WorldWideScience

Sample records for subjects underwent spirometry

  1. Spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirometry Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spirometry (spy-ROM-uh-tree) is a common office test used to assess how well your lungs work by measuring how much air ... much you exhale and how quickly you exhale. Spirometry is used to diagnose asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  2. Correlation between spirometry values and pulmonary artery pressure in young healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Benderly, Michal; Prokupetz, Alex; Gordon, Barak; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is frequently associated with parenchymal lung disease. We evaluated the association between spirometry values and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) in young subjects without lung disease : We studied applicants to the Israeli Air Force, who undergo routine evaluation that includes resting spirometry and echocardiography. Applicants with overt lung disease were excluded. All echocardiographic studies performed in the years 1994 through 2010 (n = 6,598) were screened, and files that included PASP and spirometry values were analyzed for the association between PASP and FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver. Of the 647 air force applicants who underwent echocardiography in which PASP was measurable and had spirometry data, 607 (94%) were male, and their average age was 18.16 ± 0.73 years. Mean PASP was 26.4 ± 5.2 mm Hg (range 10-41 mm Hg). None of the spirometry values significantly correlated with PASP. PASP in young healthy subjects is not significantly associated with spirometry values. Lung mechanics probably do not contribute significantly to PASP in this population.

  3. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I. Berger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Trade Center (WTC destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848 from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475 from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5 and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20. Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001. In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range R5 0.436 (0.206 versus 0.314 (0.129 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085 versus 0.004 (0.042 kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001. In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05. Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms.

  4. Oscillometry complements spirometry in evaluation of subjects following toxic inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Turetz, Meredith; Liu, Mengling; Shao, Yongzhao; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Friedman, Stephen M.; Maslow, Carey B.; Marmor, Michael; Goldring, Roberta M.

    2015-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) destruction released dust and fumes into the environment. Although many community members developed respiratory symptoms, screening spirometry was usually normal. We hypothesised that forced oscillation testing would identify functional abnormalities undetected by spirometry and that symptom severity would relate to magnitude of abnormalities measured by oscillometry. A symptomatic cohort (n=848) from the Bellevue Hospital WTC Environmental Health Center was evaluated and compared to an asymptomatic cohort (n=475) from the New York City Department of Health WTC Health Registry. Spirometry and oscillometry were performed. Oscillometry measurements included resistance (R5) and frequency dependence of resistance (R5−20). Spirometry was normal for the majority of subjects (73.2% symptomatic versus 87.6% asymptomatic, p<0.0001). In subjects with normal spirometry, R5 and R5−20 were higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic subjects (median (interquartile range) R5 0.436 (0.206) versus 0.314 (0.129) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.001; R5−20 0.075 (0.085) versus 0.004 (0.042) kPa·L−1·s−1, p<0.0001). In symptomatic subjects, R5 and R5−20 increased with increasing severity and frequency of wheeze (p<0.05). Measurement of R5–20 correlated with the presence and severity of symptoms even when spirometry was within normal limits. These findings are in accord with small airway abnormalities as a potential explanation of the respiratory symptoms. PMID:27730155

  5. The nasal provocation test combined with spirometry establishes paradoxical vocal fold motion in allergic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Argentão, Daiana Guedes Pinto; Lima, Regiane Patussi dos Santos; da Silva, Mariana Dias; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (also called paradoxical vocal cord motion) or paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) is an event elicited by specific and nonspecific triggers in which its diagnosis is limited by the restricted number of available functional tests. This study was designed to appreciate the contribution of the spirometric changes elicited by the allergen-specific nasal provocation test (NPT) performed with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus for the diagnosis of PVFM in subjects with known sensitization to this allergen. In total, 63 subjects with allergic rhinitis who had previously been shown to be sensitized to D. pteronyssinus and who had experienced one or more episodes of inspiratory shortness of breath underwent two spirometric tests, one before (pre-NPT) and another 15 minutes after the allergen-specific NPT (post-NPT). The forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in 2 seconds (FIV2), and the ratio between the FIV in 1 second and FIVC (FIV1/FIVC) were measured by spirometry. The morphology of the post-NPT inspiratory loop was compared with the pre-NPT inspiratory loop. We found that 18 subjects (28.5%) showed alterations suggestive of PVFM on post-NPT spirometry (e.g., truncation and/or flattening of the inspiratory loop). The mean differences between the pre-NPT and post-NPT values for the whole group were significant using a two-tailed paired t-test for the FIVC (4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI95%], 1.4-6.8), FIV1/FIVC ratio (2.7; CI95%, 0.05-5.3), and FIV2 (7.2; CI95%, 3.4-11). Allergen-specific NPT combined with spirometry is useful to show allergen-specific laryngeal hyperresponsiveness in allergic subjects with PVFM. Brazilian clinical trial registry platform (Plataforma Brasil, CAAE 07971212.0.0000.5480).

  6. Influence of forward leaning and incentive spirometry on inspired volumes and inspiratory electromyographic activity during breathing exercises in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thalita Vilaboim; Ruas, Gualberto; Sande de Souza, Luciane Aparecida Pascucci; Volpe, Marcia Souza

    2012-12-01

    Breathing exercises (BE), incentive spirometry and positioning are considered treatment modalities to achieve lung re-expansion. This study evaluated the influence of incentive spirometry and forward leaning on inspired tidal volumes (V(T)) and electromyographic activity of inspiratory muscles during BE. Four modalities of exercises were investigated: deep breathing, spirometry using both flow and volume-oriented devices, and volume-oriented spirometry after modified verbal instruction. Twelve healthy subjects aged 22.7 ± 2.1 years were studied. Surface electromyography activity of diaphragm, external intercostals, sternocleidomastoid and scalenes was recorded. Comparisons among the three types of exercises, without considering spirometry after modified instruction, showed that electromyographic activity and V(T) were lower during volume-oriented spirometry (p = 0.000, p = 0.054, respectively). Forward leaning resulted in a lower V(T) when compared to upright sitting (p = 0.000), but electromyographic activity was not different (p = 0.606). Inspired V(T) and electromyographic activity were higher during volume-oriented spirometry performed after modified instruction when compared with the flow-oriented device (p = 0.027, p = 0.052, respectively). In conclusion BE using volume-oriented spirometry before modified instruction resulted in a lower work of breathing as a result of a lower V(T) and was not a consequence of the device type used. Forward leaning might not be assumed by healthy subjects during situations of augmented respiratory demand. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory Responses, Spirometry, and Quality of Life in Subjects With Bronchiectasis Exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Gao, Yong-Hua; Xu, Gang; Lin, Zhi-Ya; Tang, Yan; Li, Hui-Min; Lin, Zhi-Min; Jiang, Mei; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2015-08-01

    Bronchiectasis exacerbations are critical events characterized by worsened symptoms and signs (ie, cough frequency, sputum volume, malaise). Our goal was to examine variations in airway and systemic inflammation, spirometry, and quality of life during steady state, bronchiectasis exacerbations, and convalescence (1 week following a 2-week antibiotic treatment) to determine whether potentially pathogenic microorganisms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were associated with poorer conditions during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Peripheral blood and sputum were sampled to detect inflammatory mediators and bacterial densities. Spirometry and quality of life (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]) were assessed during the 3 stages. Forty-eight subjects with bronchiectasis (43.2 ± 14.2 y of age) were analyzed. No notable differences in species and density of potentially pathogenic microorganisms were found during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Except for CXCL8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), serum inflammation was heightened during bronchiectasis exacerbations and recovered during convalescence. Even though sputum TNF-α was markedly higher during bronchiectasis exacerbations and remained heightened during convalescence, the variations in miscellaneous sputum markers were unremarkable. Bronchiectasis exacerbations were associated with notably higher SGRQ symptom and total scores, which recovered during convalescence. FVC, FEV1, and maximum mid-expiratory flow worsened during bronchiectasis exacerbations (median change from baseline of -2.2%, -0.8%, and -1.3%) and recovered during convalescence (median change from baseline of 0.6%, 0.7%, and -0.7%). Compared with no bacterial isolation, potentially pathogenic microorganism or P. aeruginosa isolation at baseline did not result in poorer clinical condition during bronchiectasis exacerbations. Bronchiectasis exacerbations are characterized by heightened inflammatory responses and poorer quality of life and

  8. Clinical Utility of Additional Measurement of Total Lung Capacity in Diagnosing Obstructive Lung Disease in Subjects With Restrictive Pattern of Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Chang, Boksoon; Kim, Kyunga; Song, Won Jun; Chon, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-04-01

    Total lung capacity (TLC), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% (FEF25-75%), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or post-bronchodilator volume response is recommended to detect obstructive abnormalities in the lung. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters to diagnose obstructive lung disease in subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry. A retrospective study was conducted in 64 subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry (normal FEV1/FVC and low FVC) out of 3,030 patients who underwent all pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and lung volume measurement between April 2008 and December 2010. After subjects were clinically classified into those with obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, and mixed lung disease, the agreements between the clinical diagnosis and PFT classification according to TLC, FEF(25-75%), PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria were compared. Of 64 subjects, 18 (28.1%) were classified with obstructive lung disease, 39 (60.9%) had restrictive lung disease, 1 (1.6%) had mixed lung disease, and 6 (9.4%) had no clinical lung disease. Among the 58 subjects with clinical lung disease, 22 (37.9%), 37 (63.8%), 33 (56.9%), and 3 (5.2%) were classified as having obstructive pattern based on TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria, respectively. The kappa coefficients for the agreement between the clinical classification and PFT classification using TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria in 58 subjects were 0.59, 0.18, 0.17, and spirometry, when obstructive lung disease is clinically suspected. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. STUDY OF SPIROMETRY FINDING IN SNORERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Dhawal Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Spirometry is indicated to detect whether a pulmonary dysfunction is present or not, to rate the severity of a known pulmonary disease, to follow up the pulmonary function. Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound. Snoring during sleep may be the first sign of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. Common signs of OSA include unexplained daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, and loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps. With this high prevalence of OSA and the rising worldwide increase in morbidity and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, more research required comparing nocturnal respiratory disturbances with attention directed on the effect of body composition, severity of OSA and severity of airway obstruction. MATERIAL & METHODS A cross-sectional observational study was carried out in snorers at Department of Respiratory Medicine. All patients underwent spirometry and PSG. RESULTS There was no significant correlation between severity of snoring and any spirometry parameter. CONCLUSION In our study, there was no correlation between snoring and spirometry nor between spirometry and AHI. It may be because of less number of subjects in our study, so study with large numbers of subjects are required to bring out the correlation. KEYWORDS Spirometry, Snoring, Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

  10. Spirometry screening for airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnivesky, Juan; Skloot, Gwen; Rundle, Andrew; Revenson, Tracey A; Neugut, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    Screening spirometry might help identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of airway obstruction in a cohort of asymptomatic smokers who underwent spirometry as part of a routine health maintenance examination. The study cohort consisted of a consecutive sample of 386 asymptomatic smokers (≥5 pack-years) without a history of COPD or asthma, who completed spirometry testing as part of a routine health maintenance examination. Overall, 9 study subjects (2.3%, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.4%) had evidence of airway obstruction on spirometry. Univariate and multiple regression analyses showed that the risk of airway obstruction was not significantly associated with age, sex, race, smoking history or past history of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry screening of asymptomatic smokers may help detect a small number of patients with airway obstruction who are at high risk for COPD.

  11. Assessment of five different guideline indication criteria for spirometry, including modified GOLD criteria, in order to detect COPD: data from 5,315 subjects in the PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luize, Ana P; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Muiño, Adriana; López, Maria Victorina; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmem; Montes de Oca, Maria; Tálamo, Carlos; Celli, Bartolomé; Nascimento, Oliver A; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Jardim, José R

    2014-10-30

    Spirometry is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although there are a number of different guideline criteria for deciding who should be selected for spirometric screening, to date it is not known which criteria are the best based on sensitivity and specificity. Firstly, to evaluate the proportion of subjects in the PLATINO Study that would be recommended for spirometry testing according to Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-modified, American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), National Lung Health Education Program (NLHEP), GOLD and American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) criteria. Secondly, we aimed to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values, of these five different criteria. Data from the PLATINO study included information on respiratory symptoms, smoking and previous spirometry testing. The GOLD-modified spirometry indication criteria are based on three positive answers out of five questions: the presence of cough, phlegm in the morning, dyspnoea, age over 40 years and smoking status. Data from 5,315 subjects were reviewed. Fewer people had an indication for spirometry (41.3%) according to the GOLD-modified criteria, and more people had an indication for spirometry (80.4%) by the GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria. A low percentage had previously had spirometry performed: GOLD-modified (14.5%); ACCP (13.2%); NLHEP (12.6%); and GOLD and ATS/ERS (12.3%). The GOLD-modified criteria showed the least sensitivity (54.9) and the highest specificity (61.0) for detecting COPD, whereas GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria showed the highest sensitivity (87.9) and the least specificity (20.8). There is a considerable difference in the indication for spirometry according to the five different guideline criteria. The GOLD-modified criteria recruit less people with the greatest sum of sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Noncontact spirometry with a webcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenbin; Yang, Yuting; Tsow, Francis; Shao, Dangdang; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-05-01

    We present an imaging-based method for noncontact spirometry. The method tracks the subtle respiratory-induced shoulder movement of a subject, builds a calibration curve, and determines the flow-volume spirometry curve and vital respiratory parameters, including forced expiratory volume in the first second, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate. We validate the accuracy of the method by comparing the data with those simultaneously recorded with a gold standard reference method and examine the reliability of the noncontact spirometry with a pilot study including 16 subjects. This work demonstrates that the noncontact method can provide accurate and reliable spirometry tests with a webcam. Compared to the traditional spirometers, the present noncontact spirometry does not require using a spirometer, breathing into a mouthpiece, or wearing a nose clip, thus making spirometry test more easily accessible for the growing population of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  13. Standardisation of spirometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, M. R; Hankinson, J; Brusasco, V; Burgos, F; Casaburi, R; Coates, A; Crapo, R; Enright, P; van der Grinten, C. P. M; Gustafsson, P; Jensen, R; Johnson, D. C; MacIntyre, N; McKay, R; Navajas, D; Pedersen, O. F; Pellegrino, R; Viegi, G; Wanger, J

    2005-01-01

    ..., V.le Benedetto XV, 6, I-16132 Genova, Italy. Fax: 39 103537690. E-mail: vito.brusasco@unige.it Keywords: Peak expiratory flow, spirometry, spirometry standardisation, spirometry technique, spirometry traning, ventilation Received...

  14. Norms of the Mini-Mental state Examination for Japanese subjects that underwent comprehensive brain examinations: the Kashima Scan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Yusuke; Horikawa, Etsuo; Eriguchi, Makoto; Nanri, Yusuke; Nishihara, Masashi; Hirotsu, Tatsumi; Hara, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores by age and educational level was investigated in subjects that underwent comprehensive brain examinations. This cross-sectional study included 1,414 adults without neurological disorders who underwent health-screening tests of the brain, referred to as the "Brain Dock," in our center. The MMSE scores were compared between age groups (40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, or ≥70 years) and educational levels [the low education level group (6-12 years) and the high education level group (≥13 years)]. The median age was 59 years, and 763 (54%) were women. There was no significant difference in the MMSE total score between women and men. The stepwise method of the multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that a higher age [β value, -0.129; standard error (S.E.), 0.020; p<0.001], low education level (6-12 years) (β value, -0.226; S.E., 0.075; p=0.003), and women (β values, 0.148; S.E., 0.066; p=0.024) was significantly associated with decreased MMSE score. In general, both the percentile scores and mean scores decreased with aging and were lower in the low education level group than in the high education level group. The degree of decrement in scores with age was stronger in the low education level group than in the high education level group. The provided data for age- and education-specific reference norms will be useful for both clinicians and investigators who perform comprehensive brain examinations to assess the cognitive function of subjects.

  15. The use of COPD maintenance therapy following spirometry in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Gottlieb

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that the use of pulmonary medication is widespread and often initiated without initial spirometry. Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by spirometry in General Practice is essential for an early and correct implementation of medical treatment. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of regular therapy following diagnostic spirometry for COPD in General Practice from February 2008 to February 2009. Method: Spirometry data and results were linked through Statistics Denmark with information from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics using the unique personal identification code. Data were analysed to evaluate the impact of screening on use of regular COPD therapy. Primary outcome was initiation of regular therapy following COPD diagnosis with spirometry. Results: In a population of 3,376 individuals at risk, 1,458 underwent spirometric assessment with 631 being diagnosed with COPD; 110 of those received regular therapy before assessment with this figure increasing to 161 after spirometry. Of 827 participants not receiving a COPD diagnosis, 36 received regular therapy prior to assessment and 42 received regular therapy after spirometry despite no established COPD diagnosis. Conclusion: There is a significant chance of receiving regular therapy after being diagnosed with COPD. However, a large proportion of subjects diagnosed with COPD did not receive regular therapy following diagnosis. Efforts should be made to ensure correct diagnosis and correct medical treatment according to guidelines in individuals with COPD.

  16. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-07-07

    Jul 7, 1996 ... Spirometry of healthy adult. South African men. Part I. Normative values. S. J. Louw, J. G. Goldin, G. Joubert. Aim. To detennine normative spirometric values for black and white South African men. Methods. A population of 796 bank personnel were. sUbjected to spirometry and anthropometric.

  17. Spirometry in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Kana Ram

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory disorders are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children. Spirometry is a useful investigation for diagnosing and monitoring a variety of paediatric respiratory diseases, but it is underused by primary care physicians and paediatricians treating children with respiratory disease. We now have a better understanding of respiratory physiology in children, and newer computerised spirometry equipment is available with updated regional reference values for the paediatric age group. This review evaluates the current literature for indications, test procedures, quality assessment, and interpretation of spirometry results in children. Spirometry may be useful for asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital or acquired airway malformations and many other respiratory diseases in children. The technique for performing spirometry in children is crucial and is discussed in detail. Most children, including preschool children, can perform acceptable spirometry. Steps for interpreting spirometry results include identification of common errors during the test by applying acceptability and repeatability criteria and then comparing test parameters with reference standards. Spirometry results depict only the pattern of ventilation, which may be normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed. The diagnosis should be based on both clinical features and spirometry results. There is a need to encourage primary care physicians and paediatricians treating respiratory diseases in children to use spirometry after adequate training.

  18. Spirometry quality in adults with very severe lung function impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; García-Torrentera, Rogelio; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Enright, Paul; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2015-05-01

    Some technologists worry that patients with very severe lung disease are unable to complete several spirometry maneuvers, which require considerable effort. We retrospectively selected all spirometry tests with an FEV1 30,000 subjects tested during the 3-y period) had adequate quality spirometry. Subjects with airway obstruction were less likely to meet FVC repeatability goals. A poor spirometry quality grade was associated with a very low FVC and a low body mass index, but not older age. Severe lung disease should not be used as an excuse for not meeting spirometry quality goals. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  19. Prediction equations for spirometry in adults from northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Kumar, R; Gupta, U; Rahman, M; Dash, D J

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Indian studies on prediction equations for spirometry in adults are several decades old and may have lost their utility as these were carried out with equipment and standardisation protocols that have since changed. Their validity is further questionable as the lung health of the population is likely to have changed over time. To develop prediction equations for spirometry in adults of north Indian origin using the 2005 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) recommendations on standardisation. Normal healthy non-smoker subjects, both males and females, aged 18 years and above underwent spirometry using a non-heated Fleisch Pneumotach spirometer calibrated daily. The dataset was randomly divided into training (70%) and test (30%) sets and the former was used to develop the equations. These were validated on the test data set. Prediction equations were developed separately for males and females for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, and instantaneous expiratory flow rates using multiple linear regression procedure with different transformations of dependent and/or independent variables to achieve the best-fitting models for the data. The equations were compared with the previous ones developed in the same population in the 1960s. In all, 685 (489 males, 196 females) subjects performed spirometry that was technically acceptable and repeatable. All the spirometry parameters were significantly higher among males except the FEV1/FVC ratio that was significantly higher in females. Overall, age had a negative relationship with the spirometry parameters while height was positively correlated with each, except for the FEV1/FVC ratio that was related only to age. Weight was included in the models for FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF75) and FEV1/FVC ratio in males, but its contribution was very small. Standard errors of estimate were provided to enable calculation of the lower

  20. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Arantes, Rodolfo Leite; Matheus, Agatha Caveda; Silva, Rodrigo Pereira da; Lauria, Vinícius Tonon; Romiti, Marcello; Gagliardi, Antônio Ricardo de Toledo; Dourado, Victor Zuniga

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL), as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years) underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness), the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI) as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8), smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5), physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4), larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71); and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98). A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  1. Feasibility of spirometry testing in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschmidt, Jordan C; Brooks, Edward G; Cherry, Debra C; Guajardo, Jesus R; Wood, Pamela R

    2016-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining acceptable and reproducible spirometry data in preschool aged children (3-5 years) by technicians without prior experience with spirometry. Two technicians were trained to perform spirometry testing (ndd Easy on-PC) and to administer standardized questionnaires. Preschool aged children were enrolled from two Head Start centers and a local primary care clinic. Subjects were trained in proper spirometry technique and tested until at least two acceptable efforts were obtained or the subject no longer produced acceptable efforts. 200 subjects were enrolled: mean age 4.0 years (± 0.7 SD); age distribution: 51 (25.5%) 3 years old, 103 (51.5%) 4 years old, and 46 (23%) 5 years old. Fifty-six percent male and 75% Hispanic. One hundred thirty (65%) subjects produced at least one acceptable effort on their first visit: 23 (45%) for 3 years old, 67 (65%) for 4 years old, and 40 (87%) for 5 years old. The number of acceptable efforts correlated with age (r = 0.29, P spirometry results from the preschool aged children; the number of acceptable efforts correlated significantly with age. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spirometry in elderly laryngectomized patients: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Alessandro; Perrotta, Fabio; Cennamo, Antonio; Cerqua, Francesco Saverio; Rinaldi, Luca; Mazzella, Antonio; Grella, Edoardo; Tranfa, Carmelindo; Bianco, Andrea; Stefanelli, Francesco; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the second most common respiratory neoplasm after lung cancer. Laryngectomy is a well established treatment for larynx cancers which involve relevant anatomic alterations. Spirometry is an essential investigation tool for diagnosis and severity of respiratory diseases, difficult to perform in laryngectomees. 43 consecutive laryngectomized patients were enrolled from July 2014 to March 2015. Patients fulfilling inclusion criteria underwent spirometry at baseline assessment and after two days. During the examination, the spirometer was placed directly on the stoma of the patient, through mouthpiece "Spirometry Filter 74". At baseline, 26 eligible laryngectomees correctly performed the spirometry test with mouthpiece adhering to the stoma; 4 patients refused to perform the second spirometry after 2 days. The feasibility of spirometry examination in these patients was 100% despite difficulties in the execution of the test. The Pearson coefficient of reproducibility for FEV1, FVC and Tiffeneau Index was, respectively, 0.98, 0.94 and 0.77. Spirometry in laryngectomee patients is a feasible procedure for assessment of respiratory function; despite technical difficulties in the execution of the test, our results underline the reproducibility and repeatability of the spirometry. In conclusion, when performed within dedicated respiratory pathophysiology unit, spirometry is a reliable tool in the assessment and follow up of laryngectomees. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spirometry and Bronchodilator Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun Su; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Won-Yeon; Suh, Dong In; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Yoon, Jong-Seo; Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Jae Hwa; Kwon, Cheol Seok; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Spirometry is a physiological test for assessing the functional aspect of the lungs using an objective indicator to measure the maximum amount of air that a patient can inhale and exhale. Acceptable spirometry testing needs to be conducted three times by an acceptable and reproducible method for determining forced vital capacity (FVC). Until the results of three tests meet the criteria of reproducibility, the test should be repeated up to eight times. Interpretation of spirometry should be clear, concise, and informative. Additionally, spirometry should guarantee optimal quality prior to the interpreting spirometry results. Our guideline adopts a fixed normal predictive value instead of the lower limit of normal as the reference value because fixed value is more convenient and also accepts FVC instead of vital capacity (VC) because measurement of VC using a spirometer is impossible. The bronchodilator test is a method for measuring the changes in lung capacity after inhaling a short-acting β-agonist that dilates the airway. When an obstructive ventilatory defect is observed, this test helps to diagnose and evaluate asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by measuring reversibility with the use of an inhaled bronchodilator. A positive response to a bronchodilator is generally defined as an increase of ≥12% and ≥200 mL as an absolute value compared with a baseline in either forced expiratory volume at 1 second or FVC.

  4. Spirometry in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  5. Spirometry in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is globally increasing in frequency and is expected to be the third largest cause of death by 2020. Smoking is the main risk factor of developing COPD. In Greenland, more than half of the adult population are daily smokers, and COPD may...... be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. Objective. To estimate the prevalence...... of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. Design. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland...

  6. Effects of one-hour training course and spirometry on the ability of physicians to diagnose and treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shan; Qin, Li; Tanoue, Lynn; Hu, Anmei; Jia, Xiujie; Luo, Hong; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In China, the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in persons 40 years of age or older is estimated at 8.2%, but this is likely a substantial underestimate. Eight secondary hospitals which didn't have spirometries were chosen randomly in Hunan province of central south China. Physician subjects at these hospitals underwent a one-hour training course on the Chinese COPD guidelines. Physicians answered questionnaires assessing their knowledge of the guidelines before and after the training session. The mean correct scores of questionnaires were compared before and after training. Four out of the eight hospitals were given access to spirometry. Eligible patient subjects underwent spirometry testing prior to the physician visit. After seeing the patient, physicians were asked to answer a questionnaire relating to the diagnosis and severity of COPD. Physicians were then given the results of the spirometry, and asked to answer the same questionnaire. Physicians' responses before and after receiving the spirometry results were compared. 225 physicians participated in the training session. 207 questionnaires were completed. Mean scores (out of 100) before and after the training were 53.1 ± 21.7 and 93.3 ± 9.8, respectively. 18 physicians and 307 patient subjects participated in the spirometry intervention. Based on spirometric results, the prevalence of COPD was 38.8%. Physicians correctly identified the presence of COPD without spirometric data in 85 cases (76.6%); this increased to 117 cases (97.4%) once spirometric data were available. Without spirometric data, physicians incorrectly diagnosed COPD in 38 patients; this decreased to 6 patients once spirometric data were available. Spirometric data also improved the ability of physicians to correctly grade COPD severity. Simple educational training can substantially improve physicians' knowledge relating to COPD. Spirometry combined with education improves the ability of physicians to diagnose COPD

  7. Effects of one-hour training course and spirometry on the ability of physicians to diagnose and treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Cai

    Full Text Available In China, the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in persons 40 years of age or older is estimated at 8.2%, but this is likely a substantial underestimate.Eight secondary hospitals which didn't have spirometries were chosen randomly in Hunan province of central south China. Physician subjects at these hospitals underwent a one-hour training course on the Chinese COPD guidelines. Physicians answered questionnaires assessing their knowledge of the guidelines before and after the training session. The mean correct scores of questionnaires were compared before and after training. Four out of the eight hospitals were given access to spirometry. Eligible patient subjects underwent spirometry testing prior to the physician visit. After seeing the patient, physicians were asked to answer a questionnaire relating to the diagnosis and severity of COPD. Physicians were then given the results of the spirometry, and asked to answer the same questionnaire. Physicians' responses before and after receiving the spirometry results were compared.225 physicians participated in the training session. 207 questionnaires were completed. Mean scores (out of 100 before and after the training were 53.1 ± 21.7 and 93.3 ± 9.8, respectively. 18 physicians and 307 patient subjects participated in the spirometry intervention. Based on spirometric results, the prevalence of COPD was 38.8%. Physicians correctly identified the presence of COPD without spirometric data in 85 cases (76.6%; this increased to 117 cases (97.4% once spirometric data were available. Without spirometric data, physicians incorrectly diagnosed COPD in 38 patients; this decreased to 6 patients once spirometric data were available. Spirometric data also improved the ability of physicians to correctly grade COPD severity.Simple educational training can substantially improve physicians' knowledge relating to COPD. Spirometry combined with education improves the ability of physicians to

  8. Evaluation of interpretation strategies and substantial bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with normal baseline spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Daniel P; Ocampo, Thad F; DiGiovanni, Heather A; Gil, Eddie R

    2013-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the best method to interpret pediatric spirometry. There is also controversy regarding the benefit of performing post-bronchodilator spirometry after normal baseline spirometry. This study compares the use of lower limit of normal (LLN) against percent of predicted (PP) in the interpretation of spirometry. We also investigate the occurrence of a substantial bronchodilator response for patients who received post-bronchodilator spirometry. Spirometric tests performed in the pediatric clinic at San Antonio Military Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Results of spirometry were compared using LLN and PP for interpretation. Abnormal spirometry was defined as a low FEV1 or low FEV1/FVC, indicating evidence of airway obstruction. The presence of a substantial bronchodilator response was recorded and the results were analyzed. Of 242 tests, 212 normal and 30 abnormal tests were reported using the LLN interpretation strategy. Using the PP interpretation strategy, there was a significant difference in the number of normal (183) and abnormal (59) tests, when compared to the LLN (P spirometry, 10% (PP) and 12% (LLN) had a substantial bronchodilator response. An abnormal baseline spirometry was more likely to have a substantial response to bronchodilator, compared to normal baseline spirometry (P spirometry, 10-12% of subjects with normal baseline spirometry showed a substantial bronchodilator response. This suggests that normal baseline spirometry may miss reversible airway obstruction, which is a hallmark of asthma.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of spirometry in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of spirometry for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma in patients suspected of suffering from an obstructive airway disease (OAD in primary care. Methods Cross sectional diagnostic study of 219 adult patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious for OAD. All patients underwent spirometry and structured medical histories were documented. All patients received whole-body plethysmography (WBP in a lung function laboratory. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC received by the spirometric maneuver during examination with WBP. In the event of inconclusive results, bronchial provocation was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR. Asthma was defined as a PC20 fall after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. Results 90 (41.1% patients suffered from asthma, 50 (22.8% suffered from COPD, 79 (36.1% had no OAD. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in COPD was 92% (95%CI 80–97; specificity was 84% (95%CI 77–89. The positive predictive value (PPV was 63% (95%CI 51–73; negative predictive value (NPV was 97% (95%CI 93–99. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in asthma was 29% (95%CI 21–39; specificity was 90% (95%CI 81–95. PPV was 77% (95%CI 60–88; NPV was 53% (95%CI 45–61. Conclusion COPD can be estimated with high diagnostic accuracy using spirometry. It is also possible to rule in asthma with spirometry. However, asthma can not be ruled out only using spirometry. This diagnostic uncertainty leads to an overestimation of asthma presence. Patients with inconclusive spirometric results should be referred for nitric oxide (NO – measurement and/or bronchial provocation if possible to guarantee accurate diagnosis.

  10. Validity of spirometry performed online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, J F; González, M T; Pereira, R; Mota, M; Riesco, J A; Corral, J; Zamorano, J; Rubio, M; Teran, J; Farré, R

    2011-04-01

    Spirometry is essential for the diagnosis and management of common respiratory diseases. However, its use and quality are low in primary care. An important reason for this is the technical difficulty in performing conventional spirometry. If high-quality spirometry could be performed online, from the pulmonary function laboratory in hospitals, most of the technical problems could be solved. The aim of the present study was to compare spirometries performed online by remote technicians with conventional spirometry. This was a controlled, randomised crossover study of 261 patients referred from primary care centres for pulmonary consultation. They were randomised to undergo either conventional or online spirometry. The technician, located remotely, controlled the spirometer computer. Using a teleconference link, the technician guided the patient through the spirometry. The comparison between conventional and online spirometries was performed on intention to treat and per protocol bases for spirometric values and quality criteria. Agreement between the two spirometric methods was assessed with a Bland-Altman plot. A subpopulation of off-range patients was also characterised. Finally, intra- and interobserver agreement was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient. No clinically significant differences were seen between the online and conventional spirometric values in both the intention to treat and per protocol analyses. The agreement in Bland-Altman analysis was poorer for intention to treat than for the per protocol analysis. The latter had a lower percentage of off-range patients and high agreement to determine abnormal spirometry in the off-range group. Conventional spirometry had a higher percentage of patients with spirometric quality criteria although the quality criteria difference was only 5.9%, when both procedures were the first to start. Very good agreement was found between intra- and interobserver reliability. Spirometry performed online

  11. Restrictive pattern on spirometry: association with cardiovascular risk and level of physical activity in asymptomatic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine whether a restrictive pattern on spirometry is associated with the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL, as well as with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, in asymptomatic adults. Methods : A total of 374 participants (mean age, 41 ± 14 years underwent spirometry, which included the determination of FVC and FEV1. A restrictive pattern on spirometry was defined as an FEV1/FVC ratio > 0.7 and an FVC < 80% of the predicted value. After conducting demographic, anthropometric, and CVD risk assessments, we evaluated body composition, muscle function, and postural balance, as well as performing cardiopulmonary exercise testing and administering the six-minute walk test. The PADL was quantified with a triaxial accelerometer. Results : A restrictive pattern on spirometry was found in 10% of the subjects. After multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for confounders (PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness, the following variables retained significance (OR; 95% CI as predictors of a restrictive pattern: systemic arterial hypertension (17.5; 1.65-184.8, smoking (11.6; 1.56-87.5, physical inactivity (8.1; 1.43-46.4, larger center-of-pressure area while standing on a force platform (1.34; 1.05-1.71; and dyslipidemia (1.89; 1.12-1.98. Conclusions : A restrictive pattern on spirometry appears to be common in asymptomatic adults. We found that CVD risk factors, especially systemic arterial hypertension, smoking, and physical inactivity, were directly associated with a restrictive pattern, even when the analysis was adjusted for PADL and cardiorespiratory fitness. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to improve understanding of the etiology of a restrictive pattern as well as to aid in the design of preventive strategies.

  12. Spirometry use among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: 1999-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Shawn P E; Wang, Yue; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Sharma, Gulshan

    2013-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and facilitate management. National trends in spirometry use in older adults with newly diagnosed COPD are not known. To examine the rate and beneficiary characteristics associated with spirometry use in subjects with newly diagnosed COPD between 1999 and 2008. We examined newly diagnosed beneficiaries with COPD using a 5% Medicare population from 1999 to 2008. A new COPD diagnosis required two outpatient visits or one hospitalization with primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code 491.xx, 492.xx, or 496 occurring at least 30 days apart with none in the prior 12 months. The primary measurement was spirometry performed within 365 days (±) of the first claim with a COPD diagnosis. Between 1999 and 2008, 64,985 subjects were newly diagnosed with COPD. Of these, 35,739 (55%) had spirometry performed within 1 year before or after the initial diagnosis of COPD. Spirometry use increased from 51.3% in 1999 to 58.3% in 2008 (P spirometry. In a multivariable analysis, compared with 1999, subjects diagnosed in 2008 had 10% higher odds (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.13) of having spirometry performed. Despite an increase in the use of spirometry over time in newly diagnosed older adults with COPD, spirometry use remains low. Clinical practice guidelines and educational efforts should focus on increasing the use of spirometry to diagnose and manage COPD.

  13. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William

    2012-01-01

    and doctors from pulmonary departments of local hospitals/universities gave their service for free. Lower limit of normal (LLN) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for diagnosing and grading airway obstruction were used. Of 12,448 participants in six congress cities, 10...... tent during the annual ERS Congresses in 2004-2009. Spirometry was performed during the ERS Congresses in volunteers; all participants answered a simple, brief questionnaire on their descriptive characteristics, smoking and asthma. Portable spirometers were freely provided by the manufacturer. Nurses......,395 (83.5%) performed acceptable spirometry (mean age 51.0 ± 18.4 yrs; 25.5% smokers; 5.5% asthmatic). Airway obstruction was present in 12.4% of investigated subjects according to LLN criteria and 20.3% according to GOLD criteria. Through multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, smoking habits...

  14. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  15. Spirometry, Static Lung Volumes, and Diffusing Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Cain, Hilary C; Casaburi, Richard; Lee, Patty J; Iannone, Lynne; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Van Ness, Peter H

    2017-09-01

    Spirometric Z-scores from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI) rigorously account for age-related changes in lung function and are thus age-appropriate when establishing spirometric impairments, including a restrictive pattern and air-flow obstruction. However, GLI-defined spirometric impairments have not yet been evaluated regarding associations with static lung volumes (total lung capacity [TLC], functional residual capacity [FRC], and residual volume [RV]) and gas exchange (diffusing capacity). We performed a retrospective review of pulmonary function tests in subjects ≥40 y old (mean age 64.6 y), including pre-bronchodilator measures for: spirometry (n = 2,586), static lung volumes by helium dilution with inspiratory capacity maneuver (n = 2,586), and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity (n = 2,508). Using multivariable linear regression, adjusted least-squares means (adjLSMeans) were calculated for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity. The adjLSMeans were expressed with and without height-cubed standardization and stratified by GLI-defined spirometry, including normal (n = 1,251), restrictive pattern (n = 663), and air-flow obstruction (mild, [n = 128]; moderate, [n = 150]; and severe, [n = 394]). Relative to normal spirometry, restrictive-pattern had lower adjLSMeans for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity (P ≤ .001). Conversely, relative to normal spirometry, mild, moderate, and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adjLSMeans for FRC and RV (P capacity (P capacity) was not increased in severe air-flow obstruction (P ≥ .11) because inspiratory capacity decreased with increasing air-flow obstruction (P capacity). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  16. Spirometry and volumetric capnography in lung function assessment of obese and normal-weight individuals without asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mariana S; Mendes, Roberto T; Marson, Fernando A L; Zambon, Mariana P; Antonio, Maria A R G M; Paschoal, Ilma A; Toro, Adyléia A D C; Severino, Silvana D; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Ribeiro, José D

    To analyze and compare lung function of obese and healthy, normal-weight children and adolescents, without asthma, through spirometry and volumetric capnography. Cross-sectional study including 77 subjects (38 obese) aged 5-17 years. All subjects underwent spirometry and volumetric capnography. The evaluations were repeated in obese subjects after the use of a bronchodilator. At the spirometry assessment, obese individuals, when compared with the control group, showed lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second by forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) and expiratory flows at 75% and between 25 and 75% of the FVC (p11 years (p<0.05). Even without the diagnosis of asthma by clinical criteria and without response to bronchodilator use, obese individuals showed lower FEV 1 /FVC values and forced expiratory flow, indicating the presence of an obstructive process. Volumetric capnography showed that obese individuals had higher alveolar tidal volume, with no alterations in ventilation homogeneity, suggesting flow alterations, without affecting lung volumes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Spirometry and volumetric capnography in lung function assessment of obese and normal-weight individuals without asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze and compare lung function of obese and healthy, normal-weight children and adolescents, without asthma, through spirometry and volumetric capnography. Methods: Cross-sectional study including 77 subjects (38 obese aged 5-17 years. All subjects underwent spirometry and volumetric capnography. The evaluations were repeated in obese subjects after the use of a bronchodilator. Results: At the spirometry assessment, obese individuals, when compared with the control group, showed lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second by forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC and expiratory flows at 75% and between 25 and 75% of the FVC (p 11 years (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Even without the diagnosis of asthma by clinical criteria and without response to bronchodilator use, obese individuals showed lower FEV1/FVC values and forced expiratory flow, indicating the presence of an obstructive process. Volumetric capnography showed that obese individuals had higher alveolar tidal volume, with no alterations in ventilation homogeneity, suggesting flow alterations, without affecting lung volumes.

  18. Standardisation of spirometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-06

    Apr 6, 1991 ... The subject is then instructed to exhale slowly and maxi- mally, to residual volume (RV) - the subject must be actively encouraged to 'squeeze' out the last bit of air. Once. RV has been reached,-the subject is exhorted to inhale as fast, forcefully and deeply as possible to total lung capacity. (TLC), to hold the ...

  19. Spirometry for Asthma - When You Need It and Why

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources Adult , Geriatric , Pediatric Spirometry for Asthma Spirometry for Asthma When you need the test—and ... from the treatment for pneumonia or heart disease. Spirometry helps diagnose and manage asthma. A spirometry test ...

  20. Spirometry Use among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: 1999–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Sharma, Gulshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and facilitate management. National trends in spirometry use in older adults with newly diagnosed COPD are not known. Objectives: To examine the rate and beneficiary characteristics associated with spirometry use in subjects with newly diagnosed COPD between 1999 and 2008. Methods: We examined newly diagnosed beneficiaries with COPD using a 5% Medicare population from 1999 to 2008. A new COPD diagnosis required two outpatient visits or one hospitalization with primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code 491.xx, 492.xx, or 496 occurring at least 30 days apart with none in the prior 12 months. The primary measurement was spirometry performed within 365 days (±) of the first claim with a COPD diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Between 1999 and 2008, 64,985 subjects were newly diagnosed with COPD. Of these, 35,739 (55%) had spirometry performed within 1 year before or after the initial diagnosis of COPD. Spirometry use increased from 51.3% in 1999 to 58.3% in 2008 (P spirometry. In a multivariable analysis, compared with 1999, subjects diagnosed in 2008 had 10% higher odds (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–1.13) of having spirometry performed. Conclusions: Despite an increase in the use of spirometry over time in newly diagnosed older adults with COPD, spirometry use remains low. Clinical practice guidelines and educational efforts should focus on increasing the use of spirometry to diagnose and manage COPD. PMID:24053440

  1. Exhaled nitric oxide atopy, and spirometry in asthma and rhinitis patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Gupta, Nitesh

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disorder. Nitric oxide (NO) is non-invasively measured in exhaled breath (FeNO). The aim of the study was to investigate the anthropometric and physiologic factors that influence FeNO measurements. Also, to evaluate FeNO correlation with spirometry and inflammatory markers in asthma and rhinitis. The study was a prospective analysis of asthma (BA) and rhinitis (AR) in patients enrolled from outpatient clinics between 2011 and 2015. Healthy controls (HC) were enrolled from the community. All subjects underwent baseline spirometry with reversibility, FeNO measurements, skin prick tests, and blood sampling for absolute eosinophil counts and serum total IgE levels. Of 528 enrolled participants, 215 were BA, 248 were BA-AR and 65 were HC. The mean FeNO was higher in atopic versus nonatopic subjects (34.14 vs. 25.99; p atopy. In examining the diagnostic accuracy of FeNO for asthma, the AUC for FeNO value is 0.833 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.717-0.901), with cut-off levels to screen for asthma being 19.45 at 71.2% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity (p asthma prediction with FeNO. The study highlights the importance of estimation of anthropometric parameters and dyspnea assessment in the evaluation of FeNO levels. Also, the presence of atopy may influence the results in the interpretation of FeNO readings. Moreover, the study have demonstrated that spirometry and FeNO have no significant correlation, which further lays emphasis on them as being different physiological parameters of asthma.  .

  2. Spirometry: a predictor of lung cancer among asbestos workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowska, Beata; Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, Neonila

    2017-01-01

    The significance of lung function as an independent risk factor for lung cancer remains unclear. The objective of the study is to answer the question if spirometry can identify patients at risk for lung cancer among people occupationally exposed to asbestos dust in the past. In order to identify a group of individuals with the highest risk of lung cancer incidence based on lung function levels of FEV 1 % predicted value, we examined 6882 subjects enrolled in the health surveillance program for asbestos related diseases over the years 2000-2014. We found a total of 110 cases confirmed as primary lung cancer. Using Cox's proportional hazards model after adjustment for age, gender, number of cigarettes, duration of smoking and cumulative asbestos exposure, we estimated that compared with the subjects with FEV 1 ≥90% pred, the HR of lung cancer was 1.40 (95%CI: 0.94-2.08) for the subjects with FEV 1 less than 90% and 1.95 (HR = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.12-3.08) for those with FEV 1 less than 70%. In addition, probability of the occurrence of lung cancer for FEV 1 spirometry and cancer diagnosis was three years or less. The results strongly support the hypothesis that spirometry can identify patients at a risk of lung cancer development. Regular spirometry should be offered to all patients with a history of asbestos exposure, at least once every three years.

  3. Clinically Useful Spirometry in Preschool-Aged Children: Evaluation of the 2007 American Thoracic Society Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Shotola, Nancy Lichtenberg; Martin, Thomas R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Rationale In 2007 the American Thoracic Society (ATS) recommended guidelines for acceptability and repeatability for assessing spirometry in preschool children. The authors aim to determine the feasibility of spirometry among children in this age group performing spirometry for the first time in a busy clinical practice. Methods First-time spirometry for children age 4 to 5 years old was selected from the Children’s Hospital Boston Pulmonary Function Test (PFT) database. Maneuvers were deemed acceptable if (1) the flow-volume loop showed rapid rise and smooth descent; (2) the back extrapolated volume (Vbe), the volume leaked by a subject prior to the forced maneuver, was ≤80 ml and 12.5% of forced vital capacity (FVC); and (3) cessation of expiratory flow was at a point ≤10% of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Repeatability was determined by another acceptable maneuver with forced expiratory volume in t seconds (FEVt) and FVC within 10% or 0.1 L of the best acceptable maneuver. Post hoc analysis compared spirometry values for those with asthma and cystic fibrosis to normative values. Results Two hundred and forty-eight preschool children performed spirometry for the first time between August 26, 2006, and August 25, 2008. At least one technically acceptable maneuver was found in 82.3% (n = 204) of the tests performed. Overall, 54% of children were able to perform acceptable and repeatable spirometry based on the ATS criteria. Children with asthma or cystic fibrosis did not have spirometry values that differed significantly from healthy controls. However, up to 29% of the overall cohort displayed at least one abnormal spirometry value. Conclusions Many preschool-aged children are able to perform technically acceptable and repeatable spirometry under normal conditions in a busy clinical setting. Spirometry may be a useful screen for abnormal lung function in this age group. PMID:20653495

  4. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain in postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David J; Hilliard, Paul E; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Brummett, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of postoperative incentive spirometry improves patient outcomes but is limited by pain after thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. Thoracic epidurals are frequently used to provide analgesia and attenuate postoperative pulmonary dysfunction. We hypothesized that, in patients with thoracic epidurals for thoracic and abdominal surgery, high pain scores would be associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance, even when accounting for other variables. Retrospective study of 468 patients who underwent upper abdominal or thoracic surgery using postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between June 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013, at a single tertiary academic center. The association between incentive spirometry performance and pain was assessed as the primary outcome. Other independent predictors of incentive spirometry performance were also identified. Postoperative incentive spirometry performance was found to be inversely proportional to pain score, which correlated significantly stronger with deep breathing pain compared with pain at rest (-0.33 vs -0.14 on postoperative day 1; -0.23 vs -0.12 on postoperative day 2). Pain with deep breathing was independently associated with poorer incentive spirometry performance in the multivariable linear regression model (P spirometry performance could be used as another indicator of thoracic epidural efficacy. This may be particularly useful in patients reporting high pain scores postoperatively.

  5. [Spirometry in the GP-Office].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Leander; Stolz, Daiana

    2016-02-17

    Spirometry is an important diagnostic tool, which, with correct implementation, detects possible obstructive or restrictive lung diseases. However, it is important to note that only part of the lung function is measured by spirometry. For instance, total lung volume and residual volume, both useful in detecting pulmonary emphysema, are not measured. Therefore, in case of pathological spirometry or suspected restrictive lung disease, further tests such as body plethysmography with diffusion measurement should be carried out.

  6. Spirometry effects on conventional and multiple flow exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Linn, William S; Salam, Muhammad T; Bastain, Theresa M; Zhang, Yue; Rappaport, Edward B; Liu, Meng; Berhane, Kiros

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and research settings often require sequencing multiple respiratory tests in a brief visit. Guidelines recommend measuring the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) before spirometry, but evidence for a spirometry carryover effect on FeNO is mixed. Only one study has investigated spirometry carryover effects on multiple flow FeNO analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate evidence for carryover effects of recent spirometry on three exhaled NO summary measures: FeNO at 50 ml/s, airway wall NO flux [J'awNO] and alveolar NO concentration [CANO] in a population-based sample of schoolchildren. Participants were 1146 children (191 with asthma), ages 12-15, from the Southern California Children's Health Study who performed spirometry and multiple flow FeNO on the same day. Approximately, half the children performed spirometry first. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate differences in exhaled NO summary measures associated with recent spirometry testing, adjusting for potential confounders. In the population-based sample, we found no evidence of spirometry carryover effects. However, for children with asthma, there was a suggestion that exhaled NO summary measures assessed ≤6 min after spirometry were lower (FeNO: 25.8% lower, 95% CI: -6.2%, 48.2%; J'awNO: 15.1% lower 95% CI: -26.5%, 43.0%; and CANO 0.43 parts per billion lower, 95% CI: -0.12, 0.98). In clinical settings, it is prudent to assess multiple flow FeNO before spirometry. In studies of healthy subjects, it may not be necessary to assess FeNO first.

  7. Reference values for spirometry in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane F; Pereira, Carlos A C; Rizzo, José A; Brito, Murilo C A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2013-01-01

    Reference values for lung function tests differ in samples from different countries, including values for preschoolers. The main objective of this study was to derive reference values in this population. A prospective study was conducted through a questionnaire applied to 425 preschool children aged 3 to 6 years, from schools and day-care centers in a metropolitan city in Brazil. Children were selected by simple random sampling from the aforementioned schools. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volumes (FEV1, FEV0.50), forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75) and FEV1/FVC, FEV0.5/FVC and FEF25-75/FVC ratios were evaluated. Of the 425 children enrolled, 321 (75.6%) underwent the tests. Of these, 135 (42.0%) showed acceptable results with full expiratory curves and thus were included in the regression analysis to define the reference values. Height and gender significantly influenced FVC values through linear and logarithmic regression analysis. In males, R(2) increased with the logarithmic model for FVC and FEV1, but the linear model was retained for its simplicity. The lower limits were calculated by measuring the fifth percentile residues. Full expiratory curves are more difficult to obtain in preschoolers. In addition to height, gender also influences the measures of FVC and FEV1. Reference values were defined for spirometry in preschool children in this population, which are applicable to similar populations. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes in patients after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Illia Ndf; Fregonezi, Guilherme Af; Melo, Rodrigo; Cabral, Elis Ea; Aliverti, Andrea; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia Mh

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess how volume-oriented incentive spirometry applied to patients after a stroke modifies the total and compartmental chest wall volume variations, including both the right and left hemithoraces, compared with controls. Twenty poststroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography during spontaneous quiet breathing (QB), during incentive spirometry, and during the recovery period after incentive spirometry. Incentive spirometry was associated with an increased chest wall volume measured at the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage and abdominal compartment (P = .001) and under 3 conditions (P spirometry, and postincentive spirometry, respectively. Under all 3 conditions, the contribution of the abdominal compartment to VT was greater in the stroke subjects (54.1, 43.2, and 48.9%) than in the control subjects (43.7, 40.8, and 46.1%, P = .039). In the vast majority of subjects (13/20 and 18/20 during QB and incentive spirometry, respectively), abdominal expansion precedes rib cage expansion during inspiration. Greater asymmetry between the right and left hemithoracic expansions occurred in stroke subjects compared with control subjects, but it decreased during QB (62.5%, P = .002), during incentive spirometry (19.7%), and postincentive spirometry (67.6%, P = .14). Incentive spirometry promotes increased expansion in all compartments of the chest wall and reduces asymmetric expansion between the right and left parts of the pulmonary rib cage; therefore, it should be considered as a tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Choosing wisely: adherence by physicians to recommended use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of adult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Kristin C; Sharma, Gulshan; Lin, Yu-Li; Goldblum, Randall M

    2015-05-01

    The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the American Thoracic Society provide guidelines stating that physicians should use spirometry in the diagnosis and management of asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends, over a 10-year period, in the utilization of spirometry in patients newly diagnosed with asthma. We hypothesized that spirometry use would increase in physicians who care for asthma patients, especially since 2007, when the revised NAEPP guidelines were published. This retrospective cohort analysis of spirometry use in subjects newly diagnosed with asthma used a privately insured adult population for the years 2002-2011. Our primary outcome of interest was spirometry performed within a year (± 365 days) of the initial date of asthma diagnosis. We also examined the type of asthma medications prescribed. In all, 134,208 patients were found to have a diagnosis of asthma. Only 47.6% had spirometry performed within 1 year of diagnosis. Younger patients, males, and those residing in the Northeast were more likely to receive spirometry. Spirometry use began to decline in 2007. Patients cared for by specialists were more likely to receive spirometry than those cared for by primary care physicians; 80.1% vs 23.3%, respectively. Lastly, even without spirometry, a significant portion of patients (78.3%) was prescribed asthma drugs. Our study suggests that spirometry is underutilized in newly diagnosed asthma patients. Moreover, the use of controller medications in those diagnosed with asthma without spirometry remains high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis: the role of acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casier, Annabelle; Goubert, Liesbet; Vervoort, Tine; Theunis, Marleen; Huse, Danielle; De Baets, Frans; Matthys, Dirk; Crombez, Geert

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of spirometry-related pain and distress in adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF), and to investigate the role of acceptance of illness in spirometry-related pain and distress. A total of 36 adolescents and young adults with CF (12 to 22 years of age) completed a questionnaire assessing acceptance of illness. Spirometry-related distress was assessed using self-report (ie, anxiety⁄worry about the procedure) and physiological outcomes (ie, heart rate and heart rate variability) before spirometry. Spirometry-related pain was assessed using self-report (ie, expected pain and pain-related thoughts). Self-reported distress and pain during spirometry were also assessed. Eighty-nine per cent of subjects reported distress before spirometry, 67% experienced distress during spirometry, 28% expected pain during spirometry and 22% actually experienced pain. Interestingly, partial correlations revealed that more acceptance was related to less expected pain and pain-related thoughts. Acceptance, however, was unrelated to distress, anxiety and pain during spirometry. The present study suggests that a non-negligible number of adolescents and young adults with CF experience pain and distress during spirometry. Furthermore, results indicate that acceptance may play a protective role in the more indirect consequences of CF such as expected pain and pain-related thoughts during medical procedures. Acceptance, however, was not related to distress before and during spirometry, nor to experienced pain. These findings contribute to the increasing evidence that acceptance may play a protective role in managing the consequences of living with CF.

  11. A randomized controlled trial on office spirometry in asthma and COPD in standard general practice: data from spirometry in Asthma and COPD: a comparative evaluation Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusuardi, Mirco; De Benedetto, Fernando; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Sanguinetti, Claudio M; Brazzola, Giancarlo; Ferri, Paolo; Donner, Claudio F

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate whether office spirometry by general practitioners (GPs) is feasible and may improve the diagnosis of asthma and COPD. A prospective, randomized, comparative trial was planned involving 57 Italian pulmonology centers and 570 GPs who had to enroll consecutive subjects aged 18 to 65 years with symptoms of asthma or COPD without a previous diagnosis. Patients were randomized 1:1 into two groups with an interactive voice responding system: conventional evaluation alone vs conventional evaluation and spirometry. Office spirometry was performed by GPs who were trained by reference specialists using a portable electronic spirometer (Spirobank Office; MIR; Rome, Italy). Diagnosis was confirmed by the reference specialist center in blind fashion. Seventy-four GPs complied to the trial. Of 333 patients enrolled, 136 nonrandom violators completed the protocol. Per-protocol analysis showed a concordant diagnosis between GPs and specialists in 78.6% of cases in the conventional evaluation-plus-spirometry group vs 69.2% in the conventional evaluation group (p = 0.35). In the intention-to-treat analysis, the respective percentages of concordant diagnosis were 57.9 and 56.7 (p = 0.87). Office spirometry by GPs is feasible, but frequent protocol violation and inadequate sample size did not allow us to prove a significant advantage of office spirometry in improving the diagnosis of asthma and COPD in standard general practice as organized at present in Italy, thus reinforcing the need for close cooperation between GPs and specialists in respiratory medicine.

  12. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawassaki, Alexandre Melo; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Uliana Kay, Fernando; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry. Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a history of smoking. Spirometry was abnormal in 30% of the patients; the chest X-ray was abnormal in 45%; and the SpO2 was abnormal in 13%. Normal chest X-ray, spirometry, and SpO2 were observed simultaneously in only 41% of the RA patients. A history of smoking was associated with abnormal spirometry findings, including evidence of obstructive or restrictive lung disease, and with abnormal chest X-ray findings, as well as with an interstitial pattern on the chest X-ray. Comparing the patients in whom all test results were normal (n = 101) with those in whom abnormal test results were obtained (n = 145), we found a statistically significant difference between the two groups, in terms of age and smoking status. Notably, there were signs of airway disease in nearly half of the patients with minimal or no history of tobacco smoke exposure. Conclusions: Pulmonary involvement in RA can be identified through the use of a combination of diagnostic methods that are simple, safe, and inexpensive. Our results lead us to suggest that RA patients with signs of lung involvement should be screened for lung abnormalities, even if presenting with no respiratory symptoms. PMID:26398753

  13. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Melo Kawassaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest, chest X-ray, and spirometry.Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a history of smoking. Spirometry was abnormal in 30% of the patients; the chest X-ray was abnormal in 45%; and the SpO2 was abnormal in 13%. Normal chest X-ray, spirometry, and SpO2 were observed simultaneously in only 41% of the RA patients. A history of smoking was associated with abnormal spirometry findings, including evidence of obstructive or restrictive lung disease, and with abnormal chest X-ray findings, as well as with an interstitial pattern on the chest X-ray. Comparing the patients in whom all test results were normal (n = 101 with those in whom abnormal test results were obtained (n = 145, we found a statistically significant difference between the two groups, in terms of age and smoking status. Notably, there were signs of airway disease in nearly half of the patients with minimal or no history of tobacco smoke exposure.Conclusions: Pulmonary involvement in RA can be identified through the use of a combination of diagnostic methods that are simple, safe, and inexpensive. Our results lead us to suggest that RA patients with signs of lung involvement should be screened for lung abnormalities, even if presenting with no respiratory symptoms.

  14. Impulse Oscillometry and Spirometry Small-Airway Parameters in Mild to Moderate Bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Jing-Jing; Gao, Yong-Hua; Li, Hui-Min; Zheng, Jin-Ping; Chen, Rong-Chang; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-11-01

    Both impulse oscillometry and spirometry can reflect small-airway disorders. The objective of this work was to investigate the diagnostic value of impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters and their correlation with radiology, disease severity, and sputum bacteriology in mild to moderate bronchiectasis (bronchiectasis severity index spirometry, and sputum culture were performed. Correlation between small-airway parameters and clinical indices was determined, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking history. Sensitivity analyses were repeated when excluding subjects with bronchiectasis severity index ≥9 or HRCT score ≥13. Impulse oscillometry and spirometry small-airway parameters could discriminate mild to moderate bronchiectasis from healthy subjects and correlated significantly with HRCT score and the number of bronchiectatic lobes and the bronchiectasis severity index (all P Spirometry, but not impulse oscillometry, small-airway parameters differed statistically between subjects with isolated peripheral-airway bronchiectasis and those with peripheral plus central-airway bronchiectasis (all P spirometry small-airway parameters have similar diagnostic value in reflecting peripheral-airway disorders and correlate with the HRCT scores, the bronchiectasis severity index, and the number of bronchiectatic lobes in mild to moderate bronchiectasis. Assessment of small-airway parameters should be incorporated in future lung function investigations in bronchiectasis. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. Total specific airway resistance vs spirometry in asthma evaluation in children in a large real-life population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzyńska, Joanna; Janas, Anna; Galica, Katarzyna; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Woicka-Kolejwa, Katarzyna; Stelmach, Iwona

    2015-10-01

    Total specific airway resistance (sRtot) has been introduced as an alternative technique to assess lung function with a particular application to younger children with asthma. To establish a diagnostic value of the body plethysmographic parameter (sRtot) in asthma diagnosis in young children. This was a prospective, noninterventional study. Children 4 to 18 year old with symptoms suggestive of asthma were included (n = 885). Subjects underwent body plethysmography and spirometry (when capable) with reversibility tests. Of 788 subjects who could perform spirometry in addition to body plethysmography, 578 were diagnosed with asthma. Subjects with asthma were treated for minimum of 6 months and then their asthma was confirmed or refuted. In 471 patients, asthma diagnosis was confirmed after 6 months of antiasthmatic treatment; 142 patients were 4 to 6 years old and 329 were 7 to 18 years old. Change in response to bronchodilator in children with asthma was significant for sRtot (P = .02) but not for forced expiration volume in 1 second (P = .21); sRtot was more sensitive and specific in identifying children with reversible obstruction than spirometry. There was a significant association between sRtot and asthma diagnosis in patients 4 to 6 years old (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.03, P = .001); to differentiate subjects with asthma from those without asthma, the optimal cutoff point for sRtot was 174.5%. A sRtot value higher than 174.5% was associated with a positive prediction of an asthma diagnosis in patients 4 to 6 years old. A ratio of forced expiration volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity below 80% was not significantly associated with asthma. These data support the recommendation of performing sRtot rather than spirometry in young children as a fairly sensitive marker of asthma. www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01805635). Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of spirometry prediction equations in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D W; Lagat, D K; MacIntyre, N; Egger, J R; Murdoch, D M; Que, L G; Kussin, P S

    2018-01-01

    Community of Eldoret, Kenya. To test the performance of three commonly used spirometry prediction equations in a healthy Kenyan population. Cross-sectional assessment of healthy adults in Eldoret. Of the 331 subjects enrolled in the study, 282 subjects aged 18-85 years (45% males, 55% females) produced high-quality spirograms. Lung function predictions were made using the Global Lung Initiative 2012 (GLI 2012) prediction equations for African Americans, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III) prediction equations for African Americans, and the Crapo prediction equation. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to measure the agreement between observed and predicted spirometry parameters. Overall, the GLI 2012 and NHANES equations for African Americans performed similarly for forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), significantly overestimating FVC while accurately predicting observed FEV1 values. The study brings into question the utility of three major spirometry prediction equations in a Kenyan population. The significant overestimation of FVC by the best-performing equations despite accurate prediction of FEV1 suggests poor performance of these equations in our population.

