showed that total erythrocyte count (TEC, hematocrit (Hct and hemoglobin (Hb concentration decreased (P<0.05 relative to controls. The decline was concentration- dependent as concentration of cadmium increased. The decline in hemoglobin and hematocrit in the experimental organism could be due to a decrease in the synthesis or release of erythrocytes into the circulation or an increase in the rate of erythrocyte destruction inflicted by cadmium toxicity. There was significant (P<0.05 elevation in total leuko- leukocyte count (TLC with increase in the concen- cyte concentration of cadmium. The increase in total leukocyte count observed in this study could be attributed to a stimulation of the immune system in response to tissue damage caused by cadmium toxicity. The study has shown that the exposure of the Bufo maculatus toad to cadmium can inflict alterations in the hematologic indices, which could induce unfavorable physiological changes in the amphibian, which may lead to death. There is, therefore, the need to protect amphibians in order to sustain the biodiversity in the Nigerian Niger Delta ecological zone.

  14. Sublethal Effects of Neonicotinoid Insecticide on Calling Behavior and Pheromone Production of Tortricid Moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Roldán, Miguel A; Gemeno, César

    2017-09-01

    In moths, sexual behavior combines female sex pheromone production and calling behavior. The normal functioning of these periodic events requires an intact nervous system. Neurotoxic insecticide residues in the agroecosystem could impact the normal functioning of pheromone communication through alteration of the nervous system. In this study we assess whether sublethal concentrations of the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid, that competitively modulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the dendrite, affect pheromone production and calling behavior in adults of three economically important tortricid moth pests; Cydia pomonella (L.), Grapholita molesta (Busck), and Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller). Thiacloprid significantly reduced the amount of calling in C. pomonella females at LC 0.001 (a lethal concentration that kills only 1 in 10 5 individuals), and altered its calling period at LC 1 , and in both cases the effect was dose-dependent. In the other two species the effect was similar but started at higher LCs, and the effect was relatively small in L. botrana. Pheromone production was altered only in C. pomonella, with a reduction of the major compound, codlemone, and one minor component, starting at LC 10 . Since sex pheromones and neonicotinoids are used together in the management of these three species, our results could have implications regarding the interaction between these two pest control methods.

  15. Sublethal Effects of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Thiamethoxam on the Transcriptome of the Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Teng-Fei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Liu, Fang; Qi, Lei; Yu, Lin-Sheng

    2017-12-05

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are now the most widely used insecticides in the world. Previous studies have indicated that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids impair learning, memory capacity, foraging, and immunocompetence in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Linnaeus) (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Despite these, few studies have been carried out on the molecular effects of neonicotinoids. In this study, we focus on the second-generation neonicotinoid thiamethoxam, which is currently widely used in agriculture to protect crops. Using high-throughput RNA-Seq, we investigated the transcriptome profile of honey bees after subchronic exposure to 10 ppb thiamethoxam over 10 d. In total, 609 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, of which 225 were upregulated and 384 were downregulated. Several genes, including vitellogenin, CSP3, defensin-1, Mrjp1, and Cyp6as5 were selected and further validated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The functions of some DEGs were identified, and Gene Ontology-enrichment analysis showed that the enriched DEGs were mainly linked to metabolism, biosynthesis, and translation. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis showed that thiamethoxam affected biological processes including ribosomes, the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, tyrosine metabolism pathway, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and drug metabolism. Overall, our results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the complex interactions between neonicotinoid insecticides and honey bees. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Sublethal Effects in Pest Management: A Surrogate Species Perspective on Fruit Fly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Banks

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tephritid fruit flies are economically important orchard pests globally. While much effort has focused on controlling individual species with a combination of pesticides and biological control, less attention has been paid to managing assemblages of species. Although several tephritid species may co-occur in orchards/cultivated areas, especially in mixed-cropping schemes, their responses to pesticides may be highly variable. Furthermore, predictive efforts about toxicant effects are generally based on acute toxicity, with little or no regard to long-term population effects. Using a simple matrix model parameterized with life history data, we quantified the responses of several tephritid species to the sublethal effects of a toxicant acting on fecundity. Using a critical threshold to determine levels of fecundity reduction below which species are driven to local extinction, we determined that threshold levels vary widely for the three tephritid species. In particular, Bactrocera dorsalis was the most robust of the three species, followed by Ceratitis capitata, and then B. cucurbitae, suggesting individual species responses should be taken into account when planning for area-wide pest control. The rank-order of susceptibility contrasts with results from several field/lab studies testing the same species, suggesting that considering a combination of life history traits and individual species susceptibility is necessary for understanding population responses of species assemblages to toxicant exposure.

  17. Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum Exposed to Sublethal Concentrations of Permethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Banaee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aquatic ecosystems are frequently subjected to contamination by toxic heavy metals and pesticides, yet very little is known about the influence of pesticides on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms. Mercury is a toxic metal with no known biological benefit to organisms. Bioavailability of mercury in aquatic environments depends on biological and non-biological parameters including other pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the effects of permethrin on bioaccumulation of mercury in zebra cichlid. Methods: Acute toxicity (LC50 of permethrin and mercury chloride was evaluated by estimating mortality in Probit Model in SPSS (version 19.0 IBM. In sub-lethal toxicity, zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum was exposed to various concentrations of permethrin (0.0, 0.40, 0.80, 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1 combined with 20 µg.L-1 mercury chloride for 15 days. At the end of the experiment, mercury concentrations were measured using ICP-OES-Perkin elmer (optima 7300-DV. Results: 96 h LC50 values of permethrin and mercury for C. nigrofasciatum were calculated to be 17.55 µg.L-1 and 140.38 µg.L-1, respectively. Our results clearly showed that the bioaccumulation of mercury in the specimens increased with increasing concentrations of permethrin to 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1. Conclusion: Increasing the concentration of permethrin had synergistic effects on the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

  18. Evaluating sublethal indicators of stress in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) caged in an urban stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, M.C.; Belin, J.I. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

    1998-12-31

    Freshwater bivalves have been used extensively to monitor chemical accumulation in field exposures, although little information is available on the use of biomarker measurements in field exposures with bivalves. DNA strand breakage, growth rate, condition index and percentage tissue water were measured in freshwater Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed in-situ in a stream that receives urban and industrial stormwater runoff and in a non-impacted reference stream. After 4 weeks exposure, DNA strand lengths in foot tissue from Trail Creek-exposed clams were significantly shorter than DNA from reference clams. These results suggest a reduction in DNA integrity in Trail Creek-exposed clams, possibly indicating exposure to genotoxic chemicals. No significant differences were observed in the growth rates of clams. However, a significant inverse relationship was detected between condition index and % tissue water for all clams. Furthermore, site-specific differences in percentage tissue water and condition indices were observed after 2 and 10 weeks exposure. For this study DNA strand breakage, condition indices, and tissue hydration appear to be more sensitive indicators of sublethal toxicity than growth.

  19. Integrated microfluidic technology for sub-lethal and behavioral marine ecotoxicity biotests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Reyes Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Persoone, Guido; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Changes in behavioral traits exhibited by small aquatic invertebrates are increasingly postulated as ethically acceptable and more sensitive endpoints for detection of water-born ecotoxicity than conventional mortality assays. Despite importance of such behavioral biotests, their implementation is profoundly limited by the lack of appropriate biocompatible automation, integrated optoelectronic sensors, and the associated electronics and analysis algorithms. This work outlines development of a proof-of-concept miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for rapid water toxicity tests based on changes in swimming patterns exhibited by Artemia franciscana (Artoxkit M™) nauplii. In contrast to conventionally performed end-point analysis based on counting numbers of dead/immobile specimens we performed a time-resolved video data analysis to dynamically assess impact of a reference toxicant on swimming pattern of A. franciscana. Our system design combined: (i) innovative microfluidic device keeping free swimming Artemia sp. nauplii under continuous microperfusion as a mean of toxin delivery; (ii) mechatronic interface for user-friendly fluidic actuation of the chip; and (iii) miniaturized video acquisition for movement analysis of test specimens. The system was capable of performing fully programmable time-lapse and video-microscopy of multiple samples for rapid ecotoxicity analysis. It enabled development of a user-friendly and inexpensive test protocol to dynamically detect sub-lethal behavioral end-points such as changes in speed of movement or distance traveled by each animal.

  20. The concerted action of lactoferrin and bacteriophages in the clearance of bacteria in sublethally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocieba, Maja; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Lusiak-Szelachowska, Marzena; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-02-07

    Both lactoferrin (LF) and bacteriophages are potent antibacterial agents. LF is contained in the secretory fluids of mammals and bacteriophages are specific bacterial viruses. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether combined treatment of infected mice may allow lowering the therapeutic dose of specific bacteriophages for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. CBA mice were infected intravenously (i.v.) with sublethal doses of E. coli or S. aureus and the specific T4 or A5 bacteriophages, respectively, were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) or per os one hour following infection. The numbers of colony-forming units (CFUs) were determined in the livers after 24 hours. Comparative administration of bacteriophages i.p. or per os showed that both routes of administration were equally efficacious in the protective action of bacteriophages. The bacteriophages were still very potent in reducing CFU numbers in the liver at a dose of 10(5)/mouse. Application of bovine lactoferrin (LF), 10 mg i.v., 24 h before infection, was also very effective in reducing CFU numbers. Using suboptimal (10(3)-10(4)) doses of bacteriophages and administration of LF, a more potent protective effect in reducing the CFU numbers in the infected mice was demonstrated. The combined effect of LF and bacteriophages in reducing CFU numbers was significantly higher than the effects of either agent alone. The study demonstrated that the combined application of LF and bacteriophages can significantly lower (1000 times) the effective dose of bacteriophages in reducing CFU numbers in infected mice.

  1. Sub-lethal effects of herbicides penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone and glyphosate on Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiali; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Ramírez-Duarte, Wilson F; Bolotaolo, Melissa B; Lam, Chelsea H; Pandey, Pramod K; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Stillway, Marie E; Zweig, Leanna; Caudill, Jeffrey; Lin, Li; Teh, Swee J

    2018-02-01

    Concerns regarding non-target toxicity of new herbicides used to control invasive aquatic weeds in the San Francisco Estuary led us to compare sub-lethal toxicity of four herbicides (penoxsulam, imazamox, fluridone, and glyphosate) on an endangered fish species Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus). We measured 17β-estradiol (E2) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations in liver, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in brain of female and male fish after 6 h of exposure to each of the four herbicides. Our results indicate that fluridone and glyphosate disrupted the E2 concentration and decreased glutathione concentration in liver, whereas penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone inhibited brain AChE activity. E2 concentrations were significantly increased in female and male fish exposed to 0.21 μM of fluridone and in male fish exposed to 0.46, 4.2, and 5300 μM of glyphosate. GSH concentrations decreased in males exposed to fluridone at 2.8 μM and higher, and glyphosate at 4.2 μM. AChE activity was significantly inhibited in both sexes exposed to penoxsulam, imazamox, and fluridone, and more pronounced inhibition was observed in females. The present study demonstrates the potential detrimental effects of these commonly used herbicides on Delta Smelt. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sublethal toxicity of quinalphos on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses in a freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemalatha, Devan; Amala, Antony; Rangasamy, Basuvannan; Nataraj, Bojan; Ramesh, Mathan

    2016-11-01

    Extensive use of quinalphos, an organophosphorus pesticide, is likely to reach the aquatic environment and thereby posing a health concern for aquatic organisms. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses may be good indicators of pesticide contamination in aquatic organisms. The data on quinalphos induced oxidative stress and antioxidant responses in carps are scanty. This study is aimed to assess the two sublethal concentrations of quinalphos (1.09 and 2.18 μL L -1 ) on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses of Cyprinus carpio for a period of 20 days. In liver, the malondialdehyde level was found to be significantly increased in both the concentrations. The results of the antioxidant parameters obtained show a significant increase in superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in liver of fish. These results demonstrate that environmentally relevant levels of the insecticide quinalphos can cause oxidative damage and increase the antioxidant scavenging capacity in C. carpio. This may reflect the potential role of these parameters as useful biomarkers for the assessment of pesticide contamination. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1399-1406, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis of lethal and sublethal impacts of environmental disasters on sperm whales using stochastic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chiquet, Ross A; Ma, Baoling; Tang, Tingting; Caswell, Hal; Veprauskas, Amy; Sidorovskaia, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Mathematical models are essential for combining data from multiple sources to quantify population endpoints. This is especially true for species, such as marine mammals, for which data on vital rates are difficult to obtain. Since the effects of an environmental disaster are not fixed, we develop time-varying (nonautonomous) matrix population models that account for the eventual recovery of the environment to the pre-disaster state. We use these models to investigate how lethal and sublethal impacts (in the form of reductions in the survival and fecundity, respectively) affect the population's recovery process. We explore two scenarios of the environmental recovery process and include the effect of demographic stochasticity. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the magnitude of the disaster, the duration of the disaster, and the probability that the population recovers to pre-disaster levels or a biologically relevant threshold level. To illustrate this modeling methodology, we provide an application to a sperm whale population. This application was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico that has impacted a wide variety of species populations including oysters, fish, corals, and whales.

  4. Sub-lethal cadmium exposure increases phytochelatin concentrations in the aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SF, Gonçalves [Department of Biology & CESAM, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); SK, Davies [Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bennett, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Raab, A.; Feldmann, J. [TESLA, Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Kille, P. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Loureiro, S. [Department of Biology & CESAM, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); DJ, Spurgeon [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); JG, Bundy, E-mail: j.bundy@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Phytochelatins are metal-binding metabolites found in almost all plant species and some animal groups, including nematodes and annelids, where they can play an important role in detoxifying metals such as cadmium. Species from several other taxa contain a phytochelatin synthase (PCS) gene orthologue, including molluscs, indicating they may have the potential to synthesize phytochelatins. However, the presence of a gene alone does not demonstrate that it plays a functional role in metal detoxification. In the present study, we show that the aquatic snail Lymnaea stagnalis produced both penta- and heptapeptide phytochelatins (i.e. phytochelatin-2 and phytochelatin-3), and their levels increased in response to sub-lethal levels of cadmium. - Highlights: • Little is known about the role of phytochelatins in metal detoxification in animals. • We detected phytochelatins (PC{sub 2} and PC{sub 3}) in a mollusc species, Lymnaea stagnalis. • Phytochelatins increased in Lymnaea stagnalis when exposed to cadmium. • Future research on phytochelatin responses in molluscs would be valuable.

  5. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects.

  6. Immunohistochemical study on gastrointestinal endocrine cells of four reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Gen; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the types, regional distributions and distribution densities as well as morphological features of gastrointestinal (GI) endocrine cells in various parts of the gastrointestinal track (GIT) of four reptiles, Gekko japonicus, Eumeces chinensis, Sphenomorphus indicus and Eumeces elegans. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded sections (5 μm) of seven parts (cardia, fundus, pylorus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, rectum) of GIT dissected from the four reptiles were prepared. GI endocrine cells were revealed by using immunohistochemical techniques of streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method. Seven types of antisera against 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin (SS), gastrin (GAS), glucagon (GLU), substance P (SP), insulin and pancreatic polypeptide were identified and then GI endocrine cells were photomicrographed and counted. RESULTS: The GI endocrine system of four reptiles was a complex structure containing many endocrine cell types similar in morphology to those found in higher vertebrates. Five types of GI endocrine cells, namely 5-HT, SS, GAS, SP and GLU immunoreactive (IR) cells were identified in the GIT of G. japonicus, E. chinensis and S. indicus; while in the GIT of E. elegans only the former three types of endocrine cells were observed. No PP- and INS- IR cells were found in all four reptiles. 5-HT-IR cells, which were most commonly found in the pylorus or duodenum, distributed throughout the whole GIT of four reptiles. However, their distribution patterns varied from each other. SS-IR cells, which were mainly found in the stomach especially in the pylorus and/or fundus, were demonstrated in the whole GIT of E. chinensis, only showed restricted distribution in the other three species. GAS-IR cells, with a much restricted distribution, were mainly demonstrated in the pylorus and/or the proximal small intestine of four reptiles. GLU-IR cells exhibited a limited and species-dependent variant distribution in the GIT of four reptiles. SP-IR cells were found

  7. Effects of a low-radiotoxicity uranium salt (uranyl acetate) on biochemical and hematological parameters of the catfish, Clarias gariepinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Ahmad, Zubair; Al-Kahem Al-Balawi, Hmoud F.; Al-Misned, Fahad; Maboob, Shahid; Suliman, El-Amin M.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of Clarias gariepinus were treated with lethal (70, 75, 80, 85, 90, and 95 mg/L) and sub-lethal concentrations (8, 12 and 16 mg/L) of uranyl acetate, a low-radiotoxicity uranium salt. The LC 50 value was registered as 81.45 mg/L. The protein and glycogen concentrations in liver and muscles were decreased in the fish exposed to sub-lethal concentrations. The red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) values were decreased. Different blood indices like mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were negatively affected. Level of plasma glucose was elevated whereas protein was decreased. The level of calcium concentration (Ca) was declined in the blood of exposed fish whereas magnesium (Mg) remains unchanged. The activity level of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) was elevated in exposed fish. These effects were more pronounced in the last period of exposure and in higher concentrations. Results of the present study indicate that uranyl acetate has adverse effects on Clarias gariepinus and causes changes in the biochemical and hematological parameters of the fish.