  17. PIKO-6® vs. forced spirometry in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Larios-Castañeda, Pablo José; Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Briseño, David Martínez; Flores-Campos, Roberto; Sáenz-López, Juan Arturo; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2014-12-01

    The PIKO-6® is an electronic device that measures forced expiratory volume at seconds 1 (FEV1) and 6 (FEV6) of a forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuver. This device could aid in diagnosing obstructive respiratory diseases. To determine the concordance of FEV1, FEV6, and the FEV1/FEV6 quotient achieved with PIKO-6® versus spirometric values from asthmatic patients, and compare results with measures from healthy children. A cross-sectional study with asthmatic and healthy 6-to-14-year-old children, all of whom performed a forced spirometry as well as a PIKO-6® test. The study included 82 subjects (58 asthmatics, 24 healthy children). Except for the functional parameters, the basal characteristics of the two groups were similar. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for FEV1 was 0.938 (P spirometry was lower in patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma compared to controlled or healthy children. The broad limits of agreement show that the FEV1, FEV6, and FEV1/FEV6 obtained with the PIKO-6® are not interchangeable with spirometry results. Longitudinal evaluations of asthma patients are necessary to assess the utility of PIKO-6®. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparison of Flow and Volume Incentive Spirometry on Pulmonary Function and Exercise Tolerance in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amaravadi Sampath; Augustine, Alfred Joseph; Pazhyaottayil, Zulfeequer Chundaanveetil; Ramakrishna, Anand; Krishnakumar, Shyam Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures in abdominal area lead to changes in pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics and impaired physical capacity leading to postoperative pulmonary complications, which can affect up to 80% of upper abdominal surgery. Aim To evaluate the effects of flow and volume incentive spirometry on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a hospital of Mangalore city in Southern India. Thirty-seven males and thirteen females who were undergoing abdominal surgeries were included and allocated into flow and volume incentive spirometry groups by block randomization. All subjects underwent evaluations of pulmonary function with measurement of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF). Preoperative and postoperative measurements were taken up to day 5 for both groups. Exercise tolerance measured by Six- Minute Walk Test during preoperative period and measured again at the time of discharge for both groups. Pulmonary function was analysed by post-hoc analysis and carried out using Bonferroni’s ‘t’-test. Exercise tolerance was analysed by Paired ‘T’-test. Results Pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be significantly decreased in 1st, 2nd and 3rd postoperative day when compared with preoperative day. On 4th and 5th postoperative day the pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and PEFR) was found to be better preserved in both flow and volume incentive spirometry groups. The Six-Minute Walk Test showed a statistically significant improvement in pulmonary function on the day of discharge than in the preoperative period. In terms of distance covered, the volume- incentive spirometry group showed a greater statistically significant improvement from the preoperative period to the time of discharge than was exhibited by the flow incentive spirometry group

  19. Spirometry is underused in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wai Cho; Fu, Sau Nga; Tai, Emily Lai-bun; Yeung, Yiu Cheong; Kwong, Kwok Chu; Chang, Yui; Tam, Cheuk Ming; Yiu, Yuk Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry is important in the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet it is a common clinical observation that it is underused though the extent is unclear. This survey aims to examine the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of COPD patients in a district in Hong Kong. It is a cross-sectional survey involving four clinic settings: hospital-based respiratory specialist clinic, hospital-based mixed medical specialist clinic, general outpatient clinic (primary care), and tuberculosis and chest clinic. Thirty physician-diagnosed COPD patients were randomly selected from each of the four clinic groups. All of them had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity ratio less than 0.70 and had been followed up at the participating clinic for at least 6 months for COPD treatment. Of 126 patients who underwent spirometry, six (4.8%) did not have COPD. Of the 120 COPD patients, there were 111 males and mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was 46.2% predicted. Only 22 patients (18.3%) had spirometry done during diagnostic workup, and 64 patients (53.3%) had spirometry done ever. The only independent factor predicting spirometry done ever was absence of old pulmonary tuberculosis and follow-up at respiratory specialist clinic. Age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, duration of COPD, percentage predicted FEV1, body mass index, 6-minute walking distance, and Medical Research Council dyspnea score were not predictive. We conclude that spirometry is underused in general but especially by nonrespiratory physicians and family physicians in the management of COPD patients. More effort at educating the medical community is urgently needed. PMID:24009418

  20. Spirometry is underused in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wai Cho; Fu, Sau Nga; Tai, Emily Lai-Bun; Yeung, Yiu Cheong; Kwong, Kwok Chu; Chang, Yui; Tam, Cheuk Ming; Yiu, Yuk Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry is important in the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet it is a common clinical observation that it is underused though the extent is unclear. This survey aims to examine the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of COPD patients in a district in Hong Kong. It is a cross-sectional survey involving four clinic settings: hospital-based respiratory specialist clinic, hospital-based mixed medical specialist clinic, general outpatient clinic (primary care), and tuberculosis and chest clinic. Thirty physician-diagnosed COPD patients were randomly selected from each of the four clinic groups. All of them had a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity ratio less than 0.70 and had been followed up at the participating clinic for at least 6 months for COPD treatment. Of 126 patients who underwent spirometry, six (4.8%) did not have COPD. Of the 120 COPD patients, there were 111 males and mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was 46.2% predicted. Only 22 patients (18.3%) had spirometry done during diagnostic workup, and 64 patients (53.3%) had spirometry done ever. The only independent factor predicting spirometry done ever was absence of old pulmonary tuberculosis and follow-up at respiratory specialist clinic. Age, sex, smoking status, comorbidities, duration of COPD, percentage predicted FEV1, body mass index, 6-minute walking distance, and Medical Research Council dyspnea score were not predictive. We conclude that spirometry is underused in general but especially by nonrespiratory physicians and family physicians in the management of COPD patients. More effort at educating the medical community is urgently needed.

  1. Public spirometry for primary prevention of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirlik, Sabine; Wich, Christina; Frieser, Markus; Hildner, Kai; Kleye, Christin; Neurath, Markus F; Fuchs, Florian S

    2014-02-01

    The most effective action for primary prevention of chronic obstructive lung disease is smoking cessation early enough. In secondary prevention, smokers with airway obstruction were more likely to quit smoking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a public spirometry on smoking habits in terms of primary prevention. Spirometry with its medical analysis was offered to visitors of a local public event called 'Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften' ('Long night of sciences'). The impact of results on smoking habits was evaluated in all smokers with an anonymized questionnaire afterwards. Two hundred fifty-seven people with the median age of 30 years (interquartile range 22-46) were examined. Out of 44 current smokers (17.1%), only two individuals showed a prebronchodilator FEV1/forced vital capacity-value spirometry result. These smokers were significantly younger (median age 28 vs. 40 years, P = 0.025) without differences in spirometry results or smoking habits. In an unselected population with a high amount of younger adults, normal spirometry did not show a short-term benefit for primary prevention of chronic obstructive lung disease in terms of increasing motivation to quit smoking. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Accuracy of spirometry for detection of asthma: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Andréa Cristina; Paulino, Ana Carolina Botto; Pereira, Luciano Penha; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease with airway hyperresponsiveness. Spirometry is the most commonly used test among asthmatic patients. Another functional test used for diagnosing asthma is the bronchial challenge test. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of spirometry for detecting asthma in the general population. Cross-sectional study with data analysis to evaluate the accuracy of spirometry through calculating sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and through the kappa agreement test. Subjects who constituted a birth cohort were enrolled at the age of 23 to 25 years. Spirometric abnormality was defined as reduced forced expiratory volume in one second, i.e. lower than 80% of the predicted value. Measurement of bronchial responsiveness was performed by means of the bronchial challenge test with methacholine. The gold-standard diagnosis of asthma was defined as the presence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in association with respiratory symptoms. Asthma was detected in 200 subjects (10.4%) out of the sample of 1922 individuals. Spirometric abnormality was detected in 208 subjects (10.9%) of the sample. The specificity of spirometric abnormality for detecting asthma was 90%, sensitivity was 23%, positive predictive value was 22%, and negative predictive value was 91%. The kappa test revealed weak agreement of 0.13 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.07-0.19) between spirometry and the diagnosis of asthma. Spirometry, as a single test, has limitations for detecting asthma in the general population.

  3. Practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis by simple spirometry: an observational case-control study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Satomi; Ichikawa, Masako; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-03-26

    We see patients who present with spirometry airflow limitation despite their forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) as well as forced vital capacity (FVC) to be supernormal (FEV1/FVC spirometry conditions (results measured with spirometry) could be suitably used as a practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis: the condition of disproportionate but physiologically normal growth between airways and lung parenchyma. We compared the conventional surrogate marker of dysanapsis, maximum mid-expiratory flow to FVC (MMF/FVC), in SUBJECTS (FEV1/FVC spirometry results with SUBJECTS) (n = 55), and in CONTROLS (age- and height- matched, normal spirometry results) (n = 25). Next we added imaging analysis to evaluate the relationship between the cross sectional airway luminal area (X-Ai) and the lung volume results among the three groups. The MMF/FVC was significantly lower in SUBJECTS and in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. However, percent predicted peak expiratory flow (%PEFR) was significantly lower only in SUBJECTS and not in EMPHYSEMA compared to CONTROLS. The ratio of the X-Ai of the trachea and right apical bronchus to lung volume was significantly lower in SUBJECTS compared to CONTROLS. The simple spirometry conditions in SUBJECTS are highly suggestive of practical surrogate marker of pulmonary dysanapsis. Awareness of this concept would help to attenuate the risk of overdiagnosis of obstructive pulmonary disease.

  4. Mobilidade diafragmática durante espirometria de incentivo orientada a fluxo e a volume em indivíduos sadios Diaphragmatic mobility in healthy subjects during incentive spirometry with a flow-oriented device and with a volume-oriented device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Pereira dos Santos Yamaguti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a mobilidade diafragmática de indivíduos sadios durante a espirometria de incentivo orientada a volume, durante a espirometria de incentivo orientada a fluxo e durante exercícios diafragmáticos. Comparar a mobilidade diafragmática entre homens e mulheres durante esses três tipos de exercícios respiratórios. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas a função pulmonar e a mobilidade diafragmática de 17 voluntários sadios adultos (9 mulheres e 8 homens. A avaliação da mobilidade do diafragma foi realizada durante a execução de exercícios diafragmáticos e durante o uso dos dois tipos de espirômetros de incentivo, por meio de um método ultrassonográfico. RESULTADOS: A mobilidade diafragmática avaliada durante a utilização do espirômetro orientado a volume foi significativamente maior que aquela durante o uso do espirômetro orientado a fluxo (70,16 ± 12,83 mm vs. 63,66 ± 10,82 mm; p = 0,02. Os exercícios diafragmáticos promoveram maior mobilidade diafragmática do que o uso do espirômetro orientado a fluxo (69,62 ± 11,83 mm vs. 63,66 ± 10,82 mm; p = 0,02. Durante os três tipos de exercícios respiratórios, a relação mobilidade/CVF foi significativamente maior nas mulheres do que nos homens. CONCLUSÕES: A espirometria de incentivo orientada a volume e o exercício diafragmático promoveram maior mobilidade diafragmática do que a espirometria de incentivo orientada a fluxo. As mulheres apresentaram um melhor desempenho nos três tipos de exercícios respiratórios avaliados do que os homens.OBJECTIVE: To compare the diaphragmatic mobility of healthy subjects during incentive spirometry with a volume-oriented device, during incentive spirometry with a flow-oriented device, and during diaphragmatic breathing. To compare men and women in terms of diaphragmatic mobility during these three types of breathing exercises. METHODS: We evaluated the pulmonary function and diaphragmatic mobility of 17 adult healthy

  5. [Quality scale for preschool spirometry interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Francisca; Bedregal, Paula; Ubilla, Carlos; Barrientos, Hortensia; Caussade, Solange

    2017-02-01

    Since 2007, there are international guidelines for implementation and interpretation of spirometry in preschool children. A percentage of these patients cannot obtain maneuvers that meet all eligibility criteria. The objective of this study was to develop a quality scale for interpreting these partially acceptable spirometry. Delphi methodology was used, which allows to reach consensus among experts analyzing a defined problem. We invited to participate pediatric pneumologists dedicated to lung function and who participated actively in scientific specialty societies in Chile. Successive rounds were conducted with questionnaires about criteria used to assess spirometry in preschool children. These criteria define the acceptability of spirometric maneuvers according to international guidelines. Proposed quality grades were “very good”, “good”, “fair” and “bad”. Thirteen of the 15 invited experts accepted our invitation. In the first round 9 disagreed with the degree of “regular” quality. In the second round this was removed and 11 experts answered, 9 of them agreed with the use of this new version. The most contentious criterion was the end of expiration. Most experts agreed with the final scale, using “very good”, “good” and “bad” judgments. This would help to improve the performance of spirometry in children between 2 and 5 years.

  6. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, R; Costa, C H; Lopes, A J; Maiworm, A I; Maynard, K; Silva, L M R A; Dias, R M

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%), 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%), and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT). This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index). From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method). Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9). The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5), and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  7. Non Communicable Diseases: Local incentive spirometry improves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The non-SCA participants were recruited from the Bayero University, Kano community. Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Ethical Committee on Research of the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. Locally designed incentive spirometry. An unused sterile surgical glove firmly tied with rubber band to the ...

  8. Is preoperative spirometry a predictive marker for postoperative complications after colorectal cancer surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yuki; Tsuruta, Masashi; Yahagi, Masashi; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Okabayashi, Koji; Shigeta, Kohei; Ishida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-09-01

    Spirometry is a basic test that provides much information about pulmonary function; it is performed preoperatively in almost all patients undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in our hospital. However, the value of spirometry as a preoperative test for CRC surgery remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether spirometry is useful to predict postoperative complications (PCs) after CRC surgery. The medical records of 1236 patients who had preoperative spirometry tests and underwent CRC surgery between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Preoperative spirometry results, such as forced vital capacity (FVC), one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), %VC (FVC/predicted VC) and FEV1/FVC (%FEV1), were analyzed with regard to PCs, including pneumonia. PCs were found in 383 (30.9%) patients, including 218 (56%) with surgical site infections, 67 (17%) with bowel obstruction, 62 (16%) with leakage and 20 (5.2%) with pneumonia. Of the spirometry results, %VC was correlated with PC according to logistic regression analysis (odds ratio, OR = 0.99, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.98-0.99; P = 0.034). Multivariate analysis after adjusting for male sex, age, laparoscopic surgery, tumor location, operation time and blood loss showed that a lower %VC tends to be a risk factor for PC (OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.002; P = 0.159) and %VC was an independent risk factor for postoperative pneumonia in PCs (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.94-0.99; P = 0.049). In CRC surgery, %VC may be a predictor of postoperative complications, especially pneumonia.

  9. Echocardiography, spirometry, and systemic acute-phase inflammatory proteins in smokers with COPD or CHF: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghé, Bianca; Verduri, Alessia; Bottazzi, Barbara; Stendardo, Mariarita; Fucili, Alessandro; Balduzzi, Sara; Leuzzi, Chiara; Papi, Alberto; Mantovani, Alberto; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Ceconi, Claudio; Boschetto, Piera

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) may coexist in elderly patients with a history of smoking. Low-grade systemic inflammation induced by smoking may represent the link between these 2 conditions. In this study, we investigated left ventricular dysfunction in patients primarily diagnosed with COPD, and nonreversible airflow limitation in patients primarily diagnosed with CHF. The levels of circulating high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), pentraxin 3 (PTX3), interleukin-1β (IL-1 β), and soluble type II receptor of IL-1 (sIL-1RII) were also measured as markers of systemic inflammation in these 2 cohorts. Patients aged ≥ 50 years and with ≥ 10 pack years of cigarette smoking who presented with a diagnosis of stable COPD (n=70) or stable CHF (n=124) were recruited. All patients underwent echocardiography, N-terminal pro-hormone of brain natriuretic peptide measurements, and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Plasma levels of Hs-CRP, PTX3, IL-1 β, and sIL-1RII were determined by using a sandwich enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay in all patients and in 24 healthy smokers (control subjects). Although we were unable to find a single COPD patient with left ventricular dysfunction, we found nonreversible airflow limitation in 34% of patients with CHF. On the other hand, COPD patients had higher plasma levels of Hs-CRP, IL1 β, and sIL-1RII compared with CHF patients and control subjects (p CHF patients and control subjects. In conclusion, although the COPD patients had no evidence of CHF, up to one third of patients with CHF had airflow limitation, suggesting that routine spirometry is warranted in patients with CHF, whereas echocardiography is not required in well characterized patients with COPD. Only smokers with COPD seem to have evidence of systemic inflammation.

  10. Echocardiography, spirometry, and systemic acute-phase inflammatory proteins in smokers with COPD or CHF: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Beghé

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic heart failure (CHF may coexist in elderly patients with a history of smoking. Low-grade systemic inflammation induced by smoking may represent the link between these 2 conditions. In this study, we investigated left ventricular dysfunction in patients primarily diagnosed with COPD, and nonreversible airflow limitation in patients primarily diagnosed with CHF. The levels of circulating high-sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP, pentraxin 3 (PTX3, interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, and soluble type II receptor of IL-1 (sIL-1RII were also measured as markers of systemic inflammation in these 2 cohorts. Patients aged ≥ 50 years and with ≥ 10 pack years of cigarette smoking who presented with a diagnosis of stable COPD (n=70 or stable CHF (n=124 were recruited. All patients underwent echocardiography, N-terminal pro-hormone of brain natriuretic peptide measurements, and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Plasma levels of Hs-CRP, PTX3, IL-1 β, and sIL-1RII were determined by using a sandwich enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay in all patients and in 24 healthy smokers (control subjects. Although we were unable to find a single COPD patient with left ventricular dysfunction, we found nonreversible airflow limitation in 34% of patients with CHF. On the other hand, COPD patients had higher plasma levels of Hs-CRP, IL1 β, and sIL-1RII compared with CHF patients and control subjects (p < 0.05. None of the inflammatory biomarkers was different between CHF patients and control subjects. In conclusion, although the COPD patients had no evidence of CHF, up to one third of patients with CHF had airflow limitation, suggesting that routine spirometry is warranted in patients with CHF, whereas echocardiography is not required in well characterized patients with COPD. Only smokers with COPD seem to have evidence of systemic inflammation.

  11. Daily Home Spirometry: An Effective Tool for Detecting Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anne-Marie; Adamali, Huzaifa; Molyneaux, Philip L; Lukey, Pauline T; Marshall, Richard P; Renzoni, Elisabetta A; Wells, Athol U; Maher, Toby M

    2016-10-15

    Recent clinical trial successes have created an urgent need for earlier and more sensitive endpoints of disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Domiciliary spirometry permits more frequent measurement of FVC than does hospital-based assessment, which therefore affords the opportunity for a more granular insight into changes in IPF progression. To determine the feasibility and reliability of measuring daily FVC in individuals with IPF. Subjects with IPF were given handheld spirometers and instruction on how to self-administer spirometry. Subjects recorded daily FEV 1 and FVC for up to 490 days. Clinical assessment and hospital-based spirometry was undertaken at 6 and 12 months, and outcome data were collected for 3 years. Daily spirometry was recorded by 50 subjects for a median period of 279 days (range, 13-490 d). There were 18 deaths during the active study period. Home spirometry showed excellent correlation with hospital-obtained readings. The rate of decline in FVC was highly predictive of outcome and subsequent mortality when measured at 3 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.040; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.021-1.062; P ≤ 0.001), 6 months (HR, 1.024; 95% CI, 1.014-1.033; P spirometry in patients with IPF is highly clinically informative and is feasible to perform for most of these patients. The relationship between mortality and rate of change of FVC at 3 months suggests that daily FVC may be of value as a primary endpoint in short proof-of-concept IPF studies.

  12. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-Hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-12-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry.We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a "Could it be COPD?" questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire.COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry.The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than 10 pack

  13. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  14. Comparing Inspiratory Resistive Muscle Training with Incentive Spirometry on Rehabilitation of COPD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Farzad, Marjan; Ahmadi hosseini, Seyed-hossein

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of incentive spirometry in pulmonary rehabilitation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and compare its efficacy with inspiratory resistive muscle training (IMT) technique. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty patients with COPD, from a general hospital in Mashhad, Iran, were randomly assigned to two study groups. All subjects trained daily in two 15-minute sessions, 4 days a week, for 4 weeks. Respiratory function tests were compared before interventions and at the end of weeks 2 and 4. Both techniques improved the mean values of all respiratory function tests (p≤.01). The IMT technique was more effective to improve MVV and PImax (p≤.05). PEFR was better improved in the incentive spirometry group (p≤.05). There was no significant difference for other spirometric parameters between two groups. Incentive spirometry can be considered as an effective component for pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD patients. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  15. Semiautomatic assessment of respiratory motion in dynamic MRI. Comparison with simultaneously acquired spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M. [Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, M.; Meinzer, H.P. [Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Diagnostische Radiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: supplementing global spirometry with regional information could allow for earlier and more specific diagnosis of lung disease. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) makes it possible to derive functional parameters from the visualization of the pulmonary motion of single lungs. The aim of this study was to compare high temporal resolution measurements of left and right thoracic diameters to simultaneously acquired spirometry. Materials and methods: 10 healthy volunteers underwent 2-dimensional dMRI of both lungs at 1.5 T. Spirometry was performed simultaneously with an MRI-compatible spirometer. Thoracic diameters were measured semiautomatically and compared to simultaneously measured spirometric volumes. A dMRI surrogate for the Tiffeneau Index was compared to the spirometric Tiffeneau. Results: The volume-time and flow-volume curves from dMRI were very similar to the spirometric curves. The semiautomatically measured diameters correlated well with the spirometric volumes (r > = 0.8, p < 10-15). Agreement between the methods at full temporal resolution was not as convincing (width of 95% limits of agreement interval up to 56%). Good agreement was found between the Tiffenau surrogate and spirometry (width of 95% limits of agreement interval of 14.5%). (orig.)

  16. Reference values of spirometry for Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainu, A; Timonen, K L; Toikka, J; Qaiser, B; Pitkäniemi, J; Kotaniemi, J T; Lindqvist, A; Vanninen, E; Länsimies, E; Sovijärvi, A R A

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic assessment of lung function necessitates up-to-date reference values. The aim of this study was to estimate reference values for spirometry for the Finnish population between 18 and 80 years and to compare them with the existing Finnish, European and the recently published global GLI2012 reference values. Spirometry was performed for 1380 adults in the population-based FinEsS studies and for 662 healthy non-smoking volunteer adults. Detailed predefined questionnaire screening of diseases and symptoms, and quality control of spirometry yielded a sample of 1000 native Finns (387 men) healthy non-smokers aged 18-83 years. Sex-specific reference values, which are estimated using the GAMLSS method and adjusted for age and height, are provided. The predicted values for lung volumes are larger than those obtained by GLI2012 prediction for the Caucasian subgroup for forced vital capacity (FVC) by an average 6·2% and 5·1% and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) by an average 4·2% and 3·0% in men and women, respectively. GLI2012 slightly overestimated the ratio FEV1/FVC with an age-dependent trend. Most reference equations from other European countries, with the exception of the Swiss SAPALDIA study, showed an underestimation of FVC and FEV1 to varying degrees, and a slight overestimation of FEV1/FVC. This study offers up-to-date reference values of spirometry for native Finns with a wide age range. The GLI2012 predictions seem not to be suitable for clinical use for native Finns due to underestimation of lung volumes. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rufino

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%, 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%, and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT. This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index. From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method. Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9. The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5, and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  18. Observational practice of incentive spirometry in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Íllia N D F; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F; Florêncio, Rêncio B; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia H

    Stroke may lead to several health problems, but positive effects can be promoted by learning to perform physical therapy techniques correctly. To compare two different types of observational practice (video instructions and demonstration by a physical therapist) during the use of incentive spirometry (IS). A total of 20 patients with diagnosis of stroke and 20 healthy individuals (56±9.7 years) were allocated into two groups: one with observational practice with video instructions for the use of IS and the other with observational practice with demonstration by a physical therapist. Ten attempts for the correct use of IS were carried out and the number of errors and the magnitude of response were evaluated. The statistic used to compare the results was the three-way ANOVA test. The stroke subjects showed less precision when compared to the healthy individuals (mean difference 1.80±0.38) 95%CI [1.02-2.52], pstroke subjects showed more errors with the video instructions (mean difference 1.5±0.5, 95%CI [0.43-2.56] (p=0.08)) and therapist demonstration (mean difference 2.40±0.52, 95%CI [1.29-3.50] (p=0.00)) when compared to the healthy individuals. The stroke subjects had a worse performance in learning the use of volume-oriented incentive spirometry when compared to healthy individuals; however, there was no difference between the types of observational practice, suggesting that both may be used to encourage the use of learning IS in patients with stroke. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of spirometry in a primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Blain, Elizabeth A; Craig, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Elizabeth A Blain, Timothy J CraigPenn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USAObjective: To determine the use of spirometry in family practice, internal medicine, and pediatric outpatient settings.Methods: Data were collected from 45 outpatient offices in the central Pennsylvania area via phone survey that asked a set of four questions: 1) Do you have spirometry in your office? 2) Do you use spirometry for asthma patients? 3) In what situation do you use spirometry for? 4) Do you use s...

  20. Reference Equations for Spirometry in the Canadian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Allan L; Wong, Suzy L; Tremblay, Christopher; Hankinson, John L

    2016-06-01

    Spirometry plays a major role in the diagnosis and assessment of severity of lung disease. Determining which lung function values are normal and which are below the lower limit of normal depends on reference equations derived from an appropriate population. The purpose of this study was to derive spirometric reference equations for the Canadian population. The Canadian Health Measures Survey consisted of a respiratory questionnaire, urinary cotinine measurements, and spirometry performed in the sitting position with rigorous quality control standards. Of the 16,606 respondents between 6 and 79 years of age, 11,145 were eliminated for positive responses to the respiratory questionnaire, tobacco exposure, or inability to provide high-quality spirograms. Of the remaining 5,461, roughly half were less than 18 years of age. Quantile regression was used to derive predictive (median) and lower limit of normal equations for males and females for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio for those with ages greater and less than 18 years. The resulting equations were compared with those from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III by using an ideal subject on the 50th percentile for height and between the ages of 6 and 79 years; the comparison showed minor and inconsistent discrepancies among the predictive equations. A plot of residuals (predicted minus measured value for each subject) suggested a marginally better fit compared with the GLI and NHANES III equations, although differences among the equations were small and unlikely to have any clinical significance. This study provides spirometric reference equations for the Canadian population that were measured under the recommended clinical conditions and with rigorous quality control.

  1. Subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Vega Encabo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I claim that subjectivity is a way of being that is constituted through a set of practices in which the self is subject to the dangers of fictionalizing and plotting her life and self-image. I examine some ways of becoming subject through narratives and through theatrical performance before others. Through these practices, a real and active subjectivity is revealed, capable of self-knowledge and self-transformation. 

  2. The Vital Capacity Is Vital: Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of the Restrictive Spirometry Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Mark S; Jankowich, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has revealed a substantial portion of the general population with abnormal spirometry results that are characterized by decreased FEV1 and FVC but a preserved FEV1/FVC ratio. This restrictive spirometry pattern (RSP) is inconsistently defined in the literature and not well addressed by current guidelines; there is an accumulating body of evidence, however, that RSP is prevalent to a similar degree as airflow obstruction. Genetic and other risk factors for RSP, such as inhalational injuries and early life exposures, continue to be actively described. Although it seems that RSP is closely associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic inflammation, it is not a simple marker of obesity. RSP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as well as mortality, and it may be an underappreciated cause of functional impairments and respiratory symptoms. Improvement in outcomes in this population will require that clinicians have an appreciation for the significance of this spirometry pattern; additional research into the clinical and radiologic phenotype of these subjects is also needed. This article provides an overview of the recent developments in our understanding of this prevalent and highly morbid spirometry pattern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Factors associated with abnormal spirometry among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, M Bradley; Huang, Laurence; Diaz, Philip T; Kirk, Gregory D; Kleerup, Eric C; Morris, Alison; Rom, William; Weiden, Michael D; Zhao, Enxu; Thompson, Bruce; Crothers, Kristina

    2015-08-24

    HIV-infected individuals are susceptible to development of chronic lung diseases, but little is known regarding the prevalence and risk factors associated with different spirometric abnormalities in this population. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors and performance characteristics of risk factors for spirometric abnormalities among HIV-infected individuals. Cross-sectional cohort study. We analyzed cross-sectional US data from the NHLBI-funded Lung-HIV consortium - a multicenter observational study of heterogeneous groups of HIV-infected participants in diverse geographic sites. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors statistically significantly associated with spirometry patterns. A total of 908 HIV-infected individuals were included. The median age of the cohort was 50 years, 78% were men and 68% current smokers. An abnormal spirometry pattern was present in 37% of the cohort: 27% had obstructed and 10% had restricted spirometry patterns. Overall, age, smoking status and intensity, history of Pneumocystis infection, asthma diagnosis and presence of respiratory symptoms were independently associated with an abnormal spirometry pattern. Regardless of the presence of respiratory symptoms, five HIV-infected participants would need to be screened with spirometry to diagnose two individuals with any abnormal spirometry pattern. Nearly 40% of a diverse US cohort of HIV-infected individuals had an abnormal spirometry pattern. Specific characteristics including age, smoking status, respiratory infection history and respiratory symptoms can identify those at risk for abnormal spirometry. The high prevalence of abnormal spirometry and the poor predictive capability of respiratory symptoms to identify abnormal spirometry should prompt clinicians to consider screening spirometry in HIV-infected populations.

  4. The effect of incentive spirometry on postoperative pulmonary function following laparotomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Anna F; Kendig, Claire E; Mabedi, Charles; Cairns, Bruce A; Charles, Anthony G

    2015-03-01

    Changes in pulmonary dynamics following laparotomy are well documented. Deep breathing exercises, with or without incentive spirometry, may help counteract postoperative decreased vital capacity; however, the evidence for the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of postoperative atelectasis is inconclusive. Furthermore, data are scarce regarding the prevention of postoperative atelectasis in sub-Saharan Africa. To determine the effect of the use of incentive spirometry on pulmonary function following exploratory laparotomy as measured by forced vital capacity (FVC). This was a single-center, randomized clinical trial performed at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Study participants were adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy and were randomized into the intervention or control groups (standard of care) from February 1 to November 30, 2013. All patients received routine postoperative care, including instructions for deep breathing and early ambulation. We used bivariate analysis to compare outcomes between the intervention and control groups. Adult patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy participated in postoperative deep breathing exercises. Patients in the intervention group received incentive spirometers. We assessed pulmonary function using a peak flow meter to measure FVC in both groups of patients. Secondary outcomes, such as hospital length of stay and mortality, were obtained from the medical records. A total of 150 patients were randomized (75 in each arm). The median age in the intervention and control groups was 35 years (interquartile range, 28-53 years) and 33 years (interquartile range, 23-46 years), respectively. Men predominated in both groups, and most patients underwent emergency procedures (78.7% in the intervention group and 84.0% in the control group). Mean initial FVC did not differ significantly between the intervention and control groups (0.92 and 0.90 L, respectively; P=.82 [95% CI, 0.52-2.29]). Although

  5. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  6. The standard of spirometry in the RSA | Basson | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Standards for high-quality lung function testing have not yet been formally adopted in the RSA, despite the increase in the performance of spirometry. A study was undertaken to determine the standard of spirometry in clinical practice in this country. Forty-five spirometer users agreed to participate. Responses to a ...

  7. A retrospective study of two populations to test a simple rule for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohar, Jill A; Yawn, Barbara P; Ruppel, Gregg L; Donohue, James F

    2016-06-04

    Chronic lung disease is common and often under-diagnosed. To test a simple rule for conducting spirometry we reviewed spirograms from two populations, occupational medicine evaluations (OME) conducted by Saint Louis and Wake Forest Universities at 3 sites (n = 3260, mean age 64.14 years, 95 % CI 58.94-69.34, 97 % men) and conducted by Wake Forest University preop clinic (POC) at one site (n = 845, mean age 62.10 years, 95 % CI 50.46-73.74, 57 % men). This retrospective review of database information that the first author collected prospectively identified rates, types, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive value for lung function abnormalities and associated mortality rate found when conducting spirometry based on the 20/40 rule (≥20 years of smoking in those aged ≥ 40 years) in the OME population. To determine the reproducibility of the 20/40 rule for conducting spirometry, the rule was applied to the POC population. A lung function abnormality was found in 74 % of the OME population and 67 % of the POC population. Sensitivity of the rule was 85 % for an obstructive pattern and 77 % for any abnormality on spirometry. Positive and negative predictive values of the rule for a spirometric abnormality were 74 and 55 %, respectively. Patients with an obstructive pattern were at greater risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.39 [confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.93] vs. normal) and death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.53, 95 % CI 1.20-1.84) than subjects with normal spirometry. Restricted spirometry patterns were also associated with greater risk of coronary disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.7 [CI 1.23-2.35]) and death (Hazard ratio 1.40, 95 % CI 1.08-1.72). Smokers (≥ 20 pack years) age ≥ 40 years are at an increased risk for lung function abnormalities and those abnormalities are associated with greater presence of coronary heart disease and increased all-cause mortality. Use of the 20/40 rule could provide a

  8. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  9. Retrospective observations on the ability to diagnose and manage patients with asthma through the use of impulse oscillometry: comparison with spirometry and overview of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Constantine; Cross, Blake; Saadeh, Charles; Gaylor, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is an evolving technology for the diagnosis and followup of patients with asthma. Our objective is to review the findings on patients who underwent both spirometry and IOS during clinical evaluations of their asthma. The goal was to retrospectively evaluate IOS during the initial diagnosis and followup of patients with asthma in comparison with spirometry. We routinely perform IOS and spirometry evaluation in patients with suspected asthma during baseline visits and at followup. We reviewed the data on 39 patients over the age of 13 with asthma at baseline and following treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. IOS and spirometry were both done at baseline, following short acting bronchodilator administration, and at followup after at least three months of inhaled corticosteroid treatment. IOS showed improvement in airway function both initially, following short acting bronchodilator introduction, and later after initiation of long term inhaled corticosteroid treatment, even when the spirometry did not reveal improvement. We noted the IOS improvement in the reactance or AX as well as the resistance in smaller airways or R5. IOS may provide a useful measure towards identifying an asthma diagnosis and followup without inducing the extra respiratory effort spirometry requires.

  10. Spirometry in primary care for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiak, Nancy Cantey

    2014-01-01

    Spirometry is an essential part of diagnosing a child with asthma. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) expert panels recommend spirometry to be performed on children five years of age and older as an objective assessment of lung function, to diagnosis asthma, and for ongoing yearly management of asthma (GINA, 2012; NAEPP, 2007). According to the NAEPP expert panel, history and physical examination alone are not reliable to accurately diagnose asthma, exclude alternative diagnosis, or determine lung impairment (NAEPP, 2007 Dombkowski, Hassan, Wasilevich, and Clark (2010) found 52% of physicians who provide primary care to children used spirometry, but only 21% used spirometry according to the national guidelines, and only 35% of physicians surveyed were comfortable interpreting the test results. Zanconato, Meneghelli, Braga, Zacchello, and Baraldi (2005) found that 21% of spirometry readings were interpreted incorrectly, concluding that proper training and quality control were important to provide if spirometry in the primary care office setting is to be used. The purpose of this article is to review the appropriate use of spirometry in pediatric primary care.

  11. The recent multi-ethnic global lung initiative 2012 (GLI2012) reference values don't reflect contemporary adult's North African spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Helmi; El Attar, Mohamed Nour; Hadj Mabrouk, Khaoula; Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Bousarssar, Mohamed; Limam, Khélifa; Maatoug, Chiraz; Bouslah, Hmida; Charrada, Ameur; Rouatbi, Sonia

    2013-12-01

    The applicability of the recent multi-ethnic reference equations derived by the ERS Global Lung Initiative (ERS/GLI) in interpreting spirometry data in North African adult subjects has not been studied. To ascertain how well the recent ERS/GLI reference equations fit contemporary adult Tunisian spirometric data. Spirometric data were recorded from 1192 consecutive spirometry procedures in adults aged 18-60 years. Reference values and lower limits of normality (LLN) were calculated using the local and the ERS/GLI reference equations. Applied definitions: large airway obstructive ventilatory defect (LAOVD): FEV1/FVC spirometry from North African healthy subjects (n = 489) were calculated. If the average Z-score deviated by spirometry. Using Tunisian reference equations, 71.31%, 6.71% and 19.04% of spirometry records were interpreted as normal, and as having, LAOVD and TRVD, respectively. Using the ERS/GLI reference equations, these figures were respectively, 85.82%, 4.19% and 8.39%. The mean ± SD Z-scores for the contemporary healthy North African subject's data were -0.55 ± 0.87 for FEV1, -0.62 ± 0.86 for FVC and 0.10 ± 0.73 for FEV1/FVC. The present study don't recommend the use of the recent ERS/GLI reference equations to interpret spirometry in North African adult population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spirometry reference values in Indigenous Australians: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Tamara L; Chang, Anne B; Petsky, Helen L; Rodwell, Leanne T; Brown, Michael G; Hill, Debra C; Thompson, Bruce; McElrea, Margaret S

    2016-07-04

    To evaluate published spirometry data for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) peoples to determine (i) whether their ethnicity influenced spirometry results; and (ii) if any reliable spirometry reference values exist for Indigenous Australians. Systematic review of published and grey literature. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases, references of included articles and appropriate grey literature. Last searches were conducted in April 2016. We included any study that performed spirometry on healthy Indigenous Australians and compared their results with those from people of European ancestry. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts and then reviewed potentially relevant full-text articles for possible inclusion. We used PRISMA systematic review reporting methods to collate data. Of a possible 125 studies, 18 full-text articles were reviewed, but only nine fulfilled the inclusion criteria. None specified Torres Strait Islander inclusion. All studies reported lower spirometry values (as much as 30% lower) for Aboriginal people compared with non-Indigenous people. Five studies developed spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians; however, none adhered to all participant inclusion and exclusion criteria outlined by the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. Hence, reported results and subsequent reference values may not be a true representation of spirometry values in healthy Indigenous people. The lower spirometry values reported for Indigenous Australians may be due to study limitations. Furthermore, there are currently no reliable spirometry reference values for Indigenous Australians that adhere to current guidelines. Developing a set of Indigenous Australian reference values will improve the accuracy of test interpretation and aid in the diagnosis of respiratory disease in this population.

  13. Quality assurance of spirometry in a population-based study -predictors of good outcome in spirometry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wan C; Bourbeau, Jean; O'Donnell, Denis; Aaron, Shawn; Maltais, Francois; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hernandez, Paul; Cowie, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth; Sonia Buist, A; Sin, Don; Mark Fitzgerald, J

    2014-04-01

    The assurance of high-quality spirometry testing remains a challenge. Spirometry training consisted of standardized coaching followed by certification for 35 spirometry-naïve and 9 spirometry-experienced research assistants. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator (BD) in random population samples of 5176 people aged 40 years and older from 9 sites in Canada. using the hand-held EasyOne spirometer (ndd Medical Technologies Inc., Andover, MA, USA). Pulmonary function quality assurance with over reading was conducted centrally in Vancouver: spirograms were reviewed and graded according to ATS/ERS standards with prompt feedback to the technician at each site. Descriptive statistics were calculated for manoeuvre acceptability and repeatability variables. A logistic regression model was constructed for the predictors of spirometry quality success. 95% of test sessions achieved pre-determined quality standards for back extrapolated volume (BEV), time to peak flow (PEFT) and end of test volume (EOTV). The mean forced expiratory time (FET) was 11.2 seconds. Then, 90% and 95% of all manoeuvres had FEV1 and FVC that were repeatable within 150 ml and 200 ml respectively. Test quality was slightly better for post-BD test sessions compared with pre-BD for both groups of research assistants. Independent predictors of acceptable test quality included participant characteristics: female sex, younger age, greater BD responsiveness; but not study site or prior experience in completing spirometry by the technologist. Good quality spirometry tests are attainable in large multicenter epidemiological studies by trained research assistants, irrespective of their prior experience in spirometry.

  14. Evaluating the appropriateness of hospital doctors' requests for pulmonary function tests beyond basic spirometry: results from a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishna Bajee; Fountain, Zoe; Hockenhull, Jessica; Zagami, Debbie

    2017-08-01

    Hospitalists request 'complete' pulmonary function tests (PFTs), typically comprising of spirometry, diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and absolute lung volumes (ALVs), the results of which assist in the management of patients with respiratory disorders. Recently, concerns have been raised about over-requesting of 'complete' PFTs, but there is a paucity of information on the proportion of requests that can be considered clinically inappropriate. This study prospectively evaluated the 'complete' PFTs requested in a hospital service and assessed the impact of medical review of the requests. A six-month prospective study on requests to two teaching hospital PFT laboratories from non-respiratory doctors was undertaken. Requests at one laboratory underwent review by a respiratory doctor ('intervention laboratory') while requests at the second laboratory were not reviewed ('control laboratory'). The appropriateness of requests was measured against pre-specified criteria. PFT requests for 335 subjects were included in the study. In the intervention laboratory, 8 of 110 ALV and 122 of 134 DLCO requests fulfilled pre-specified criteria for appropriate test indications. Fewer ALV (7% vs. 100%, p requests from non-respiratory hospital doctors may be unwarranted. Using a simple screening method, the number of unnecessary PFTs could be reduced, resulting in substantial time and cost savings for hospital PFT laboratories.

  15. Pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing: an evidence based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Michael J; Warning, William J

    2015-10-01

    The scope of pharmacist services for patients with pulmonary disease has primarily focused on drug related outcomes; however pharmacists have the ability to broaden the scope of clinical services by performing diagnostic testing including quality spirometry testing. Studies have demonstrated that pharmacists can perform quality spirometry testing based upon international guidelines. The primary aim of this review was to assess the published evidence of pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing based upon American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines. In order to accomplish this, the description of evidence and type of outcome from these services were reviewed. A literature search was conducted using five databases [PubMed (1946-January 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews] with search terms including pharmacy, spirometry, pulmonary function, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to publications in English and reported in humans. In addition, Uniform Resource Locators and Google Scholar searches were implemented to include any additional supplemental information. Eight studies (six prospective multi-center trials, two retrospective single center studies) were included. Pharmacists in all studies received specialized training in performing spirometry testing. Of the eight studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 (100%) demonstrated acceptable repeatability of spirometry testing based upon standards set by the ATS/ERS guidelines. Acceptable repeatability of seven studies ranged from 70 to 99% consistent with published data. Available evidence suggests that quality spirometry testing can be performed by pharmacists. More prospective studies are needed to add to the current evidence of quality spirometry testing performed by

  16. Prevalence of Respiratory Diseases According to Spirometry Findings Among Patients Attending the Spirometry Department of Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, B K; Pradhan, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Spirometry is a standard test for screening and evaluation of patients with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath. Despite its easy availability, low cost and ease of performance it has not been widely used in clinical practice in Nepal. Objective To assess the prevalence of respiratory diseases in a regional referral centre in patients referred for spirometry. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study including patients referred for spirometry to the spirometry unit of Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital from 2014 July to 2015 October. The spirometry findings of the patients fulfilling the criteria of American Thoracic Society/European Respitatory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines were analyzed and categorized as normal, having obstructive lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma or restrictive lung disease. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 software. Result Out of 821 patients, 755 patients (92%) fulfilled ATS/ERS criteria for satisfactory spirometry. The prevalence of COPD was 31.4%, bronchial asthma 24.2% and restrictive lung disease 8.1%. The mean age of patients diagnosed with COPD was 57.8±10.8 years; bronchial asthma 44.3±16.2 years; and restrictive lung disease 44.6±21.5 years. Both COPD and bronchial asthma were common in females. About twenty two percent of the COPD patients were non-smokers and 86.3% of these were females. The most common symptoms for referral was cough and shortness of breath: these symptoms were more likely to be associated with abnormal spirometry findings. Conclusion Spirometry is a crucial preliminary test for evaluation of patients with respiratory symptoms. It should be used more frequently to help stratify patients for appropriate treatment.

  17. Impact of switching from Caucasian to Indian reference equations for spirometry interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Madan, M

    2018-03-01

    In the absence of ethnically appropriate prediction equations, spirometry data in Indian subjects are often interpreted using equations for other ethnic populations. To evaluate the impact of switching from Caucasian (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III [NHANES III] and Global Lung Function Initiative [GLI]) equations to the recently published North Indian equations on spirometric interpretation, and to examine the suitability of GLI-Mixed equations for this population. Spirometry data on 12 323 North Indian patients were analysed using the North Indian equations as well as NHANES III, GLI-Caucasian and GLI-Mixed equations. Abnormalities and ventilatory patterns were categorised and agreement in interpretation was evaluated. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations and, to a lesser extent, the GLI-Mixed equations, predicted higher values and labelled more measurements as abnormal. In up to one third of the patients, these differed from Indian equations in the categorisation of ventilatory patterns, with more patients classified as having restrictive and mixed disease. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations substantially overdiagnose abnormalities and misclassify ventilatory patterns on spirometry in Indian patients. Such errors of interpretation, although less common with the GLI-Mixed equations, remain substantial and are clinically unacceptable. A switch to Indian equations will have a major impact on interpretation.

  18. Reference values for spirometry in Chinese aged 4-80 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Hao, Chuangli; Wang, Ning; Ai, Tao; Liu, Chuanhe; Xu, Yongjian; Kang, Jian; Yang, Lan; Shen, Huahao; Guan, Weijie; Jiang, Mei; Zhong, Nanshan; Zheng, Jinping

    2017-11-01

    Although there are over 1.34 billion Chinese in the world, nationwide spirometric reference values for Chinese are unavailable, which is usually based on Caucasian conversion. The aim of this study was to establish spirometric reference values for Chinese with a national wide sample. We enrolled healthy non-smokers in 24 centers in Northeast, North, Northwest, Southwest, South, East and Central China from January 2007 to June 2010. Spirometry was performed according to American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society guidelines. Reference equations were established using the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) method for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV 1 /FVC, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF). Popular Caucasian reference values adjusted with ethnic conversion factors were validated with Chinese measured spirometry data. The present study also compared with other published Chinese equations for spirometry. A total of 7,115 eligible individuals aged 4 to 80 years (50.9% females) were recruited. Reference equations against age and height by gender were established, including predicted values and lower limits of normal (LLNs). Validated with Chinese data, the mean percentage differences of Caucasian reference values adjusted with ethnic conversion factors were -10.2% to 1.8%, and the percentages of total subjects under LLNs were 0.1% to 8.9%. Compared with this study, the percentage differences of previous Chinese studies ranged from -17.8% to 11.4%, which were found to significantly overestimate or underestimate lung function. This study established new reference values for better interpretation of spirometry in Chinese aged 4 to 80 years, while Caucasian references with adjustment were inappropriate for Chinese.

  19. Reference values for spirometry in elderly individuals: a cross-sectional study of different reference equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Joana; Palmeiro, Teresa; Caires, Iolanda; Papoila, Ana L; Alves, Marta; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Botelho, Maria A; Neuparth, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Spirometry is the single most important test for the evaluation of respiratory function. The results are interpreted by comparing measured data with predicted values previously obtained from a reference population. Reference equations for spirometry have been discussed previously. The aim of this study was to compare reference values based on National Health and Nutrition Assessment Survey (NHANES III), European Community of Steel and Coal (ECSC), and Global Lung Initiative (GLI) equations in an elderly sample population. Subjects from the Geriatric Study on Health Effects of Air Quality in elder care centres who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Spirometry was performed according to international guidelines. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and FEV 1 /FVC ratio were reported as percentages of the predicted value, and the lower limit of normality was calculated. Out of 260 elderly patients, 69.6% were women; the mean age was 83.0 ± 6.46 years with an age range of 65-95 years. The lowest %FVC and %FEV 1 values were obtained using the GLI reference equations. However, when NHANES III equations were used, the FEV 1 /FVC ratio was higher than ratios obtained from GLI and ECSC equations. The prevalence of airway obstruction was highest using ECSC equations, while GLI equations demonstrated more restrictive defects. The present study showed meaningful differences in the reference values, and consequently, in the results obtained using NHANES III, ECSC, and GLI reference equations. The spirometry interpretation was also influenced by the reference equations used.

  20. Pathway to Best Practice in Spirometry in the Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry performed in the ambulatory setting is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, monitoring, and evaluation of respiratory health in patients with chronic lung disease. If spirometry is not performed according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines, unnecessary repeated testing, increased expenditure of time and money, and increased patient and family anxiety may result. Two respiratory therapists at Mission Health System in Asheville, NC, identified an increase in patients arriving at the pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories with abnormal spirometry results obtained in the ambulatory setting. These abnormal results were due to incorrect testing procedure, not chronic lung disease. Three training methods were developed to increase knowledge of correct spirometry testing procedure in the ambulatory setting. The therapists also created a plan to educate offices that do not perform spirometry on the importance and availability of PFT services at our hospital for the population of patients with chronic lung disease. Notable improvements in posttraining test results were demonstrated. The education process was evaluated by a leading respiratory expert, with improvements suggested and implemented. Next steps are listed.

  1. Optoelectronic plethysmography compared to spirometry during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Aimee M; Moran, Sienna L; Garber, Carol Ewing; Armstrong, Hilary F; Basner, Robert C; Thomashow, Byron M; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare simultaneous measurements of tidal volume (Vt) by optoelectronic plethysmography (OEP) and spirometry during a maximal cycling exercise test to quantify possible differences between methods. Vt measured simultaneously by OEP and spirometry was collected during a maximal exercise test in thirty healthy participants. The two methods were compared by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis at submaximal and maximal exercise. The average difference between the two methods and the mean percentage discrepancy were calculated. Submaximal exercise (SM) and maximal exercise (M) Vt measured by OEP and spirometry had very good correlation, SM R=0.963 (pspirometry. OEP could measure exercise Vt as much as 0.188 L above and -0.017 L below that of spirometry. The discrepancy between measurements was -2.0 ± 7.2% at SM and -2.4 ± 3.9% at M. In conclusion, Vt measurements at during exercise by OEP and spirometry are closely correlated and the difference between measurements was insignificant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Left ventricular mass, forced baseline spirometry and adipocytokine profiles in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río-Camacho, G; Domínguez-Garrido, M N; Pita, J; Aragón, I; Collado, R; Soriano-Guillén, L

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports have shown an increase in changes in cardiac and pulmonary function among obese patients. Furthermore, it has also been demonstrated that obesity is a state of chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that obese children with metabolic syndrome exhibit a higher percentage of left ventricular hypertrophy and altered spirometry values due to higher levels of inflammation. Left ventricular mass was studied using echocardiography, baseline forced spirometry by spirometer (FlowScreen) and adipocytokine profiles (adiponectin, IL-6, leptin, MCP-1, PCR-Hs, RBP-4, TNF-( and visfatin) were evaluated in peripubertal obese children with and without metabolic syndrome. Forty-one patients (20 girls and 21 boys) were included in the study, 20 of whom (10 boys and 10 girls) were subjects with metabolic syndrome. Of the adipocytokines studied, only leptin, hs-CRP, MCP-1, and the leptin/adiponectin ratio yielded values that were substantially greater in the group with metabolic syndrome (Pspirometry showed no differences between the groups studied. However, of the entire cohort, 9.5% had left ventricular hypertrophy. No significant relationship was found between anthropometric data and adipocytokines and the parameters used to study left ventricular mass and spirometry values on the other. At the time the study was performed, left ventricular mass and baseline forced spirometry did not appear to be influenced by inflammatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Interpretation of Spirometry: Selection of Predicted Values and Defining Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most frequently performed investigation to evaluate pulmonary function. It provides clinically useful information on the mechanical properties of the lung and the thoracic cage and aids in taking management-related decisions in a wide spectrum of diseases and disorders. Few measurements in medicine are so dependent on factors related to equipment, operator and the patient. Good spirometry requires quality assured measurements and a systematic approach to interpretation. Standard guidelines on the technical aspects of equipment and their calibration as well as the test procedure have been developed and revised from time-to-time. Strict compliance with standardisation guidelines ensures quality control. Interpretation of spirometry data is based only on two basic measurements--the forced vital capacity (FVC) and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and their ratio, FEV1/FVC. A meaningful and clinically useful interpretation of the measured data requires a systematic approach and consideration of several important issues. Central to interpretation is the understanding of the development and application of prediction equations. Selection of prediction equations that are appropriate for the ethnic origin of the patient is vital to avoid erroneous interpretation. Defining abnormal values is a debatable but critical aspect of spirometry. A statistically valid definition of the lower limits of normal has been advocated as the better method over the more commonly used approach of defining abnormality as a fixed percentage of the predicted value. Spirometry rarely provides a specific diagnosis. Examination of the flow-volume curve and the measured data provides information to define patterns of ventilatory impairment. Spirometry must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical information including results of other investigations.

  4. Phenotype of normal spirometry in an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; McAvay, Gail; Van Ness, Peter H; Casaburi, Richard; Jensen, Robert L; MacIntyre, Neil; Gill, Thomas M; Yaggi, H Klar; Concato, John

    2015-10-01

    In aging populations, the commonly used Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) may misclassify normal spirometry as respiratory impairment (airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern), including the presumption of respiratory disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). To evaluate the phenotype of normal spirometry as defined by a new approach from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI), overall and across GOLD spirometric categories. Using data from COPDGene (n = 10,131; ages 45-81; smoking history, ≥10 pack-years), we evaluated spirometry and multiple phenotypes, including dyspnea severity (Modified Medical Research Council grade 0-4), health-related quality of life (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score), 6-minute-walk distance, bronchodilator reversibility (FEV1 % change), computed tomography-measured percentage of lung with emphysema (% emphysema) and gas trapping (% gas trapping), and small airway dimensions (square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm). Among 5,100 participants with GLI-defined normal spirometry, GOLD identified respiratory impairment in 1,146 (22.5%), including a restrictive pattern in 464 (9.1%), mild COPD in 380 (7.5%), moderate COPD in 302 (5.9%), and severe COPD in none. Overall, the phenotype of GLI-defined normal spirometry included normal adjusted mean values for dyspnea grade (0.8), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (15.9), 6-minute-walk distance (1,424 ft [434 m]), bronchodilator reversibility (2.7%), % emphysema (0.9%), % gas trapping (10.7%), and square root of the wall area for a standardized airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (3.65 mm); corresponding 95% confidence intervals were similarly normal. These phenotypes remained normal for GLI-defined normal spirometry across GOLD spirometric categories. GLI-defined normal spirometry, even when classified as respiratory impairment by GOLD, included adjusted mean values in the

  5. Cross-Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Stella E; Barker, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S

    2015-12-01

    An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23-infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00-22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86-589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cross‐Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Elizabeth A.; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Methods Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. Results We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23‐infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00‐22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86‐589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. Conclusions In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. PMID:26553118

  7. Variation in spirometry utilization between trained general practitioners in practices equipped with a spirometer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.E.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Jacobs, A.; Akkermans, R.P.; Hartman, J.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore spirometry utilization among general practitioners and identify practitioner and practice-related factors associated with spirometry utilization. DESIGN: Multivariate multilevel cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey. SETTING: Some 61 general practices involved in a

  8. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floor Borlée

    Full Text Available COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their level of agreement, and to compare associations between COPD-definitions and risk factors.COPD-prevalence in 1,793 adults from the general Dutch population (aged 18-70 years was assessed based on self-reported data, Electronic Medical Records (EMR, and post-BD spirometry: using the FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN and GOLD fixed cut-off (FEV1/FVC <0.70. Using spirometry as a reference, sensitivity was calculated for self-reported and EMR-based COPD. Associations between COPD and known risk factors were assessed with logistic regression. Data were collected as part of the cross-sectional VGO study (Livestock Farming and Neighboring Residents' Health Study.The highest prevalence was found based on spirometry (GOLD: 10.9%, LLN: 5.9%, followed by self-report (4.6% and EMR (2.9%. Self-reported or EMR-based COPD identified less than 30% of all COPD-cases based on spirometry. The direction of association between known risk factors and COPD was similar across the four definitions, however, magnitude and significance varied. Especially indicators of allergy were more strongly associated with self-reported COPD compared to the other definitions.COPD-prevalence varied depending on the used definition. A substantial number of subjects with spirometry-based COPD cannot be identified with questionnaires or medical records which can cause underestimation of COPD-prevalence. The influence of the different COPD-definitions on associations with known risk factors was limited.

  9. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlée, Floor; Yzermans, C Joris; Krop, Esmeralda; Aalders, Bernadette; Rooijackers, Jos; Zock, Jan-Paul; van Dijk, Christel E; Maassen, Catharina B M; Schellevis, François; Heederik, Dick; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-01-01

    COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their level of agreement, and to compare associations between COPD-definitions and risk factors. COPD-prevalence in 1,793 adults from the general Dutch population (aged 18-70 years) was assessed based on self-reported data, Electronic Medical Records (EMR), and post-BD spirometry: using the FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN) and GOLD fixed cut-off (FEV1/FVC spirometry as a reference, sensitivity was calculated for self-reported and EMR-based COPD. Associations between COPD and known risk factors were assessed with logistic regression. Data were collected as part of the cross-sectional VGO study (Livestock Farming and Neighboring Residents' Health Study). The highest prevalence was found based on spirometry (GOLD: 10.9%, LLN: 5.9%), followed by self-report (4.6%) and EMR (2.9%). Self-reported or EMR-based COPD identified less than 30% of all COPD-cases based on spirometry. The direction of association between known risk factors and COPD was similar across the four definitions, however, magnitude and significance varied. Especially indicators of allergy were more strongly associated with self-reported COPD compared to the other definitions. COPD-prevalence varied depending on the used definition. A substantial number of subjects with spirometry-based COPD cannot be identified with questionnaires or medical records which can cause underestimation of COPD-prevalence. The influence of the different COPD-definitions on associations with known risk factors was limited.

  10. Five tips for good office spirometry | Maree | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 9 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Five tips for good office spirometry. DM Maree. Abstract. No Abstract.