  8. Nanotoxicity: a growing need for study in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuefei; Liu, Ying; Kong, Xiangjun; Lobie, Peter E; Chen, Chunying; Zhu, Tao

    2013-05-27

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are engineered for commercial purposes such as semiconductors, building materials, cosmetics, and drug carriers, while natural nanoparticles (NPs) already exist in the environment. Due to their unique physicochemical properties, they may interact actively with biological systems. Some of these interactions might be detrimental to human health, and therefore studies on the potential 'nanotoxicity' of these materials in different organ systems are warranted. The purpose of developing the concept of nanotoxicity is to recognize and evaluate the hazards and risks of NMs and evaluate safety. This review will summarize and discuss recent reports derived from cell lines or animal models concerning the effects of NMs on, and their application in, the endocrine system of mammalian and other species. It will present an update on current studies of the effects of some typical NMs-such as metal-based NMs, carbon-based NMs, and dendrimers-on endocrine functions, in which some effects are adverse or unwanted and others are favorable or intended. Disruption of endocrine function is associated with adverse health outcomes including reproductive failure, metabolic syndrome, and some types of cancer. Further investigations are therefore required to obtain a thorough understanding of any potential risk of pathological endocrine disruption from products containing NMs. This review aims to provide impetus for further studies on the interactions of NMs with endocrine functions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders in Children With Cancer Treatment

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    Maryam Nakhaei-Moghadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Survivors of childhood malignancy are at risk of long-term late effects. One of the most commonly involved systems in this effect is endocrine system. Appropriate timely recognition and treatment of late complications including endocrine complication is essential for the continuing health and improvement in quality of life in cancer survivors. Objectives Therefore, this study has been conducted to investigate the aforementioned complications resulting from the treatment of the common malignancies in children in Iran. Patients and Methods We performed a cross sectional study for evaluation of endocrine complication in cancer survivors who had finished their cancer treatment and come for followed up in oncology clinic of children medical center. Results Demographic data, treatment modality, and endocrine late effect recorded and analyzed. There were 96 survivors with median age of 13.8 ± 5.8 years (range 3 - 31 years. The median follow up time was 2.7 years (range 1 - 10 years. Hyperinsulinemia was the most common late effect. Other complication was dyslipidemia, overweight, obesity, osteopenia, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis respectively. Conclusions Our study has demonstrated a significant prevalence of endocrine complication after childhood cancer therapy and a long term follow-up program for survivors of childhood cancer is therefore needed.

  10. Endocrine Disruptors in Mediterranean top marine predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossi, M Cristina; Casini, Silvia; Marsili, Letizia

    2006-05-01

    Man-made Endocrine Disruptors (EDs) range across all continents and oceans. Some geographic areas are potentially more threatened than others: one of these is the Mediterranean Sea. Levels of some xenobiotics are much higher here than in other seas and oceans. In this paper we review the final results of a project in which the hypothesis that Mediterranean top predator species (such as large pelagic fish and marine mammals) are potentially at risk due to EDs was investigated. In a four-year survey on the Mediterranean population of swordfish (Xiphias gladius), the potential toxicological effects of organochlorine compounds (OCs) on specimens of swordfish and tuna fish (Thunnus thynnus thynnus), caught in the spawning seasons from 1999 to 2002 in the Straits of Messina, Sicily (Italy), were investigated using vitellogenin (Vtg), Zona radiata proteins (Zrp), and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) activities (EROD, BPMO). Tissues (skin and blubber) were obtained from Stenella coeruleoalba, Tursiops truncatus, Delphinus delphis and Balaenoptera physalus from the western Ligurian Sea, between Corsica and the French-Italian coast, and Ionic Sea using biopsy darts launched with a crossbow. Benzo(alpha)pyrene monoxigenase (BPMO) activity was mesured in biopsies and cholrinated hydrocarbon levels were detected. We illustrate the need to develop and apply sensitive methodological tools, such as biomarkers (Vitellogenin, Zona Radiata proteins and CYP1A activities) for evaluation of toxicological risk in Xiphias gladius and Thunnus thynnus thynnus), and nondestructive biomarkers (CYP1A activities and fibroblast cell culture in skin biopsy), for the hazard assessment of threatened marine mammals species (Stenella coeruleoalba, Tursiops truncatus, Delphinus delphis and Balaenoptera physalus) exposed to EDs. The present research shows that: a) Vtg and Zrp can be used as diagnostic tools for fish stocks hazard assessment in the Mediterranean Sea; b) that CYP1A1 (BPMO) induction in

  11. Recent findings within the microbiota–gut–brain–endocrine metabolic interactome

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    Obrenovich M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark Obrenovich,1–4 Thriveen Sankar Chittoor Mana,5 Herleen Rai,2 Dorjee Shola,4,6 Christopher Sass,2,3 Benjamin McCloskey,4 Bruce S Levison7 1Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service, 2Research Service, Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Chemistry, Cleveland State University, 4Gilgamesh Foundation, 5Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 6Gene Targeting Resource Center, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, 7Department of Pediatrics, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA Purpose of review: We have established that many metabolic biomes exist within the complex mammalian gut. Substantial metabolism occurs within these biomes and is called co-metabolism of the host and resident microorganisms. This gut–brain–endocrine metabolic interaction emphasizes how bacteria can affect the brain and the hormonal axes in the process of co-metabolism. This review highlights new findings in this regard. Recent findings: In this review, we explore how the gut microbiota affect the development and regulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and neurochemistry from mental health and behavioral health to memory, depression, mood, anxiety, obesity, and the development of the blood–brain barrier. Summary: This review describes the implications of the findings for clinical practice or research. Interaction of small molecules within these biomes is now described collectively as a “metabolic interactome”. Metabolites of the gut–brain–endocrine axis and our overall gut health constantly shape the host phenotype in ways previously unimagined, and this niche represents potential targets for treatment and drug design, since the interaction or biochemical interplay results in net metabolite production and/or end products to exercise either positive or negative effects on human health. Keywords: neurotransmitters, gut brain axis, metabolomics, microbiota

  12. Surgical approach to medullary thyroid carcinoma associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2

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    Marcos R. Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the surgical approaches to medullary thyroid carcinoma associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (medullary thyroid carcinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. The recommended surgical approaches are usually based on the age of the affected carrier/patient, tumor staging and the specific rearranged during transfection codon mutation. We have focused mainly on young children with no apparent disease who are carrying a germline rearranged during transfection mutation. Successful management of medullary thyroid carcinoma in these cases depends on early diagnosis and treatment. Total thyroidectomy should be performed before 6 months of age in infants carrying the rearranged during transfection 918 codon mutation, by the age of 3 years in rearranged during transfection 634 mutation carriers, at 5 years of age in carriers with level 3 risk rearranged during transfection mutations, and by the age of 10 years in level 4 risk rearranged during transfection mutations. Patients with thyroid tumor >5 mm detected by ultrasound, and basal calcitonin levels >40 pg/ml, frequently have cervical and upper mediastinal lymph node metastasis. In the latter patients, total thyroidectomy should be complemented by extensive lymph node dissection. Also, we briefly review our data from a large familial medullary thyroid carcinoma genealogy harboring a germline rearranged during transfection Cys620Arg mutation. All 14 screened carriers of the rearranged during transfection Cys620Arg mutation who underwent total thyroidectomy before the age of 12 years presented persistently undetectable serum levels of calcitonin (<2 pg/ml during the follow-up period of 2-6 years. Although it is recommended that preventive total thyroidectomy in rearranged during transfection codon 620 mutation carriers is performed before the age of 5 years, in this particular family the surgical intervention performed before the age of 12 years led to an apparent

  13. Radiological surveillance in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: a double-edged sword?

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    Ruth Therese Casey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a hereditary condition characterised by the predisposition to hyperplasia/tumours of endocrine glands. MEN1-related disease, moreover, malignancy related to MEN1, is increasingly responsible for death in up to two-thirds of patients. Although patients undergo radiological and biochemical surveillance, current recommendations for radiological monitoring are based on non-prospective data with little consensus or evidence demonstrating improved outcome from this approach. Here, we sought to determine whether cumulative radiation exposure as part of the recommended radiological screening programme posed a distinct risk in a cohort of patients with MEN1.Patients and study design: A retrospective review of 43 patients with MEN1 attending our institution between 2007 and 2015 was performed. Demographic and clinical information including phenotype was obtained for all patients. We also obtained details regarding all radiological procedures performed as part of MEN1 surveillance or disease localisation. An estimated effective radiation dose (ED for each individual patient was calculated.Results: The mean ED for the total patient cohort was 121 mSv, and the estimated mean lifetime risk of cancer secondary to radiation exposure was 0.49%. Patients with malignant neuroendocrine tumours (NETS had significantly higher ED levels compared to patients without metastatic disease (P < 0.0022.Conclusions: In MEN1, radiological surveillance is associated with clinically significant exposure to ionising radiation. In patients with MEN1, multi-modality imaging strategies designed to minimise this exposure should be considered.

  14. Combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzein Abdulhalem

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas comprise 10%–15% of pancreatic cystic lesions, with the serous cystadenoms being the commonest. The association of exocrine and endocrine tumours of the pancreas unrelated to Von Hipple Lindau disease is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. We present another case of both these tumours in one patient. Case presentation A female patient was seen in the surgical clinic for a pain in the right groin. Clinical examination and investigations confirmed a diagnosis of combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. She underwent surgery and is under regular follow-up in the surgical clinic. Conclusion Biphasic differentiation of pancreatic stem cell during embryological development could happen and may result in combined endocrine and exocrine tumours of the pancreas. Imaging studies are excellent in diagnosing theses lesions. Surgery has a central role and could be curative.

  15. Risk of osteoporosis in endocrine disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, Anna Velia; Trinti, Biagino

    2007-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a loss of bone mass; the bones become less dense, fragile and prone to fracturing. It is regulated by endocrine-environmental factors with the genetic component accounting for 70% of an individual's variation in bone mass density (BMD). Pathological conditions such as celiac disease (CD) exacerbate the process of bone loss and the presence of osteoporosis in celiac subjects may be the only sign of undiagnosed CD. The interleukins IL-1alpha and IL-1beta are stimulators of bone resorption; the relatives of celiac patients shown the increased IL-1beta supporting the genetic susceptibility. In women osteoporosis is indirectly associated with early menopause and amenorrhea, while in men it is associated with hypogonadism and GH deficit. The direct effect on the bones of CD is secondary to poor absorption of calcium and vitamin D. These endocrine and non-endocrine factors exert their effects on bones by modulating the RANK/RANK-L/OPG system.

  16. Endocrine Disruptor Induction of Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposures such as toxicants, nutrition and stress have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease susceptibility. Endocrine disruptors are one of the largest groups of specific toxicants shown to promote this form of epigenetic inheritance. These environmental compounds that interfere with normal endocrine signaling are one of the largest classes of toxicants we are exposed to on a daily level. The ability of ancestral exposures to promote disease susceptibility significantly increases the potential biohazards of these toxicants. Therefore, what your great-grandmother was exposed to during pregnancy may influence your disease development, even in the absence of any exposure, and you are going to pass this on to your grandchildren. This non-genetic form of inheritance significantly impacts our understanding of biology from the origins of disease to evolutionary biology. The current review will describe the previous studies and endocrine disruptors shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. PMID:25088466

  17. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  18. Acute, chronic and biochemical effects of chlorothalonil on Agalychnis callidryas, Isthmohyla pseudopuma and Smilisca baudinii tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Michael; Obando, Priscilla; Pinnock-Branford, Margaret; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E; Mena, Freylan; Alvarado, Gilbert

    2016-11-01

    Declines of amphibian populations have been a worldwide issue of concern for the scientific community during the last several decades. Efforts are being carried out to elucidate factors related to this phenomenon. Among these factors, pathogens, climate change, and environmental pollution have been suggested as possible causes. Regarding environmental pollutants, some pesticides are persistent in the environment and capable of being transported long distances from their release point. In Costa Rica, some pesticides have been detected in protected areas, at locations where amphibian populations have declined. Information about toxicity of pesticides used in Costa Rican agriculture to amphibians is still scarce, particularly for native species.Toxicity tests with chlorothalonil, a fungicide intensively used in Costa Rica, were carried out exposing tadpoles of three Costa Rican native species: Agalychnis callidryas, Isthmohyla pseudopuma, and Smilisca baudinii in order to evaluate acute and chronic toxicity as well as the biomarkers cholinesterase activity (ChE), glutathione-S transferase activity (GST), and lipid peroxidation (LPO).96-h LC50: 26.6 (18.9-35.8) μg/L to A. callidryas, 25.5 (21.3-29.7) μg/L to I pseudopuma and 32.3 (26.3-39.7) μg/L to S. baudinii were determined for chlorothalonil. These three species of anurans are among the most sensitive to chlorothalonil according to the literature. Besides, GST was induced in S. baudinii after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of chlorothalonil while evisceration occurred in S. baudinii and A. callidryas tadpoles exposed to lethal concentrations of the fungicide. Chronic exposure to sub-lethal concentrations accelerated development in S. baudinii and caused lesions in tail of S. baudinii and I. pseudopuma tadpoles. Our results demonstrate that chlorothalonil is highly toxic to native amphibian species and that low concentrations can cause biochemical responses related to phase II of biotransformation and

  19. Neurotoxicity and biochemical responses in the earthworm Pheretima hawayana exposed to TiO2NPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Abdelmonem M

    2015-12-01

    Serious concerns have been expressed about potential risks of manufactured TiO2NPs. In this research, toxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk TiO2 were examined to the earthworm Pheretima hawayana. The 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) and sublethal endpoints were assessed. Both NPs and their bulk counterparts were toxic. The 24-h LC50 for TiO2NPs (145.36 mg kg(-1)) was highly toxic than that of bulk TiO2 (357.77 mg kg(-1)). The aim of the present work is to evaluate the suitability of P. hawayana and its biochemical responses to be used as a bioindicator organism and biomarkers of TiO2 toxicity. Earthworms were exposed to three sublethal concentrations of TiO2NPs (1, 10 and 100 µg kg(-1)) for 28 days to test acetylcholinesterase (AChE), antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase: SOD and catalase: CAT) activities and MDA content. The response of the antioxidant enzymes combined with AChE inhibition and MDA accumulation indicated that TiO2NPs could induce significant impairments to the earthworms at the actual environment tested concentrations. The results pointed out the high sensitivity of the antioxidant and oxidative stress related responses to TiO2NPs exposure, demonstrating their usefulness in environmental monitoring and risk assessment. The study highlights also the usefulness of earthworm P. hawayana as potential bioindicator species for assessing the risk of nanoparticles environmental contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical effects of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M

    1976-01-01

    Literature on the biochemical effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) is reviewed. The effects of OCs on concentrations of mineral elements ( calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper, and zinc), vitamins (ascor bic acid, folic acid, and Vitamins-B6, B12, and E), hormones, (gonadotro pins, progesterone, estrogens, androgens, corticosteroids, aldosterone, renin-angiotensin, insulin, growth hormone, thyroid hormones, catecholamines, and prolactin), amino acids and proteins (free amino acids, tryptophan, metalloproteins, hormone-binding proteins, miscellaneous serum proteins, and blood coagulation factors), carbohydra tes (glucose tolerance tests, glucose metablism and other carbohydrates) , lipids (total serum lipids, triglycerides, phospholipids, fatty acids, and cholesterol), and enzymes (aminotransfereases, alkaline phosphatase, and glutamyltransferase) are reviewed. Changes induced by combined, sequential, and low-dose OCs in 116 biochemical parameters are summarized in a table.

  1. Inhibitors of Src and Focal Adhesion Kinase Promote Endocrine Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrikanova, Ivka; Yebra, Mayra; Simpkinson, Megan; Xu, Yang; Hayek, Alberto; Montgomery, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Stepwise approaches for the derivation of β-cells from human embryonic stem cells have been described. However, low levels of endocrine specification limit the final yield of insulin-producing β-cells. In this study, we show that the pyrrolo-pyrimidine Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor PP2 effectively promotes the endocrine specification of human embryonic stem cell derivatives based on its capacity to induce the expression of proendocrine transcription factors (NGN3, NEUROD1, NKX2.2, and PAX4) and to significantly increase the final yield of insulin-positive cells. We further demonstrate that PP2 inhibits the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and selective inhibition of this kinase is also sufficient to induce early endocrine commitment based on increased expression of NGN3, NEUROD1, and NKX2.2. Additional studies using dominant negative constructs and isolated human fetal pancreata suggest that c-Src is at least partially responsible for inhibiting early endocrine specification. Mechanistically, we propose that inhibition of SFK/FAK signaling can promote endocrine specification by limiting activation of the TGFβR/Smad2/3 pathway. Moreover, we show that inhibition of SFK/FAK signaling suppresses cell growth, increases the expression of the β-cell-associated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57kip2, and simultaneously suppresses the expression of Id1 and Id2. This study has important implications for the derivation of β-cells for the cell-based therapy of diabetes and sheds new light on the signaling events that regulate early endocrine specification. PMID:21852242

  2. Persistent developmental toxicity in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Boberg, Julie

    2012-01-01

    There is growing concern of permanent damage to the endocrine and nervous systems after developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. In this study the permanent reproductive and neurobehavioral effects of combined exposure to five endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole...

  3. Ultrastructural investigation of renomedullary interstitial cells in "endocrine kidney".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavi, B L

    1980-01-01

    In the renomedullary interstitial cells of rats with Selye's "endocrine kidney" in the phase of beginning hypertension there appeared bilateral stress hypergranulation and an ultrastructural pattern of intensive prostaglandin synthesis. In the interstitial tissue of the left medulla there appeared light and dense (fibroblast- or macrophage-like) cells. Along with the stabilization of hypertension a relative degranulation of interstitial cells in the right kidney and an absolute degranulation in the left kidney took place. Necrobiotic changes, appearing in the ischaemic kidney, reflected an exhaustion of morphological substrates of prostaglandin synthesis. The changes in the interstitial cells, possessing endocrine activity, present the decisive links in the genesis of experimental malignant hypertension in rats.

  4. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders leading to dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Amitabha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the first steps toward the correct diagnosis of dementia is to segregate out the nondegenerative dementias from possible degenerative dementias. Nondegenerative dementias could be due to traumatic, endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, toxic, infective, and immunological causes. They could also be caused by tumors, subdural hematomas, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Many of the nondegenerative dementias occur at an earlier age and often progress quickly compared to Alzheimer′s disease and other degenerative dementias. Many are treatable or preventable with simple measures. This review aims to give an overview of some of the more important endocrine, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic disorders that may lead to dementia.

  5. The endocrine system and sarcopenia: potential therapeutic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Kevin L; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2011-12-01

    Age related muscle loss, known as sarcopenia, is a major factor in disability, loss of mobility and quality of life in the elderly. There are many proposed mechanisms of age-related muscle loss that include the endocrine system. A variety of hormones regulate growth, development and metabolism throughout the lifespan. Hormone activity may change with age as a result of reduced hormone secretion or decreased tissue responsiveness. This review will focus on the complex interplay between the endocrine system, aging and skeletal muscle and will present possible benefits of therapeutic interventions for sarcopenia.

  6. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I

    2008-01-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly......, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in beta cells (P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2X subtypes and A(1) receptors) and in glucagon-secreting alpha cells (P2X(7), A(2) receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors...