  11. Prediction Equations for Spirometry for Children from Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Kumar, Rajeev; Mittal, Vikas

    2016-09-08

    To develop prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India using current international guidelines for standardization. Re-analysis of cross-sectional data from a single school. 670 normal children (age 6-17 y; 365 boys) of northern Indian parentage. After screening for normal health, we carried out spirometry with recommended quality assurance according to current guidelines. We developed linear and nonlinear prediction equations using multiple regression analysis. We selected the final models on the basis of the highest coefficient of multiple determination (R2) and statistical validity. Spirometry parameters: FVC, FEV1, PEFR, FEF50, FEF75 and FEF25-75. The equations for the main parameters were as follows: Boys, Ln FVC = -1.687+0.016*height +0.022*age; Ln FEV1 = -1.748+0.015*height+0.031*age. Girls, Ln FVC = -9.989 +(2.018*Ln(height)) + (0.324*Ln(age)); Ln FEV1 = -10.055 +(1.990*Ln(height))+(0.358*Ln(age)). Nonlinear regression yielded substantially greater R2 values compared to linear models except for FEF50 for girls. Height and age were found to be the significant explanatory variables for all parameters on multiple regression with weight making no significant contribution. We developed prediction equations for spirometry for children from northern India. Nonlinear equations were superior to linear equations.

  12. Accuracy and Quality of Spirometry in Primary Care Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewald, Matthew J; Gallo, Heather M; Wilson, Emily L

    2016-12-01

    Spirometry is necessary for the optimal management of patients with respiratory disease. The quality of spirometry performed in the primary care setting has been inconsistent. We aimed to evaluate spirometer accuracy, determine the clinical significance of inaccurate spirometers, and assess the quality of spirograms obtained in primary care offices. We tested 17 spirometers used in primary care offices with a waveform generator; accuracy and precision were assessed using American Thoracic Society criteria. The clinical significance of inaccurate instruments was determined by applying the FEV 1 /FVC error from an obstructed waveform to a clinical data set. Spirogram quality was determined by grading spirograms using acceptability and repeatability criteria. The relationship between the number of tests performed by a clinic and test quality was assessed. Only 1 of 17 spirometers met accuracy criteria, with mean errors for FVC, FEV 1 , and FEV 1 /FVC ranging from 1.7 to 3.1%. Applying the percentage error to a clinical data set resulted in 28% of tests being recategorized from obstructed to nonobstructed. Of the spirograms reviewed, 60% were considered acceptable for clinical use. There was no association between the number of tests performed by a clinic and spirometry quality. Most spirometers tested were not accurate. The magnitude of the errors resulted in significant changes in the categorization of patients with obstruction. Acceptable-quality tests were produced for only 60% of patients. Our results raise concerns regarding the utility of spirometry obtained in primary care offices without greater attention to quality assurance and training.

  13. A Rwandan spirometry and resting ventilation study | Gahutu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To illustrate spirometric population variation and ventilatory adaptation to moderate altitude, we report the spirometric and resting ventilation values observed in a student population in Butare, Rwanda (altitude: 1 768 m; barometric pressure: 629 mm Hg). Spirometry was carried out with a Mijnhardt Volutest VT-3 ...

  14. A guide to spirometry as applied to occupational health | White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the context of occupational health, spirometric testing of respiratory function has a number of important applications. These applications can be expected to become more widespread in view of extensive changes to occupational health and compensation legislation in South Africa. Spirometry is an essential component of ...

  15. Paediatric spirometry guideline of the South African Thoracic Society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reviewed the recommendations on the technical aspects of performing spirometry in children, from the available guidelines and clinical trials. The focus was on the indications, methods and the interpretation of lung function tests in children <12 years of age. Reliable lung function testing can be performed in children, but ...

  16. Paediatric spirometry guideline of the South African Thoracic Society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spirometry forms an important component in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary diseases in children. In the paediatric setting, there are ... an altered mental state[10] or learning difficulties[2,3]. • chest .... When maximal expiration is met, fill up the lungs again by taking another quick, deep breath. ×. ✓. Repeat for a ...

  17. Influence of the diving wetsuit on standard spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Sterk, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A well-fitting wetsuit exerts a pressure on the body that may influence spirometry. This pressure is expected to reduce the forced vital capacity (FVC) due to hampered inspiration. Since the shape of the spirometric flow curve should not be changed by the pressure effects of the

  18. Aerobic Exercise Training and Incentive Spirometry Can Control Age-related respiratory muscles performance Changes in Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kader, Shehab Mahmoud Abd; Ashmawy, Eman Mohamed Salah El-Den

    2013-01-01

    As aging occurs, the respiratory system undergoes a measurable decline in physiological functions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of walking exercise and incentive spirometry in controlling age related respiratory muscles function changes in elderly. Forty elderly subjects of both sexes their age ranged from 65 to 74 years and included into two equal groups; group (A) received walking exercise and incentive spirometery three times a week for 3 months, where group (B) receiv...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a patient's...

  20. Comparison of spirometry criteria for the diagnosis of COPD: results from the BOLD study

    OpenAIRE

    Vollmer, W.M.; Gíslason, þ.; Burney, P.; Enright, P.L.; Gulsvik, A.; Kocabas, A.; Buist, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Published guidelines recommend spirometry to accurately diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, even spirometry-based COPD prevalence estimates can vary widely. We compared properties of several spirometry-based COPD definitions using data from the international Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD)study.

  1. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  2. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel Fm; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter Ma

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland-Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of -0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis.

  3. Prevalence of Airflow Limitation Defined by Pre- and Post-Bronchodilator Spirometry in a Community-Based Health Checkup: The Hisayama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Satoru; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Kaneko, Yasuko; Kan-o, Keiko; Noda, Naotaka; Tajiri-Asai, Yukari; Nakano, Takako; Ishii, Yumiko; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-02-01

    Spirometry in health checkup may contribute to early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Although post-bronchodilator airflow limitation is essential for definite diagnosis of COPD and post-bronchodilator normalization of airflow is suggestive of asthma, this test has not been prevailed in health checkup. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of airflow limitation defined by pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry in health checkup. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was conducted for participants with airflow limitation in a town-wide health checkup for residents aged 40 years and older in Hisayama, a town in the western part of Japan. The prevalence of pre- and post-bronchodilator airway limitation defined by FEV1/FVC spirometry. In males, the age of current smokers was significantly younger than those of never smokers and former smokers. In females, the ages of current- and former smokers were significantly younger than never smokers. The values of %FEV1 and %FVC in current smokers were significantly lower than those in former smokers and never smokers. Two hundred sixty nine subjects, 85% of total subjects with a pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC spirometry. The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator airflow limitation was 14.6% in males and 13.7% in females, and the prevalence of post-bronchodilator airway limitation was 8.7% and 8.7%, respectively. Post-bronchodilator spirometry in health checkup would reduce the number of subjects with probable COPD to two-third. Recommendation for those examinees to take further evaluations may pave the way for early intervention.

  4. Development of a spirometry T-score in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Baek, Seunghee; Jung, Ji-Ye; Kim, Young Sam; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Do; Mannino, David M; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry values may be expressed as T-scores in standard deviation units relative to a reference in a young, normal population as an analogy to the T-score for bone mineral density. This study was performed to develop the spirometry T-score. T-scores were calculated from lambda-mu-sigma-derived Z-scores using a young, normal age reference. Three outcomes of all-cause death, respiratory death, and COPD death were evaluated in 9,101 US subjects followed for 10 years; an outcome of COPD-related health care utilization (COPD utilization) was evaluated in 1,894 Korean subjects followed for 4 years. The probability of all-cause death appeared to remain nearly zero until -1 of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) T-score but increased steeply where FEV1 T-score reached below -2.5. Survival curves for all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization differed significantly among the groups when stratified by FEV1 T-score (Pspirometry T-score could predict all-cause death, respiratory death, COPD death, and COPD utilization.

  5. Effect of volume-oriented versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Adriana C; Porras, Desiderio C; Barbosa, Renata Cc; Paisani, Denise M; Marques da Silva, Cibele C B; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2014-03-01

    Aging causes physiological and functional changes that impair pulmonary function. Incentive spirometry is widely used for lung expansion, but the effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry (VIS) versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry (FIS) on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly are poorly understood. We compared VIS and FIS in elderly subjects and healthy adult subjects. Sixteen elderly subjects (9 women, mean ± SD age 70.6 ± 3.9 y, mean ± SD body mass index 23.8 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)) and 16 healthy adults (8 women, mean ± age 25.9 ± 4.3 y, mean ± body mass index 23.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) performed quiet breathing, VIS, and FIS in randomized sequence. Chest wall kinematics (via optoelectronic plethysmography) and inspiratory muscle activity (via surface electromyography) were assessed simultaneously. Synchrony between the superior thorax and abdominal motion was calculated (phase angle). In the elderly subjects both types of incentive spirometry increased chest wall volumes similarly, whereas in the healthy adult subjects VIS increased the chest wall volume more than did FIS. FIS and VIS triggered similar lower thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly subjects, whereas in the healthy adults FIS induced lower synchrony than did VIS. FIS required more muscle activity in the elderly subjects to create an increase in chest wall volume. Incentive spirometry performance is influenced by age, and the differences between elderly and healthy adults response should be considered in clinical practice.

  6. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Barnes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas A Barnes1, Len Fromer21Department of Cardiopulmonary Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by the use of office spirometry.Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most recent published evaluations of office spirometry and the analysis of preliminary data from a recent spirometry mass screening project. A mass screening study by the American Association for Respiratory Care and the COPD Foundation was used to identify the most effective way for general practitioners to implement office spirometry in order to stage COPD.Results: A simple three-step method is described to identify people with a high pre-test probability in an attempt to detect moderate to severe COPD: COPD questionnaire, measurement of peak expiratory flow, and office spirometry. Clinical practice guidelines exist for office spirometry basics for safety, use of electronic peak flow devices, and portable spirometers.Conclusion: Spirometry can be undertaken in primary care offices with acceptable levels of technical expertise. Using office spirometry, primary care physicians can diagnose the presence and severity of COPD. Spirometry can guide therapies for COPD and predict outcomes when used in general practice.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, spirometry, family practice, primary care physician

  7. Pilot program on distance training in spirometry testing - the technology feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowiński, Adam; Romański, Emil; Bieleń, Przemysław; Bednarek, Michał; Puścińska, Elżbieta; Goljan-Geremek, Anna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Śliwinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Office spirometry has been widely used in recent years by general practitioners in primary care setting, thus the need for stricter monitoring of the quality of spirometry has been recognized. A spirometry counseling network of outpatients clinics was created in Poland using portable spirometer Spirotel. The spirometry data were transferred to counseling centre once a week. The tests sent to the counseling centre were analyzed by doctors experienced in the analysis of spirometric data. In justified cases they sent their remarks concerning performed tests to the centres via e-mail. We received 878 records of spirometry tests in total. Data transmission via the telephone was 100% effective. The quality of spirometry tests performed by outpatients clinics was variable. The use of spirometers with data transfer for training purposes seems to be advisable. There is a need to proper face-to-face training of spirometry operators before an implementation of any telemedicine technology.

  8. Virtual respiratory system for interactive e-learning of spirometry

    OpenAIRE

    W. Tomalak; T. Gólczewski; Michnikowski, M; Darowski, M

    2008-01-01

    Progress in computer simulation technology offers new possibilities for modern medicine. On one hand – virtual organs can help to create animal or human models for research, on the other hand – e-learning or distant learning through Internet is now possible. The aim of our work was to create a system for interactive learning of spirometry (SILS), enabling students or physicians to observe spirometric measurements (flow-volume) modified by setting level and kind of abnormalities within the res...

  9. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.M.; Moser, K.M.; Hartman, M.T.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A vital factor conditioning the usage of the pulmonary perfusion (Q) scan in the evaluation of patients suspected of pulmonary embolism is the prevalence of abnormal Q scans in subjects free of cardiopulmonary disease. Because this prevalence has not been well defined, we performed Q scans in 80 nonsmoking subjects 18 to 29 yr of age having no known active cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject underwent a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and PA chest roentgenogram, followed by a 6-view Q scan. Two subjects in whom a Q defect was suspected underwent a /sup 133/Xe equilibrium-washout ventilation (V) scan. All Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by 2 experienced readers. Seventy-nine of the 80 Q scans were read as normal. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect. One of the 80 subjects, who had a mild pectus excavatum, had a left upper lobe subsegmental defect, which was not seen on the V scan. Based on the statistical analysis of these data, no more than 3.68% of normal nonsmoking persons in this age group may have a lobar or segmental Q scan defect and no more than 6.77% may have a subsegmental defect (with 95% confidence). Therefore, our study indicated that Q scan defects, particularly lobar or segmental, are rarely present among normal nonsmokers in this age group.

  10. Spirometry. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Río, Francisco; Calle, Myriam; Burgos, Felip; Casan, Pere; Del Campo, Félix; Galdiz, Juan B; Giner, Jordi; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Ortega, Francisco; Puente Maestu, Luis

    2013-09-01

    Spirometry is the main pulmonary function test and is essential for the evaluation and monitoring of respiratory diseases. Its utility transcends the field of Respiratory Medicine, is becoming increasingly important in primary care and applications have even been described outside the field of respiratory diseases. This document is therefore intended to serve as support for all health professionals who use spirometry, providing recommendations based on the best scientific evidence available. An update of the indications and contraindications of the test is proposed. The document sets out recommendations on the requirements necessary for conventional spirometers and portable office equipment, as well as on spirometer hygiene and quality control measures. Spirometric parameters that must be considered, performance of manoeuvres, criteria for acceptability and repeatability of measurements and their quality control are defined. A proposal is also established for presentation of the results and an evaluation and interpretation is proposed according to information generated in recent years. Finally, lines of adaptation and integration of spirometry in the field of new technologies are considered. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Roisin R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Rodriguez-Roisin,1 Kay Tetzlaff,2,3 Henrik Watz,4 Emiel FM Wouters,5 Bernd Disse,2 Helen Finnigan,6 Helgo Magnussen,4 Peter MA Calverley7 1Respiratory Institute, Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Clínic IDIBAPS-CIBERES, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 3Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 4Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Biostatistics and Data Sciences, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK; 7Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool, UK Abstract: The WISDOM study (NCT00975195 reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume

  12. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sullivan, James [Pulmonary Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  13. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Thomas A; Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by the use of office spirometry. Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most recent published evaluations of office spirometry and the analysis of preliminary data from a recent spirometry mass screening project. A mass screening study by the American Association for Respiratory Care and the COPD Foundation was used to identify the most effective way for general practitioners to implement office spirometry in order to stage COPD. Results: A simple three-step method is described to identify people with a high pre-test probability in an attempt to detect moderate to severe COPD: COPD questionnaire, measurement of peak expiratory flow, and office spirometry. Clinical practice guidelines exist for office spirometry basics for safety, use of electronic peak flow devices, and portable spirometers. Conclusion: Spirometry can be undertaken in primary care offices with acceptable levels of technical expertise. Using office spirometry, primary care physicians can diagnose the presence and severity of COPD. Spirometry can guide therapies for COPD and predict outcomes when used in general practice. PMID:21472091

  14. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pTest can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of the lung in cystic fibrosis: comparison with high resolution CT and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Colm J.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Skehan, Stephen J.; Masterson, James B. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Wild, Jim M.; Fichele, Stan [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, The Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare hyperpolarized {sup 3}helium magnetic resonance imaging ({sup 3}He MRI) of the lungs in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and spirometry. Eight patients with stable CF prospectively underwent {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry within 1 week. Three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo sequence was used during an 18-s breath-hold following inhalation of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He. Each lung was divided into six zones; {sup 3}He MRI was scored as percentage ventilation per lung zone. HRCT was scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Univariate (Spearman rank) and multivariate correlations were performed between {sup 3}He MRI, HRCT, and spirometry. Results are expressed as mean{+-}SD (range). Spirometry is expressed as percent predicted. There were four men and four women, mean age=31.9{+-}9 (20-46). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV){sub 1}=52%{+-}29 (27-93). Mean {sup 3}He MRI score=74%{+-}25 (55-100). Mean HRCT score=48.8{+-}24 (13.5-83). The correlation between {sup 3}He MRI and HRCT was strong (R={+-}0.89, p<0.001). Bronchiectasis was the only independent predictor of {sup 3}He MRI; {sup 3}He MRI correlated better with FEV{sub 1} and forced vital capacity (FVC) (R=0.86 and 0.93, p<0.01, respectively) than HRCT (R={+-}0.72 and {+-}0.81, p<0.05, respectively). This study showed that {sup 3}He MRI correlates strongly with structural HRCT abnormalities and is a stronger correlate of spirometry than HRCT in CF. (orig.)

  16. Progression of lung disease in primary ciliary dyskinesia: is spirometry less accurate than CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Montella, Silvia; Mollica, Carmine; Manna, Angelo; Esposito, Antonietta; Santamaria, Francesca

    2012-05-01

    Despite its extensive use, there is no evidence that spirometry is useful in the assessment of progression of lung disease in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We hypothesize that high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is a better indicator of PCD lung disease progression than spirometry. We retrospectively evaluated two paired spirometry and HRCT examinations from 20 PCD patients (age, 11.6 years; range, 6.5-27.5 years). The evaluations were performed in stable state and during unstable lung disease. HRCT scans were scored blind by two raters. Compared to the first assessment, at the second evaluation spirometry did not change while HRCT scores significantly worsened (P spirometry. In PCD, structural lung disease may worsen despite spirometry being stable. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Risk for COPD with Obstruction of Active Smokers with Normal Spirometry and Reduced Diffusion Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Robert J.; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Smokers are assessed for COPD using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusion capacity (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these “normal spirometry/low DLCO” smokers is unknown. Methods From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, CBC, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest X-ray, FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity (TLC). Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers. Findings In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45 ± 20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41 ± 31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD. Interpretation Despite appearing “normal” by GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk for developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. PMID:26541521

  18. Spirometry in an unselected group of 6-year-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Eller, Esben; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    This study presents reference equations for spirometric parameters in 6-year-old children and evaluates the ability of spirometry to discriminate healthy children from children with asthma. Baseline spirometry and respiratory symptoms were assessed in 404 children participating in a longitudinal...... in Delta FEV1(mean) between healthy children and children with asthma (3.1% vs. 6.1%, P Spirometry including bronchodilator measurements was demonstrated...... to be feasible in 6-year-old children and reference values were determined. Spirometry aids the diagnosis of asthma in young children, but knowledge on sensitivity and specificity of these measurements is a prerequisite....

  19. Lack of spirometry use in Danish patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette Marie; dePont Christensen, René; Søndergaard, Jens; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2012-12-01

    Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing. To investigate the use of spirometry when initiating pulmonary medication targeting obstructive lung disease and to explore possible patient characteristics associated with undergoing spirometry. Population-based cohort study. Three Danish National registers were linked enabling a retrieval of data on all primary and secondary healthcare services provided in the time period 2007-2010. In 2008 a total of 40,969 patients were registered as first time users of pulmonary medication targeting obstructive lung disease. The mean age of the study cohort was 55.6 yrs (SD 18.7). Spirometry test had been performed in 20,262 (49.5%) of the study cohort in the period from 6 months before to 12 months after their first prescription. Just above one third of the cohort, 14,275 (34.8%), had undergone spirometry in the two-month period close to redemption of their first prescription. Women and patients in the oldest age categories were less likely to have spirometry performed. Many patients initiate medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease without having airway obstruction confirmed through spirometry. Only one third of the study cohort had a spirometry performed when initiating medication and half had still not undergone spirometry after a year. There should be an increased focus on confirming airway obstruction when initiating medication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spirometry in primary care: An analysis of spirometry test quality in a regional primary care asthma program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licskai, Christopher J; Sands, Todd W; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan; Ferrone, Madonna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training. METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patient encounters. Quality was analyzed using American Thoracic Society (ATS) 1994 and ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2003 (ATS/ERS) standards. These results were compared with two regional reference sites: a primary care group practice (Family Medical Centre [FMC], Windsor, Ontario) and a teaching hospital pulmonary function laboratory (London Health Sciences Centre [LHSC], London, Ontario). RESULTS: A total of 12,815 flow-volume loops (FVL) were evaluated: RAP – 1606 FVL in 472 patient sessions; reference sites – FMC 4013 FVL in 573 sessions; and LHSC – 7196 in 1151 sessions. RAP: There were three acceptable FVL in 392 of 472 (83%) sessions, two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 428 of 469 (91%) sessions, and 395 of 469 (84%) according to ATS/ERS criteria. All quality criteria – minimum of three acceptable and two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 361 of 472 (77%) sessions and according to ATS/ERS criteria in 337 of 472 (71%) sessions. RAP met ATS criteria more often than the FMC (388 of 573 [68%]); however, less often than LHSC (1050 of 1151 [91%]; Pspirometry in the majority of sessions in a primary care setting. The quality performance approached pulmonary function laboratory standards. PMID:22891184

  1. Virtual respiratory system for interactive e-learning of spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tomalak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in computer simulation technology offers new possibilities for modern medicine. On one hand – virtual organs can help to create animal or human models for research, on the other hand – e-learning or distant learning through Internet is now possible. The aim of our work was to create a system for interactive learning of spirometry (SILS, enabling students or physicians to observe spirometric measurements (flow-volume modified by setting level and kind of abnormalities within the respiratory system. SILS is based on a virtual respiratory system presented previously in several papers. Its main features are: separation of the lungs and chest; anatomical division of the lungs; division of airway resistance into transmural pressure dependent (Rp and lung volume dependent (Rv parts. The one mathematical formula that represents Rp describes both flow limitation (forced expiration and dependence of Raw on lungs volume (small airflows. The output of system are spirometric parameters (as FEV1, FVC, FEV1%FVC and a flow–volume loop constructed according to results of simulation of forced expiration for the chosen abnormality kind and level. As a result – this system may be used in teaching process in medical schools and postgraduate education. We offer access to a basic version of SILS for students and physicians at: www.spirometry.ibib.waw.pl and www.zpigichp.edu.pl. As we expect feedback from users, it is possible to modify user interface or model features to comply with users' requests.

  2. Changes in Spirometry After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedali, Burhan; Bhat, Geetha; Yost, Gardner; Tatooles, Antone

    2015-12-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly being used as life-saving therapy in patients with end-stage heart failure. The changes in spirometry following LVAD implantation and subsequent unloading of the left ventricle and pulmonary circulation are unknown. In this study, we explored long-term changes in spirometry after LVAD placement. In this retrospective study, we compared baseline preoperative pulmonary function test (PFT) results to post-LVAD spirometric measurements. Our results indicated that pulmonary function tests were significantly reduced after LVAD placement (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1 ]: 1.9 vs.1.7, P = 0.016; forced vital capacity [FVC]: 2.61 vs. 2.38, P = 0.03; diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide [DLCO]: 14.75 vs. 11.01, P = 0.01). Subgroup analysis revealed greater impairment in lung function in patients receiving HeartMate II (Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA, USA) LVADs compared with those receiving HeartWare (HeartWare, Framingham, MA, USA) devices. These unexpected findings may result from restriction of left anterior hemi-diaphragm; however, further prospective studies to validate our findings are warranted. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Confirmatory spirometry for adults hospitalized with a diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Objective measurement of airflow obstruction by spirometry is an essential part of the diagnosis of asthma or COPD. During exacerbations, the feasibility and utility of spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unclear. Addressing these gaps in knowledge may help define the need for confirmatory testing in clinical care and quality improvement efforts. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of spirometry and to determine its utility to confirm the diagnosis in patients hospitalized with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Methods Multi-center study of four academic healthcare institutions. Spirometry was performed in 113 adults admitted to general medicine wards with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Two board-certified pulmonologists evaluated the spirometry tracings to determine the proportion of patients able to produce adequate quality spirometry data. Findings were interpreted to evaluate the utility of spirometry to confirm the presence of obstructive lung disease, according to the 2005 European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations. Results There was an almost perfect agreement for acceptability (κ = 0.92) and reproducibility (κ =0.93) of spirometry tracings. Three-quarters (73%) of the tests were interpreted by both pulmonologists as being of adequate quality. Of these adequate quality tests, 22% did not present objective evidence of obstructive lung disease. Obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) were more likely to produce spirometry tracings with no evidence of obstructive lung disease, compared to non-obese patients (33% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Conclusions Adequate quality spirometry can be obtained in most hospitalized adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Confirmatory spirometry could be a useful tool to help reduce overdiagnosis of obstructive lung disease, especially among obese

  4. Confirmatory spirometry for adults hospitalized with a diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Centurion, Valentin; Huang, Frank; Naureckas, Edward T; Camargo, Carlos A; Charbeneau, Jeffrey; Joo, Min J; Press, Valerie G; Krishnan, Jerry A

    2012-12-07

    Objective measurement of airflow obstruction by spirometry is an essential part of the diagnosis of asthma or COPD. During exacerbations, the feasibility and utility of spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unclear. Addressing these gaps in knowledge may help define the need for confirmatory testing in clinical care and quality improvement efforts. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of spirometry and to determine its utility to confirm the diagnosis in patients hospitalized with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Multi-center study of four academic healthcare institutions. Spirometry was performed in 113 adults admitted to general medicine wards with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Two board-certified pulmonologists evaluated the spirometry tracings to determine the proportion of patients able to produce adequate quality spirometry data. Findings were interpreted to evaluate the utility of spirometry to confirm the presence of obstructive lung disease, according to the 2005 European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations. There was an almost perfect agreement for acceptability (κ = 0.92) and reproducibility (κ =0.93) of spirometry tracings. Three-quarters (73%) of the tests were interpreted by both pulmonologists as being of adequate quality. Of these adequate quality tests, 22% did not present objective evidence of obstructive lung disease. Obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) were more likely to produce spirometry tracings with no evidence of obstructive lung disease, compared to non-obese patients (33% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Adequate quality spirometry can be obtained in most hospitalized adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Confirmatory spirometry could be a useful tool to help reduce overdiagnosis of obstructive lung disease, especially among obese patients.

  5. Confirmatory spirometry for adults hospitalized with a diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Centurion Valentin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective measurement of airflow obstruction by spirometry is an essential part of the diagnosis of asthma or COPD. During exacerbations, the feasibility and utility of spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are unclear. Addressing these gaps in knowledge may help define the need for confirmatory testing in clinical care and quality improvement efforts. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of spirometry and to determine its utility to confirm the diagnosis in patients hospitalized with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Methods Multi-center study of four academic healthcare institutions. Spirometry was performed in 113 adults admitted to general medicine wards with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Two board-certified pulmonologists evaluated the spirometry tracings to determine the proportion of patients able to produce adequate quality spirometry data. Findings were interpreted to evaluate the utility of spirometry to confirm the presence of obstructive lung disease, according to the 2005 European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations. Results There was an almost perfect agreement for acceptability (κ = 0.92 and reproducibility (κ =0.93 of spirometry tracings. Three-quarters (73% of the tests were interpreted by both pulmonologists as being of adequate quality. Of these adequate quality tests, 22% did not present objective evidence of obstructive lung disease. Obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were more likely to produce spirometry tracings with no evidence of obstructive lung disease, compared to non-obese patients (33% vs. 8%, p = 0.007. Conclusions Adequate quality spirometry can be obtained in most hospitalized adults with a physician diagnosis of asthma or COPD exacerbation. Confirmatory spirometry could be a useful tool to help reduce overdiagnosis of obstructive lung disease

  6. CT-derived Biomechanical Metrics Improve Agreement Between Spirometry and Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C; Han, Meilan K; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have marked discordance between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and degree of emphysema on computed tomography (CT). Biomechanical differences between these patients have not been studied. We aimed to identify reasons for the discordance between CT and spirometry in some patients with COPD. Subjects with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I-IV from a large multicenter study (The Genetic Epidemiology of COPD) were arranged by percentiles of %predicted FEV1 and emphysema on CT. Three categories were created using differences in percentiles: Catspir with predominant airflow obstruction/minimal emphysema, CatCT with predominant emphysema/minimal airflow obstruction, and Catmatched with matched FEV1 and emphysema. Image registration was used to derive Jacobian determinants, a measure of lung elasticity, anisotropy, and strain tensors, to assess biomechanical differences between groups. Regression models were created with the previously mentioned categories as outcome variable, adjusting for demographics, scanner type, quantitative CT-derived emphysema, gas trapping, and airway thickness (model 1), and after adding biomechanical CT metrics (model 2). Jacobian determinants, anisotropy, and strain tensors were strongly associated with FEV1. With Catmatched as control, model 2 predicted Catspir and CatCT better than model 1 (Akaike information criterion 255.8 vs. 320.8). In addition to demographics, the strongest independent predictors of FEV1 were Jacobian mean (β = 1.60,95%confidence intervals [CI] = 1.16 to 1.98; P spirometry, offering the potential for new insights into the linkage between regional parenchymal destruction and global decrement in lung function in patients with COPD. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mismatch between asthma symptoms and spirometry: implications for managing asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Elizabeth D; Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in assessing asthma severity and beginning therapy by the general pediatrician. Between 2008 and 2012, spirometry testing was satisfactorily performed in 894 children (ages 5-19 years) whose asthma severity had been determined by their pediatrician using asthma guideline-based clinical criteria. Spirometry-determined asthma severity using national asthma guidelines and clinician-determined asthma severity were compared for concordance using weighted Kappa coefficients. Thirty percent of participants had clinically determined intermittent asthma; 32%, 33%, and 5% had mild, moderate, and severe, persistent asthma, respectively. Increasing disease severity was associated with decreases in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P spirometry-determined severity. Concordance was 0.16 (95% CI 0.10, 0.23), and when adjusted for bias and prevalence, was 0.20 (95% CI 0.17, 0.23). When accounting for age, sex, exposure to smoke, and insurance type, only spirometry-determined asthma severity was a significant predictor of agreement (P spirometry-determined severity increased. Concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in determining asthma severity is low even when guideline-based clinical assessment tools are used. Because appropriate therapy reduces asthma morbidity and is guided by disease severity, results from spirometry testing could better guide pediatricians in determining appropriate therapy for their patients with asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Harry; Kenealy, Timothy; Adair, Jacqui; Robinson, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is clinically useful for long-term management. Methods Patients admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of AECOPD had spirometry post-bronchodilator at discharge and approximately 4 weeks later. Results Spirometry was achieved in less than half of those considered to have AECOPD. Of 49 patients who had spirometry on both occasions, 41 met the GOLD criteria for COPD at discharge and 39 of these met the criteria at 1 month. For the 41, spirometry was not statistically different between discharge and 1 month but often crossed arbitrary boundaries for classification of severity based on FEV1. The eight who did not meet GOLD criteria at discharge were either misclassified due to comorbidities that reduce FVC, or they did not have COPD as a cause of their hospital admission. Conclusion Spirometry done in hospital at the time of AECOP is useful in patients with a high pre-test probability of moderate-to-severe COPD. Small changes in spirometry at 1 month could place them up or down one grade of severity. Spirometry at discharge may be useful to detect those who warrant further investigation. PMID:22069364

  9. Disease Severity Prediction by Spirometry in Adults with Visceral Leishmaniasis from Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Isabel A; Bezerra, Frank S; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira de; Andrade, Heitor F; Nicodemo, Antonio C; Amato, Valdir S

    2017-02-08

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is associated with interstitial pneumonitis according to histology and radiology reports. However, studies to address the functional impact on respiratory function in patients are lacking. We assessed pulmonary function using noninvasive spirometry in a cross-sectional study of hospitalized adult VL patients from Minas Gerais, Brazil, without unrelated lung conditions or acute infections. Lung conditions were graded as normal, restrictive, obstructive, or mixed patterns, according to Brazilian consensus standards for spirometry. To control for regional patterns of lung function, we compared spirometry of patients with regional paired controls. Spirometry detected abnormal lung function in most VL patients (70%, 14/20), usually showing a restrictive pattern, in contrast to regional controls and the standards for normal tests. Alterations in spirometry measurements correlated with hypoalbuminemia, the only laboratory value indicative of severity of parasitic disease. Abnormalities did not correlate with unrelated factors such as smoking or occupation. Clinical data including pulmonary symptoms and duration of therapy were also unrelated to abnormal spirometry findings. We conclude that the severity of VL is correlated with a restrictive pattern of lung function according to spirometry, suggesting that there may be interstitial lung involvement in VL. Further studies should address whether spirometry could serve as an index of disease severity in the management of VL. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Lack of spirometry use in Danish patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette; Christensen, René Depont; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing.......Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing....

  11. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lum, S. (Sooky); Bountziouka, V. (Vassiliki); P.H. Quanjer (Philip); Sonnappa, S. (Samatha); Wade, A. (Angela); Beardsmore, C. (Caroline); Chhabra, S.K. (Sunil K.); Chudasama, R.K. (Rajesh K.); Cook, D.G. (Derek G.); S. Harding (Seeromanie); C. Kuehni (Claudia); K.V.V. Prasad; P.H. Whincup (Peter); Lee, S. (Simon); J. Stocks (Janet)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMETHODS: Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110).RESULTS: Following exclusions, cross-sectional

  12. An audit of spirometry at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spirometry is a noninvasive and cost-effective physiologic test that greatly complements other investigative procedures in evaluation of respiratory conditions. This study was aimed at auditing the spirometry performed at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH) Ilorin, Nigeria, and highlighting some of ...

  13. Implications of the Transition From Zapletal to GLI Reference Values for Spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, Lena; Zwitserloot, Annelies; Merkus, Peter; Gappa, Monika

    The current standard for monitoring lung function in children with asthma is spirometry. In Europe, results of these lung function tests have been related to Zapletal reference values published in 1977. Recently, the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) published predicted values of spirometry for

  14. Impact of spirometry on GPs' diagnostic differentiation and decision-making.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavannes, N.H.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Jacobs, J.E.; Graaf, G. van de; Bollen, R.; Schayck, C.P. van; Bottema, B.J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is increasingly implemented in general practice, while the ability of general practitioners (GPs) to interpret flow volume curves (F-V curves) has been questioned. Furthermore, the role of spirometry in the GPs decision-making process has barely been studied. AIM: To compare

  15. Use of Spirometry in the Diagnosis of COPD: A Qualitative Study in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Min J.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Au, David H; Lee, Todd A.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines that recommend spirometry to confirm airflow obstruction among patients with suspected COPD are not routinely followed. We conducted a qualitative study to identify attitudes and barriers of primary care physicians to performing spirometry for patients with possible COPD. We conducted four focus groups, each with three primary care physicians (PCPs) who practice in an urban, academic medical center. In general, PCPs believed that spirometry was not necessary to confirm the diagnosis of COPD. Compared to other co-morbid conditions, in a patient with a diagnosis of COPD without self-reported symptoms, COPD was not a priority during a clinic visit. This was in part due to the belief that there was lack of evidence that medication used in COPD lead to improved outcomes and that there was no point of care measure for COPD compared to other co-morbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Health system barriers specific to spirometry use was not identified. In conclusion, in our sample of PCPs, there was skepticism that spirometry is warranted to diagnose and manage COPD. Availability of spirometry was not a perceived barrier. Our results explain, in part, why previous interventions to improve access to spirometry and diagnosis of COPD in primary care settings have been difficult to conduct and/or have had marginal success. Our findings strongly suggest that a first step toward increasing the use of spirometry among primary care physicians is to have them believe in its utility in the diagnosis of COPD. PMID:23537230

  16. The role of computer games in measuring spirometry in healthy and "asthmatic" preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilozni, Daphna; Barak, Asher; Efrati, Ori; Augarten, Arie; Springer, Chaim; Yahav, Yacov; Bentur, Lea

    2005-09-01

    To explore the role of respiratory interactive computer games in teaching spirometry to preschool children, and to examine whether the spirometry data achieved are compatible with acceptable criteria for adults and with published data for healthy preschool children, and whether spirometry at this age can assess airway obstruction. Feasibility study. Community kindergartens around Israel and a tertiary pediatric pulmonary clinic. Healthy and asthmatic preschool children (age range, 2.0 to 6.5 years). Multi-target interactive spirometry games including three targets: full inspiration before expiration, instant forced expiration, and long expiration to residual volume. One hundred nine healthy and 157 asthmatic children succeeded in performing adequate spirometry using a multi-target interactive spirometry game. American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society spirometry criteria for adults for the start of the test, and repeatability were met. Expiration time increased with age (1.3 +/- 0.3 s at 3 years to 1.9 +/- 0.3 s at 6 years [+/- SD], p 1.5 SD for forced expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity [FEF50] and forced expiratory flow at 75% of vital capacity [FEF75], p games can facilitate spirometry in very young children, yielding results that conform to most of the ATS criteria established for adults and published data for healthy preschool children. Spirometric indexes correlated with degree of asthma severity.

  17. Semi-Quantitative Assessment of the Health Risk of Occupational Exposure to Chemicals and Evaluation of Spirometry Indices on the Staff of Petrochemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Dazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Petrochemical industry is an important industry in the economic development of the country that causes employees have exposure with several kinds of contamination. The aim of this study was Semi-quantitative assessment of the health risk of occupational exposure to chemical materials and investigation of spirometry indices between employees of petrochemical industry. Material & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the petrochemical industry complex in a special area of Assaluyeh in Iran in 2016. Health risk assessment of exposure to harmful chemical agents was performed in all of units and during three stages (identification of harmful material, determination of hazard rate of the chemical material, exposure rate and estimate of risk rate. Spirometry indices were measured using spirometry. Results: The results of chemical materials risk assessment showed that Raffinate in Butadiene unit has identified the highest amount of risk rank among 27 chemical materials in investigated units. In comparison with spirometry indices in Olefine unit between age with FVC parameter and history work with FVC and FEV1 parameters has observed a significant and negative correlation (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of risk assessment in all of the petrochemical units showed that 48.14% of materials were at low risk level, 29.62% medium risk, 18.51% high risk and 3.7% had very high risk level. The variables affecting on spirometry employees such as age and work experience play an important role in reducing the pulmonary function tests in exposed subjects.

  18. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Martín, Eduardo; Soriano, Joan B; Rubio, Myriam Calle; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance. Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs) gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs). The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], Pspirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003). RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P=0.019) and received more training course for interpreting spirometry (41.0% vs 33.2%, P=0.004). The performance of the bronchodilator test showed a homogeneous measure in different ways. The spirometer type and the reference values were unknown to the majority of respondents. This study shows the differences between primary care RCs and UCs in Spain in terms of performing spirometry. The findings in the present study can be used to improve the performance of spirometry in these areas.

  19. Assessment of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic within a primary care physicians office

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley MJ; Pacitti R; Warning W

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess value-added service of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic to quantify respiratory disease abnormalities within a primary care physicians officeMethods: This retrospective, cohort study was an analysis of physician referred patients who attended our spirometry clinic during 2008-2010 due to pulmonary symptoms or disease. After spirometry testing, data was collected retrospectively to include patient demographics, spirometry results, and pulmonary pharmaceu...

  20. A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case that underwent bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS) biopsy combined with pneumonectomy is presented. The patient developed hypoxia during the contralateral VATS biopsy. His hypoxia was treated with positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the dependent lung and apneic oxygen insufflation to ...

  1. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette Marie

    2015-02-01

    This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals.   Non-infectious dyspnoea, chronic cough and wheezing are common symptoms in the population. Patients often present with these symptoms in general practice and have a high probability of having obstructive lung diseases. However, there is an indication that the majority of these patients are treated empirically with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing can also rule out airway obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms caused by other illnesses, such as heart failure or lung cancer. Initiating medication for obstructive lung disease without spirometry entails the risk of these patients experiencing unnecessary delay in the diagnostic process and being exposed to unnecessary economic costs and medication risks. The literature has indicated that many users of medication targeting obstructive lung medication have not had spirometry performed and do not actually have obstructive lung disease. This potential quality gap needs to be assessed. Also, in order to target interventions enhancing earlier spirometry utilisation among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease, improved knowledge on patient and practice factors associated with spirometry testing is needed.   Among first time users of obstructive lung medication we aimed: - To assess to what extent spirometry was performed within the first year of medication use (Study I) - To assess if patient characteristics like socioeconomic and demographic

  2. Use of spirometry among chest physicians and primary care physicians in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjare, Nitin; Chhowala, Sushmeeta; Madas, Sapna; Kodgule, Rahul; Gogtay, Jaideep; Salvi, Sundeep

    2016-07-07

    Although spirometry is the gold-standard diagnostic test for obstructive airways diseases, it remains poorly utilised in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate the use of spirometry across India, the change in its usage over a period of time and to understand the reasons for its under-utilisation. Two nationwide surveys were conducted in the years 2005 and 2013, among four groups of doctors: chest physicians (CPs), general physicians (GenPs), general practitioners (GPs) and paediatricians (Ps). A total of 1,000 physicians from each of the four groups were randomly selected from our database in the years 2005 and 2013. These surveys were conducted in 52 cities and towns across 15 states in India. A questionnaire was administered to the physicians, which captured information about their demographic details, type of practice and use of spirometry. The overall response rates of the physicians in 2005 and 2013 were 42.8% and 54.9%, respectively. Spirometry was reported to be used by 55% CPs, 20% GenPs, 10% GPs and 5% Ps in 2005, and this increased by 30.9% among CPs (P value spirometry varied between 2005 and 2013. In all, 32.2% of physicians were unaware of which predicted equation they were using. The use of spirometry in India is low, although it seems to have improved over the years. The reasons identified in this study for under-utilisation should be used to address initiatives to improve the use of spirometry in clinical practice.

  3. NUTRITION SUPPORT COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENT WHO UNDERWENT CARDIAC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Krdžalić, Alisa; Kovčić, Jasmina; Krdžalić, Goran; Jahić, Elmir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nutrition support complications after cardiac surgery should be detected and treated on time. Aim: To show the incidence and type of nutritional support complication in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods: The prospective study included 415 patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2013 in Clinic for Cardiovascular Disease of University Clinical Center Tuzla. Complications of the delivery system for nutrition support (NS) and nutrition itself were analy...

  4. Risk of COPD with obstruction in active smokers with normal spirometry and reduced diffusion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben-Gary; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Kaner, Robert J; Sanders, Abraham; Vincent, Thomas L; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Smokers are assessed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry, with COPD defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as airflow limitation that is not fully reversible with bronchodilators. There is a subset of smokers with normal spirometry (by GOLD criteria), who have a low diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), a parameter linked to emphysema and small airway disease. The natural history of these "normal spirometry/low DLCO" smokers is unknown.From a cohort of 1570 smokers in the New York City metropolitian area, all of whom had normal spirometry, two groups were randomly selected for lung function follow-up: smokers with normal spirometry/normal DLCO (n=59) and smokers with normal spirometry/low DLCO (n=46). All had normal history, physical examination, complete blood count, urinalysis, HIV status, α1-antitrypsin level, chest radiography, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio and total lung capacity. Throughout the study, all continued to be active smokers.In the normal spirometry/normal DLCO group assessed over 45±20 months, 3% developed GOLD-defined COPD. In contrast, in the normal spirometry/low DLCO group, followed over 41±31 months, 22% developed GOLD-defined COPD.Despite appearing "normal" according to GOLD, smokers with normal spirometry but low DLCO are at significant risk of developing COPD with obstruction to airflow. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  5. Head-Out Spirometry Accurately Monitors the Course of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wölbeling, Florian; Munder, Antje; Stanke, Frauke; Tümmler, Burkhard; Baumann, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    .... Longitudinal parameters such as temperature appear to have a relatively low accuracy. Spirometry might be an accurate method to assess the course of a bacterial lung infection without the necessity to sacrifice the animals. Objectives...

  6. Correlation between Bhalla score and spirometry in children and adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Flavia Fajardo Linhares; Ibiapina, Cassio da Cunha; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Figueiredo, Reginaldo; Pedrosa, Jesiana Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to correlate the findings of high resolution computed tomography of the chest based on the Bhalla score with the clinical data and spirometry in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis...

  7. Spirometrie v prostředí LabVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Pernicová, Lenka

    2010-01-01

    Tato bakalářská práce se zabývá funkčním vyšetřením plic – spirometrií. Skládá se ze dvou základních částí. V první části je důležité seznámit se s jednotlivými metodami funkčního vyšetření plic. Na základě důkladného prostudování parametrů popisujících funkci plic a zaměření se na spirometrickou křivkou, bylo možné přejít k druhé části této práce, tzn. k realizaci spirometru v grafickém prostředí LabVIEW. Vytvořený virtuální přístroj nám umožňuje zobrazení spirometrické křivky, následnou ana...

  8. Evaluation of Current Knowledge, Awareness and Practice of Spirometry among Hospital -based Nigerian Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is a cost-effective diagnostic tool for evaluation of lung function and for case-finding in a resource-limited setting. The acceptance of this test depends on the awareness of its indications and the ability to interpret the results. No studies have assessed the knowledge of spirometry among Nigerian doctors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current knowledge, awareness and practice of spirometry among hospital-based Nigerian doctors. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey among 321 doctors working in Nigerian hospitals between March 2008 and June 2008. Information on knowledge, awareness, practice of and barriers to spirometry were obtained using a pre-tested, self-administered structured questionnaire and the data were then analysed. Results Of the 321 doctors that participated, 108 (33.6%) reported that they have good knowledge of spirometry. One hundred and ninety-five (60.7%) were aware of the importance of spirometry in aiding the diagnosis of respiratory diseases; 213(66.4%) were aware of the importance of spirometry in determining the severity of diseases. Medical school was the most common source of knowledge on spirometry (64.5%). Eighty-one (25.2%) doctors reported having a spirometer in their hospitals. Doctors having access to a spirometer used it more frequently for aiding the diagnosis of COPD (40.7% vs.27.5%) and for monitoring of asthma (18.5% vs.11.3%) than those without access to a spirometer. The doctors working in University Teaching Hospitals and Federal Medical Centres (FMC) (22.4% vs. 4.5%) and those having access to a spirometer (40.7 vs.11.3%) were very confident of interpreting spirometry results compared to those working in District and General Hospitals and without access to a spirometer. Irrespective of access to a spirometer or the type of hospital they were employed in, doctors reported that unavailability of a spirometer was the greatest barrier to its use (62.5%) followed by lack of awareness

  9. The reliability and utility of spirometry performed on people with asthma in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei Burton, Deborah; LeMay, Kate S; Saini, Bandana; Smith, Lorraine; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Southwell, Phillipa; Cooke, Julie; Emmerton, Lynne; Stewart, Kay; Krass, Ines; Reddel, Helen; Armour, Carol

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and the utility of spirometry generated by community pharmacists participating in two large asthma intervention trials of 892 people. The Pharmacy Asthma Care Program (PACP) and the Pharmacy Asthma Management Service (PAMS) involved up to four visits to the pharmacy over 6 months for counseling and goal setting. Pharmacists performed spirometry according to ATS/ERS guidelines to inform management. The proportion of A-E, F quality tests, as per EasyOne QC grades, were recorded. Lung function results between visits and for participants referred/not referred to their general practitioner on the basis of spirometry were compared. Complete data from 2593 spirometry sessions were recorded, 68.5% of spirometry sessions achieved three acceptable tests with between-test repeatability of 150 ml or less (A or B quality), 96% of spirometry sessions included at least one test that met ATS/ERS acceptability criteria. About 39.1% of participants had FEV1/FVC values below the lower limit of normal (LNN), indicating a respiratory obstruction. As a result of the service, there was a significant increase in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC and asthma control. Lung function values were significantly poorer for participants referred to their general practitioner, compared with those not referred, on the basis of spirometry. Community pharmacists are able to reliably achieve spirometry results meeting ATS/ERS guidelines in people with asthma. Significant improvements in airway obstruction were demonstrated with the pharmacy services. Pharmacists interpreted lung function results to identify airway obstruction for referral, making this a useful technique for review of people with asthma in the community.

  10. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: spirometry in the occupational setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Carrie A; Tarlo, Susan M; Hankinson, John L; Townsend, Mary C; Eschenbacher, William L; Von Essen, Susanna G; Sigsgaard, Torben; Weissman, David N

    2014-04-15

    This document addresses aspects of the performance and interpretation of spirometry that are particularly important in the workplace, where inhalation exposures can affect lung function and cause or exacerbate lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or fibrosis. Issues that previous American Thoracic Society spirometry statements did not adequately address with respect to the workplace were identified for systematic review. Medline 1950-2012 and Embase 1980-2012 were searched for evidence related to the following: training for spirometry technicians; testing posture; appropriate reference values to use for Asians in North America; and interpretative strategies for analyzing longitudinal change in lung function. The evidence was reviewed and technical recommendations were developed. Spirometry performed in the work setting should be part of a comprehensive workplace respiratory health program. Effective technician training and feedback can improve the quality of spirometry testing. Posture-related changes in FEV1 and FVC, although small, may impact interpretation, so testing posture should be kept consistent and documented on repeat testing. Until North American Asian-specific equations are developed, applying a correction factor of 0.88 to white reference values is considered reasonable when testing Asian American individuals in North America. Current spirometry should be compared with previous tests. Excessive loss in FEV1 over time should be evaluated using either a percentage decline (15% plus loss expected due to aging) or one of the other approaches discussed, taking into consideration testing variability, worker exposures, symptoms, and other clinical information. Important aspects of workplace spirometry are discussed and recommendations are provided for the performance and interpretation of workplace spirometry.

  11. Effect of Incentive Spirometry on Oxygenation in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    H Dehghani; MH Zahmatkesh; MH Abdullahi; A Dehghani

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Arterial hypoxemia is one of the main pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Therefore, several proceedings have been recommended to reduce the complications, and to improve arterial hypoxemia as well as arterial blood gas parameters such as incentive spirometry. This study intended to investigate the effect of incentive spirometry on patients´ oxygenation. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, a sample size of 70 patients undergoing corona...

  12. Angle β of greater than 80° at the start of spirometry may identify high-quality flow volume curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Ningfang; Li, Li; Ren, Weiying; Jiang, Zhilong; Zhu, Lei

    2017-04-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) emphasize a satisfactory start in maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves and highlight subjective parameters: performance without hesitation and expiration with maximum force. We described a new parameter, angle β for characterization of the start to the MEFV curve. Subjects completed the MEFV curve at least three times and at least two curves met ATS/ERS quality. Subjects were divided into normal, restrictive and obstructive groups according to pulmonary function test results. The tangent line was drawn at the start of the MEFV curve's ascending limb to the x-axis and the angle β between the tangent line and x-axis was obtained. The relationships between tangent of β, pulmonary function parameters (PFPs) and anthropometric data were assessed. The MEFV curves with insufficient explosion at the start were considered as poor-quality MEFV curves. In 998 subjects with high-quality spirometry, although PFP varied in relation to the three aspects: the angle β and its tangent were similar (P > 0.05), the tangent of β did not correlate with PFP or anthropometric measurements (P > 0.05) and the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the angle β was 80° in the group with high-quality spirometry (P < 0.05). Angle β derived from poor-quality MEFV curves was smaller than that from good quality one (P < 0.05). Angle β may function as a parameter to assess the expiratory efforts, which can be used to assess the quality of the MEFV curve start. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Telemedicine spirometry training and quality assurance program in primary care centers of a public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina Malanda, Nuria; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Garcia, Larraitz; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2014-04-01

    Forced spirometry is essential for diagnosing respiratory diseases and is widely used across levels of care. However, several studies have shown that spirometry quality in primary care is not ideal, with risks of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and performance of a telemedicine-based training and quality assurance program for forced spirometry in primary care. The two phases included (1) a 9-month pilot study involving 15 centers, in which spirometry tests were assessed by the Basque Office for Health Technology Assessment, and (2) the introduction of the program to all centers in the Public Basque Health Service. Technicians first received 4 h of training, and, subsequently, they sent all tests to the reference laboratory using the program. Quality assessment was performed in accordance with clinical guidelines (A and B, good; C-F, poor). In the first phase, 1,894 spirometry tests were assessed, showing an improvement in quality: acceptable quality tests increased from 57% at the beginning to 78% after 6 months and 83% after 9 months (pspirometry tests were assessed after the inclusion of 36 additional centers, maintaining the positive trend (61%, 87%, and 84% at the same time points; pspirometry tests improved in all centers. (2) The program provides a tool for transferring data that allows monitoring of its quality and training of technicians who perform the tests. (3) This approach is useful for improving spirometry quality in the routine practice of a public health system.

  14. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Patient who Underwent Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Dabak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS is a rare, benign, but a locally aggressive tumor. It is characterized by the proliferation of synovial membrane, but it can also be seen in tendon sheaths and bursae. Clinical presentation of solitary lesions include compression and locking of the joint suggesting loose bodies in the joint and a subsequent findings of an effusion, whereas diffuse lesions manifest with pain and chronic swelling. In this article, we presented a curious case of PVNS in a female patient who have been followed up due to an acetabular cystic lesion. She underwent total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis of the hip joint and associated pain. The diagnosis of PVNS was established intraoperatively. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 235-7

  15. Hepatic iron in African Americans who underwent liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Alford, Thomas J; Barton, J Clayborn; Edwards, Corwin Q

    2015-01-01

    Primary iron overload in African Americans has been reported predominantly from autopsy studies. We characterized hepatic iron phenotypes in 83 African Americans who underwent liver biopsy during the interval 1990 to 1995. We tabulated pathology report form data, iron grades in hepatocytes (0-4) and Kupffer cells (0-3) and abnormal liver histology. Increased iron was defined as hepatocyte or Kupffer iron grades ≥ 2, respectively. Heavy iron was defined as hepatocyte iron grade 3 or 4. Primary iron overload was defined as the presence of grade 3 or 4 hepatocellular iron in the absence of evidence of chronic alcohol effect, viral hepatitis, steatosis, unexplained inflammation, chronic erythrocyte transfusion or chronic ingestion of iron supplements. There were 37 men and 46 women (mean age: 53 ± 15 [SD] years). We observed heavy ethanol consumption, 12.0%; viral hepatitis, 26.5%; steatosis without heavy ethanol consumption, 43.4%; inflammation, 45.6%; fibrosis, 26.2% and bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis, 29.4%. Logistic regression on bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis revealed positive associations with heavy ethanol consumption (P = 0.0410) and viral hepatitis (P = 0.0044). The 22 patients (26.5%) with increased iron had greater mean age, proportion of men and heavy ethanol consumption. Five patients had heavy iron staining, among whom were 3 women (mean age: 54 years) with primary iron overload. Two of the 3 women had cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. Among 83 adult African Americans who underwent liver biopsy, 3.6% had hepatic iron phenotypes consistent with primary iron overload.

  16. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  17. Analysis of 42 patients who underwent tracheal resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül Sağıroğlu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to analyze the etiology, diagnostic and surgical methods, complications and mortality of the patients who underwent tracheal resection for tracheal stenosis.Materials and methods: Between January 2006 and January 2010, 42 patients who underwent tracheal resection and reconstruction was retrospectively analyzed in terms of age, sex, co-morbid disease, etiology of tracheal stenosis, symptoms, the location of stenosis, surgical approach, incision techniques, length of resected segment, types of different suture materials, length of anesthesia and surgery, the ratio of prolonged intubation, morbidities and mortality ratios were analyzed.Results: There were 26 men and 16 female with the mean age was 48 (9-79 years. The etiology was tracheal stenos in 30 patients, tracheal tumor in 10 patients, trauma and congenital tracheal stenos in one each. Symptoms were dispnea, cough, stridor and hemoptysis. Surgical technique was performed through cervical incision (n=36 and cervical incision plus partial sternotomy (n=4 in patients with high tracheal stenosis where the stenosis is lower then complete sternotomy was performed. The mean tracheal segmental resection was 4.1 cm (2-5.2 cm. The morbidities were respiratory insufficiency, secretion retention and atelectasis, pneumonia, sepsis and tracheal re-stenosis. The postoperative mortality was seen in 4 (%9.5 patients.Conclusion: The most important issue leading to complication during tracheal surgery is the ventilation and aspiration towards bronchus. The intense collaboration between surgeon, anesthesiologist and intensive care physician is a necessity in order to reduce complication rates and mortality.

  18. Physical and social characteristics and support needs of adult female childhood cancer survivors who underwent hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Akiko; Maru, Mitsue; Kashimada, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Hideya

    2017-08-01

    Female childhood cancer survivors who develop gonadal dysfunction require female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) from puberty until menopause. However, the support provided in such cases has not been studied. We investigated the physical and social characteristics and support needs of adult female childhood cancer survivors who underwent HRT. Forty-nine adult female childhood cancer survivors completed self-administered questionnaires. We compared the clinical characteristics, health status, and social conditions between a group that underwent HRT and a group that did not, and we surveyed support needs of the group that underwent HRT. The median age of the subjects was 25.0 years (range 20-41). Twenty subjects (40.8%) underwent HRT. A significantly high number of those who underwent HRT also underwent radiation therapy (p social characteristics between the groups. Those who experienced anxiety regarding fertility required information about HRT, a platform to share their concerns, and psychological support and cooperation among healthcare providers. Although the subjects of this survey exhibited good social adjustment regardless of whether or not they underwent HRT, they were anxious about fertility. It is important to understand the concerns and anxieties unique to female childhood cancer survivors and to enhance psychological support in addition to providing educational support so that HRT can be administered.

  19. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  20. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center (WTC)-related illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I.; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M.; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Methods Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern and WTC-related exposure category. Results Improvement in forced expiratory volume (FVC; 54.4 ml/year; 95% CI: 45.0-63.8) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; 36.8 ml/year; 95% CI: 29.3-44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. Conclusions These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment. PMID:22995806

  1. Feasibility of spirometry in primary care to screen for COPD: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Violaine; Beauchet, Alain; Gomis, Thierry; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a frequent but underdiagnosed disease whose diagnosis relies on the spirometric demonstration of bronchial obstruction. Spirometry use by general practitioners could represent the first line in COPD diagnosis. Because duration of spirometry is retarding its development in primary care, we decided to measure the time it requires in the primary-care context in France. Ten volunteer general practitioners were trained during two 3-hour theoretical and practical continuing education sessions. Then, from October 2013 to May 2014, they included patients without any known respiratory disease but at risk of developing COPD (age: ≥40 years, smoker: ≥20 pack-years). The duration of spirometry and its quality were evaluated according to the following acceptability criteria: 1) expiration ≥6 seconds or reaching a plateau; 2) good start with an early peak flow, curve peaked on top and not flat; 3) no artifacts; and 4) reproducibility criteria, ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity differences between the two best spirometry curves ≤0.15 L. Quality of the spirograms was defined as optimal when all the criteria were met and acceptable when all the criteria were satisfied except the reproducibility criterion, otherwise, it was unacceptable. For the 152 patients included, the 142 assessable spirometries lasted for 15.2±5.9 minutes. Acceptability criteria 1-3, respectively, were satisfied for 90.1%, 89.4%, and 91.5% of patients and reproducibility criterion 4 for 56.3%. Quality was considered optimal for 58.5% of the curves and acceptable for 30.2%. The duration of spirometry renders it poorly compatible with the current primary-care practice in France other than for dedicated consultations. Moreover, the quality of spirometry needs to be improved.