  7. Elucidating the links between endocrine disruptors and neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Blawas, Ashley M; Gray, Kimberly; Heindel, Jerrold J; Lawler, Cindy P

    2015-06-01

    Recent data indicate that approximately 12% of children in the United States are affected by neurodevelopmental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disorders, intellectual disabilities, and autism spectrum disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates a multifactorial etiology for these disorders, with social, physical, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, and chemical toxicants acting together to influence risk. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals during the early stages of life can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus alter brain function and disease susceptibility later in life. This article highlights research efforts and pinpoints approaches that could shed light on the possible associations between environmental chemicals that act on the endocrine system and compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  8. Physiological and biochemical responses of halophyte Kalidium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the physiological and biochemical responses of a halophyte Kalidium foliatum to salinity were studied. In order to reflect salt-tolerance in K. foliatum and to analyze the physiological and biochemical mechanism for its salt tolerance, salinity threshold and biochemical parameters were studied. A halophyte ...

  9. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 exposed to a sublethal concentration of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kendi Nishino; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; da Silva Caumo, Karin; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-04-24

    Listeria monocytogenes infections have been frequently reported in many food poisoning outbreaks around the world. In this work, the protein repertoires of L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644 cells treated or not with a 10(-3)mg/mL nisin sublethal concentration, established by antimicrobial susceptibility tests, were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Overall, 179 proteins were identified, 9 of them more abundant in nisin-treated samples, and 4 more abundant in non-treated control samples. In nisin treated cells, proteins associated to oxidative stress response showed higher abundance. Also, the higher abundance of an enzyme related to the production of cell membrane lipids upon nisin exposure is suggestive of both a failure in conventional cell division mechanism and the activation of an alternative L-form mediated division mechanism. Finally, flagellar and motility proteins' overexpression upon nisin exposure is indicative of increased bacterial motility in response to the bacteriocin. Taken together, these results provide new insights on nisin effects on L. monocytogenes cells and on how this bacterium may overcome a bacteriocin-containing environment. The antimicrobial mechanism of nisin on target bacterial cells has been extensively studied since discovery of this bacteriocin. The nisin pore-forming mechanism is mediated by its binding to the pyrophosphate portion of membrane lipid II [1], but some evidences point out to alternative mechanisms. Results from assays with mutacin 1140 hybrids [2] showed that the portion of nisin that is not involved with lipid II binding could damage the bacterial cell, independently of pore formation [3,4]. Moreover, there are insufficient data to explain how nisin affects the bacterial survival. In this scenario, proteomics is an interesting approach, as a comparison between treated and untreated cells may provide insights of both antimicrobial mechanisms of action and bacterial response mechanisms [5]. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Sub-lethal levels of electric current elicit the biosynthesis of plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimoyo, Evans; Farag, Mohamed A; Sumner, Lloyd W; Wasmann, Catherine; Cuello, Joel L; VanEtten, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Many secondary metabolites that are normally undetectable or in low amounts in healthy plant tissue are synthesized in high amounts in response to microbial infection. Various abiotic and biotic agents have been shown to mimic microorganisms and act as elicitors of the synthesis of these plant compounds. In the present study, sub-lethal levels of electric current are shown to elicit the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in transgenic and non-transgenic plant tissue. The production of the phytoalexin (+)-pisatin by pea was used as the main model system. Non-transgenic pea hairy roots treated with 30-100 mA of electric current produced 13 times higher amounts of (+)-pisatin than did the non-elicited controls. Electrically elicited transgenic pea hairy root cultures blocked at various enzymatic steps in the (+)-pisatin biosynthetic pathway also accumulated intermediates preceding the blocked enzymatic step. Secondary metabolites not usually produced by pea accumulated in some of the transgenic root cultures after electric elicitation due to the diversion of the intermediates into new pathways. The amount of pisatin in the medium bathing the roots of electro-elicited roots of hydroponically cultivated pea plants was 10 times higher 24 h after elicitation than in the medium surrounding the roots of non-elicited control plants, showing not only that the electric current elicited (+)-pisatin biosynthesis but also that the (+)-pisatin was released from the roots. Seedlings, intact roots or cell suspension cultures of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), barrel medic, (Medicago truncatula), Arabidopsis thaliana, red clover (Trifolium pratense) and chickpea (Cicer arietinum) also produced increased levels of secondary metabolites in response to electro-elicitation. On the basis of our results, electric current would appear to be a general elicitor of plant secondary metabolites and to have potential for application in both basic and commercial research.

  12. Responses of bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) larvae under lethal and sublethal scenarios of crude oil exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tara A; Childress, William; Portier, Ralph; Chesney, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    Bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) is an ecologically important zooplanktivorous fish inhabiting estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico and eastern North America from Maine to Florida. Because they have a protracted spawning season (spring through fall) and are abundant at all life stages in coastal estuaries, their eggs and larvae likely encountered oil that reached the coast during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We compared responses to oil exposure at different life stages and at lethal and sublethal conditions using acute, 24h exposures. In a series of experiments, bay anchovy larvae were exposed to high energy water accommodated fractions (HEWAF) and chemically-enhanced WAF (CEWAF) at two stages of larval development (5 and 21 days post hatch, dph). HEWAF oil exposures induced significantly greater life stage dependent sensitivity at 5 dph than at 21 dph but chemically dispersed (CEWAF) exposure mortality was more variable and LC50s were not significantly different between 5 and 21dph larvae. Acute exposure to two low-level concentrations of CEWAF did not result in significant mortality over 24h, but resulted in a 25-77% reduction in larval survival and a 12-34% reduction in weight specific growth after six days of post-exposure growth following the initial 24h exposure. These results show that younger (5 dph) bay anchovy larvae are more vulnerable to acute oil exposure than older (21 dph) larvae, and that acute responses do not accurately reflect potential population level mortality and impacts to growth and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sublethal concentrations of silver nanoparticles affect the mechanical stability of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Alexandra Y; Meier, Jutta; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Manz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are most likely confronted with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as a pollutant stressor in aquatic systems. In this study, biofilms of Aquabacterium citratiphilum were exposed for 20 h to 30 and 70 nm citrate stabilized Ag NPs in low-dose concentrations ranging from 600 to 2400 μg l(-1), and the Ag NP-mediated effects on descriptive, structural, and functional biofilm characteristics, including viability, protein content, architecture, and mechanical stability, were investigated. Viability, based on the bacterial cell membrane integrity of A. citratiphilum, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy, remained unaffected after Ag NP exposure. Moreover, in contrast to information in the current literature, protein contents of cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and biofilm architecture, including dry mass, thickness, and density, were not significantly impacted by exposure to Ag NPs. However, the biofilms themselves served as effective sinks for Ag NPs, exhibiting enrichment factors from 5 to 8. Biofilms showed a greater capacity to accumulate 30 nm sized Ag NPs than 70 nm Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs significantly threatened the mechanical stability of biofilms, as determined by a newly developed assay. For 30 nm Ag NPs, the mechanical stability of biofilms decreased as the Ag NP concentrations applied to them increased. In contrast, 70 nm Ag NPs produced a similar decrease in mechanical stability for each applied concentration. Overall, this finding demonstrates that exposure to Ag NPs triggers remarkable changes in biofilm adhesion and/or cohesiveness. Because of biofilm-mediated ecological services, this response raises environmental concerns regarding Ag NP release into freshwater systems, even in sublethal concentrations.

  14. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular

  15. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloti, Vitor Hugo; Alves, Gustavo Rodrigues; Araújo, Diogo Feliciano Dias; Picoli, Mateus Manara; Moral, Rafael de Andrade; Demétrio, Clarice Garcia Borges; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease associated with the bacteria "Candidatus Liberibacter spp." and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston), the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1), 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2), 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3) and 56% as harmful (Class 4), according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful) were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless) were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases.

  16. Metalloporphyrin Co(III)TMPyP ameliorates acute, sublethal cyanide toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Oscar S; Yuan, Quan; Amoscato, Andrew A; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2012-12-17

    The formation of Co(III)TMPyP(CN)(2) at pH 7.4 has been shown to be completely cooperative (α(H) = 2) with an association constant of 2.1 (±0.2) × 10(11). The kinetics were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry and revealed a complicated net reaction exhibiting 4 phases at pH 7.4 under conditions where cyanide was in excess. The data suggest molecular HCN (rather than CN(-)) to be the attacking nucleophile around neutrality. The two slower phases do not seem to be present when cyanide is not in excess, and the other two phases have rates comparable to that observed for cobalamin, a known effective cyanide scavenger. Addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not affect the cooperativity of cyanide binding to Co(III)TMPyP, only lowered the equilibrium constant slightly to 1.2 (±0.2) × 10(11) and had an insignificant effect on the observed rate. A sublethal mouse model was used to assess the effectiveness of Co(III)TMPyP as a potential cyanide antidote. The administration of Co(III)TMPyP to sodium cyanide intoxicated mice resulted in the time required for the surviving mice to right themselves from a supine position being significantly decreased (9 ± 2 min) compared to that of the controls (33 ± 2 min). All observations were consistent with the demonstrated antidotal activity of Co(III)TMPyP operating through a cyanide-binding (i.e., scavenging) mechanism.