  2. Effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 Quality Improvement Program for Improving Asthma Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione-Smith, Rita; Zhou, Chuan; Corwin, Michael J; Taylor, James A; Rice, Fiona; Stout, James W

    To determine the effectiveness of the Spirometry 360 distance learning quality improvement (QI) program for enhancing the processes and outcomes of care for children with asthma. Cluster randomized controlled trial involving 25 matched pairs of pediatric primary care practices. Practices were recruited from 2 practice-based research networks: the Slone Center Office-based Research Network at Boston University, Boston, Mass, and the Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network, Seattle, Wash. Study participants included providers from one of the 50 enrolled pediatric practices and 626 of their patients with asthma. Process measures assessed included spirometry test quality and appropriate prescription of asthma controller medications. Outcome measures included asthma-specific health-related quality of life, and outpatient, emergency department, and inpatient utilization for asthma. At baseline, 25.4% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 50.4% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. During the 6-month postintervention period, 28.7% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 49.9% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. The adjusted difference-of-differences analysis revealed no intervention effect on spirometry test quality. Adjusted differences-of-differences analysis also revealed no intervention effect on appropriate use of controller medications or any of the parent- or patient-reported outcomes examined. In this study, the Spirometry 360 distance learning QI program was ineffective in improving spirometry test quality or parent- or patient-reported outcomes. QI programs like the one assessed here may need to focus on practices with lower baseline performance levels or may need to be tailored for those with higher baseline performance. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Baseline and post-bronchodilator interrupter resistance and spirometry in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydon, Nicole; Mahut, Bruno; Maingot, L; Guillo, H; La Rocca, M C; Medjahdi, N; Koskas, M; Boulé, M; Delclaux, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    In children unable to perform reliable spirometry, the interrupter resistance (R(int) ) technique for assessing respiratory resistance is easy to perform. However, few data are available on the possibility to use R(int) as a surrogate for spirometry. We aimed at comparing R(int) and spirometry at baseline and after bronchodilator administration in a large population of asthmatic children. We collected retrospectively R(int) and spirometry results measured in 695 children [median age 7.8 (range 4.8-13.9) years] referred to our lab for routine assessment of asthma disease. Correlations between R(int) and spirometry were studied using data expressed as z-scores. Receiver operator characteristic curves for the baseline R(int) value (z-score) and the bronchodilator effect (percentage predicted value and z-score) were generated to assess diagnostic performance. At baseline, the relationship between raw values of R(int) and FEV(1) was not linear. Despite a highly significant inverse correlation between R(int) and all of the spirometry indices (FEV(1) , FVC, FEV(1) /FVC, FEF(25-75%) ; P 12% baseline increase) with 70% sensitivity and 69% specificity (AUC = 0.79). R(int) measurements fitted a one-compartment model that explained the relationship between flows and airway resistance. We found that R(int) had poor sensitivity to detect baseline obstruction, but fairly good sensitivity and specificity to detect reversibility. However, in order to implement asthma guidelines for children unable to produce reliable spirometry, bronchodilator response measured by R(int) should be systematically studied and further assessed in conjunction with clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A clinical study of COPD severity assessment by primary care physicians and their patients compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, Douglas W; Dalal, Anand A; Johnson, Phaedra; Becker, Laura; Hunter, Alyssa Goolsby

    2015-06-01

    Primary care physicians often do not use spirometry to confirm the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This project was designed to see how well physicians' impressions about their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity correlate with the severity of airflow obstruction measured by spirometry and to assess whether spirometry results subsequently changed the physicians' opinions about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and treatment. We performed a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted in 83 primary care clinics from across the United States. A total of 899 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed a questionnaire and spirometry testing. Physicians completed a questionnaire and case report forms. Concordance among physician ratings, patient ratings, and spirometry results was evaluated. Physicians' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity ratings before spirometry were accurate for only 30% of patients with evaluable spirometry results, and disease severity in 41% of patients was underestimated. Physicians also underestimated severity compared with patients' self-assessment among 42% of those with evaluable results. After spirometry, physicians changed their opinions on the severity for 30% of patients and recommended treatment changes for 37%. Only 75% of patients performed at least 1 high-quality spirometry test; however, the physicians' opinions and treatment decisions were similar regardless of suboptimal test results. Without performing spirometry, physicians are likely to underestimate their patients' chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity or inadequately characterize their patients' lung disease. Spirometry changed the physicians' clinical impressions and treatments for approximately one third of these patients; thus, spirometry is a valuable tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care. Copyright © 2015

  5. [Utility of normality low limit of spirometry in diagnosed COPD patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveiro-Rilo, J C; García García, S; Flores-Zurutuza, L; Carazo Fernández, L; Domínguez Fernández, C; Palomo García, J L

    To evaluate the differences in COPD patients below the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the fixed ratio FEV1/FVC limit. Cross-sectional study. COPD patients between 40 and 85 years old included in primary care clinical record database were randomly selected. Baseline and postbronchodilator spirometries were performed. Two groups of patients were established: FEV1/FVCLIN (group 2). Sociodemographic, clinical, pulmonary obstruction, quality of life and attendance to health services variables were measured. The results of both groups were compared. 22.3% of the subjects were misdiagnosed FEV1/FVC LLN) are diagnosed at an older age, they have a lower exposure to tobacco and better pulmonary function (FEV1: 74.9% vs 54.6%). 35.5% of those patients belong to stage i of GOLD, vs 8.5%, this patients have an increased comorbidity. Patients in group 1 have more COPD exacerbations, worse quality of life, a higher BODEx index 2,3 (1.8) vs 1.1 (1.5); 55.1% of those patients were high risk patients (GoldC or Gold D). Diagnose before being 56 years old, an increased exposure to tobacco, the FEV>50%, and a lower comorbidity are associated with a greater chance of suffering COPD with LLN criteria. We obtain two groups of patients with differentiated clinical characteristics if we use LLN. Subjects with FEV1/FVCLLN have less obstruction, less severity and more comorbidity, suggesting the possibility of overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis. On the other hand, younger age at the time of diagnosis, higher tobacco consumption and more severe obstruction are related with FEV1/FVC >0.70 and

  6. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, Adaeze C; Uwaezuoke, Samuel N; Ndukwu, Chizalu I; Ndu, Ikenna K; Iloh, Kenechukwu K; Okoli, Chinyere V

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD. PMID:28781518

  7. Correlation between Bhalla score and spirometry in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Flavia Fajardo Linhares; Ibiapina, Cassio da Cunha; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Figueiredo, Reginaldo; Pedrosa, Jesiana Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    To correlate the findings of high resolution computed tomography of the chest based on the Bhalla score with the clinical data and spirometry in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis, and to study the concordance between two radiologists for the Bhalla score and its categories. We evaluated the medical records of 23 patients from the outpatient clinic. The items evaluated included age, weight, height, height/age Z-score, weight/age Z-score, body mass index (BMI), O2 saturation, spirometry and Bhalla score. The patients had a mean age of 17.4 years ± 5.7 years, with fifteen females and eight males. There was good correlation between Bhalla score and spirometry (FVC-r =0.718, p 70% already had changes in their final Bhalla score. In the analysis of the concordance between the examiners a Kappa coefficient of 0.81 (p spirometry confirmed its usefulness in evaluating and monitoring patients with cystic fibrosis, given it can be used both in patients who are unable to perform spirometry as well as for a pooled analysis of the two examinations since the HRCT scans show early changes in patients with normal function tests.

  8. Spirometry in Asthma Care: A Review of the Trends and Challenges in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaeze C Ayuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the rising incidence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs globally, especially bronchial asthma, there is the need to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality by adopting an objective means of diagnosis and monitoring. Aim: This article aims to review the trends and challenges in the use of spirometry for managing childhood bronchial asthma especially in developing countries. Methods: We conducted a literature search of published data on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis of childhood bronchial asthma with special emphasis resource-poor countries. Results: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma recommend the use of spirometry, but this is currently underused in both tertiary and primary care settings especially in developing countries. Lack of spirometers and proper training in their use and interpretation of findings as well as a dearth of asthma guidelines remains core to the underuse of spirometry in managing children with asthma. Targeting education of health care staff was, however, observed to improve its utility, and practical implementable strategies are highlighted. Conclusions: Spirometry is not frequently used for asthma diagnosis in pediatric practice especially in resource-poor countries where the NCD burden is higher. Strategies to overcome the obstacles are implementable and can make a difference in reducing the burden of NCD.

  9. The value of including spirometry in health checks - a randomized controlled study in primary health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background Lung diseases are among the most frequent and most serious ailments in Denmark. Preventive health checks including spirometry can be used to detect lung diseases earlier. Over time the attendance at preventive health checks has decreased and at present the response rate is approximately...... 50%. Little is known about initiatives that can influence the attendance rate. Objectives To examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation material will influence the attendance in preventive health checks. Materiel/Methods Design: A randomized controlled study on information...... on spirometry embedded in “Check your health Prevention Program, CHPP” from 2015-16. CHPP is a house-hold cluster randomized controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30-49 year olds in a Danish municipality during the years 2012 through to 2017 (n= 26,216), carried out in collaboration between...

  10. The impact of spirometry in the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Study (EHPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Ottesen, Anders Løkke; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise

    Background: It has been stressed that early detection of impaired lung function can be useful in prevention of lung diseases. It is unknown whether spirometry as an integrated part of preventive health checks including a questionnaire regarding risk factors and exposure, can be used for early...... detection of lung diseases.The aim of the study is to describe exposure characteristics and spirometry parameters 15 years ahead of a diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD*)*Defined by FEV1/FVC ... (n=573), aged 30-49 years at baseline, attended in 1991 and 2006 a health check and a follow-up consultation at their own general practitioner. The characteristics of the citizens are described according to sex, age, smoking history, exposure, lung symptoms and spirometry values. Register information...

  11. The Prevalence of COPD in Individuals with Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Spirometry-Based Screening Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooe, Thomas; Stenfors, Nikolai

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of COPD among individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is estimated at 5% to 18%, and COPD appears to be a predictor of poor outcome. Diagnosis of COPD has mostly been based on medical records without spirometry. As COPD is largely undiagnosed and misdiagnosed, the prevalence and clinical significance of COPD in the ACS population has not been reliably assessed. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of COPD in patients with ACS and evaluate the accuracy of medical record-based COPD diagnoses. This was a single-centre spirometry screening study for COPD in patients admitted for ACS in the county of Jämtland, Sweden. Patient medical records were reviewed to register previous medical history. Spirometry was performed prior to discharge or at the first follow-up outpatient visit after discharge. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC of coronary disease. ISRCTN number 05697808 (www. controlled-trials.com).

  12. The majority of participants with abnormal spirometry at walk-in consult their general practitioner as recommended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kølner-Augustson, Line; Thøgersen, Niels; Faaborg, Thea Heide; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2015-11-01

    A number of studies inviting citizens to perform spirometry without need for a previous appointment have been performed to determine the need for general screening of the population for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Yet, no studies have examined how many of the participants follow the advice given to consult their general practitioner (GP) afterwards. A walk-in spirometry was carried out on the island of Laesoe. All habitants above the age of 18 years were invited. In total, 142 were eligible for the study. Participants with an abnormal spirometry were recommended to consult their GP immediately, whereas smokers with symptoms, but with a normal spirometry, were recommended to consult their GP within a year for another spirometry. A follow-up was performed to investigate whether the participants had followed this advice. In total, 52% (74/142) of the participants were advised to contact their GP: 34 due to an abnormal spirometry and 40 due to smoking and respiratory symptoms. Among the participants with an abnormal spirometry, 79% saw their GP within three months, whereas 30% of the current smokers saw their GP within 9-15 months. Lung disease was diagnosed in 56% (19/34) of the participants who initially had an abnormal spirometry. Among the participants who had an abnormal spirometry at screening, 79% consulted their GP as recommended. Furthermore, 52% of the participants who had an abnormal spirometry were subsequently diagnosed with pulmonary disease by their GP. We conclude that walk-in spirometry is a useful tool for early diagnosis of COPD. none. not relevant.

  13. Evaluation of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 Reference Values for Spirometry in African Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigliani, Michele; Canciani, Mario C; Mottini, Giovanni; Altomare, Michele; Magnolato, Andrea; Loa Clemente, Sofia Vanda; Tshilolo, Leon; Cogo, Paola; Quanjer, Philip H

    2017-01-15

    Despite the high burden of respiratory disease, no spirometry reference values for African children are available. Investigate whether the Global Lung Initiative (GLI-2012) reference values for spirometry are appropriate for children in sub-Saharan Africa and assess the impact of malnutrition on lung function. Anthropometry and spirometry were obtained in children aged 6 to 12 years from urban and semiurban schools in three African countries. Spirometry z-scores were derived using the GLI-2012 prediction equations for African Americans. Thinness (body mass index z-score Spirometry outcomes were compared with those of African American children from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Spirometry data were analyzed from 1,082 schoolchildren (51% boys) aged 6.0 to 12.8 years in Angola (n = 306), Democratic Republic of the Congo (n = 377), and Madagascar (n = 399). GLI-2012 provided a good fit with mean (SD) z-scores of -0.11 (0.83) for FEV 1 , -0.08 (0.86) for FVC, and -0.07 (0.83) for FEV 1 /FVC. Because of low scatter, the fifth centile corresponded to -1.3 z-scores in boys and -1.5 z-scores in girls. Malnourished African children had a normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio but significant reductions of ∼0.5 z-scores (∼5%) in FEV 1 and FVC compared with African American peers from the third National Health and Nutrition Survey. Children in Angola had the lowest, and those in Madagascar had the highest, zFEV 1 and zFVC. The results of this study support the use of GLI-2012 reference values for schoolchildren in sub-Saharan Africa. Malnutrition affects body growth, leading to a proportionately smaller FEV 1 and FVC without respiratory impairment, as shown by the normal FEV 1 /FVC ratio.

  14. Methacholine bronchial provocation measured by spirometry versus wheeze detection in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahav Yaacov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of PC20-FEV1 during Methacholine bronchial provocation test (MCT is considered to be impossible in preschool children, as it requires repetitive spirometry sets. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of determining PC20-FEV1 in preschool age children and compares the results to the wheeze detection (PCW method. Methods 55 preschool children (ages 2.8–6.4 years with recurrent respiratory symptoms were recruited. Baseline spirometry and MCT were performed according to ATS/ERS guidelines and the following parameters were determined at baseline and after each inhalation: spirometry-indices, lung auscultation at tidal breathing, oxygen saturation, respiratory and heart rate. Comparison between PCW and PC20-FEV1 and clinical parameters at these end-points was done by paired Student's t-tests. Results and discussion Thirty-six of 55 children (65.4% successfully performed spirometry-sets up to the point of PCW. PC20-FEV1 occurred at a mean concentration of 1.70+/-2.01 while PCW occurred at a mean concentration of 4.37+/-3.40 mg/ml (p 1 by 44.7+/-14.5%; PEFR by 40.5+/-14.5 and FEF25–75 by 54.7+/-14.4% (P Conclusion Determination of PC20-FEV1 by spirometry is feasible in many preschool children. PC20-FEV1 often appears at lower provocation dose than PCW. The lower dose may shorten the test and encourage participation. Significant decrease in spirometry indices at PCW suggests that PC20-FEV1 determination may be safer.

  15. Evolution of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Moré Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a steady increase in the number of elderly patients with severe cardiovascular diseases who require a surgical procedure to recover some quality of life that allows them a socially meaningful existence, despite the risks.Objectives: To analyze the behavior of elderly patients who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Method: A descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted with patients over 65 years of age who underwent surgery at the Cardiocentro Ernesto Che Guevara, in Santa Clara, from January 2013 to March 2014.Results: In the study, 73.1% of patients were men; and there was a predominance of subjects between 65 and 70 years of age, accounting for 67.3%. Coronary artery bypass graft was the most prevalent type of surgery and had the longest cardiopulmonary bypass times. Hypertension was present in 98.1% of patients. The most frequent postoperative complications were renal dysfunction and severe low cardiac output, with 44.2% and 34.6% respectively.Conclusions: There was a predominance of men, the age group of 65 to 70 years, hypertension, and patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft with prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass. Renal dysfunction was the most frequent complication.

  16. Validation of Global Lung Function Initiative and All Ages Reference Equations for Forced Spirometry in Healthy Spanish Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín de Vicente, Carlos; de Mir Messa, Inés; Rovira Amigo, Sandra; Torrent Vernetta, Alba; Gartner, Silvia; Iglesias Serrano, Ignacio; Carrascosa Lezcano, Antonio; Moreno Galdó, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Recent publication of multi-ethnic spirometry reference equations for subjects aged from 3-95 years aim to avoid age-related discontinuities and provide a worldwide standard for interpreting spirometric test results. To assess the agreement of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI-2012) and All ages (FEV 0.5 ) reference equations with the Spanish preschool lung function data. To verify the appropriateness of these reference values for clinical use in Spanish preschool children. Spirometric measurements were obtained from children aged 3 to 6 years attending 10 randomly selected schools in Barcelona (Spain). Stanojevic's quality control criteria were applied. Z-scores were calculated for the spirometry outcomes based on the GLI equations. If the z-score (mean) of each parameter was close to 0, with a maximum variance of ± 0.5 from the mean and a standard deviation of 1, the GLI-2012 equations would be applicable in our population. Of 543 children recruited, 405 (74.6%) were 'healthy', and of these, 380 were Caucasians. Of these 380, 81.6% (169 females, 141 males) performed technically acceptable and reproducible maneuvers to assess FEVt, and 69.5% achieved a clear end-expiratory plateau. Z-scores for FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC, FEV 0.75 , FEV 0.75 /FVC, FEV 0.5 , FEF 75 and FEF 25-75 all fell within ± 0.5, except for FEV 1 /FVC (0.53 z-scores). GLI equations are appropriate for Spanish preschool children. These data provide further evidence to support widespread application of the GLI reference equations. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbye, Hasse; Drivenes, Elin; Dalbak, Lene G; Leinan, Tone; Høegh-Henrichsen, Svein; Østrem, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Aims To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs) diagnoses. Methods Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared. Results Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9%) than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003). Conclusion The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found. PMID:22135492

  18. Spirometry-Adjusted Fraction of Exhaled Nitric Oxide Allows Asthma Diagnosis in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelewski, Tomasz; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Stelmach, Rafał; Janas, Anna; Grzelewska, Aleksandra; Witkowski, Konrad; Makandjou-Ola, Eusebio; Majak, Paweł; Stelmach, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Recently, it has been proved that fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) results are in disagreement with other measurements of asthma control. The objective of this work is to present and validate new lung function/lung inflammation ratios. This is a retrospective, cross-sectional study in which we evaluated data from medical documentation of 1,529 pediatric and adolescent subjects and a small number (2% of the studied population) of young adults, who presented symptoms suggestive of asthma (age range 4-24 y). We are the first to analyze results obtained in this manner (before the introduction of controlled medication): FENO, spirometry, specific resistance of the airways, diagnosis of allergic diseases, and allergen sensitization (specific immunoglobulin E results). Cut-off points for the new indicators allowed us to diagnose asthma in the study participants: for FVC/FENO ratio, 0.17 L/ppb; for FEV1/FENO ratio, 0.15 L/ppb; for forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver (FEF25-75%)/FENO ratio, 0.16 L/s/ppb; for FENO/FVC ratio, 11.00 ppb/L; for FENO/FEV1 ratio, 12.53 ppb/L; and for FENO/FEF25-75% ratio, 11.81 ppb/L/s. Only the ratios described above were closely correlated with the diagnosis of asthma and with one another. They significantly differed between subjects with asthma and healthy subjects as well as between females and males. Only FEF25-75%/FENO and FENO/FEF25-75% values were significant predictors of any sensitization in the studied subjects. We found higher sensitivity than specificity and higher positive predictive value than negative predictive value for FVC/FENO, FEV1/FENO, and FEF25-75%/FENO and found a mirror image for reverse parameters. However, the positive predictive values and negative predictive values were not clearly convincing with respect to diagnostic accuracy in the case of the new parameters proposed. We propose new lung function/lung inflammation ratios by which it may become possible to diagnose asthma in

  19. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René Depont

    2013-01-01

    a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data...... on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. RESULTS: A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years...... educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having...

  20. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Robberts, B.; Crockett, A.J.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Lucas, A.; Grootens, J.; Smeele, I.J.; Thamrin, C.; Reddel, H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care

  1. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711. Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  2. A new spirometry-based algorithm to predict occupational pulmonary restrictive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, S; Iridoy-Zulet, A A; Aaron, S; Swann, A; Cullinan, P

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry is often included in workplace-based respiratory surveillance programmes but its performance in the identification of restrictive lung disease is poor, especially when the prevalence of this condition is low in the tested population. To improve the specificity (Sp) and positive predictive value (PPV) of current spirometry-based algorithms in the diagnosis of restrictive pulmonary impairment in the workplace and to reduce the proportion of false positives findings and, as a result, unnecessary referrals for lung volume measurements. We re-analysed two studies of hospital patients, respectively used to derive and validate a recommended spirometry-based algorithm [forced vital capacity (FVC) 55%] for the recognition of restrictive pulmonary impairment. We used true lung restrictive cases as a reference standard in 2×2 contingency tables to estimate sensitivity (Sn), Sp and PPV and negative predictive values for each diagnostic cut-off. We simulated a working population aged spirometry-based algorithm may be adopted to accurately exclude pulmonary restriction and to possibly reduce unnecessary lung volume testing in an occupational health setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Spirometry expert support in family practice: a cluster-randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Jacobs, J.E.; Akkermans, R.P.; Vries Robbe, P.F. de; Quanjer, P.H.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of two modes of spirometry expert support on Family physicians' (FPs') diagnoses and planned management in patients with apparent respiratory disease. METHOD: A cluster-randomised trial was performed with family practices as the unit of randomisation. FPs from 44 family

  4. [Accesibility and use of spirometry in primary care centers in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llauger, M Antònia; Rosas, Alba; Burgos, Felip; Torrente, Elena; Tresserras, Ricard; Escarrabill, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Examine the accessibility and use of forced spirometry (FS) in public primary care facilities centers in Catalonia. Cross-sectional study using a survey. Three hundred sixty-six Primary Care Teams (PCT) in Catalonia. Third quarter of 2010. Survey with information on spirometers, training, interpretation and quality control, and the priority that the quality of spirometry had for the team. Indicators FS/100 inhabitants/year, FS/month/PCT; FS/month/10,000 inhabitants. Response rate: 75%. 97.5% of PCT had spirometer and made an average of 2.01 spirometries/100 inhabitants (34.68 spirometry/PCT/month). 83% have trained professionals.>50% centers perform formal training but no information is available on the quality. 70% performed some sort of calibration. Interpretation was made by the family physician in 87.3% of cases. In 68% of cases not performed any quality control of exploration. 2/3 typed data manually into the computerized medical record.>50% recognized a high priority strategies for improving the quality. Despite the accessibility of EF efforts should be made to standardize training, increasing the number of scans test and promote systematic quality control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. General practitioners' needs for ongoing support for the interpretation of spirometry tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Jacobs, A.; Bogart-Jansen, M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although one out of three general practitioners (GPs) carries out spirometry, the diagnostic interpretation of spirometric test results appears to be a common barrier for GPs towards its routine application. METHODS: Multivariate cross-sectional analysis of a questionnaire survey among

  6. Should the diagnosis of COPD be based on a single spirometry test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.; Robberts, B.; Crockett, A.J.; Thoonen, B.P.; Lucas, A.; Grootens, J.; Smeele, I.J.; Thamrin, C.; Reddel, H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical guidelines indicate that a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis is made from a single spirometry test. However, long-term stability of diagnosis based on forced expiratory volume in 1 s over forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio has not been reported. In primary care

  7. Adherence to acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry in complex lung function laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Brigitte M; Hartley, M Faizel; Bailey, Michael J; Thompson, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Few published data exist for adherence rates to spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria in clinical respiratory laboratories. This study quantified adherence levels in this setting and observed changes in adherence levels as a result of feedback and ongoing training. Two tertiary hospital-based, lung function laboratories (L1 and L2) participated. Approximately 100 consecutive, FVC spirometry sessions were reviewed for each year from 2004 to 2008 at L1 and for years 2004 and 2008 at L2. Each spirometric effort and session was interrogated for adherence to the acceptability and repeatability criteria of international spirometry standards of the time. Feedback of audit results and refresher training were provided at L1 throughout the study; in addition, a quality rating scale was implemented in 2006. No formal feedback or follow-up training was provided at L2. We reviewed 707 test sessions over the 5 years. There was no difference in adherence rates to acceptability and repeatability criteria between sites in 2004 (L1 61%, L2 59%, P = .89). There was, however, a significant difference between sites in 2008 (L1 92%, L2 65%, P audit period. This improved with regular review, feedback, and implementation of a rating scale. Auditing of spirometry quality, feedback, and implementation of test rating scales need to be incorporated as an integral component of laboratory quality assurance programs to improve adherence to international acceptability and repeatability criteria.

  8. Validation of the GLI-2012 spirometry reference equations in Argentinian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Luciano E; Sly, Peter D

    2018-02-01

    The Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) has produced spirometry reference equations for use in different ethnic groups. Previous reports have shown that the GLI equations do not adequately describe lung function in all populations and that adopting the new equations into clinical practice can increase the number of patients considered to have abnormal lung function. Therefore, before adopting these equations into local practice it is necessary to establish how well the equations represent the local population. The present study was conducted to determine how well the GLI spirometry reference equations represented the young children in Argentina, a population not included in the GLI dataset. Spirometry was measured in 2072 healthy children (50.9% males) aged 3.0-12.4 years (mean 6.64 ± SD 1.39), with a height range of 93.0-158.5 cm and weight range from 13.1 to 54.7 kg. We used the GLI "Caucasian" and "other/mixed" race equations to create Z-scores. The Z-scores predicted by the Caucasian GLI equations did not differ from zero and fitted the data well. Z-scores calculated using "other/mixed race" fit less well. Using the GLI definition of low lung function (Z-score equation. This compares well with the expected 5% below the lower limit of normal. We recommend the use of the GLI-2012 Caucasian equations for spirometry undertaken in Argentinian children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of Incentive Spirometry on Oxygenation in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Dehghani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arterial hypoxemia is one of the main pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Therefore, several proceedings have been recommended to reduce the complications, and to improve arterial hypoxemia as well as arterial blood gas parameters such as incentive spirometry. This study intended to investigate the effect of incentive spirometry on patients´ oxygenation. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, a sample size of 70 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft was chosen. Incentive spirometry was applied in the experimental group, whereas no special intervention was taken in the control group. Arterial blood gas samples were measured in three stages: Preoperation, the first and second day after surgery. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16 using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: In terms of gender, 70% were males and 30% were females whose mean age was 61±9.7. Moreover, the duration of mechanical ventilation was 6.4±1.67. The study results indicated that no significant difference was observed between experimental and control groups in terms of parameters of arterial blood gases in preoperation, first and second postoperative days (P> 0.05. Conclusions: Utilizing incentive spirometry did not have any effects on improving oxygenation in patients in the first and second days after surgery, compared with routine hospital treatment .

  10. Impulse oscillometry in acute and stable asthmatic children: a comparison with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Kuyucu, Semanur; Arıkoglu, Tugba; Tezol, Ozlem; Aydogdu, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Lung function tests have attracted interest for the diagnosis and follow-up of childhood asthma in recent years. For patients who cannot perform forced expiratory maneuvers, impulse oscillometry (IOS), performed during spontaneous breathing, may be an alternative tool. Thirty-five acute, 107 stable asthmatic and 103 healthy children who presented to our clinic performed IOS followed by spirometry before and after salbutamol inhalation. The mean baseline and reversibility of IOS and spirometry parameters were compared between the groups. Correlation analyses were undertaken within the asthmatics, and the healthy controls separately. To distinguish the three groups, the sensitivity and specificity of baseline and reversibility values of IOS and spirometry were computed. When spirometry was taken as the gold standard, the discriminating performance of IOS to detect the airway obstruction and reversibility was investigated. The mean absolute values of Zrs, R5, R5-R20, X5, X10, X15, Fres, AX, and all spirometric parameters, and the mean reversibility values of R5, R10, Fres, AX and forced expiratory volume in one second were different between the groups and the highest area under curve values to discriminate the groups was obtained from area of reactance (AX) and ΔAX. Zrs, all resistance (including R5-R20) and reactance parameters, Fres and AX were correlated with at least one spirometric parameter. Spirometric reversibility was detected by ≤-22.34 and ≤-39.05 cut-off values of ΔR5 and ΔAX, respectively. IOS has shown a highly significant association with spirometric indices and reversibility testing. It may be a substitute for spirometry in children who fail to perform forced expiratory maneuvers.

  11. Why is spirometry underused in the diagnosis of the breathless patient: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of spirometry is essential for the accurate diagnosis of respiratory disease but it is underused in both primary and specialist care. In the current study, we have explored the reasons for this underuse. Methods Five separate focus groups were undertaken with final year medical undergraduates, junior hospital doctors, general practitioners (GPs) and specialist trainees in respiratory medicine. The participants were not told prior to the session that we were specifically interested in their views about spirometry but discussion was moderated to elicit their approaches to the diagnosis of a breathless patient, their use of investigations and their learning preferences. Results Undergraduates and junior doctors rarely had a systematic approach towards the breathless patient and tended, unless prompted, to focus on the emergency room situation rather than on patients with longer term causes of breathlessness. Whilst their theoretical knowledge embraced the possibility of a non-respiratory cause for breathlessness, neither undergraduates nor junior doctors spontaneously mentioned the use of spirometry in the diagnosis of respiratory disease. When prompted they cited lack of familiarity with the use and location of equipment, and lack of encouragement to use it as being major barriers to utilization. In contrast, GPs and specialist respiratory trainees were enthusiastic about its use and perceived spirometry as a core element of the diagnostic workup. Conclusions More explicit training is needed regarding the role of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of those with lung disease and this necessitates both practical experience and training in interpretation of the data. However, formal teaching is likely to be undermined in practice, if the concept is not strongly promoted by the senior staff who act as role models and trainers. PMID:21679396

  12. Inter-regional changes in the performance and interpretation of spirometry in Spain: 3E study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Campos, José Luis; Soriano, Joan B; Calle, Myriam

    2014-11-01

    This report shows the results of a nation-wide survey on spirometry to assess regional differences. Observational cross-sectional study conducted by means of a telephone survey in 805 primary care (PC) and specialized centers (SC) in all regions. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test. The results showed major differences between regions. Most centers had 1-2 spirometers. The number of spirometry tests per week ranged from 2 to 8.9 in PC and between 34.3 and 98.3 in SC. Some training had been given in most centers (63.6-100% in PC and 60.0-100% in SC) but not on a regular basis. Most centers used several short-acting bronchodilators for the bronchodilation test, but with insufficient inhalations (2.0-3.8 in PC and 2.0-3.3 in SC) and frequently incorrect waiting time (29.4-83.3% PC and 33.3-87.5% in SC). Daily calibration was not performed in all centers (0-100% in PC and 66.7-100% in SC). Significant inter-regional differences in spirometry quality criteria were observed, with 6 or more criteria met in 9.1-84.6% of PC centers and 37.5-100% in SC. Our results show the current situation of spirometry in primary and specialized care in Spain, highlighting considerable variability and areas for improvement. This information should be considered by health officials to improve the quality and accessibility of such tests. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Feasibility and reproducibility of spirometry and inductance plethysmography in healthy Brazilian preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Danielle C; Camargos, Paulo A M; Martins, Jocimar A; Abreu, Mercês C S; Avelar e Araújo, Gilda Helena; Parreira, Verônica F

    2013-07-01

    Preschoolers show peculiarities that reinforce the importance of assessing their pulmonary function. However, there are few data on the success rate and between-occasions reproducibility of pulmonary function tests in preschoolers, particularly in the Brazilian population. To assess the success rate and between-occasions reproducibility of the variables obtained by spirometry and respiratory inductive plethysmography in healthy children aged 4-6 years. Breathing pattern was assessed by plethysmography (tidal volume-V(T), respiratory rate-f, inspiratory duty cycle-Ti/Ttot, mean respiratory flow-V(T)/Ti, displacement of the rib cage-RC and phase relation during the total breath-PhRTB) and spirometry (forced vital capacity-FVC, forced expiratory volume in 0.5 sec-FEV0.5 and forced expiratory volume in first second-FEV1) in 47 healthy children, aged 4-6 years. To evaluate between-occasions reproducibility, 10 children (according to the sample size calculation) were reassessed after 3 weeks. Between-occasions reproducibility was evaluated by paired t-test, considering significant P spirometry and a 98% success rate for plethysmography. Regarding reproducibility, there were no significant differences between the variables of any test. Spirometry ICC was above 0.80 and the CV(ME) was lower than 10%. The plethysmography ICC was between 0.61 and 0.95, and the CV(ME) was between 2% and 31%. These results suggest a high success rate in performing the pulmonary function tests and good between-occasions reproducibility for spirometry and plethysmography in healthy preschoolers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Why is spirometry underused in the diagnosis of the breathless patient: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partridge Martyn R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of spirometry is essential for the accurate diagnosis of respiratory disease but it is underused in both primary and specialist care. In the current study, we have explored the reasons for this underuse. Methods Five separate focus groups were undertaken with final year medical undergraduates, junior hospital doctors, general practitioners (GPs and specialist trainees in respiratory medicine. The participants were not told prior to the session that we were specifically interested in their views about spirometry but discussion was moderated to elicit their approaches to the diagnosis of a breathless patient, their use of investigations and their learning preferences. Results Undergraduates and junior doctors rarely had a systematic approach towards the breathless patient and tended, unless prompted, to focus on the emergency room situation rather than on patients with longer term causes of breathlessness. Whilst their theoretical knowledge embraced the possibility of a non-respiratory cause for breathlessness, neither undergraduates nor junior doctors spontaneously mentioned the use of spirometry in the diagnosis of respiratory disease. When prompted they cited lack of familiarity with the use and location of equipment, and lack of encouragement to use it as being major barriers to utilization. In contrast, GPs and specialist respiratory trainees were enthusiastic about its use and perceived spirometry as a core element of the diagnostic workup. Conclusions More explicit training is needed regarding the role of spirometry in the diagnosis and management of those with lung disease and this necessitates both practical experience and training in interpretation of the data. However, formal teaching is likely to be undermined in practice, if the concept is not strongly promoted by the senior staff who act as role models and trainers.

  15. Sarcopenia: a new predictor of postoperative complications for elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Min; Zhang, Fei-Yu; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Chen, Xiao-Xi

    2017-05-01

    A geriatric assessment is needed to identify high-risk elderly patients with gastric cancer. However, the current geriatric assessment has been considered to be either time-consuming or subjective. The present study aimed to investigate the predictive effect of sarcopenia on the postoperative complications for elderly patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. We conducted a prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Computed tomography-assessed lumbar skeletal muscle, handgrip strength, and gait speed were measured to define sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was present in 69 of 240 patients (28.8%) and was associated with lower body mass index, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, and higher nutritional risk screening 2002 scores. Postoperative complications significantly increased in the sarcopenic patients (49.3% versus 24.6%, P sarcopenia (odds ratio: 2.959, 95% CI: 1.629-5.373, P Sarcopenia, presented as a new geriatric assessment factor, was a strong and independent risk factor for postoperative complications of elderly patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of spirometry and impulse oscillometry in relation to asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Arvind; Anderson, William J; Lipworth, Joseph; Lipworth, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Guidelines advocate the use of spirometry to assess pulmonary function in asthmatic patients. Commonly used measures include forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory ratio (FEV1/FVC), and forced mid-expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75). Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is an effort-independent test performed during tidal breathing. IOS may be used to assess the total and central airway resistance at 5 Hz (R5) and 20 Hz (R20), respectively, and hence derive the peripheral airway resistance from the difference (R5-R20). We compared spirometry and IOS as tests of global airway function (i.e., FEV1, FEV1/FVC, R5) and putative measures of small airways function (i.e., FEF25-75, R5-R20) and their relationship to oral steroid and short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) use as surrogates for long-term asthma control. Spirometry and IOS measurements from physician-diagnosed asthmatics were linked to a health informatics database for oral steroid and SABA use 1 year prior to the index measurements. Four hundred forty-two patients had both spirometry and IOS, mean FEV1 = 86 % predicted, 94 % on ICS, median dose 800 µg/day. IOS and spirometry measures were equally predictive of impaired asthma control for both oral steroid and SABA use. For oral steroid use, the adjusted odds ratio, OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.91(1.25-2.95), p = 0.003; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s 1.73(1.12-2.66), p = 0.013. For SABA use, the adjusted OR (95 % CI) is as follows: FEV1 150 %: 1.76(1.18-2.63), p = 0.006; and R5-R20 > 0.1 kPa L(-1) s: 2.94(1.94-4.46), p Spirometry or IOS measurements were equally useful as potential markers of asthma control in persistent asthmatic patients.

  17. Implications of the Transition From Zapletal to GLI Reference Values for Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Lena; Zwitserloot, Annelies; Merkus, Peter; Gappa, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The current standard for monitoring lung function in children with asthma is spirometry. In Europe, results of these lung function tests have been related to Zapletal reference values published in 1977. Recently, the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) published predicted values of spirometry for 5 ethnic groups, valid over an age range from 3 to 95 years. These reference values have been approved by many international lung societies, and the algorithms are increasingly being implemented globally. This report describes the consequences of the transition from Zapletal reference values to GLI reference values for 2 pediatric asthma patients, which include unexpected declines in lung function and the ability to take advantage of newly approved reimbursement for advanced therapy. The Zapletal and GLI reference values cannot be used interchangeably, and transition to the GLI values might lead to better treatment in the future. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. [Further examination of COPD using spirometry, respiratory function test, and impulse oscillometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Masaru; Kitada, Junya

    2011-10-01

    Spirometry is essential for diagnosis and staging of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristic of physiological change of small airways in COPD is heterogeneous distribution of small airway narrowing, resulting in air-trapping and nonhomogeneous ventilation. FEF25-75, residual volume/total lung capacity, delta N2 in phase III slope of single breath N2 washout test, closing volume, static and dynamic compliance, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (transfer factor) are measured for detecting small airways disease. Impulse oscillometry is also useful for assessment of small airways disease, especially indices of frequent resonance (Fres) and frequent dependent of resistance change of R5-R20; resistance at 5 Hz minus resistance at 20 Hz. Impulse oscillometry seems to have a complemental role of spirometry in managing COPD.

  19. The Biological Activity of Propolis-Containing Toothpaste on Oral Health Environment in Patients Who Underwent Implant-Supported Prosthodontic Rehabilitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    .... Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA...

  20. Spirometry Reference Equations from the HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVange, Lisa; Davis, Sonia M; Hankinson, John; Enright, Paul; Wilson, Rebbecca; Barr, R Graham; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kalhan, Ravi; Lemus, Hector; Ni, Ai; Smith, Lewis J; Talavera, Gregory A

    2017-10-15

    Accurate reference values for spirometry are important because the results are used for diagnosing common chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, estimating physiologic impairment, and predicting all-cause mortality. Reference equations have been established for Mexican Americans but not for others with Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. To develop spirometry reference equations for adult Hispanic/Latino background groups in the United States. The HCHS/SOL (Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos) recruited a population-based probability sample of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years living in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. Participants self-identified as being of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, or Central or South American background. Spirometry was performed using standardized methods with central quality control monitoring. Spirometric measures from a subset of 6,425 never-smoking participants without respiratory symptoms or disease were modeled as a function of sex, age, height, and Hispanic/Latino background to produce background-specific reference equations for the predicted value and lower limit of normal. Dominican and Puerto Rican Americans had substantially lower predicted and lower limit of normal values for FVC and FEV 1 than those in other Hispanic/Latino background groups and also than Mexican American values from NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). For patients of Dominican and Puerto Rican background who present with pulmonary symptoms in clinical practice, use of background-specific spirometry reference equations may provide more appropriate predicted and lower limit of normal values, enabling more accurate diagnoses of abnormality and physiologic impairment.

  1. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected.

  2. Measurement of total lung capacity : a comparison of spiral CT and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyung Il; Park, Kyung Ju; Lee, Eh Hyung; Yune, Heun Young; Suh, Jung Ho [Ajou Univ. School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kyu Ok; Lim, Tae Hwan [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, In Hyuk [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    To determine the potential of spiral CT as a functional imaging modality of the lung aside from its proven value in morphological depiction. Spiral CT scan was performed in ten normal female and nine normal male adults (mean age: 39, height: 163 cm, weight: 62 kg ) after single full breath-holding. Three dimensional lung images were reconstructed(minimal threshold value: -1,000HU, maximal threshold values: -150, 250, -350, -450 HU) to obtain total lung volume(TLV) on a histogram. Total lung volume measured by spiral CT was compared with TLV obtained by spirometry. Mean TLV measured by spirometry was 5.62L and TLV measured by CT at maximal threshold values of -150, -250, -350, and -450 HU was 5.53, 5.33, 5.15, and 4.98L, respectively. Mean absolute differences between the modalities of 0.17L(3%), 0.32L(5.6%), 0.48L(8.5%), 0.65L(11.5%) were statistically significant(p<0.001). Linear regression coefficients between the modalities were 0.99, 0.97, 095, and 0.94 and no statistically significant differences in accuracy of threshold levels in the estimation of lung volume(r=0.99, standard error=0.034L in all) were seen. TLV measured by spiral CT closely approximated that measured by spirometry. Spiral CT may be useful as a means of evaluating lung function.

  3. Head-out spirometry accurately monitors the course of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölbeling, Florian; Munder, Antje; Stanke, Frauke; Tümmler, Burkhard; Baumann, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Classic infection models in rodents use lethal doses of bacteria as inocula, thus creating models which are rarely comparable to the clinical situation. Moreover, single time-point evaluation requires killing of the animals, necessitating large numbers of animals. Longitudinal parameters such as temperature appear to have a relatively low accuracy. Spirometry might be an accurate method to assess the course of a bacterial lung infection without the necessity to sacrifice the animals. We measured lung function in C57BL/6JZtm mice following intratracheal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared it to physiological parameters and lung histology. Head-out spirometry measuring 14 parameters was performed on C57BL6/J mice for eight days following a P. aeruginosa lung infection. Additionally rectal temperature, body weight and condition were assessed together with histological data and bacteriological clearance. Several spirometric parameters were significantly altered for more than 72 h after inoculation, which was four times longer than observed alterations in physiological parameters such as temperature. Volume (amount of air inspired) decreased more than seven-fold within 6 h after inoculation and required 72 h to recover, rendering it the most sensitive spirometric parameter investigated. Spirometric and histological data correlated well. Our findings suggest that non-invasive head-out spirometry is a reliable and highly sensitive method to longitudinally assess the course of bacterial lung infections. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Spirometry in Greenland: a cross-sectional study on patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Overballe; Olsen, Sequssuna; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is globally increasing in frequency and is expected to be the third largest cause of death by 2020. Smoking is the main risk factor of developing COPD. In Greenland, more than half of the adult population are daily smokers, and COPD may be common. International guidelines recommend the usage of spirometry as a golden standard for diagnosing COPD. The current number of spirometries performed among patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease in Greenland remains unexplored. To estimate the prevalence of patients aged 50 years or above treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease and the extent to which spirometry was performed among them within 2 years. An observational, cross-sectional study based on the review of data obtained from electronic medical records in Greenland was performed. The inclusion criterion was that patients must have been permanent residents aged 50 years or above who had medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease prescribed within a period of 15 months prior to data extraction. A full review of electronic patient records was done on each of the identified users of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. Information on age, gender, town and spirometry was registered for each patient within the period from October 2013 to October 2015. The prevalence of patients treated with medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease aged 50 years or above was 7.9%. Of those, 34.8% had spirometry performed within 2 years and 50% had a forced expiratory volume (1 sec)/ forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) under 70% indicating obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease among patients over 50 years old is common in Greenland. About one third of the patients had a spirometry performed within 2 years. To further increase spirometry performance, it is recommended to explore possible barriers in health

  5. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melbye H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hasse Melbye1, Elin Drivenes1, Lene G Dalbak2, Tone Leinan1, Svein Høegh-Henrichsen2, Anders Østrem21General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 2General Practice Research Unit, Department of Health and Society, University of Oslo, NorwayAims: To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings fit with general practitioners’ (GPs diagnoses.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 years with a diagnosis of asthma or COPD registered in the electronic medical record during the previous 5 years were recruited at seven GP offices in Norway in 2009–2010. Registered diagnosis, spirometry results, comorbidity, and reported symptoms were compared.Results: Among 376 patients, 62% were women. Based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases criteria, a spirometry diagnosis of COPD could be made in 68.1% of the patients with a previous COPD diagnosis and in 17.1% of those diagnosed with asthma only (P < 0.001. The κ agreement between last clinical diagnosis of COPD and COPD based on spirometry was 0.50. A restrictive spirometry pattern was found in 19.4% and more frequently in patients diagnosed with both asthma and COPD (23.9% than in patients diagnosed with COPD only (6.8%, P = 0.003.Conclusion: The ability of GPs to differentiate between asthma and COPD seems to have considerably improved during the last decade, probably due to the dissemination of spirometry and guidelines for COPD diagnosis. A diagnosis of COPD that cannot be confirmed by spirometry represents a challenge in clinical practice, in particular when a restrictive pattern on spirometry is found.Keywords: asthma, COPD, diagnosis, primary care

  6. Forced oscillation technique in the detection of smoking-induced respiratory alterations: diagnostic accuracy and comparison with spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Camilo Dias Faria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detection of smoking effects is of utmost importance in the prevention of cigarette-induced chronic airway obstruction. The forced oscillation technique offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. However, there have been no data concerning the use of the forced oscillation technique to evaluate respiratory mechanics in groups with different degrees of tobacco consumption. OBJECTIVES: (1 to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique to detect smoking-induced respiratory alterations, with special emphasis on early alterations; and (2 to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: One hundred and seventy subjects were divided into five groups according to the number of pack-years smoked: four groups of smokers classified as 60 pack-years and a control group. The four groups of smokers were compared with the control group using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. RESULTS: The early adverse effects of smoking in the group with 60 pack-years, the diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique was similar to that observed with spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that forced oscillation technique parameters were able to detect early smoking-induced respiratory involvement when pathologic changes are still potentially reversible. These findings support the use of the forced oscillation technique as a versatile clinical diagnostic tool in helping with chronic obstructive lung disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. Forced oscillation technique in the detection of smoking-induced respiratory alterations: diagnostic accuracy and comparison with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Costa, Alessandra Alves da; Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Jansen, Jose Manoel; Melo, Pedro Lopes de

    2010-01-01

    Detection of smoking effects is of utmost importance in the prevention of cigarette-induced chronic airway obstruction. The forced oscillation technique offers a simple and detailed approach to investigate the mechanical properties of the respiratory system. However, there have been no data concerning the use of the forced oscillation technique to evaluate respiratory mechanics in groups with different degrees of tobacco consumption. (1) to evaluate the ability of the forced oscillation technique to detect smoking-induced respiratory alterations, with special emphasis on early alterations; and (2) to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. One hundred and seventy subjects were divided into five groups according to the number of pack-years smoked: four groups of smokers classified as 60 pack-years and a control group. The four groups of smokers were compared with the control group using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The early adverse effects of smoking in the group with 60 pack-years, the diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique was similar to that observed with spirometry. This study revealed that forced oscillation technique parameters were able to detect early smoking-induced respiratory involvement when pathologic changes are still potentially reversible. These findings support the use of the forced oscillation technique as a versatile clinical diagnostic tool in helping with chronic obstructive lung disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  8. Effects of a 12-month multi-faceted mentoring intervention on knowledge, quality, and usage of spirometry in primary care: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Moosa, Dilshad; MacPherson, Ana; Allen, Christopher; Tamari, Itamar E

    2016-04-21

    Asthma is among the most common chronic diseases in adults. International guidelines have emphasized the importance of regular spirometry for asthma control evaluation. However, spirometry use in primary care remains low across jurisdictions. We sought to design and evaluate a knowledge translation intervention to address both the poor quality of spirometry and the underuse of spirometry in primary care. We designed a 1-year intervention consisting of initial interactive education and hands-on training followed by unstructured peer expert mentoring (through an online portal, email, telephone, videoconference, fax, and/or in-person). We recruited physician and allied health mentees from across primary care sites in Ontario, Canada. We compared spirometry-related knowledge immediately before and after the 1-year intervention period and the quality of spirometry testing and the usage of spirometry in patients with asthma in the year before and the year of the intervention. Seven of 10 (70 %) invited sites participated, including 25/90 (28 %) invited allied health mentees and 23/68 (34 %) invited physician mentees. We recruited 7 physician mentors and 4 allied health mentors to form 3 mentor-mentee pods. Spirometry knowledge scores increased from 21.4 +/- 3.1 pre- to 27.3 +/- 3.5 (out of 35) (p Spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria were met by 59/191 (30.9 %) spirometries and 86/193 (44.6 %) spirometries [odds ratio 1.7 (1.0, 3.0)], in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Spirometry was ordered in 75/512 (14.6 %) and 129/336 (38.4 %) respiratory visits (p spirometry in real world primary care settings. A future controlled study should assess the impact of this intervention on patient outcomes, its cost-effectiveness, and its sustainability.

  9. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  10. Comparative analysis of pain in patients who underwent total knee replacement regarding the tourniquet pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos George de Souza Leão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To evaluate through the visual analog scale (VAS the pain in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR with different pressures of the pneumatic tourniquet. METHODS: An observational, randomized, descriptive study on an analytical basis, with 60 patients who underwent TKR, divided into two groups, which were matched: a group where TKR was performed with tourniquet pressures of 350 mmHg (standard and the other with systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg (P + 100. These patients had their pain assessed by VAS at 48 h, and at the 5th and 15th days after procedure. Secondarily, the following were also measured: range of motion (ROM, complications, and blood drainage volume in each group; the data were subjected to statistical analysis. RESULTS: After data analysis, there was no statistical difference regarding the incidence of complications (p = 0.612, ROM (p = 0.202, bleeding after 24 and 48 h (p = 0.432 and p = 0.254 or in relation to VAS. No correlation was observed between time of ischemia compared to VAS and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the pneumatic tourniquet pressure at 350 mmHg or systolic blood pressure plus 100 mmHg did not influence the pain, blood loss, ROM, and complications. Therefore the pressures at these levels are safe and do not change the surgery outcomes; the time of ischemia must be closely observed to avoid major complications.

  11. The diagnosis of COPD in primary care; gender differences and the role of spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N J; Patel, I S; Partridge, M R

    2016-02-01

    Females with exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease now account for one half of all hospital admissions for that condition and rates have been increasing over the last few decades. Differences in presentations of disease between genders have been shown in several conditions and this study explores whether there are inter gender biases in probable diagnoses in those suspected to have COPD. 445 individuals with a provisional diagnosis by their General Practitioner of "suspected COPD" or "definite COPD" were referred to a community Respiratory Assessment unit (CRAU) for tests including spirometry. Gender, demographics, respiratory symptoms and respiratory medical history were recorded. The provisional diagnoses were compared with the final diagnosis made after spirometry and respiratory specialist nurse review and the provisional diagnosis was either confirmed as correct or refuted as unlikely. Significantly more men (87.5%) had their diagnosis of "definite COPD" confirmed compared to 73.9% of women (p = 0.021). When the GP suggested a provisional diagnosis of "suspected COPD" (n = 265) at referral, this was confirmed in 60.9% of men and only 43.2% of women (p = 0.004). There was a different symptom pattern between genders with women being more likely to report allergies, symptoms starting earlier in life, and being less likely than men to report breathlessness as the main symptom. These results may suggest a difference between genders in some of the clinical features of COPD and a difference in likelihood of a GPs provisional diagnosis of COPD being correct. The study reiterates the absolute importance of spirometry in the diagnosis of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals. BACKGROUND: Non...... can also rule out airway obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms caused by other illnesses, such as heart failure or lung cancer. Initiating medication for obstructive lung disease without spirometry entails the risk of these patients experiencing unnecessary delay in the diagnostic process...

  13. A multiphase non-linear mixed effects model: An application to spirometry after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-02-01

    In medical sciences, we often encounter longitudinal temporal relationships that are non-linear in nature. The influence of risk factors may also change across longitudinal follow-up. A system of multiphase non-linear mixed effects model is presented to model temporal patterns of longitudinal continuous measurements, with temporal decomposition to identify the phases and risk factors within each phase. Application of this model is illustrated using spirometry data after lung transplantation using readily available statistical software. This application illustrates the usefulness of our flexible model when dealing with complex non-linear patterns and time-varying coefficients.

  14. Effect of Incentive Spirometry on Oxygenation in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Dehghani

    2014-08-01

    Results: In terms of gender, 70% were males and 30% were females whose mean age was 61±9.7. Moreover, the duration of mechanical ventilation was 6.4±1.67. The study results indicated that no significant difference was observed between experimental and control groups in terms of parameters of arterial blood gases in preoperation, first and second postoperative days (P> 0.05. Conclusions: Utilizing incentive spirometry did not have any effects on improving oxygenation in patients in the first and second days after surgery, compared with routine hospital treatment .

  15. Identification of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants in subjects reporting work-related respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wiszniewska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The role of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs in diagnostics of occupational allergy remains unclarified and its clinical relevance is still questioned. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of positive response to CCDs in the subjects with suspected occupational allergy and the relationship between other diagnostic test results and final diagnosis. Material and methods The study group included 201 patients. They underwent clinical examination, skin prick test (SPT to common and occupational allergens, specific serum immunoglobulin (sIgE determinations, spirometry and specific inhalation challenge test. Moreover, sIgE to CCDs from bromelain was assessed in all subjects. Results Occupational respiratory allergy was recognized in 64.3% of CCD-positive and 52.4% of CCD-negative patients. Positive SPT results to common and occupational allergens were found in 64.3% and 35.7% of CCD-positive subjects, respectively. In all subjects with CCDs, the sIgE to grass pollens as well as to occupational allergens were detected. The total IgE level > 100 kU/l was significantly associated with the presence of sIgE to CCDs. Conclusions sIgE to CCDs were found in 7% of subjects suspected to suffer from occupational respiratory allergy. The presence of CCDs is not significantly associated with occupational respiratory allergy. It is also not more frequent in subjects reporting work-related respiratory symptoms in whom occupational allergy was not confirmed. The elevated total IgE level was related with CCD positivity. In patients with suspected occupational allergy, the presence of sIgE to CCDs in serum did not indicate the irrelevance of positive sIgE to occupational allergens.

  16. [Need for the training of GPs to perform spirometry: a study of French GP trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C; Buffel, C; Lorenzo, A

    2014-05-01

    The increased prevalence of asthma and COPD, the expected decline in the number of respiratory physicians and the availability of spirometers in primary care suggest that GPs should perform spirometry. To evaluate French final year medical (GP) students' theoretical and practical knowledge of spirometry. The students completed a questionnaire and were then separated into 4 groups: satisfactory theoretical and practical knowledge (group 1), theoretical knowledge (group 2), practical knowledge (group 3), insufficient theoretical and practical knowledge (group 4). One thousand two hundred and sixty one students (29 universities) were included between February and April 2012. Of the students, 4.3 % (54) fell into group 1, 35.2% (444) into group 2, 5.4% (68) into group 3 and 63.7% (803) into group 4. The students in group 1 had done significantly more internships in departments of respiratory medicine during their training (Pspirometry. A specific training program is necessary. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of socioeconomic and demographic status on spirometry testing in patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-06-14

    Socioeconomic status is known to influence the prevalence, severity and mortality of obstructive lung diseases, but it is uncertain whether it affects the use of diagnostic spirometry in patients initiating treatment for these conditions. The objective of this paper was to examine a possible association between education, income, labour market affiliation, cohabitation status and having spirometry performed when initiating medication targeting obstructive pulmonary disease. We conducted a population-based cohort study. Danish national registers were linked, retrieving data on prescriptions, spirometry testing, socioeconomic and demographic variables in all first time users of medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008. A total of 37,734 persons were included and approximately half of the cohort had spirometry performed. Among medication users under 65 years of age, being unemployed was significantly associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed, the strongest association was seen in men (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73-0.91). Medium income was associated with increased odds of having spirometry performed in men (OR =1.18, CI = 1.06-1.30) and high educational level (>12 years) was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed in women (OR = 0.86, CI = 0.78-0.94). Cohabitation status was not associated with having spirometry performed. Among medication users over 65 years of age, living alone was associated with reduced odds of having spirometry performed among men (OR = 0.78, CI = 0.69-0.88). Social inequity in spirometry testing among patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease was confirmed in this study. Increased focus on spirometry testing among elderly men living alone, among the unemployed and among women with higher education is required when initiating medication.

  18. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark: a population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont; Jarbøl, Dorte E

    2013-08-07

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease. A national register-based cohort study was performed. All patients over 18 years receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in 2008 were identified and detailed patient-specific data on sociodemographic status and spirometry tests were extracted. Information on practice characteristics like number of doctors, number of patients per doctor, training practice status, as well as age and gender of the general practitioners was linked to each medication user. Partnership practices had a higher odds ratio (OR) of performing spirometry compared with single-handed practices (OR 1.24, CI 1.09-1.40). We found a significant association between increasing general practitioner age and decreasing spirometry testing. This tendency was most pronounced among partnership practices, where doctors over 65 years had the lowest odds of spirometry testing (OR 0.25, CI 0.10-0.61). Training practice status was significantly associated with spirometry testing among single-handed practices (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Some of the variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving

  19. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and spirometry: rewarding quality or just quantity? A cross-sectional study in Rotherham, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    South Gail

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate spirometry is important in the management of COPD. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme for general practitioners includes spirometry related indicators within its COPD domain. It is not known whether high achievement against QOF spirometry indicators is associated with spirometry to BTS standards. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 3,217 patients randomly sampled from 5,649 patients with COPD in 38 general practices in Rotherham, UK. Severity of airflow obstruction was categorised by FEV1 (% predicted according to NICE guidelines. This was compared with clinician recorded COPD severity. The proportion of patients whose spirometry met BTS standards was calculated in each practice using a random sub-sample of 761 patients. The Spearman rank correlation between practice level QOF spirometry achievement and performance against BTS spirometry standards was calculated. Results Spirometry as assessed by clinical records was to BTS standards in 31% of cases (range at practice level 0% to 74%. The categorisation of airflow obstruction according to the most recent spirometry results did not agree well with the clinical categorisation of COPD recorded in the notes (Cohen's kappa = 0.34, 0.30 – 0.38. 12% of patients on COPD registers had FEV1 (% predicted results recorded that did not support the diagnosis of COPD. There was no association between quality, as measured by adherence to BTS spirometry standards, and either QOF COPD9 achievement (Spearman's rho = -0.11, or QOF COPD10 achievement (rho = 0.01. Conclusion The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework currently assesses the quantity, but not the quality of spirometry.

  20. The Effect of Two Different Hand Exercises on Grip Strength, Forearm Circumference, and Vascular Maturation in Patients Who Underwent Arteriovenous Fistula Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Sangwon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Junho; Jang, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of two different hand exercises on hand strength and vascular maturation in patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. Methods We recruited 18 patients who had chronic kidney disease and had undergone arteriovenous fistula surgery for hemodialysis. After the surgery, 10 subjects performed hand-squeezing exercise with GD Grip, and other 8 subjects used Soft Ball. The subjects continued the exercises for 4 weeks. The hand grip strength, pinch strength ...

  1. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  2. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Akkermans, Reinier P; Crockett, Alan J; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices.

  3. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis

    2016-01-01

    fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness...... in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care...

  4. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borlée, F.; Yzermans, C.J.; Krop, E.; Rooijackers, J.; Aalders, B.; Zock, J.P.; Dijk, C.E. van; Maassen, C.B.M.; Schellevis, F.; Heederik, D.; Smit, L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their

  5. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey : Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borlée, Floor|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315138661; Yzermans, C Joris; Krop, Esmeralda|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30482383X; Aalders, Bernadette; Rooijackers, Jos; Zock, Jan-Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/095184309; van Dijk, Christel E; Maassen, Catharina B M; Schellevis, François; Heederik, Dick|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Smit, Lidwien A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470882

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their

  6. General practice variation in spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette M; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, René dePont

    2013-01-01

    Spirometry testing is essential to confirm an obstructive lung disease, but studies have reported that a large proportion of patients diagnosed with COPD or asthma have no history of spirometry testing. Also, it has been shown that many patients are prescribed medication for obstructive lung...... disease without a relevant diagnosis or spirometry test registered. General practice characteristics have been reported to influence diagnosis and management of several chronic diseases. However, these findings are inconsistent, and it is uncertain whether practice characteristics influence spirometry...... testing among patients receiving medication for obstructive lung disease. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if practice characteristics are associated with spirometry testing among patients receiving first-time prescriptions for medication targeting obstructive lung disease....

  7. [Spirometry interpretation feasibility among pre-school children according to the European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Roberto M; González, Scarlett A; Moya, Ana I; Fierro, Laura T; Brockmann, Pablo V; Caussade, Solange L

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most used test to evaluate pulmonary function. Guidelines that defined acceptability and repeatability criteria for its implementation and interpretation among preschoolers were published in 2007. Our objective was to quantify the actual compliance with these criteria among pre-school patients. A review was performed on the baseline spirometry measured in patients aged 2 to 5 years in the Pediatric Respiratory Laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, who were admitted due to recurrent or persistent coughing or wheezing. Only those results obtained in patients who took the test for the first time were considered. They were analyzed by international standards. A total of 93 spirometry results (mean age 57.4 ± 8.6 months, 48 males) were obtained, of which 44 (47%) met all acceptable criteria, 87 (93%) obtained expiratory time of ≥ 0.5seconds, and 67 (72%) of the patients had an end-expiratory flow of ≤10% from peak flow. The variation in the measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was very low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.9). It was possible to meet the acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry among pre-school children in our Center, which was similar to previous reports. As in older children, this test is fully recommended for pre-school children who require lung function studies. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  8. Spirometry and PRAM severity score changes during pediatric acute asthma exacerbation treatment in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Hartert, Tina V

    2013-03-01

    To examine the time-dependent changes of spirometry (percent-predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second [%FEV(1)]) and the Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM) during the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations. We conducted a prospective study of participants aged 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations managed in a Pediatric Emergency Department. %FEV(1) and the PRAM were recorded pretreatment and at 2 and 4 hours. We examined responses at 2 and 4 hours following treatment and assessed whether the changes of %FEV(1) and of the PRAM differed during the first and the second 2-hour treatment periods. Among 503 participants, median [interquartile range, IQR] age was 8.8 [6.9, 11.4], 61% were male, and 63% were African-American. There was significant mean change of %FEV(1) during the first (+15.4%; 95% CI 13.7 to 17.1; p spirometry does not. This suggests that spirometry and clinical severity scores do not have similar trajectories and that clinical severity scores may be more sensitive to clinical change of acute asthma severity than spirometry.

  9. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Sooky; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Quanjer, Philip; Sonnappa, Samatha; Wade, Angela; Beardsmore, Caroline; Chhabra, Sunil K; Chudasama, Rajesh K; Cook, Derek G; Harding, Seeromanie; Kuehni, Claudia E; Prasad, K V V; Whincup, Peter H; Lee, Simon; Stocks, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110). Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5-17 years). When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4-19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The 'GLI-Other' equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while 'GLI-Black' equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the 'GLI-White' equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment. Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of 'GLI-Black' equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although 'GLI-Other' may be more appropriate for North Indian data. Prospective data collection using standardised protocols to explore potential sources of variation due to socio-economic circumstances, secular changes in growth/predictors of lung function and ethnicities within the South-Asian classification are urgently required.

  10. A novel flow partition device for spirometry during large animal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramel, Johannes P; Wimmer, Kurt; Ambrisko, Tamas D; Moens, Yves P

    2014-03-01

    We describe and test a novel device for large animal anaesthesia monitoring that uses standard human medicine spirometry sensors. In-vitro study. The device consists of two adapters that enable the flow to be split evenly into four tubes in parallel, each tube containing a D-lite sensor. The performance of this flow partitioning device (FPD) over a range of flows from 100 to 700 L minute⁻¹ was determined and the pressure versus flow relation, resistance and dead space was compared with a Horse-lite (Moens 2010). Equipped with four D-lite sensors, and a flow of 700 L minute⁻¹ the pressure drop of the FPD was 13.5 cm H₂O, resistance 1.17 cm H₂O second L⁻¹ and volume (potential dead space) 182 mL, compared to 2.8 cm H₂O, 0.24 cm H₂O second L⁻¹ and 54 mL respectively for the Horse-lite. The predicted value of the flow partition of ¼ could be confirmed. Limits of agreement were found to be 4.2% in inspiratory direction and 7.1% in expiratory direction. The FPD is an affordable device that extends the specification of any commercially available human spirometry sensors to large animal applications. However, an increase in total resistance and dead space has to be taken into account. Therefore, the new device could be useful during equine anaesthesia. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  11. Forced expiratory manoeuvres in children: do they meet ATS and ERS criteria for spirometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arets, H G; Brackel, H J; van der Ent, C K

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society criteria for spirometry in children. Maximal expiratory flow/volume (MEFV) measurements from 446 school-age children, experienced in performing MEFV manoeuvres, were studied and acceptability (start-of-test (backward extrapolated volume as a percentage of forced vital capacity (FVC) ([Vbc%FVC) or as an absolute value (Vbe), end-of-test (forced expiratory time (FET)) and reproducibility criteria (absolute and percentage difference between best and second-best FVC and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (deltaFVC, deltaFVC %, deltaFEV1 and deltaFEV1 %)) were applied to these manoeuvres. The Vbe%FVC criterion was met by 91.5%, the Vbe <0.15 L criterion by 94.8% and the Vbe <0.10 L by 60.1% of children. Vbe <0.15 L appeared to be a more useful parameter than Vbe%FVC. The FET criterion was met by only 15.3% of children. deltaFVC <0.2 L and deltaFEV1 <0.2 L were met by 97.1% and 98.4%, and deltaFVC <0.1 L and deltaFEV1 <0.1 L by 79.8% and 84.3% of the children, respectively. These criteria appeared to be less useful compared to percentage criteria (deltaFVC % and deltaFEV1 %). Even experienced children did not meet all international criteria for spirometry. However, most of their MEFV curves are useful for interpretation. Based on the performance of these children, a re-evaluation of criteria for maximal expiratory flow/volume measurements in children is proposed.

  12. Challenges in Collating Spirometry Reference Data for South-Asian Children: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooky Lum

    Full Text Available Spirometry datasets from South-Asian children were collated from four centres in India and five within the UK. Records with transcription errors, missing values for height or spirometry, and implausible values were excluded(n = 110.Following exclusions, cross-sectional data were available from 8,124 children (56.3% male; 5-17 years. When compared with GLI-predicted values from White Europeans, forced expired volume in 1s (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC in South-Asian children were on average 15% lower, ranging from 4-19% between centres. By contrast, proportional reductions in FEV1 and FVC within all but two datasets meant that the FEV1/FVC ratio remained independent of ethnicity. The 'GLI-Other' equation fitted data from North India reasonably well while 'GLI-Black' equations provided a better approximation for South-Asian data than the 'GLI-White' equation. However, marked discrepancies in the mean lung function z-scores between centres especially when examined according to socio-economic conditions precluded derivation of a single South-Asian GLI-adjustment.Until improved and more robust prediction equations can be derived, we recommend the use of 'GLI-Black' equations for interpreting most South-Asian data, although 'GLI-Other' may be more appropriate for North Indian data. Prospective data collection using standardised protocols to explore potential sources of variation due to socio-economic circumstances, secular changes in growth/predictors of lung function and ethnicities within the South-Asian classification are urgently required.

  13. Effect on attendance by including focused information on spirometry in preventive health checks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Løkke, Anders; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sandbæk, Annelli

    2016-12-01

    Early detection of lung diseases can help to reduce their severity. Lung diseases are among the most frequently occurring and serious diseases worldwide; nonetheless, many patients remain undiagnosed. Preventive health checks including spirometry can detect lung diseases at early stages; however, recruitment for health checks remains a challenge, and little is known about what motivates the attendance. The aim of the study is to examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation compared to general information will impact the attendance rate in preventive health checks. This randomized, controlled trial tests the effect of information on spirometry embedded in the Check your Health Preventive Program (CHPP). The CHPP is an open-label, household cluster-randomized, controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30- to -49-year-olds in a Danish municipality from 2012 to 2017 (n = 26,216). During 2015-2016, 4356 citizens aged 30-49 years will be randomized into two groups. The intervention group receives an invitation which highlights the value and contents of spirometry as part of a health check and information about lung diseases. The comparison group receives a standard invitation containing practical information and specifies the contents of the general health check. Outcomes are (1) differences in attendance rates measured by the proportion of citizens attending each of the two study groups and (2) proportion of persons at risk defined by smoking status and self-reported lung symptoms in the study groups. The proportion of participants with abnormal spirometry assessed at the preventive health check will be compared between the two study groups. The results from the present study will inform future recruitment strategies to health checks. The developed material on content, value, and information about lung disease is feasible and transferable to other populations, making it easy to implement if effective. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT

  14. Short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program in spirometry use for primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represas-Represas, Cristina; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; González-Silva, Ana Isabel; García-Martínez, Ana; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of spirometry, its use and quality are limited in the Primary Care setting. There are few accredited training programs that have demonstrated improvement in the quality of spirometric studies. In this paper, we analyze the short- and long-term effectiveness of a supervised training program for performing and interpreting spirometries. Ours is an intervention study with before and after measurements. The target population included teams of physicians and nursing staff at 26 health-care centers in the area of Vigo (Galicia, Spain). The structured training program involved 2 theoretical and practical training sessions (that were 2months apart), an intermediate period of 30 supervised spirometries performed in the respective centers and weekly e-mail exercises. Effectiveness was evaluated using exercises at the beginning (test 1) and the end (test 2) of the 1st day, 2nd day (test 3) and one year later (test 4), as well as the analysis of spirometries done in month1, month2 and one year later. Participants also completed a survey about their satisfaction. 74 participants initiated the program; 72 completed the program, but only 45 participated in the one-year evaluation. Mean test scores were: 4.1±1.9 on test 1; 7.5±1.6 on test 2; 8.9±1.3 on test 3, and 8.8±1.4 on test 4. During month1, the percentage of correctly done/interpreted tests was 71%, in month two it was 91% and after one year it was 83% (P<.05). A training program based on theoretical and practical workshops and a supervised follow-up of spirometries significantly improved the ability of Primary Care professionals to carry out and interpret spirometric testing, although the quality of the tests diminished over time. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Survival and spirometry outcomes after lung transplantation from donors aged 70 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Wiebke; Ius, Fabio; Salman, Jawad; Avsar, Murat; Tudorache, Igor; Kühn, Christian; Wiegmann, Bettina; Marsch, Georg; Kaufeld, Tim; Zinne, Norman; Fuehner, Thomas; Greer, Mark; Gottlieb, Jens; Boethig, Dietmar; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Warnecke, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    Mediocre donation rates and increasing demand for lung transplantation leads transplant centers to consider extended-criteria donor lungs. Arguably, the largest remaining non-utilized lung donor segment is the elderly individual, already considered for visceral organ donation but not thoracic. So far, transplantation of donor lungs aged ≥ 70 years is rarely reported, and recipient outcomes are unknown. Accordingly, we report a single-center series of lung transplantations from donors aged ≥ 70 years and compare outcomes with contemporary lung transplantations from younger donors. All bilateral lung transplantations performed at our center between March 2011 and July 2014 were analyzed, and 2 cohorts were built according to lung donor age. A total of 440 bilateral lung transplantations were performed from 413 donors aged history (43.7% vs 14.8%, p = 0.003) or for abnormal bronchoscopy results (52.9% vs 15.8%, p = 0.002). Recipients receiving donor lungs aged <70 years were younger than those receiving older donor lungs ≥ 70 (49.8 [range, 35-58] vs 58 [range, 53-62] years, p < 0.0001). Underlying diagnoses did not differ significantly between the groups. Post-operative mechanical ventilation times (15 [range, 10-59] vs 27.5 [range, 10-75.8] hours), intensive care unit stays (3 [range, 1-5] vs 3 [range, 1-8] days), and total hospital lengths of stay (24 [range, 22-40.5] vs 24 [range, 22-40] days) of the recipients did not differ significantly between the two groups. The percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 86.5% ± 26.2% 12 months after transplantation of younger lungs vs 72.2% ± 23.8% (p = 0.01) after transplantation of older lungs. Differentiating the spirometry findings according to underlying diseases showed significantly lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second values after transplantation of donor lungs aged ≥70 only in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis recipients but not in emphysema patients. Patient survival up to 36 months was

  16. Testicular microlithiasis and leydig cell proliferation in wistar rats underwent fowler-stephens procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gougoudi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study investigates the outcome of Fowler-Stephens operation in prepubertal Wistar rats focused on microlithiasis and Leydig cell hyperplasia development. Methods: Thirty-eight (38 animals underwent laparoscopic Fowler-Stephens operation on the right testis (8 of them formed the control group and 6 of them additional contra-lateral orchectomy. The testes were examined histological 9,30,70 and 90 days later, while ultrasound study was perfomed a day earlier. Results: Initially, atrophic signs were visible as early as 9 days after the operation. Signs of intratubular calcification were obvious 30 days after the operation, in severe atrophic testes. Another important point was that in the animals that underwent orchectomy, testicular microlithiasis co-existed with lesions of Leydig cell hyperplasia. Conclusions: Microlithiasis and Leydig cell hyperplasia seem to have causative relation in operated undescended testis and present serious postoperative complications, with a review in the literature.

  17. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  18. Dysphagia among Adult Patients who Underwent Surgery for Esophageal Atresia at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Huynh-Trudeau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies.

  19. LARYNGEAL CANCER: SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC, LIFE STYLE AND CLINICAL RISK FACTORS AMONG PATIENTS UNDERWENT TOTAL LARYNGECTOMY

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. EL-MOSELHY, Y. M. SALEH, M. M. EL-SAWY

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngeal cancer (LC) is an important health problem. It is one of the most common respiratory cancers. The prevalence of this cancer is increasing all over the world. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to determine the clinical features of the laryngeal cancer patients underwent total laryngectomty (TL); to define the characteristic features of surgery in these patients; and to define the life style, health behavioral, sociodemographic and clinical risk factors of the ...

  20. PROPHYLAXIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION WITH VANCOMYCIN IN 513 PATIENTS THAT UNDERWENT TO LUMBAR FUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Scheverin, Nicolas; Steverlynck, Alejandro; Castelli, Roberto; Sobrero, Diego; Kopp, Nicolas Videla; Dinelli, Dino; Sarotto, Anibal; Falavigna, Asdrubal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To assess the prophylactic effects of local vancomycin on an infection of the surgical site in patients undergoing lumbar instrumented fusion.Methods:Retrospective study from January 2011 to June 2014 in patients with symptomatic and refractory lumbar spine stenosis and listhesis who underwent instrumented pedicle screw spinal fusion. Two groups of patient were analyzed, one using vancomycin on the surgical site, vancomycin group (VG) and the control group (CG) without topical vanco...

  1. Risk Factors for Metachronous Gastric Neoplasms in Patients Who Underwent Endoscopic Resection of a Gastric Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Joo Sung; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-03-01

    To identify the risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasms in patients who underwent an endoscopic resection of a gastric neoplasm. We prospectively collected clinicopathologic data and measured the methylation levels of HAND1, THBD, APC, and MOS in the gastric mucosa by methylation-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction in patients who underwent endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasms. A total of 257 patients with gastric neoplasms (113 low-grade dysplasias, 25 highgrade dysplasias, and 119 early gastric cancers) were enrolled. Metachronous gastric neoplasm developed in 7.4% of patients during a mean follow-up of 52 months. The 5-year cumulative incidence of metachronous gastric neoplasm was 4.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that moderate/severe corpus intestinal metaplasia and family history of gastric cancer were independent risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasm development; the hazard ratios were 4.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 13.87; p=0.022) and 3.52 (95% CI, 1.09 to 11.40; p=0.036), respectively. The methylation level of MOS was significantly elevated in patients with metachronous gastric neoplasms compared age- and sex-matched patients without metachronous gastric neoplasms (p=0.020). In patients who underwent endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasms, moderate/severe corpus intestinal metaplasia and a family history of gastric cancer were independent risk factors for metachronous gastric neoplasm, and MOS was significantly hypermethylated in patients with metachronous gastric neoplasms.

  2. Acute myocardial infarctation in patients with critical ischemia underwent lower limb revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esdras Marques Lins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD of the lower limbs. Patients with PAOD often also have obstructive atherosclerosis in other arterial sites, mainly the coronary arteries. This means that patients who undergo infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia have a higher risk of AMI. There are, however, few reports in the literature that have assessed this risk properly. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass to treat critical ischemia of the lower limbs caused by PAOD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 64 patients who underwent 82 infrainguinal bypass operations, from February 2011 to July 2012 were studied. All patients had electrocardiograms and troponin I blood assays during the postoperative period (within 72 hours. RESULTS: There were abnormal ECG findings and elevated blood troponin I levels suggestive of AMI in five (6% of the 82 operations performed. All five had conventional surgery. The incidence of AMI as a proportion of the 52 conventional surgery cases was 9.6%. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: There was a 6% AMI incidence among patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to PAOD. Considering only cases operated using conventional surgery, the incidence of AMI was 9.6%.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new large animal spirometry device using mainstream CO2 flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, T D; Lammer, V; Schramel, J P; Moens, Y P S

    2014-07-01

    A spirometry device equipped with mainstream CO2 flow sensor is not available for large animal anaesthesia. To measure the resistance of a new large animal spirometry device and assess its agreement with reference methods for volume measurements. In vitro experiment and crossover study using anaesthetised horses. A flow partitioning device (FPD) equipped with 4 human CO2 flow sensors was tested. Pressure differences were measured across the whole FPD and across each sensor separately using air flows (range: 90-720 l/min). One sensor was connected to a spirometry monitor for in vitro volume (3, 5 and 7 l) measurements. These measurements were compared with a reference method. Five anaesthetised horses were used for tidal volume (VT) measurements using the FPD and a horse-lite sensor (reference method). Bland-Altman analysis, ANOVA and linear regression analysis were used for data analysis. Pressure differences across each sensor were similar suggesting equal flow partitioning. The resistance of the device increased with flow (range: 0.3-1.5 cmH2 O s/l) and was higher than that of the horse-lite. The limits of agreement for volume measurements were within -1 and 2% in vitro and -12 and 0% in vivo. Nine of 147 VT measurements in horses were outside of the ± 10% limits of acceptance but most of these erroneous measurements occurred with VTs lower than 4 l. The determined correction factor for volume measurements was 3.97 ± 0.03. The limits of agreement for volume measurements by the new device were within ± 10% using clinically relevant range of volumes. The new spirometry device can be recommended for measurement of VT in adult Warmblood horses. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Reference Values for Spirometry Derived Using Lambda, Mu, Sigma (LMS) Method in Korean Adults: in Comparison with Previous References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Bum Seak; Myong, Jun Pyo; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Koo, Jung Wan; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2018-01-15

    The present study aimed to update the prediction equations for spirometry and their lower limits of normal (LLN) by using the lambda, mu, sigma (LMS) method and to compare the outcomes with the values of previous spirometric reference equations. Spirometric data of 10,249 healthy non-smokers (8,776 females) were extracted from the fourth and fifth versions of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV, 2007-2009; V, 2010-2012). Reference equations were derived using the LMS method which allows modeling skewness (lambda [L]), mean (mu [M]), and coefficient of variation (sigma [S]). The outcome equations were compared with previous reference values. Prediction equations were presented in the following form: predicted value = e{a + b × ln(height) + c × ln(age) + M - spline}. The new predicted values for spirometry and their LLN derived using the LMS method were shown to more accurately reflect transitions in pulmonary function in young adults than previous prediction equations derived using conventional regression analysis in 2013. There were partial discrepancies between the new reference values and the reference values from the Global Lung Function Initiative in 2012. The results should be interpreted with caution for young adults and elderly males, particularly in terms of the LLN for forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity in elderly males. Serial spirometry follow-up, together with correlations with other clinical findings, should be emphasized in evaluating the pulmonary function of individuals. Future studies are needed to improve the accuracy of reference data and to develop continuous reference values for spirometry across all ages.

  5. An Investigation of Respiratory Symptoms and Spirometry Parameters of Welders in a Steel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangkooy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Fumes released form welding activities are capable of initiating several acute and chronic respiratory effects. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate respiratory symptoms and spirometry parameters in welders of a steel industry. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in a steel industry and involved 60 welders and 40 non-welders. A questionnaire was used to record participants’ details, and to determine pulmonary function values the spirometric test was used. Pearson correlation, paired and independent t test as statistic tests were used for data analysis. Results Comparison between pulmonary function values (PFV showed a significant relationship between forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and 25% - 75% forced expiratory flow (FEF25 - 75% of the two groups. These values in the welder group had a significant reduction and declines were from 6 to 11 mL. Age and work experience showed a significant correlation with PFV in the two groups. Conclusions All workers that participated in this study were relatively young and considering them being young and not having long history of work experience, our results revealed that welders had less respiratory capacity and this was related to increasing work experience and age, but inconsistent with smoking habits of the two groups.

  6. The effect of incentive spirometry on arterial blood gases after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Bollbanabad, Hiva Mohammadi; Mirmohammadsadeghi, Mohsen; Khalifezade, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    After coronary artery bypass surgery, pulmonary complications and oxygenation disorders are common, which have an important role in mortality and morbidity. Different methods are used for the improvement of pulmonary function and oxygenation, of which incentive spirometry (IS) has been investigated here. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of IS on arterial blood gases after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This was a clinical trial. Fifty patients who were candidates for CABG were chosen. The patients had been allocated to two random groups of intervention and control. The intervention was done through IS. These two groups were compared for the arterial blood gases' preoperative level, and the levels on first (after extubation), second, and third postoperative days. The study findings showed that on the third postoperative day, there was a significant difference between the intervention and control groups in the mean amount of arterial blood oxygen (82.3 ± 4.7 vs. 72.7 ± 7.1, respectively, P = 0.02), arterial blood carbon dioxide (36.8 ± 2 vs. 43.7 ± 3.2, respectively, P = 0.007), and oxygen saturation (96.8 ± 1.4 vs. 90.5 ± 1.4, respectively, P = 0.03). This investigation shows that using IS is significantly effective in the improvement of blood arterial gas parameters.

  7. Prediction equations for spirometry in four- to six-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Danielle Corrêa; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Martins, Jocimar Avelar; Vieira, Bruna da Silva Pinto Pinheiro; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; de Mendonça, Karla Morganna Pereira Pinto; Borja, Raíssa de Oliveira; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues; Parreira, Verônica Franco

    2016-01-01

    To generate prediction equations for spirometry in 4- to 6-year-old children. Forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 0.5s, forced expiratory volume in one second, peak expiratory flow, and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity were assessed in 195 healthy children residing in the town of Sete Lagoas, state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. The least mean squares method was used to derive the prediction equations. The level of significance was established as p<0.05. Overall, 85% of the children succeeded in performing the spirometric maneuvers. In the prediction equation, height was the single predictor of the spirometric variables as follows: forced vital capacity=exponential [(-2.255)+(0.022×height)], forced expiratory volume in 0.5s=exponential [(-2.288)+(0.019×height)], forced expiratory volume in one second=exponential [(-2.767)+(0.026×height)], peak expiratory flow=exponential [(-2.908)+(0.019×height)], and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of the forced vital capacity=exponential [(-1.404)+(0.016×height)]. Neither age nor weight influenced the regression equations. No significant differences in the predicted values for boys and girls were observed. The predicted values obtained in the present study are comparable to those reported for preschoolers from both Brazil and other countries. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary function of patients with chronic neck pain: a spirometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2014-04-01

    Chronic neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pain conditions experienced by many people during their lives. Although patients with neck pain are managed predominantly as musculoskeletal patients, there are indications that they also have poor pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to examine whether patients with chronic neck pain have spirometric abnormalities and whether neck pain problems and psychological states are associated with these abnormalities. Forty-five participants with chronic neck pain and 45 well-matched healthy controls were recruited. Spirometry was used to assess participants' pulmonary function. Neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, cervical range of motion, forward head posture, psychological states, disability, and pain intensity were also evaluated. The results showed that patients with chronic neck pain yielded significantly reduced vital capacity, FVC, expiratory reserve volume, and maximum voluntary ventilation (P .05). Strength of neck muscles, pain intensity, and kinesiophobia were found to be significantly correlated (r > 0.3, P < .05) with respiratory function. Patients with chronic neck pain do not have optimal pulmonary function. Cervical spine muscle dysfunction in parallel with pain intensity and kinesiophobia are factors that are associated mainly with this respiratory dysfunction.

  9. Differences in spirometry values between U.S. children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years with current asthma, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, Brian K; Simon, Alan E; Tilert, Timothy; Okelo, Sande; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-03-01

    National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines recommend that periodic spirometry be performed in youth with asthma. NAEPP uses different spirometry criteria to define uncontrolled asthma for children (6-11 years) and adolescents (12+ years). To describe differences in spirometry between U.S. children and adolescents with current asthma. We examined cross-sectional spirometry data from 453 U.S. youth with current asthma age 6-19 years from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The main outcomes were percentage predicted forced expiratory volume at 1 sec (FEV1%) ≤80 and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ≤0.80. We also examined the prevalence of youth with spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma, using NAEPP age-specific criteria, defined for children aged 6-11 years as FEV1% ≤80 or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80, and for adolescents aged 12-19 years as FEV1% ≤80. Children 6-11 years and adolescents 12-19 years did not differ in prevalence of FEV1% ≤80 (10.1% vs. 9.0%) or FEV1/FVC ≤0.80 (30.6% vs. 29.8%). However, based on the NAEPP age-specific criteria, 33.0% of children 6-11 years and 9.0% of adolescents 12-19 years had spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma (P spirometry values consistent with uncontrolled asthma did differ. The difference appears to stem mainly from the different spirometry criteria for the two age groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Predictors of poor-quality spirometry in two cohorts of older adults in Russia and Belgium: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeshi, Eralda; Zelenukha, Dmitry; Vaes, Bert; Andreeva, Elena; Frolova, Elena; Degryse, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-23

    Spirometry is an important test for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases, yet it is underused especially in older adults. Several predictors of good-quality spirometry in this age group have been reported, based mainly on in/outpatients of geriatric and/or respiratory units. This study aims to assess predictors of poor-quality spirometry in community-dwelling older adults from two primary care cohorts in Russia and Belgium. Spirograms from two population-based cohort studies in Russia (CRYSTAL) and Belgium (BELFRAIL) were assessed in accordance with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) acceptability and repeatability criteria and grouped into good and poor quality. Multivariable analysis assessed the association of poor-quality spirometry with socio-demographics, functional dependency, physical and mental functioning and co-morbidities. In all, 43.3% of the 522 BELFRAIL participants (84.71 ± 3.67 years old) and 57.7% of the 605 CRYSTAL participants (75.11 ± 5.97 years old) achieved all ATS/ERS acceptability and repeatability criteria. In both cohorts, those with poor-quality spirometry had lower cognitive function (mini-mental state examination (MMSE) ⩽ 24). After adjustment in multivariable analysis, MMSE ⩽ 24 had an odds ratio for poor-quality spirometry of 1.33 (95% CI = 0.78-2.28) in the BELFRAIL and 1.30 (95% CI = 0.88-1.91) in the CRYSTAL cohort. In community-dwelling older adults, including those over 80 years old, impaired cognition measured by the MMSE may not be an independent predictor of poor-quality spirometry. Further research is needed in this area, and spirometry should be used more often in older adults in primary care.

  11. Spirometry, questionnaire and electronic medical record based COPD in a population survey: Comparing prevalence, level of agreement and associations with potential risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Borl?e, Floor; Yzermans, C. Joris; Krop, Esmeralda; Aalders, Bernadette; Rooijackers, Jos; Zock, Jan-Paul; van Dijk, Christel E.; Maassen, Catharina B. M.; Schellevis, Fran?ois; Heederik, Dick; Smit, Lidwien A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: COPD-diagnosis is confirmed by post-bronchodilator (BD) spirometry. However, epidemiological studies often rely on pre-BD spirometry, self-reports, or medical records. This population-based study aims to determine COPD-prevalence based on four different operational definitions and their level of agreement, and to compare associations between COPD-definitions and risk factors. Methods: COPD-prevalence in 1,793 adults from the general Dutch population (aged 18–70 years) was assessed...

  12. A Study of the Use of Impulse Oscillometry in the Evaluation of Children With Asthma: Analysis of Lung Parameters, Order Effect, and Utility Compared With Spirometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarow, Hirsh D.; Skinner, Jeff; Young, Michael; Gaskins, Donna; Nelson, Celeste; Gergen, Peter J.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The ability to objectively measure lung function in children is critical in the assessment and treatment of asthma in this age group. We thus determined the effectiveness of impulse oscillometry (IOS) as a non-invasive technique to assess lung function in children and in comparison to spirometry for sensitivity and specificity, testing variability, and the order effect of sequential testing of IOS and spirometry. Methods One hundred seventeen children sequentially evaluated in a pediatric clinic and under medical care for disease, were asked to perform IOS and spirometry. The utility of IOS and spirometry in differentiating children that had asthma versus those children who did not was then analyzed. Results In the primary analysis (n = 117), bronchodilator response using IOS distinguished asthmatics from non-asthmatics, P = 0.0008 for R10. Receiver–operator characteristic curve (ROC) analysis of R10 bronchodilator response at the best cut-off (–8.6% change) correctly identified 77% of patients with asthma and excluded 76% of non-asthmatics. Amongst those children able to perform spirometry (asthmatics, n = 66; non-asthmatics, n = 16), FEV1 did not reveal a difference between these two groups, while area of reactance (AX) did distinguish these groups (P = 0.0092). Sequential testing of IOS and then spirometry (n = 47) showed a significant decrement in lung function as determined by IOS following performance of spirometry (P = 0.0309). Conclusion In the diagnosis and management of children with lung disease, IOS is a non-invasive approach that easily and objectively measures lung impedance and should be considered as both an adjunct, and in some situations, an alternative to standard spirometry. PMID:22170806

  13. A study of the use of impulse oscillometry in the evaluation of children with asthma: analysis of lung parameters, order effect, and utility compared with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarow, Hirsh D; Skinner, Jeff; Young, Michael; Gaskins, Donna; Nelson, Celeste; Gergen, Peter J; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2012-01-01

    The ability to objectively measure lung function in children is critical in the assessment and treatment of asthma in this age group. We thus determined the effectiveness of impulse oscillometry (IOS) as a non-invasive technique to assess lung function in children and in comparison to spirometry for sensitivity and specificity, testing variability, and the order effect of sequential testing of IOS and spirometry. One hundred seventeen children sequentially evaluated in a pediatric clinic and under medical care for disease, were asked to perform IOS and spirometry. The utility of IOS and spirometry in differentiating children that had asthma versus those children who did not was then analyzed. In the primary analysis (n = 117), bronchodilator response using IOS distinguished asthmatics from non-asthmatics, P = 0.0008 for R10. Receiver-operator characteristic curve (ROC) analysis of R10 bronchodilator response at the best cut-off (-8.6% change) correctly identified 77% of patients with asthma and excluded 76% of non-asthmatics. Amongst those children able to perform spirometry (asthmatics, n = 66; non-asthmatics, n = 16), FEV(1) did not reveal a difference between these two groups, while area of reactance (AX) did distinguish these groups (P = 0.0092). Sequential testing of IOS and then spirometry (n = 47) showed a significant decrement in lung function as determined by IOS following performance of spirometry (P = 0.0309). In the diagnosis and management of children with lung disease, IOS is a non-invasive approach that easily and objectively measures lung impedance and should be considered as both an adjunct, and in some situations, an alternative to standard spirometry. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Incidence of Concomitant Precancerous Lesions in Cases Who Underwent Hysterectomy for Prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Aydin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was is to assess the incidence of unexpected gynecological cancers and pre-cancerous lesions following hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse to better understand the risks of uterine sparing surgery. Material and Method: This was a retrospective analysis of histopathology findings after hysterectomy for uterine prolapse surgery who underwent preoperative diagnostic work including cervical cytology, transvaginal ultrasonography and endometrial histopathological examination for a high risk group (Postmenopausal women with an endometrial thickness of %u22655 mm and premenopausal women with abnormal bleeding. Patients with a history of endometrial, cervical and/or adnexal precancerous or cancerous pathological conditions and with incomplete medical records were excluded.Results: Results were taken from 106 women who underwent hysterectomy. The abdominal route was used in 22 cases (21.7 %, the vaginal route in 82 patients (77.4 % and laparoscopic-assisted vaginal route in two (1.9 % women. Oophorectomy was performed in 35 (33 % cases. None of the patients had malignant histopathology specimens from hysterectomy. Total premalignant pathology incidence was 7.5 % (8/106. Six (5.7% patients had simple endometrial hyperplasia and 2 patients (1.9 % had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Discussion: The incidence of unexpected endometrial, cervical or ovarian malignancy among women who underwent hysterectomy after preoperative diagnostic workup including transvaginal ultrasonograhy, endometrial pathological examination to high risk cases was negligible. The inclusion of low risk endometrial and cervical precancerous lesions increased the incidences. Our results could provide precious data to extrapolate to similar populations with uterine prolapse who desire surgical correction sparing uterus.

  15. Reference values for spirometry and their use in test interpretation: A Position Statement from the Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzale, Danny; Hall, Graham; Swanney, Maureen P

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, spirometry testing tended to be confined to the realm of hospital-based laboratories but is now performed in a variety of health care settings. Regardless of the setting in which the test is conducted, the fundamental basis of spirometry is that the test is both performed and interpreted according to the international standards. The purpose of this Australian and New Zealand Society of Respiratory Science (ANZSRS) statement is to provide the background and recommendations for the interpretation of spirometry results in clinical practice. This includes the benchmarking of an individual's results to population reference data, as well as providing the platform for a statistically and conceptually based approach to the interpretation of spirometry results. Given the many limitations of older reference equations, it is imperative that the most up-to-date and relevant reference equations are used for test interpretation. Given this, the ANZSRS recommends the adoption of the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) 2012 spirometry reference values throughout Australia and New Zealand. The ANZSRS also recommends that interpretation of spirometry results is based on the lower limit of normal from the reference values and the use of Z-scores where available. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  16. Assessment of serology and spirometry and the combination of both to complement microbiological isolation for earlier detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik Pirš, Ana; Krivec, Uroš; Simčič, Saša; Seme, Katja

    2016-11-25

    The aim of this study was to assess whether serology and spirometry and the combination of both can complement culture-based detection for earlier recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis. A 4 year longitudinal prospective study that included 67 Slovenian children with cystic fibrosis with a mean age of 10.5 years was conducted. Serology, spirometry and a scoring system combining serology and spirometry were assessed and compared. Infection was confirmed with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from respiratory samples. There was a significantly positive correlation between serology and the combination of serology and spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation (P spirometry the highest sensitivity (0.90). Both had a high negative predictive value (0.93 and 0.79 respectively). Using serology and the combination of serology and lung function measurement can be beneficial for earlier detection of infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis when done simultaneously with standard culture-based detection from respiratory samples.

  17. The development of a community-based spirometry service in the Canterbury region of New Zealand: observations on new service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epton, Michael J; Stanton, Josh D; McGeoch, Graham R B; Shand, Brett I; Swanney, Maureen P

    2015-03-05

    In 2008, as part of the changes to develop integrated health care services in the Canterbury region of New Zealand, the local health board in collaboration with general practitioners, respiratory specialists and scientists introduced a programme for general practices to provide laboratory-quality spirometry in the community. The service adhered to the 2005 ATS/ERS international spirometry standards. The spirometry service was provided by trained practice nurses and community respiratory nurses, and was monitored and quality assured by certified respiratory scientists in the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Christchurch Hospital and CISO (Canterbury Initiative Services Organisation). These two organisations were responsible for organising training seminars and refresher courses on spirometry technique and interpretation of results. A total of 10 practices have now become approved spirometry providers, with the number of tests carried out in the primary care setting increasing gradually. Consistently high-quality spirometry tests have been obtained and are now presented on a centrally available results database for all hospital and community clinicians to review. Although the service has proved to be more convenient for patients, the tests have not been delivered as quickly as those carried out by the Respiratory Physiology Laboratory. However, the time scales for testing achieved by the community service is considered suitable for investigation of chronic disease. The success of the service has been dependent on several key factors including hospital and clinical support and a centralised quality assurance programme, a comprehensive training schedule and online clinical guidance and close integration between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  18. HLA-G regulatory haplotypes and implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cynthia Hernandes; Gelmini, Georgia Fernanda; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; Mattar, Sibelle Botogosque; Vargas, Rafael Gustavo; Roxo, Valéria Maria Munhoz Sperandio; Schuffner, Alessandro; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2012-09-01

    The role of HLA-G in several clinical conditions related to reproduction has been investigated. Important polymorphisms have been found within the 5'URR and 3'UTR regions of the HLA-G promoter. The aim of the present study was to investigate 16 SNPs in the 5'URR and 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism located in the 3'UTR region of the HLA-G gene and its possible association with the implantation outcome in couples who underwent assisted reproduction treatments (ART). The case group was composed of 25 ART couples. Ninety-four couples with two or more term pregnancies composed the control group. Polymorphism haplotype frequencies of the HLA-G were determined for both groups. The Haplotype 5, Haplotype 8 and Haplotype 11 were absolute absence in ART couples. The HLA-G*01:01:02a, HLA-G*01:01:02b alleles and the 14-bp ins polymorphism, Haplotype 2, showed an increased frequency in case women and similar distribution between case and control men. However, this susceptibility haplotype is significantly presented in case women and in couple with failure implantation after treatment, which led us to suggest a maternal effect, associated with this haplotype, once their presence in women is related to a higher number of couples who underwent ART. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Clinical profiles of 710 premenopausal women with adenomyosis who underwent hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelian; Liu, Xishi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of various symptoms and their associated characteristics in women with adenomyosis who underwent hysterectomy, and to determine which symptoms are likely to go with which others in these patients. In 2007, 1697 consecutive patients underwent hysterectomy in our hospital. Among them, 734 (43.3%) were histologically confirmed to have adenomyosis, and 710 of them were premenopausal. The medical charts of all 734 patients were retrieved, and their demographic, clinical information and postoperative findings were recorded. We used the Verbal Descriptor Scale to measure the preoperative severity of dysmenorrhea. The Apriori Algorithm was used for mining the association of different symptoms. Among the 710 premenopausal patients, only 4.5% of them had no symptoms. Dysmenorrhea was the most common complaint, occurring in 81.7% of patients. Dysmenorrhea co-occurred most frequently with menorrhagia. The presence of adhesion, presence of endometriosis, complaint of menorrhagia, longer duration of disease, gravidity, palpable pain during pelvic examination, and diffuse adenomyosis were positively associated with the severity of dysmenorrhea. Age, severity of dysmenorrhea, and complaint of metrorrhagia were positively associated with the risk of menorrhagia. Dysmenorrhea is the most common complaint in women with adenomyosis, which often goes with that of menorrhagia. Adenomyosis often co-occurs with endometriosis and leiomyomas. Various factors are associated with the risk of having different symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. Voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Jawdat; Kocherov, Stanislav; Chertin, Leonid; Farkas, Amicur; Chertin, Boris

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the voiding patterns of adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair in childhood. Following IRB approval 103 (22.7%) of 449 adult patients who underwent hypospadias repair between 1978 and 1993 responded to the following questionnaires: International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Short Form 12 questionnaire (SF-12). Uroflowmetry (UF) was performed for all patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to the primary meatus localization. Group I had 63 patients (61.5%) treated for glanular hypospadias, group II had 19 patients (18.4%) treated for distal hypospadias, and group III comprised the remaining 21 patients (20.4%) treated for proximal hypospadias. The mean ± SD I-PSS score for all patients who responded to the questionnaire was 2.3 ± 2.4, and UF was 21.1 ± 4.3 mL/s. The patients from groups I and III had fewer urinary symptoms compared with those of the group II: 1.3 ± 1.5, 5.5 ± 2.4, and 1.6 ± 1.4, respectively (p hypospadias repair in childhood had normal or mild voiding disturbance, with no effects on their physical or mental status. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Circulating S100B and Adiponectin in Children Who Underwent Open Heart Surgery and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Varrica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. S100B protein, previously proposed as a consolidated marker of brain damage in congenital heart disease (CHD newborns who underwent cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, has been progressively abandoned due to S100B CNS extra-source such as adipose tissue. The present study investigated CHD newborns, if adipose tissue contributes significantly to S100B serum levels. Methods. We conducted a prospective study in 26 CHD infants, without preexisting neurological disorders, who underwent cardiac surgery and CPB in whom blood samples for S100B and adiponectin (ADN measurement were drawn at five perioperative time-points. Results. S100B showed a significant increase from hospital admission up to 24 h after procedure reaching its maximum peak (P0.05 have been found all along perioperative monitoring. ADN/S100B ratio pattern was identical to S100B alone with the higher peak at the end of CPB and remained higher up to 24 h from surgery. Conclusions. The present study provides evidence that, in CHD infants, S100B protein is not affected by an extra-source adipose tissue release as suggested by no changes in circulating ADN concentrations.

  2. Undergrading and understaging in patients with clinically insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irai S. Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of our study is to evaluate the undergrading and understaging rates in patients with clinically localized insignificant prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between July 2005 and July 2008, 406 patients underwent radical prostatectomy for clinical localized prostate cancer in our hospital. Based on preoperative data, 93 of these patients fulfilled our criteria of non-significance: Gleason score < 7, stage T1c, PSA < 10 ng/mL and percentage of affected fragments less than 25%. The pathologic stage and Gleason score were compared to preoperative data to evaluate the rate of understaging and undergrading. The biochemical recurrence free survival of these operated insignificant cancers were also evaluated. RESULTS: On surgical specimen analysis 74.7% of patients had Gleason score of 6 or less and 25.3% had Gleason 7 or greater. Furthermore 8.3% of cases showed extracapsular extension. After 36 months of follow-up 3.4% had biochemical recurrence, defined by a PSA above 0.4 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the limited number of cases, we have found considerable rates of undergrading and understaging in patients with prostate cancer whose current definitions classified them as candidates for active surveillance. According to our results the current definition seems inadequate as up to a third of patients had higher grade or cancer outside the prostate.

  3. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT < 5º percentil por pletismografia. Distúrbio ventilatório obstrutivo (DVO) foi caracterizado por resistência específica de vias aéreas elevada, resposta significativa do VEF1 pós-broncodilatador e/ou um FEF25-75% < 50% do previsto associado a uma relação VR/CPT elevada. Distúrbio ventilatório inespecífico (DVI) foi caracterizado por CPT na faixa prevista e ausência de obstrução. Distúrbio ventilatório combinado (DVC) foi caracterizado por CPT reduzida e achados indicativos de obstrução ao fluxo aéreo. Os diagnósticos clínicos foram baseados em suspeita clínica, um questionário respiratório e revisão de exames de interesse. Foram incluídos 300 pacientes no estudo, dos quais 108 (36%) tiveram diagnóstico de DVR, enquanto 120 (40%) foram diagnosticados com DVO ou DVC e 72 (24%) com DVI. Destes últimos, 24 (33%) tinham diagnóstico clínico de DVO. Nesta amostra, 151 pacientes (50,3%) eram obesos, e isso se associou com todos os padrões de dist

  4. Characterization of optical-surface-imaging-based spirometry for respiratory surrogating in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Lin, Tiffany; Yuan, Amy; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive characterization of a novel respiratory surrogate that uses optical surface imaging (OSI) for accurate tidal volume (TV) measurement, dynamic airflow (TV′) calculation, and quantitative breathing pattern (BP) estimation during free breathing (FB), belly breathing (BB), chest breathing (CB), and breath hold (BH). Methods: Optical surface imaging, which captures all respiration-induced torso surface motion, was applied to measure respiratory TV, TV′, and BP in three common breathing patterns. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in breathing experiments with concurrent OSI-based and conventional spirometric measurements under an institutional review board approved protocol. This OSI-based technique measures dynamic TV from torso volume change (ΔVtorso = TV) in reference to full exhalation and airflow (TV′ = dTV/dt). Volume conservation, excluding exchanging air, was applied for OSI-based measurements under negligible pleural pressure variation in FB, BB, and CB. To demonstrate volume conservation, a constant TV was measured during BH while the chest and belly are moving (“pretended” respiration). To assess the accuracy of OSI-based spirometry, a conventional spirometer was used as the standard for both TV and TV′. Using OSI, BP was measured as BPOSI = ΔVchest/ΔVtorso and BP can be visualized using BPSHI = SHIchest/(SHIchest + SHIbelly), where surface height index (SHI) is defined as the mean vertical distance within a region of interest on the torso surface. A software tool was developed for OSI image processing, volume calculation, and BP visualization, and another tool was implemented for data acquisition using a Bernoulli-type spirometer. Results: The accuracy of the OSI-based spirometry is −21 ± 33 cm3 or −3.5% ± 6.3% averaged from 11 volunteers with 76 ± 28 breathing cycles on average in FB. Breathing variations between two separate acquisitions with approximate 30-min intervals are substantial: −1%

  5. Outcome of Patients Underwent Emergency Department Thoracotomy and Its Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Paydar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department thoracotomy (EDT may serve as the last survival chance for patients who arrive at hospital in extremis. It is considered as an effective tool for improvement of traumatic patients’ outcome. The present study was done with the goal of assessing the outcome of patients who underwent EDT and its predictive factors. Methods: In the present study, medical charts of 50 retrospective and 8 prospective cases underwent emergency department thoracotomy (EDT were reviewed during November 2011 to June 2013. Comparisons between survived and died patients were performed by Mann-Whitney U test and the predictive factors of EDT outcome were measured using multivariate logistic regression analysis. P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty eight cases of EDT were enrolled (86.2% male. The mean age of patients was 43.27±19.85 years with the range of 18-85. The mean time duration of CPR was recorded as 37.12±12.49 minutes. Eleven cases (19% were alive to be transported to OR (defined as ED survived. The mean time of survival in ED survived patients was 223.5±450.8 hours. More than 24 hours survival rate (late survived was 6.9% (4 cases. Only one case (1.7% survived to discharge from hospital (mortality rate=98.3%. There were only a significant relation between ED survival and SBP, GCS, CPR duration, and chest trauma (p=0.04. The results demonstrated that initial SBP lower than 80 mmHg (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.001-1.05, p=0.04 and presence of chest trauma (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.75-3.16, p=0.02 were independent predictive factors of EDT mortality. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that the survival rate of trauma patients underwent EDT was 1.7%. In addition, it was defined that falling systolic blood pressure below 80 mmHg and blunt trauma of chest are independent factors that along with poor outcome.

  6. [Screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by electronic mini-spirometry in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorilhon, P; Deat, J; Gérard, A; Laine, E; Laporte, C; Ruivard, M; Vaillant Roussel, H

    2014-05-01

    Screening for COPD is currently considered to be insufficient. Electronic mini-spirometers allow screening for COPD in general practice. To assess the prevalence of COPD in a population of at-risk patients in general practice (GP) and to identify the high-risk factors for the disease. A cross-sectional study was performed in a GP setting. Patients aged between 40 and 75years with a history of smoking, occupational exposure to toxic substances or chronic respiratory symptoms were offered airflow assessments by electronic mini-spirometry. For any value of FEV1/FEV6 less than 70 %, screening for COPD was considered as positive. Of the 778 patients seen during routine consultations, 273 (35.1 %) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The test was positive in 128 of the eligible patients (46.9 %). The prevalence of proven COPD (ratio<70 %) was 13.9 % (38 patients). The high-risk factors were age over 60years (P=0.03), body mass index over 28 (P=0.04), smoking history of more than 30pack-years (P<0.0001), presence of clinical signs (P<0.0001) and industrial exposure to toxic substances (P=0.03). Targeted screening of patients with risk factors for COPD can be performed in a GP setting. An electronic mini-spirometer is a reliable and inexpensive screening tool. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Saline-filled breast implant contamination with Curvularia species among women who underwent cosmetic breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainer, Marion A; Keshavarz, Homa; Jensen, Bette J; Arduino, Matthew J; Brandt, Mary E; Padhye, Arvind A; Jarvis, William R; Archibald, Lennox K

    2005-07-01

    During December 2000-July 2001, black sediment was noted in saline-filled silicone breast implants of women who had undergone revision surgery at facility A. Curvularia fungus was isolated from implant saline. To identify risk factors for contamination with Curvularia species, we performed case-control, retrospective cohort, and laboratory studies and conducted procedural reviews. A case patient was defined as any woman who underwent revision surgery at facility A between January 2000 and June 2001 and had black sediment in her implants. Five patients met the case definition. Contamination was associated with having had surgery performed in operating room (OR) 2 (4/88 vs. 1/140; P=.07) and a longer duration of surgery (PSurgery center infection control measures must include moisture control and balanced ventilation systems.

  8. A Pregnant Woman Who Underwent Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy due to Cushing’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Diri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS may lead to severe maternal and fetal morbidities and even mortalities in pregnancy. However, pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and treatment of CS. This study describes a 26-year-old pregnant woman admitted with hypertension-induced headache. Hormonal analyses performed due to her cushingoid phenotype revealed a diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone- (ACTH- independent CS. MRI showed a 3.5 cm adenoma in her right adrenal gland. After preoperative metyrapone therapy, she underwent a successful unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy at 14-week gestation. Although she had a temporary postoperative adrenal insufficiency, hormonal analyses showed that she has been in remission since delivery. Findings in this patient, as well as those in previous patients, indicate that pregnancy is not an absolute contraindication for laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Rather, such surgery should be considered a safe and efficient treatment method for pregnant women with cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas.

  9. Clinicopathological Features of Cervical Esophageal Cancer: Retrospective Analysis of 63 Consecutive Patients Who Underwent Surgical Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Yukaya, Takafumi; Tajiri, Hirotada; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Sho; Nakaji, Yu; Kudou, Kensuke; Akiyama, Shingo; Kasagi, Yuta; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Sonoda, Hideto; Ohgaki, Kippei; Oki, Eiji; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to elucidate the clinicopathological features and recent surgical results of cervical esophageal cancer. Cervical esophageal cancer has been reported to have a dismal prognosis. Accurate knowledge of the clinical characteristics of cervical esophageal cancer is warranted to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. The clinicopathological features and treatment results of 63 consecutive patients with cervical esophageal cancer (Ce group) who underwent surgical resection from 1980 to 2013 were analyzed and compared with 977 patients with thoracic or abdominal esophageal cancer (T/A group) who underwent surgical resection during that time. Among the patients who received curative resection, the 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rates of the Ce patients were significantly better than those of the T/A patients (overall: 77.3% vs 46.5%, respectively, P = 0.0067; disease-specific: 81.9% vs 55.8%, respectively, P = 0.0135). Although total pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy procedures were less frequently performed in the recent period, the rate of curative surgical procedures was markedly higher in the recent period (2000-1013) than that in the early period (1980-1999) (44.4% vs 88.9%, P = 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rate in the recent period (71.5%) was significantly better than that in the early period (40.7%, P = 0.0342). Curative resection for cervical esophageal cancer contributes to favorable outcomes compared with other esophageal cancers. Recent surgical results for cervical esophageal cancer have improved, and include an increased rate of curative resection and decreased rate of extensive surgery.

  10. Correlation between location of transposed ovary and function in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Aera; Lee, Yoo-Young; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2015-05-01

    The study investigated the association between the location of transposed ovaries and posttreatment ovarian function in patients with early cervical cancer (IB1-IIA) who underwent radical hysterectomy and ovarian transposition with or without adjuvant therapies. Retrospective medical records were reviewed to enroll the patients with early cervical cancer who underwent ovarian transposition during radical hysterectomy at Samsung Medical Center between July 1995 and July 2012. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) level was used as a surrogate marker for ovarian function. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The median age and body mass index (BMI) were 31 years (range, 24-39 years) and 21.3 kg/m² (range, 17.7-31.2 kg/m²), respectively. The median serum FSH level after treatment was 7.9 mIU/mL (range, 2.4-143.4 mIU/mL). The median distance from the iliac crest to transposed ovaries on erect plain abdominal x-ray was 0.5 cm (range, -2.7 to 5.2 cm). In multivariate analysis, posttreatment serum FSH levels were significantly associated with the location of transposed ovaries (β = -8.1, P = 0.032), concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) as an adjuvant therapy (β = 71.08, P = 0.006), and BMI before treatment (underweight: β = -59.93, P = 0.05; overweight: β = -40.62, P = 0.041). Location of transposed ovaries, adjuvant CCRT, and BMI before treatment may be associated with ovarian function after treatment. We suggest that ovaries should be transposed as highly as possible during radical hysterectomy to preserve ovarian function in young patients with early cervical cancer who might be a candidate for adjuvant CCRT and who have low BMI before treatment.

  11. A Comparison between Venables Standardized Respiratory Questionnaire and Pre-Shift Spirometry in Screening of Occupational Asthma in a Steel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SJ Mirmohammadi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational asthma (OA is the most common occupational lung disease in developed countries. One of the causative agents is metal fume that may be encountered in steel industries. Screening for the OA is mainly performed by questionnaire but in our country spirometry is used more commonly. Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of the Venables standardized respiratory questionnaire and pre-shift spirometry as screening tools for OA. Method: In a cross-sectional study, we investigated 450 workers of a steel industry by the Venables standardized questionnaire. We also performed a pre-shift spirometry as the screening spirometry and a post-shift spirometry. A person with 10% drop in post-shift FEV1 compared with the pre-shift value was considered as asthmatic (our gold-standard. The results of the questionnaire and the pre-shift spirometry were then examined against the gold-standard test results. For each test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Results: The overall prevalence of OA among our studied workers was 3.9% (95% CI: 1.9%–5.9%. The highest rate was seen in those working in catering (25% and welding (10% units. Pre-shift spirometry and the questionnaire had low sensitivity (42.9% and 28.6%, respectively and positive predictive values (16.7% and 3.6%, respectively; moderate specificity (92.4% and 71.6%, respectively and high negative predictive values (97.9% and 96.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Taking into account the ease of use of the questionnaire, it seems that it is more feasible to use questionnaire as the primary screening tool for the diagnosis of OA.

  12. Fundus fluorescein angiographic findings in patients who underwent ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Taylan; Nalcaci, Serhad; Ozturk, Pelin; Engin, Cagatay; Yagdi, Tahir; Akkin, Cezmi; Ozbaran, Mustafa

    2013-09-01

    Disruption of microcirculation in various tissues as a result of deformed blood rheology due to ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation causes novel arteriovenous malformations. Capillary disturbances and related vascular leakage in the retina and choroidea may also be seen in patients supported by VADs. We aimed to evaluate retinal vasculature deteriorations after VAD implantation. The charts of 17 patients who underwent VAD implantation surgery for the treatment of end-stage heart failure were retrospectively reviewed. Eight cases (47.1%) underwent pulsatile pump implantation (Berlin Heart EXCOR, Berlin Heart Mediprodukt GmbH, Berlin, Germany); however, nine cases (52.9%) had continuous-flow pump using centrifugal design (HeartWare, HeartWare Inc., Miramar, FL, USA). Study participants were selected among the patients who had survived with a VAD for at least 6 months, and results of detailed ophthalmologic examinations including optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus fluorescein angiography (FA) were documented. All of the 17 patients were male, with a mean age of 48.5 ± 14.8 years (15-67 years). Detailed ophthalmologic examinations including the evaluation of retinal vascular deteriorations via FA were performed at a mean of 11.8 ± 3.7 months of follow-up (6-18 months). Mean best-corrected visual acuity and intraocular pressure were found as logMAR 0.02 ± 0.08 and 14.6 ± 1.9 mm Hg, respectively in the study population. Dilated fundoscopy revealed severe focal arteriolar narrowing in two patients (11.8%), and arteriovenous crossing changes in four patients (23.5%); however, no pathological alteration was present in macular OCT scans. In patients with continuous-flow blood pumps, mean arm-retina circulation time (ARCT) and arteriovenous transit time (AVTT) were found to be 16.8 ± 3.0 and 12.4 ± 6.2 s, respectively; whereas those with pulsatile-flow blood pumps were found to be 17.4 ± 3.6 and 14.0 ± 2.1 s in patients (P=0.526 and P=0

  13. Transcranial doppler sonography in two patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy for traumatic brain swelling: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Seng-Shu Edson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of severe posttraumatic cerebral swelling remains quite a controversial issue. To the best of our knowledge, there is no study demonstrating the effect of decompressive craniectomy on cerebral blood flow (CBF velocity by means of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD. We present two patients who developed traumatic brain swelling and uncontrollable intracranial hypertension with coma and signs of transtentorial herniation. One patient underwent bifrontal, while the second, unilateral, frontotemporoparietal decompressive craniectomy with dural expansion. In both patients, TCD examinations were performed immediately before and after surgery to study the cerebral hemodynamic changes related to the operations. Pre and postoperative TCD examinations demonstrated a significant increase in blood flow velocity in the intracranial arteries in both subjects. In conclusion, our cases suggest that decompressive craniectomy with dural expansion may result in elevation of CBF velocity in patients with massive brain swelling. The increase in CBF velocity appears to occur not only in the decompressed hemisphere, but also on the opposite side.

  14. The Effects of Functional Knee Brace on Postural Control in Patients Who Underwent Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The current study aimed to evaluate the postural control in patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction pre and post wearing functional knee brace. Methods Eighteen athletes undergone unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction included in the study. They had unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at least six months before session test. Postural control was assessed pre and post wearing custom-fit functional knee brace using a posturographic platform prokin 254. The balance tests included: 1 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction limb, 2 standing on prokin platform with eyes open/closed on both limbs. The standard deviation (SD of body sway along the anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML axis, mean velocity of center of pressure (COP along AP/ ML axis and the area ellipse (measured in 2 mm were calculated. Results Results of the paired T-test revealed a significant effect on selected postural control variables for the brace conditions especially in low challengeable conditions (double leg, eyes open test situations (P < 0.05. But in high challengeable conditions this effect was not significant. Conclusions Functional knee brace improved postural control in the simple balancing task in the subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. But this improvement in more difficult balancing task was limited.

  15. Intraocular lens power estimation by accurate ray tracing for eyes underwent previous refractive surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Que; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Lu; Meng, Qingyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2015-08-01

    For normal eyes without history of any ocular surgery, traditional equations for calculating intraocular lens (IOL) power, such as SRK-T, Holladay, Higis, SRK-II, et al., all were relativley accurate. However, for eyes underwent refractive surgeries, such as LASIK, or eyes diagnosed as keratoconus, these equations may cause significant postoperative refractive error, which may cause poor satisfaction after cataract surgery. Although some methods have been carried out to solve this problem, such as Hagis-L equation[1], or using preoperative data (data before LASIK) to estimate K value[2], no precise equations were available for these eyes. Here, we introduced a novel intraocular lens power estimation method by accurate ray tracing with optical design software ZEMAX. Instead of using traditional regression formula, we adopted the exact measured corneal elevation distribution, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, axial length, and estimated effective lens plane as the input parameters. The calculation of intraocular lens power for a patient with keratoconus and another LASIK postoperative patient met very well with their visual capacity after cataract surgery.

  16. Incidence of venous thromboembolism among patients who underwent major surgery in a public hospital in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya P. Susanto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a fatal yet potentially preventable complication of surgery. Routine thromboprophylaxis is still unequivocal prescription is problematic due to perception of low VTE incidence among Asian population. This study aims to investigate the incidence of VTE and thromboprophylaxis prescription among patients undergoing major surgery in a Singapore hospital.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from medical record of 1,103 patients who had underwent major orthopaedic or abdominal surgery in 2011-2012 at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore. Incidence of VTE events either in the same admission or re-admission in less than one month time were noted as study parameters.Results: Incidence of VTE was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.67 - 2.53 of which 1.3% and 0.8% were DVT and PE cases respectively. Age, gender, history of VTE, ischemic heart disease, and mechanical prophylaxis were associated with VTE incidence based on bivariate analysis. The prescription of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was associated with prior anticoagulant medication, type of surgery, and incidence of new bleeding. Conclusion: Subsequent to major surgeries, VTE is as common in Asian patients as published data in other populations. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered as recommended in non-Asian guidelines.Keywords: thromboprophylaxis, venous thromboembolism

  17. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  18. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent c

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  19. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a pediatric patient who underwent a hematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julia; Catalán, Paula; Mardones, Patricia; Santolaya, M Elena

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 10 year old girl with a relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who underwent a haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), with grade II skin and digestive graft versus host disease, treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. On day + 54, she presented fever, with no other remarkable clinical findings. Imaging study showed the presence of lung and liver nodules, liver biopsy was performed. The study included histology, staining and culture for bacteria and fungi, and the preservation of a piece of tissue at -20°C for future prospective studies. Ziehl Nielsen stain was positive, and study for Mycobacterium infection was performed. Microbiological smears of tracheal and gastric aspirate, and bronchial fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were positive. The final report confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in gastric content, sputum, BAL and liver tissue, susceptible to rifampin, isoniazid, streptomycin and ethambutol, with determination of mutations for genes rpoβ and kat G (-). Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was confirmed. The girl received daily therapy for two months and then she continued on three times per week therapy for 9 months. Controlled by the transplant, infectious diseases and respiratory teams, the patient remained in good general condition, with radiologic resolution of pulmonary and liver involvement and negative smears. We conclude that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be part of differential diagnosis of febrile illness in patients undergoing HSCT, and biopsy should be a standard practice of early diagnosis in these patients.