  17. Sublethal effects of insecticide seed treatments on two nearctic lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Michaud, J P; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade

    2015-07-01

    Predatory insects often feed on plants or use plant products to supplement their diet, creating a potential route of exposure to systemic insecticides used as seed treatments. This study examined whether chlorantraniliprole or thiamethoxam might negatively impact Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens when the beetles consumed the extrafloral nectar of sunflowers grown from treated seed. We reared both species on eggs of Ephestia kuehniella and then switched adult H. convergens to a diet of greenbugs, Schizaphis graminum, in order to induce oviposition in this species. Excised sunflower stems, either treated or control and refreshed every 48 h, were provided throughout larval development, or for the first week of adult life. Exposure of C. maculata larvae to chlorantraniliprole and thiamethoxam applied as seed treatments delayed adult emergence by prolonging the pupal period. When adults were exposed, thiamethoxam reduced the preoviposition period compared to chlorantraniliprole, whereas the latter treatment cause females to produce fewer clutches during the observation period. Larvae of C. maculata did not appear to obtain sufficient hydration from the sunflower stems and their subsequent fecundity and fertility were compromised in comparison to the adult exposure experiment where larvae received supplemental water during development. Exposure of H. convergens larvae to thiamethoxam skewed the sex ratio in favor of females; both materials reduced the egg viability of resulting adults and increased the period required for eclosion. Exposure of H. convergens adults to chlorantraniliprole reduced egg eclosion times compared to thiamethoxam and exposure to both insecticides reduced pupation times in progeny. The results indicate that both insecticides have negative, sublethal impacts on the biology of these predators when they feed on extrafloral nectar of sunflower plants grown from treated seed.

  18. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Hugo Beloti

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is a disease associated with the bacteria "Candidatus Liberibacter spp." and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston, the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1, 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2, 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3 and 56% as harmful (Class 4, according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases.

  19. In vitro screening for endocrine disruptive activity in selected South African harbours and river mouths

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Truter, JC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Various waterborne anthropogenic contaminants disrupt the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, targeting reproductive pathways, among others. Very little is known, however, regarding the occurrence of endocrine disruptive activity in South...

  20. Developing brain as an endocrine organ: a paradoxical reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugrumov, M V

    2010-06-01

    The maintaining of homeostasis in the organism in response to a variable environment is provided by the highly hierarchic neuroendocrine-immune system. The crucial component of this system is the hypothalamus providing the endocrine regulation of key peripheral organs, and the adenohypophysis. In this case, neuron-derived signaling molecules (SM) are delivered to the blood vessels in hypothalamic "neurohaemal organs" lacking the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the posterior lobe of the pituitary and the median eminence. The release of SM to the blood vessels in most other brain regions is prohibited by BBB. According to the conventional concept, the development of the neuroendocrine system in ontogenesis begins with the "maturation" of peripheral endocrine glands which first are self-governed and then operate under the adenohypophysial control. Meantime, the brain maturation is under the control of SM secreted by endocrine glands of the developing organism and coming from the placenta and maternal organism. The hypothalamus is involved in the neuroendocrine regulation only after its full maturation that is followed by the conversion of the opened-looped neuroendocrine system to the closed-looped system as in adulthood. Neurons of the developing brain begin to secrete SM shortly after their origin and long before the establishment of specific interneuronal relations providing initially autocrine and paracrine morphogenetic influence on differentiating target neurons. Taking into account that the brain lacks BBB over this ontogenetic period, we hypothesized that it operates as the multipotent endocrine gland secreting SM to the general circulation and thereby providing the endocrine regulation of peripheral organs and the brain. The term "multipotent" means that the spectrum of the brain-derived circulating SM and their occupancy at the periphery in the developing organism should greatly exceed those in adulthood. In order to test this hypothesis, gonadotropin

  1. Toxicity of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate to freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus: lethality, biochemical effects and role of dietary ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Madhuban; Kaviraj, Anilava

    2009-08-01

    Static bioassays were made in the laboratory to determine lethal concentration of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate [(RS)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyrate] for the freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus and effects of sublethal concentrations of the pesticide on some biochemical parameters of the fish. For exposure periods of 24 to 96 h, LC(50) values of fenvalerate ranged from 5.83-4.76 micro g/L and 4.24-2.94 micro g/L, respectively for water and acetone soluble fenvalerate. Two sublethal concentrations of fenvalerate were used in the bioassays for biochemical parameters: 2.1 micro g/L for 24 h and 1.4 micro g/L for 96 h exposure, both concentrations representing 50% of LC(50) value of acetone soluble fenvalerate for the respective exposure period. Hepatosomatic index, liver glycogen, alkaline phosphatase of liver and ascorbic acid of blood, liver, and kidney decreased while haemoglobin (Hb) %, plasma glucose levels and acid phosphatase level of liver increased after 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. Longer exposure (96 h) to even a lower concentration (1.4 micro g/L) of fenvalerate resulted in reduction of all the parameters (except Hb %) tested as compared with control. Fish previously fed for 60 days with a diet supplemented by a high level of ascorbic acid (100 mg/100 g diet) could reverse most of the effects caused by 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. A lower level of ascorbic acid (50 mg/ 100 g diet) supplement could not influence these effects of fenvalerate. Even the higher dose of ascorbic acid supplementation (100 mg/100 g diet) could not relieve the stress parameters, except for Hb% and HSI, when the pesticide was applied at 1.4 micro g/L for a longer time period (96 h).

  2. [Novel concepts in biology of diffuse endocrine system: results and future investigations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaglov, V V; Iaglova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse endocrine system is a largest part of endocrine system of vertebrates. Recend findings showed that DES-cells are not neuroectodermal but have ectodermal, mesodermal, and entodermal ontogeny. The article reviews novel concept of diffuse endocrine system anatomy and physiology, functional role of DES hormones and poorly investigated aspects like DES-cell morphology, hormones secretion in normal and pathologic conditions. Further research of diffuse endocrine system has a great significance for biochemistry, morphology, and clinical medicine.

  3. Putative effects of endocrine disrupters on pubertal development in the human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Grete; Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    -called endocrine disrupters. Precocious puberty has been described in several case reports of accidental exposure to oestrogenic compounds in cosmetic products, food and pharmaceuticals. Local epidemics of premature thelarche have also been suggested to be linked to endocrine disrupters. Children adopted from...... developing countries to industrialized countries often develop precocious puberty. Not only precocious puberty, but also delayed puberty can, theoretically, be associated with exposure to endocrine disrupters. While it is very plausible that endocrine disrupters may disturb pubertal development...

  4. Fipronil promotes motor and behavioral changes in honey bees (Apis mellifera) and affects the development of colonies exposed to sublethal doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluski, Rodrigo; Kadri, Samir Moura; Alonso, Diego Peres; Martins Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo; de Oliveira Orsi, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Bees play a crucial role in pollination and generate honey and other hive products; therefore, their worldwide decline is cause for concern. New broad-spectrum systemic insecticides such as fipronil can harm bees and their use has been discussed as a potential threat to bees' survival. In the present study, the authors evaluate the in vitro toxicity of fipronil and note behavioral and motor activity changes in Africanized adult Apis mellifera that ingest or come into contact with lethal or sublethal doses of fipronil. The effects of sublethal doses on brood viability, population growth, behavior, and the expression of the defensin 1 gene in adult bees were studied in colonies fed with contaminated sugar syrup (8 µg fipronil L(-1) ). Fipronil is highly toxic to bees triggering agitation, seizures, tremors, and paralysis. Bees that are exposed to a lethal or sublethal doses showed reduced motor activity. The number of eggs that hatched, the area occupied by worker eggs, and the number of larvae and pupae that developed were reduced, adult bees showed lethargy, and colonies were abandoned when they were exposed to sublethal doses of fipronil. No change was seen in the bees' expression of defensin 1. The authors conclude that fipronil is highly toxic to honey bees and even sublethal doses may negatively affect the development and maintenance of colonies. © 2015 SETAC.

  5. Assessment of the lethal and sublethal effects of 20 environmental chemicals in zebrafish embryos and larvae by using OECD TG 212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Yoshifumi; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hiroko; Shintaku, Youko; Iguchi, Taisen; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2017-10-01

    Fish embryo toxicity tests are used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of environmental chemicals in aquatic organisms. Previously, we used a short-term toxicity test published by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (test no. 212: Fish, Short-term Toxicity Test on Embryo and Sac-Fry Stages [OECD TG 212]) to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of aniline and several chlorinated anilines in zebrafish embryos and larvae. To expand upon this previous study, we used OECD TG 212 in zebrafish embryos and larvae to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of 20 additional environmental chemicals that included active pharmaceutical ingredients, pesticides, metals, aromatic compounds or chlorinated anilines. Zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were exposed to the test chemicals until 8 days post-fertilization. A delayed lethal effect was induced by 16 of the 20 test chemicals, and a positive correlation was found between heart rate turbulence and mortality. We also found that exposure to the test chemicals at concentrations lower than the lethal concentration induced the sublethal effects of edema, body curvature and absence of swim-bladder inflation. In conclusion, the environmental chemicals assessed in the present study induced both lethal and sublethal effects in zebrafish embryos and larvae, as assessed by using OECD TG 212. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 38 CFR 4.119 - Schedule of ratings-endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-endocrine system. 4.119 Section 4.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Endocrine System § 4.119 Schedule of ratings—endocrine system. Rating 7900Hyperthyroidism Thyroid enlargement, tachycardia (more than 100 beats per...