  20. THE EXPERIENCE OF TREGALOZA BASED LUBRICANT USAGE FOR PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT EXCIMER LASER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Eskina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the tregalose based eye drops effectiveness in patients who underwent PRK or TransPRK surgery. patients and methods: 50 patients with moderate myopia were examined before, 7 days and 1 month after PRK or TransPRK surgery made by SCHWIND Amaris excimer laser by the same surgeon. In addition to conventional diagnostics, Schirmer test and tear break up time were performed as well as ODSI questionare and Oxford index of ocular surface disorders were investigated. Patients were divided in two groups, Study group — “Thealos” group and “Control” group. In both groups patients have started using non preservative eye drops based on tregalosa and hyaluronic acid 4-th day after surgery respectively. results: The tear film breakup time was significantly better in “Thealos” group (7,22±3,61 sec 7 days postop and 9,36±3,68 sec 1 month postop in comparison to «Control” group 5,21±0,25 (р<0,01 sec and 7,21±2,85 sec respectively (р<0,05 as well as ocular surface index score in “Thealos” group post surgery was less (0,26±0,38 и 0,85±0,31 marks 7 days postop (р<0,05 and 0,09±0,19 and 0,21±0,4 (р<0,05 1 month postop respectively. There were no other statistically significant differences found in analysed data. Conclusion: Using of “Thealoz” non-preservative eye drops leads to faster recovery after surface excimer laser ablations in terms of dry eye manifestation, those as tearfilm stability and ocular surface index score, measured using “Oxford” scale. Moistening properties of tregaloze solution could be compared with those of hyaluronic acid solution.

  1. Retention of laparoscopic skills in naive medical students who underwent short training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ana, Guilherme M; Cavalini, Worens; Negrello, Bruce; Bonin, Eduardo A; Dimbarre, Daniellson; Claus, Christiano; Loureiro, Marcelo P; Salvalaggio, Paolo R

    2017-02-01

    Simulators are useful tools in the development of laparoscopic skills. However, little is known about the effectiveness of short laparoscopic training sessions and how retention of skills occurs in surgical trainees who are naïve to laparoscopy. This study analyses the retention of laparoscopic surgical skills in medical students without prior surgical training. A group of first- and second-year medical students (n = 68), without prior experience in surgery or laparoscopy, answered a demographic questionnaire and had their laparoscopic skills assessed by the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training protocol. Subsequently, they underwent a 150-minute training course after which they were re-tested. One year after the training, the medical students' performance in the simulator was re-evaluated in order to analyse retention. Of the initial 68 students, a total of 36 participated throughout the entire study, giving a final participation rate of 52 %. Thirty-six medical students with no gender predominance and an average age of 20 years were evaluated. One year after the short training programme, retention was 69.3 % in the peg transfer (p training evaluation. There was no significant difference in suturing. The average sample score in the baseline test was 8.3, in the post-training test it was 89.7, and in the retention test it was 84.2, which corresponded to a skill retention equivalence of 93 %. There was a significant retention of the laparoscopic surgical skills developed. Even 1 year after a short training session, medical students without previous surgical experience showed that they have retained a great part of the skills acquired through training.

  2. [The role of spirometry in encouraging smoking cessation in general practice. A pilot study using "lung age"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, A; Noël, F; Lorenzo, M; Van Den Broucke, J

    2017-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether spirometry, performed in general practitioners' offices would change non-motivated smokers' attitudes toward smoking cessation. We performed an interventional, prospective, before-after single-center study, approved by a research ethics committee. We included 74 smokers older than 18years old, who reported no intention to quit smoking, whatever they were visiting general practitioners for. We performed spirometry and gave them their results, FEV 1 /FVC and lung age together with a comment on it. Nine months later, we called them for another assessment. Fifty-six percent were women with an average-age of 46.5, who smoked 26.3 pack-years. Eighty-two percent of them had normal FEV 1 /FVC but lung age was pathological among 38% of them. Nine months later, 61.1% reported an increased motivation to quit smoking. They smoked 10.9 cigarettes per day versus 13,3 at baseline (P=0.0254). Increase in motivation was not statistically related to age, gender, previous smoking cessations, daily smoking, nicotine dependence or an abnormal FEV 1 /VC ratio (P>0.75) but was significantly related to the presence of an abnormal lung age status (Pspirometry in general practice, combined with the determination of the lung age, may increase motivation towards smoking cessation in smokers who lack motivation. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A new non-invasive method of infant spirometry demonstrates a level of repeatability that is comparable to traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Mariann H L; Haaland, Øystein A; Lønning, Lise B; Gudmundsdottir, Hrefna K; Markestad, Trond; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The FloRight system provides novel non-invasive infant spirometry based on electromagnetic inductance plethysmography. We investigated the consistency of repeated measurements carried out in a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using the system and how well these were tolerated. Tidal flow-volume loops were obtained from 10 preterm infants at discharge, 10 stable growing preterm infants weighing about 1500 g and 10 term-born infants. A nurse experienced with the system measured all patients before and after meals, and these measurements were repeated by nurses new to the system. The measurements were well tolerated by the infants. The repeatability for the two parameters 'tidal volume' (Vt) and 'time to peak tidal expiratory flow to total expiratory time' (Tptef/Te) were relatively poor, similar to previous methods. However, the repeatability was good for the new 'flow-volume gravity mid-point' (FVg) parameter. Repeatability was better for term than preterm infants, when measurements were obtained by the experienced nurse and for measurements carried out before meals. The FloRight system proved feasible in a NICU setting. The repeatability of the lung function measurements was similar to those reported for traditional infant spirometry. The nurse's experience and the relationship to meals appeared to be important. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT LUMBAR MICRODISCECTOMY FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE (IVDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Urampath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Intervertebral Disc Prolapse (IVDP is a very common cause for low backache in younger population. When conservative treatment fails or when patient develops complications like neurological deficit, then the treatment is surgical discectomy. Open laminectomy and microdiscectomy are the modes of surgical interventions for such patients. There is a lot of morbidity for open laminectomy when compared to microdiscectomy to assess the functional outcome of patients underwent lumbar microdiscectomy. METHODS A prospective study was done among 30 patients with Intervertebral Disc Prolapse (IVDP who did not respond to conservative treatment were undergone the surgical procedure microdiscectomy. The patients were re-evaluated for pre and postoperative neurological deficit and postoperative pain relief at 1 week, 6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months after surgery. RESULTS Out of 30 patients in 15 (50% patients, microdiscectomy was done in hip flexion and in the remaining half (15 patients it was done without hip flexion. There were 18 men and 12 women with a mean age of 39.4. All patients 30 (100% is presented with preoperative neurological impairment had a positive Lasegue sign, 20 (66.67% had motor deficits and 18 (60% had sensory deficits. In this study group, the vertebral levels mainly affected were L4-L5 in 18 (60% patients and L5-S1 in 12 (40% patients. After microdiscectomy, motor deficit was reduced from 66.67% to 20% out of 30 patients by the end of one year. Similarly, a reduction in sensory deficit was also seen from 60% to 20%. Pain relief was also found to be excellent in 86.6% patients at the end of 24 months. CONCLUSION Early postoperative mobilisation and earlier pain relief are the most important advantages of this novel technique. Lesser blood loss, low surgical time, least destabilisation of spine are other merits of this procedure and can be recommended as the gold standard surgical method for patients with IVDP who

  5. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool to understa...

  6. COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) for selecting at-risk patients for spirometry: a cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Anthony J; Hasan, Iqbal; Crockett, Alan J; van Schayck, Onno C P; Zwar, Nicholas A

    2014-07-10

    Using the COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) as a selection tool for spirometry could potentially improve the efficiency and accuracy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis in at-risk patients. To identify an optimal single cut point for the CDQ that divides primary care patients into low or high likelihood of COPD, with the latter group undergoing spirometry. Former or current smokers aged 40-85 years with no prior COPD diagnosis were invited to a case-finding appointment with the practice nurse at various general practices in Sydney, Australia. The CDQ was collected and pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry was performed. Cases with complete CDQ data and spirometry meeting quality standards were analysed (1,054 out of 1,631 patients). CDQ cut points were selected from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the ROC curve was 0.713. A cut point of 19.5 had the optimal combination of sensitivity (63%) and specificity (70%) with two-thirds below this cut point. A cut point of 14.5 corresponded to a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 35% and negative predictive value of 96%, and 31% of patients below this cut point. The CDQ can be used to select patients at risk of COPD for spirometry using one cut point. We consider two possible cut points. The 19.5 cut point excludes a higher proportion of patients from undergoing spirometry with the trade-off of more false negatives. The 14.5 cut point has a high sensitivity and negative predictive value, includes more potential COPD cases but has a higher rate of false positives.

  7. Viabilidade da realização de espirometria em pré-escolares Feasibility of spirometry in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Neves Veras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a taxa de sucesso na obtenção de resultados adequados de espirometria em pacientes pré-escolares. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os resultados de espirometrias de crianças menores que 6 anos. Todos os testes foram realizados no Laboratório de Função Pulmonar do Hospital Infantil Jeser Amarante Faria, em Joinville (SC entre junho de 2009 e fevereiro de 2010. O programa utilizado continha um incentivo de animação (bolhas de sabão.Os procedimentos foram realizados por um pneumologista infantil e obedeceram aos critérios de reprodutibilidade e aceitabilidade preconizados pela American Thoracic Society. Buscou-se atingir um tempo expiratório de pelo menos 1 s. Os seguintes parâmetros foram registrados: CVF, VEF0,5, VEF1 e relação VEF1/CVF. RESULTADOS: Nossa amostra consistiu de 74 crianças. A taxa de sucesso foi de 82%, com melhora no desempenho do teste em idades mais avançadas, mas sem significado estatístico (p > 0,05. Em média, foram necessárias 6,6 tentativas durante o exame para a obtenção de curvas aceitáveis e reprodutíveis. Todos os 61 testes bem sucedidos tiveram resultados de VEF0,5 e VEF1 satisfatórios. Através de escore Z, constatou-se que 21,6 % das crianças apresentavam com padrão obstrutivo. CONCLUSÕES: A taxa de sucesso da espirometria foi alta em nossa amostra, mostrando que esse é um método válido de avaliação da função pulmonar em pré-escolares. O uso de métodos de incentivo e a realização do teste por profissionais treinados no trabalho com crianças podem estar associados à elevada taxa de sucesso em nossa amostraOBJECTIVE: To determine the rate at which satisfactory spirometry results are obtained (spirometry success rate in preschool children. METHODS: We analyzed the spirometry results of children 0.05. An average of 6.6 attempts/test were needed in order to achieve acceptable, reproducible curves. All 61 successful tests produced satisfactory FEV0.5 and FEV1 values

  8. Analysis of eating behaviors and eating habits, body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio in association with spirometry results of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzięciołowska-Baran Edyta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Behavior and eating habits stands as an important factor in terms of maintaining a good health condition in every age group. This involves optimal digestion, maintaining proper metabolism of the entire organism and thus maintaining proper body weight. It is especially important for students, as the increased mental activity results in increased energy expenditure. The state of body weight can affect the respiratory efficiency measured in spirometry. The aim of the study was to assessthe relation between behavior and eating habits, body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR and results from spirometry tests among young adults.

  9. The Bt-DUX: development of a subjective measure of health-related quality of life in patients who underwent surgery for lower extremity malignant bone tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, W.P.; Vlieland, T.P.; Koopman, H.M.; Schaap, G.R.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Beishuizen, A.; Tissing, W.J.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Anninga, J.K.; Taminiau, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the lower

  10. The Bt-DUX : Development of a Subjective Measure of Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients Who Underwent Surgery for Lower Extremity Malignant Bone Tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, W. Peter; Vlieland, Theodora P. M. Vliet; Koopman, Hendrik M.; Schaap, Gerard R.; Schreuder, H. W. Bart; Beishuizen, Auke; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Anninga, Jacob K.; Taminiau, Antonie H. M.

    Background To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the lower extremity

  11. Adult Treatment Panel III 2001 but not International Diabetes Federation 2005 criteria of the metabolic syndrome predict clinical cardiovascular events in subjects who underwent coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saely, Christoph H; Koch, Lorena; Schmid, Fabian; Marte, Thomas; Aczel, Stefan; Langer, Peter; Hoefle, Guenter; Drexel, Heinz

    2006-04-01

    The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recently established a worldwide consensus definition of the metabolic syndrome. No prospective data are available on the cardiovascular risk associated with this new metabolic syndrome definition. In a prospective study of 750 coronary patients, we recorded vascular events over 4 years. From our patients, 37.3% (n = 280) had the metabolic syndrome according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) definition and 45.5% (n = 341) according to the IDF definition. The metabolic syndrome as defined by the ATPIII criteria significantly predicted vascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 1.745 [95% CI 1.255-2.427]; P = 0.001), but the metabolic syndrome as defined by IDF criteria did not (1.189 [0.859-1.646]; P = 0.297). Accordingly, event-free survival was significantly lower among patients who fulfilled the ATPIII but not the IDF criteria than among those who met the IDF but not the ATPIII criteria (P = 0.012). The metabolic syndrome as defined by ATPIII criteria remained significantly predictive of vascular events after adjustment for type 2 diabetes but not after additional adjustment for the metabolic syndrome components high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol. These lipid traits in turn proved significantly predictive of vascular events even after adjustment for the metabolic syndrome. The ATPIII definition of the metabolic syndrome confers a significantly higher risk of vascular events than the IDF definition. However, among angiographied coronary patients, even the ATPIII definition of the metabolic syndrome does not provide prognostic information beyond its dyslipidemic features.

  12. Factors associated with bone mineral density in women who underwent bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Jaeger Hintze

    2014-03-01

    To analyze factors associated with bone mineral density (BMD of candidates and patients admitted to Bariatric Surgery (BS. This study included 61 women who had done or were waiting for BS. Anthropometric variables, body composition and BMD from the femur, femoral neck, lumbar spine and the whole body were measured. The factors associated with changes in BMD, such as smoking, alcohol ingestion, sedentary lifestyle, BS, nutritional supplementation and age were evaluated. The statistical significance was set at 5%. Age and BS were associated with changes in BMD. Among the individuals who had  BS done, the rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis were greater in the femur (OR 3.34; CI [1.52 - 1.83] and femoral neck (OR 3.69; CI [1.34 – 2.08]. Subjects older than 50 years also had greater rates of BMD in the lumbar spine (OR 4.12; CI [2.09 – 22.33], the whole body (OR 4.77; CI [1.34 – 28.14], femur (OR 16.94; CI [2.16 - 124.32] and femoral neck (OR 14.95; CI [1.86 - 110.66]. Patients who have had BS and are over 50 years of age showed higher rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis, which demonstrate the necessity of further studies exploring the effects of BS and its impact on bone metabolism.

  13. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy in Isfahan; maternal mortality and morbidity rates among the women who underwent peripartum hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mostajeran Gurtani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion : This study indicated the high rate of mortality among patients underwent peripartum hysterectomy. Evaluation of management during referring the patients and designing more studies to evaluate the mortality and morbidities are warranted.

  14. A pilot study to monitor changes in spirometry and lung volume, following an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), as part of a supported discharge program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushen, Breda; McCormack, Niamh; Hennigan, Kerrie; Sulaiman, Imran; Costello, Richard W; Deering, Brenda

    2016-10-01

    One-third of patients with an exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease(COPD) are re-hospitalised at 90 days. Exacerbation recovery is associated with reductions in lung hyperinflation and improvements in symptoms and physical activity. We assessed the feasibility of monitoring these clinical parameters in the home. We hypothesised that the degree of change in spirometry and lung volumes differs between those who had an uneventful recovery and those who experienced a further exacerbation. Hospitalised patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD referred for a supported discharge program participated in the study. Spirometry and Inspiratory Vital Capacity(IVC) were measured in the home at Days 1, 14 and 42 post-discharge. Patients also completed Medical Research Council(MRC), Borg and COPD Assessment Test(CAT) scores and were provided with a tri-axial accelerometer. Any new exacerbation events were recorded. Sixty-five patients with 72 exacerbation episodes were recruited. Fifty percent experienced a second exacerbation. Adequate IVC measurements were achieved by 90%, while only 70% completed spirometry. Uneventful recovery was accompanied by significant improvements in physiological measurements at day14, improved symptom scores and step count, p spirometry, lung volumes, symptoms and step count following a COPD exacerbation may help to identify patients at risk of re-exacerbation. It is feasible to carry out these assessments in the home as part of a supported discharge programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Advantage of impulse oscillometry over spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and monitor pulmonary responses to bronchodilators: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine Saadeh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This retrospective study was a comparative analysis of sensitivity of impulse oscillometry and spirometry techniques for use in a mixed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease group for assessing disease severity and inhalation therapy. Methods: A total of 30 patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were monitored by impulse oscillometry, followed by spirometry. Lung function was measured at baseline after bronchodilation and at follow-up (3–18 months. The impulse oscillometry parameters were resistance in the small and large airways at 5 Hz (R5, resistance in the large airways at 15 Hz (R15, and lung reactance (area under the curve X; AX. Results: After the bronchodilator therapy, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 readings evaluated by spirometry were unaffected at baseline and at follow-up, while impulse oscillometry detected an immediate improvement in lung function, in terms of AX (p = 0.043. All impulse oscillometry parameters significantly improved at follow-up, with a decrease in AX by 37% (p = 0.0008, R5 by 20% (p = 0.0011, and R15 by 12% (p = 0.0097. Discussion: Impulse oscillometry parameters demonstrated greater sensitivity compared with spirometry for monitoring reversibility of airway obstruction and the effect of maintenance therapy. Impulse oscillometry may facilitate early treatment dose optimization and personalized medicine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  16. Quality of spirometry tests and pulmonary function changes among industrial company workers in Iran: a two-year before-and-after study following an intensive training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Lakeh, Maziar Moradi

    2013-03-01

    Quality improvement, standardisation of spirometry testing, and interpretation of results are critically important in the occupational setting. To determine the quality of spirometry tests and pulmonary function changes in two consecutive years among the personnel of an industrial company. This study was performed in an oil refinery in Iran in 2011. Data on 1,004 male personnel were evaluated before and after a training course conducted according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health guidelines. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guidelines were used for assessment of the acceptability and repeatability criteria. The most common error in the first year of evaluation was forced vital capacity >6 seconds or a 1 second plateau. Acceptability and proper interpretation significantly improved after the course (p0.05). The results of this study show that the validity and quality of spirometric tests conducted in the studied company in Iran were unacceptable, but these improved significantly after the training intervention. The study demonstrated the lack of a systematic guideline for conducting spirometry and interpreting the results in the occupational setting in Iran, and emphasises the need for a nationwide programme to improve the quality of spirometry tests in this setting.

  17. The use of spirometry to evaluate pulmonary function in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) with positive buoyancy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Todd L; Munns, Suzanne; Adams, Lance; Hicks, James

    2013-09-01

    This study utilized computed spirometry to compare the pulmonary function of two stranded olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) presenting with a positive buoyancy disorder with two healthy captive olive ridley sea turtles held in a large public aquarium. Pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements demonstrated that the metabolic cost of breathing was much greater for animals admitted with positive buoyancy than for the normal sea turtles. Positively buoyant turtles had higher tidal volumes and significantly lower breathing-frequency patterns with significantly higher expiration rates, typical of gasp-type breathing. The resulting higher energetic cost of breathing in the diseased turtles may have a significant impact on their long-term survival. The findings represent a method for clinical respiratory function analysis for an individual animal to assist with diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to evaluate objectively sea turtles presenting with positive buoyancy and respiratory disease using pulmonary function tests.

  18. Comparing the Effect of Resistive Inspiratory Muscle Training and Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Pattern of COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossien Ahmadi Hosseini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistive Inspiratory Muscle Training (RIMT is a well-known technique for rehabilitation of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. Incentive spirometry is another technique with potential viability for this application, but there is limited evidence in support of its efficacy in the rehabilitation of COPD patients. Aim: The objective of this study was to compare the effect ofresistive inspiratory muscle training and incentive spirometry on respiratory pattern of COPD patients. Method: This study was a randomized clinical trial on 30 patients with moderate COPD who were referred, in 2011, to the pulmonary clinic of Emamreza Hospital of Mashhad (Iran. The patients were randomly divided into the RIMT and the IS treatment group. In both groups, exercise regimen consisted of two 15-minute sessions of exercise per day, in the morning and evening, four days a week for 4 weeks. Respiratory pattern (respiratory rate and depth and dyspnea (at rest and during activity were measured before and after exercise. Data was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney and ratio difference tests using SPSS v.11.5. Results: The average age was 50.8±10.7 in the IS group and 51±10.8 in the RIMT group. The statistical tests found no significant difference between the groups in terms of post-intervention exertional dyspnea, dyspnea at rest, tidal volume, and respiratory rate (P>0.05; but post-intervention maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal voluntary ventilation in the two groups were found to be significantly different (P

  19. SUBJECT INDEX

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subject Index. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica. 1721. Geomorphology. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets. 1653. Decision Support System integrated with Geographic. Information System to target restoration actions in water-.

  20. Accuracy of bone SPECT/CT for identifying hardware loosening in patients who underwent lumbar fusion with pedicle screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudyana, Hendrah; Maes, Alex [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Thierry; Fidlers, Luc [AZ Groeninge, Department of Neurosurgery, Kortrijk (Belgium); Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nicolai, Daniel [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of bone SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) in diagnosing loosening of fixation material in patients with recurrent or persistent back pain that underwent lumbar arthrodesis with pedicle screws using surgery and clinical follow-up as gold standard A total of 48 patients (median age 49 years, range 21-81 years; 17 men) who had undergone lumbar spinal arthrodesis were included in this retrospective analysis. SPECT/CT results were compared to the gold standard of surgical evaluation or clinical follow-up. Positive SPECT/CT results were considered true positives if findings were confirmed by surgery or if clinical and other examinations were completely consistent with the positive SPECT/CT finding. They were considered false positives if surgical evaluation did not find any loose pedicle screws or if symptoms subsided with non-surgical therapy. Negative SPECT/CT scans were considered true negatives if symptoms either improved without surgical intervention or remained stable over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Negative SPECT/CT scans were determined to be false negatives if surgery was still required and loosening of material was found. The median length of time from primary surgery to bone SPECT/CT referral was 29.5 months (range 12-192 months). Median follow-up was 18 months (range 6-57) for subjects who did not undergo surgery. Thirteen of the 48 patients were found to be positive for loosening on bone SPECT/CT. Surgical evaluation (8 patients) and clinical follow-up (5 patients) showed that bone SPECT/CT correctly predicted loosening in 9 of 13 patients, while it falsely diagnosed loosening in 4 patients. Of 35 negative bone SPECT/CT scans, 12 were surgically confirmed. In 18 patients, bone SPECT/CT revealed lesions that could provide an alternative explanation for the symptoms of pain (active facet degeneration in 14 patients, and disc and sacroiliac

  1. Preinduction incentive spirometry versus deep breathing to improve apnea tolerance during induction of anesthesia in patients of abdominal sepsis: A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal sepsis is associated with varied degree of hypoxemia and atelactasis in the lung and can enhance the onset of desaturation of arterial blood during apnea. Aims : This study looked at methods to improve safety margin of apnea during induction of anesthesia in these high-risk patients. Settings and Design: It was a randomized, single blind study on adult patients presenting for emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis in a university teaching hospital setting. Materials and Methods: In group 1 (IS (n = 32, three sessions of incentive spirometry (IS were performed within one hour before induction of anesthesia. In group 2 (DB (n = 34, patients were subjected to deep breathing sessions in a similar manner. All patients received preoxygenation (100% by mask for 3 min, followed by rapid-sequence induction of anesthesia using fentanyl, thiopental, and suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Patients were subjected to a period of apnea by keeping the end of the endotracheal tube open to air till they developed 95% hemoglobin saturation (SpO 2 by pulse oxymetry. Positive pressure ventilation was resumed at the end. We observed for hemodynamic changes, apnea time, and SpO 2 (100% recovery time on resuming ventilation. Arterial blood gas samples were taken before intervention, after IS or DB, after preoxygenation, and at the end of apnea. Statistical analysis used: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, X 2 test, Kaplan-Meier graph, and log-rank tests were applied to compare the two study groups. Results: Oxygenation level in group 1 (265 ± 76.7 mmHg patients was significantly (P < 0.001 higher than in group 2 (221 ± 61.8 mmHgat the end of preoxygenation. The apnea time (median: lower bound - upper bound Confidence Interval apnea time (272:240-279 s in group 1 (IS patients was significantly higher P < 0.05 than in group 2 (180:163-209 s patients. Saturation recovery time (35:34-46 s in group 1 (IS patients was also quicker than in

  2. A comparison of biochemical pregnancy rates between women who underwent IVF and fertile controls who conceived spontaneously†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeadna, Atif; Son, Weon Young; Moon, Jeong Hee; Dahan, Michael H

    2015-04-01

    Does IVF affect the biochemical pregnancy rate? The likelihood of an early pregnancy loss may be lower and is certainly not higher in IVF cycles when compared with published rates of biochemical pregnancy in fertile women ≤42 years old. The use of gonadotrophins to stimulate multi-folliculogenesis alters endometrial expression of genes and proteins, compared with unstimulated cycles. Exogenous estrogen and progesterone taken for endometrial preparation in frozen embryo transfer cycles, also cause changes in endometrial gene and protein expression .These endometrial alterations may compromise the ability of embryos to develop once implanted, possibly increasing the biochemical pregnancy rate. This is a retrospective study, involving 1636 fresh and 188 frozen, single embryo transfer (SET) IVF cycles performed between August 2008 and December 2012. The biochemical pregnancy rate of the 1824 combined IVF and frozen cycles were compared with fertile controls, derived from the three prospective studies in the medical literature that evaluate this rate. Subjects ≤42-years old, who underwent a SET, as part of a fresh or thawed IVF cycle were considered for inclusion. Each subject is represented only once. The biochemical pregnancy rates were compared with those of historical standard, fertile populations with spontaneous conceptions. The pregnancy rates per transfer for fresh and frozen IVF cycles were similar at 39 and 40%, respectively. There was also no significant difference in the likelihood of pregnancy outcomes (clinical, biochemical and ectopic pregnancy) between fresh IVF and frozen cycles (85.4 versus 85.6%, 13.8 versus 14.8%, 0.5 versus 0%, P = 0.82). However, pregnancy rates decreased in older patients when compared with younger ones P IVF cycles combined was 13.8% of all pregnancies. IVF and frozen cycles were combined as the IVF group treated with hormones for further comparison with the fertile control group. The biochemical pregnancy rate (14%) in the

  3. Valor de la espirometría para el diagnostico de restricción pulmonar Accuracy of spirometry in the diagnosis of pulmonary restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Quadrelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Un defecto ventilatorio restrictivo está caracterizado por una reducción en la capacidad pulmonar total. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la utilidad de la espirometría para determinar la presencia de restricción en pacientes con y sin obstrucción bronquial. Fueron incluídos 520 pacientes. Se definieron los valores normales mediante el intervalo de confianza del 95% (IC utilizando la ecuación de Morris para la espirometría, y la de la European Respiratory Society (ERS para capacidad pulmonar. Las espirometrías fueron clasificadas como obstructivas cuando mostraban relación volumen espiratorio forzado en 1 segundo (VEF1/capacidad vital forzada (CVF A restrictive ventilatory defect is characterized by a decreased total lung capacity (TLC. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of spirometry to detect pulmonary restriction in patients with or without airflow obstruction in the spirometry. Five hundred and twenty patients were included. Normal values for lung function were determined by using the 95% confidence interval (CI with Morris reference equation for spirometry and European Respiratory Society equation for lung volume. Spirometries were considered obstructive when FEV1/FVC ratio was <70% and FEV1 was below 95%CI. In patients without obstruction in the spirometry (n = 357 sensitivity and specificity were 42.2% and 94.3% respectively, negative predictive value (NPP was 86.6% and positive PV (PPV was 65.2%. In patients with an obstructive spirometry (n = 66 sensitivity increased to 75.8% but specificity decreased to 65.9%. PPV was only 57.8% and NPV 81.5%. Patients showing obstruction in the spirometry and false positives of a low FVC (n = 22 had similar values of FVC (57.36 ± 13.45 vs. 58.82 ± 8.71%, p = 0.6451, FEV1 (44.73 ± 19.24 vs. 44.0 ± 13.08%, p = 0.8745 and DLCO (67.50 ±27.23 vs. 77.00 ±16.00%, p = 0.1299 than true positives. Residual volume (RV (125.72 ± 64. vs. 77.96 ± 29.98%, p = 0

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN SPIROMETRY DATES AND SPECIAL ALLERGEN- SPECIFIC IGE IN PATIENTS WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN WEST GEORGIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepiashvili, R; Chikhladze, M; Khachapuridze, D; Gamkrelidze, S

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to establish correlation between airway obstruction and specific IgE specificity, managing future treatment in the patients with bronchial asthma, among the population of west Georgia. In the study have been involved 56 patients (among them 24 males and 32 females) of different ages, with diagnostic bronchial asthma (according to GINA recommendation). On the ground of the aim the study included the following steps of allegro-diagnostics: I step - Computerized spirometry by apparatus ,,SPIROLAB 3". II step - To detect allergenization degree, total serum IgE levels, specific IgE and concentration of Phadiatop, using modern automated system - "Immuno CAP 100", were estimated in the patients. III step- future treatment recommendations. All 56 patients were undergone the spirometry measurement. Our results show that of 56 patient 21 (38%) had very severe obstruction by spiromatry: Pretest: FEV 1 - 28%; FEF-45%; FEV1/FVC ratio -55% on average. Post test: significant bronchodilatation was revealed FEV1> +12%( >200 mL) after the inhalation of four puffs of a short - acting beta2 sympathomimetic agent, e.r., 400 µg of salbutamol. In 19 (33%) patients severe bronchoobstruction was established. By spiromometry was revealed: Pre test: FEV 1 - 42%; FEF-55%; FEV1/FVC ratio -67% on average. Post test: significant bronchodilatation was revealed FEV1> +12%( >200 mL) In 14 (25%) patients moderate bronchoobstruction was diagnosed, the spiromatry results were. Pretest: FEV 1 - 52%; FEF-65%; FEV1/FVC ratio - 67% on average. Post test: It was revealed significant bronchodilatation FEV1> +12%( >200 mL). Only in 2 (4%) patients were diagnosed the normal spiromatry. In the patients with bronchial asthma of a specific positivity of specific IgE to the weeds (Wx2) - ambrosia, plantain, clasp/tarragon, atriplex - in 23 (53%) on average; tree dust (Tx9) - alder, lactarius piperatus, nuts, oak, willow - 11 (19%); and cereals (Gx1) - festuca pratensis, lolium temulentum, timoti

  5. Home spirometry: Assessment of patient compliance and satisfaction and its impact on early diagnosis of pulmonary symptoms in post-lung transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaizadeh, Lida; Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Shajareh, Elham; Shafaghi, Shadi; Hosseini, Mahsa; Heydari, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Telemedicine is useful in monitoring patients, and in particular those, such as lung transplant recipients, suffering from chronic illnesses. This prospective cohort study was conducted on 15 lung transplant recipients. The patients provided physicians with data from spirometry as well as their clinical respiratory symptoms via SMS messages. In cases where spirometry results or clinical symptoms required follow-up, the monitoring physician contacted the patient according to guidelines and gave appropriate instructions. Qualitative assessment of satisfaction showed that the sense of increased support from medical staff was rated highest (92.9%). Telespirometry is an efficient method of monitoring lung transplant recipients which leads to patient satisfaction, compliance, adherence to study and sense of security. Nevertheless, for optimal implementation of this method, thorough training of both medical staff and patients is required. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Economic Assessment and Budgetary Impact of a Telemedicine Procedure and Spirometry Quality Control in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Nuria; Bayón, Juan Carlos; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Inchausti, Marta; Bustamante, Victor; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of a telemedicine procedure designed to improve the quality of lung function testing (LFT) in primary care in a public healthcare system, compared with the standard method. The economic impact of 9,039 LFTs performed in 51 health centers (2010-2013) using telespirometry (TS) compared to standard spirometry (SS) was studied. TS costs more per unit than SS (€47.80 vs. €39.70) (2013), but the quality of the TS procedure is superior (84% good quality, compared to 61% using the standard procedure). Total cost of TS was €431,974 (compared with €358,306€ for SS), generating an economic impact of €73,668 (2013). The increase in cost for good quality LFT performed using TS was €34,030 (2010) and €144,295 (2013), while the costs of poor quality tests fell by €15,525 (2010) and 70,627€ (2013). The cost-effectiveness analysis concludes that TS is 23% more expensive and 46% more effective. Healthcare costs consequently fall as the number of LFTs performed by TS rises. Avoiding poor quality, invalid LFTs generates savings that compensate for the increased costs of performing LFTs with TS, making it a cost-effective method. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of switching to the new global lung function initiative equations on spirometry results in the UK CF registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, Sanja; Stocks, Janet; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Aurora, Paul; Kirkby, Jane; Bourke, Stephen; Carr, Siobhán B; Gunn, Elaine; Prasad, Ammani; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Bilton, Diana

    2014-05-01

    The Quanjer et al. Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI)-2012 multi-ethnic all-age reference equations for spirometry are endorsed by all major respiratory societies and are the new gold standard. Before the GLI equations are implemented for use in CF patients, the impact of changing equations from those currently used needs to be better understood. Annual review data submitted to the UK CF Trust Registry between 2007 and 2011 were used to calculate %predicted FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC using three widely used reference equations (Wang-Hankinson and Knudson) and the new GLI-2012 equations. Overall, Knudson and Wang equations overestimated %predicted values in paediatric patients, such that a greater proportion of patients had lung function values in the normal range. Within individual patients, the impact of switching equations varied greatly depending on the patients' age, and which equations were used. A unified approach to interpreting spirometric lung function measurements would help facilitate more appropriate comparison both within and between centres and countries. Interpretation of longitudinal measurements using a continuous reference equation across all-ages, like the GLI, may further improve our understanding of CF lung disease. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirometry and regular follow-up do not improve quality of life in children or adolescents with asthma: Cluster randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael J; Schattner, Rosa L; Holton, Christine; Simpson, Pam; Briggs, Nancy; Beilby, Justin; Nelson, Mark R; Wood-Baker, Richard; Thien, Francis; Sulaiman, Nabil D; Colle, Eleonora Del; Wolfe, Rory; Crockett, Alan J; Massie, R John

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether spirometry and regular medical review improved quality of life or other outcomes in children and adolescents with asthma. We conducted two cluster randomized controlled trials. We recruited 238 asthma patients aged between 7 and 17 years from 56 general practices in South Eastern Australia. Participants were randomized to receive an intervention that included spirometry or usual care. The main outcome measure was asthma related quality of life. Baseline characteristics were well matched between the intervention and control groups. Neither trial found any difference in asthma related quality of life between groups. However because of measurement properties, a formal meta-analysis could not be performed. Nor were there any significant effects of the intervention upon asthma attacks, limitation to usual activities, nocturnal cough, bother during physical activity, worry about asthma, or written asthma action plans. The findings do not support more widespread use of spirometry for the management of childhood asthma in general practice, unless it is integrated into a complete management model. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Gender-specific differences in serum immunoglobulin E levels and prevalence of fungus in sinonasal tissue noted in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Antoine; Rank, Matthew A; Zarka, Matthew A; Chang, Yu-Hui; Lal, Devyani

    2017-11-01

    We previously presented that women with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who elected endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) have a higher symptom burden than men. Causes of these gender-based differences warranted further study. To study gender differences in another cohort of adult patients with CRS who underwent ESS and to compare key histopathologic and serologic features Methods: Patients with CRS who underwent ESS (from 2011 to 2014) with structured histopathology reports on surgical samples were studied. The 13-item structured histopathology report detailed key metrics of inflammation and the presence of fungal elements. Clinical, 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) score, Lund-Mackay computed tomography (CT) score, serologic (immunoglobulin E [IgE] level, absolute eosinophil count) and histopathologic data were compared between male and female patients by using statistical software. We studied 130 eligible subjects (mean age, 54.7 years; 49.2% women). Compared with the men, the women had significantly higher preoperative SNOT-22 scores (women, 48.7; men 38.0 [p = 0.004]) but similar CT scores. Serum IgE levels were significantly higher among women versus men (peak, 433.3 versus 190.8 kU/L [p = 0.03]; closest to surgery, 435.0 versus 190.8 kU/L [p = 0.03]). Tissue fungal elements were significantly more prevalent in women versus men (19.0 versus 5.2%; p = 0.02). Up to this point, the analysis was agnostic of clinical details of the subjects. Further analysis was conducted regarding clinical features. Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) was found significantly more commonly in the female versus male patients (21.9 versus 9.1%; p = 0.04). Women versus men had a higher prevalence of migraine (19.4 versus 4.6%; p = 0.01) or any primary headache disorders (23.0 versus 6.2%; p = 0.007). Women who underwent ESS for CRS had higher SNOT-22 symptom burden. Worsened symptomatology may be secondary to a higher prevalence of primary headache disorders in women. However, surgeons

  10. Air pollution and lung function among susceptible adult subjects: a panel study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconi Achille

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse health effects at relatively low levels of ambient air pollution have consistently been reported in the last years. We conducted a time-series panel study of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma, and ischemic heart disease (IHD to evaluate whether daily levels of air pollutants have a measurable impact on the lung function of adult subjects with pre-existing lung or heart diseases. Methods Twenty-nine patients with COPD, asthma, or IHD underwent repeated lung function tests by supervised spirometry in two one-month surveys. Daily samples of coarse (PM10–2.5 and fine (PM2.5 particulate matter were collected by means of dichotomous samplers, and the dust was gravimetrically analyzed. The particulate content of selected metals (cadmium, chrome, iron, nickel, lead, platinum, vanadium, and zinc was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, carbon monoxide (CO, ozone (O3, and sulphur dioxide (SO2 were obtained from the regional air-quality monitoring network. The relationships between concentrations of air pollutants and lung function parameters were analyzed by generalized estimating equations (GEE for panel data. Results Decrements in lung function indices (FVC and/or FEV1 associated with increasing concentrations of PM2.5, NO2 and some metals (especially zinc and iron were observed in COPD cases. Among the asthmatics, NO2 was associated with a decrease in FEV1. No association between average ambient concentrations of any air pollutant and lung function was observed among IHD cases. Conclusion This study suggests that the short-term negative impact of exposure to air pollutants on respiratory volume and flow is limited to individuals with already impaired respiratory function. The fine fraction of ambient PM seems responsible for the observed effects among COPD cases, with zinc and iron having a potential role via oxidative stress. The

  11. The effect of two different hand exercises on grip strength, forearm circumference, and vascular maturation in patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sangwon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Junho; Jang, Seong Ho

    2014-10-01

    To compare the effect of two different hand exercises on hand strength and vascular maturation in patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. We recruited 18 patients who had chronic kidney disease and had undergone arteriovenous fistula surgery for hemodialysis. After the surgery, 10 subjects performed hand-squeezing exercise with GD Grip, and other 8 subjects used Soft Ball. The subjects continued the exercises for 4 weeks. The hand grip strength, pinch strength (tip, palmar and lateral pinch), and forearm circumference of the subjects were assessed before and after the hand-squeezing exercise. The cephalic vein size, blood flow velocity and volume were also measured by ultrasonography in the operated limb. All of the 3 types of pinch strengths, grip strength, and forearm circumference were significantly increased in the group using GD Grip. Cephalic vein size and blood flow volume were also significantly increased. However, blood flow velocity showed no difference after the exercise. The group using Soft Ball showed a significant increase in the tip and lateral pinch strength and forearm circumference. The cephalic vein size and blood flow volume were also significantly increased. On comparing the effect of the two different hand exercises, hand-squeezing exercise with GD Grip had a significantly better effect on the tip and palmar pinch strength than hand-squeezing exercise with Soft Ball. The effect on cephalic vein size was not significantly different between the two groups. The results showed that hand squeezing exercise with GD Grip was more effective in increasing the tip and palmar pinch strength compared to hand squeezing exercise with soft ball.

  12. Screening with spirometry is a useful predictor of later development of noninfectious pulmonary syndromes in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Philip A; Lim, Andrew; Panek-Hudson, Yvonne; Tacey, Mark; Hijazi, Ramzi; Ng, Ashley P; Szer, Jeff; Ritchie, David; Bajel, Ashish

    2014-06-01

    Noninfectious pulmonary syndromes (NIPS) frequently complicate allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The most common and serious is the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, characterized by irreversible fixed airflow obstruction, impaired quality of life, and a high mortality. Treatment for established symptomatic disease is relatively ineffective. We therefore sought to identify potential predictive factors for development of NIPS, which may identify patients at risk in whom earlier intervention may be of benefit. Spirometry and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide were performed before allo-SCT, day 100, and 1 year after allo-SCT. We retrospectively analyzed spirometry in consecutive patients having allo-SCT from 2004 to 2010, along with computed tomography and bronchoalveolar lavage results to identify cases of NIPS. Cases of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were defined as per current National Institutes of Health consensus guidelines. Spirometry results and baseline variables were compared between patients with and without NIPS to identify early predictors and risk factors for NIPS. Of 235 assessable patients, 23 (9.8%) developed NIPS. Median time of onset was day 367 (interquartile range [IQR], 144 to 544 days). Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (ΔFEV1.0) was the best predictor of later NIPS development. Median ΔFEV1.0 from pretransplant to day 100 in patients later developing NIPS was -12% (IQR, -25% to -1%) versus -1% (IQR, -7% to +6%) in unaffected patients, P = .002. From pretransplant to 1 year, ΔFEV1.0 was -19% (IQR, -37% to -6%) versus -3% (IQR, -10% to +4%) in patients later developing NIPS and unaffected patients, respectively, P Spirometry is a potentially useful screening test for identification of presymptomatic NIPS. We recommend 3-monthly spirometry surveillance for up to 2 years post-transplant. Our findings require prospective validation to identify patients in whom earlier intervention may potentially modify the

  13. Atopic asthmatic subjects but not atopic subjects without ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a known risk factor for acute ozone-associated respiratory disease. Ozone causes an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. The role of atopy and asthma in modulation of ozone-induced inflammation has not been determined. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether atopic status modulates ozone response phenotypes in human subjects. METHODS: Fifty volunteers (25 healthy volunteers, 14 atopic nonasthmatic subjects, and 11 atopic asthmatic subjects not requiring maintenance therapy) underwent a 0.4-ppm ozone exposure protocol. Ozone response was determined based on changes in lung function and induced sputum composition, including airway inflammatory cell concentration, cell-surface markers, and cytokine and hyaluronic acid concentrations. RESULTS: All cohorts experienced similar decreases in lung function after ozone. Atopic and atopic asthmatic subjects had increased sputum neutrophil numbers and IL-8 levels after ozone exposure; values did not significantly change in healthy volunteers. After ozone exposure, atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly increased sputum IL-6 and IL-1beta levels and airway macrophage Toll-like receptor 4, Fc(epsilon)RI, and CD23 expression; values in healthy volunteers and atopic nonasthmatic subjects showed no significant change. Atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly decreased IL-10 levels at baseline compared with healthy volunteers; IL-10 levels did not significa

  14. Efficacy and safety of abciximab in diabetic patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with thienopyridines loading: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihua Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been controversial whether abciximab offered additional benefits for diabetic patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with thienopyridines loading. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library clinical trials registry, ISI Science Citation Index, ISI Web of Knowledge and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI were searched, supplemented with manual-screening for relevant publications. Quantitative meta-analyses were performed to assess differences between abciximab groups and controls with respect to post-PCI risk of major cardiac events (MACEs, angiographic restenosis and bleeding complications. RESULTS: 9 trials were identified, involving 2,607 diabetic patients receiving PCI for coronary artery diseases. Among those patients who underwent elective PCI or primary PCI, pooling results showed that abciximab did not significantly reduce risks of MACEs (for elective-PCI patients: RR(1-month: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.60-1.44; RR(1-year: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.81-1.11; for primary-PCI patients: RR(1-month: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.70-1.57; RR(1-year: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.80-1.21, nor all-cause mortality, re-infarction and angiographic restenosis in either group. The only beneficial effect by abciximab appeared to be a decrease 1-year TLR (target lesion revascularization risk in elective-PCI patients (RR1-year: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.99. Moreover, occurrence of minor bleeding complications increased in elective-PCI patients treated with abciximab (RR: 2.94, 95% CI: 1.68-5.13, P<0.001, whereas major bleedings rate was similar (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.27-2.57. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant dosing of abciximab and thienopyridines provides no additional benefit among diabetic patients who underwent PCI; this conclusion, though, needs further confirmation in larger studies.

  15. Systematic review with network meta-analysis: comparative efficacy of different enteral immunonutrition formulas in patients underwent gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Bian, Wei; Wu, Jing; Deng, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Xu

    2017-04-04

    Optimal enteral immunonutrition (EIN) regime for gastric cancer (GC) patients underwent gastrectomy remains uncertainty. To assess comparative efficacy of different EIN formulas in GC patients underwent gastrectomy, we performed network meta-analysis. We included 11 RCTs enrolling 840 patients. Pairwise meta-analysis indicated that EIN (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.36-0.86; MD -0.42, 95% CI -0.74-0.10), Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.22-0.63; MD -0.42, 95% CI -0.75-0.07), Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.94; MD -0.69, 95% CI -1.22-1.07) reduced ICs and LOS. Network meta-analysis confirmed the potential of Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs for ICs (OR 0.27, 95% Crl 0.12-0.49) and Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs for CIs (OR 0.22, 95% Crl 0.02-0.84) and LOS (SMD -0.63, 95% Crl -1.07-0.13), and indicated that Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs was superior to Arg+RNA and Arg+Gln for ICs as well. We performed direct and network meta-analyses for randomized controlled trials comparing EIN formulas with each other or standard enteral nutrition (SEN) in reducing infectious complications (ICs), noninfectious complications (NICs) and length of hospital stay (LOS), through January 2016. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SCURA) and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) were used to rank regimes and rate qualities of evidences respectively. As for GC patients underwent gastrectomy, Arg+RNA+ω-3-FAs and Arg+Gln+ω-3-FAs are the optimal regimes of reducing ICs and LOS.

  16. Prognostic Impact of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on Long-Term Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Hassan, Ahmed; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Malnutrition has been identified as an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. The aim of this study is to examine the prognostic impact of nutritional status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of nutrition, assessed using the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) calculated by serum albumin and body mass index, was evaluated in 2,853 patients with CAD who underwent their first PCI between 2000 and 2011. Patients were assigned to tertiles based on their GNRI levels. The incidences of all-cause death and cardiac death were assessed. The median GNRI values were 101 (interquartile range 95 to 106). Lower GNRI levels were associated with older age and higher prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and chronic kidney disease. During the median follow-up period of 7.4 years, Kaplan-Meier curves showed ongoing divergence in rates of mortality among tertiles (GNRI nutritional status was associated with long-term clinical outcomes in CAD patients after PCI. Evaluation of GNRI carries important prognostic information and may guide the therapeutic approach to such patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Citrus aurantium Naringenin Prevents Osteosarcoma Progression and Recurrence in the Patients Who Underwent Osteosarcoma Surgery by Improving Antioxidant Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus aurantium is rich in flavonoids, which may prevent osteosarcoma progression, but its related molecular mechanism remains unclear. Flavonoids were extracted from C. aurantium and purified by reparative HPLC. Each fraction was identified by using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS. Three main components (naringin, naringenin, and hesperetin were isolated from C. aurantium. Naringenin inhibited the growth of MG-63 cells, whereas naringin and hesperetin had no inhibitory function on cell growth. ROS production was increased in naringin- and hesperetin-treated groups after one day of culture while the level was always lowest in the naringenin-treated group after three days of culture. 95 osteosarcoma patients who underwent surgery were assigned into two groups: naringenin group (NG, received 20 mg naringenin daily, n=47 and control group (CG, received 20 mg placebo daily, n=48. After an average of two-year follow-up, osteosarcoma volumes were smaller in the NG group than in the CG group (P>0.01. The rate of osteosarcoma recurrence was also lower in the NG group than in CG group. ROS levels were lower in the NG group than in the CG group. Thus, naringenin from Citrus aurantium inhibits osteosarcoma progression and local recurrence in the patients who underwent osteosarcoma surgery by improving antioxidant capability.

  18. The Mid-Term Results of Patients who Underwent Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Together with Mitral Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Çolak

    Full Text Available Abstract Objetive: Saline-irrigated radiofrequency ablation, which has been widely used for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in recent years, is 80-90% successful in achieving sinus rhythm. In our study, our surgical experience and mid-term results in patients who underwent mitral valve surgery and left atrial radiofrequency ablation were analyzed. Methods: Forty patients (15 males, 25 females; mean age 52.05±9.9 years; range 32-74 underwent surgery for atrial fibrillation associated with mitral valvular disease. All patients manifested atrial fibrillation, which started at least six months before the surgical intervention. The majority of patients (36 patients, 90% were in NYHA class III; 34 (85% patients had rheumatic heart disease. In addition to mitral valve surgery and radiofrequency ablation, coronary artery bypass, DeVega tricuspid annuloplasty, left ventricular aneurysm repair, and left atrial thrombus excision were performed. Following discharge from the hospital, patients' follow-up was performed as outpatient clinic examinations and the average follow-up period of patients was 18±3 months. Results: While the incidence of sinus rhythm was 85.3% on the first postoperative day, it was 80% during discharge and 71% in the 1st year follow-up examination. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation is an effective method when it is performed by appropriate surgical technique. Its rate for returning to sinus rhythm is as high as the rate of conventional surgical procedure.

  19. [Subgroup analysis results of platelet inhibition trial in acute coronary syndrome patients (PLATO) who underwent intervention or medical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakal, Enbiya

    2013-04-01

    Antiplatelet agents are among the most important drug classes in reducing mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Ticagrelor is the first reversible and direct acting P2Y(12) receptor inhibitor with an earlier onset of action compared to clopidogrel. The PLATO study (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) with ticagrelor was conducted with a design providing consistency with the current clinical practice, including all forms of ACS and a wide spectrum of treatment options in 18624 patients from 862 centers in 43 countries. Of these patients, 13408 underwent interventional procedures (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 6732/6676) (PLATO-INVASIVE). As reported by the investigator, non-invasive treatment strategy was planned for 5216 patients (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 2601/2615). However, 2040 patients in this group received interventional treatment during the follow-up (PLATO-NON-INVASIVE/MEDICAL TREATMENT). 1261 patients requiring surgical treatment underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) within 7 days after the discontinuation of study treatment (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 632/629) (PLATO-CABG). The results of these three subgroups were consistent with the main PLATO study results, demonstrating that ticagrelor reduced the primary (cardiovascular death, myocardial Infarction and stroke) and secondary composite endpoints without increasing bleeding compared with clopidogrel. Ticagrelor fulfills an important unmet need regarding antiplatelet effectiveness in patients with ACS. This review evaluates the INVASIVE and MEDICAL subgroup studies of the PLATO study.

  20. The Role of Speech Therapy in Patients Who Underwent Laryngeal Microsurgery due to Phonotraumatic Lesions and Lesions Unrelated to Phonotrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Claudia de Assis Corrêa de; Macedo, Evaldo Dacheux de; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Catani, Guilherme Simas do Amaral; Ido, Jorge Massaki; Stahlke, Henrique Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of the speech-language pathology in the multiprofessional team dealing with laryngology and the voice has been recognized for a long time. Scientific studies in this field recommend therapies for laryngeal microsurgeries; few of the studies, however, effectively evaluate the result of postoperative speech therapy. Objective To compare speech therapy evaluation and treatment among patients with phonotraumatic lesions and patients with lesions unrelated to phonotrauma who underwent laryngeal microsurgery. Methods This study was performed at IPO Hospital (Paranaense Institute of Otorhinolaryngology, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil) between February 2010 and February 2011. Of 254 patients who underwent laryngeal microsurgery, 208 patients were included in the study and divided in two groups: group A with phonotraumatic lesions (n = 131) and group B with lesions unrelated to phonotrauma (n = 77). The number of sessions and the functional result after speech therapy were evaluated. Results The number of postoperative phonotherapy sessions after microsurgery was up to 10 sessions in 89.31% and 87.71% for groups A and B, respectively. Phonotherapy treatment showed a better functional evolution in group A (92.37%). Conclusion A significant difference was observed only in functional evolution, which was better in the group with phonotraumatic lesions (p < 0.0001). PMID:25992078

  1. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; de Andrade, Armèle Dornelas; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. Methods: This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. Results: We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. PMID:27812631

  2. Effect of changing from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III spirometry reference range to that of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 at Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embling, Laura A K; Zagami, Debbie; Sriram, Krishna Bajee; Gordon, Robert J; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan

    2016-12-01

    The categorisation of lung disease into obstructive ventilatory defect (OVD) and tendency to a restrictive ventilatory defect (TRVD) patterns using spirometry is used to guide both prognostication and treatment. The effectiveness of categorisation depends upon having reference ranges that accurately represent the population they describe. The Global Lung Initiative 2012 (GLI 2012) has spirometry reference ranges drawn from the largest sample size to date. This study aimed to determine whether using spirometry reference ranges from the new GLI 2012 dataset, compared to the previously used National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III (NHANES III) dataset, resulted in a change in diagnosis between OVD, TRVD and normal ventilatory pattern (NVP). Spirometry data were collected from 301 patients, aged 18-80 years, undergoing investigation at the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service (GCHHS) throughout February and March 2014. OVD was defined as a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) less than lower limit of normal (LLN). TRVD was defined as FEV1/FVC ≥ LLN, FEV1 < LLN, and FVC < LLN. The LLN values were determined by equations from the GLI and NHANES datasets. Spirometry interpreted using the NHANES III equations showed: 102 individuals (33.9%) with normal spirometry, 136 (45.2%) with an OVD pattern, 52 (17.3%) with a TRVD pattern, and 11 (3.7%) with a mixed pattern. When the spirometry data were interpreted using the GLI 2012 equations 2 (0.7%) individuals changed from OVD to NVP, 2 (0.7%) changed from NVP to OVD and 14 (4.7%) changed from TRVD to NVP. Using the GLI 2012 reference range resulted in a change in diagnosis of lung disease in 5.9% of the individuals included in this study. This variance in diagnosis when changing reference ranges should be taken into account by clinicians as it may affect patient management.

  3. The association between orthostatic hypotension and cognitive state among adults 65 years and older who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchick, Boris; Freud, Tamar; Press, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of cognitive impairment and orthostatic hypotension (OH) increases with age, but the results of studies that assessed possible associations between them are inconsistent. The aim of this study is to assess possible associations between cognitive impairment and OH in patients ≥65 years of age who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the computerized medical records of the study population from 2005 to 2013. Data collected included blood pressure measurements that enabled the calculation of OH, results of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), results of the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) test, and cognitive diagnoses that were determined over the course of the assessment. The rate of OH in the study population of 571 adults was 32.1%. The mean MMSE score was 22.5 ± 5.2 among participants with OH and 21.6 ± 5.8 among those without OH (P = 0.09). The absence of a significant association between OH and MMSE remained after adjusting the MMSE score for age and education level. The mean MoCA score was 16.4 ± 5.0 among participants with OH and 16.4 ± 4.8 among those without (P = 0.33). The prevalence of OH was 39% among participants without cognitive impairment, 28.9% among those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 30.6% among those with dementia (P = 0.13). There was no association between OH and cognitive impairment in adults who underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27442658

  4. Autotransplantation of spleen tissue in children with mansonic schistosomiasis who underwent splenectomy: Evaluation of splenic residual functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt Carlos Teixeira

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Autotransplantation of spleen tissue is an attempt for maintenance of splenic functions when splenectomy is indicated in children. It minimizes the risks of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection and it has been done in children with severe portal hypertension due to hepatosplenic mansonic schistosomiasis that underwent splenectomy. The purposes of this investigation were to study the morphology of the residual splenic tissue; to evaluate the residual filtration function of this splenosis; and to assess the immune response to polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine of these patients. Twenty-three children with portal hypertension from mansonic schistosomiasis who underwent splenectomy, ligature of the left gastric vein, autotransplantation of spleen tissue into an omental pouch were evaluated for residual splenic parenchyma and functions. Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans were used for detection of splenic nodules. The search for Howell Jolly bodies were used for assessing the filtration function and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for measuring the relative rise in titter of specific pneumococcal antibodies. Splenosis was evident in all children; however, in two there were less than five splenic nodules in the greater omentum, which was considered insufficient. Howell-Jolly bodies were found in the peripheral blood only in these two patients with less evident splenosis. The immune response was adequate in 15 patients; it was intermediate in 4 patients and inadequate in 4 patients. Autotransplantation of spleen tissue into an omental pouch is efficient in maintaining the filtration splenic function in more than 90% of the cases and the immune response to pneumococcal vaccination in approximately 65% of the children.

  5. Risk Factors for Pedicle Flap Complications in 251 Elderly Chinese Patients Who Underwent Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zao; Tian, Zhuowei; Zhang, Chenping; Sun, Jian; Hu, Jingzhou; He, Yue

    2016-10-01

    To determine risk factors for pedicle flap complications in elderly patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The authors designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study and enrolled a sample of patients at least 75 years old who underwent resection of oral and maxillofacial tumors and pedicle flap reconstruction from January 2004 through December 2013. The primary predictor variable was reconstructive technique grouped into 5 types of pedicle flap. The difference among groups was tested with the χ(2) test and t test. The primary outcome variable was the presence of flap complication, which was divided into minor and major groups. Other variables were grouped into the following sets: demographic, operative, and adjuvant treatments. Univariate, bivariate, and regression statistics were computed and statistical significance was set at a P value less than .05. The study sample was composed of 251 patients with a mean age of 78 years and 62.95% were men. Of these, 68.13% had various preoperative systemic diseases. With regard to flap type, 120 underwent reconstruction with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, 5 with a submental island flap, 4 with a submandibular gland flap, 13 with a platysma myocutaneous flap, and 109 with a sternocleidomastoid flap. TNM stage (negative correlation) and smoking (positive correlation) correlated with flap type. There were 48 complications, of which 32 were minor and 16 were major; flap failure was observed in only 1 patient. Risk factors associated with complications were types of pedicle flap, age, heart score, hypertension, diabetes, postoperative hypoproteinemia, and drug-induced liver injury. The pedicle flap is suitable and safe for the reconstruction of defects caused by the ablation of oral and maxillofacial tumors in elderly patients. Preoperative evaluation of positive risk factors, including type of surgery and systemic conditions, is very important for the selection of an appropriate flap for such

  6. [Evaluation of the antithrombotic strategy in low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Velázquez, Eduardo; Vieyra-Herrera, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Chávez, Laura; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín

    2017-07-16

    According to current guidelines, in patients without additional risk factors who have undergone aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis, anticoagulation in the first 3 months after surgery is still a matter of debate. According to current evidence, aspirin in low doses is a reasonable alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA). A comparison is made between the incidence of thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications in patients with low thrombotic risk who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico. The hypothesis: aspirin as monotherapy has a beneficial effect compared to VKA. The studied patients were the low thrombotic risk patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis in the National Institute of Cardiology of Ignacio Chávez of Mexico from 2011 to 2015. The groups studied were: aspirin only, VKA only, and the combination of VKA plus aspirin. The patients were retrospectively followed-up for 12 months, and the thrombotic and haemorrhagic complications were documented. Of the 231 patients included in the study, only one patient in the VKA only group presented with a haemorrhagic complication. No thrombotic complications were observed. In the present study no thrombotic complications were observed in patients who did not receive anticoagulation in the first 3 months after an aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis after a follow up period of 12 months. This suggests that the use of aspirin only is safe during this period. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Usefulness of the CHA2DS2-VASc Score to Predict Outcome in Patients Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvin, Katia; Levi, Amos; Landes, Uri; Bental, Tamir; Sagie, Alexander; Shapira, Yaron; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Assali, Abid; Kornowski, Ran

    2017-10-19

    Risk assessment for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) patients remains challenging, especially in elderly and high-risk candidates. Although several risk factors contribute to increased morbidity and mortality after TAVI, simple risk scores for routine use are lacking. Applying the CHA2DS2-VASC (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 years, diabetes, prior stroke, vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex [female] category) score as a novel risk stratification tool for conditions other than atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention has been previously examined; however, its usefulness in a population of patients with aortic stenosis after TAVI has not been established. Thus, we investigated 633 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI between November 2008 and May 2017, and calculated the CHA2DS2-VASC score. Patients were stratified according to their CHA2DS2-VASC score into 3 categories (0 to 3, 4 to 6, 7 to 9), and the association between CHA2DS2-VASC score and 1-year clinical outcomes (stroke, all-cause mortality, and combined outcome of stroke or mortality) was evaluated. We found that both stroke and mortality at 1 year were significantly more frequent with increasing CHA2DS2-VASC score (p = 0.012 and p = 0.025, respectively). Each single-point rise in CHA2DS2-VASC score was associated with a 38% increase in the 1-year combined outcome of mortality or stroke (p = 0.022; C index 0.615). In conclusion, CHA2DS2-VASC score can be used as a simple and effective tool to predict 1-year clinical outcomes including death and stroke in patients who underwent TAVI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty and Those Converted to Penetrating Keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Koçluk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare clinical outcomes of cases who underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK and cases who were converted to penetrating keratoplasty (PKP from DALK surgery. Materials and Methods: The records of 54 patients for whom DALK surgery was planned and were operated for different diagnoses between March 2013 and June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (PKP group consisted of 23 cases who were converted to PKP due to Descemet’s membrane perforation at any stage of surgery; group 2 (DALK group consisted of 31 patients whose surgery could be completed as DALK. Preoperative and postoperative follow-up results were evaluated in each group. Results: Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA increased in the postoperative period according to baseline in both groups. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the rates of CDVA increase between the groups (p=0.142. The mean astigmatism measured by corneal topography at final examination was 5.8±2.3 diopters in group 1 and 5.4±1.8 diopters in group 2. The difference between groups was not statistically significant (p=0.430. The groups were not statistically different regarding postoperative pachymetry (p=0.453. The grafts in all 54 patients (100% were clear at final postoperative examination. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of postoperative complications. Conclusion: Similar clinical outcomes were obtained in our study for patients who underwent DALK and those whose procedure was converted from DALK to PKP.

  9. Ventilation with high versus low peep levels during general anaesthesia for open abdominal surgery does not affect postoperative spirometry: A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treschan, Tanja A; Schaefer, Maximilian; Kemper, Johann; Bastin, Bea; Kienbaum, Peter; Pannen, Benedikt; Hemmes, Sabrine N; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Pelosi, Paolo; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-08-01

    Invasive mechanical ventilation during general anaesthesia for surgery typically causes atelectasis and impairs postoperative lung function. We investigated the effect of intraoperative ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment manoeuvres (RMs) on postoperative spirometry. This was a preplanned, single-centre substudy of an international multicentre randomised controlled trial, the PROVHILO trial. University hospital from November 2011 to January 2013. Nonobese patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery at a high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). Intraoperative low tidal volume ventilation with PEEP levels of 12 cmH2O and RM (the high PEEP group) or with PEEP levels of 2 cmH2O or less without RM (the low PEEP group). Time-weighted averages (TWAs) of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) up to postoperative day five. Thirty-one patients were allocated to the high PEEP group and 32 to the low PEEP group. No postoperative spirometry test results were available for 6 patients. In both groups, TWA of FEV1 and FVC until postoperative day five were lower than preoperative values. Postoperative spirometry test results were not different between the high and low PEEP group; Data are median [interquartile range], TWA FVC 1.8 [1.6 to 2.4] versus 1.7 [1.2 to 2.4] l (P = NS) and TWA FEV1 1.2 [1.1 to 2.5] versus 1.2 [0.9 to 1.9] l (P = NS). Patients who developed PPCs had lower FEV1 and FVC on postoperative day five; 1.1 [0.9 to 1.6] versus 1.6 [1.4 to 1.9] l (P = 0.001) and 1.6 [1.2 to 2.6] versus 2.3 [1.7 to 2.6] l (P = 0.036), respectively. Postoperative spirometry is not affected by PEEP and RM during intraoperative ventilation for open abdominal surgery in nonobese patients at a high risk of PPCs, but rather is associated with the development of PPCs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01441791.

  10. Effectiveness of a structured motivational intervention including smoking cessation advice and spirometry information in the primary care setting: the ESPITAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lujan, Francisco; Piñol-Moreso, Josep L I; Martin-Vergara, Nuria; Basora-Gallisa, Josep; Pascual-Palacios, Irene; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Llopis, Estefania Aparicio; Basora-Gallisa, Maria T; Pedret-Llaberia, Roser

    2011-11-11

    There is current controversy about the efficacy of smoking cessation interventions that are based on information obtained by spirometry. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness in the primary care setting of structured motivational intervention to achieve smoking cessation, compared with usual clinical practice. Multicentre randomized clinical trial with an intervention and a control group. 12 primary care centres in the province of Tarragona (Spain). 600 current smokers aged between 35 and 70 years with a cumulative habit of more than 10 packs of cigarettes per year, attended in primary care for any reason and who did not meet any of the exclusion criteria for the study, randomly assigned to structured intervention or standard clinical attention. Usual advice to quit smoking by a general practitioner as well as a 20-minute personalized visit to provide detailed information about spirometry results, during which FEV1, FVC, FEF 25-75% and PEF measurements were discussed and interpreted in terms of theoretical values. Additional information included the lung age index (defined as the average age of a non-smoker with the same FEV1 as the study participant), comparing this with the chronological age to illustrate the pulmonary deterioration that results from smoking. Spirometry during the initial visit. Structured interview questionnaire administered at the primary care centre at the initial visit and at 12-month follow-up. Telephone follow-up interview at 6 months. At 12-month follow-up, expired CO was measured in patients who claimed to have quit smoking. Smoking cessation at 12 months. Data will be analyzed on the basis of "intention to treat" and the unit of analysis will be the individual smoker. Among active smokers treated in primary care we anticipate significantly higher smoking cessation in the intervention group than in the control group. Application of a motivational intervention based on structured information about spirometry results

  11. Effect of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction on Quality of Life (SF-36) and Spirometry Parameters, in Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    AREFNASAB, Zahra; GHANEI, Mostafa; NOORBALA, Ahmad Ali; ALIPOUR, Ahmad; BABAMAHMOODI, Farhang; BABAMAHMOODI, Abdolreza; SALEHI, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have shown that Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) has positive effect on physical and psychological dimensions of chronic illnesses. In this study for the first time we examine the effect of this new technique on quality of life and pulmonary function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans who have chronic pulmonary problem, psychological problems and low quality of life. Methods Forty male pulmonary injured veterans were randomly replaced in two groups with 20 participants (MBSR and control Wait List (WL)). Then MBSR group received 8-weekly sessions intervention. We evaluate quality of life (used SF-36 questionnaire) and Spirometry parameters two times; before and after intervention in two group. We used “mixed factorial analyses of variance” test for analyzing data in each dependent variables. Then if we have significant interactional effect, we used –paired- sample t-test” for comparing before and after intervention data of each group, and “Independent-Sample t-test” for comparing after intervention data of two groups. Results The MBSR compare to WL group improved SF-36 total score, (F (1, 38) =12.09, P=0.001), “Role limitations due to physical problems”(F(1,38)= 6.92, P=0.01), “Role limitations due to emotional problems”(F(1,38)= 7.75, P=0.008), “Social functioning”(F(1,38)= 9.89, P=0.003), “Mental health”(F(1,38)= 15.93, P=0), “Vitality”(F(1,38)= 40.03, P≤0.001), and “Pain”(F(1,38)= 27.60, P≤0.001). MBSR had no significant effect on “FEV1” (F (1, 38) = 0.03, P=0.85),”FVC” (F (1, 38) = 0.16, P=0.69) and “FEV1/FVC” (F (1, 38) = 2.21, P=0.14). Conclusion MBSR can improve individual’s quality of life but not lung function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans. PMID:26060664

  12. Effect of Incentive Spirometry on Postoperative Hypoxemia and Pulmonary Complications After Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, Haddon; Hwang, John; Brams, David; Schnelldorfer, Thomas; Nepomnayshy, Dmitry

    2017-05-01

    The combination of obesity and foregut surgery puts patients undergoing bariatric surgery at high risk for postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative incentive spirometry (IS) is a ubiquitous practice; however, little evidence exists on its effectiveness. To determine the effect of postoperative IS on hypoxemia, arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) level, and pulmonary complications after bariatric surgery. A randomized noninferiority clinical trial enrolled patients undergoing bariatric surgery from May 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016. Patients were randomized to postoperative IS (control group) or clinical observation (test group) at a single-center tertiary referral teaching hospital. Analysis was based on the evaluable population. The controls received the standard of care with IS use 10 times every hour while awake. The test group did not receive an IS device or these orders. The primary outcome was frequency of hypoxemia, defined as an Sao2 level of less than 92% without supplementation at 6, 12, and 24 postoperative hours. Secondary outcomes were Sao2 levels at these times and the rate of 30-day postoperative pulmonary complications. A total of 224 patients (50 men [22.3%] and 174 women [77.7%]; mean [SD] age, 45.6 [11.8] years) were enrolled, and 112 were randomized for each group. Baseline characteristics of the groups were similar. No significant differences in frequency of postoperative hypoxemia between the control and test groups were found at 6 (11.9% vs 10.4%; P = .72), 12 (5.4% vs 8.2%; P = .40), or 24 (3.7% vs 4.6%; P = .73) postoperative hours. No significant differences were observed in mean (SD) Sao2 level between the control and test groups at 6 (94.9% [3.2%] vs 94.9% [2.9%]; P = .99), 12 (95.4% [2.2%] vs 95.1% [2.5%]; P = .40), or 24 (95.7% [2.4%] vs 95.6% [2.4%]; P = .69) postoperative hours. Rates of 30-day postoperative pulmonary complications did not differ between groups (8 patients [7.1%] in the control group vs

  13. Preoperative and Postoperative (1st and 3rd Month Metabolic Data of Patients Who Underwent Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Özdemir Kutbay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The growing prevalence of obesity has become a major concern. The efficacy of medical treatment, diet and behavior therapy in morbidly obese patients is limited. Obesity surgery is a treatment option for selected morbidly obese patients. Material and Method: Data of 47 patients (n=39 women, 8 men who underwent bariatric surgery were investigated. Results: Out of 47 patients, 20 underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB (43% and 27 had sleeve gastrectomy (SG (57%. The mean age of the patients was 37±9.5 (19-59 years. 17% of patients were men and 83% were women. In the analysis of data on weight that could be found for 31 out of 47 patients, we detected preoperative and postoperative (1st and 3rd month mean weight values as 125.4±15.9 kg, 112.7±13.2 kg (p<0.001 and 100.9±17.5 kg (p<0.001, respectively. In addition, the analysis of the data on mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG levels which could be found for 23 out of 47 patients, showed us that preoperative and postoperative (1st and 3rd month FPG levels were 100.9±17.5 mg/dL, 91.6±10.9 mg/dL (p=0.03 and 87.3±2.0 mg/dL, respectively. Only 1 patient had diabetes before the surgery. In the RYGB group, the mean change in weight was 12.4±5.5 kg in the 1st month and 22.2±8.6 kg in the 3rd month (compared to the weights in the preoperative period. Moreover, in the SG group, the mean change in weight was 13.7±4.5 kg in the 1st month and 23.4±5.8 kg in the 3rd month. No statistically significant difference was found between the weight changes in the 1st and the 3rd month as for surgery types. Discussion: After bariatric surgery, significant loss in weight and reduction in FPG occurred in short-term.

  14. In vitro study of trematodicidal action of Dicranopteris linearis (Burm.f.) Underw. extracts against Gastrothylax crumenifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Kalpana Devi; Subramani, Vasantha; Annamalai, Panneerselvam; Nakulan V, Rajesh; Narayanaperumal, Jeyathilakan; Solomon, Jeeva

    2016-12-01

    The anthelmintic activity of column fractioned Dicranopteris linearis (Burm.f.) Underw. extracts was used for in vitro incubation study against adult Gastrothylax crumenifer. The qualitative analysis showed ethanol extract performed well to express 12 secondary metabolites studied except anthocyanin. Quantitative phytochemical analysis of terpenoids, phenols, flavonoids and tannins showed predominant amount of terpenoids (97.0±1.15)mg/g and tannins (30.8±0.44)mg tannic acid equivalents/gram. GC-MS analysis of fraction separated under column (Fraction V-79.5%) showed presence of QUERCETIN 7,3',4' TRIMETHOXY, a flavonoids (polyphenol derivative), PHYTOL, a diterpenoids, feren-8-ene, a triterpenoids, hexdecanoic acid, a fatty acid derivative shown to have potent anthelmintic property. 25ml of Hedon-Fleig (H-F) salt solution containing various concentrations (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5mg/ml) respectively as test extracts, Standard control Oxyclozanide @1(*)% (0.25g/25ml) and negative control H-F salt solution, distributed to 7-Petri plates in an incubator with 5% CO2 at 37°C. Twenty five amphistomes were incubated and the motility of control and drug treated flukes was observed under dissection microscope at a regular time interval of 0, 10, 15, 30min and 1hr respectively. The motility response of the parasites was categorized with specific score 3, 2, 1, 0 respectively. Relative Motility (RM) value based on mean mortality and drug concentration for analysis of Lethal Concentration (LC50) and were determined by Probit regression analysis. In vitro incubation study revealed death of all trematodes, lethal at 10min incubation time at 5mg/ml concentration, indicated RM value is 0, equivalent effective to Standard control Oxyclozanide, where RM value is 0 at 10min. Confirmative study on gross morphology, histopathology, and ultra-structural changes showed considerable effect on suckers, teguments and internal organs and were dose dependent. It is indicative that presence of

  15. The Biological Activity of Propolis-Containing Toothpaste on Oral Health Environment in Patients Who Underwent Implant-Supported Prosthodontic Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Morawiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC. Approximal plaque index (API, oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component, and sulcus bleeding index (SBI were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora.

  16. The biological activity of propolis-containing toothpaste on oral health environment in patients who underwent implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Niedzielska, Iwona; Mertas, Anna; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skaba, Dariusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kucharzewski, Marek; Szaniawska, Karolina; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Więckiewicz, Mieszko

    2013-01-01

    The soft and periodontal tissues surrounding dental implants are particularly susceptible to bacteria invasion and inflammatory reactions due to complex histological structures. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Sixteen subjects who underwent an oral rehabilitation with dental implants were selected and randomly assigned into two groups, which received a newly formulated propolis-containing toothpaste (3% (CA)) or a negative control without an active ingredient (CC). Approximal plaque index (API), oral hygiene index (OHI, debris component), and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) were assessed in three subsequent stages. During the first and last examinations, the swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation. Propolis-containing toothpaste was found to be distinctively effective in improving oral health and the occurrence of gingivitis triggered by dental plaque. The qualitative and quantitative changes in oral bacteria spectrum were observed. Antibacterial measures containing propolis might be used as a natural adjuvant to other active substances in individuals with a high risk of periodontal problems against pathogenic oral microflora.

  17. The Effect of Prazosin and Oxybutynin on the Symptoms Due to Using Double J Catheter in Patients Underwent TUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tavakkoli Tabassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Double J catheter has been used for years as an independent practice or a part of other urological practices. Although these catheters have solved many patients’ problems but those can cause symptoms and problems for patients. The aim of this study was the investigation the effect of prazosin and oxybutynin on the degree of symptoms due to using Double J catheter. Methods: In this interventional study, patients who underwent TUL from July 2008 to march 2008 in the lithotripsy ward of Imam Reza hospital were entered to the study and randomly divided in 3 groups randomly. In the first group, placebo, in the second group, oxybutynin, in the third group prazosin were prescribed. Three weeks later standard questionnaire Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ was completed. After collecting data, was analyzed using SPSS software. Results: A total of 113 patients (70 men 43 women were included to the study. The mean age was 39 years. There were no significance difference among urinary symptoms score pain of body and physical activity problems in three groups (P>0.05, but there was a significant difference in general health and work problems among them (P<0.05. Conclusion: Oxybutynin caused a low effect on improvement of general health and work problems in patients who were studied. It might Prazosin does not has a sufficient time to affect on urinary symptoms, because of shortness of usage.

  18. The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent assisted reproductive techniques on the pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun; Turk, Rukiye; Yucel, Cigdem; Dilbaz, Serdar; Cinar, Ozgur; Karahalil, Bensu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who underwent Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) on pregnancy outcomes. This study was conducted as a prospective and comparative study with 217 couples. The study data was collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire and the Turkish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The questionnaire, STAI and BDI were applied to couples who initiated ART treatment. Couples' state anxiety scores were re-evaluated after embryo transfer (ET). A significant relationship was found between the depression score of women and pregnancy outcome (p 0.05) and lower depression scores (p <0.05) than spouses of women with a positive pregnancy outcome. Study results indicated that the anxiety and depression scores of couples who had achieved a positive pregnancy result were lower than for couples with a negative result. The results of this study will contribute to the health professionals especially to the nurses who spend the most time with couples in providing consulting services and supporting psychological status of couples during ART process in Turkey.

  19. Association between Seminal Vesicle Invasion and Prostate Cancer Detection Location after Transrectal Systemic Biopsy among Men Who Underwent Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ik; Lee, Hak Min; Jo, Jung Ki; Lee, Sangchul; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun; Oh, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that the location of the seminal vesicles near the base of the prostate, the more positive cores are detected in the base, the greater the risk of seminal vesicle invasion. Therefore we investigate the clinical outcomes of base dominant prostate cancer (BDPC) in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) -guided biopsies compared with anteromiddle dominant prostate cancer (AMPC). From November 2003 to June 2014, a total of 990 intermediate and high risk prostate cancer (PCa) patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) were enrolled and stratified into two groups according to proportion of positive cores-BDPC group had ≥ 33.3% ratio of positive cores from the prostate base among all positive cores and AMPC group regression model to confirm the significance of BDPC to seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) and Cox proportional hazard analysis to BCR. Among these 990 PCa patients, the 487 patients in BDPC group had more advanced clinical stage (pextension (ECE), SVI and BCR (all pCox proportional analysis (hazard ratio: 1.466, p = 0.004). BDPC in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies was significantly associated with SVI and BCR after adjusting for other clinical factors. Therefore, BDPC should be considered to be a more aggressive tumor despite an otherwise similar cancer profile.

  20. Comparison of TIMI and Gensini score in patients admitted to the emergency department with chest pain, who underwent coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşcanlı, Murat Doğan; Metin Aksu, Nalan; Evranos, Banu; Aytemir, Kudret; Özmen, Mehmet Mahir

    2014-03-01

    In patients admitted to the emergency department with complaints of chest pain and unstable angina pectoris, ST-elevation MI scoring is done according to risk factors used to calculate risks of urgent revascularization, MI, and death within 14 days. For this calculation, the most widely used scoring system is TIMI risk score. In this prospective, cross-sectional descriptive study, we evaluated and compared the effectiveness of TIMI and Gensini scores of patients with chest pain who were admitted to Hacettepe University Hospitals Emergency Department between March 2011 and September 2011 and who underwent coronary angiography. The mean (range) age of 165 patients was 62 (31-88) years. Moderate correlation between TIMI and Gensini scores was detected (mean values of Gensini score for TIMI 1 is 53.50, for TIMI 2 it is 52.09, for TIMI 3 it is 102.77, for TIMI 4 it is 113.70, and for TIMI 5 it is 115.43). There was also a positive correlation between TIMI score and the results. TIMI risk stratification score is safe and easy to use for rapid assessment of mortality and MI risk, despite its low possibility of predicting the outcome.

  1. Assessment of quality of life of patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and a rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moises Cohen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life can be defined as the expression of aconceptual model that tries to represent patient’s perspectivesand his/her level of satisfaction expressed by numbers. Theobjective of this study is to evaluate the parameters of quality oflife of 23 patients who underwent surgery for anterior cruciateligament reconstruction. Methods: We adopted SF-36, a generichealth-related evaluation questionnaire, to obtain informationregarding several aspects of patients’ health conditions, and theLysholm questionnaire, specific to evaluate the symptoms andfunction of the knee. The questionnaires were applied at two stagesof the treatment: pre- and postoperatively (after the rehabilitationprogram. Results: Before surgery, the Lysholm questionnairepresented the following results: excellent in 4% of the cases, goodin 22%, fair in 22%, and poor in 52%. After surgery (Lysholm e SF-36 the correlation level was approximately 44% (p = 0.041.Discussion: The correlation between the Lysholm and the SF-36questionnaires showed the following: the lower the level of pain,the higher the Lysholm score. The high scores presented by theLysholm questionnaire are directly proportional to physical andemotional aspects, and to functional capacity. Conclusion:Analysis of both questionnaires, as well as of their correlation,showed some improvement in patients´ quality of life. We werealso able to demonstrate the importance and usefulness of applyingthe two questionnaires at three different moments: before, duringand after physiotherapeutic intervention.

  2. Quantitative computed tomography analysis of the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis using automated software: correlation with spirometry in the evaluation of severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Cruvinel, Danilo Lemos; Menezes, Marcelo Bezerra de; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Vianna, Elcio de Oliveira; Elias Junior, Jorge; Martinez, Jose Antonio Baddini, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the airways using automated software, in computed tomography images of patients with cystic fibrosis, correlating the results with spirometric findings. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with cystic fibrosis were studied-20 males and 14 females; mean age 18 ± 9 years - divided into two groups according to the spirometry findings: group I (n = 21), without severe airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1] > 50% predicted), and group II (n = 13), with severe obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 50% predicted). The following tracheobronchial tree parameters were obtained automatically: bronchial diameter, area, thickness, and wall attenuation. Results: On average, 52 bronchi per patient were studied. The number of bronchi analyzed was higher in group II. The correlation with spirometry findings, especially between the relative wall thickness of third to eighth bronchial generation and predicted FEV1, was better in group I. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the airways by computed tomography can be useful for assessing disease severity in cystic fibrosis patients. In patients with severe airflow obstruction, the number of bronchi studied by the method is higher, indicating more bronchiectasis. In patients without severe obstruction, the relative bronchial wall thickness showed a good correlation with the predicted FEV1. (author)

  3. Size, number, and distribution of thyroid nodules and the risk of malignancy in radiation-exposed patients who underwent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Dan V; Schneider, Arthur B

    2008-06-01

    The chance that a thyroid nodule is malignant is higher when there is a history of childhood radiation exposure. The objective of the study was to determine how the size of a thyroid nodule, the number of nodules, and the distribution of nodules influence the risk of cancer in irradiated patients. From a cohort of 4296 radiation-exposed people, we studied the 1059 that underwent thyroid surgery. DESIGN AND OUTCOMES: We studied the association between the size, number, distribution, and rank order of thyroid nodules and the chance of malignancy. There were 612 malignant nodules in 358 patients and 2037 benign ones in 930 patients. There was no change in the risk that a nodule was malignant with increasing size (odds ratio 0.91/cm, P = 0.11) among the 1709 nodules that were 0.5 cm or greater. A solitary nodule had a similar likelihood of being malignant as a nodule that was one of several (18.8 vs. 17.3%), whereas patients with multiple nodules were more likely to have thyroid cancer than those with solitary nodules [30.7 vs. 18.7%; risk ratio 1.64 (1.27-2.13)]. Aspirating only the largest nodule would have missed 111 of the cancers (42%), whereas aspirating the two largest nodules would have missed 45 of the cases (17%), although none would have been 10 mm or greater. In radiation-exposed patients, the following conclusions were made: 1) the likelihood that a nodule is malignant is independent of nodule number and size; 2) the likelihood of cancer is increased if more than one nodule is present; 3) evaluating the two largest nodules by fine-needle aspiration would have resulted in a significant number of cases being missed but none with large cancers; and 4) more than half of the patients with thyroid cancer had multifocal tumors.

  4. Efficacy of Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Treatment in Patients with Liver Coagulopathy Who Underwent Various Invasive Hepatobiliary and Gastrointestinal Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmas Rinaldi A. Lesmana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs containing prothrombin, factors VII, IX, and X, as well as the inhibitors protein C and S have been used as an emergent reversal for oral anticoagulation therapy. The use of PCCs in hepatobiliary disorder patients or patients with liver coagulopathy who need to undergo invasive procedures has not been well studied. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of PCC treatment in order to control or prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo various invasive procedures. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label, non-randomized, before-and-after study in patients with hepatobiliary disorders who underwent invasive procedures accompanied by liver impairment and received PCC injection (Cofact®, Sanquin, The Netherlands. Patients with coagulopathy from various causes were recruited consecutively. Data collected were the episodes of bleeding, liver function test and the international normalized ratio (INR before and after PCC therapy. The primary endpoint was INR change after treatment, while secondary endpoints included bleeding control and bleeding event after treatment. Results: Thirty patients (17 men, 13 women were enrolled. Patients’ mean age was 57.0 + 15.5 years. Liver cirrhosis was found in 14 patients (46.7%. The procedures consisted of liver biopsy, liver abscess aspiration, abdominal paracentesis, therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, abdominal surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. After treatment, 25 patients (83.3% showed a decreased median INR (from 1.6 to 1.3 (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test. Five patients failed to show INR reduction. No new bleeding event related to the invasive procedures was observed. Conclusion: PCC treatment is effective to control and prevent bleeding complications in patients with liver coagulopathy who undergo invasive procedures.

  5. Effectiveness of informational and emotional consultation on the psychological impact on women with breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Su-Chin; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chu, Shu-Yuan; Yen, Hsiu-Fang

    2010-09-01

    Female breast cancer has been ranked as the leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. Women who undergo a mastectomy are at risk of suffering emotional disturbance because of deteriorating body image. A nursing intervention designed to restore body image perceptions and to reduce anxiety and emotional distress in this vulnerable group should be developed and administered. This study was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of informational and emotional consultation on body image, anxiety, and emotional distress in women with breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy. A quasi-experimental design with convenience sampling was used. Two hospitals within the same hospital system in southern Taiwan provided the research setting. Sixty-three women diagnosed with breast cancer completed the interviews (experimental group = 32, control group = 31). The experimental group participants received a two-session informational and emotional consultation, whereas those in the control group received routine nursing care only. All participants completed a series of three face-to-face interviews, including one pretest (Time 1, before surgery), a first posttest (Time 2, the day of discharge), and a second (follow-up) test (Time 3, 2 months after surgery). The intervention had an immediate positive effect (i.e., on the day of hospital discharge) on anxiety and a delayed positive effect (i.e., 2 months after surgery) on body image, anxiety, and emotional distress. The experimental group participants indicated a high level of satisfaction with the intervention. Our findings suggest the ability of this nursing informational and emotional consultation intervention to reduce patient anxiety at both short- and long-term stages. However, improved perception of body image and emotional distress only over the longer term indicates that these dimensions take time to be internalized and improved. This nursing informational and emotional consultation intervention may provide a

  6. A systematic review of methods for quantifying serum testosterone in patients with prostate cancer who underwent castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, I; Ferrer, R; Planas, J; Celma, A; Regis, L; Morote, J

    2017-03-02

    The clinical practice guidelines recommend measuring serum testosterone in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who undergo castration. The serum testosterone concentration should be <50ng/dL, a level established by using a radioimmunoassay method. The use of chemiluminescent immunoassays (IA) has become widespread, although their metrological characteristics do not seem appropriate for quantifying low testosterone concentrations. The objective of this review is to analyse the methods for quantifying testosterone and to establish whether there is scientific evidence that justifies measuring it in patients with PC who undergo castration, through liquid chromatography attached to a mass spectrometry in tandem (LC-MSMS). We performed a search in PubMed with the following MeSH terms: measurement, testosterone, androgen suppression and prostate cancer. We selected 12 studies that compared the metrological characteristics of various methods for quantifying serum testosterone compared with MS detection methods. IAs are standard tools for measuring testosterone levels; however, there is evidence that IAs lack accuracy and precision for quantifying low concentrations. Most chemiluminescent IAs overestimate their concentration, especially below 100ng/dL. The procedures that use LC-MSMS have an adequate lower quantification limit and proper accuracy and precision. We found no specific evidence in patients with PC who underwent castration. LC-MSMS is the appropriate method for quantifying low serum testosterone concentrations. We need to define the level of castration with this method and the optimal level related to better progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between Seminal Vesicle Invasion and Prostate Cancer Detection Location after Transrectal Systemic Biopsy among Men Who Underwent Radical Prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ik Lee

    Full Text Available Our hypothesis is that the location of the seminal vesicles near the base of the prostate, the more positive cores are detected in the base, the greater the risk of seminal vesicle invasion. Therefore we investigate the clinical outcomes of base dominant prostate cancer (BDPC in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS -guided biopsies compared with anteromiddle dominant prostate cancer (AMPC.From November 2003 to June 2014, a total of 990 intermediate and high risk prostate cancer (PCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP were enrolled and stratified into two groups according to proportion of positive cores-BDPC group had ≥ 33.3% ratio of positive cores from the prostate base among all positive cores and AMPC group < 33.3% in systemic biopsy. Between two groups, we compared the rate of pathologic outcomes and biochemical recurrence (BCR. We performed multivariate logistic regression model to confirm the significance of BDPC to seminal vesicle invasion (SVI and Cox proportional hazard analysis to BCR.Among these 990 PCa patients, the 487 patients in BDPC group had more advanced clinical stage (p<0.001, a higher biopsy GS (p = 0.002, and a higher rate of extracapsular extension (ECE, SVI and BCR (all p<0.001 than AMPC group. The patients in BDPC group had poor BCR free survival rate via Kaplan-meier analysis (p<0.001. The ratio of the base positive cores was a significant predictor to SVI in multivariate analysis (p < 0.001 and significant predictor of BCR in multivariate Cox proportional analysis (hazard ratio: 1.466, p = 0.004.BDPC in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies was significantly associated with SVI and BCR after adjusting for other clinical factors. Therefore, BDPC should be considered to be a more aggressive tumor despite an otherwise similar cancer profile.

  8. Usefulness of Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Unstable Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Patients Who Underwent Pulmonary Embolectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Lawrence, Frank R; Hughes, Mary J

    2018-02-15

    Administrative data were analyzed from the Premier Healthcare Database, 2010 to 2014, to assess whether inferior vena cava (IVC) filters reduce mortality in unstable patients (in shock or on ventilator support) with acute pulmonary embolism and in stable patients who undergo surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Mortality was assumed to be due to pulmonary embolism in patients who had none of the co-morbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Data were determined on the basis of International Classification of Disease-9th Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. All-cause mortality in unstable patients was lower with IVC filters in-hospital, 288 of 1,972 (23%) versus 1339 of 3002 (45%) (p <0.0001), and at 3 months, all-cause mortality was 316 of 1,272 (25%) versus 1,428 of 3,002 (48%) (p <0.0001). Pulmonary embolism mortality was lower with IVC filters in unstable patients in-hospital, 191 of 926 (21%) versus 913 of 2,138 (43%) (p <0.0001) and at 3 months, 215 of 926 (23%) versus 971 of 2,138 (45%) (p <0.0001). A lower in-hospital and 3-month all-cause mortality and pulmonary embolism mortality was also shown with IVC filters in stable patients who underwent pulmonary embolectomy. These data, in concert with previous retrospective data, suggest that unstable patients with pulmonary embolism and stable patients who undergo pulmonary embolectomy may benefit from an IVC filter. Further investigations would be useful. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Usefulness of the residual SYNTAX score to predict long term outcome in acute coronary syndrome patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Xu, J J; Tang, X F; Ma, Y L; Yao, Y; He, C; Wang, H H; Liu, R; Xu, N; Jiang, P; Jiang, L; Zhao, X Y; Gao, Z; Gao, R L; Qiao, S B; Yang, Y J; Xu, B; Yuan, J Q

    2017-02-21

    Objective: To quantify the extent and complexity of residual coronary stenosis following PCI by the residual SYNTAX score, and to evaluate its impact on adverse ischemic outcomes in acute coronary syndrome(ACS) patients. Methods: From January 2013 to December 2013, a total of 1 414 consecutive moderate- and high-risk ACS patients who underwent any PCI with multi-vessel coronary artery disease were evaluated.Patients were stratified by rSS quartiles and their outcomes were compared. Results: The rSS was 4.8±6.7. 591 patients (41.8%) had rSS=0(CR), 233 patients (16.5%) had rSS>0 but ≤ 3, 296 patients (20.9%) had rSS>3 but ≤8 and 294 patients (20.8%) had rSS>8.Clinical risk factors were more frequent in patients with incomplete revascularization(IR) compared with complete revascularization(CR). The 2-year rates of all-caused death(1.2% vs 0.4%, 2.0%, 4.4%, P=0.003), cardiac death, revascularization and MACCE were significantly higher in high rSS group, compared to other groups.By multivariable analysis, rSS was a strong independent predictor of ischemic outcomes at 2-year, including all-cause mortality (HR=1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, P=0.019), cardiac death, revascularization and MACCE. Conclusions: The rSS is a strong independent predictor of all-caused death, cardiac death, revascularization and MACCE and has moderated predictive ability for those ischemic outcomes.

  10. Long-term follow-up of children who underwent severe hypospadias repair using an online survey with validated questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraumann, Sarah A; Stephany, Heidi A; Clayton, Douglass B; Thomas, John C; Pope, John C; Adams, Mark C; Brock, John W; Tanaka, Stacy T

    2014-06-01

    Few studies of hypospadias repair in childhood have used validated questionnaires to investigate outcomes of cosmesis, urinary function, and sexual function in adulthood. We sought to investigate long-term outcomes in adult patients who had undergone severe hypospadias repair as children using an existing web-based application available to multiple institutions in order to develop an online patient survey of previously validated questionnaires. Patients aged 18 years or older who underwent severe hypospadias repair between 1992 and 1997 at our institution were contacted to complete an online survey. Through medical chart reviews, we analyzed the location of meatus, type of repair, and complications. The online survey included questions about penile appearance, and validated questionnaires to assess urinary and sexual function. Of 58 patients who met the inclusion criteria, we contacted 19, and 13 completed the survey. Fifty-nine percent had complications, with an average of 2.2 procedures per patient. Most (85.0%) were satisfied with penile appearance, although 38.0% had residual penile curvature. Hypospadias patients had mean lower orgasmic function than normal controls. Mean scores for urinary function and other domains of sexual function were similar to normal controls. Although the majority of adult patients were satisfied with the outcomes of penile appearance, urinary function, and sexual function, our online survey suggests decreased lower orgasmic function as measured by validated questionnaire. An online survey accessible to multiple institutions with validated questionnaires may facilitate assessment of long-term hypospadias results. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CT quantification of lung and airways in normal Korean subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Hye Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong; Li, Yuan Zhe [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To measure and compare the quantitative parameters of the lungs and airways in Korean never-smokers and current or former smokers (“ever-smokers”). Never-smokers (n = 119) and ever-smokers (n = 45) who had normal spirometry and visually normal chest computed tomography (CT) results were retrospectively enrolled in this study. For quantitative CT analyses, the low attenuation area (LAA) of LAA{sub I-950}, LAA{sub E-856}, CT attenuation value at the 15th percentile, mean lung attenuation (MLA), bronchial wall thickness of inner perimeter of a 10 mm diameter airway (Pi10), total lung capacity (TLC{sub CT}), and functional residual capacity (FRC{sub CT}) were calculated based on inspiratory and expiratory CT images. To compare the results between groups according to age, sex, and smoking history, independent t test, one way ANOVA, correlation test, and simple and multiple regression analyses were performed. The values of attenuation parameters and volume on inspiratory and expiratory quantitative computed tomography (QCT) were significantly different between males and females (p < 0.001). The MLA and the 15th percentile value on inspiratory QCT were significantly lower in the ever-smoker group than in the never-smoker group (p < 0.05). On expiratory QCT, all lung attenuation parameters were significantly different according to the age range (p < 0.05). Pi10 in ever-smokers was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (r = −0.455, p = 0.003). In simple and multivariate regression analyses, TLC{sub CT}, FRC{sub CT}, and age showed significant associations with lung attenuation (p < 0.05), and only TLC{sub CT} was significantly associated with inspiratory Pi10. In Korean subjects with normal spirometry and visually normal chest CT, there may be significant differences in QCT parameters according to sex, age, and smoking history.

  12. New evidence of increased risk of rhinitis in subjects with COPD: a longitudinal population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergqvist J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Joel Bergqvist,1 Anders Andersson,2 Anna-Carin Olin,3 Nicola Murgia,3,4 Linus Schiöler,3 Mogens Bove,5 Johan Hellgren1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, 3Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Department of Medicine, Section of Occupational Medicine, Respiratory Diseases and Toxicology, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 5Department of ENT and Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden Background: The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the risk of developing noninfectious rhinitis (NIR in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Materials and methods: This is a longitudinal population-based study comprising 3,612 randomly selected subjects from Gothenburg, Sweden, aged 25–75 years. Lung function was measured at baseline with spirometry and the included subjects answered a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms. At follow-up, the subjects answered a questionnaire with a response rate of 87%. NIR was defined as symptoms of nasal obstruction, nasal secretion, and/or sneezing attacks without having a cold, during the last 5 years. COPD was defined as a spirometry ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second divided by forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC <0.7. Subjects who reported asthma and NIR at baseline were excluded from the study. The odds ratios for developing NIR (ie, new-onset NIR in relation to age, gender, body mass index, COPD, smoking, and atopy were calculated. Results: In subjects with COPD, the 5-year incidence of NIR was significantly increased (10.8% vs 7.4%, P=0.005 and was higher among subjects aged >40 years. Smoking, atopy, and occupational exposure to gas, fumes, or dust were also associated with new-onset NIR. COPD, smoking, and atopy remained

  13. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Andrade, Armèle Dornelas de; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. Determinar os pontos de corte de resposta ao broncodilatador do VEF1, VEF0,75, VEF0,5 e FEF25-75% em crianças pré-escolares saudáveis e gerar valores de referência para o VEF0,75. Foi realizado um estudo transversal de base comunitária em crianças de 3-5 anos de idade. Pré-escolares saudáveis foram selecionados por um questionário padronizado. Foi realizada espirometria antes e depois do uso de broncodilatador. Foram definidos os pontos de corte dessa resposta como o percentil 95 de variação em cada parâmetro. Foram recrutadas 266 crianças, e 160 (60,0%) foram capazes de gerar manobras expiratórias aceitáveis e reprodut

  14. Short- and Long-Term Mortality Rates of Elderly Acute Kidney Injury Patients Who Underwent Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harin Rhee

    Full Text Available The world's population is aging faster and the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI needing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is increasing in elderly population. The outcome of AKI needing CRRT in elderly patients is known to be poor. However, the definitions of elderly used in the previous literatures were diverse and, there were few data that compared the long-term mortality rates of these patients with middle aged patients. This study was aimed to evaluate this issue.This study was a single-center, retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent CRRT from January 2013 to December 2015. The patients were divided into the following four age cohorts: middle-aged (55-64, young-old (65-74, middle-old (75-84, and old-old (≥85. The short- and long-term mortality rates for each age cohort were compared.A total of 562 patients met the inclusion criteria. The short-term mortality rate was 57.3% in the entire cohort. Compared with the middle-aged cohort, the middle-old cohort (HR 1.48 (1.09-2.02, p = 0.012 and the old-old cohort (HR 2.33 (1.30-4.19, p = 0.005 showed an increased short-term mortality rate along with an increased SOFA score, acidemia and a prolonged prothrombin time. When we analyzed the long-term mortality rate of the 238 survived patients, the middle-old cohort (HR 3.76 (1.84-7.68, p<0.001, the old-old cohort (HR 4.40(1.20-16.10, p = 0.025, a lower BMI, the presence of liver cirrhosis, the presence of congestive heart failure and a history of sepsis were independent risk factors for the prediction of long-term mortality.Compared with the middle-aged cohort, the middle-old and the old-old cohort showed an increased short-term and long-term mortality rate. However, in the young-old cohort, neither the short-term nor the long-term mortality rate was increased.

  15. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  16. Effect of Recumbent Body Positions on Dynamic Lung Function Parameters in Healthy Young Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, Sunita; Verma, Dileep Kumar

    2017-05-01

    The change in body position can alter pulmonary functions parameters, therefore it is important to understand the physiological basis of these alteration. Ideally, spirometry is done in sitting position until the subject is unable to do so. Hospitalized patients often assume recumbent body positions irrespective of underlying pathology. Hence, need arises to find out best recumbent body positions for the benefit of these patients to make breathing comfortable for them. The aim of this study was to find out whether the change from the supine position to crook lying and Fowler's position (45° dorsal elevation) causes change in spirometric parameters. The present work was carried out at Department of Physiology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow. A total 131 apparently healthy individuals were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Lung function was assessed using a PC-based spirometer according to American Thoracic Society guideline in the supine, crook lying and Fowler's position (45° dorsal elevation). The study consisted of 131 subjects (male 66%, female 34%), with mean age of 20.15±2.71 years and BMI 21.20±3.28 Kg/m(2). Repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni test was used to compare the mean values between each body position. Compared with the other two positions, Fowler's position showed significantly (pcrook lying position. The results of this study will help in the selection of the best alternative position for the spirometry in bed ridden patients.

  17. Efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre la espirometría de adultos de la Ciudad de México Effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma on spirometry among adults attending a check-up clinic in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justino Regalado-Pineda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre la función pulmonar espirométrica en población adulta mexicana. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se generaron ecuaciones de predicción basadas en modelos de regresión lineal múltiple para la capacidad vital forzada (FVC, el vollumen espiratorio forzado al primer segundo (FEV1 y FEV1/FVC de espirometrías obtenidas de adultos que acuden a evaluación de salud y se determinó el efecto del tabaquismo, los síntomas respiratorios y el asma sobre los modelos de estos parámetros. RESULTADOS: Se estudiaron 919 sujetos de entre 14 y 86 años de edad. El asma disminuye la FVC y el FEV1 en hombres con un cambio en la R² OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms, and asthma on lung function among Mexican adults who were evaluated during a medical exam in a private health clinic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Reference prediction equations were generated for spirometry parameters [forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expired volume in one second (FEV1 and FEV1/FVC] based on multiple linear regression models. The effect of tobacco smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma on these equations were explored. RESULTS: Spirometry tests were performed on 919 subjects from 14 to 86 years of age. Asthma decreased FVC and FEV1 in men with a R² change <1%. Respiratory symptoms decreased the FEV1/FVC ratio in both sexes. Tobacco smoking was associated with a significant reduction in FEV1 in women. CONCLUSIONS: Asthma lightly reduced lung function in males while tobacco smoking decreased FEV1, particularly in females.

  18. Incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in children whose fathers underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with epididymal sperm aspiration: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirelli-Filho, Milton; Marchi, Patricia Leme de; Mafra, Fernanda Abani; Cavalcanti, Viviane; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Barbosa, Caio Parente; Bianco, Bianca; Glina, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by epididymal aspiration (percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration). A case-control study comprising male children of couples in which the man had been previously vasectomized and chose vasectomy reversal (n=31) or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (n=30) to conceive new children, and a Control Group of male children of fertile men who had programmed vasectomies (n=60). Y-chromosome microdeletions research was performed by polymerase chain reaction on fathers and children, evaluating 20 regions of the chromosome. The results showed no Y-chromosome microdeletions in any of the studied subjects. The incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with spermatozoa recovered by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration did not differ between the groups, and there was no difference between control subjects born from natural pregnancies or population incidence in fertile men. We found no association considering microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome and assisted reproduction. We also found no correlation between these Y-chromosome microdeletions and vasectomies, which suggests that the assisted reproduction techniques do not increase the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions. Avaliar a incidência de microdeleções do cromossomo Y em indivíduos nascidos de pais vasectomizados submetidos à reversão de vasectomia ou fertilização in vitro com recuperação de espermatozoides por aspiração do epidídimo (aspiração percutânea de espermatozoides do epidídimo). Estudo caso-controle que compreende crianças do sexo masculino de casais em que o homem havia sido previamente vasectomizado e escolheu revers

  19. Accuracy of a Staging System for Prognosis of 5-Year Survival of Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Who Underwent Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-I; Chen, Li-Fu; Chang, Shih-Lun; Wu, Hung-Chang; Ting, Wei-Chen; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy delivers a high level of tumor control and survival benefits for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, many uncertainties still exist regarding the outcomes of chemoradiotherapy, making a more precise survival prognostic system necessary. To introduce a new staging system that combines tumor and clinical characteristics to improve the accuracy of prognosis for patients with NPC. This cohort study enrolled 207 patients with newly diagnosed NPC who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2014, at Chi-Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan. Data on these patients were collected from the cancer registry database of the Chi-Mei Medical Center. Patients who had a history of cancer or were unable to complete a full course of radiotherapy were excluded. Follow-up was completed on September 30, 2016, and the data analysis was performed from January 1, 2017, to February 28, 2017. The risk factors associated with 5-year disease-specific survival were incorporated into the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union Against Cancer TNM staging system to construct a new prognostic staging system. The χ2 test for linear trend, the Akaike information criterion, and the C statistic were used to evaluate the monotonicity and discriminatory ability of the new prognostic staging system and the AJCC TNM staging system. Of the 207 patients enrolled in the study, 157 (75.8%) were men, and the mean (SD) age was 48 (11) years. Multivariate analysis identified advanced clinical T stage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 3.20; 95% CI, 1.58-6.48), poor performance status (aHR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.30-5.28), and cumulative cisplatin dose lower than 100 mg/m2 (aHR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.10-4.74) as independent prognostic factors. The β coefficients from the Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to develop an integer-based, weighted point system; advanced clinical T stage, poor

  20. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves subjective sleep quality in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Yao-Kuang

    2014-10-01

    Poor sleep quality is often reported among patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is beneficial in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, its benefit in terms of sleep quality in patients with COPD remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PR on sleep quality of patients with COPD. Thirty-four subjects with COPD were studied. All subjects participated in a 12-week (2 sessions/week) hospital-based out-patient PR study. Baseline and post-PR status were evaluated by spirometry, a sleep questionnaire (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), a disease-specific questionnaire of HRQOL (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]), cardiopulmonary exercise testing, respiratory muscle strength, and the Borg dyspnea scale. Mean FEV1/FVC in the subjects was 0.49 ± 0.13, and the mean FEV1 was 1.06 ± 0.49 L/min (49.7 ± 18.0% of predicted). After PR, the PSQI score decreased from 9.41 ± 4.33 to 7.82 ± 3.90 (P 5 also decreased (85.3-64.7%, P = .006). There were significant improvements in HRQOL (SGRQ, P = .003), exercise capacity (peak oxygen uptake, P rate, P sleep quality, along with concurrent improvements in HRQOL and exercise capacity. PR is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment to improve sleep quality in patients with COPD and should be part of their clinical management. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Development and Validation of Risk Matrices for Crohn's Disease Outcomes in Patients Who Underwent Early Therapeutic Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cláudia Camila; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira; Coelho, Rosa; Santos, Paula Moura; Fernandes, Samuel; Lago, Paula; Caetano, Cidalina; Rodrigues, Ângela; Portela, Francisco; Oliveira, Ana; Ministro, Paula; Cancela, Eugénia; Vieira, Ana Isabel; Barosa, Rita; Cotter, José; Carvalho, Pedro; Cremers, Isabelle; Trabulo, Daniel; Caldeira, Paulo; Antunes, Artur; Rosa, Isadora; Moleiro, Joana; Peixe, Paula; Herculano, Rita; Gonçalves, Raquel; Gonçalves, Bruno; Sousa, Helena Tavares; Contente, Luís; Morna, Henrique; Lopes, Susana; Magro, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    The establishment of prognostic models for Crohn's disease [CD] is highly desirable, as they have the potential to guide physicians in the decision-making process concerning therapeutic choices, thus improving patients' health and quality of life. Our aim was to derive models for disabling CD and reoperation based solely on clinical/demographic data. A multicentric and retrospectively enrolled cohort of CD patients, subject to early surgery or immunosuppression, was analysed in order to build Bayesian network models and risk matrices. The final results were validated internally and with a multicentric and prospectively enrolled cohort. The derivation cohort included a total of 489 CD patients [64% with disabling disease and 18% who needed reoperation], while the validation cohort included 129 CD patients with similar outcome proportions. The Bayesian models achieved an area under the curve of 78% for disabling disease and 86% for reoperation. Age at diagnosis, perianal disease, disease aggressiveness and early therapeutic decisions were found to be significant factors, and were used to construct user-friendly matrices depicting the probability of each outcome in patients with various combinations of these factors. The matrices exhibit good performance for the most important criteria: disabling disease positive post-test odds = 8.00 [2.72-23.44] and reoperation negative post-test odds = 0.02 [0.00-0.11]. Clinical and demographical risk factors for disabling CD and reoperation were determined and their impact was quantified by means of risk matrices, which are applicable as bedside clinical tools that can help physicians during therapeutic decisions in early disease management.

  2. Cell culture replication of a genotype 1b hepatitis C virus isolate cloned from a patient who underwent liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Koutsoudakis

    Full Text Available The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV, allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1, and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV.

  3. Sensibility and Subjectivity: Levinas’ Traumatic Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmika Pandya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Levinas’ notions of sensibility and subjectivity are evident in the revision of phenomenological method by current phenomenologists such as Jean-Luc Marion and Michel Henry. The criticisms of key tenants of classical phenomenology, intentionality and reduction, are of a particular note. However, there are problems with Levinas’ characterization of subjectivity as essentially sensible. In “Totality and Infinity” and “Otherwise than Being”, Levinas criticizes and recasts a traditional notion of subjectivity, particularly the notion of the subject as the first and foremost rational subject. The subject in Levinas’ works is characterized more by its sensibility and affectedness than by its capacity to reason or affect its world. Levinas ties rationality to economy and suggests an alternative notion of reason that leads to his analysis of the ethical relation as the face-to-face encounter. The ‘origin’ of the social relation is located not in our capacity to know but rather in a sensibility that is diametrically opposed to the reason understood as economy. I argue that the opposition in Levinas’ thought between reason and sensibility is problematic and essentially leads to a self-conflicted subject. In fact, it would seem that violence characterizes the subject’s self-relation and, thus, is also inscribed at the base of the social relation. Rather than overcoming a problematic tendency to dualistic thought in philosophy Levinas merely reverses traditional hierarchies of reason/emotion, subject/object and self/other. 

  4. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for inpatients with pulmonary exacerbations of cystic fibrosis: effects on spirometry findings and patient assessments of breathing, anxiety, and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swender, David A; Thompson, Gina; Schneider, Kristen; McCoy, Karen; Patel, Alpa

    2014-06-01

    Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) has been studied in patients with various respiratory diseases. However, to the authors' knowledge, no studies have assessed the efficacy of OMT in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To evaluate pulmonary function and perceptions of breathing, anxiety, and pain of CF patients who receive OMT in addition to standard inpatient management of pulmonary exacerbation. In a single-blind randomized controlled trial, we assessed adult patients with a history of CF who were admitted to the hospital because of pulmonary exacerbation. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a daily standardized protocol of OMT or sham therapy. Both groups also received standard treatment for CF. Spirometry and questionnaire data (self-assessment of breathing, pain, and anxiety level) were collected before the first OMT or sham therapy session and after the final session. A total of 33 patients were included in the study: 16 in the OMT group and 17 in the sham therapy group. Improvements in spirometric parameters were observed in both the OMT and the sham therapy groups, with no statistically significant differences found between the groups. More patients in the OMT group than in the sham therapy group had questionnaire response patterns that indicated their breathing had improved during the study period (15 of 16 vs 8 of 16, respectively). No differences were found between groups for perceived improvement of pain and anxiety. In the current study, CF patients who received OMT did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in pre- and posttreatment spirometry findings compared with CF patients who received sham therapy. Questionnaire findings suggest that OMT may affect CF patients' perception of overall quality of breathing. Additional studies are needed to assess the clinical use of OMT in patients with CF. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  5. Braille character discrimination in blindfolded human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Thomas; Théoret, Hugo; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2002-04-16

    Visual deprivation may lead to enhanced performance in other sensory modalities. Whether this is the case in the tactile modality is controversial and may depend upon specific training and experience. We compared the performance of sighted subjects on a Braille character discrimination task to that of normal individuals blindfolded for a period of five days. Some participants in each group (blindfolded and sighted) received intensive Braille training to offset the effects of experience. Blindfolded subjects performed better than sighted subjects in the Braille discrimination task, irrespective of tactile training. For the left index finger, which had not been used in the formal Braille classes, blindfolding had no effect on performance while subjects who underwent tactile training outperformed non-stimulated participants. These results suggest that visual deprivation speeds up Braille learning and may be associated with behaviorally relevant neuroplastic changes.

  6. Respiratory system impedance with impulse oscillometry in healthy and COPD subjects: ECLIPSE baseline results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Courtney; Celli, Bartolome; Edwards, Lisa D; Wouters, Emiel; Coxson, Harvey O; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Calverley, Peter M A

    2011-07-01

    Current assessment of COPD relies extensively on the use of spirometry, an effort-dependent maneuver. Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is a non-volitional way to measure respiratory system mechanics, but its relationship to structural and functional measurements in large groups of patients with COPD is not clear. We evaluated the ability of IOS to detect and stage COPD severity in the prospective ECLIPSE cohort of COPD patients defined spirometrically, and contrasted with smoking and non-smoking healthy subjects. Additionally, we assessed whether IOS relates to extent of CT-defined emphysema. We measured lung impedance with IOS in healthy non-smokers (n = 233), healthy former smokers (n = 322) or patients with COPD (n = 2054) and related these parameters with spirometry and areas of low attenuation in lung CT. In healthy control subjects, IOS demonstrated good repeatability over 3 months. In the COPD group, respiratory system impedance was worse compared with controls as was frequency dependence of resistance, which related to GOLD stage. However, 29-86% of the COPD subjects had values that fell within the 90% confidence interval of several parameters of the healthy non-smokers. Although mean values for impedance parameters and CT indices worsened as GOLD severity increased, actual correlations between them were poor (r ≤ 0.16). IOS can be reliably used in large cohorts of subjects to assess respiratory system impedance. Cross-sectional data suggest that it may have limited usefulness in evaluating the degree of pathologic disease, whereas its role in assessing disease progression in COPD currently remains undefined. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Incentive spirometry in major surgeries: a systematic review Incentivador respiratório em cirurgias de grande porte: uma revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso R. F. Carvalho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the evidence of the use of incentive spirometry (IS for the prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications and for the recovery of pulmonary function in patients undergoing abdominal, cardiac and thoracic surgeries. METHODS: Searches were performed in the following databases: Medline, Embase, Web of Science, PEDro and Scopus to select randomized controlled trials which the IS was used in pre- and/or post-operative in order to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications and/or recover lung function after abdominal, cardiac and thoracic surgery. Two reviewers independently assessed all studies. In addition, the studies quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. RESULTS: Thirty studies were included (14 abdominal, 13 cardiac and 3 thoracic surgery; n=3,370 patients. In the analysis of the methodological quality, studies achieved a PEDro average score of 5.6, 4.7 and 4.8 points in abdominal, cardiac and thoracic surgeries, respectively. Five studies (3 abdominal, 1 cardiac and 1 thoracic surgery compared the effect of the IS with control group (no intervention and no difference was detected in the evaluated outcomes. CONCLUSION: There was no evidence to support the use of incentive spirometry in the management of surgical patients. Despite this, the use of incentive spirometry remains widely used without standardization in clinical practice.OBJETIVO: Realizar um levantamento da literatura para avaliar as evidências do uso do incentivador respiratório (IR na prevenção de complicações pulmonares pós-operatórias (CPPs e recuperação da função pulmonar em pacientes submetidos a cirurgias abdominal, cardíaca e torácica. MÉTODOS: Esta revisão sistemática utilizou as bases de dados Medline, Embase, Web of Science, PEDro e Scopus para selecionar ensaios clínicos randomizados, nos quais o IR foi utilizado nos período pré e/ou pós-operatório, visando prevenir CPP e/ou recuperar

  8. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  9. Preventing parastomal hernia with modified stapled mesh stoma reinforcement technique (SMART) in patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, A E; Terzi, C; Agalar, C; Egeli, T; Arslan, C; Altay, C; Obuz, F

    2018-01-05

    Parastomal hernia is a frequent complication of an abdominal wall stoma. Surgical repairs have high complication and recurrence rates. Several different techniques have been suggested to prevent parastomal hernia during stoma creation. The aim of the present case-control study was to evaluate the efficacy of modified Stapled Mesh stomA Reinforcement Technique (SMART) for prevention of parastomal hernia compared with conventional colostomy formation in patients who underwent open or laparoscopic rectal resection and end colostomy for cancer. Between January 2014 and May 2016, all consecutive patients who underwent open or laparoscopic resection and end colostomy for primary or recurrent rectal cancer were identified from a prospectively collected database. Since January 2014, one surgeon in our team has routinely offered modified SMART procedure to all patients who are candidates for permanent terminal colostomy. In the SMART group patients, while creating an end colostomy, we placed a standard polypropylene mesh in the retromuscular position, fixed and cut the mesh by firing a 31- or 33-mm-diameter circular stapler and constructed the stoma. In the control group, a stoma was created conventionally by a longitudinal or transverse incision of the rectus abdominis sheath sufficiently large for the colon to pass through. Twenty-nine patients underwent parastomal hernia prophylaxis with modified SMART and 38 patients underwent end-colostomy formation without prophylaxis (control group). Groups were similar in terms of age, sex and underlying conditions predisposing to herniation. Median follow-up time is 27 (range 12-41) months. Nineteen patients (28.4%) developed parastomal herniation. In the SMART group, 4 patients (13.8%) developed parastomal herniation which is significantly lower than the control group in which 15 patients (39.5%) developed parastomal herniation (p = 0.029). We did not observe mesh infection, stenosis, erosion or fistulation in the SMART group

  10. Assessment of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis using hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI: comparison with Shwachman score, Chrispin-Norman score and spirometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, Edwin J.R. van [University of Sheffield, Unit of Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hill, Catherine; Woodhouse, Neil; Fichele, Stanislao; Fleming, Sally; Wild, Jim M. [University of Sheffield, Unit of Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Howe, Bridget; Bott, Sandra; Taylor, Christopher J. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    This study assesses the feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-Helium MRI in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and correlates the findings with standard clinical parameters based on chest radiograph (CXR) and pulmonary function tests (PFT). An uncontrolled, observational study in eighteen children with cystic fibrosis aged 5 - 17 years (median 12.1 years), with different severity of disease was carried out. All subjects underwent routine clinical assessment including PFT and standard auxology; CXR was obtained and Shwachman and Chrispin-Norman scores calculated. Hyperpolarized 3-He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out using a spin-exchange polarizer and a whole body 1.5 T scanner. Ventilation distribution images were obtained during a 21-second breath-hold and scored according to previously defined criteria. Spearman's non-parametric correlations test was performed to assess for statistical significance at the p<0.05 level. The children tolerated the procedure well. No desaturation events were observed during 3-He MRI. A significant, albeit moderate, correlation was found between MRI score and FEV1% predicted (r=-0.41; p=0.047) and FVC% predicted (r=-0.42; p=0.04), while there were trends of correlations between Shwachman score and MRI score (r=-0.38; p=0.06) and Shwachman score and FEV1% predicted (r=0.39; p=0.055). The feasibility of hyperpolarized 3-He MRI in children with CF was demonstrated. MRI appears to be able to demonstrate functional lung changes, although correlations with routine clinical tests are only moderate to poor. This non-ionising radiation technique could be useful for monitoring lung disease and assessing therapy in this patient population. (orig.)

  11. Management of the Axilla in T1-2 Breast Cancer Patients with Macrometastatic Sentinel Node Involvement Who Underwent Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Bekir; Yuruker, Savas; Sullu, Yurdanur; Gursel, Bilge; Ozen, Necati

    2017-09-25

    The aims of our study were to determine the incidence of axillary recurrence and arm morbidity in T1-2 invasive breast cancer patients with macrometastases on the sentinel lymph node (SLN) who underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT), with or without axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). One hundred and nine T1-2 invasive breast cancer patients with macrometastases on the SLN who underwent BCT in our institution were included in the study. Patients with 1-2 positive SLN and without extra nodal extension (ENE) on the SLN did not undergo ALND (SLN-only group) and patients with ENE or patients who had >2 metastatic nodes underwent level I, II ALND (ALND group). The SLN-only group received radiotherapy to three axillary levels, the supraclavicular fossa, and ± mammaria interna. ALND group received radiotherapy to axillary level III, the supraclavicular fossa, and ± mammaria interna. The incidence of axillary recurrence and arm morbidity were investigated. Of the 109 patients, 18 patients with >2 metastatic SLNs and 10 with ENE on the SLN underwent ALND and 81 patients underwent SLN only. Median follow-up time was 37 months (3-77). There was no axillary recurrence in SLN-only group. However, in the ALND group 1 patient had developed axillary metastasis. There were 2 objective lymphoedema and 3 arm-shoulder restriction cases in the SLN-only group, and 2 and 3 in the ALND group, respectively. Axillary dissection could safely be omitted in patients with 1-2 macrometastatic SLN and without ENE who undergo BCT and axillary radiotherapy.