  7. Two Virus Based Endocrine Disruptor Assays Effective Across Vertebrate Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of hormone mimics, or endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC’s), in the environment are increasing. Sources range from agricultural run–off, pharmaceuticals in waste water, to industrial operations. Current levels of contamination are sufficient to alter sexual develo...

  8. Psychotropic medication during endocrine treatment for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, G.H.; Musters, R.F.; Bos, H.J.; Schroder, C.P.; Mourits, M.J.; de Jong-van den Berg, [No Value

    Psychological problems are frequently mentioned in women treated for breast cancer in whom depression is mentioned as the most common disorder. The aim was to study the prescription of psychotropic medication in women with endocrine treatment for breast cancer in women in our prospective and

  9. High efficiency endocrine operation protocol: From design to implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarella, Marco A; Lahrichi, Nadia; Cloutier, Fabienne; Kleiman, Simcha; Payne, Richard J; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2016-10-01

    We developed a high efficiency endocrine operative protocol based on a mathematical programming approach, process reengineering, and value-stream mapping to increase the number of operations completed per day without increasing operating room time at a tertiary-care, academic center. Using this protocol, a case-control study of 72 patients undergoing endocrine operation during high efficiency days were age, sex, and procedure-matched to 72 patients undergoing operation during standard days. The demographic profile, operative times, and perioperative complications were noted. The average number of cases per 8-hour workday in the high efficiency and standard operating rooms were 7 and 5, respectively. Mean procedure times in both groups were similar. The turnaround time (mean ± standard deviation) in the high efficiency group was 8.5 (±2.7) minutes as compared with 15.4 (±4.9) minutes in the standard group (P < .001). Transient postoperative hypocalcemia was 6.9% (5/72) and 8.3% (6/72) for the high efficiency and standard groups, respectively (P = .99). In this study, patients undergoing high efficiency endocrine operation had similar procedure times and perioperative complications compared with the standard group. The proposed high efficiency protocol seems to better utilize operative time and decrease the backlog of patients waiting for endocrine operation in a country with a universal national health care program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging Finding of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yum, Tae Jun; Cho, Hee Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome with characteristic clinical and radiological manifestations. Many reports on MEN1 have been published; however, no cases of radiologically diagnosed MEN1 have been reported. Therefore, we report on a radiologically diagnosed case of MEN1 with clinical symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer.

  11. Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders Associated with Human Immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Many reports have described endocrine and metabolic disorders in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection . This article reviewed various reports in the literature in order to increase the awareness and thus the need for early intervention when necessary. DATA SOURCE: Data were obtained from ...

  12. ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CONTAMINANTS AND REPRODUCTION IN VERTEBRATE WILDLIFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fields of toxicology, endocrinology, and reproductive physiology recently have combined resources to study the effects of endocrine-disrupting contaminants (EDCs) in wildlife populations. EDCs include a wide variety of chemicals that are only related by the ability to disrupt...

  13. Influence of Endocrine Activity on Larval Development in Busseola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigated the role of juvenile and moulting hormones in development of Busseola fusca. Morphometric measurements were used to distinguish differences in endocrine activity between non-diapause and diapause development with regard to the prothoracic glands and the corpora allata. The corpora ...

  14. The impact of opioids on the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Nathaniel; Mazer, Norman A

    2009-02-01

    Opioids have been used for medicinal and analgesic purposes for centuries. However, their negative effects on the endocrine system, which have been known for some times, are barely discussed in modern medicine. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the impact of opioids on the endocrine system. A review of the English language literature on preclinical and clinical studies of any type on the influence of opioids on the endocrine system was conducted. Preliminary recommendations for monitoring and managing these problems were provided. Long-term opioid therapy for either addiction or chronic pain often induces hypogonadism owing to central suppression of hypothalamic secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Symptoms of opioid-induced hypogonadism include loss of libido, infertility, fatigue, depression, anxiety, loss of muscle strength and mass, osteoporosis, and compression fractures in both men and women; impotence in men; and menstrual irregularities and galactorrhea in women. In view of the increased use of opioids for chronic pain, it has become increasingly important to monitor patients taking opioids and manage endocrine complications. Therefore, patients on opioid therapy should be routinely screened for such symptoms and for laboratory abnormalities in sex hormones. Opioid-induced hypogonadism seems to be a common complication of therapeutic or illicit opioid use. Patients on long-term opioid therapy should be prospectively monitored, and in cases of opioid-induced hypogonadism, we recommend nonopioid pain management, opioid rotation, or sex hormone supplementation after careful consideration of the risks and benefits.

  15. Spreeta-based biosensor assays for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; meulenberg, E.P.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta™-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  16. Review: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (phenol and phthalates) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endocrinedisrupting chemicals have been reported in water, sediment and serum, as well as in fish tissue samples, at a level that could trigger endocrine disruption in humans and wildlife. Although some monitoring has been reported, particularly in water systems within the country, information on EDCs in other ...

  17. Rhythms in the endocrine system of fish: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Mairi; Azpeleta, Clara; López-Olmeda, Jose Fernando

    2017-12-01

    The environment which living organisms inhabit is not constant and many factors, such as light, temperature, and food availability, display cyclic and predictable variations. To adapt to these cyclic changes, animals present biological rhythms in many of their physiological variables, timing their functions to occur when the possibility of success is greatest. Among these variables, many endocrine factors have been described as displaying rhythms in vertebrates. The aim of the present review is to provide a thorough review of the existing knowledge on the rhythms of the endocrine system of fish by examining the hormones that show rhythmicity, how environmental factors control these rhythms and the variation in the responses of the endocrine system depending on the time of the day. We mainly focused on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which can be considered as the master axis of the endocrine system of vertebrates and regulates a great variety of functions, including reproduction, growth, metabolism, energy homeostasis, stress response, and osmoregulation. In addition, the rhythms of other hormones, such as melatonin and the factors, produced in the gastrointestinal system of fish are reviewed.

  18. The peripheral GABAergic system as a target in endocrine disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladkevich, A; Korf, J; Hakobyan, VP; Melkonyan, KV

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its well-recognized function as a cerebral inhibitory transmitter, less well established is the role of GABA in peripheral nervous and endocrine systems. We Summarize current evidence that GABA serves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the autonomic nervous system and as a

  19. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie

    2010-01-01

    Parabens are preservatives used in a wide range of cosmetic products, including products for children, and some are permitted in foods. However, there is concern for endocrine disrupting effects. This paper critically discusses the conclusions of recent reviews and original research papers...

  20. Pollution by endocrine disrupting estrogens in aquatic ecosystems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane Erike-Etchie

    This study aimed to assess the extent of pollution of aquatic ecosystems by endocrine disrupting .... Water from these tributaries is collected in the Mindu dam whose purpose is to supply drinking water to Morogoro urban area but also used for fishing activities. ... were supplied by Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Texas, USA.

  1. Alterations in polyadenylation and its implications for endocrine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Krogh, Anders

    2013-01-01

    , polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) and to be associated with type I and II diabetes, pre-eclampsia, fragile X-associated premature ovarian insufficiency, ectopic Cushing syndrome, and many cancer diseases, including several types of endocrine tumor diseases. Perspectives: Recent developments in high...

  2. Endocrine Disruptor Degradation by Photocatalytic Pilot Plant Unit.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spáčilová, Lucie; Morozová, Magdalena; Mašín, P.; Maléterová, Ywetta; Kaštánek, František; Dytrych, Pavel; Ezechiáš, Martin; Křesinová, Zdena; Šolcová, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 4 (2016), s. 4613-4620 ISSN 2458-9403 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04020700 Grant - others:NATO(US) SPS984398 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : endocrine disruptor * titanium dioxide * photocatalysis Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M)

  3. Paediatric Endocrine Disorders at the University College Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects/Methods: A review of records of children who presented at University College Hospital, Ibadan with paediatric endocrine disorders from 2002 to 2009 was ... Rickets and metabolic disorders constituted 56.4% of patients; Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 12.8%, adrenal disoders in 10.6%, pubertal disorders in ...

  4. Sleep and Quality of Life in Endocrine Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quik, Elise; Verster, Joris; PandiPerumal, S.R.; Streiner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary It is well established that a close relationship exists between sleep and hormones of the hypothalamic–pituitary axis. Sleep has an electrophysiological component and an endocrine component, i.e., the distinct patterns of hormone secretion. Both the electrophysiological and the hormonal

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (phenol and phthalates) in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been increasing concern about the impacts of exposure to chemical compounds with endocrine disrupting activi- ties in the environment, ... natural and synthetic organic compounds, but are mostly man- made products such as ...... and organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and semi-volatile organic compounds in ...

  6. Endocrine Hypertension | Elamin | Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acromegaly, thyrotoxicosis, hypothyroidism, and hyperparathyroidism. Endocrine hypertension is noted in both adults and children but it is more relevant for children where it comes second to renal hypertension, the common cause of hypertension in that age group. Sudan Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 3 (3) 2008: pp.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-01-01

    Jan 1, 1998 ... occurs as a component of either multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A, comprising MTC, phaeochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism, or the rarer. MEN type 28 characterised by MTC, phaeochromocytoma,. Department of Chemical Pathology, University of Natal, Durban. R J Pegoraro. BSc, PhD.

  8. Cosmetics as endocrine disruptors: are they a health risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolopoulou-Stamati, Polyxeni; Hens, Luc; Sasco, Annie J

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to chemicals from different sources in everyday life is widespread; one such source is the wide range of products listed under the title "cosmetics", including the different types of popular and widely-advertised sunscreens. Women are encouraged through advertising to buy into the myth of everlasting youth, and one of the most alarming consequences is in utero exposure to chemicals. The main route of exposure is the skin, but the main endpoint of exposure is endocrine disruption. This is due to many substances in cosmetics and sunscreens that have endocrine active properties which affect reproductive health but which also have other endpoints, such as cancer. Reducing the exposure to endocrine disruptors is framed not only in the context of the reduction of health risks, but is also significant against the background and rise of ethical consumerism, and the responsibility of the cosmetics industry in this respect. Although some plants show endocrine-disrupting activity, the use of well-selected natural products might reduce the use of synthetic chemicals. Instruments dealing with this problem include life-cycle analysis, eco-design, and green labels; in combination with the committed use of environmental management systems, they contribute to "corporate social responsibility".

  9. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  10. Diagnosis and management of endocrine gland neoplasmas. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Functional and nonfunctional neoplasms of the endocrine glands constitute some of the more challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in veterinary cancer medicine. This discussion will focus on the clinical signs and syndromes associated with neoplasms of the thyroid, adrenal, and parathyroid glands, and pancreas in companion animals and will concentrate on the mechanisms producing the clinical signs, diagnosis, staging, therapy and prognosis.

  11. 76 FR 19692 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Endocrine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... that causes a hormonal imbalance. When an endocrine gland functions abnormally, producing either too... insulin, impairing glucose absorption and metabolism. Treatment of type 2 DM generally requires lifestyle... blood glucose that may produce acute and long-term complications. Acute complications of hyperglycemia...

  12. Perspectives in endocrine toxicity of heavy metals--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, S V S

    2014-07-01

    An attempt has been made to review the endocrine/hormonal implications of a few environmentally significant metals, viz, lead, mercury, cadmium, copper, arsenic and nickel, in man and animals. Special emphasis has been given to the adrenals, thyroid, testis, ovary and pancreas. Toxic metals can cause structural and functional changes in the adrenal glands. Their effects on steroidogenesis have been reviewed. It has been reported that thyroid hormone kinetics are affected by a number of metallic compounds. Occupational exposure to a few of these metals can cause testicular injury and sex hormone disturbances. Protective effects of a few antioxidants on their reproductive toxicity have also been discussed. Information gathered on female reproductive toxicity of heavy metals shows that exposure to these metals can lead to disturbances in reproductive performance in exposed subjects. Certain metals can cause injury to the endocrine pancreas. Exposure to them can cause diabetes mellitus and disturb insulin homeostasis. The need to develop molecular markers of endocrine toxicity of heavy metals has been suggested. Overall information described in this review is expected to be helpful in planning future studies on endocrine toxicity of heavy metals.

  13. Endocrine Disruption and In Vitro Ecotoxicology: Recent Advances and Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Kienle, Cornelia; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Oehlmann, Jörg

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling. Omnipresent in the environment, they can cause adverse effects in a wide range of wildlife. Accordingly, Endocrine Disruption is one focal area of ecotoxicology. Because EDCs induce complex response patterns in vivo via a wide range of mechanisms of action, in vitro techniques have been developed to reduce and understand endocrine toxicity. In this review we revisit the evidence for endocrine disruption in diverse species and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Based on this, we examine the battery of in vitro bioassays currently in use in ecotoxicological research and discuss the following key questions. Why do we use in vitro techniques? What endpoints are we looking at? Which applications are we using in vitro bioassays for? How can we put in vitro data into a broader context? And finally, what is the practical relevance of in vitro data? In critically examining these questions, we review the current state-of-the-art of in vitro (eco)toxicology, highlight important limitations and challenges, and discuss emerging trends and future research needs.

  14. Effects of endocrine disrupting heavy metals on pituitary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of hypogonadism and visceral obesity (VO) was recently demonstrated in male auto-mechanics occupationally exposed to endocrine disruptors (ED)-lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic, known to alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. The effects of exposure to these EDs on pituitary and gonadal ...

  15. Steroidogenesis in vitro : towards relevant models for endocrine disruptor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, M.J.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357301137

    2016-01-01

    Starting our search for in vitro alternative methods to screen for steroidogenesis toxicity, we focused on the effects of (suggested) endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme activity. CYP17 is responsible for conversion of progestagens to dehydroepiandrosterone

  16. Pollution by endocrine disrupting estrogens in aquatic ecosystems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out in Morogoro urban and peri-urban areas. The main sources of fresh water for domestic uses, fishing and agricultural activities in the study areas including the Mindu dam catchment area, Ngerengere and Morogoro Rivers were assessed. The endocrine disrupting estrogens in water samples were ...

  17. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu Kiriyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS, such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems.

  18. The Role of ARX in Human Pancreatic Endocrine Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Blair K; Asadi, Ali; Baker, Robert K; Webber, Travis D; Wang, Rennian; Itoh, Masayuki; Hayashi, Masaharu; Miyata, Rie; Akashi, Takumi; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offers a model system to explore human development. Humans with mutations in the transcription factor Aristaless Related Homeobox (ARX) often suffer from the syndrome X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia (XLAG), affecting many cell types including those of the pancreas. Indeed, XLAG pancreatic islets lack glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide-positive cells but retain somatostatin, insulin, and ghrelin-positive cells. To further examine the role of ARX in human pancreatic endocrine development, we utilized genomic editing in hESCs to generate deletions in ARX. ARX knockout hESCs retained pancreatic differentiation capacity and ARX knockout endocrine cells were biased toward somatostatin-positive cells (94% of endocrine cells) with reduced pancreatic polypeptide (rarely detected), glucagon (90% reduced) and insulin-positive (65% reduced) lineages. ARX knockout somatostatin-positive cells shared expression patterns with human fetal and adult δ-cells. Differentiated ARX knockout cells upregulated PAX4, NKX2.2, ISL1, HHEX, PCSK1, PCSK2 expression while downregulating PAX6 and IRX2. Re-expression of ARX in ARX knockout pancreatic progenitors reduced HHEX and increased PAX6 and insulin expression following differentiation. Taken together these data suggest that ARX plays a key role in pancreatic endocrine fate specification of pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, glucagon and insulin positive cells from hESCs.

  19. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Essential Oils From Artemisia khorassanica and Vitex pseudo-negundo Against Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzoui, Ehsan; Naseri, Bahram; Abedi, Zahra; Karimi-Pormehr, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-10-01

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner, 1813) is a polyphagous and key pest of different stored products worldwide. The lethal and sublethal effects of essential oils of Artemisia khorassanica Podl. and Vitex pseudo-negundo (Hausskn) were studied on P. interpunctella The chemical constituents of the essential oils were also assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Assays showed that the fumigant toxicity of A. khorassanica (LC50: 9.60 µl/liter air) was higher than V. pseudo-negundo (LC50: 23.05 µl/liter air). Moreover, the speed of mortality caused by A. khorassanica oil (LT50: 2.07 h) was higher than V. pseudo-negundo (LT50: 3.11 h). To assess the sublethal effects of the essential oils, adult moths were exposed to the LC30 of each essential oil, and life table parameters and energy contents of the surviving P. interpunctella were studied. Exposure to sublethal concentration of A. khorassanica negatively affected the life table of P. interpunctella, and also the protein, lipid, and glycogen contents of the larvae that came from treated adults. Vitex pseudo-negundo also affected lipid, protein, and glycogen contents of P. interpunctella The intrinsic rate of increase (rm), finite rate of increase ([Formula: see text]), and doubling time (DT) were not significantly different between control and V. pseudo-negundo treatment. According with these results, both tested essential oils, especially one extracted from A. khorassanica, have potential applications for the integrated management of P. interpunctella. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the industrial chemical epichlorohydrin on Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae) embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutler Wolkowicz, Ianina R; Aronzon, Carolina M; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2013-12-15

    Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the major chemical used in epoxide compounds, epichlorohydrin (ECH) was evaluated on the early life cycle of the common South American toad, Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae). The stages evaluated were (according to Del Conte and Sirlin): early blastula (S.3-S.4), gastrula (S.10-S.12), rotation (S.15), tail bud (S.17), muscular response (S.18), gill circulation (S.20), open mouth (S.21), opercular folds (S.23) and complete operculum (S.25). The LC50 and EC50 values for lethal and sublethal effects were calculated. The early blastula was the most sensitive stage to ECH both for continuously and pulse-exposures (LC50-24h=50.9 mg L(-1)), while S.20 was the most resistant (LC50-24h=104.9 mg L(-1)). Among sublethal effects, early blastula was also the most sensitive stage (LOEC-48 h=20 mg L(-1)) and it has a Teratogenic Index of 2.5, which indicates the teratogenic potential of the substance. The main abnormalities were persistent yolk plugs, cell dissociation, tumors, hydropsy, oral malformations, axial/tail flexures, delayed development and reduced body size. ECH also caused neurotoxicity including scarce response to stimuli, reduction in the food intake, general weakness, spasms and shortening, erratic or circular swimming. Industrial contamination is considered an important factor on the decline of amphibian populations. Considering the available information about ECH's toxicity and its potential hazard to the environment, this work shows the first results of its developmental toxicity on a native amphibian species, Rhinella arenarum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.