  12. Preoperative hepatitis B virus DNA level is a risk factor for postoperative liver failure in patients who underwent partial hepatectomy for hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gang; Lau, Wan Yee; Shen, Feng; Pan, Ze-Ya; Fu, Si-Yuan; Yang, Yun; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to explore the short-term effects of preoperative serum hepatitis B virus DNA level (HBV DNA) on postoperative hepatic function in patients who underwent partial hepatectomy for hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical data of 1,602 patients with hepatitis B-related HCC who underwent partial hepatectomy in our department were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into three groups according to their preoperative HBV DNA levels: group A 20,000 IU/mL. The rates of postoperative complications, especially the rate of postoperative liver failure, were compared. There were significant differences among the three groups in the rates of postoperative liver failure. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, a high preoperative HBV DNA level was an independent risk factor for postoperative liver failure. Preoperative HBV DNA level was a significant risk factor for postoperative hepatic dysfunction.

  13. AB103. Overexpression of RNF2 is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder underwent radical cystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhuowei; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Objective RNF2 is frequently overexpressed in several types of human cancer, but the status of RNF2 amplification and expression in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) and its clinical/prognostic significance is unclear. Methods In this study, the methods of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were utilized to examine the protein expression and amplification of RNF2 in 184 patients of with UCBs who underwent radical cystectomy. Results Overexpression of RN...

  14. Simplified Chinese version of the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) for patients who underwent joint arthroplasty: cross-cultural adaptation and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Shiqi; Liu, Ning; Han, Wuxiang; Zi, Yunpeng; Peng,Fan; Li, Lexiang; Fu, Qiwei; Chen, Yi; Zheng, Weijie; Qian, Qirong

    2017-01-01

    Background The Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) is a newly developed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire designed to evaluate the awareness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study cross-culturally adapted and psychometrically validated a simplified Chinese version of the FJS (SC-FJS). Methods Cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to the internationally recognized guidelines. One-hundred and fifty participants who underwent primary TKA were recruited in this stu...

  15. Efficacy of auditory training in elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Albuquerque Morais

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Auditory training (AT  has been used for auditory rehabilitation in elderly individuals and is an effective tool for optimizing speech processing in this population. However, it is necessary to distinguish training-related improvements from placebo and test-retest effects. Thus, we investigated the efficacy of short-term auditory training (acoustically controlled auditory training - ACAT in elderly subjects through behavioral measures and P300. Sixteen elderly individuals with APD received an initial evaluation (evaluation 1 - E1 consisting of behavioral and electrophysiological tests (P300 evoked by tone burst and speech sounds to evaluate their auditory processing. The individuals were divided into two groups. The Active Control Group [ACG (n=8] underwent placebo training. The Passive Control Group [PCG (n=8] did not receive any intervention. After 12 weeks, the subjects were  revaluated (evaluation 2 - E2. Then, all of the subjects underwent ACAT. Following another 12 weeks (8 training sessions, they underwent the final evaluation (evaluation 3 – E3. There was no significant difference between E1 and E2 in the behavioral test [F(9.6=0,.6 p=0.92, λ de Wilks=0.65] or P300 [F(8.7=2.11, p=0.17, λ de Wilks=0.29] (discarding the presence of placebo effects and test-retest. A significant improvement was observed between the pre- and post-ACAT conditions (E2 and E3 for all auditory skills according to the behavioral methods [F(4.27=0.18, p=0.94, λ de Wilks=0.97]. However, the same result was not observed for P300 in any condition. There was no significant difference between P300 stimuli. The ACAT improved the behavioral performance of the elderly for all auditory skills and was an effective method for hearing rehabilitation.

  16. Pathologic findings in patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy following active surveillance: a prospective study in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Y S; Yu, J; Patel, N; Hassanzadeh Salmasi, A; Parihar, J; Kwon, T G; Kim, W J; Kim, I Y

    2015-03-01

    Active surveillance is the recommended treatment of option for men with very low-risk prostate cancer. In this study, the clinicopathological results of patients who were initially treated with active surveillance and subsequently underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy during follow-up are described. A prospective cohort of 106 men enrolled in active surveillance was reviewed. Pathologic specimens for patients who ultimately underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for progression or personal preference were analyzed. After exclusion of 14 patients who were lost to follow-up or with incomplete data collection, 92 men were included in the present analyses. Median follow-up was 27.6 months (range 3.3 to 193.1). Twenty-nine patients underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Progression occurred in 32 patients (34.8%), of which 23 men elected to undergo surgery. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was performed in 6 additional patients who chose definitive intervention due to anxiety. Pathologic analyses revealed organ-confined disease in 24 patients (82.8%), and Gleason score was ≥ 7 in nine (31%). Fourteen (48.3%) specimens were identified as having an advanced disease (Gleason score ≥ 7 and/or T3). In comparison to the patients with low-risk disease post-operatively (Gleason score robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, 48.3% displayed advanced pathologic features. Therefore we recommend that patients considering active surveillance should be counseled on risk of advanced disease as a possible hazard.

  17. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions, and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must...

  18. Estimating Subjective Probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Fountain, John; Harrison, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    Subjective probabilities play a central role in many economic decisions and act as an immediate confound of inferences about behavior, unless controlled for. Several procedures to recover subjective probabilities have been proposed, but in order to recover the correct latent probability one must ...

  19. Subjective meaning: an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen-Huitink, Janneke; van Wijbergen-Huitink, Janneke; Meier, Cécile

    This introductory chapter traces some of the considerations on the basis of which relativistic approaches to subjective meaning became en vogue. In doing so, the chapter provides an overview of the relevant linguistic and philosophical issues when developing a treatment of subjectivity. In addition,

  20. Subjective safety in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the

  1. Subjective poverty line definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Flik; B.M.S. van Praag (Bernard)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will deal with definitions of subjective poverty lines. To measure a poverty threshold value in terms of household income, which separates the poor from the non-poor, we take into account the opinions of all people in society. Three subjective methods will be discussed

  2. Estimating the U.S. prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background During 2007–2010, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted a spirometry component which obtained pre-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data on a nationally representative sample of US adults aged 6–79 years and post-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data for the subset of adults with airflow limitation. The goals of this study were to 1) compute prevalence estimates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and fixed ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) diagnostic criteria and 2) examine the potential impact of nonresponse on the estimates. Methods This analysis was limited to those aged 40–79 years who were eligible for NHANES pre-bronchodilator spirometry (n=7,104). Examinees with likely airflow limitation were further eligible for post-bronchodilator testing (n=1,110). Persons were classified as having COPD based on FEV1/FVC spirometry but self-reporting both daytime supplemental oxygen therapy plus emphysema and/or current chronic bronchitis were also classified as having COPD. The final analytic samples for pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator analyses were 77.1% (n=5,477) and 50.8% (n=564) of those eligible, respectively. To account for non-response, NHANES examination weights were adjusted to the eligible pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator subpopulations. Results In 2007–2010, using the fixed ratio criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, COPD prevalence was 20.9% (SE 1.1) among US adults aged 40–79 years. Applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 14.0% (SE 1.0). Using the LLN criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, the COPD prevalence was 15.4% (SE 0.8), while applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 10.2% (SE 0.8). Conclusions The overall COPD prevalence among US adults aged 40–79 years varied from 10.2% to 20

  3. Diseño de un programa de formación básico para conseguir espirometrías de calidad Design of a basic training program to get quality spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Escarrabill

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La espirometría forzada es una manera sencilla y no invasiva de valorar la función pulmonar. La obtención de una espirometría de calidad requiere formación, condiciones técnicas adecuadas (calibración, mantenimiento y ubicación del aparato y colaboración del paciente. Diversos trabajos han constatado déficits formativos de los profesionales, relacionados en parte con la elevada rotación en un mismo puesto, la falta de sistemática en la incorporación de nuevos profesionales que realizan espirometrías y la ausencia de planes de evaluación periódica de competencias. Materiales y métodos. En el marco del Plan Director de Enfermedades del Aparato Respiratorio (PDMAR se ha diseñado un programa formativo mínimo teórico-práctico de 16 horas de duración, basado en el programa de formación del National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health y de las iniciativas que surgen en el marco de la European Respiratory Society. Durante el año 2010 se realizaron 13 cursos en los que participaron 307 profesionales. Resultados. Las diferencias observadas entre la evaluación de conocimientos previos y la evaluación final fue estadísticamente significativa (p Introduction. The spirometry is a simple and noninvasive test to assess lung function. Obtaining a spirometry of quality requires training, appropriate technical conditions (calibration, maintenance and location of the device, and patient cooperation. Several studies have found professional training deficits related to a high turnover in the same place, the lack of systematic training when new professionals performing spirometry are incorporated and the lack of competences' periodic evaluation. Materials and methods. The Master Plan for respiratory diseases (PDMAR has designed a minimum practical/theoretical training program (16 hours based on the training program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the European Respiratory Society

  4. Unifying Subjectivity and Objectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Chandrasekaran

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of modern science to the progress of civilization is immeasurable. Even its tendency toward exclusive concentration on the objective world has had salutary effects of great value. Modern science has wiped away much that was merely superstitious or speculative. Its rejection of unfounded opinions and prejudices has helped the thinking mind question conventional beliefs, shed preferences and prejudices, and challenge established authority. But modern systems thinking inherited from natural science is the suppression of the subjective dimension of reality. Many complex systems are an attempt to define and represent all subjective experience in physical terms. The modern man has a bias towards objectivity. The powerful influence of sense impressions on his mind and thinking makes him ignore the subjective experience and consider only objective facts as a valid, legitimate and representation of reality. Observing objective factors that are physical is easier than observing subjective factors that are subtle. The mechanistic view of reality has led to the rejection of the role of the individual in social development as insignificant. The individuals determine the development of society. Their social power has its roots both in subjective factors and objective factors. Economy, politics, society, and culture are inseparable dimensions of a single integrated reality. Subject and object constitute an integrated whole. The mind sees them as separate and independent. Or it views one as completely subordinate to the other. Unbiased approach to the study of all human experiences may prove that subject and object are interdependent dimensions or elements of reality.

  5. RUSSIAN LAW SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Bakhrakh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The question about the subjects of law branches is concerning the number of most important and difficult in law science. Its right decision influences on the subject of law regulation, precise definition of addressees of law norms, the volume of their rights and duties, the limits of action of norms of Main part of the branch, its principles. Scientific investigations, dedicated to law subjects system, promote the development of recommendations for the legislative and law applying activity; they are needed for scientific work organization and student training, for preparing qualified lawyers.

  6. Efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure and incentive spirometry on respiratory functions during the postoperative period following supratentorial craniotomy: A prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Hulya Kahraman; Akcil, Eren Fatma; Tunali, Yusuf; Vehid, Hayriye; Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz

    2017-11-01

    Volume controlled ventilation with low PEEP is used in neuro-anesthesia to provide constant PaCO2 levels and prevent raised intracranial pressure. Therefore, neurosurgery patients prone to atelectasis formation, however, we could not find any study that evaluates prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications in neurosurgery. A prospective, randomized controlled study. Intensive care unit in a university hospital in Istanbul. Seventy-nine ASAI-II patients aged between 18 and 70years scheduled for elective supratentorial craniotomy were included in the study. Patients randomized into 3 groups after surgery. The Group IS (n=20) was treated with incentive spirometry 5 times in 1min and 5min per hour, the Group CPAP (n=20) with continuous positive airway pressure 10 cmH2O pressure and 0.4 FiO2 via an oronasal mask 5min per hour, and the Group Control (n=20) 4L·min-1O2 via mask; all during the first 6h postoperatively. Respiratory functions tests and arterial blood gases analysis were performed before the induction of anesthesia (Baseline), 30min, 6h, 24h postoperatively. The IS and CPAP applications have similar effects with respect to FVC values. The postoperative 30min FEV1 values were statistically significantly reduced compared to the Baseline in all groups (ppostoperative 24h compared to the postoperative 30min in the Groups IS and CPAP (ppostoperative 24h FEV1 values were statistically significantly lower in the Group Control compared to the Group IS (p=0.015). Although this study is underpowered to detect differences in FEV1 values, the postoperative 24h FEV1 values were significantly higher in the IS group than the Control group and this difference was not observed between the CPAP and Control groups. It might be evaluate a favorable effect of IS in neurosurgery patients. But larger studies are needed to make a certain conclusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Data Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article considers whether it is fortunate that data protection rules, as a starting point, apply to all physical persons as data subjects, or whether it would be better to differentiate between kinds of persons on grounds of their ability to act as a data subject. In order to protect all...... persons, it is argued that a principle of care should be part of data protection law....

  8. Patterns and Timing of Failure for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma After Initial Therapy in a Cohort Who Underwent Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for Relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Bates, James E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Casulo, Carla; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Becker, Michael W.; Liesveld, Jane L. [Department of Medicine, Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Constine, Louis S., E-mail: louis_constine@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the location and timing of initial recurrence in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who subsequently underwent high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant (HDC/ASCT), to direct approaches for disease surveillance, elucidate the patterns of failure of contemporary treatment strategies, and guide adjuvant treatment decisions. Methods and Materials: We analyzed consecutive patients with DLBCL who underwent HDC/ASCT between May 1992 and March 2014 at our institution. Of the 187 evaluable patients, 8 had incomplete data, and 79 underwent HDC/ASCT as a component of initial treatment for de novo or refractory DLBCL and were excluded from further analysis. Results: The median age was 50.8 years; the median time to relapse was 1.3 years. Patients were segregated according to the initial stage at diagnosis, with early stage (ES) defined as stage I/II and advanced stage (AS) defined as stage III/IV. In total, 40.4% of the ES and 75.5% of the AS patients relapsed in sites of initial disease; 68.4% of those with ES disease and 75.0% of those with AS disease relapsed in sites of initial disease only. Extranodal relapses were common (44.7% in ES and 35.9% in AS) and occurred in a variety of organs, although gastrointestinal tract/liver (n=12) was most frequent. Conclusions: Most patients with DLBCL who relapse and subsequently undergo HDC/ASCT initially recur in the previously involved disease site(s). Time to recurrence is brief, suggesting that frequency of screening is most justifiably greatest in the early posttherapy years. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Outcome of Triple Antiplatelet Therapy Including Cilostazol in Elderly Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction who Underwent Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results from the INTERSTELLAR Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho-Jun; Park, Sang-Don; Park, Hyun Woo; Suh, Jon; Oh, Pyung Chun; Moon, Jeonggeun; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kang, Woong Chol; Kwon, Sung Woo; Kim, Tae-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy including aspirin and clopidogrel, triple antiplatelet therapy including cilostazol has a mortality benefit in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. However, whether the mortality benefit persists in elderly patients is not clear. From 2007 to 2014, 1278 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into four groups by age (myocardial infarction. Although this benefit was strong in patients aged <75 years, no definite increase in major bleeding was seen for elderly patients (aged ≥75 years).

  10. The importance of superficial basal cell carcinoma in a retrospective study of 139 patients who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery in a Brazilian university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata Pontes, Luciana; Fantelli Stelini, Rafael; Cintra, Maria Leticia; Magalhães, Renata Ferreira; Velho, Paulo Eduardo N F; Moraes, Aparecida Machado

    2015-11-01

    Mohs micrographic surgery is a specialized surgical procedure used to treat skin cancer. The purpose of this study was to better understand the profile of the patients who underwent the procedure and to determine how histology might be related to complications and the number of stages required for complete removal. The records of patients who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery from October 2008 to November 2013 at the Dermatology Division of the Hospital of the Campinas University were assessed. The variables included were gender, age, anatomical location, histology, number of stages required and complications. Contingency tables were used to compare the number of stages with the histological diagnosis. The analysis showed that patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma were 9.03 times more likely to require more than one stage. A comparison between complications and histological diagnosis showed that patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma were 6.5 times more likely to experience complications. Although superficial basal cell carcinoma is typically thought to represent a less-aggressive variant of these tumors, its propensity for demonstrating "skip areas" and clinically indistinct borders make it a challenge to treat. Its particular nature may result in the higher number of surgery stages required, which may, as a consequence, result in more complications, including recurrence. Recurrence likely occurs due to the inadequate excision of the tumors despite their clear margins. Further research on this subtype of basal cell carcinoma is needed to optimize treatments and decrease morbidity.

  11. Role of capsule endoscopy Pillcam COLON 2 in patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease who refused colonoscopy or underwent incomplete colonoscopic exam: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreanu, L; Smarandache, G; Mateescu, R B

    2014-03-01

    Almost 70-80 % of patients with Crohn's disease and virtually all patients with ulcerative colitis have colorectal mucosa involvement. Colon capsule endoscopy is an interesting option for patients unable or unwilling to undergo colonoscopy. We report our experience with the second-generation colon capsule PillCam(®) COLON 2 in the detection of significant lesions in patients with known or suspected Crohn's disease, who refused colonoscopy or underwent incomplete colonoscopic exam. We have retrospectively reviewed the results of capsule endoscopy in 6 patients who refused colonoscopy (n = 3) or underwent incomplete colonoscopic exam (n = 3) between March 2011 and October 2012. In all patients, a CT scan was obtained before capsule endoscopy to rule out significant stenosis. In our series of 6 patients, 4 had both small bowel and colonic involvement. The use of the PillCam(®) COLON 2 capsule allowed a thorough examination and evaluation of the mucosal lesions with high acceptability, the method being perceived as noninvasive by the patients. No adverse events related to the capsule or bowel preparation were recorded. In this patient population, PillCam(®) COLON 2 capsule endoscopy was safe. The capsule findings had an important impact on treatment decisions and patient management.

  12. Simplified Chinese version of the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) for patients who underwent joint arthroplasty: cross-cultural adaptation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shiqi; Liu, Ning; Han, Wuxiang; Zi, Yunpeng; Peng, Fan; Li, Lexiang; Fu, Qiwei; Chen, Yi; Zheng, Weijie; Qian, Qirong

    2017-01-14

    The Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) is a newly developed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire designed to evaluate the awareness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study cross-culturally adapted and psychometrically validated a simplified Chinese version of the FJS (SC-FJS). Cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to the internationally recognized guidelines. One-hundred and fifty participants who underwent primary TKA were recruited in this study. Cronbach's α and intra-class correlations were used to determine reliability. Construct validity was analyzed by evaluating the correlations between SC-FJS and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the short form (36) health survey (SF-36). Each of the 12 items was properly responded and correlated with the total items. SC-FJS had excellent reliability [Cronbach's α = 0.907, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.970, 95% CI 0.959-0.978). Elimination of any one item in all did not result in a value of Cronbach's α of social functioning (0.66, p sport and recreation (0.40, p low (r = 0.20) or not significant (p > 0.05) correlation with mental subscale of SF-36. SC-FJS demonstrated excellent acceptability, internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity, which can be recommended for patients who underwent joint arthroplasty in Mainland China.

  13. Attenuated response to repeated daily ozone exposures in asthmatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, H. Jr.; Linn, W.S. [Rancho Low Amigos Medical Center, Downey, CA (United States); McManus, M.S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The development of attenuated response ({open_quotes}tolerance{close_quotes}) to daily ozone (O{sub 3}) exposures in the laboratory is well established in healthy adult volunteers. However, the capability of asthmatics to develop tolerance during multiday ozone exposures in unclear. We exposed 10 adult volunteers with mild asthma to 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} in filtered air for 3 h/d on 5 consecutive d. Two similar filtered-air exposures during the preceding week served as controls. Follow-up O{sub 3} exposures were performed 4 and 7 d after the most recent consecutive exposure. All exposures were performed in an environmental chamber at 31 {degrees}C and 35% relative humidity. The subjects performed moderate exercise (mean ventilation rate of 32 l/min) for 15 min of each half-hour. Responses were measured with spirometry and symptom evaluations before and after each exposure, and a bronchial reactivity test (methacholine challenge) was conducted after each exposure. All response measurements showed clinically and statistically significant day-to-day variation. Symptom and forced-expiratory-volume-in-1-s responses were similarly large on the 1st and 2nd O{sub 3} exposure days, after which they diminished progressively, approaching filtered air response levels by the 5th consecutive O{sub 3} day. This tolerance was partially lost 4 and 7 d later. Bronchial reactivity peaked after the first O{sub 3} exposure and remained somewhat elevated after all subsequent O{sub 3} exposures, relative to its control level following filtered-air exposures. Individual responses varied widely; more severe initial responses to O{sub 3} predicted less rapid attenuation. We concluded that asthmatics can develop tolerance to frequent high-level O{sub 3} exposures in much the same manner as normal subjects, although the process may be slower and less fully effective in asthmatics. 27 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Subject (of documents)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    such as concepts, aboutness, topic, isness and ofness are also briefly presented. The conclusion is that the most fruitful way of defining “subject” (of a document) is the documents informative or epistemological potentials, that is, the documents potentials of informing users and advance the development......This article presents and discuss the concept “subject” or subject matter (of documents) as it has been examined in library and information science (LIS) for more than 100 years. Different theoretical positions are outlined and it is found that the most important distinction is between document......-oriented views versus request-oriented views. The document-oriented view conceive subject as something inherent in documents, whereas the request-oriented view (or the policy based view) understand subject as an attribution made to documents in order to facilitate certain uses of them. Related concepts...

  15. Science of the subjective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R G; Dunne, B J

    2007-01-01

    Over the greater portion of its long scholarly history, the particular form of human observation, reasoning, and technical deployment we properly term "science" has relied at least as much on subjective experience and inspiration as it has on objective experiments and theories. Only over the past few centuries has subjectivity been progressively excluded from the practice of science, leaving an essentially secular analytical paradigm. Quite recently, however, a compounding constellation of newly inexplicable physical evidence, coupled with a growing scholarly interest in the nature and capability of human consciousness, are beginning to suggest that this sterilization of science may have been excessive and could ultimately limit its epistemological reach and cultural relevance. In particular, an array of demonstrable consciousness-related anomalous physical phenomena, a persistent pattern of biological and medical anomalies, systematic studies of mind/brain relationships and the mechanics of human creativity, and a burgeoning catalogue of human factors effects within contemporary information processing technologies, all display empirical correlations with subjective aspects that greatly complicate, and in many cases preclude, their comprehension on strictly objective grounds. However, any disciplined re-admission of subjective elements into rigorous scientific methodology will hinge on the precision with which they can be defined, measured, and represented, and on the resilience of established scientific techniques to their inclusion. For example, any neo-subjective science, while retaining the logical rigor, empirical/theoretical dialogue, and cultural purpose of its rigidly objective predecessor, would have the following requirements: acknowledgment of a proactive role for human consciousness; more explicit and profound use of interdisciplinary metaphors; more generous interpretations of measurability, replicability, and resonance; a reduction of ontological

  16. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  17. Semi-Automated Analysis of Diaphragmatic Motion with Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Controls and Non-Ambulant Subjects with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney A. Bishop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD suffer from progressive muscle damage leading to diaphragmatic weakness that ultimately requires ventilation. Emerging treatments have generated interest in better characterizing the natural history of respiratory impairment in DMD and responses to therapy. Dynamic (cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI may provide a more sensitive measure of diaphragm function in DMD than the commonly used spirometry. This study presents an analysis pipeline for measuring parameters of diaphragmatic motion from dynamic MRI and its application to investigate MRI measures of respiratory function in both healthy controls and non-ambulant DMD boys. We scanned 13 non-ambulant DMD boys and 10 age-matched healthy male volunteers at baseline, with a subset (n = 10, 10, 8 of the DMD subjects also assessed 3, 6, and 12 months later. Spirometry-derived metrics including forced vital capacity were recorded. The MRI-derived measures included the lung cross-sectional area (CSA, the anterior, central, and posterior lung lengths in the sagittal imaging plane, and the diaphragm length over the time-course of the dynamic MRI. Regression analyses demonstrated strong linear correlations between lung CSA and the length measures over the respiratory cycle, with a reduction of these correlations in DMD, and diaphragmatic motions that contribute less efficiently to changing lung capacity in DMD. MRI measures of pulmonary function were reduced in DMD, controlling for height differences between the groups: at maximal inhalation, the maximum CSA and the total distance of motion of the diaphragm were 45% and 37% smaller. MRI measures of pulmonary function were correlated with spirometry data and showed relationships with disease progression surrogates of age and months non-ambulatory, suggesting that they provide clinically meaningful information. Changes in the MRI measures over 12 months were consistent with weakening of

  18. Paying Hypertension Research Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David; Karlawish, Jason; Asch, David A

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Cash payments are often used to compensate subjects who participate in research. However, ethicists have argued that these payments might constitute an undue inducement. OBJECTIVES To determine whether potential subjects agree with theoretical arguments that a payment could be an undue inducement. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS Survey of 350 prospective jurors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Belief that a $500 payment for research participation would impair their own, and others' ability to think carefully about the risks and benefits of a clinical trial. RESULTS Two hundred sixty-one jurors (74.6%) believed that a $500 payment would impair subjects' ability to think carefully about the risks and benefits of research. Ninety-six of 120 (80%) expressed this concern about subjects with a low income ($50,000). In contrast, only 69 (19.7%) of jurors believed that a $500 payment would influence them. Jurors who believed that this payment would influence them reported lower incomes and less education. CONCLUSION Members of the general public share ethical concerns about the influence of payments for research, although they believe that these concerns are more applicable to others than to themselves.

  19. Subjects, Models, Languages, Transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Bézivin, J.; Heckel, R.

    2005-01-01

    Discussions about model-driven approaches tend to be hampered by terminological confusion. This is at least partially caused by a lack of formal precision in defining the basic concepts, including that of "model" and "thing being modelled" - which we call subject in this paper. We propose a minimal

  20. Subjective Duration and Psychophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Hannes

    1975-01-01

    Three models are proposed to describe the strategy applied by a subject when he is confronted with two successive time intervals and is required to deal with some relation between them, for example, by telling which was the longer by adjusting the second to match the first. (Author)

  1. Barron's SAT subject test

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, MA, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Includes one diagnostic test and three complete tests, all questions answered and explained, self-assessment guides, and subject reviews. Also features test strategies, QR codes to short instructional videos, and a detailed appendix with equations, physical constants, and a basic math review.

  2. Spinopelvic balance evaluation of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis L4L5 and L4L5 herniated disc who underwent surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Regina Hernandez Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To correlate spinopelvic balance with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis and disk herniation. METHODS: This was a descriptive retrospective study that evaluated 60 patients in this hospital, 30 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis at the L4-L5 level and 30 with herniated disk at the L4-L5 level, all of whom underwent Surgical treatment. RESULTS: Patients with lumbar disk herniation at L4-L5 level had a mean tilt of 8.06, mean slope of 36.93, and mean PI of 45. In patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis at the L4-L5 level, a mean tilt of 22.1, mean slope of 38.3, and mean PI of 61.4 were observed. CONCLUSION: This article reinforces the finding that the high mean tilt and PI are related to the onset of degenerative spondylolisthesis, and also concluded that the same angles, when low, increase the risk for disk herniation.

  3. [A Case of Virchow's Lymph Node Recurrence of Gastric Cancer Who Had Underwent Gastrectomy, and Treated with S-1 Monotherapy Leading to Complete Response (CR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinichi; Sanefuji, Kensaku; Kabashima, Akira; Maekawa, Souichirou

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old male with Virchow's lymph node recurrence of gastric cancer, who underwent distal gastrectomy for type 2 forecourt part of pylorus gastric cancer, showing complete response(CR)in response to S-1 monotherapy. The tumor was pathologically diagnosed as Stage IIIb(well to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, T3[SE], N2 [20/51], M0). Virchow's lymph node metastasis was confirmed 2 months after surgery. One week after S-1 administration, a reduction in lymph node size was observed. After 5 courses of S-1 monotherapy, he achieved CR. The patient maintained CR for 2 years, before we switched to uracil and tegafur(UFT)monotherapy. The patient maintained CR for 2 years, after which UFT was discontinued. No relapse was observed 22 months after discontinuation.

  4. Relation of Coronary Artery Calcium Score and Risk of Cancer (from a Danish Population-Based Follow-up Study in Patients Who Underwent Cardiac Computed Tomography)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter, Nicklas; Christesen, Amanda M S; Mortensen, Leif Spange

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of a causal link between atherosclerosis and cancer is sparse and conflicting. Therefore, we examined the association between extent of coronary atherosclerosis determined by coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and risk of cancer. We conducted a historical population-based cohort study...... of 28,549 cancer-free patients identified in the Western Denmark Heart Registry. All patients underwent cardiac computed tomography for measurement of CACS for suspected coronary artery disease. The outcome was an incident cancer diagnosis: total, tobacco-related, lung, prostate, breast, and colorectal....... We used Cox proportional hazards regression analyses stratified by gender to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for relations between CACS and cancer with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). During follow-up, 455 men and 527 women had a cancer diagnosis. In a multivariable model (reference group: CACS 0...

  5. Prevalence of Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Is Associated With Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity: An Analysis of 5296 Individuals Who Underwent a Preventive Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Suguru; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Ishigaki, Kazunaga; Matsubara, Saburo; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Minoru; Hayashi, Naoto; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) are considered precursors of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are known as risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We investigated the prevalence of PCLs in the general population and the relationship between PCLs and DM/obesity. This cross-sectional analysis included 5296 individuals who underwent a preventive medical examination between October 2006 and June 2013 at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging, including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, was performed using a 3.0-T system as part of a comprehensive health screening program. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of PCLs. The prevalence of PCLs was 13.7%, which was increased according to age. Individuals with PCLs were more prone to obesity (body mass index, 24.0 vs 23.7 kg/m [P = 0.015]; waist circumference, 87.4 vs 85.5 cm [P Pancreatic cystic lesions were significantly associated with DM and obesity.

  6. Retrospective comparison between preoperative diagnosis by International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria and histological diagnosis in patients with focal autoimmune pancreatitis who underwent surgery with suspicion of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Detlefsen, Sönke; Zamboni, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the preoperative diagnosis by International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC) with histological diagnosis in patients with focal autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) who underwent surgery. METHODS: Thirty patients (type 1 AIP in 23 and type 2 AIP...... in 7) with a diagnosis of AIP based on histology of surgical specimens were classified according to ICDC based on their preoperative data. RESULTS: Pancreatic core biopsies and diagnostic steroid trial were not preoperatively performed in any of the patients. Based on preoperative data, ICDC diagnosed....... In the hypothetical situation, 7 of 8 type 1 AIP patients and 3 of 3 type 2 AIP patients would have been classified into the correct subtype of AIP. CONCLUSIONS: A steroid trial enhances the possibility of correctly diagnosing AIP by ICDC despite the lack of histology. However, some patients cannot be diagnosed...

  7. Analysis of 175 Cases Underwent Surgical Treatment in Our Hospital After Having Abdominal Wounding by Firearm in the War at Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Yucel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed at analysing the patients, who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital after having abdominal wounding by firearm in the war at Syria, retrospectively. Material and Method: The files of Syrian patients, who applied to Emergency Service of Harran University Medical Faculty because of gunshot wounds and had operation after being hospitalized in General Surgery Clinic due to abdominal injuries between the years of 2011 and 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Results: 175 Syrian patients, who had abdominal injuries by firearms, underwent operation in our general surgery clinic. 99.4% (n=174 of the patients were male, and 0.6% (n=1 were female. Trauma-admission to hospital times of all cases were %u2265 6 hours. 62.8% (n=110 of the patients had isolated abdominal injuries, and 37.1% (n=65 had two or more system injuries. The frequency of more than one organ injuries in abdominal region was 44.5% (n=78 and the most frequent complication was wound infection (10%. Negative laparoscopy was 2.8% (n=5, support for intensive care was 38.2% (n=67, average duration of intensive care unit stay was 5.57 days and mortality was 9.7% (n=17. Discussion: In our study, it was seen that infectious morbidity and mortality increased for the patients, who applied to our hospital because of abdominal injuries by firearm, particularly the ones with gastrointestinal perforation, if trauma-admission to hospital times were %u2265 6 hours. And this shows us that the early intervention to injuries that perforate gastrointestinal tract was an important factor for decreasing morbidity and mortality.

  8. Improved predictive value of GRACE risk score combined with platelet reactivity for 1-year cardiovascular risk in patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Haijun

    2016-11-01

    Both high platelet reactivity (HPR) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score have moderate predictive value for major adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whereas the prognostic significance of GRACE risk score combined with platelet function testing remains unclear. A total of 596 patients with non-ST elevation ACS who underwent PCI were enrolled. The P2Y 12 reaction unit (PRU) value was measured by VerifyNow P2Y 12 assay and GRACE score was calculated by GRACE risk 2.0 calculator. Patients were stratified by a pre-specified cutoff value of PRU 230 and GRACE score 140 to assess 1-year risk of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis. Seventy-two (12.1%) patients developed CVD events during 1-year follow-up. Patients with CVD events had a higher PRU value (244.6 ± 50.9 vs. 203.7 ± 52.0, p risk independently. Compared to patients with normal platelet reactivity (NPR) and GRACE score risk (HR: 5.048; 95% CI: 2.268-11.237; p risk score yielded superior risk predictive capacity beyond GRACE score alone, which is shown by improved c-statistic value (0.871, p = 0.002) as well as net reclassification improvement (NRI 0.263, p risk of adverse CVD events. The combination of platelet function testing and GRACE score predicted 1-year CVD risk better.

  9. Pediatric keratoconus and iontophoretic corneal crosslinking: refractive and topographic evidence in patients underwent general and topical anesthesia, 18 months of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magli, Adriano; Chiariello Vecchio, Elisabetta; Carelli, Roberta; Piozzi, Elena; Di Landro, Felicia; Troisi, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency and safety of iontophoretic transepithelial corneal crosslinking in pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus underwent general or topical anesthesia in 18 months follow-up. 13 patients (13 eyes) diagnosed with progressive keratoconus underwent corneal CXL with iontophoresis (I-CXL). Riboflavin solution was administered by iontophoresis for 5 min, and then UV-A irradiation (10 mW/cm) was performed for 9 min. Preoperative and post-operative visits at 1, 6, 12, and 18 months assessed the following parameters: uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), slit-lamp biomicroscopy, corneal topography, optical tomography, and pachymetry with Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany), endothelial biomicroscopy (Konan Specular Microscope; Konan Medical, Inc., Hyogo, Japan). The paired Student t test was used to compare data during the follow-up. 10 males and 3 females with a mean age of 15.4 ± 1.7 years (range 11-18 years) were included. The results showed a stabilization of the refractive UCVA and BCVA as early as the first post-operative month, with a slight improvement over time. The Kmax remained stable throughout follow-up (p = 0.04). Transepithelial collagen crosslinking by iontophoresis, unlike other transepithelial techniques seems to halt pediatric keratoconus progression over 18 months. This is the second study evaluating CXL with iontophoresis in pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus with 18 months of follow-up using two different ways of anesthesia.

  10. HO-1 gene overexpression enhances the beneficial effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplantation in swine hearts underwent ischemia/reperfusion: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yibo; Chen, Lijuan; Tang, Yaoliang; Ma, Genshan; Shen, Chengxing; Qi, Chunmei; Zhu, Qi; Yao, Yuyu; Liu, Naifeng

    2010-05-01

    To determine the effect of intracoronary transfer of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpressed bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in a porcine myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model. Cell apoptosis was assayed and supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured in BMSCs that underwent hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro. Female mini-swines that underwent 1 h LAD occlusion followed by 1 h reperfusion were randomly allocated to receive intracoronary saline (control), 1 x 10(7) SPIO-labeled BMSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-human HO-1 (HO-1-BMSCs), pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 pretreated with a HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, n = 10 each). MRI and postmortem histological analysis were made at 1 week or 3 months thereafter. Post hypoxia/reoxygen in vitro, apoptosis was significantly reduced, supernatant VEGF significantly increased while TNF-alpha and IL-6 significantly reduced in HO-1-BMSCs group compared with Lacz-BMSCs group (all p < 0.05). Myocardial expression of VEGF was significantly higher in HO-1-BMSCs than in Lacz-BMSCs group at 1 week post transplantation (all p < 0.05). Signal voids induced by the SPIO were detected in the peri-infarction region in all BMSC groups at 1 week but not at 3 months post transplantation and the extent of the hypointense signal was the highest in HO-1-BMSCs group, and histological analysis showed that signal voids represented cardiac macrophages that engulfed the SPIO-labeled BMSCs. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly attenuated the beneficial effects of HO-1-BMSCs. Transplantation of HO-1-overexpressed BMSCs significantly enhanced the beneficial effects of BMSCs on improving cardiac function in this model.

  11. Functional Changes of Dendritic Cells in C6 Glioma-Bearing Rats That Underwent Combined Argon-Helium Cryotherapy and IL-12 Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cui, Yao; Li, Xiqing; Guo, Yanwu; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Jiadong; Xu, Jian; Han, Shuangyin; Shi, Xiwen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes in tumor tissues of glioma-bearing rats that underwent argon-helium cryoablation as well as changes in antitumor immunity before and after combined interleukin 12 treatment. Two hundred sixty Wistar rats were randomly divided into a blank control group, intravenous injection interleukin-12 group, cryotherapy group, and cryotherapy + intravenous injection group. C6 glioma cells proliferated in vitro were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of rats to establish C6 glioma-bearing animal models. Each group underwent the corresponding treatments, and morphological changes in tumor tissues were examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. CD11c staining was examined using immunohistochemistry, and differences in dendritic cells and T-cell subsets before and after treatment were analyzed using flow cytometry. The control group showed no statistical changes in terms of tumor tissue morphology and cellular immunity, cryotherapy group, and cryotherapy + intravenous injection group, among which the count for the cryotherapy + intravenous injection group was significantly higher than those of all other groups. In the argon-helium cryotherapy group, tumor cells were damaged and dendritic cell markers were positive. The number of CD11c+ and CD86+ cells increased significantly after the operation as did the cytokine interferon-γ level (P < .01), suggesting a shift toward Th1-type immunity. Combined treatment of argon-helium cryoablation and interleukin 12 for gliomas not only effectively injured tumor tissues but also boosted immune function and increased antitumor ability. Therefore, this approach is a promising treatment measure for brain gliomas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Clinical impacts of inhibition of renin-angiotensin system in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent successful late percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyukjin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Jeong, Myung Ho; Cho, Jae Yeong; Lee, Ki Hong; Sim, Doo Sun; Yoon, Nam Sik; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jim

    2017-01-01

    Successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) in latecomers may improve long-term survival mainly by reducing left ventricular remodeling. It is not clear whether inhibition of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) brings additional better clinical outcomes in this specific population subset. Between January 2008 and June 2013, 669 latecomer patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (66.2±12.1 years, 71.0% males) in Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) who underwent a successful PCI were enrolled. The study population underwent a successful PCI for a totally occluded IRA. They were divided into two groups according to whether they were prescribed RAS inhibitors at the time of discharge: group I (RAS inhibition, n=556), and group II (no RAS inhibition, n=113). During the one-year follow-up, major adverse cardiac events (MACE), which consist of cardiac death and myocardial infarction, occurred in 71 patients (10.6%). There were significantly reduced incidences of MACE in the group I (hazard ratio=0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.199-0.588, p=0.001). In subgroup analyses, RAS inhibition was beneficial in patients with male gender, history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, and even in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥40%. In the baseline and follow-up echocardiographic data, benefit in changes of LVEF and left ventricular end-systolic volume was noted in group I. In latecomers with STEMI, RAS inhibition improved long-term clinical outcomes after a successful PCI, even in patients with low risk who had relatively preserved LVEF. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimating the U.S. prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilert, Timothy; Dillon, Charles; Paulose-Ram, Ryne; Hnizdo, Eva; Doney, Brent

    2013-10-09

    During 2007-2010, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) conducted a spirometry component which obtained pre-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data on a nationally representative sample of US adults aged 6-79 years and post-bronchodilator pulmonary lung function data for the subset of adults with airflow limitation. The goals of this study were to 1) compute prevalence estimates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and fixed ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) diagnostic criteria and 2) examine the potential impact of nonresponse on the estimates. This analysis was limited to those aged 40-79 years who were eligible for NHANES pre-bronchodilator spirometry (n=7,104). Examinees with likely airflow limitation were further eligible for post-bronchodilator testing (n=1,110). Persons were classified as having COPD based on FEV1/FVC chronic bronchitis were also classified as having COPD. The final analytic samples for pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator analyses were 77.1% (n=5,477) and 50.8% (n=564) of those eligible, respectively. To account for non-response, NHANES examination weights were adjusted to the eligible pre-bronchodilator and post-bronchodilator subpopulations. In 2007-2010, using the fixed ratio criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, COPD prevalence was 20.9% (SE 1.1) among US adults aged 40-79 years. Applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 14.0% (SE 1.0). Using the LLN criterion and pre-bronchodilator test results, the COPD prevalence was 15.4% (SE 0.8), while applying the same criterion to post-bronchodilator test results, prevalence was 10.2% (SE 0.8). The overall COPD prevalence among US adults aged 40-79 years varied from 10.2% to 20.9% based on whether pre- or post-bronchodilator values were used and which diagnostic criterion (fixed ratio or LLN) was applied. The overall prevalence

  14. [Subjective cognition in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, S; Aubin, G; Stip, E

    2017-02-01

    Given the extent, magnitude and functional significance of the neurocognitive deficits of schizophrenia, growing attention has been paid recently to patients' self-awareness of their own deficits. Thus far, the literature has shown either that patients fail to recognize their cognitive deficits or that the association between subjective and objective cognition is weak in schizophrenia. The reasons for this lack of consistency remain unexplained but may have to do, among others, with the influence of potential confounding clinical variables and the choice of the scale used to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits. In the current study, we sought to examine the relationships between subjective and objective cognitive performance in schizophrenia, while controlling for the influence of sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Eighty-two patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (DSM-IV criteria) were recruited. Patients' subjective cognitive complaints were evaluated with the Subjective Scale to Investigate Cognition in Schizophrenia (SSTICS), the most frequently used scale to measure self-awareness of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Neurocognition was evaluated with working memory, planning and visual learning tasks taken from Cambridge Neuropsychological Tests Automated Battery. The Stroop Color-Word test was also administered. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. The relationships between subjective and objective cognition were evaluated with multivariate hierarchic linear regression analyses, taking into consideration potential confounders such as sociodemographic and psychiatric variables. Finally, a factor analysis of the SSTICS was performed. For the SSTICS total score, the regression analysis produced a model including two predictors, namely visual learning and Stoop interference performance, explaining a moderate portion of the variance

  15. Interaction, transference, and subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Fieldwork is one of the important methods in educational, social, and organisational research. In fieldwork, the researcher takes residence for a shorter or longer period amongst the subjects and settings to be studied. The aim of this is to study the culture of people: how people seem to make...... sense of their lives and which moral, professional, and ethical values seem to guide their behaviour and attitudes. In fieldwork, the researcher has to balance participation and observation in her attempts at representation. Consequently, the researcher’s academic and life-historical subjectivity...... are important filters for fieldwork. In general, fieldwork can be understood as processes where field reports and field analysis are determined by how the researcher interacts with and experiences the field, the events and informants in it, and how she subsequently develops an ethnography. However, fieldwork...

  16. Writing and the 'Subject'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Charlotte

    /reading subject) manifests itself in the material mark on the page. The study shows how this indexical reference to a ‘subject’ is manipulated and used as a mask through which a writer/painter can perform a certain ‘subject’. Through analyses of the various levels on which the ‘subject’ is represented...... in the early as well as the contemporary avant-garde, it becomes clear that the ‘subject’ is an unstable category that can be exposed to manipulation and play. Handwriting is performing as a signature (as an index), but is at the same time similar to the signature of a subject (an icon) and a verbal construct...

  17. Risk of Severe Acute Exacerbation of Chronic HBV Infection Cancer Patients Who Underwent Chemotherapy and Did Not Receive Anti-Viral Prophylaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-An Shih

    Full Text Available Reactivation of HBV replication with an increase in serum HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity has been reported in 20-50% of hepatitis B carriers undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Manifestation of HBV reactivation ranges from asymptomatic self-limiting hepatitis to severe progressive hepatic failure and fatal consequences.To investigate the risk of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection in HBsAg-positive cancer patients with solid tumors or hematological malignancies who underwent chemotherapy without antiviral prophylaxis.A retrospective review of charts was conducted for HBsAg-positive cancer patients in our institution who underwent chemotherapy and did not receive anti-viral prophylaxis between the periods of July 2007 to January 2013. We investigate the incidence of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection if these patients with a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies.A total of 156 patients (hematological malignancies: 16; solid tumors: 140 were included. The incidence of severe acute HBV exacerbation in the patients with hematological malignancy was higher than that in solid tumors (25.0% [4/16] vs 4.3% [6/140]; P = 0.005. Additionally, patients receiving rituximab-based chemotherapy had higher acute exacerbation rate than those with non-rituximab-based chemotherapy (40.0% vs 4.1%, P = 0.001. Among the patients with solid tumors, the incidences of severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV in hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, gynecological cancer, urological tract cancer, head/neck cancer and other solid malignancies were 2.3%, 4.0%, 7.1%, 9.0%, 16.7%, 6.7%, 0% and 0%, respectively.Severe acute exacerbation of chronic HBV infection may occur in HBsAg-positive patients with a variety of solid tumors who received chemotherapy without adequate anti-viral prophylaxis. Hematological malignancy and rituximab-based chemotherapy are

  18. Estimation of absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and effective sose in patients underwent abdominopelvic spiral CT scan using impact CT patient dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Amirnia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the presence of radiosensitive organs in the abdominopelvic region and increasing the number of requests for CT scan examinations, concerns about increasing radiation doses in patients has been greatly elevated. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and the effective dose in patients underwent abdominopelvic CT scan using ImPACT CT patient dosimetry Calculator (version 1.0.4, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Imam Reza Hospital from November to February 2015 February 2015 in the Imam Reza Hospital, in Urmia, Iran. The demographic and dosimetric information of 100 patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT scan in a 6-slice CT scanner were obtained through the data collection forms. The demographic data of the patients included age, weight, gender, and BMI. The dosimetric parameters included pitch value, CT dose volume index (CTDIvol, dose-length product (DLP, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, collimation size, scan length, and scan time. To determine the absorbed dose of radiosensitive organs and also the effective dose in patients, ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator was used. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that the mean and standard deviation (SD of patients' effective dose in abdominopelvic CT scan was 4.927±0.164 mSv. The bladder in both genders had the greatest mean organ dose, which was 64.71±17.15 mGy for men and 77.56±18.48 mGy for women (P<0.001. Conclusion: The effective dose values of this examination are in the same range as previous studies, as well as International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP recommendations. However, the radiation dose from CT scan has the largest contribution to the medical imaging. According to the ALARA principle, it is recommended that the scan parameters, especially mAs, should be

  19. Subject Sensitive Invariantism: In Memoriam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Subject sensitive invariantism is the view that whether a subject knows depends on what is at stake for that subject: the truth-value of a knowledge-attribution is sensitive to the subject's practical interests. I argue that subject sensitive invariantism cannot accept a very plausible principle for

  20. A espirometria na avaliação pré e pós-transplante de medula óssea Pre-operative and post-operative spirometry in bone marrow transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Viana Mancuzo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados da espirometria de pacientes submetidos a transplante de medula óssea e verificar sua importância na detecção de complicações pulmonares e sua correlação com a evolução dos pacientes. MÉTODOS:Foram analisados retrospectivamente os resultados da espirometria em 120 pacientes, maiores de doze anos, de ambos os sexos, e comparados com o tipo de transplante de medula óssea, doença de base, sorologia para citomegalovírus, fonte de células para o transplante, tabagismo, infecção pulmonar, doença pulmonar prévia, duração da doença hematológica, quimioterapia utilizada, regime de condicionamento, doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro aguda e crônica e óbito. RESULTADOS: Dezesseis pacientes apresentaram alterações da espirometria antes do transplante, sendo 5% com obstrução pura, 5,8% com restrição pura e 2,5% com obstrução com redução da capacidade vital. Após o transplante 29 pacientes apresentaram alterações desses exames. A chance de alteração da espirometria foi maior nos pacientes com doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro aguda (p = 0,02, idade menor que 30 anos (p = 0,02, sexo feminino (p = 0,02 e naqueles que receberam células tronco (p = 0,01. As presenças de doença pulmonar prévia e doença do enxerto contra o hospedeiro crônica associaram-se com aumento da mortalidade. Alterações prévias da espirometria não estiveram relacionadas com o óbito pós-transplante. CONCLUSÃO: As alterações detectadas na espirometria não foram capazes de predizer a ocorrência de complicações pulmonares e óbito pós-transplantes. Também não foram determinantes para a não realização do procedimento. A espirometria simples realizada na avaliação desses pacientes parece ter pouca importância prática.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the spirometry findings in patients undergoing bone marrow transplant, determining the importance of such findings in predicting postoperative pulmonary

  1. Impaired Fat-induced Thermogenesis in Obese Subjects: The NUGENOB Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, E.E.; Hul, G.; Verdich, C.; Stich, V.; Martinez, J.A.; Petersen, M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Patel, K.; Oppert, J.M.; Barbe, P.; Tourbro, S.; Polak, J.; Anderson, I.; Astrup, A.; Macdonald, I.; Langin, D.; Sorensen, T.; Saris, W.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To study energy expenditure before and 3 hours after a high-fat load in a large cohort of obese subjects (n=701) and a lean reference group (n = 113). Research Methods and Procedures: Subjects from seven European countries underwent a 1-day clinical study with a liquid test meal

  2. [The effect of smoking on the quality of life enhancement following prosthetic rehabilitation in head and neck cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Judit; Novák, Péter; Buzás, Kristóf; Nagy, Katalin; Antal, Márk

    2017-02-01

    It is known that the quality of life (QoL) of patients surgically treated for head and neck cancer (HNC) is significantly enhanced by rehabilitation. It is also known that some of these patients will not quit smoking. To assess if smoking hampers rehabilitation-related QoL enhancement after surgery. Applying the H&N 35 questionnaire of EORTC, we assessed the QoL of 38 smoking and non-smoking patients who underwent surgical therapy for HNC and subsequent rehabilitation. QoL was assessed after surgery (after the healing period) and 6 months after rehabilitation. While the QoL enhancement of nonsmokers was significant in almost all aspects, that of smoking patients did not reach the level of significance on a number of scales. The results suggest that smoking does not hamper rehabilitation directly, rather, it prevents rehabilitation from exerting its beneficial effects through its own effects. Smoking is a factor that measurably acts against the efforts to enhance the QoL of the surgically treated HNC patient. Therefore, it is essential that emphasis is put on smoking cessation right from the cancer diagnosis also for this reason. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(5), 172-177.

  3. Sociodemographic characteristics of women in a public hospital in Campinas who underwent legal abortion due to sexual violence: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Mutta, Danielle; Angerame Yela, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Sexual violence is increasingly frequent worldwide. The aim here was to evaluate the sociodemographic and psychological characteristics of women who requested legal abortion, at a public healthcare service, after sufering sexual violence. Retrospective descriptive study on 131 women who underwent legal abortion at the University of Campinas between 1994 and 2014, consequent to sexual violence. The sociodemographic and psychological characteristics of women who were victims of sexual violence were evaluated from their medical records. The tests used to evaluate possible associations were the chi-square and/or Fisher's exact test. The women's mean age was 23 ± 9.2 years; 77.9% were white and 71.8% were single; 32.8% were students and 58.6% had employment outside of their homes. The majority reported that they did not know the aggressor (62.3%), but among the adolescents, 58% of the aggressors were known. The majority asked for abortion up to the 12th weeks of gestation (63.4%). Only 2.3% presented curettage complications. The psychological situation most frequently encountered was determined, in 34.4% of the cases before the abortion; and good in 32.8% after the abortion. There was greater occurrence of sexual violence among students and women who worked outside. Among the students, most of these were adolescents and had no previous sexual life. The teenagers were raped by a known aggressor.

  4. Acute myocardial infarction in progressively elderly patients. A comparative analysis of immediate results in patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos Luiz Alberto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Analysis of the in-hospital results, in progressively elderly patients who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in the first 24 hours of AMI. METHODS: The patients were divided into three different age groups (60/69, 70/79, and > or = 80 years and were treated from 7/95 until 12/99. The primary success rate and the occurrence of major clinical events were analyzed at the end of the in-hospital phase. Coronary stent implantation and abciximab use were employed at the intervencionist discretion. RESULTS: We analyzed 201 patients with age ranging from 60 to 93 years, who underwent primary PCI. Patients with ages above 70 were more often female (p=.015. Those with ages above 80 were treated later with PCI (p=.054, and all of them presented with total occlusion of the infarct-related artery. Coronary stents were implanted in 30% of the patients. Procedural success was lower in > or = 80 year old patients (p=.022, and the death rate was higher in > or = 70 years olds (p=.019. Reinfarction and coronary bypass surgery were uncommon events. A trend occurred toward a higher combined incidence of major in-hospital events according to increased age (p=.064. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients ( > or = 70 years presented with adverse clinical and angiographic profiles and patients > or = 80 years of age obtained reduced TIMI 3 flow success rates after primary PTCA, and those > or = 70 years had a higher death rate.

  5. Acute myocardial infarction in progressively elderly patients. A comparative analysis of immediate results in patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, L A; Zago, A; Chaves, A; Pinto, I; Tanajura, L; Staico, R; Centemero, M; Feres, F; Maldonado, G; Cano, M; Abizaid, A; Abizaid, A; Sousa, A G; Sousa, J E

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the in-hospital results, in progressively elderly patients who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the first 24 hours of AMI. The patients were divided into three different age groups (60/69, 70/79, and > or =80 years) and were treated from 7/95 until 12/99. The primary success rate and the occurrence of major clinical events were analyzed at the end of the in-hospital phase. Coronary stent implantation and abciximab use were employed at the interventionist discretion. We analyzed 201 patients with age ranging from 60 to 93 years, who underwent primary PCI. Patients with ages above 70 were more often female (p=.015). Those with ages above 80 were treated later with PCI (p=.054), and all of them presented with total occlusion of the infarct-related artery. Coronary stents were implanted in 30% of the patients. Procedural success was lower in > or =80 year old patients (p=.022), and the death rate was higher in > or =70 years olds (p=.019). Reinfarction and coronary bypass surgery were uncommon events. A trend occurred toward a higher combined incidence of major in-hospital events according to increased age (p=.064). Elderly patients (> or =70 years) presented with adverse clinical and angiographic profiles and patients > or =80 years of age obtained reduced TIMI 3 flow success rates after primary PTCA, and those > or =70 years had a higher death rate.

  6. Analysis of incidence of keratoconus in relatives of patients who underwent corneal transplant due to advanced keratoconus using the Orbscan II topographic graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Olazagasti, Estela; Hernández y del Callejo, César E.; Ibarra-Galitzia, Jorge; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Gustavo; Tepichín, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disease in which the cornea assumes a conical shape due to an irregular alteration of the internal structure of the corneal tissue and sometimes is progressive, especially in young people. Anatomically, the main signs of keratoconus are thinning of the cornea in its central or paracentral region, usually accompanied by an increase in this part of a high irregular astigmatism, with a consequent loss of vision. Its diagnosis requires a thorough study including the family history, a complete ophthalmologic examination and imaging studies. This diagnosis allows classifying the type of keratoconus, which allow determining options of management, with what it is possible to establish a visual prognosis of each eye. One of the indicators that help in the diagnosis of keratoconus is an inherited familiar propensity. The literature reports an incidence of keratoconus of 11%1 in first-degree relatives of patients with keratoconus. Results suggest an ethnic dependence, which implies that the knowledge of the tendency of keratoconus in the Mexican population is important. In this work, we present the preliminary results of the study realized to a group of relatives of patients who underwent corneal transplant by advanced keratoconus using Orbscan II topographic diagnosis, to determine the predisposition to Keratoconus in this group.e

  7. Accuracy of MDCT in the preoperative definition of Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who underwent peritonectomy and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Khader, Leila; Cirigliano, Alfredo; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Guerrini, Susanna; Forzoni, Beatrice; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Volterrani, Luca

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of MDCT in the preoperative definition of Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who underwent a peritonectomy and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy to obtain a pre-surgery prognostic evaluation and a prediction of optimal cytoreduction surgery. Pre-HIPEC CT examinations of 43 patients with advanced ovarian cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed by two radiologists. The PCI was scored according to the Sugarbaker classification, based on lesion size and distribution. The results were compared with macroscopic and histologic data after peritonectomy and HIPEC. To evaluate the accuracy of MDCT to detect and localize peritoneal carcinomatosis, both patient-level and regional-level analyses were conducted. A correlation between PCI CT and histologic values for each patient was searched according to the PCI grading. Considering the patient-level analysis, CT shows a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and an accuracy in detecting the peritoneal carcinomatosis of 100 %, 40 %, 93 % 100 %, and 93 %, respectively. Considering the regional level analysis, a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and diagnostic accuracy of 72 %, 80 %, 66 %, 84 %, and 77 %, respectively were obtained for the correlation between CT and histology. Our results encourage the use of MDCT as the only technique sufficient to select patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis for cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC on the condition that a CT examination will be performed using a dedicated protocol optimized to detect minimal peritoneal disease and CT images will be analyzed by an experienced reader.

  8. Improved image quality in abdominal CT in patients who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with small metal implants using a raw data-based metal artifact reduction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Negi, Noriyuki [Kobe University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To determine the value of a raw data-based metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for image quality improvement in abdominal CT for patients with small metal implants. Fifty-eight patients with small metal implants (3-15 mm in size) who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were imaged with CT. CT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection with and without SEMAR algorithm in axial and coronal planes. To evaluate metal artefact reduction, mean CT number (HU and SD) and artefact index (AI) values within the liver were calculated. Two readers independently evaluated image quality of the liver and pancreas and visualization of vasculature using a 5-point visual score. HU and AI values and image quality on images with and without SEMAR were compared using the paired Student's t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using linear-weighted κ test. Mean HU and AI on images with SEMAR was significantly lower than those without SEMAR (P < 0.0001). Liver and pancreas image qualities and visualizations of vasculature were significantly improved on CT with SEMAR (P < 0.0001) with substantial or almost perfect agreement (0.62 ≤ κ ≤ 0.83). SEMAR can improve image quality in abdominal CT in patients with small metal implants by reducing metallic artefacts. (orig.)

  9. Abdominal acupuncture reduces laser-evoked potentials in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzaglia, C.; Liguori, S.; Minciotti, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acupuncture is known to reduce clinical pain, although the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on laser-evoked potential amplitudes and laser pain perception. Methods: In order to evaluate whether abdominal acupuncture...... is able to modify pain perception, 10 healthy subjects underwent a protocol in which laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and laser pain perception were collected before the test (baseline), during abdominal acupuncture, and 15. min after needle removal. The same subjects also underwent a similar protocol...... in which, however, sham acupuncture without any needle penetration was used. Results: During real acupuncture, both N1 and N2/P2 amplitudes were reduced, as compared to baseline (p . < 0.01). The reduction lasted up to 15. min after needle removal. Furthermore, laser pain perception was reduced during...

  10. Long-term progress of six cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the mediastinum that underwent surgical treatment: Case report series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Discussion and conclusions: Nerve sheath tumors localized within the membrane offer good long-term prognosis even if malignant. Furthermore, long-term survival is possible even if the tumor has invaded neighboring organs, provided it can be completely excised. In cases where complete excision is difficult, a multidisciplinary approach including radiotherapy and anti-cancer drug treatment may contribute to improved prognosis but this is a subject that requires further study.

  11. A single FTO gene variant rs9939609 is associated with body weight evolution in a multiethnic extremely obese population that underwent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gisele K; Resende, Cristina M M; Durso, Danielle F; Rodrigues, Lorena A A; Silva, José Luiz P; Reis, Rodrigo C; Pereira, Solange S; Ferreira, Daniela C; Franco, Gloria R; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is involved in obesity. Few studies have been conducted on patients who underwent bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence